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Sample records for hot atom chemical

  1. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  2. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  3. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  4. Semiempirical hot atom theory. I - Initialization and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.

    1981-01-01

    A semiempirical approach to the modeling of the kinetics of reaction systems containing both hot and nonhot atoms is proposed. The approach is based on the probabilistic kinetic theory of hot-atom reactions formulated by Wolfgang (1963), with transmission probabilities estimated for a rectangular potential barrier for hot-atom and nonhot-atom reactions. A computational scheme for determining product concentrations following hot and nonhot reactions in a system containing photolytically produced hot atoms is then applied to the DBr + CH4 and HBr + CD4 hot hydrogen atom systems studied by Martin and Willard (1964), and good agreement is obtained between theoretical and experimental results.

  5. Rydberg blockade in a hot atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.; Zhang, X.; Dunning, F. B.

    2017-04-01

    The dipole blockade of very-high-n , n ˜300 , strontium 5 s n f 1F3 Rydberg atoms in a hot atomic beam is studied. For such high n , the blockade radius can exceed the linear dimensions of the excitation volume. Rydberg atoms formed inside the excitation volume can, upon leaving the region, continue to suppress excitation until they have moved farther away than the blockade radius. Moreover, the high density of states originating from the many magnetic sublevels associated with the F states results in a small but finite probability of excitation of L =3 n 1F3 atom pairs at small internuclear separations below the blockade radius. We demonstrate that these effects can be distinguished from one another by the distinct features they imprint on the Mandel Q parameter as a function of the duration of the exciting laser.

  6. Liquid-metal atomization for hot working preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid quenching of a liquid metal by atomization or splat cooling overcomes the major limitation of most solidification processes, namely, the segregation of alloying elements, impurities, and constituent phases. The cooling rates of different atomizing processes are related to the dendrite arm spacings and to the microstructure of the atomized powders. The increased solubility limits and the formation of metastable compounds in splat-cooled alloys are discussed. Consolidation of the powders by hot isostatic compaction, hot extrusion, or hot forging and rolling processes yields billets with properties equivalent to or better than those of the wrought alloys. The application of this powder processing technology to high-performance alloys is reviewed.

  7. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, Graeme; Curry, John J.

    2011-05-11

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  8. Escape of Hot Oxygen Atoms from the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, A.; Croxell, J. A.; Cravens, T.; Pothapragada, S.; Nagy, A. F.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    The main source of the production of hot oxygen atoms in the Martian atmosphere is the dissociative recombination (DR) reaction of O2+ ions with electrons. In this study, the primary production rate of hot O atoms is found for four energy channels of DR reaction. The one-dimensional energy and altitude dependent up and down flux differential equations are solved using a two-stream transport method, by taking into account the primary, secondary and cascade productions of hot O and also, the interactions with the background atmosphere. The forward and backward scattering probabilities and energy loss coefficients for 12 neutral target species are found using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The neutral target species are H, H2, He, C, N, O, CO, N2, NO, O2, Ar and CO2 for which the density profiles appropriate for Viking landers condition are used. From the up and down fluxes, the energy distribution function of hot O atoms and the escape flux at the exobase of Mars is calculated and by using the Liouville equation, the density profile of hot O is found above the exobase, extending out to several Martian radii. The results are used to study the interaction of escaping hot O atoms with the solar wind and specifically, the fluxes of energetic O+ pickup ions are determined.

  9. TOWARD CHEMICAL CONSTRAINTS ON HOT JUPITER MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amin, Mustafa A.; Kennedy, Grant M.

    2014-10-10

    The origin of hot Jupiters—gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars—is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily explained by giant planets forming at large orbital separations, either by core accretion or gravitational instability, and migrating to close-in orbits via disk-free mechanisms involving dynamical encounters. Such planets also contain solar or super-solar C/O ratios. On the contrary, hot Jupiters with super-solar O and C abundances can be explained by a variety of formation-migration pathways which, however, lead to solar or sub-solar C/O ratios. Current estimates of low oxygen abundances in hot Jupiter atmospheres may be indicative of disk-free migration mechanisms. We discuss open questions in this area which future studies will need to investigate.

  10. Atomic processes in the hot gas in our galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2017-03-01

    Our galaxy contains vast regions of very hot, very low density plasma that provide scientists with unique opportunities to observe atomic processes in extreme conditions. With temperatures of ˜ 105 to ˜ 106 K, the atoms in these regions are ionized to high charge states. Collisional ionization and excitation dominate the atomic physics in the interiors of these regions, and charge exchange becomes important where the highly ionized gas borders cool gas. Examples of very hot regions include the bubbles blown by supernova explosions and the interstellar gas above and below the disk of our galaxy. Examples of charge exchange sites include the heliosphere, supernova shock fronts, and high velocity clouds. Highly ionized plasmas are primarily studied via ultraviolet and X-ray observations using telescopes mounted on satellites, rockets, or space shuttles. Observations have been made of both the emitted spectrum and the number of ions along a path. The sensitivity and spectral resolution of the observing instruments have already reached the stage where some individual transitions can be detected, even in weak plasmas. Where the spectrum is crowded with emission lines from multiple elements, ionization levels, and transitions, spectral modeling is performed in order to estimate the contribution from each. The goal of this paper is to provide examples of interesting atomic physics occurring in our galaxy especially that in the hot component of our galaxy, highlight some areas where new atomic calculations and measurements are needed, and explain how astrophysical atomic transitions are observed.

  11. Chemical identification of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Abe, Masayuki; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Morita, Seizo; Custance, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy is a versatile and powerful method that uses sharp tips to image, measure and manipulate matter at surfaces with atomic resolution. At cryogenic temperatures, scanning probe microscopy can even provide electron tunnelling spectra that serve as fingerprints of the vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules and of the electronic properties of magnetic impurity atoms, thereby allowing chemical identification. But in many instances, and particularly for insulating systems, determining the exact chemical composition of surfaces or nanostructures remains a considerable challenge. In principle, dynamic force microscopy should make it possible to overcome this problem: it can image insulator, semiconductor and metal surfaces with true atomic resolution, by detecting and precisely measuring the short-range forces that arise with the onset of chemical bonding between the tip and surface atoms and that depend sensitively on the chemical identity of the atoms involved. Here we report precise measurements of such short-range chemical forces, and show that their dependence on the force microscope tip used can be overcome through a normalization procedure. This allows us to use the chemical force measurements as the basis for atomic recognition, even at room temperature. We illustrate the performance of this approach by imaging the surface of a particularly challenging alloy system and successfully identifying the three constituent atomic species silicon, tin and lead, even though these exhibit very similar chemical properties and identical surface position preferences that render any discrimination attempt based on topographic measurements impossible.

  12. On the role of 'hot' atoms in plasma-assisted ignition.

    PubMed

    Starikovskiy, Andrey Yu

    2015-08-13

    This paper discusses the processes leading to the formation of 'hot' atoms and radicals possessing excessive translational energy in high-voltage NS pulse discharges. It is shown that the formation of such 'hot' atoms occurs efficiently both in the dissociation of molecules by direct electron impact, and in the collisional quenching of electronically excited states. Depending on the magnitude of the reduced electric field in the discharge, reactions of these 'hot' atoms increase the initial concentration of radicals in the discharge afterglow two to three times when compared with the values calculated without effects of translational non-equilibrium. The role of thermally non-equilibrium excitation has been demonstrated in the formation of the initial distribution of the chemically active components in the mixture and its influence on the kinetics of ignition initiation at low and high temperatures. It was found that in undiluted mixtures the presence of 'hot' atoms can significantly decrease an ignition threshold and accelerate a low-temperature oxidation.

  13. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He.

    PubMed

    Aronowitz, S; Scattergood, T; Flores, J; Chang, S

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and the He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 angstoms) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system results in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  14. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Scattergood, T.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 A) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system resulted in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  15. Chemical uncertainties in modeling hot Jupiters atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebrard, Eric; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Most predictions and interpretations of observations in beyond our Solar System have occurred through the use of 1D photo-thermo-chemical models. Their predicted atmospheric compositions are highly dependent on model parameters. Chemical reactions are based on empirical parameters that must be known at temperatures ranging from 100 K to above 2500 K and at pressures from millibars to hundreds of bars. Obtained from experiments, calculations and educated-guessed estimations, these parameters are always evaluated with substantial uncertainties. However, although of practical use, few models of exoplanetary atmospheres have considered these underlying chemical uncertainties and their consequences. Recent progress has been made recently that allow us to (1) evaluate the accuracy and precision of 1D models of planetary atmospheres, with quantifiable uncertainties on their predictions for the atmospheric composition and associated spectral features, (2) identify the ‘key parameters’ that contribute the most to the models predictivity and should therefore require further experimental or theoretical analysis, (3) reduce and optimize complex chemical networks for their inclusion in multidimensional atmospheric models.First, a global sampling approach based on low discrepancy sequences has been applied in order to propose error bars on simulations of the atmospheres HD 209458b and HD 189733b, using a detailed kinetic model derived from applied combustion models that was methodically validated over a range of temperatures and pressures typical for these hot Jupiters. A two-parameters temperature-dependent uncertainty factor has been assigned to each considered rate constant. Second, a global sensitivity approach based on high dimensional model representations (HDMR) has been applied in order to identify those reactions which make the largest contributions to the overall uncertainty of the simulated results. The HDMR analysis has been restricted to the most important

  16. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  17. Hot hydrogen atoms - Initiators of reactions of interest in interstellar chemistry and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, K.-Y.; Hong, J.-H.; Becker, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms possess kinetic (or translational) energy in excess of that to be expected if the atoms were in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. In the investigation reported the hot hydrogen atoms were generated by the photolysis of donor molecules. The light sources for the photolysis were 1000-watt xenon or 500-watt mercury lamps combined with a filter system. The experiments show that hot hydrogen atoms can initiate reactions among simple molecules to produce biomolecules of significance.

  18. Hot hydrogen atoms - Initiators of reactions of interest in interstellar chemistry and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, K.-Y.; Hong, J.-H.; Becker, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms possess kinetic (or translational) energy in excess of that to be expected if the atoms were in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. In the investigation reported the hot hydrogen atoms were generated by the photolysis of donor molecules. The light sources for the photolysis were 1000-watt xenon or 500-watt mercury lamps combined with a filter system. The experiments show that hot hydrogen atoms can initiate reactions among simple molecules to produce biomolecules of significance.

  19. Hot-atom synthesis of organic compounds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Results of recent laboratory 'simulations' of photochemical processes on Jupiter are combined with available data on mixing rates and exposure times in the Jovian atmosphere to give quantitative predictions of the rate at which hot-atom reactions produce organic molecules. It is shown that abstraction reactions on methane by hot H atoms from solar UV photolysis of H2S will produce no more than 4 times 10 to the -17th power g/sq cm/sec for a steady-state mole fraction of total organics of approximately 10 to the -16th power. This is roughly 10 to the 7th power times less than the limit of detection of the most sensitive gas analysis experiments ever flown on a spacecraft. By far the most common organic molecule produced by this mechanism is CH3SH, methyl mercaptan, which is produced at a rate at least 600 times smaller than the rate of production of ethane by direct photolysis of CH4 at high altitudes.

  20. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone. PMID:28054636

  1. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  2. Two Step Excitation in Hot Atomic Sodium Vapor.

    PubMed

    Docters, Bernd; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2017-09-18

    A two step excitation scheme in hot atomic sodium vapor is experimentally investigated. The observed effects reflect a coupling between the 3(2)S, 3(2)P and the 3(2)D states. We present the relative dependence on detuning of the two utilized lasers around λ = 589 nm and 819 nm. Unlike expected, we achieve a higher detuning dependence of the probe and the coupling laser by a factor of approximately three. The presented work aimed for a Rydberg excitation and quantum light storage. Such schemes are usually implemented with a red laser on the D-line transition and a coupling laser of shorter (typically blue) wavelength. Due to the fact that higher P-Rydberg states are approximately two times higher in energy than the 3(2)D state, a two photon transition from the atomic excited 3(2)P state to a Rydberg P state is feasible. This might circumvent laser frequency doubling whereby only two lasers might mediate a three photon process. The scheme of adding three k-vectors allows for electromagnetically induced transparency experiments in which the resulting k-vector can be effectively reduced to zero. By measurements utilizing electric fields and an analysis of the emission spectrum of the atomic vapor, we can exclude the excitation of the P-P two photon transition.

  3. Novel Infrared Dynamics of Cold Atoms on Hot Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sanghita; Kotov, Valeri; Clougherty, Dennis

    The low-energy dynamics of cold atoms interacting with macroscopic graphene membranes exhibits severe infrared divergences when treated perturbatively. These infrared problems are even more pronounced at finite temperature due to the (infinitely) many flexural phonons excited in graphene. We have devised a technique to take account (resummation) of such processes in the spirit of the well-known exact solution of the independent boson model. Remarkably, there is also similarity to the infrared problems and their treatment (via the Bloch-Nordsieck scheme) in finite temperature ``hot'' quantum electrodynamics and chromodynamics due to the long-range, unscreened nature of gauge interactions. The method takes into account correctly the strong damping provided by the many emitted phonons at finite temperature. In our case, the inverse membrane size plays the role of an effective low-energy scale, and, unlike the above mentioned field theories, there remains an unusual, highly nontrivial dependence on that scale due to the 2D nature of the problem. We present detailed results for the sticking (atomic damping rate) rate of cold atomic hydrogen as a function of the membrane temperature and size. We find that the rate is very strongly dependent on both quantities.

  4. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

    1995-04-25

    A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

  5. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K. G.; Jellison, James L.; Staley, David J.

    1995-01-01

    A system for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs.

  6. Extended Characterization of Chemical Processes in Hot Cells Using Environmental Swipe Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Thomas, M-L; Lepel, Elwood A.; Brunson, Ronald R.; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer

    2012-09-15

    Environmental sampling is used extensively by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verification of information from State declarations or a facility’s design regarding nuclear activities occurring within the country or a specific facility. Environmental sampling of hot cells within a facility under safeguards is conducted using 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm cotton swipe material or cellulose swipes. Traditional target analytes used by the IAEA to verify operations within a facility include a select list of gamma-emitting radionuclides and total and isotopic U and Pu. Analysis of environmental swipe samples collected within a hot-cell facility where chemical processing occurs may also provide information regarding specific chemicals used in fuel processing. However, using swipe material to elucidate what specific chemical processes were/are being used within a hot cell has not been previously evaluated. Staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) teamed to evaluate the potential use of environmental swipe samples as collection media for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. This evaluation was initiated with sample collection during a series of Coupled End-to-End (CETE) reprocessing runs at ORNL. The study included measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides, total and isotopic U and Pu, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. These results allowed us to elucidate what chemical processes used in the hot cells during reprocessing of power reactor and identify other legacy chemicals used in hot cell operations which predate the CETE process.

  7. Hot hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Andrew F.; Kim, Jhoon; Cravens, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Optical observations of hot atoms in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars are briefly reviewed. A summary of hot hydrogen and oxygen production and loss processes is given. Results of some recent model calculations as well as a number of new results of the hot hydrogen and oxygen populations are presented and their implication in terms of solar wind interaction processes is discussed.

  8. Synthesis of silicon nanowires using tin catalyst by hot wire chemical vapor processing

    SciTech Connect

    Meshram, Nagsen; Kumbhar, Alka; Dusane, R.O.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Silicon nanowires are grown by hot wire chemical vapor processing at 400 °C using Sn as catalyst material via VLS. ► For nanowire synthesis Sn nanotemplates are formed with hot wire generated atomic hydrogen. ► The TEM image reveals the crystalline nature of nanowire. - Abstract: Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been synthesized at temperatures in the range 300–400 °C by the hot wire chemical vapor processing (HWCVP) using tin nanotemplate. The tin nano-template is formed by hot wire atomic hydrogen treatment of thermally evaporated Sn films (∼300 nm thick) on glass substrates. Silicon nanowires are then grown using hot wire induced dissociation of SiH{sub 4} gas over the nanotemplate. Growth conditions like growth time and temperature were varied to study their effect on the tin nanoparticle size and on the silicon nanowire dimensions thereafter. From the observations, it is clear that the nanowire diameters and lengths depend on the size of nanoparticles and the growth time respectively. Though SiNWs were observed to grow at temperatures as low as 300 °C, nanowires with a narrow diameter distribution were achieved at 400 °C. Raman spectra and transmission electron microscope (TEM) reveal the crystalline nature of the silicon nanowires.

  9. RADIOACTIVE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular elements has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass number to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of ''these constants'' for use in chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was most stable, i.e., it had the longest known half-life. In their 1973 report, the Commission noted that the users of the Atomic Weights Table were dissatisfied with the omission of values in the Table for some elements and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for elements. In their 1983 report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to

  10. 25. Wood quench tower, chemical tank on right, hot gas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Wood quench tower, chemical tank on right, hot gas pipes between coke ovens and compressor building XX), coal conveyor to pulverizer building on right, water tank to left of quench tower. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  11. A hot-atom reaction kinetic model for H abstraction from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammler, Th.; Kolovos-Vellianitis, D.; Küppers, J.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of the abstraction reaction kinetics in the interaction of gaseous H atoms with D adsorbed on metal and semiconductor surfaces, H(g)+D(ad)/S→ products, have shown that the kinetics of the HD products are at variance with the expectations drawn from the operation of Eley-Rideal mechanisms. Furthermore, in addition to HD product molecules, D 2 products were observed which are not expected in an Eley-Rideal scenario. Products and kinetics of abstraction reactions on Ni(100), Pt(111), and Cu(111) surfaces were recently explained by a random-walk model based solely on the operation of hot-atom mechanistic steps. Based on the same reaction scenario, the present work provides numerical solutions of the appropriate kinetic equations in the limit of the steady-state approximation for hot-atom species. It is shown that the HD and D 2 product kinetics derived from global kinetic rate constants are the same as those obtained from local probabilities in the random walk model. The rate constants of the hot-atom kinetics provide a background for the interpretation of measured data, which was missing up to now. Assuming that reconstruction affects the competition between hot-atom sticking and hot-atom reaction, the application of the present model at D abstraction from Cu(100) surfaces reproduces the essential characteristics of the experimentally determined kinetics.

  12. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  13. The status of chemical sensors for hot-dip galvanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    1996-09-01

    Alloying elements are added to the zinc used in the hot-dip galvanization of sheet steel to control the properties and appearance of the resulting coating. For example, aluminum is added to improve the corrosion resistance and adherence of the coating. Other additions, such as antimony, are added to control the grain size and, thus, the appearance of the coating. The concentrations of these alloying elements may change during the process, either deliberately according to product specifications or due to factors such as preferential oxidation. These changes may require replenishment of a depleted alloying element or adjustments in other processing parameters to maintain optimal efficiency. Intelligent adjustments require knowledge of the alloy composition, which requires inline measurement of the concentrations of alloying elements. This article presents recent developments in chemical sensors for use in hot-dip galvanization. In particular, electrochemical sensors for measuring the concentrations of aluminum and antimony in molten zinc are reviewed.

  14. Infrared dynamics of cold atoms on hot graphene membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sanghita; Kotov, Valeri N.; Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the infrared dynamics of low-energy atoms interacting with a sample of suspended graphene at finite temperature. The dynamics exhibits severe infrared divergences order by order in perturbation theory as a result of the singular nature of low-energy flexural phonon emission. Our model can be viewed as a two-channel generalization of the independent boson model with asymmetric atom-phonon coupling. This allows us to take advantage of the exact nonperturbative solution of the independent boson model in the stronger channel while treating the weaker one perturbatively. In the low-energy limit, the exact solution can be viewed as a resummation (exponentiation) of the most divergent diagrams in the perturbative expansion. As a result of this procedure, we obtain the atom's Green function which we use to calculate the atom damping rate, a quantity equal to the quantum sticking rate. A characteristic feature of our results is that the Green's function retains a weak, infrared cutoff dependence that reflects the reduced dimensionality of the problem. As a consequence, we predict a measurable dependence of the sticking rate on graphene sample size. We provide detailed predictions for the sticking rate of atomic hydrogen as a function of temperature and sample size. The resummation yields an enhanced sticking rate relative to the conventional Fermi golden rule result (equivalent to the one-loop atom self-energy), as higher-order processes increase damping at finite temperature.

  15. Chemical stability of positronic complexes with atoms and atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.W.; Nakanishi, H.; Schrader, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    A simple theory for establishing the stability or instability of positron-atomic systems against dissociation is presented. The theory consists of assuming that Morse-potential parameters for protonic diatoms are transferrable to the corresponding positronic molecules, and making appropriate reduced-mass modifications in the calculation of binding energies. The surprisingly good reliability of the method is established by appealing to the well-known positronium affinities of atomic hydrogen and fluorine. Positronium (Ps) binding is found for about half of the 42 atoms tested. In addition, instability is indicated for all nine positron-atom systems tested, and stability is indicated for seven of eight negatively charged systems tested; e.g., PsO/sup -/.

  16. Atomically resolved real-space imaging of hot electron dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lock, D.; Rusimova, K. R.; Pan, T. L.; Palmer, R. E.; Sloan, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of hot electrons are central to understanding the properties of many electronic devices. But their ultra-short lifetime, typically 100 fs or less, and correspondingly short transport length-scale in the nanometre range constrain real-space investigations. Here we report variable temperature and voltage measurements of the nonlocal manipulation of adsorbed molecules on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface in the scanning tunnelling microscope. The range of the nonlocal effect increases with temperature and, at constant temperature, is invariant over a wide range of electron energies. The measurements probe, in real space, the underlying hot electron dynamics on the 10 nm scale and are well described by a two-dimensional diffusive model with a single decay channel, consistent with 2-photon photo-emission (2PPE) measurements of the real time dynamics. PMID:26387703

  17. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.N.

    1984-01-01

    The main achievements of this contract are in three areas: (1) radiotracer catalytic studies, (2) recoil Carbon-11 atom reactions, and (3) recoil Silicon-31 atom reactions. In radiotracer catalytic studies, we have shown that the major effect of activated carbon as a supporting material is to shift the absorbed hydrogen from the Pd(100) and Pd(110) surfaces to the Pd(111) surface. In the recoil Carbon-11 studies, the results suggest that a direct double bond insertion process is operative at high energy. In addition, these results indicate that while singlet carbon atoms are selective in undergoing double bond interactions, triplet carbon atoms are the sole reactants in the C-H insertion process. In the recoil Silicon-31 studies, we have established the formation of silylenes such as /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ in these systems. We have studied the interactions of /sup 31/Si atoms and /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ with alkenes and dienes to give silacyclopentenes or silacyclopentadienes.

  18. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots.

  19. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots. PMID:26675422

  20. Hot oxygen atoms in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Andrew; Cravens, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of calculations of the hot oxygen atom density values for the upper atmospheres of Venus (computed for solar cycle maximum) and for that of Mars (for solar cycle minimum conditions), using a two stream model to calculate the equilibrium fluxes and energy distribution of the nonthermal component of atomic oxygen. After the energy-dependent hot oxygen fluxes are calculated below the exosphere, the densities above the exobase are obtained using Liouville's equation. The values of hot oxygen atoms calculated for Venus were found to be in good agreement with the values observed by Pioneer Venus Orbiter; the Venus values are about a factor of twenty larger than the calculated values for Mars at the exobase.

  1. Chemical Alterations in Martian Meteorites from Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Huisl, W.; Spettel, B.; Haubold, R.; Jagoutz, E.

    2003-04-01

    Martian meteorites (SNC) provide evidence of the magmatic fractionation processes of their parent body. As 23 of the total of 27 meteorites are finds, the influence of chemical alterations during their residence time on Earth must be considered, when interpreting the mineralogical, chemical, or isotopic features. Many basaltic shergottites and nakhlites were collected both in the cold desert, Antarctica, and in hot deserts of North Africa and Asia. To detect alteration processes in the finds we have to compare their analytical data with those obtained from the very scarce falls. In this way, we find an overabundance of iodine in meteorites from Antarctica. The iodine contamination is caused by aerosols adhering to the ice. Therefore, iodine can penetrate into the meteorite during its residence in Antarctica. The iodine content measured in the Antarctic shergottites varies from 0.060 to 4.6 ppm and seems to depend on their residence time on ice. The paired Yamato nakhlites Y-000593 and Y-000749 recently discovered in Antarctica also reveal an iodine overabundance compared to Nakhla, which is the only fall among the nakhlites. However, in Nakhla we have another problem of alteration. Nakhla has unusually high Br and Cl concentrations which could originate from terrestrial or parent body alterations. As Cl and Br are readily extracted during water leaching experiments we favor a terrestrial contamination. A Br overabundance was also found in many olivine-rich shergottite finds from hot deserts, DaG 476, Dhofar 019, and SaU 005. However, in the basaltic shergottite Dhofar 378 and in the nakhlite NWA 817 [1] no Br contamination was observed. The olivine phases of the shergottites seem to be preferably attacked by weathering reactions in the hot deserts. In the shergottites from hot deserts, the subchondritic La/U ratios are remarkable, indicating a U contamination. All these meteorites are covered with an evaporation product, caliche. Caliche has a high content of

  2. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  3. Quantum Chemical Topology: Knowledgeable atoms in peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The need to improve atomistic biomolecular force fields remains acute. Fortunately, the abundance of contemporary computing power enables an overhaul of the architecture of current force fields, which typically base their electrostatics on fixed atomic partial charges. We discuss the principles behind the electrostatics of a more realistic force field under construction, called QCTFF. At the heart of QCTFF lies the so-called topological atom, which is a malleable box, whose shape and electrostatics changes in response to a changing environment. This response is captured by a machine learning method called Kriging. Kriging directly predicts each multipole moment of a given atom (i.e. the output) from the coordinates of the nuclei surrounding this atom (i.e. the input). This procedure yields accurate interatomic electrostatic energies, which form the basis for future-proof progress in force field design.

  4. Breakdown into nanoscale of graphene oxide: Confined hot spot atomic reduction and fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Gil; Vila, Mercedes; Bdikin, Igor; de Andrés, Alicia; Emami, Nazanin; Ferreira, Rute A. S.; Carlos, Luís D.; Grácio, José; Marques, Paula A. A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Nano-graphene oxide (nano-GO) is a new class of carbon based materials being proposed for biomedical applications due to its small size, intrinsic optical properties, large specific surface area, and easy to functionalize. To fully exploit nano-GO properties, a reproducible method for its production is of utmost importance. Herein we report, the study of the sequential fracture of GO sheets onto nano-GO with controllable lateral width, by a simple, and reproducible method based on a mechanism that we describe as a confined hot spot atomic fragmentation/reduction of GO promoted by ultrasonication. The chemical and structural changes on GO structure during the breakage were monitored by XPS, FTIR, Raman and HRTEM. We found that GO sheets starts breaking from the defects region and in a second phase through the disruption of carbon bonds while still maintaining crystalline carbon domains. The breaking of GO is accompanied by its own reduction, essentially by the elimination of carboxylic and carbonyl functional groups. Photoluminescence and photothermal studies using this nano-GO are also presented highlighting the potential of this nanomaterial as a unique imaging/therapy platform. PMID:25339424

  5. Breakdown into nanoscale of graphene oxide: Confined hot spot atomic reduction and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Gil; Vila, Mercedes; Bdikin, Igor; de Andrés, Alicia; Emami, Nazanin; Ferreira, Rute A. S.; Carlos, Luís D.; Grácio, José; Marques, Paula A. A. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-graphene oxide (nano-GO) is a new class of carbon based materials being proposed for biomedical applications due to its small size, intrinsic optical properties, large specific surface area, and easy to functionalize. To fully exploit nano-GO properties, a reproducible method for its production is of utmost importance. Herein we report, the study of the sequential fracture of GO sheets onto nano-GO with controllable lateral width, by a simple, and reproducible method based on a mechanism that we describe as a confined hot spot atomic fragmentation/reduction of GO promoted by ultrasonication. The chemical and structural changes on GO structure during the breakage were monitored by XPS, FTIR, Raman and HRTEM. We found that GO sheets starts breaking from the defects region and in a second phase through the disruption of carbon bonds while still maintaining crystalline carbon domains. The breaking of GO is accompanied by its own reduction, essentially by the elimination of carboxylic and carbonyl functional groups. Photoluminescence and photothermal studies using this nano-GO are also presented highlighting the potential of this nanomaterial as a unique imaging/therapy platform.

  6. Hydrogen-exchange reactions via hot hydrogen atoms produced in the dissociation process of molecular hydrogen on Ir{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Okada, Michio; Nakamura, Mamiko; Kasai, Toshio; Murata, Yoshitada

    2001-12-01

    Adsorption and reaction of hydrogen (deuterium) on the Ir{111} surface has been studied with temperature-programmed desorption and direct measurements of desorbing molecules using a quadrupole mass spectrometer at ˜100 K. H2 exposure of the D-precovered Ir{111} surface was found to induce the desorption of HD and D2 molecules. This result suggests that energetic H atoms (hot H atoms) produced in the dissociation process of incident H2 molecules react with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as HD molecules or produce secondary energetic D atoms via energy transfer. Secondary energetic D atoms (secondary hot D atoms) also induce the associative reactions with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as D2 molecules. We will discuss the hot-H-atom-mediated reaction based on both empirical and steady-state approximation models for interpreting the present experimental results.

  7. "Atomic Force Masking" Induced Formation of Effective Hot Spots along Grain Boundaries of Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chae, Soo Sang; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O; Lee, Tae Il

    2016-11-30

    We present an interesting phenomenon, "atomic force masking", which is the deposition of a few-nanometer-thick gold film on ultrathin low-molecular-weight (LMW) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) engineered on a polycrystalline gold thin film, and demonstrated the formation of hot spot based on SERS. The essential principle of this atomic force masking phenomenon is that an LMW PDMS layer on a single crystalline grain of gold thin film would repel gold atoms approaching this region during a second cycle of evaporation, whereas new nucleation and growth of gold atoms would occur on LMW PDMS deposited on grain boundary regions. The nanostructure formed by the atomic force masking, denoted here as "hot spots on grain boundaries" (HOGs), which is consistent with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and the mechanism of atomic force masking were investigated by carrying out systematic experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were made to carefully explain the related fundamental physics. Also, to highlight the manufacturing advantages of the proposed method, we demonstrated the simple synthesis of a flexible HOG SERS, and we used this substrate in a swabbing test to detect a common pesticide placed on the surface of an apple.

  8. Possibility of nonexistence of hot and superhot hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2010-09-15

    Recently, the existence of extremely energetic hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges has been proposed in the literature with large controversy, from the analysis of the anomalous broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. In this paper, the velocity distribution of H atoms and the profiles of the emitting atom lines created by the exothermic reaction H{sub 2}{sup +}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 3}{sup +}+H+{Delta}E are calculated, as a function of the internal energy defect {Delta}E. The shapes found for the non-Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions resulting in non-Gaussian line profiles raise serious arguments against the existence of hot and superhot H atoms as it has been proposed, at least with those temperatures.

  9. Ultra fast cooling of hot steel plate by air atomized spray with salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Soumya S.; Ravikumar, Satya V.; Jha, Jay M.; Singh, Akhilendra K.; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Pal, Surjya K.; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the applicability of air atomized spray with the salt added water has been studied for ultra fast cooling (UFC) of a 6 mm thick AISI-304 hot steel plate. The investigation includes the effect of salt (NaCl and MgSO4) concentration and spray mass flux on the cooling rate. The initial temperature of the steel plate before the commencement of cooling is kept at 900 °C or above, which is usually observed as the "finish rolling temperature" in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The heat transfer analysis shows that air atomized spray with the MgSO4 salt produces 1.5 times higher cooling rate than atomized spray with the pure water, whereas air atomized spray with NaCl produces only 1.2 times higher cooling rate. In transition boiling regime, the salt deposition occurs which causes enhancement in heat transfer rate by conduction. Moreover, surface tension is the governing parameter behind the vapour film instability and this length scale increases with increase in surface tension of coolant. Overall, the achieved cooling rates produced by both types of salt added air atomized spray are found to be in the UFC regime.

  10. Verification survey of the hot cell facility site, General Atomics, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W. C.

    2000-06-30

    From 1958, General Atomics maintain a hot cell facility in support of government-funded research into reactor fuels. As the use of the facility declined, General Atomics entered into an agreement with DOE to dismantle the facility and decontaminate and decommission (D&D) the site so that it could made available for unrestricted use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) was requested to verify the final radiological status of the D&D effort. This is the report of ESSAP survey and verification activities conducted at the San Diego site from November 1999 through March 2000.

  11. Bright narrowband biphoton generation from a hot rubidium atomic vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lingbang; Guo, Xianxin; Shu, Chi; Jeong, Heejeong; Du, Shengwang

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the generation of high-quality narrowband biphotons from a Doppler-broadened hot rubidium atomic vapor cell. Choosing a double-Λ atomic energy level scheme for optimizing both spontaneous four-wave mixing nonlinear parametric interaction and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we achieve a biphoton spectral brightness as high as 14 000 s-1 MHz-1. Meanwhile, we apply a spatially tailored optical pumping beam for reduction of the Raman noise and obtain a violation of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by a factor of 1023.

  12. Hot hydrogen atoms reactions of interest in molecular evolution and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Hong, K.; Hong, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms which are photochemically generated initiate reactions among mixtures of methane, ethane, water and ammonia, to produce ethanol, organic amines, organic acids, and amino acids. Both ethanol and ethyl amine can also act as substrates for formation of amino acids. The one carbon substrate methane is sufficient as a carbon source to produce amino acids. Typical quantum yields for formation of amino acids are approximately 0.00002 to 0.00004. In one experiment, 6 protein amino acids were identified and 8 nonprotein amino acids verified utilizing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We propose that hot atoms, especially hydrogen, initiate reactions in the thermodynamic nonequilibrium environment of interstellar space as well as in the atmospheres of planets.

  13. Hot hydrogen atoms reactions of interest in molecular evolution and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Hong, K.; Hong, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms which are photochemically generated initiate reactions among mixtures of methane, ethane, water and ammonia, to produce ethanol, organic amines, organic acids, and amino acids. Both ethanol and ethyl amine can also act as substrates for formation of amino acids. The one carbon substrate methane is sufficient as a carbon source to produce amino acids. Typical quantum yields for formation of amino acids are approximately 0.00002 to 0.00004. In one experiment, 6 protein amino acids were identified and 8 nonprotein amino acids verified utilizing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We propose that hot atoms, especially hydrogen, initiate reactions in the thermodynamic nonequilibrium environment of interstellar space as well as in the atmospheres of planets.

  14. Two-color ghost interference with photon pairs generated in hot atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Dongsheng; Zhou Zhiyuan; Shi Baosen; Zou Xubo; Guo Guangcan

    2012-09-15

    We report on an experimental observation of a two-photon ghost interference experiment. A distinguishing feature of our experiment is that the photons are generated via a non-degenerated spontaneous four-wave mixing process in a hot atomic ensemble; therefore the photon has narrow bandwidth. Besides, there is a large difference in frequency between two photons in a pair. Our works may be important to achieve more secure, large transmission capacity long-distance quantum communication.

  15. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition of diamond ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingping; Foord, John S; Holt, Katherine B

    2007-10-28

    The hot filament chemical vapour deposition of boron-doped diamond was optimised for the fabrication of diamond ultramicroelectrodes. Applications of ultramicroelectrodes require thin, conformal and non-porous diamond coatings, which display electrochemical properties similar to those associated with good quality doped diamond electrodes. The growth conditions to attain these goals are elucidated. The influence of the use of nanodiamond ultrasonic seeding prior to growth, in order to promote nucleation, and varying the negative electrical bias and methane concentration during growth, to control the growth chemistry, are explored. Although Raman spectroscopy shows a deterioration of diamond phase quality with increased negative bias voltage during growth, cyclic voltammetry indicates an improved electrochemical performance due to decreased porosity at reduced grain size under moderate bias voltage. At even higher bias voltage, the electrochemical properties deteriorate due to aggregation of sp(2) hybridised carbon at grain boundaries. By combining efficient nucleation methods and appropriate methane concentrations and electrical bias during growth, small grain polycrystalline diamond coatings can be obtained, which show optimal electrochemical properties most suitable for ultramicroelectrode applications.

  16. Atomic layer engineering of perovskite oxides for chemically sharp heterointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M; Seo, Sung Seok A; Luo, Zhenlin; Zhou, Hua; Fister, Timothy T; Eastman, Jeffrey A; Fuoss, Paul H; Fong, Dillon D; Tischler, Jonathan Z; Eres, Gyula; Chisholm, Matthew F; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2012-12-18

    Atomic layer engineering enables fabrication of a chemically sharp oxide heterointerface. The interface formation and strain evolution during the initial growth of LaAlO(3) /SrTiO(3) heterostructures by pulsed laser deposition are investigated in search of a means for controlling the atomic-sharpness of the interface. This study shows that inserting a monolayer of LaAlO(3) grown at high oxygen pressure dramatically enhances interface abruptness.

  17. Subnatural-linewidth biphotons from a Doppler-broadened hot atomic vapour cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chi; Chen, Peng; Chow, Tsz Kiu Aaron; Zhu, Lingbang; Xiao, Yanhong; Loy, M. M. T.; Du, Shengwang

    2016-09-01

    Entangled photon pairs, termed as biphotons, have been the benchmark tool for experimental quantum optics. The quantum-network protocols based on photon-atom interfaces have stimulated a great demand for single photons with bandwidth comparable to or narrower than the atomic natural linewidth. In the past decade, laser-cooled atoms have often been used for producing such biphotons, but the apparatus is too large and complicated for engineering. Here we report the generation of subnatural-linewidth (<6 MHz) biphotons from a Doppler-broadened (530 MHz) hot atomic vapour cell. We use on-resonance spontaneous four-wave mixing in a hot paraffin-coated 87Rb vapour cell at 63 °C to produce biphotons with controllable bandwidth (1.9-3.2 MHz) and coherence time (47-94 ns). Our backward phase-matching scheme with spatially separated optical pumping is the key to suppress uncorrelated photons from resonance fluorescence. The result may lead towards miniature narrowband biphoton sources.

  18. Subnatural-linewidth biphotons from a Doppler-broadened hot atomic vapour cell

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chi; Chen, Peng; Chow, Tsz Kiu Aaron; Zhu, Lingbang; Xiao, Yanhong; Loy, M.M.T.; Du, Shengwang

    2016-01-01

    Entangled photon pairs, termed as biphotons, have been the benchmark tool for experimental quantum optics. The quantum-network protocols based on photon–atom interfaces have stimulated a great demand for single photons with bandwidth comparable to or narrower than the atomic natural linewidth. In the past decade, laser-cooled atoms have often been used for producing such biphotons, but the apparatus is too large and complicated for engineering. Here we report the generation of subnatural-linewidth (<6 MHz) biphotons from a Doppler-broadened (530 MHz) hot atomic vapour cell. We use on-resonance spontaneous four-wave mixing in a hot paraffin-coated 87Rb vapour cell at 63 °C to produce biphotons with controllable bandwidth (1.9–3.2 MHz) and coherence time (47–94 ns). Our backward phase-matching scheme with spatially separated optical pumping is the key to suppress uncorrelated photons from resonance fluorescence. The result may lead towards miniature narrowband biphoton sources. PMID:27658721

  19. Transverse azimuthal dephasing of a vortex spin wave in a hot atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuai; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Dong, Ming-Xin; Liu, Shi-Long; Wang, Kai; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-03-01

    An optical field with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has many remarkable properties due to its unique azimuthal phase, showing many potential applications in high-capacity information processing such as terabit free-space data transmission, and high-precision measurement such as high sensitivity of angular resolution. The dephasing mechanisms of optical fields in an interface between light and matter play a vital role in OAM storage. In this work, we study the transverse azimuthal dephasing of an OAM spin wave in a hot atomic gas via OAM storage. We find that the transverse azimuthal phase difference between the control and probe beams is mapped onto the spin wave, and the atomic motion during the storage results in dephasing of the atomic spin wave with transverse azimuthal phase. The dephasing of the OAM spin wave is related to the OAM's topological charge and the beam waist. Our results are helpful for studying OAM light interaction with matter.

  20. DBAC: A simple prediction method for protein binding hot spots based on burial levels and deeply buried atomic contacts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A protein binding hot spot is a cluster of residues in the interface that are energetically important for the binding of the protein with its interaction partner. Identifying protein binding hot spots can give useful information to protein engineering and drug design, and can also deepen our understanding of protein-protein interaction. These residues are usually buried inside the interface with very low solvent accessible surface area (SASA). Thus SASA is widely used as an outstanding feature in hot spot prediction by many computational methods. However, SASA is not capable of distinguishing slightly buried residues, of which most are non hot spots, and deeply buried ones that are usually inside a hot spot. Results We propose a new descriptor called “burial level” for characterizing residues, atoms and atomic contacts. Specifically, burial level captures the depth the residues are buried. We identify different kinds of deeply buried atomic contacts (DBAC) at different burial levels that are directly broken in alanine substitution. We use their numbers as input for SVM to classify between hot spot or non hot spot residues. We achieve F measure of 0.6237 under the leave-one-out cross-validation on a data set containing 258 mutations. This performance is better than other computational methods. Conclusions Our results show that hot spot residues tend to be deeply buried in the interface, not just having a low SASA value. This indicates that a high burial level is not only a necessary but also a more sufficient condition than a low SASA for a residue to be a hot spot residue. We find that those deeply buried atoms become increasingly more important when their burial levels rise up. This work also confirms the contribution of deeply buried interfacial atomic contacts to the energy of protein binding hot spot. PMID:21689480

  1. Geologic setting and chemical characteristics of hot springs in central and western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.; Barnes, Ivan; Pattan, William Wallace

    1973-01-01

    The geologic and chemical data are too preliminary to make an estimate of the potential of the hot springs as a geothermal resource. The data suggest, however, that most of the hot springs of central and western Alaska have relatively low subsurface temperatures and limited reservoir capacities in comparison with geothermal areas presently being utilized for electrical power generation.

  2. Infrared light emission from nano hot electron gas created in atomic point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, T.; Klein, H. R.; Iazykov, M.; Dumas, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Gold atomic point contacts are prototype systems to evidence ballistic electron transport. The typical dimension of the nanojunction being smaller than the electron-phonon interaction length, even at room temperature, electrons transfer their excess energy to the lattice only far from the contact. At the contact however, favored by huge current densities, electron-electron interactions result in a nano hot electron gas acting as a source of photons. Using a home built Mechanically Controlled Break Junction, it is reported here, for the first time, that this nano hot electron gas also radiates in the infrared range (0.2 eV to 1.2 eV). Moreover, following the description introduced by Tomchuk et al. (Sov. Phys.-Solid State, 8 (1966) 2510), we show that this radiation is compatible with a black-body-like spectrum emitted from an electron gas at temperatures of several thousands of kelvins.

  3. Formation of AN Extended Halo of Hot Oxygen Atoms in the Wake Region of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying; Ip, Wing Huen

    From the detailed measurements in Venusian ionosphere by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, it was well-known that there is a large day-to-night flow of ionospheric plasma with the horizontal speed reaching a value as high as 5 km/s at 500 km altitude near the terminator. This large-scale anti-sunward convective motion could lead to a significant distortion of the hot oxygen corona maintained by oxygen atoms from {\\text{O}}_2^ + dissociation recombination into a tadpole-like structure. A Monte-Carlo model is developed to simulate the two-dimensional configuration of such a hot oxygen corona.

  4. Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted wet chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Barzegar Vishlaghi, M.; Farzalipour Tabriz, M.; Mohammad Moradi, O.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles is reported. ► Substituting water with non-aqueous media prevents the formation of nickel hydroxide. ► Size of particles decreased from 10 to 20 nm down to 2–4 nm by using multi-jet mode. ► Synthesized nanoparticles have diffraction patterns similar to amorphous materials. -- Abstract: In this study nickel nanoparticles were prepared via chemical reduction of nickel acetate using sodium borohydride using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. This technique was used to spray a finely dispersed aerosol of nickel precursor solution into the reductive bath. Obtained particles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles and showed that applying EHDA technique to chemical reduction method results in producing smaller particles with narrower size distribution in comparison with conventional reductive precipitation method.

  5. Generating Molecular Rovibrational Coherence by Two-Photon Femtosecond Photoassociation of Thermally Hot Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michal; Moszynski, Robert; Koch, Christiane P.

    2011-12-30

    The formation of diatomic molecules with rotational and vibrational coherence is demonstrated experimentally in free-to-bound two-photon femtosecond photoassociation of hot atoms. In a thermal gas at a temperature of 1000 K, pairs of magnesium atoms, colliding in their electronic ground state, are excited into coherent superpositions of bound rovibrational levels in an electronically excited state. The rovibrational coherence is probed by a time-delayed third photon, resulting in quantum beats in the UV fluorescence. A comprehensive theoretical model based on ab initio calculations rationalizes the generation of coherence by Franck-Condon filtering of collision energies and partial waves, quantifying it in terms of an increase in quantum purity of the thermal ensemble. Our results open the way to coherent control of a binary reaction.

  6. Atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen, and chemical heating rates derived from SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.

    The SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite measures the infrared OH airglow at 2.0 um in the terrestrial mesosphere. These measurements are inverted to provide the volume emissions rates of the OH(9-7 + 8-6) bands. These high-lying bands are formed directly upon the reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone and thus the measured volume emission rate is a direct measure of the rate of reaction. The SABER OH emission rates and the measured SABER ozone are used to derive the concentration of atomic hydrogen in the mesopause region. The emission rate is also a direct measure of the rate of energy deposition due to the reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone. Rates of chemical heating are then readily derived upon provision of atmospheric temperature and density from SABER. Under the assumption of photochemical steady state in the production and loss of ozone, the emission rates can also be used to derive atomic oxygen. The abundances of H and O enable the computation of rates of chemical heating due to numerous exothermic reactions. A key to these derivations lies in the knowledge of the rate of quenching/reaction of vibrationally excited OH with atomic oxygen. We present the SABER airglow models, data inversion approach, and results for O, H, and chemical heating.

  7. Femtosecond two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms: A quantum dynamical study using thermal random phase wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michał; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Berglund, J. Martin; Reich, Daniel M.; Koch, Christiane P.

    2013-10-28

    Two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses, creating electronically excited magnesium dimer molecules, is studied from first principles, combining ab initio quantum chemistry and molecular quantum dynamics. This theoretical framework allows for rationalizing the generation of molecular rovibrational coherence from thermally hot atoms [L. Rybak, S. Amaran, L. Levin, M. Tomza, R. Moszynski, R. Kosloff, C. P. Koch, and Z. Amitay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 273001 (2011)]. Random phase thermal wavefunctions are employed to model the thermal ensemble of hot colliding atoms. Comparing two different choices of basis functions, random phase wavefunctions built from eigenstates are found to have the fastest convergence for the photoassociation yield. The interaction of the colliding atoms with a femtosecond laser pulse is modeled non-perturbatively to account for strong-field effects.

  8. Disentangling hot Jupiters formation location from their chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad

    2017-05-01

    We use a population synthesis model that includes pebbles and gas accretion, planetary migration and a simplified chemistry scheme to study the formation of hot Jupiters. Models have been proposed that these planets can either originate beyond the snowline and then move inwards via disc migration, or form 'in situ' inside the snowline. The goal of this work is to verify which of these two scenarios is more compatible with pebble accretion, and whether we can distinguish observationally between them via the resulting planetary C/O ratios and core masses. Our results show that for Solar system composition, the C/O ratios will vary but moderately between the two populations, since a significant amount of carbon and oxygen is locked up in refractories. In this case, we find a strong correlation between the carbon and oxygen abundances and core mass. The C/O ratio variations are more pronounced in the case where we assume that all carbon and oxygen are in volatiles. On average, hot Jupiters forming 'in situ' inside the snowline will have higher C/O ratios because they accrete less water ice. However, only hot Jupiters forming in situ around stars with C/O = 0.8 can have a C/O ratio higher than unity. We finally find that even with fast pebble accretion, it is significantly easier to form hot Jupiters outside of the snowline, even if forming these 'in situ' is not impossible in the limit of the simplifying assumptions made.

  9. Chemical domain of QSAR models from atom-centered fragments.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Ralph; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2009-12-01

    A methodology to characterize the chemical domain of qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on the atom-centered fragment (ACF) approach is introduced. ACFs decompose the molecule into structural pieces, with each non-hydrogen atom of the molecule acting as an ACF center. ACFs vary with respect to their size in terms of the path length covered in each bonding direction starting from a given central atom and how comprehensively the neighbor atoms (including hydrogen) are described in terms of element type and bonding environment. In addition to these different levels of ACF definitions, the ACF match mode as degree of strictness of the ACF comparison between a test compound and a given ACF pool (such as from a training set) has to be specified. Analyses of the prediction statistics of three QSAR models with their training sets as well as with external test sets and associated subsets demonstrate a clear relationship between the prediction performance and the levels of ACF definition and match mode. The findings suggest that second-order ACFs combined with a borderline match mode may serve as a generic and at the same time a mechanistically sound tool to define and evaluate the chemical domain of QSAR models. Moreover, four standard categories of the ACF-based membership to a given chemical domain (outside, borderline outside, borderline inside, inside) are introduced that provide more specific information about the expected QSAR prediction performance. As such, the ACF-based characterization of the chemical domain appears to be particularly useful for QSAR applications in the context of REACH and other regulatory schemes addressing the safety evaluation of chemical compounds.

  10. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Guangjie Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-15

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH{sub 2} radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH{sub 2} radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 3} with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH{sub 2} radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH{sub 2} radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH{sub 2} radical flux and the reactivity of the NH{sub 2} radicals.

  11. Hot spots in density fingering of exothermic autocatalytic chemical fronts.

    PubMed

    Gérard, T; Tóth, T; Grosfils, P; Horváth, D; De Wit, A; Tóth, A

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of two-dimensional (2D) temperature fields are performed by an interferometric method during density fingering of the autocatalytic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction in a Hele-Shaw cell. These measures confirm that, because of heat losses through the glass walls of the reactor, the temperature profile across the front is a pulse rather than a front. Moreover, the full 2D temperature field shows the presence in the reactive zone of hot spots where the temperature exceeds the maximum temperature measured in a stable planar front. We investigate here experimentally the increase of temperature in the hot spots when the composition of the reactants is varied to increase the exothermicity of the reaction. We back up these experimental observations by nonlinear simulations of a reaction-diffusion-convection model which show that the maximum temperature reached in the system depends on the intensity of convection.

  12. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Udo D.; Altman, Eric I.

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  13. Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AFRL-RQ-ED-TR-2014-0025 Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules P.W. Langhoff J.D. Mills J.A...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Oct 2013 - 15 Oct 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules...atoms in molecules and provide corresponding definitions of atomic energies and of the chemical bonds between atoms from the perspective of

  14. Doping of vanadium to nanocrystalline diamond films by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Doping an impure element with a larger atomic volume into crystalline structure of buck crystals is normally blocked because the rigid crystalline structure could not tolerate a larger distortion. However, this difficulty may be weakened for nanocrystalline structures. Diamonds, as well as many semiconductors, have a difficulty in effective doping. Theoretical calculations carried out by DFT indicate that vanadium (V) is a dopant element for the n-type diamond semiconductor, and their several donor state levels are distributed between the conduction band and middle bandgap position in the V-doped band structure of diamond. Experimental investigation of doping vanadium into nanocrystalline diamond films (NDFs) was first attempted by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. Acetone/H2 gas mixtures and vanadium oxytripropoxide (VO(OCH2CH2CH3)3) solutions of acetone with V and C elemental ratios of 1:5,000, 1:2,000, and 1:1,000 were used as carbon and vanadium sources, respectively. The resistivity of the V-doped NDFs decreased two orders with the increasing V/C ratios. PMID:22873631

  15. Optical limiting using spatial self-phase modulation in hot atomic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Cheng, Xuemei; Zhang, Ying; Yin, Xunli; Jiang, Man; Chen, Haowei; Bai, Jintao

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we characterized the performance of optical limiting by self-phase modulation (SPM) in hot atomic vapor cell. The results indicated that the performance of the optical limiter is closely related to the position of the sample cell, which is determined by the Rayleigh lenght of beam. The lowest limiting threshold and clamp output were obtained at the sample position at -10 mm from the coordinate origin (the beam waist). The phenomenon was explained well by the theory of SPM and z-scan, which are caused by both Kerr effect and the thermal optical nonlinear effect. This useful information obtained in the meaning of this work is determining the optimal position of the sample cell in the optical limiter and other applications of SPM.

  16. Protein-protein interface analysis and hot spots identification for chemical ligand design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Ma, Xiaomin; Yuan, Yaxia; Pei, Jianfeng; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    Rational design for chemical compounds targeting protein-protein interactions has grown from a dream to reality after a decade of efforts. There are an increasing number of successful examples, though major challenges remain in the field. In this paper, we will first give a brief review of the available methods that can be used to analyze protein-protein interface and predict hot spots for chemical ligand design. New developments of binding sites detection, ligandability and hot spots prediction from the author's group will also be described. Pocket V.3 is an improved program for identifying hot spots in protein-protein interface using only an apo protein structure. It has been developed based on Pocket V.2 that can derive receptor-based pharmacophore model for ligand binding cavity. Given similarities and differences between the essence of pharmacophore and hot spots for guiding design of chemical compounds, not only energetic but also spatial properties of protein-protein interface are used in Pocket V.3 for dealing with protein-protein interface. In order to illustrate the capability of Pocket V.3, two datasets have been used. One is taken from ASEdb and BID having experimental alanine scanning results for testing hot spots prediction. The other is taken from the 2P2I database containing complex structures of protein-ligand binding at the original protein-protein interface for testing hot spots application in ligand design.

  17. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  18. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Microscopy of chemical-potential variations on an atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. C.; Wickramasinghe, H. K.

    1990-03-01

    THE invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope1 (STM) has stimulated the development of several new forms of probe microscopy2-10. Here we demonstrate the use of a microscope that is capable of measuring chemical-potential variations on an atomic scale-the scanning chemical potential microscope (SCPM). The system is based on a recently developed tunnelling thermometer11, which allows the spatial mapping, on an atomic scale, of thermoelectric potential variations resulting from absorption of light, by scanning a conducting tip within tunnelling range of a conducting (or semiconducting) sample. In the SCPM, we replace the optical pump with an electrical sample heater, to generate a temperature gradient between the sample and the tunnel-current-measuring device. We measure the spatial variations in the thermoelectric voltage across the tip-sample system as the tip is scanned across the sample surface with no external bias. This signal can be shown to be equal to the product of the local gradient of chemical potential with respect to temperature and the temperature differential normal to the surface being imaged. The images obtained in this way show features that are not present in the conventional STM images.

  20. Enhancing microbiological safety of fresh orange juice by fruit immersion in hot water and chemical sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Pao, S; Davis, C L

    1999-07-01

    Trials were conducted with hot water and chemicals to sanitize Valencia oranges contaminated by natural microflora or inoculated with Escherichia coli. Microbial loads and sensory quality of fresh juice extracted from surface-heated fruit were also evaluated. E. coli on fruit surfaces was reduced by either hot water or chemical treatments. An estimated 5-log reduction of E. coli was attained by immersing inoculated fruit in hot water at 80 degrees C for 1 min or 70 degrees C for 2 min. Immersing inoculated fruit in various chemical solutions at about 30 degrees C for 8 min only reduced E. coli by about 1.8- to 3.1-log cycles on nonstem-scar surfaces of the fruit. In general, both hot water and chemical treatments were less effective at removing microflora from the stem-scar area. Rapid hot-water immersions at 80 degrees C for 1 min and 70 degrees C for 2 min reduced both fruit-surface and initial juice microbial loads without altering original sensory quality of fresh juice.

  1. Spatial chemical distance based on atomic property fields

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, A. V.; Kufareva, I.; Totrov, M.

    2010-01-01

    Similarity of compound chemical structures often leads to close pharmacological profiles, including binding to the same protein targets. The opposite, however, is not always true, as distinct chemical scaffolds can exhibit similar pharmacology as well. Therefore, relying on chemical similarity to known binders in search for novel chemicals targeting the same protein artificially narrows down the results and makes lead hopping impossible. In this study we attempt to design a compound similarity/distance measure that better captures structural aspects of their pharmacology and molecular interactions. The measure is based on our recently published method for compound spatial alignment with atomic property fields as a generalized 3D pharmacophoric potential. We optimized contributions of different atomic properties for better discrimination of compound pairs with the same pharmacology from those with different pharmacology using Partial Least Squares regression. Our proposed similarity measure was then tested for its ability to discriminate pharmacologically similar pairs from decoys on a large diverse dataset of 115 protein–ligand complexes. Compared to 2D Tanimoto and Shape Tanimoto approaches, our new approach led to improvement in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values in 66 and 58% of domains respectively. The improvement was particularly high for the previously problematic cases (weak performance of the 2D Tanimoto and Shape Tanimoto measures) with original AUC values below 0.8. In fact for these cases we obtained improvement in 86% of domains compare to 2D Tanimoto measure and 85% compare to Shape Tanimoto measure. The proposed spatial chemical distance measure can be used in virtual ligand screening. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10822-009-9316-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20229197

  2. Spatial chemical distance based on atomic property fields.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, A V; Kufareva, I; Totrov, M; Abagyan, R A

    2010-03-01

    Similarity of compound chemical structures often leads to close pharmacological profiles, including binding to the same protein targets. The opposite, however, is not always true, as distinct chemical scaffolds can exhibit similar pharmacology as well. Therefore, relying on chemical similarity to known binders in search for novel chemicals targeting the same protein artificially narrows down the results and makes lead hopping impossible. In this study we attempt to design a compound similarity/distance measure that better captures structural aspects of their pharmacology and molecular interactions. The measure is based on our recently published method for compound spatial alignment with atomic property fields as a generalized 3D pharmacophoric potential. We optimized contributions of different atomic properties for better discrimination of compound pairs with the same pharmacology from those with different pharmacology using Partial Least Squares regression. Our proposed similarity measure was then tested for its ability to discriminate pharmacologically similar pairs from decoys on a large diverse dataset of 115 protein-ligand complexes. Compared to 2D Tanimoto and Shape Tanimoto approaches, our new approach led to improvement in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values in 66 and 58% of domains respectively. The improvement was particularly high for the previously problematic cases (weak performance of the 2D Tanimoto and Shape Tanimoto measures) with original AUC values below 0.8. In fact for these cases we obtained improvement in 86% of domains compare to 2D Tanimoto measure and 85% compare to Shape Tanimoto measure. The proposed spatial chemical distance measure can be used in virtual ligand screening.

  3. Atomically Resolved Structural and Chemical Investigation of Single MXene Sheets.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Linda H; Birch, Jens; Halim, Joseph; Barsoum, Michel W; Persson, Per O Å

    2015-08-12

    The properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials depend strongly on the chemical and electrochemical activity of their surfaces. MXene, one of the most recent additions to 2D materials, shows great promise as an energy storage material. In the present investigation, the chemical and structural properties of individual Ti3C2 MXene sheets with associated surface groups are investigated at the atomic level by aberration corrected STEM-EELS. The MXene sheets are shown to exhibit a nonuniform coverage of O-based surface groups which locally affect the chemistry. Additionally, native point defects which are proposed to affect the local surface chemistry, such as oxidized titanium adatoms (TiOx), are identified and found to be mobile.

  4. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic `hot' carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions.We identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  5. Hot-Corrosion Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coated DZ125 Superalloy Exposed to Atomized Seawater and Kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhiming; Zhou, Le; Liang, Tianquan; Guo, Hongbo; Gong, Shengkai

    The bare superalloy DZ 125 alloy, the aluminide coated specimens and electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coating (TBC) consisting of yttria stabilizied zirconia (YSZ) topcoat and NiCoCrAlY bond coat specimens were exposed to atomized seawater and kerosene at 900°C and the cyclic hot-corrosion behaviors of the specimens were investigated. Disastrous spallation of the bare superalloy occurred within 50 h hot-corrosion. In contrast to this, after 100 h hot-corrosion, the average mass change for the aluminized and TBC coated specimens is 0.7 mg/cm2 and 0.63 mg/cm2, respectively, exhibiting excellent hot-corrosion resistance.

  6. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  7. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    PubMed Central

    Jelsch, Christian; Bibila Mayaya Bisseyou, Yvon

    2017-01-01

    The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds) and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl⋯O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers) are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols) are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between two phenol groups

  8. Hot precursor reactions during the collisions of gas-phase oxygen atoms with deuterium chemisorbed on Pt(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Heywood H.; Shumbera, R. Bradley; Weaver, Jason F.

    2007-04-01

    We utilized direct rate measurements and temperature programmed desorption to investigate reactions that occur during the collisions of gaseous oxygen atoms with deuterium-covered Pt(100). We find that both D2O and D2 desorb promptly when an oxygen atom beam impinges upon D-covered Pt(100) held at surface temperatures ranging from 90to150K, and estimate effective cross sections of 12 and 1.8Å2, respectively, for the production of gaseous D2O and D2 at 90K. The yields of D2O and D2 that desorb at 90K are about 13% and 2%, respectively, of the initial D atom coverage, though most of the D2O product molecules (˜80%) thermalize to the surface rather than desorb at the surface temperatures studied. Increasing the surface temperature from 90to150K causes the D2O desorption rate to decay more quickly during O atom exposures to the surface and results in lower yields of gaseous D2O. We attribute the production of D2O and D2 in these experiments to reactions involving intermediates that are not thermally accommodated to the surface, so-called hot precursors. The results are consistent with the production of hot D2O involving first the generation of hot OD groups from the reaction O*+D(a)→OD*, where the asterisk denotes a hot precursor, followed by the parallel pathways OD *+D(a)→D2O* and OD *+OD(a)→D2O*+O(a). The final reaction contributes significantly to hot D2O production only later in the reaction period when thermalized OD groups have accumulated on the surface, and it becomes less important at higher temperature due to depletion of the OD(a) concentration by thermally activated D2O production.

  9. Hot precursor reactions during the collisions of gas-phase oxygen atoms with deuterium chemisorbed on Pt(100).

    PubMed

    Kan, Heywood H; Shumbera, R Bradley; Weaver, Jason F

    2007-04-07

    We utilized direct rate measurements and temperature programmed desorption to investigate reactions that occur during the collisions of gaseous oxygen atoms with deuterium-covered Pt(100). We find that both D2O and D2 desorb promptly when an oxygen atom beam impinges upon D-covered Pt(100) held at surface temperatures ranging from 90 to 150 K, and estimate effective cross sections of 12 and 1.8 A2, respectively, for the production of gaseous D2O and D2 at 90 K. The yields of D2O and D2 that desorb at 90 K are about 13% and 2%, respectively, of the initial D atom coverage, though most of the D2O product molecules (approximately 80%) thermalize to the surface rather than desorb at the surface temperatures studied. Increasing the surface temperature from 90 to 150 K causes the D2O desorption rate to decay more quickly during O atom exposures to the surface and results in lower yields of gaseous D2O. We attribute the production of D2O and D2 in these experiments to reactions involving intermediates that are not thermally accommodated to the surface, so-called hot precursors. The results are consistent with the production of hot D2O involving first the generation of hot OD groups from the reaction O*+D(a)-->OD*, where the asterisk denotes a hot precursor, followed by the parallel pathways OD*+D(a)-->D2O* and OD*+OD(a)-->D2O*+O(a). The final reaction contributes significantly to hot D2O production only later in the reaction period when thermalized OD groups have accumulated on the surface, and it becomes less important at higher temperature due to depletion of the OD(a) concentration by thermally activated D2O production.

  10. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  11. Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition of silicon and silicon nitride for photovoltaics: Experiments, simulations, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason Knowles

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition is a promising technique for deposition of thin film silicon for photovoltaics. Fundamental questions remain, however, about the gas-phase and surface-kinetic processes involved. To this end, the nature of the decomposition process has been studied in detail by use of mass spectrometry. Catalysis was evident for SiH3 production with the use of a new wire, while aged wires appear to produce radicals by a non-catalyzed route. Large quantities of silicon were present at the surface, consistent with a silicide layer. Threshold ionization mass spectrometry revealed large quantities of the SiH2 radical, attributed to heterogeneous pyrolysis on the walls of the reactor. At dilute (1% in He) silane pressures of up to 2 Torr, a negligible amount of ions and silicon agglomerates (Si2, Si2H, Si 2H6) were detected. Density functional theory calculations reveal an energetically favorable route for the reaction of Si and SiH 4, producing Si2H2 and H2. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used to model a hot-wire reactor, showing that filament arrays can be used to improve film growth uniformity. Continuum simulations predict a maximum growth rate of 10 nm/s for dilute (1%) silane conditions and a rate of 50 nm/s for pure silane. Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit silicon nitride films with indices of refraction from 1.8--2.5 and hydrogen content from 9--18 atomic %. By tuning the SiH4/NH3 flow ratio, films in which the hydrogen was predominantly bound to N or Si could be produced. Platinum-diffused silicon samples, capped by a hydrogenated silicon nitride layer revealed, upon annealing at 700°C, platinum-hydrogen complexes with a bulk concentration of 1014 cm-3. Photovoltaic cells employing a hot-wire nitride layer were found to have comparable electrical properties to those using plasma nitride layers. Finally, a method for in situ generation of SiH 4 by atomic hydrogen etching was evaluated. Using a cooled

  12. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. [in model for cooling of hot Galactic corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Bruna, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  13. Hot-atom versus Eley-Rideal dynamics in hydrogen recombination on Ni(100). I. The single-adsorbate case.

    PubMed

    Martinazzo, R; Assoni, S; Marinoni, G; Tantardini, G F

    2004-05-08

    We compare the efficiency of the Eley-Rideal (ER) reaction with the formation of hot-atom (HA) species in the simplest case, i.e., the scattering of a projectile off a single adsorbate, considering the Hydrogen and Hydrogen-on-Ni(100) system. We use classical mechanics and the accurate embedded diatomics-in-molecules potential to study the collision system over a wide range of collision energies (0.10-1.50 eV), both with a rigid and a nonrigid Ni substrate and for impact on the occupied and neighboring empty cells. In the rigid model metastable and truly bound hot-atoms occur and we find that the cross section for the formation of bound hot-atoms is considerably higher than that for the ER reaction over the whole range of collision energies examined. Metastable hot-atoms form because of the inefficient energy transfer to the adsorbate and have lifetimes of the order 0.1-0.7 ps, depending on the collision energy. When considering the effects of lattice vibrations we find, on average, a consistent energy transfer to the substrate, say 0.1-0.2 eV, which forced us to devise a two-step dynamical model to get rid of the problems associated with the use of periodic boundary conditions. Results for long-lived HA formation due to scattering on the occupied cell at a surface temperature of 120 K agree well with those of the rigid model, suggesting that in the above process the substrate plays only a secondary role and further calculations at surface temperatures of 50 and 300 K are in line with these findings. However, considerably high cross sections for formation of long-lived hot-atoms result also from scattering off the neighboring cells where the energy transfer to the lattice cannot be neglected. Metastable hot-atoms are reduced in number and have usually lifetimes shorter than those of the rigid-model, say less than 0.3 ps. In addition, ER cross sections are only slightly affected by the lattice motion and show a little temperature dependence. Finally, we find also

  14. Chemical Reactions and Atomic Removal Dynamics during Gallium Nitride Chemical Mechanical Polishing Process: Quantum Chemical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2015-03-01

    The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is promising for efficient polishing of the GaN substrate, and it is essential for manufacturing of GaN devices. However, the detailed CMP mechanisms are unclear, and then the design of efficient and precise CMP process is difficult. We performed polishing simulations of a GaN substrate by a SiO2 abrasive grain in a solution including OH radicals in order to reveal effects of OH radicals on the polishing process. The OH radicals in the solution are adsorbed on the GaN surface and occupy the hollow sites on the surface. Then, a surface-adsorbed O atom is generated by the chemical reaction between the surface-adsorbed OH species and a OH radical in the solution. In the friction interface between the GaN substrate and the abrasive grain, the surface-adsorbed O atom is mechanically pushed into the GaN substrate by the abrasive grain. This O atom intrusion induces the dissociation of Ga-N bonds of the GaN substrate. Moreover, volatile N2 molecules and soluble Ga(OH)3 molecules are generated due to the dissociation of Ga-N bonds. Then, we suggested that the GaN CMP process efficiently proceeds by the mechanically induced chemical reactions: a surface-adsorbed O atom is generated and pushed into the GaN bulk by the abrasive grain.

  15. Hydrogen abstraction from metal surfaces: when electron-hole pair excitations strongly affect hot-atom recombination.

    PubMed

    Galparsoro, Oihana; Pétuya, Rémi; Busnengo, Fabio; Juaristi, Joseba Iñaki; Crespos, Cédric; Alducin, Maite; Larregaray, Pascal

    2016-11-23

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict that the inclusion of nonadiabatic electronic excitations influences the dynamics of preadsorbed hydrogen abstraction from the W(110) surface by hydrogen scattering. The hot-atom recombination, which involves hyperthermal diffusion of the impinging atom on the surface, is significantly affected by the dissipation of energy mediated by electron-hole pair excitations at low coverage and low incidence energy. This issue is of importance as this abstraction mechanism is thought to largely contribute to molecular hydrogen formation from metal surfaces.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Atomically-Thin Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 625 Technical Report ARMET-TR-14041 CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF ATOMICALLY -THIN MOLYBDENUM...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF ATOMICALLY -THIN MOLYBDENUM DISULFIDE (MoS2) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...materials, in their bulk form exist as lamellar structures, they can be exfoliated into individual, atomically -thin layers . While the exfoliated 2D materials

  17. Chemical segregation in hot cores with disk candidates. An investigation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, V.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Cesaroni, R.; Beltrán, M. T.

    2017-07-01

    Context. In the study of high-mass star formation, hot cores are empirically defined stages where chemically rich emission is detected toward a massive YSO. It is unknown whether the physical origin of this emission is a disk, inner envelope, or outflow cavity wall and whether the hot core stage is common to all massive stars. Aims: We investigate the chemical makeup of several hot molecular cores to determine physical and chemical structure. We use high spectral and spatial resolution submillimeter observations to determine how this stage fits into the formation sequence of a high-mass star. Methods: The submillimeter interferometer ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) was used to observe the G35.20-0.74N and G35.03+0.35 hot cores at 350 GHz in Cycle 0. We analyzed spectra and maps from four continuum peaks (A, B1, B2 and B3) in G35.20-0.74N, separated by 1000-2000 AU, and one continuum peak in G35.03+0.35. We made all possible line identifications across 8 GHz of spectral windows of molecular emission lines down to a 3σ line flux of 0.5 K and determined column densities and temperatures for as many as 35 species assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Results: In comparing the spectra of the four continuum peaks, we find each has a distinct chemical composition expressed in over 400 different transitions. In G35.20, B1 and B2 contain oxygen- and sulfur-bearing organic and inorganic species but few nitrogen-bearing species whereas A and B3 are strong sources of O-, S-, and N-bearing organic and inorganic species (especially those with the CN bond). Column densities of vibrationally excited states are observed to be equal to or greater than the ground state for a number of species. Deuterated methyl cyanide is clearly detected in A and B3 with D/H ratios of 8 and 13%, respectively, but is much weaker at B1 and undetected at B2. No deuterated species are detected in G35.03, but similar molecular abundances to G35.20 were found in other species. We also

  18. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  19. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mengdi Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  20. [Atomic volume, packing density of the atoms, and chemical bonds in nonmetallic elements].

    PubMed

    Trömel, M

    2007-08-01

    The atomic volume of crystalline elements is largely determined by the packing density of atoms in the respective modification. The determination of packing density is improved by assuming that the atomic distances depend on bond valences according to Pauling's equation. With the additional assumption of equal valence in different modifications, the experimental atomic volume of an element in any given structure is reduced to its volume in close-packed structures, e.g. f.c.c. The ratio of this reduced atomic volume and the experimental atomic volume is a measure of packing density. Reduced atomic volumes of C, Si, Ge, P, As, S and Se, as calculated from different modifications, correspond in most cases to within less than +/-1% for each element, even if calculated from extremely different structures like diamond and buckminsterfullerene in the case of carbon, or from numerous modifications of sulfur with annular molecules of different sizes. Exceptions (graphite, white phosphorus, tin and selenium) indicate deviating valences.

  1. Diamond-coated fiber Bragg grating through the hot filament chemical vapor process for chemical durability improvement.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Nélia; José Kalinowski, Hypolito; Neto, Victor; Nogueira, Rogério

    2017-02-20

    In recent years, the coating of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with a specific material has opened up the possibility to broaden the limits of applicability of this technology. Diamond has a set of properties that makes it an attractive candidate to protect the optical fiber against chemically harsh environments, whose sensing is also a great challenge. One of the most used techniques to obtain these coatings is through the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD); in this process, the temperature reaches, typically, around 850°C-900°C. In this work, the regeneration of a seed FBG during its coating with a nanocrystalline diamond thin film through the HFCVD process is presented. Simultaneously, the thermal monitoring of the process was also performed using the same grating. The resistance test in a corrosive medium reveals an improvement on the durability of the sensing properties of the diamond-coated FBG compared with an uncoated FBG, foreseeing a vast range of applications.

  2. Decomposition of hexamethyldisilane on a hot tungsten filament and gas-phase reactions in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yujun; Li, Xinmao; Tong, Ling; Toukabri, Rim; Eustergerling, Brett

    2008-05-14

    To study the effect of an Si-Si bond on gas-phase reaction chemistry in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) process with a single source alkylsilane molecule, soft ionization with a vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 118 nm was used with time-of-flight mass spectrometry to examine the products from the primary decomposition of hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) on a heated tungsten (W) filament and from secondary gas-phase reactions in a HWCVD reactor. It is found that both Si-Si and Si-C bonds break when HMDS decomposes on the W filament. The dominance of the breakage of Si-Si over Si-C bond has been demonstrated. In the reactor, the abstraction of methyl and H atom, respectively, from the abundant HMDS molecules by the dominant primary trimethylsilyl radicals produces tetramethylsilane (TMS) and trimethylsilane (TriMS). Along with TMS and TriMS, various other alkyl-substituted silanes (m/z = 160, 204, 262) and silyl-substituted alkanes (m/z = 218, 276, 290) are also formed from radical combination reactions. With HMDS, an increasing number of Si-Si bonds are found in the gas-phase reaction products aside from the Si-C bond which has been shown to be the major bond connection in the products when TMS is used in the same reactor. Three methyl-substituted 1,3-disilacyclobutane species (m/z = 116, 130, 144) are present in the reactor with HMDS, suggesting a more active involvement from the reactive silene intermediates.

  3. The influence of chemical bonding configuration on atomic identification by force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Welker, Joachim; Weymouth, Alfred John; Giessibl, Franz J

    2013-08-27

    The force between two atoms depends not only on their chemical species and distance, but also on the configuration of their chemical bonds to other atoms. This strongly affects atomic force spectroscopy, in which the force between the tip of an atomic force microscope and a sample is measured as a function of distance. We show that the short-range forces between tip and sample atoms depend strongly on the configuration of the tip, to the point of preventing atom identification with a poorly defined tip. Our solution is to control the tip apex before using it for spectroscopy. We demonstrate a method by which a CO molecule on Cu can be used to characterize the tip. In combination with gentle pokes, this can be used to engineer a specific tip apex. This CO Front atom Identification (COFI) method allows us to use a well-defined tip to conduct force spectroscopy.

  4. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  5. CHEMICAL SEGREGATION TOWARD MASSIVE HOT CORES: THE AFGL2591 STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q.; Viti, S.; Martin-Pintado, J.; De Wit, W.-J. E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es

    2012-07-01

    We present high angular resolution observations (0.''5 Multiplication-Sign 0.''3) carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward the AFGL2591 high-mass star-forming region. Our SMA images reveal a clear chemical segregation within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core, where different molecular species (Types I, II, and III) appear distributed in three concentric shells. This is the first time that such a chemical segregation is ever reported at linear scales {<=}3000 AU within a hot core. While Type I species (H{sub 2}S and {sup 13}CS) peak at the AFGL2591 VLA 3 protostar, Type II molecules (HC{sub 3}N, OCS, SO, and SO{sub 2}) show a double-peaked structure circumventing the continuum peak. Type III species, represented by CH{sub 3}OH, form a ring-like structure surrounding the continuum emission. The excitation temperatures of SO{sub 2}, HC{sub 3}N, and CH{sub 3}OH (185 {+-} 11 K, 150 {+-} 20 K, and 124 {+-} 12 K, respectively) show a temperature gradient within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 envelope, consistent with previous observations and modeling of the source. By combining the H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH images, representative of the three concentric shells, we find that the global kinematics of the molecular gas follow Keplerian-like rotation around a 40 M{sub Sun} star. The chemical segregation observed toward AFGL2591 VLA 3 is explained by the combination of molecular UV photodissociation and a high-temperature ({approx}1000 K) gas-phase chemistry within the low extinction innermost region in the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core.

  6. A THREE-PHASE CHEMICAL MODEL OF HOT CORES: THE FORMATION OF GLYCINE

    SciTech Connect

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures {approx}40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, occurring at {approx}200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH{sub 2}, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  7. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  8. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-11

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic ‘hot’ carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions. As a result, we identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  9. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-11

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic ‘hot’ carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem intomore » three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions. As a result, we identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.« less

  10. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  11. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  12. Chemical Principles Revisited: Updating the Atomic Theory in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Mark

    1984-01-01

    Presents a descriptive overview of recent achievements in atomic structure to provide instructors with the background necessary to enhance their classroom presentations. Topics considered include hadrons, quarks, leptons, forces, and the unified fields theory. (JN)

  13. Chemical Principles Revisited: Updating the Atomic Theory in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Mark

    1984-01-01

    Presents a descriptive overview of recent achievements in atomic structure to provide instructors with the background necessary to enhance their classroom presentations. Topics considered include hadrons, quarks, leptons, forces, and the unified fields theory. (JN)

  14. Ion-atom charge-transfer reactions and a hot intercloud medium. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the ionization equilibrium of carbon in a hot intercloud medium (ICM), taking into account various charge-transfer reactions. Attention is given to problems related to observations of carbon along the lines of sight to several unreddened stars. It is pointed out that the observed underabundance of C III and overabundance of C I can be consistent with the presence of a hot, partially ionized ICM, provided that two of the charge-transfer reactions considered are rapid at thermal energies.

  15. Hydrogen Assisted Nano-crystallization in TiO2 Thin Film Prepared by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Tamio; Koie, Ryousuke; Masuda, Toshiro; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Shuichi

    2009-03-01

    Preparations and structural studies of TiO2 thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (CVD) (hot-filament CVD) are reported for the first time. Titanium tetra-isopropoxide [Ti(OC3H7)4] was used as a source gas and decomposed on a heated rhenium filament. The film deposited at the filament temperature (Tf) of 1300 °C shows amorphous structure with the substrate temperature (Ts) of 300 °C, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks originated from nano-crystalline with anatase structure appeared over Ts of 400-700 °C. The optical band gap energies of the nano-crystalline TiO2 films with anatase structure were ˜3.4 eV. An increase of Ts from 400 to 700 °C enhanced the XRD peak intensity of (112) orientation. Meanwhile, an increase of Tf up to 1500 °C induces nano-crystalline TiO2 with rutile structure. Furthermore, the hydrogen dilution realizes the nano-crystallite growth of rutile structure even in the deposition at Tf = 1300 °C. During this deposition, the actual substrate surface temperature (Tsuf) was 305 °C. In bulk TiO2 materials, the anatase structure changes to the rutile structure by thermal annealing up to about 800 °C. We propose for the first time that atomic hydrogen contributes to the low temperature nucleation of rutile structure in the deposition of oxide system, TiO2 films.

  16. Benchmark values of chemical potential and chemical hardness for atoms and atomic ions (including unstable anions) from the energies of isoelectronic series.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Carlos; Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-09-14

    We present benchmark values for the electronic chemical potential and chemical hardness from reference data for ionization potentials and electron affinities. In cases where the energies needed to compute these quantities are not available, we estimate the ionization potential of the metastable (di)anions by extrapolation along the isoelectronic series, taking care to ensure that the extrapolated data satisfy reasonable intuitive rules to the maximum possible extent. We also propose suitable values for the chemical potential and chemical hardness of zero-electron species. Because the values we report are faithful to the trends in accurate data on atomic energies, we believe that our proposed values for the chemical potential and chemical hardness are ideally suited to conceptual studies of chemical trends across the periodic table. The critical nuclear charge (Z critical) of the isoelectronic series with 2 < N < 96 has also been reported for the first time.

  17. Unraveling the complex chemistry using dimethylsilane as a precursor gas in hot wire chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Toukabri, Rim; Shi, Yujun

    2014-05-07

    The gas-phase reaction chemistry when using dimethylsilane (DMS) as a source gas in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has been studied in this work. The complex chemistry is unraveled by using a soft 10.5 eV single photon ionization technique coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry in combination with the isotope labelling and chemical trapping methods. It has been demonstrated that both free-radical reactions and those involving silylene/silene intermediates are important. The reaction chemistry is characterized by the formation of 1,1,2,2-tetramethyldisilane (TMDS) from dimethylsilylene insertion into the Si-H bond of DMS, trimethylsilane (TriMS) from free-radical recombination, and 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane (DMDSCB) from the self dimerization of either dimethylsilylene or 1-methylsilene. At low filament temperatures and short reaction time, silylene chemistry dominates. The free-radical reactions become more important with increasing temperature and time. The same three products have been detected when using tantalum and tungsten filaments, indicating that changing the filament material from Ta to W does not affect much the gas-phase reaction chemistry when using DMS as a source gas in a hot-wire CVD reactor.

  18. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is it Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Mercè; Adúriz-Bravo, Agustín

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process of evidence construction, new contributions from physicists and physical chemists that were incorporated to chemical research acquired ‘chemical’ meaning, since they were related to research questions that genuinely came from chemistry. Conversely, the core ideas of 19th-century chemical atomism, among which we must highlight valence and Mendeleev’s periodic system, provided ‘clues’ for imagining an atom in terms of the elements adjusted to their chemical behaviour, which changed periodically as a function of atomic mass. With this, chemistry ceased to be a descriptive science and began to be a ‘law-based’, theoretical science. Little by little, chemistry teaching became the teaching of the internal structure of atoms, which were arranged in the Periodic Table according to criteria and ‘construction rules’ related to quantum mechanics. We pose the question: ‘how can we now teach general chemistry in a way that does not disregard current knowledge about the structure of the atom yet, at the same time, gives priority to chemical criteria, thus making such structure useful to interpret chemical change?’.

  19. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in two hot pepper cultivars differing in cadmium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Junliang; Huang, Baifei

    2014-01-15

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to compare the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in roots, stems, leaves, and fruits between a low-Cd cultivar (Yeshengchaotianjiao, YCT) and a high-Cd cultivar (Jinfuzaohuangjiao, JFZ) of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The Cd concentrations in the root's subcellular fractions, and in all chemical forms in roots, were 1.85-4.88- and 1.84-4.90-fold higher, respectively, in YCT than in JFZ. Compared with JFZ, YCT had significantly lower Cd concentrations in the subcellular fractions (1.10-2.42-fold) of stems and leaves and in almost all chemical forms (1.17-2.97-fold) in the stems and leaves. Also, in fruits, the concentrations of Cd in the cell wall and soluble fractions were 1.18-2.24-fold significantly lower in YCT than in JFZ, and there were lower Cd concentrations (1.36-2.08-fold) in the chemical forms in YCT than in JFZ.

  20. The chemical structure of a molecule resolved by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Moll, Nikolaj; Liljeroth, Peter; Meyer, Gerhard

    2009-08-28

    Resolving individual atoms has always been the ultimate goal of surface microscopy. The scanning tunneling microscope images atomic-scale features on surfaces, but resolving single atoms within an adsorbed molecule remains a great challenge because the tunneling current is primarily sensitive to the local electron density of states close to the Fermi level. We demonstrate imaging of molecules with unprecedented atomic resolution by probing the short-range chemical forces with use of noncontact atomic force microscopy. The key step is functionalizing the microscope's tip apex with suitable, atomically well-defined terminations, such as CO molecules. Our experimental findings are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. Comparison with theory shows that Pauli repulsion is the source of the atomic resolution, whereas van der Waals and electrostatic forces only add a diffuse attractive background.

  1. Measurement of Fluorine Atom Concentrations and Reaction Rates in Chemical Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    AD-A1RA 070 AERODYNEERESEARCHUINC BEDFORDM MA F/6_20/5 MEASURE MENT OF FLUORINE ATOM CONCENTRATIONS AND REACTION RATFS -ETC(U) SEP_ A A C STANT ON...0772 LEVELIg 00 ~ARI-RR-272 cO0 MEASUREMENT OF FLUORINE ATOM CONCENTRATIONS AND REACTION RATES IN CHEMICAL LASER SYSTEMS ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT by...MEASUREMENT OF FLUORINE ATOM CONCENTRATIONS AND Annual Report REACTION RATES IN CHEMICAL LASER SYSTEMS 23 July 1980 - 23 July 1981 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  2. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  3. Chemical analysis of impurity boron atoms in diamond using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D

    2008-07-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  4. Deciphering chemical order/disorder and material properties at the single-atom level

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yongsoo; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; ...

    2017-02-01

    The properties and functionalities of materials are strongly influenced by the three-dimensional (3D) arrangements of atoms and defects. Correlating 3D atomic structure and chemical order/disorder with material properties is essential to understand microscopic mechanisms and engineer new materials. Here, we use iron-platinum nanoparticles as a model system to reveal chemical order/disorder and magnetic properties at the single-atom level. We also determined the 3D coordinates of 6,569 iron and 16,627 platinum atoms in an iron-platinum nanoparticle with 22pm precision. We identified rich structural variety and chemical order/disorder including 3D grains with different compositions, orientations, anti-phase boundaries, anti-site point defects and swapmore » defects. We show for the first time that measured 3D atomic coordinates and chemical species with defects can be used as direct input for density functional theory calculations of material properties such as local magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This work not only opens the door to determining the 3D chemical order/disorder of a wide range of nanostructured materials with atomic resolution, but also promises to understand structure-property relationships at the most fundamental scale.« less

  5. Neutral atom analyzers for diagnosing hot plasmas: A review of research at the ioffe physicotechnical institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.

    2009-07-01

    Research on neutral particle diagnostics of thermonuclear plasmas that has been carried out in recent years at the Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (St. Petersburg, Russia) is reviewed. Work on the creation and improvement of neutral atom analyzers was done in two directions: for potential applications (in particular, on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which is now under construction at Cadarache in France) and for investigation of the ion plasma component in various devices (in particular, in the largest tokamaks, such as JET, TFTR, and JT-60). Neutral atom analyzers are the main tool for studying the behavior of hydrogen ions and isotopes in magnetic confinement systems. They make it possible to determine energy spectra, to perform the isotope analysis of atom fluxes from the plasma, to measure the absolute intensity of the fluxes, and to record how these parameters vary with time. A comparative description of the analyzers developed in recent years at the Ioffe Institute is given. These are ACORD-12/24 analyzers for recording 0.2-100-keV hydrogen and deuterium atoms with a tunable range of simultaneously measured energies, CNPA compact analyzers for a fixed energy gain in the ranges 80-1000 eV and 0.8-100 keV, an ISEP analyzer for simultaneously recording the atoms of all the three hydrogen isotopes (H, D, and T) in the energy range 5-700 keV, and GEMMA analyzers for recording atom fluxes of hydrogen and helium isotopes in the range 0.1-4 MeV. The scintillating detectors of the ISEP and GEMMA analyzers have a lowered sensitivity to neutrons and thus can operate without additional shielding in neutron fields of up to 109 n/(cm2 s). These two types of analyzers, intended to operate under deuterium-tritium plasma conditions, are prototypes of atom analyzers created at the Ioffe Institute for use in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. With these analyzers, a number of new results have been

  6. Neutral atom analyzers for diagnosing hot plasmas: A review of research at the ioffe physicotechnical institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.

    2009-07-15

    Research on neutral particle diagnostics of thermonuclear plasmas that has been carried out in recent years at the Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (St. Petersburg, Russia) is reviewed. Work on the creation and improvement of neutral atom analyzers was done in two directions: for potential applications (in particular, on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which is now under construction at Cadarache in France) and for investigation of the ion plasma component in various devices (in particular, in the largest tokamaks, such as JET, TFTR, and JT-60). Neutral atom analyzers are the main tool for studying the behavior of hydrogen ions and isotopes in magnetic confinement systems. They make it possible to determine energy spectra, to perform the isotope analysis of atom fluxes from the plasma, to measure the absolute intensity of the fluxes, and to record how these parameters vary with time. A comparative description of the analyzers developed in recent years at the Ioffe Institute is given. These are ACORD-12/24 analyzers for recording 0.2-100-keV hydrogen and deuterium atoms with a tunable range of simultaneously measured energies, CNPA compact analyzers for a fixed energy gain in the ranges 80-1000 eV and 0.8-100 keV, an ISEP analyzer for simultaneously recording the atoms of all the three hydrogen isotopes (H, D, and T) in the energy range 5-700 keV, and GEMMA analyzers for recording atom fluxes of hydrogen and helium isotopes in the range 0.1-4 MeV. The scintillating detectors of the ISEP and GEMMA analyzers have a lowered sensitivity to neutrons and thus can operate without additional shielding in neutron fields of up to 10{sup 9} n/(cm{sup 2} s). These two types of analyzers, intended to operate under deuterium-tritium plasma conditions, are prototypes of atom analyzers created at the Ioffe Institute for use in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. With these analyzers, a number of new results

  7. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  8. Fabrication of commercial-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.R. . New Products Dept.)

    1992-11-01

    Goal was to fabricate a filter for removing particulates from hot gases; principal applications would be in advanced utility processes such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion or coal gasification combined cycle systems. Filters were made in two steps: make a ceramic fiber preform and coat it with SiC by chemical vapor infiltration (CVD). The most promising construction was felt/filament wound. Light, tough ceramic composite filters can be made; reinforcement by continuous fibers is needed to avoid brittleness. Direct metal to filter contact does not damage the top which simplifies installation. However, much of the filter surface of felt/filament wound structures is closed over by the CVD coating, and the surface is rough and subject to delamination. Recommendations are given for improving the filters.

  9. Thermoelectric Power of Nanocrystalline Silicon Prepared by Hot-Wire Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Brian; Liu, Xiao; Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Queen, Daniel; Metcalf, Thomas; Culbertson, James; Chervin, Christopher; Stroud, Rhonda; Nemeth, William; Wang, Qi

    Although doped bulk silicon possesses a favorable Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, its thermal conductivity is too large for practical thermoelectric applications. Thin film nanocrystalline silicon prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition (HWCVD) is an established material used in multijunction amorphous silicon solar cells. Its potential in low cost and scalable thermoelectric applications depends on achieving a low thermal conductivity without sacrificing thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity. We examine the thermoelectric power of boron-doped HWCVD nanocrystalline silicon and find that it is comparable to doped nanostructured silicon alloys prepared by other methods. Given the low thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity of these materials, they can achieve a high thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  10. SELECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSES AND GEOTHERMOMETRY OF HOT SPRING WATERS FROM THE CALABOZOS CALDERA, CENTRAL CHILE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Grunder, A.L.; Hildreth, Wes

    1983-01-01

    Hot springs discharging from the active hydrothermal system associated with the Calabozos caldera, Chile, have measured orifice temperatures as high as 98. 5 degree C and calculated geothermometer temperatures as high as 250 degree C. Three types of spring waters can be identified from the chemical analyses: a Na-Cl type, a Na-HCO//3 type and a Na-mixed anion type. Chloride-enthalpy relations indicate that the hydrothermal reservoir water may attain temperatures near 342 degree C and that most spring waters are mixed with cold meteoric water. Despite the proximity of Mesozoic marine gypsum deposits, the Cl/Br weight ratio of the Calabozos spring waters does not appear to indicate that these waters have a significant 'marine' signature. Refs.

  11. Non-classical crystallization of silicon thin films during hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Da-Seul; Kim, Kun-Su; Park, Soon-Won; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The deposition behavior of silicon films by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was approached by non-classical crystallization, where the building block of deposition is a nanoparticle generated in the gas phase of the reactor. The puzzling phenomenon of the formation of an amorphous incubation layer on glass could be explained by the liquid-like property of small charged nanoparticles (CNPs), which are generated in the initial stage of the HWCVD process. Using the liquid-like property of small CNPs, homo-epitaxial growth as thick as 150 nm could be successfully grown on a silicon wafer at 600 °C under the processing condition where CNPs as small as possible could be supplied steadily by a cyclic process which periodically resets the process. The size of CNPs turned out to be an important parameter in the microstructure evolution of thin films.

  12. Fabrication of commercial-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.R.

    1992-11-01

    Goal was to fabricate a filter for removing particulates from hot gases; principal applications would be in advanced utility processes such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion or coal gasification combined cycle systems. Filters were made in two steps: make a ceramic fiber preform and coat it with SiC by chemical vapor infiltration (CVD). The most promising construction was felt/filament wound. Light, tough ceramic composite filters can be made; reinforcement by continuous fibers is needed to avoid brittleness. Direct metal to filter contact does not damage the top which simplifies installation. However, much of the filter surface of felt/filament wound structures is closed over by the CVD coating, and the surface is rough and subject to delamination. Recommendations are given for improving the filters.

  13. Growth, delta-doping and characterization of diamond films by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtengi, Bokani

    The synthesis of high-quality heteroepitaxial diamond films continues to attract interesting research possibilities for the development of diamond devices. Diamond has great properties; mechanical, optical, electrical and its natural impurities that can be explored for various applications. The color centers are widely recognized as promising solid-state platform for quantum computing applications. We report successful heteroepitaxial growth and delta doping of color centers in hot filament chemical vapor deposited diamond films composed of nitrogen, germanium and silicon indicated by the strong photoluminescence intensity peaks obtained using the confocal microscope. We studied the effect of hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions on the quality of diamond films grown on silicon and silicon carbide substrates. The effect of substrate distance, the methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases flow rates and ratios, substrate growth and filament temperature, growth time and growth termination procedures on diamond film quality are discussed. The relatively good quality of these films was confirmed by several spectroscopic techniques including, Raman spectroscopy that gave insights into the relative sp2/sp3 bonding configurations, the residual strain and the crystalline quality. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the grain size and morphology. In-situ growth monitoring was studied using the laser reflectance interferometer (LRI) tool, which provides data for thickness, growth rate measurements and guidance for nitrogen doping. Optimal growth conditions that lead to synthesis of high quality heteroepitaxial diamond layer at growth rate of 0.5microm/hr were determined. The delta-doped samples have been analyzed using the confocal optical microscope to measure their spin-dependent photoluminescence intensity (IPL). Electrical properties of the undoped diamond films have been measured using the Hall effects measurement for resistivity and

  14. Role of tip chemical reactivity on atom manipulation process in dynamic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo; Ondráček, Martin; Pou, Pablo; Pérez, Ruben; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-08-27

    The effect of tip chemical reactivity on the lateral manipulation of intrinsic Si adatoms toward a vacancy site on a Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface has been investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy at room temperature. Here we measure the atom-hopping probabilities associated with different manipulation processes as a function of the tip-surface distance by means of constant height scans with chemically different types of tips. The interactions between different tips and Si atoms are evaluated by force spectroscopic measurements. Our results demonstrate that the ability to manipulate Si adatoms depends extremely on the chemical nature of the tip apex and is correlated with the maximal attractive force measured over Si adatoms. We rationalize the observed dependence of the atom manipulation process on tip-apex chemical reactivity by means of density functional theory calculations. The results of these calculations suggest that the ability to reduce the energy barrier associated with the Si adatom movement depends profoundly on tip chemical reactivity and that the level of energy barrier reduction is higher with tips that exhibit high chemical reactivity with Si adatoms. The results of this study provide a better way to control the efficiency of the atomic manipulation process for chemisorption systems.

  15. Chemical mapping of mammalian cells by atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Kedar; Prosa, Ty; Fu, Jing; Kelly, Thomas F; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), a technique that has been used to determine 3D maps of ion compositions of metals and semiconductors at sub-nanometer resolution, controlled emissions of ions can be induced from needle-shaped specimens in the vicinity of a strong electric field. Detection of these ions in the plane of a position sensitive detector provides two-dimensional compositional information while the sequence of ion arrival at the detector provides information in the third dimension. However, the applicability of APT to imaging unstained cells has not been explored. Here, we report the use of APT to obtain 3D spatial distributions of cellular ions and metabolites from unstained, freeze-dried mammalian cells. Multiple peaks were reliably obtained in the mass spectrum from tips with diameters of ~ 50 nm and heights of ~ 200 nm, with mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) ranging from 1 to 80. Peaks at m/z 12, 23, 28 and 39, corresponding to carbon, sodium, carbonyl and potassium ions respectively, showed distinct patterns of spatial distribution within the cell. Our studies establish that APT could become a powerful tool for mapping the sub-cellular distribution of atomic species, such as labeled metabolites, at 3D spatial resolutions as high as ~ 1 nm. PMID:22245777

  16. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  17. Hydrogen atom initiated chemistry. [chemical evolution in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. H.; Becker, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    H Atoms have been created by the photolysis of H2S. These then initiated reactions in mixtures involving acetylene-ammonia-water and ethylene-ammonia-water. In the case of the acetylene system, the products consisted of two amino acids, ethylene and a group of primarily cyclic thio-compounds, but no free sulfur. In the case of the ethylene systems, seven amino acids, including an aromatic one, ethane, free sulfur, and a group of solely linear thio-compounds were produced. Total quantum yields for the production of amino acids were about 3 x 10 to the -5th and about 2 x 10 to the -4th with ethylene and acetylene respectively as carbon substrates. Consideration is given of the mechanism for the formation of some of the products and implications regarding planetary atmosphere chemistry, particularly that of Jupiter, are explored.

  18. Hydrogen atom initiated chemistry. [chemical evolution in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. H.; Becker, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    H Atoms have been created by the photolysis of H2S. These then initiated reactions in mixtures involving acetylene-ammonia-water and ethylene-ammonia-water. In the case of the acetylene system, the products consisted of two amino acids, ethylene and a group of primarily cyclic thio-compounds, but no free sulfur. In the case of the ethylene systems, seven amino acids, including an aromatic one, ethane, free sulfur, and a group of solely linear thio-compounds were produced. Total quantum yields for the production of amino acids were about 3 x 10 to the -5th and about 2 x 10 to the -4th with ethylene and acetylene respectively as carbon substrates. Consideration is given of the mechanism for the formation of some of the products and implications regarding planetary atmosphere chemistry, particularly that of Jupiter, are explored.

  19. Deducing chemical structure from crystallographically determined atomic coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Ian J.; Shields, Gregory P.; Taylor, Robin

    2011-01-01

    An improved algorithm has been developed for assigning chemical structures to incoming entries to the Cambridge Structural Database, using only the information available in the deposited CIF. Steps in the algorithm include detection of bonds, selection of polymer unit, resolution of disorder, and assignment of bond types and formal charges. The chief difficulty is posed by the large number of metallo-organic crystal structures that must be processed, given our aspiration that assigned chemical structures should accurately reflect properties such as the oxidation states of metals and redox-active ligands, metal coordination numbers and hapticities, and the aromaticity or otherwise of metal ligands. Other complications arise from disorder, especially when it is symmetry imposed or modelled with the SQUEEZE algorithm. Each assigned structure is accompanied by an estimate of reliability and, where necessary, diagnostic information indicating probable points of error. Although the algorithm was written to aid building of the Cambridge Structural Database, it has the potential to develop into a general-purpose tool for adding chemical information to newly determined crystal structures. PMID:21775812

  20. Chemical reactions involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions; Cr203 + 2 Na2S04(1) + 3/2 02 yields 2 Na2Cr04(1) + 2 S03(g)n TiO2 + Na2S04(1) yields Na20(T102)n + 503(g)n T102 + Na2Cro4(1) yields Na2(T102)n + Cr03(g).

  1. Chemical mechanisms and reaction rates for the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions: Cr2O3 + 2 Na2SO4(1) + 3/2 O2 yields 2 Na2CrO4(1) + 2 SO3(g)n TiO2 + Na2SO4(1) yields Na2O(TiO2)n + SO3(g)n TiO2 + Na2CrO4(1) yields Na2O(TiO2)n + CrO3(g).

  2. Photon pair production from a hot atomic ensemble in the diamond configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Richard Thomas

    This thesis discusses four-wave mixing (4WM) in a warm ensemble of rubidium using the diamond configuration level structure. Both classical 4WM and nonclassical photon-pair production are investigated. Quantum information science has spawned a great amount of experimental work on the interaction of light with collective modes of excitation in atomic ensembles. Plans to build quantum networks and quantum repeaters with atom ensembles take advantage of nonlinear interactions to produce and store non-classical states of light. These technologies will require photon sources that not only generate nonclassical light, but also resonant, narrow band light. Here we investigate a system which could be used as such a source. We take advantage of the 4WM interaction in a warm ensemble of Rubidium atoms. Our scheme utilizes the diamond energy level configuration which, in rubidium, allows for correlated pairs at telecommunications wavelengths. We start by examining the properties of classical 4WM in the system. We measure the resonance structure and see that it can be understood in terms of velocity class selective resonant enhancement and power splitting effects. The efficiency of the process is low and limited by linear absorption of the pumps. Our observations agree with a semi-classical Maxwell-Bloch theoretical treatment. Next we observe pair generation by spontaneous 4WM from the warm ensemble. The temporal profile of the cross-correlation function (CCF) for the photons depends on pump-laser power and detuning. This allows us to produce biphotons with controllable spectra. A simple quantum optical theoretical treatment based on linear filtering gives qualitative agreement with the data. We show that the photon pairs are polarization entangled, clearly violating Bell's Inequality. A perturbative quantum optical treatment predicts the polarization state of the pairs and agrees with our measurements. We analyze the photon statistics of the source and find the largest

  3. Reaction rate of H atoms with N2O in hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Leanne; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Bartels, David M.

    2017-06-01

    The rate constant of H• atoms with N2O in water has been measured by a competition method up to 300 °C. Radiolysis with 2.5 MeV electrons generated H• atoms, and the HD product from their reaction with deuterated tetrahydrofuran (THF-d8) was measured with mass spectroscopy. The concentration of THF-d8 was changed by an order of magnitude in the presence of 25 mM N2O to obtain the ratio of rate constants. To determine the rate constant of H• with THF-d8, a similar competition vs. 0.2 mM OH- ion was also measured. The reaction rate of H• with OH- has been accurately determined vs. temperature in previous work, allowing the two unknown rate constants to be deduced. Rate constant of H• with THF-d8 follows the Arrhenius law ln(k/M-1s-1)=27.33 - (32.30 kJ/mol)/RT. Rate constant of H• with N2O follows the Arrhenius law ln(k/M-1s-1)=24.50 - (30.42 kJ/mol)/RT. In all likelihood, the N2O reaction proceeds via cis-HNNO• radical intermediate as in the gas phase, but with participation of a bridging water molecule in the 1,3 hydrogen shift to form N2 and •OH products.

  4. Deciphering chemical order/disorder and material properties at the single-atom level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongsoo; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; Ophus, Colin; Xu, Rui; Pryor, Alan; Wu, Li; Sun, Fan; Theis, Wolfgang; Zhou, Jihan; Eisenbach, Markus; Kent, Paul R. C.; Sabirianov, Renat F.; Zeng, Hao; Ercius, Peter; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Perfect crystals are rare in nature. Real materials often contain crystal defects and chemical order/disorder such as grain boundaries, dislocations, interfaces, surface reconstructions and point defects. Such disruption in periodicity strongly affects material properties and functionality. Despite rapid development of quantitative material characterization methods, correlating three-dimensional (3D) atomic arrangements of chemical order/disorder and crystal defects with material properties remains a challenge. On a parallel front, quantum mechanics calculations such as density functional theory (DFT) have progressed from the modelling of ideal bulk systems to modelling ‘real’ materials with dopants, dislocations, grain boundaries and interfaces; but these calculations rely heavily on average atomic models extracted from crystallography. To improve the predictive power of first-principles calculations, there is a pressing need to use atomic coordinates of real systems beyond average crystallographic measurements. Here we determine the 3D coordinates of 6,569 iron and 16,627 platinum atoms in an iron-platinum nanoparticle, and correlate chemical order/disorder and crystal defects with material properties at the single-atom level. We identify rich structural variety with unprecedented 3D detail including atomic composition, grain boundaries, anti-phase boundaries, anti-site point defects and swap defects. We show that the experimentally measured coordinates and chemical species with 22 picometre precision can be used as direct input for DFT calculations of material properties such as atomic spin and orbital magnetic moments and local magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This work combines 3D atomic structure determination of crystal defects with DFT calculations, which is expected to advance our understanding of structure-property relationships at the fundamental level.

  5. Deciphering chemical order/disorder and material properties at the single-atom level.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongsoo; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Ophus, Colin; Xu, Rui; Pryor, Alan; Wu, Li; Sun, Fan; Theis, Wolfgang; Zhou, Jihan; Eisenbach, Markus; Kent, Paul R C; Sabirianov, Renat F; Zeng, Hao; Ercius, Peter; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Perfect crystals are rare in nature. Real materials often contain crystal defects and chemical order/disorder such as grain boundaries, dislocations, interfaces, surface reconstructions and point defects. Such disruption in periodicity strongly affects material properties and functionality. Despite rapid development of quantitative material characterization methods, correlating three-dimensional (3D) atomic arrangements of chemical order/disorder and crystal defects with material properties remains a challenge. On a parallel front, quantum mechanics calculations such as density functional theory (DFT) have progressed from the modelling of ideal bulk systems to modelling 'real' materials with dopants, dislocations, grain boundaries and interfaces; but these calculations rely heavily on average atomic models extracted from crystallography. To improve the predictive power of first-principles calculations, there is a pressing need to use atomic coordinates of real systems beyond average crystallographic measurements. Here we determine the 3D coordinates of 6,569 iron and 16,627 platinum atoms in an iron-platinum nanoparticle, and correlate chemical order/disorder and crystal defects with material properties at the single-atom level. We identify rich structural variety with unprecedented 3D detail including atomic composition, grain boundaries, anti-phase boundaries, anti-site point defects and swap defects. We show that the experimentally measured coordinates and chemical species with 22 picometre precision can be used as direct input for DFT calculations of material properties such as atomic spin and orbital magnetic moments and local magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This work combines 3D atomic structure determination of crystal defects with DFT calculations, which is expected to advance our understanding of structure-property relationships at the fundamental level.

  6. Chemical alteration and REE mobilization in meteorites from hot and cold deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crozaz, Ghislaine; Floss, Christine; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2003-12-01

    The effects of terrestrial weathering on REE mobilization are evaluated for a variety of uncommon meteorites found in Antarctica and in hot deserts. The meteorites analyzed include 7 non-cumulate eucrites, 10 shergottites, 3 nakhlites, 2 lunar meteorites, 4 angrites, 10 acapulcoites, 1 winonaite, and 1 brachinite. In-situ concentration measurements of lanthanides and selected other minor and trace elements were made on individual grains by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In Antarctic meteorites, oxidation converts Ce 3+ to Ce 4+, which is less soluble than the trivalent REE, resulting in Ce anomalies. The mineral most affected is low-Ca pyroxene. However, not all grains of a given mineral are, and distinct analyses of a single grain can even yield REE patterns with and without Ce anomalies. The effect is most pronounced for Antarctic eucrites in which Ce anomalies are observed not only in individual minerals but also in whole rock samples. Although Ce anomalies are observed in meteorites from hot deserts as well, the most characteristic signs of chemical alteration in this environment are a LREE enrichment with a typical crustal signature, as well as Sr, Ba and U contaminations. These can modify the whole rock REE patterns and disturb the isotope systematics used to date these objects. The LREE contamination is highly heterogeneous, affecting some grains and not others of a given mineral (mainly olivine and low-Ca pyroxene, the two minerals with the lowest REE concentrations). The major conduit for REE movement is through shock-induced cracks and defects, and the highest levels of contamination are found in altered material filling such veins and cracks. Meteorites that experienced low shock levels and those that are highly recrystallized are the least altered.

  7. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Alloyeau, D.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C.

    2012-09-17

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  8. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloyeau, D.; Oikawa, T.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C.

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  9. Determining Chemically and Spatially Resolved Atomic Profile of Low Contrast Interface Structure with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Maheswar; Pradhan, P. C.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present precise measurements of atomic distributions of low electron density contrast at a buried interface using soft x-ray resonant scattering. This approach allows one to construct chemically and spatially highly resolved atomic distribution profile upto several tens of nanometer in a non-destructive and quantitative manner. We demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to resolve compositional differences of few atomic percent in nano-scaled layered structures of elements with poor electron density differences (0.05%). The present study near the edge of potential impurities in soft x-ray range for low-Z system will stimulate the activity in that field. PMID:25726866

  10. Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/β-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu; Bian, Jiming; Zhang, Dong; Miao, Lihua

    2013-11-18

    β-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown β-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/β-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

  11. Chemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas compositions of the hot springs of the Owyhee Uplands, Malheur County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Young, H.W.; Evans, William C.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    Hot springs along the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon between Three Forks and Lake Owyhee could be part of a north flowing regional system or a series of small separate geothermal systems Heat for the waters could be from a very young (Holocene) volcanic activity (basalt flows) of the Owyhee Uplands or the regional heat flow. The springs discharge warm to hot, dilute, slightly alkaline, sodium bicarbonate water. Chemically they are similar to the dilute thermal water at Bruneau Grand View and Twin Falls, Idaho. Maximum aquifer temperatures in the Owyhee Uplands, estimated from chemical geothermometry, are about 100°C. Dissolved helium concentrations, carbon 14 activity, and chemical and isotope data are examined fro systematic trends which would indicate a geothermal system of regional extent.

  12. Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Van Benthem, Mark; Xiong, Jie; Jia, Quanxi

    2013-04-29

    Atomic-scale quantification of chemical composition across oxide interfaces is important for understanding physical properties of epitaxial oxide nanostructures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to quantify chemical composition across the interface of ferromagnetic La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and antiferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} quantum structure. This research demonstrates that chemical composition at atomic columns can be quantified by Gaussian peak-fitting of EDS compositional profiles across the interface. Cation diffusion was observed at both A- and B-sublattice sites; and asymmetric chemical profiles exist across the interface, consistent with the previous studies.

  13. Ultrafast formation of interlayer hot excitons in atomically thin MoS2/WS2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Tianmin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jiangtan; Yi, Chongyue; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Guangyu; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-08-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures composed of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides layers have recently emerged as a new family of materials, with great potential for atomically thin opto-electronic and photovoltaic applications. It is puzzling, however, that the photocurrent is yielded so efficiently in these structures, despite the apparent momentum mismatch between the intralayer/interlayer excitons during the charge transfer, as well as the tightly bound nature of the excitons in 2D geometry. Using the energy-state-resolved ultrafast visible/infrared microspectroscopy, we herein obtain unambiguous experimental evidence of the charge transfer intermediate state with excess energy, during the transition from an intralayer exciton to an interlayer exciton at the interface of a WS2/MoS2 heterostructure, and free carriers moving across the interface much faster than recombining into the intralayer excitons. The observations therefore explain how the remarkable charge transfer rate and photocurrent generation are achieved even with the aforementioned momentum mismatch and excitonic localization in 2D heterostructures and devices.

  14. Ultrafast formation of interlayer hot excitons in atomically thin MoS2/WS2 heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Tianmin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jiangtan; Yi, Chongyue; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Guangyu; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures composed of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides layers have recently emerged as a new family of materials, with great potential for atomically thin opto-electronic and photovoltaic applications. It is puzzling, however, that the photocurrent is yielded so efficiently in these structures, despite the apparent momentum mismatch between the intralayer/interlayer excitons during the charge transfer, as well as the tightly bound nature of the excitons in 2D geometry. Using the energy-state-resolved ultrafast visible/infrared microspectroscopy, we herein obtain unambiguous experimental evidence of the charge transfer intermediate state with excess energy, during the transition from an intralayer exciton to an interlayer exciton at the interface of a WS2/MoS2 heterostructure, and free carriers moving across the interface much faster than recombining into the intralayer excitons. The observations therefore explain how the remarkable charge transfer rate and photocurrent generation are achieved even with the aforementioned momentum mismatch and excitonic localization in 2D heterostructures and devices. PMID:27539942

  15. Controlled growth of high-quality graphene using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, N.; Vadivel, B.; Rao, D. V. Sridhara; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2016-11-01

    High-quality graphene was grown on polycrystalline copper (Cu) foils (1 cm × 1 cm) using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition method. The role of process parameters such as gas flow rates (methane and hydrogen), growth temperatures (filament and substrate) and durations on the growth of graphene was studied. The process parameters were also optimized to grow monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene in a controlled manner, and a growth mechanism was deduced from the experimental results. The presence of graphene on Cu foils was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. FESEM micrographs clearly showed that the graphene starts nucleating as hexagonal islands and later evolves as dendritic lobe-shaped islands with an increase in supersaturation. The TEM images substantiate the growth of monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene. The I 2D/ I G ratio = 2 confirmed the presence of the monolayer graphene and the absence of `D' peak in the Raman spectrum indicated the high purity of graphene grown on Cu foils. These results also show that the polycrystalline copper foil morphology has negligible effect on the growth of monolayer graphene.

  16. Fast Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Crystalline Materials and Dynamic Phase Transformations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Ren Liang; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Spoerke, Erik David; Pan, Wei; Zuo, Jian Min

    2016-04-13

    Atomic-scale phenomena fundamentally influence materials form and function that makes the ability to locally probe and study these processes critical to advancing our understanding and development of materials. Atomic-scale chemical imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a powerful approach to investigate solid crystal structures. Inefficient X-ray emission and collection, however, require long acquisition times (typically hundreds of seconds), making the technique incompatible with electron-beam sensitive materials and study of dynamic material phenomena. Here we describe an atomic-scale STEM-EDS chemical imaging technique that decreases the acquisition time to as little as one second, a reduction of more than 100 times. We demonstrate this new approach using LaAlO3 single crystal and study dynamic phase transformation in beam-sensitive Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) lithium ion battery cathode material. By capturing a series of time-lapsed chemical maps, we show for the first time clear atomic-scale evidence of preferred Ni-mobility in LNMO transformation, revealing new kinetic mechanisms. These examples highlight the potential of this approach toward temporal, atomic-scale mapping of crystal structure and chemistry for investigating dynamic material phenomena.

  17. Single atom hot-spots at Au-Pd nanoalloys for electrocatalytic H2O2 production.

    PubMed

    Jirkovský, Jakub S; Panas, Itai; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Halasa, Matej; Romani, Simon; Schiffrin, David J

    2011-12-07

    A novel strategy to direct the oxygen reduction reaction to preferentially produce H(2)O(2) is formulated and evaluated. The approach combines the inertness of Au nanoparticles toward oxidation, with the improved O(2) sticking probability of isolated transition metal "guest" atoms embedded in the Au "host". DFT modeling was employed to screen for the best alloy candidates. Modeling indicates that isolated alloying atoms of Pd, Pt, or Rh placed within the Au surface should enhance the H(2)O(2) production relative to pure Au. Consequently, Au(1-x)Pd(x) nanoalloys with variable Pd content supported on Vulcan XC-72 were prepared to investigate the predicted selectivity toward H(2)O(2) production for Au alloyed with Pd. It is demonstrated that increasing the Pd concentration to 8% leads to an increase of the electrocatalytic H(2)O(2) production selectivity up to nearly 95%, when the nanoparticles are placed in an environment compatible with that of a proton exchange membrane. Further increase of Pd content leads to a drop in H(2)O(2) selectivity, to below 10% for x = 0.5. It is proposed that the enhancement in H(2)O(2) selectivity is caused by the presence of individual surface Pd atoms surrounded by gold, whereas surface ensembles of contiguous Pd atoms support H(2)O formation. The results are discussed in the context of exergonic electrocatalytic H(2)O(2) synthesis in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells for the simultaneous cogeneration of chemicals and electricity, the latter a credit to production costs.

  18. Revealing the angular symmetry of chemical bonds by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welker, Joachim; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-04-27

    We have measured the angular dependence of chemical bonding forces between a carbon monoxide molecule that is adsorbed to a copper surface and the terminal atom of the metallic tip of a combined scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope. We provide tomographic maps of force and current as a function of distance that revealed the emergence of strongly directional chemical bonds as tip and sample approach. The force maps show pronounced single, dual, or triple minima depending on the orientation of the tip atom, whereas tunneling current maps showed a single minimum for all three tip conditions. We introduce an angular dependent model for the bonding energy that maps the observed experimental data for all observed orientations and distances.

  19. Inelastic processes in atomic, molecular and chemical physics (in honour of Andrey K. Belyaev)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.; Tscherbul, Timur V.

    2015-11-01

    This Special Issue is dedicated to Professor Andrey K. Belyaev, on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in celebration of his productive career in theoretical atomic, molecular, and chemical physics. It brings together 12 research studies of Inelastic Processes in Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics, a research area where Andrey himself made significant contributions. Inelastic processes are central to many different areas of physics, including atmospheric physics, astrophysics, and plasma physics to name a few, as well as in related technological applications such as lasers and fusion reactors. Quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of inelastic processes in atoms and molecules is therefore a problem of fundamental importance in physics, astrophysics, and chemistry. It is precisely this challenging problem that Andrey's research addresses using a broad arsenal of theoretical tools and techniques.

  20. Chemical bond imaging using higher eigenmodes of tuning fork sensors in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Daniel; Zhong, Qigang; Ahles, Sebastian; Chi, Lifeng; Wegner, Hermann A.; Schirmeisen, André

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the ability of resolving the chemical structure of single organic molecules using non-contact atomic force microscopy with higher normal eigenmodes of quartz tuning fork sensors. In order to achieve submolecular resolution, CO-functionalized tips at low temperatures are used. The tuning fork sensors are operated in ultrahigh vacuum in the frequency modulation mode by exciting either their first or second eigenmode. Despite the high effective spring constant of the second eigenmode (on the order of several tens of kN/m), the force sensitivity is sufficiently high to achieve atomic resolution above the organic molecules. This is observed for two different tuning fork sensors with different tip geometries (small tip vs. large tip). These results represent an important step towards resolving the chemical structure of single molecules with multifrequency atomic force microscopy techniques where two or more eigenmodes are driven simultaneously.

  1. Metal oxide nanoparticle growth on graphene via chemical activation with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Johns, James E; Alaboson, Justice M P; Patwardhan, Sameer; Ryder, Christopher R; Schatz, George C; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-12-04

    Chemically interfacing the inert basal plane of graphene with other materials has limited the development of graphene-based catalysts, composite materials, and devices. Here, we overcome this limitation by chemically activating epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) using atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen produces epoxide groups on graphene, which act as reactive nucleation sites for zinc oxide nanoparticle growth using the atomic layer deposition precursor diethyl zinc. In particular, exposure of epoxidized graphene to diethyl zinc abstracts oxygen, creating mobile species that diffuse on the surface to form metal oxide clusters. This mechanism is corroborated with a combination of scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory and can likely be generalized to a wide variety of related surface reactions on graphene.

  2. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  3. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  4. Assessing Mixing Quality of a Copovidone-TPGS Hot Melt Extrusion Process with Atomic Force Microscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Matthew S; DiNunzio, James; Khawaja, Nazia N; Crocker, Louis S; Pecora, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) were used to evaluate the extent of mixing of a hot melt extrusion process for producing solid dispersions of copovidone and D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS 1000). In addition to composition, extrusion process parameters of screw speed and thermal quench rate were varied. The data indicated that for 10% TPGS and 300 rpm screw speed, the mixing was insufficient to yield a single-phase amorphous material. AFM images of the extrudate cross section for air-cooled material indicate round domains 200 to 700 nm in diameter without any observed alignment resulting from the extrusion whereas domains in extrudate subjected to chilled rolls were elliptical in shape with uniform orientation. Thermal analysis indicated that the domains were predominantly semi-crystalline TPGS. For 10% TPGS and 600 rpm screw speed, AFM and mDSC data were consistent with that of a single-phase amorphous material for both thermal quench rates examined. When the TPGS concentration was reduced to 5%, a single-phase amorphous material was achieved for all conditions even the slowest screw speed studied (150 rpm).

  5. He-Ion and Self-Atom Induced Damage and Surface-Morphology Changes of a Hot W Target

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Hijazi, Hussein Dib; Krstic, Predrag S; Dadras, Mostafa Jonny; Meyer III, Harry M; Parish, Chad M; Bannister, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80 12,000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF), while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundreds impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in FIB/SEM scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased.

  6. Development Of Hot Surface Polysilicon-Based Chemical Sensor And Actuator With Integrated Catalytic Micropatterns For Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagina, E.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.

    2009-05-01

    Over the last twenty years, we have followed a rapid expansion in the development of chemical sensors and microreactors for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds. However, for many of the developed gas sensors poor sensitivity and selectivity, and high-power consumption remain among one of the main drawbacks. One promising approach to increase selectivity at lower power consumption is calorimetric sensing, performed in a pulsed regime and using specific catalytic materials. In this work, we study kinetics of various catalytic oxidation reactions using micromachined hot surface polysilicon-based sensor containing sensitive and selective catalysts. The sensor acts as both thermal actuator of chemical and biochemical reactions on hot-surfaces and detector of heats (enthalpies) associated with these reactions. Using novel deposition techniques we integrated selective catalysts in an array of hot plates such that they can be thermally actuated and sensed individually. This allows selective detection and analysis of dangerous gas compounds in a mixture, specifically hydrocarbons at concentrations down to low ppm level. In this contribution we compare various techniques for the local immobilization of catalytic material on hot spots of the sensor in terms of process compatibility, mechanical stress, stability and cost.

  7. Very thin and stable thin-film silicon alloy triple junction solar cells by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhuizen, L. W.; Schropp, R. E. I.

    2016-08-01

    We present a silicon-based triple junction solar cell that requires a deposition time of less than 15 min for all photoactive layers. As a low-bandgap material, we used thin layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium with lower band gap than commonly used, which is possible due to the application of hot wire chemical vapor deposition. The triple junction cell shows an initial energy conversion efficiency exceeding 10%, and with a relative performance stability within 6%, the cell shows a high tolerance to light-induced degradation. With these results, we help to demonstrate that hot wire chemical vapor deposition is a viable deposition method for the fabrication of low-cost solar cells.

  8. Chemical processes involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium sulfate induced hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA at 900 C was studied with special emphasis on the chemical reactions occurring during and immediately after the induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for set periods of time after which the samples were washed with water and water soluable metal salts and/or residual sulfates were analyzed chemically. Element distributions within the oxide layer were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. A third set of samples were subjected to surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of SO2 was monitored throughout many of the hot corrosion tests. Results are interpreted in terms of acid-base fluxing mechanisms.

  9. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore, the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.

  10. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; ...

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore,more » the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.« less

  11. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu .

  12. Chemical mapping and quantification at the atomic scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng Hsuan

    2013-06-25

    With innovative modern material-growth methods, a broad spectrum of fascinating materials with reduced dimensions-ranging from single-atom catalysts, nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic materials to two-dimensional heterostructural interfaces-is continually emerging and extending the new frontiers of materials research. A persistent central challenge in this grand scientific context has been the detailed characterization of the individual objects in these materials with the highest spatial resolution, a problem prompting the need for experimental techniques that integrate both microscopic and spectroscopic capabilities. To date, several representative microscopy-spectroscopy combinations have become available, such as scanning tunneling microscopy, tip-enhanced scanning optical microscopy, atom probe tomography, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Among these tools, STEM boasts unique chemical and electronic sensitivity at unparalleled resolution. In this Perspective, we elucidate the advances in STEM and chemical mapping applications at the atomic scale by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with a focus on the ultimate challenge of chemical quantification with atomic accuracy.

  13. Determination of hot and cool burning residential wood combustion source strengths using chemical mass balance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.A.; Huntzicker, J.J.; Khalil, M.A.K. )

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares CMB results using separate hot and cool RWC source composition profiles, a composite of hot and cool composition profiles weighted according reported stove usage patterns, and the conventional EPA RWC source composition profile. These profiles are shown. Since the composition of hot and cool burn particles is dramatically different, hot and cool burn composition profiles can be used as separate sources in the same CMB model. Hot burning RWC particles are black, have a mild acrid smell and contain from 20 to 60% carbon (up to 80% of the carbon can be in the form of elemental carbon) and high levels of trace elements (5-25%K, 2-5% S and 2-4% Cl). In contrast, cool or smoldering burn smoke particles are tan, have a strong pleasant wood smoke smell, and contain 55-60% carbon which is mostly in the form of organic carbon with only a few percent of elemental carbon. The concentrations of trace elements in cool burning emissions are generally less than 0.1%. During hot burning the RWC smoke plume is practically invisible, while during cool burning the plume is very visible and has the typical blue-gray color associated with wood burning. For similar amounts of fuel burning in a stove, emission levels for cool burning are an average of 4.8 times higher than for hot burning.

  14. On the chemical ladder of esters. Detection and formation of ethyl formate in the W51 e2 hot molecular core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Fontani, F.; Caselli, P.; Cesaroni, R.

    2017-03-01

    Context. In recent years, the detection of organic molecules with increasing complexity and potential biological relevance is opening the possibility to understand the formation of the building blocks of life in the interstellar medium. One of the families of molecules of substantial astrobiological interest are the esters. The simplest ester, methyl formate (CH3OCHO), is rather abundant in star-forming regions. The next step in the chemical complexity of esters is ethyl formate, C2H5OCHO. Despite the increase in sensitivity of current telescopes, the detection of complex molecules with more than ten atoms such as C2H5OCHO is still a challenge. Only two detections of this species have been reported so far, which strongly limits our understanding of how complex molecules are formed in the interstellar medium. New detections towards additional sources with a wide range of physical conditions are crucial to differentiate between competing chemical models based on dust grain surface and gas-phase chemistry. Aims: We have searched for ethyl formate towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, one of the most chemically rich sources in the Galaxy and one of the most promising regions to study prebiotic chemistry, especially after the recent discovery of the P-O bond, key in the formation of DNA. Methods: We have analyzed a spectral line survey towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, which covers 44 GHz in the 1, 2 and 3 mm bands, carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We report the detection of the trans and gauche conformers of ethyl formate. A local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis indicates that the excitation temperature is 78 ± 10 K and that the two conformers have similar source-averaged column densities of (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-16 cm-2 and an abundance of 10-8. We compare for the first time the observed molecular abundances of ethyl formate with different competing chemical models based on grain surface and gas-phase chemistry. Conclusions: We propose that

  15. The effects of consistent chemical kinetics calculations on the pressure-temperature profiles and emission spectra of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, B.; Tremblin, P.; Baraffe, I.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mayne, N. J.; Venot, O.; Goyal, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of calculating non-equilibrium chemical abundances consistently with the temperature structure for the atmospheres of highly-irradiated, close-in gas giant exoplanets. Chemical kinetics models have been widely used in the literature to investigate the chemical compositions of hot Jupiter atmospheres which are expected to be driven away from chemical equilibrium via processes such as vertical mixing and photochemistry. All of these models have so far used pressure-temperature (P-T) profiles as fixed model input. This results in a decoupling of the chemistry from the radiative and thermal properties of the atmosphere, despite the fact that in nature they are intricately linked. We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model, ATMO, which includes a sophisticated chemistry scheme to calculate P-T profiles which are fully consistent with non-equilibrium chemical abundances, including vertical mixing and photochemistry. Our primary conclusion is that, in cases of strong chemical disequilibrium, consistent calculations can lead to differences in the P-T profile of up to 100 K compared to the P-T profile derived assuming chemical equilibrium. This temperature change can, in turn, have important consequences for the chemical abundances themselves as well as for the simulated emission spectra. In particular, we find that performing the chemical kinetics calculation consistently can reduce the overall impact of non-equilibrium chemistry on the observable emission spectrum of hot Jupiters. Simulated observations derived from non-consistent models could thus yield the wrong interpretation. We show that this behaviour is due to the non-consistent models violating the energy budget balance of the atmosphere.

  16. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperatures for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, R.

    2010-09-01

    The need for large quantities of rapidly and cheaply produced electronic devices has increased rapidly over the past decades. The transistors and diodes that are used to build these devices are predominantly made of crystalline silicon. Since crystalline silicon is very expensive to produce on a large scale and cannot be directly deposited on plastic substrates, much research is being done on thin film amorphous or nanocrystalline semiconductors and insulators. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) is a novel, low cost, and convenient way to deposit these materials. The process can be controlled in such a way that specific chemical reactions take place and unwanted side reactions are minimized. It can easily be scaled up to produce large-area thin film electronics. Conventionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit semiconductors and inorganic dielectrics. Recently, HWCVD has been explored for fast deposition of such materials. An adaptation of HWCVD, initiated chemical vapour deposition (iCVD), offers the unique possibility of producing organic materials and polymers in a vacuum reactor, without the use of solvents. This technique was originally proposed at the Massachusetts institute of technology (MIT) by Prof. Karen Gleason. The iCVD process involves the creation of radicals by dissociation of a peroxide (a molecule with a ~O-O~ bond) by a heated wire in a vacuum reactor. This radical initiates a polymerization reaction of a vinyl (a molecule with a double carbon-carbon bond, ~C=C~) monomer at a substrate held at room temperature. This thesis describes a dedicated iCVD reactor for polymer deposition, installed at Utrecht University, along with a reactor with a cooled substrate holder in an existing HWCVD multi-chamber setup for low-temperature silicon nitride (SiNx) depositions. The most important features of these reactors are described and the characterization techniques are explained. This thesis contains four new

  17. The Influence of Atomic Diffusion on Stellar Ages and Chemical Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotter, Aaron; Conroy, Charlie; Cargile, Phillip; Asplund, Martin

    2017-05-01

    In the era of large stellar spectroscopic surveys, there is an emphasis on deriving not only stellar abundances but also the ages for millions of stars. In the context of Galactic archeology, stellar ages provide a direct probe of the formation history of the Galaxy. We use the stellar evolution code MESA to compute models with atomic diffusion—with and without radiative acceleration—and extra mixing in the surface layers. The extra mixing consists of both density-dependent turbulent mixing and envelope overshoot mixing. Based on these models we argue that it is important to distinguish between initial, bulk abundances (parameters) and current, surface abundances (variables) in the analysis of individual stellar ages. In stars that maintain radiative regions on evolutionary timescales, atomic diffusion modifies the surface abundances. We show that when initial, bulk metallicity is equated with current, surface metallicity in isochrone age analysis, the resulting stellar ages can be systematically overestimated by up to 20%. The change of surface abundances with evolutionary phase also complicates chemical tagging, which is the concept that dispersed star clusters can be identified through unique, high-dimensional chemical signatures. Stars from the same cluster, but in different evolutionary phases, will show different surface abundances. We speculate that calibration of stellar models may allow us to estimate not only stellar ages but also initial abundances for individual stars. In the meantime, analyzing the chemical properties of stars in similar evolutionary phases is essential to minimize the effects of atomic diffusion in the context of chemical tagging.

  18. Chemical processes involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA. [high temperature tests of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium surface-induced hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA alloys at 900 C has been studied, with special attention to the chemical reactions during and immediately after the induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run and data were obtained by chemical analysis of water soluble metal salts and of residual sulfate. Surface analyses of hot corroded samples were obtained by spectroscopic techniques (ESCA). A chemical mechanism for elucidating Na2SO4-induced hot corrosion is proposed indicating that hot corrosion is initiated by basic fluxing of the protective Al2O3 scale. The sequential, catastrophic corrosion results from molybdenum content. The self-sustaining feature is a consequence of the cyclic nature of the acidic fluxing. It is believed that the mechanism is applicable not only to laboratory results, but also to the practical problem of hot corrosion encountered in gas turbine engines.

  19. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that

  20. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    A decomposition of the molecular energy is presented that is motivated by the atom superposition and electron delocalization physical model of chemical binding. The energy appears in physically transparent form consisting of a classical electrostatic interaction, a zero order two electron exchange interaction, a relaxation energy, and the atomic energies. Detailed formulae are derived in zero and first order of approximation. The formulation extends beyond first order to any chosen level of approximation leading, in principle, to the exact energy. The structure of this energy decomposition lends itself to the fullest utilization of the solutions to the atomic sub problems to simplify the calculation of the molecular energy. If nonlinear relaxation effects remain minor, the molecular energy calculation requires at most the calculation of two center, two electron integrals. This scheme thus affords the prospects of substantially reducing the computational effort required for the calculation of molecular energies.

  1. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    ScienceCinema

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2016-07-12

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  2. Chemical reactions of atomic lithium and molecular calcium monohydride at 1 K.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Hardman, Kyle S; Tariq, Naima; Lu, Mei-Ju; Ellis, Aja; Morrison, Muir J; Weinstein, Jonathan D

    2012-05-18

    Using cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling, we have prepared dense samples of atomic lithium and molecular calcium monohydride at temperatures as low as 1 K. We have measured the Li+CaH→LiH+Ca chemical reaction, observed in both the accelerated disappearance of CaH in the presence of high densities of lithium and in the appearance of the LiH molecule.

  3. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  4. Mechanism of atomic-scale passivation and flattening of semiconductor surfaces by wet-chemical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Kenta; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Hirose, Kikuji; Ono, Tomoya; Sano, Yasuhisa

    2011-10-01

    Atomic arrangements of Si(001), Si(110) and 4H-SiC(0001) surfaces after wet-chemical preparations are investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy. Their passivated structures as well as the surface formation mechanisms in aqueous solutions are discussed. On both Si(001) and Si(110) surfaces, simple 1 × 1 phases terminated by H atoms are clearly resolved after dilute HF dipping. Subsequent etching with water produces the surfaces with 'near-atomic' smoothness. The mechanisms of atomic-scale preferential etching in water are described in detail together with first-principles calculations. Furthermore, 4H-SiC(0001), which is a hard material and where it is difficult to control the surface structure by solutions, is flattened on the atomic scale with Pt as a catalyst in HF solution. After a mechanism is proposed based on electroless oxidation, the flattened surface mainly composed of a 1 × 1 phase is analyzed. The obtained results will be helpful from various scientific and technological viewpoints.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  6. Generation of chemically engineered ribosomes for atomic mutagenesis studies on protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Chirkova, Anna; Voegele, Paul; Polacek, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The protocol describes the site-specific chemical modification of 23S rRNA of Thermus aquaticus ribosomes. The centerpiece of this 'atomic mutagenesis' approach is the site-specific incorporation of non-natural nucleoside analogs into 23S rRNA in the context of the entire 70S ribosome. This technique exhaustively makes use of the available crystallographic structures of the ribosome for designing detailed biochemical experiments aiming at unraveling molecular insights of ribosomal functions. The generation of chemically engineered ribosomes carrying a particular non-natural 23S rRNA residue at the site of interest, a procedure that typically takes less than 2 d, allows the study of translation at the molecular level and goes far beyond the limits of standard mutagenesis approaches. This methodology, in combination with the presented tests for ribosomal functions adapted to chemically engineered ribosomes, allows unprecedented molecular insight into the mechanisms of protein biosynthesis.

  7. Intrinsic Atomic Orbitals: An Unbiased Bridge between Quantum Theory and Chemical Concepts.

    PubMed

    Knizia, Gerald

    2013-11-12

    Modern quantum chemistry can make quantitative predictions on an immense array of chemical systems. However, the interpretation of those predictions is often complicated by the complex wave function expansions used. Here we show that an exceptionally simple algebraic construction allows for defining atomic core and valence orbitals, polarized by the molecular environment, which can exactly represent self-consistent field wave functions. This construction provides an unbiased and direct connection between quantum chemistry and empirical chemical concepts, and can be used, for example, to calculate the nature of bonding in molecules, in chemical terms, from first principles. In particular, we find consistency with electronegativities (χ), C 1s core-level shifts, resonance substituent parameters (σR), Lewis structures, and oxidation states of transition-metal complexes.

  8. Molecular network and chemical fragment-based characteristics of medicinal herbs with cold and hot properties from Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fei; Li, Li; Wang, Maolin; Niu, Xuyan; Zhan, Junping; He, Xiaojuan; Yu, Changyuan; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Aiping

    2013-07-30

    specific pathway is detected to be involved in the biological network of HMs with the cold property, the specific molecules are RAN and KPNB1. Cold propertied HMs show intensive toxicity in the heart, liver and kidney compared with hot HMs, which is likely to be correlated with the specific chemical fragments constructions in the HMs with the cold property, such as long chain alkenes, Benzo heterocycle and azotic heterocycle according to the chemical fragment analysis for the HMs. Inflammation and immunity regulation are more related to HMs with the hot property, and cold propertied HMs possess the tendency to impact cell growth, proliferation and development. Integrative bioinformatics analysis and chemical structure analysis are a promising methods for identifying the biological activity of HM properties. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Calculation of the Relative Chemical Stabilities of Proteins as a Function of Temperature and Redox Chemistry in a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the chemical and physical links between natural environments and microbial communities is becoming increasingly amenable owing to geochemical observations and metagenomic sequencing. At the hot spring known as Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park, the cooling of the water in the outflow channel is associated with an increase in oxidation potential estimated from multiple field-based measurements. Representative groups of proteins whose sequences were derived from metagenomic data also exhibit an increase in average oxidation state of carbon in the protein molecules with distance from the hot-spring source. The energetic requirements of reactions to form selected proteins used in the model were computed using amino-acid group additivity for the standard molal thermodynamic properties of the proteins, and the relative chemical stabilities of the proteins were investigated by varying temperature, pH and oxidation state, expressed as activity of dissolved hydrogen. The relative stabilities of the proteins were found to track the locations of the sampling sites when the calculations included a function for hydrogen activity that increases with temperature and is higher, or more reducing, than values consistent with measurements of dissolved oxygen, sulfide and oxidation-reduction potential in the field. These findings imply that spatial patterns in the amino acid compositions of proteins can be linked, through energetics of overall chemical reactions representing the formation of the proteins, to the environmental conditions at this hot spring, even if microbial cells maintain considerably different internal conditions. Further applications of the thermodynamic calculations are possible for other natural microbial ecosystems. PMID:21853048

  10. Large-scale chemical assembly of atomically thin transistors and circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mervin; Ye, Yu; Han, Yimo; Xia, Yang; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Siqi; Wang, Yuan; Muller, David A.; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Next-generation electronics calls for new materials beyond silicon, aiming at increased functionality, performance and scaling in integrated circuits. In this respect, two-dimensional gapless graphene and semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides have emerged as promising candidates due to their atomic thickness and chemical stability. However, difficulties with precise spatial control during their assembly currently impede actual integration into devices. Here, we report on the large-scale, spatially controlled synthesis of heterostructures made of single-layer semiconducting molybdenum disulfide contacting conductive graphene. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the single-layer molybdenum disulfide nucleates at the graphene edges. We demonstrate that such chemically assembled atomic transistors exhibit high transconductance (10 µS), on-off ratio (˜106) and mobility (˜17 cm2 V-1 s-1). The precise site selectivity from atomically thin conducting and semiconducting crystals enables us to exploit these heterostructures to assemble two-dimensional logic circuits, such as an NMOS inverter with high voltage gain (up to 70).

  11. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-08-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces.

  12. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces. PMID:27528258

  13. QSTR with extended topochemical atom indices. 10. Modeling of toxicity of organic chemicals to humans using different chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kunal; Ghosh, Gopinath

    2008-11-01

    In this communication, we have developed quantitative predictive models using human lethal concentration values of 26 organic compounds including some pharmaceuticals with extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices applying different chemometric tools and compared the extended topochemical atom models with the models developed from non-extended topochemical atom ones. Extended topochemical atom descriptors were also tried in combination with non-extended topochemical atom descriptors to develop better predictive models. The use of extended topochemical atom descriptors along with non-extended topochemical atom ones improved equation statistics and cross-validation quality. The best model with sound statistical quality was developed from partial least squares regression using extended topochemical atom descriptors in combination non-extended topochemical atom ones. Finally, to check true predictability of the ETA parameters, the data set was divided into training (n = 19) and test (n = 7) sets. Partial least squares and genetic partial least squares models were developed from the training set using extended topochemical atom indices and the models were validated using the test set. The extended topochemical atom models developed from different statistical tools suggest that the toxicity increases with bulk, chloro functionality, presence of electronegative atoms within a chain or ring and unsaturation, and decreases with hydroxy functionality and branching. The results suggest that the extended topochemical atom descriptors are sufficiently rich in chemical information to encode the structural features for QSAR/QSPR/QSTR modeling.

  14. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  15. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M

    2016-05-27

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel's Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms.

  16. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  17. Ab initio studies of the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of a rare gas atom in a zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1995-09-01

    The intermolecular chemical shift of a rare gas atom inside a zeolite cavity is calculated by ab initio analytical derivative theory using gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO) at the Ar atom and the atoms of selected neutral clusters each of which is a 4-, 6-, or 8-ring fragment of the zeolite cage. The Si, Al, O atoms and the charge-balancing counterions (Na+, K+, Ca2+) of the clusters (from 24 to 52 atoms) are at coordinates taken from the refined single crystal x-ray structure of the NaA, KA, and CaA zeolites. Terminating OH groups place the H atom at an appropriate O-H distance along the bond to the next Si or Al atom in the crystal. The chemical shift of the Ar atom located at various positions relative to the cluster is calculated using Boys-Bernardi counterpoise correction at each position. The dependence of the rare gas atom chemical shift on the Al/Si ratio of the clusters is investigated. The resulting shielding values are fitted to a pairwise additive form to elicit effective individual Ar-O, Ar-Na, Ar-K, Ar-Ca intermolecular shielding functions of the form σ(39Ar, Ar...Ozeol)= a6r-6+a8r-8+a10r-10+a12r -12, where r is the distance between the Ar and the O atom. A similar form is used for the counterions. The dependence of the Ar shielding on the Al/Si ratio is established (the greater the Al content, the higher the Ar chemical shift), which is in agreement with the few experimental cases where the dependence of the 129Xe chemical shift on the Al/Si ratio of the zeolite has been observed.

  18. [Comparative assessment of radiation and chemical risks for cancer in the areas in vicinity of an atomic power station].

    PubMed

    Petoian, I M

    2008-01-01

    The estimated cancer risks due to radioactive and chemical factors are assessed and compared. Their possible contribution to malignancy mortality in the population living at the areas in the vicinity of an operating atomic power station is also estimated.

  19. Improvement of the Crystallinity of Silicon Films Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition with Negative Substrate Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Shen, Honglie; You, Jiayi

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of negative substrate bias on microcrystalline silicon films deposited on glass and stainless steel by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to gain insight into the effect of negative substrate bias on crystallization. Structural characterization of the silicon films was performed by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the crystallinity of the films is obviously improved by applying the substrate bias, especially for films on stainless steel. At hot-wire temperature of 1800°C and negative substrate bias of -800 V, grain size as large as 200 nm was obtained on stainless-steel substrate with crystalline fraction 9% higher than that of films deposited on glass and 15% higher than that of films deposited without substrate bias. It is deduced that the improvement of the crystallinity is mainly related to the accelerated electrons emitted from the hot wires. The differences in this improvement between different substrates are caused by the different electrical potential of the substrates. A solar cell fabricated by HWCVD with -800 V substrate bias is demonstrated, showing an obviously higher conversion efficiency than that without substrate bias.

  20. Physico-chemical evolution of groundwater in tectonically active areas. Application to the Leana hot spring (Murcia Region, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Hornero, J.; Trujillo, C.

    2017-03-01

    Seismic events can affect the physico-chemical characteristics of groundwater. These anomalies are of a pre-seismic, co-seismic and post-seismic nature and correspond to pulse variations, sudden increases and decreases without return to initial values and upward or downward changes in trend. Continuous and in situ conductivity and temperature monitoring and periodic water sampling at a hot spring associated with neotectonic activity are of great interest for establishing predictive methods. This method is limited to the seismic activity affecting the fracturing system with which the hot spring is associated. The Region of Murcia and surroundings (southeast Spain) was selected as the study area for exploring the nature of these influences on groundwater. A hot spring in the Leana spa (Murcia) was equipped and monitored during the period 2006-2008, allowing for the in situ determination of conductivity and temperature as well as of major and minor constituents at the laboratory. Due to its proximity and related with fault network, we suggest that 86 % of earthquakes located between 0 and 10 km may affect in situ parameters of groundwater, and 75 % may affect laboratory determinations. This percentage drops in more distant zones. Of all earthquakes that seem to influence groundwater, 55 % of the in situ parameter anomalies and 53 % of laboratory were of a pre-seismic nature.

  1. Physico-chemical evolution of groundwater in tectonically active areas. Application to the Leana hot spring (Murcia Region, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Hornero, J.; Trujillo, C.

    2016-09-01

    Seismic events can affect the physico-chemical characteristics of groundwater. These anomalies are of a pre-seismic, co-seismic and post-seismic nature and correspond to pulse variations, sudden increases and decreases without return to initial values and upward or downward changes in trend. Continuous and in situ conductivity and temperature monitoring and periodic water sampling at a hot spring associated with neotectonic activity are of great interest for establishing predictive methods. This method is limited to the seismic activity affecting the fracturing system with which the hot spring is associated. The Region of Murcia and surroundings (southeast Spain) was selected as the study area for exploring the nature of these influences on groundwater. A hot spring in the Leana spa (Murcia) was equipped and monitored during the period 2006-2008, allowing for the in situ determination of conductivity and temperature as well as of major and minor constituents at the laboratory. Due to its proximity and related with fault network, we suggest that 86 % of earthquakes located between 0 and 10 km may affect in situ parameters of groundwater, and 75 % may affect laboratory determinations. This percentage drops in more distant zones. Of all earthquakes that seem to influence groundwater, 55 % of the in situ parameter anomalies and 53 % of laboratory were of a pre-seismic nature.

  2. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  3. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  4. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovan, R. Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  5. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-01

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  6. Tuning the conditions for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond by hot filament chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A; Ranjbar, Samaneh; Neto, V F; Ruch, D; Grácio, J

    2012-08-01

    Although large focus has been placed into the deposition of nanocrystalline and ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films, most of this research uses microwave plasma assisted CVD systems. However, the growth conditions used in microwave systems cannot be directly used in hot-filament CVD systems. This paper, aims to enlarge the knowledge of the diamond film depositing process. H2/CH4/Ar gas mixtures have been used to deposit micro, nano and ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films by hot-filament CVD systems. Additionally, the distance between the filaments array and the substrate was varied, in order to observe its effect and consequently the effect of a lower substrate temperature in the nucleation density and deposition. All the samples were characterized for microstructure and quality, using scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility hot test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    Prior to initial operation with radioactive feed or ``hot`` operation, the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal (LET&D) Facility underwent extensive testing. This report provides a detailed description and analysis of this testing. Testing has determined that LET&D is capable of processing radioactive solutions between the design flowrates of 275 gph to 550 gph. Modifications made to prevent condensation on the off-gas HEPA filters, to the process vacuum control, bottoms cooler rupture disks, and feed control system operation were successful. Unfortunately, two mixers failed prior to ``hot`` testing due to manufacturer`s error which limited operation of the PEW Evaporator System and sampling was not able to prove that design removal efficiencies for Mercury, Cadmium, Plutonium, and Non-Volatile Radionuclides.

  8. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-15

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  9. Mathematical modeling of chemical composition modification and etching of polymers under the atomic oxygen influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirskaia, Natalia; Novikov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) of the upper atmosphere is one of the most important space factors that can cause degradation of spacecraft surface. In our previous mathematical model the Monte Carlo method and the "large particles" approximation were used for simulating processes of polymer etching under the influence of AO [1]. The interaction of enlarged AO particles with the polymer was described in terms of probabilities of reactions such as etching of polymer and specular and diffuse scattering of the AO particles on polymer. The effects of atomic oxygen on protected polymers and microfiller containing composites were simulated. The simulation results were in quite good agreement with the results of laboratory experiments on magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator of the oxygen plasma of SINP MSU [2]. In this paper we present a new model that describes the reactions of AO interactions with polymeric materials in more detail. Reactions of formation and further emission of chemical compounds such as CO, CO _{2}, H _{2}O, etc. cause the modification of the chemical composition of the polymer and change the probabilities of its consequent interaction with the AO. The simulation results are compared with the results of previous simulation and with the results of laboratory experiments. The reasons for the differences between the results of natural experiments on spacecraft, laboratory experiments and simulations are discussed. N. Chirskaya, M. Samokhina, Computer modeling of polymer structures degradation under the atomic oxygen exposure, WDS'12 Proceedings of Contributed Papers: Part III - Physics, Matfyzpress Prague, 2012, pp. 30-35. E. Voronina, L. Novikov, V. Chernik, N. Chirskaya, K. Vernigorov, G. Bondarenko, and A. Gaidar, Mathematical and experimental simulation of impact of atomic oxygen of the earth's upper atmosphere on nanostructures and polymer composites, Inorganic Materials: Applied Research, 2012, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 95-101.

  10. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition chamber and process with multiple gas inlets

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Povolny, Henry S.

    2004-06-29

    A thin film deposition method uses a vacuum confinement cup that employs a dense hot filament and multiple gas inlets. At least one reactant gas is introduced into the confinement cup both near and spaced apart from the heated filament. An electrode inside the confinement cup is used to generate plasma for film deposition. The method is used to deposit advanced thin films (such as silicon based thin films) at a high quality and at a high deposition rate.

  11. STM observation of the chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen on the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Takuma; Yamada, Masamichi; Komori, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen with the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surfaces was investigated at room temperature by scanning tunnel microscopy. At the low exposure of atomic hydrogen, it reacted with the N atoms and turned to be the NH species on the surface. The reaction rate is proportional to the amount of the unreacted N atoms. By increasing the exposure of atomic hydrogen from this condition, the amount of nitrogen species on the surface decreased. This is attributed to the formation of ammonia and its desorption from the surface. The NH species on the surface turn to NH3 through the surface NH2 species by atomic hydrogen. Coexistence of the clean Cu surface enhances the rate of ammonia formation owing to atomic hydrogen migrating on the clean surface.

  12. Chemical destruction of rotationally "hot" HeH+: Quantum cross sections and mechanisms of its reaction with H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovino, S.; Gianturco, F. A.; Tacconi, M.

    2012-12-01

    The present work focuses on the reaction of a molecule of astrophysical interest, the HeH+, with the most abundant species in the Universe: the H atom, and in situations where the partner ion is internally excited into some of its lower rotational states. This strongly exothermic reaction: HeH++H→H2++He, leads to the destruction of HeH+ and we study this outcome by using an accurate reactive potential energy surface (RPES) and by analysing the behaviour of the helicity within the Negative Imaginary Potential (NIP) approach. Different, possible molecular mechanisms connected with the role of rotationally "hot" HeH+ partners are thus suggested from the behaviour of cross sections for different helicity values and the effects on the overall destruction efficiency are also discussed, both for reaction temperatures in the range of Early Universe processes and for colder reaction conditions in ion traps (at mK temperatures).

  13. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Correlation Between the Atomic and Bulk Chemical Potentials of Low work Function Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, T.J.

    1998-12-22

    An attempt is made to identify preferred values for the work functions of the rare earth elements by correlating the atomic chemical potential with the work function of the bulk elements. Trends in the alkali and alkali earth metal are evaluated in the same context. Strong linear correlation between the two quantities is observed within the IA, 11A, and IIIB (Se, Y, La) groups. Within the lanthanide series the nature of the correlation between the metallic radius and the work function suggests a dependence on the total angular momentum.

  15. The Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union: refining strategies for labor.

    PubMed

    Wooding, J; Levenstein, C; Rosenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    In a period of declining union membership and severe economic and environmental crisis it is important that labor unions rethink their traditional roles and organizational goals. Responding to some of these problems and reflecting a history of innovative and progressive unionism, the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers Union (OCAW) has sought to address occupational and environmental health problems within the context of a political struggle. This study suggests that by joining with the environmental movement and community activists, by pursuing a strategy of coalition building, and by developing an initiative to build and advocate for a new political party, OCAW provides a model for reinvigorating trade unionism in the United States.

  16. Boron atoms in the subsurface layers of diamond: Quantum chemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvova, N. A.; Ponomarev, O. V.; Ananina, O. Yu.; Ryazanova, A. I.

    2017-08-01

    Results from quantum-chemical modeling of the configurations of boron impurities and BV complexes of "boron + monovacancy" on diamond surface C(100)-(2 × 1) are presented with their positions varied in subsurface layers. The geometric, electronic, and energy characteristics of these configurations are calculated. It is shown that the most stable BV complexes are complex defects consisting of an impurity defect in the fourth layer and an intrinsic defect in the third layer. The bonding energy of a hydrogen atom and a surface containing the most stable of the studied defects is estimated.

  17. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  18. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  19. Progress in Visualizing Atomic Size Effects with DFT-Chemical Pressure Analysis: From Isolated Atoms to Trends in AB5 Intermetallics.

    PubMed

    Berns, Veronica M; Engelkemier, Joshua; Guo, Yiming; Kilduff, Brandon J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-08-12

    The notion of atomic size poses an important challenge to chemical theory: empirical evidence has long established that atoms have spatial requirements, which are summarized in tables of covalent, ionic, metallic, and van der Waals radii. Considerations based on these radii play a central role in the design and interpretation of experiments, but few methods are available to directly support arguments based on atomic size using electronic structure methods. Recently, we described an approach to elucidating atomic size effects using theoretical calculations: the DFT-Chemical Pressure analysis, which visualizes the local pressures arising in crystal structures from the interactions of atomic size and electronic effects. Using this approach, a variety of structural phenomena in intermetallic phases have already been understood in terms that provide guidance to new synthetic experiments. However, the applicability of the DFT-CP method to the broad range of the structures encountered in the solid state is limited by two issues: (1) the difficulty of interpreting the intense pressure features that appear in atomic core regions and (2) the need to divide space among pairs of interacting atoms in a meaningful way. In this article, we describe general solutions to these issues. In addressing the first issue, we explore the CP analysis of a test case in which no core pressures would be expected to arise: isolated atoms in large boxes. Our calculations reveal that intense core pressures do indeed arise in these virtually pressure-less model systems and allow us to trace the issue to the shifts in the voxel positions relative to atomic centers upon expanding and contracting the unit cell. A compensatory grid unwarping procedure is introduced to remedy this artifact. The second issue revolves around the difficulty of interpreting the pressure map in terms of interatomic interactions in a way that respects the size differences of the atoms and avoids artificial geometrical

  20. Effect of local atomic and electronic structures on thermoelectric properties of chemically substituted CoSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Pao, C. W.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. L.; Dong, C. L.; Liu, Y. S.; Lee, J. F.; Chan, T. S.; Chang, C. L.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    We report the effects of Ge partial substitution for Si on local atomic and electronic structures of thermoelectric materials in binary compound cobalt monosilicides (\\text{CoSi}_{1-x}\\text{Ge}_{x}\\text{:}\\ 0 \\le x \\le 0.15 ). Correlations between local atomic/electronic structure and thermoelectric properties are investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The spectroscopic results indicate that as Ge is partially substituted onto Si sites at x \\le 0.05 , Co in CoSi1-xGex gains a certain amount of charge in its 3d orbitals. Contrarily, upon further replacing Si with Ge at x \\ge 0.05 , the Co 3d orbitals start to lose some of their charge. Notably, thermopower is strongly correlated with charge redistribution in the Co 3d orbital, and the observed charge transfer between Ge and Co is responsible for the variation of Co 3d occupancy number. In addition to Seebeck coefficient, which can be modified by tailoring the Co 3d states, local lattice disorder may also be beneficial in enhancing the thermoelectric properties. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectrum results further demonstrate that the lattice phonons can be enhanced by Ge doping, which results in the formation of the disordered Co-Co pair. Improvements in the thermoelectric properties are interpreted based on the variation of local atomic and electronic structure induced by lattice distortion through chemical substitution.

  1. Intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving fluorine atoms: implications for recognition, selectivity, and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2012-02-06

    A correlation between 19F NMR isotropic chemical shift and close intermolecular F⋅⋅⋅H-X contacts (with X=N or O) has been identified upon analysis of the X-ray crystal structures of fluorinated molecules listed in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). An optimal F⋅⋅⋅X distance involving primary and shielded secondary fluorine atoms in hydrogen-bond formation along with a correlation between F⋅⋅⋅H distance and F⋅⋅⋅H-X angle were also derived from the analysis. The hydrogen bonds involving fluorine are relevant, not only for the recognition mechanism and stabilization of a preferred conformation, but also for improvement in the permeability of the molecules, as shown with examples taken from a proprietary database. Results of an analysis of the small number of fluorine-containing natural products listed in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) appear to strengthen the derived correlation between 19F NMR isotropic chemical shift and interactions involving fluorine (also known as the "rule of shielding") and provides a hypothesis for the recognition mechanism and catalytic activity of specific enzymes. Novel chemical scaffolds, based on the rule of shielding, have been designed for recognizing distinct structural motifs present in proteins. It is envisaged that this approach could find useful applications in drug design for the efficient optimization of chemical fragments or promising compounds by increasing potency and selectivity against the desired biomolecular target.

  2. Chemical indicators of subsurface temperature applied to hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1970-01-01

    Under favorable conditions the chemistry of hot springs may give reliable indications of subsurface temperatures and circulation patterns. These chemical indicators can be classified by the type of process involved: {A table is presented}. All these indicators have certain limitations. The silica geothermometer gives results independent of the local mineral suite and gas partial pressures, but may be affected by dilution. Alkali ratios are strongly affected by the local mineral suite and the formation of complex ions. Carbonate-chloride ratios are strongly affected by subsurface PCO2. The relative concentration of volatiles can be very misleading in high-pressure liquid systems. In Yellowstone National Park most thermal waters issue from hot, shallow aquifers with pressures in excess of hydrostatic by 2 to 6 bars and with large flows (the flow of hot spring water from the Park is greater than 4000 liters per second). These conditions should be ideal for the use of chemical indicators to estimate aquifer temperatures. In five drill holes aquifer temperatures were within 2??C of that predicted from the silica content of nearby hot springs; the temperature level off at a lower value than predicted in only one hole, and in four other holes drilling was terminated before the predicted aquifer temperature was reached. The temperature-Na/K ratio relationship does not follow any published experimental or empirical curve for water-feldspar or water-clay reactions. We suspect that ion exchange reactions involving zeolites in the Yellowstone rocks result in higher Na/K ratios at given temperatures than result from feldspar or clay reactions. Comparison of SiO2 and Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) suggest that because of higher subsurface PCO2 in Upper Geyser Basin a given Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) ratio there means a higher temperature than in Lower Geyser Basin. No correlation was found in Yellowstone Park between the subsurface regions of highest temperature and the relative concentration of volatile

  3. Chemical reactions of atomic hydrogen at SiC surface and heterogeneous chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styrov, V. V.; Tyutyunnikov, V. I.; Sergeev, O. T.; Oya, Y.; Okuno, K.

    2005-02-01

    In studies of the surface properties of SiC polytypes and chemical reactions of hydrogen atoms at SiC surfaces the surface (chemi)luminescence of SiC has been applied excited in the reaction of hydrogen atoms due to chemical energy released (heterogeneous chemiluminescence, HCL). The bulk photoluminescence (PL) have also been used for comparison with surface HCL. All the samples showed HCL, but only α-SiC (6H, 15R), technologically or specially doped (predominantly by N, B, Al), exhibited PL (λex=365 nm). Cubic polycrystalline β-SiC (or 3C SiC) did not show PL. The general luminescence band of α-SiC (6H, 15R) and B and Al doped SiC (6H) was a broad yellow band with λmax ranged from 620 to 650 nm for PL (110 K). Another less intensive luminescence band is a blue one, which has been observed only at low temperatures for α-SiC (6H,15R) and B and Al doped SiC (6H) in PL spectra and as a shoulder in HCL spectra (λmax=477 nm at 110 K for 15R SiC). The green band near 540 nm was also observed sometimes in PL spectra for α-SiC. The heat of adsorption of hydrogen atoms at polycrystalline β-SiC estimated from HCL data was found to be in the range from 2 to 3 eV.

  4. Characterizing intra and inter annual variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: what can we learn about hot spots and hot moments from continuous hydro-chemical sensors ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, O.; Thelusma, G.; Humbert, G.; Dupas, R.; Jaffrezic, A.; Grimaldi, C.; Faucheux, M.; Gilliet, N.; Hamon, Y.; Gruau, G.

    2015-12-01

    Storm events are hot moments of emission for several dissolved and particulate chemical species at major stake for water quality (e.g. dissolved organic carbon DOC, suspended sediments, phosphorus, NH4). During such events, the solutes or particles are exported from heterogeneous sources through various pathways to stream or are possibly stored in retention hot spots temporary. This leads to specific integrated signals at the outlet at the scale of storm events. The dynamics of such events are also very short especially in headwater catchments where their total duration ranges over 10h to 3 days, with very quick variations in stream flow and concentrations at the outlet occurring in a few hours. Thus for investigating properly event processes, high frequency monitoring of flow and water quality is required. We analysed 103 storm events in a 5 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, part of the AgrHys Observatory, on the basis of a 3-year-long data set which combined meterological (Rainfall), hydrological (flow and piezometry), and water quality (turbidity, conductivity, DOC and NO3 concentrations) data recorded at very high frequencies (from 1 to 20 min) thanks to dedicated sensors. We described the storm events using simple (1 variable) and combined (2 variables) descriptors for characterizing level and dynamics of flow (Q), groundwater levels, and concentrations (C) but also the C-Q relationships. Three intra annual periods have been previously defined for base flow dynamic according to shallow groundwater table variations so that they correspond to different connectivity status in the catchment. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the storm events have been analysed using the descriptors and based on these predefined periods. Principal component analysis based on storm chemical descriptors led to discriminate these three seasons while storm hydrological descriptors are less variable between them. Finally we used a clustering method to build a typology of

  5. Atomic scale dynamics of a solid state chemical reaction directly determined by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Jones, Lewys; Pettersson, Henrik; Coelho, João; Canavan, Megan; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Nicolosi, Valeria; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic processes, such as solid-state chemical reactions and phase changes, are ubiquitous in materials science, and developing a capability to observe the mechanisms of such processes on the atomic scale can offer new insights across a wide range of materials systems. Aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has enabled atomic resolution imaging at significantly reduced beam energies and electron doses. It has also made possible the quantitative determination of the composition and occupancy of atomic columns using the atomic number (Z)-contrast annular dark-field (ADF) imaging available in STEM. Here we combine these benefits to record the motions and quantitative changes in the occupancy of individual atomic columns during a solid-state chemical reaction in manganese oxides. These oxides are of great interest for energy-storage applications such as for electrode materials in pseudocapacitors. We employ rapid scanning in STEM to both drive and directly observe the atomic scale dynamics behind the transformation of Mn3O4 into MnO. The results demonstrate we now have the experimental capability to understand the complex atomic mechanisms involved in phase changes and solid state chemical reactions. PMID:25532123

  6. Atomic scale dynamics of a solid state chemical reaction directly determined by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, Timothy J; Jones, Lewys; Pettersson, Henrik; Coelho, João; Canavan, Megan; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Nicolosi, Valeria; Nellist, Peter D

    2014-12-22

    Dynamic processes, such as solid-state chemical reactions and phase changes, are ubiquitous in materials science, and developing a capability to observe the mechanisms of such processes on the atomic scale can offer new insights across a wide range of materials systems. Aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has enabled atomic resolution imaging at significantly reduced beam energies and electron doses. It has also made possible the quantitative determination of the composition and occupancy of atomic columns using the atomic number (Z)-contrast annular dark-field (ADF) imaging available in STEM. Here we combine these benefits to record the motions and quantitative changes in the occupancy of individual atomic columns during a solid-state chemical reaction in manganese oxides. These oxides are of great interest for energy-storage applications such as for electrode materials in pseudocapacitors. We employ rapid scanning in STEM to both drive and directly observe the atomic scale dynamics behind the transformation of Mn3O4 into MnO. The results demonstrate we now have the experimental capability to understand the complex atomic mechanisms involved in phase changes and solid state chemical reactions.

  7. On the possibility to grow zinc oxide-based transparent conducting oxide films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Abrutis, Adulfas Silimavicus, Laimis; Kubilius, Virgaudas; Murauskas, Tomas; Saltyte, Zita; Kuprenaite, Sabina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina

    2014-03-15

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Indium (In)-doped ZnO films were deposited using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system with three nichrome wires installed at a distance of 2 cm from the substrate holder. The wires were heated by an AC current in the range of 0–10 A. Zn and In 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. The hot wires had a marked effect on the growth rates of ZnO, In-doped ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films; at a current of 6–10 A, growth rates were increased by a factor of ≈10–20 compared with those of traditional CVD at the same substrate temperature (400 °C). In-doped ZnO films with thickness of ≈150 nm deposited on sapphire-R grown at a wire current of 9 A exhibited a resistivity of ≈2 × 10{sup −3} Ωcm and transparency of >90% in the visible spectral range. These initial results reveal the potential of HW-CVD for the growth of TCOs.

  8. Epitaxial Growth of GaN Films by Pulse-Mode Hot-Mesh Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komae, Yasuaki; Yasui, Kanji; Suemitsu, Maki; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ito, Takashi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Narita, Yuzuru; Takata, Masasuke; Akahane, Tadashi

    2009-07-01

    Intermittent gas supplies for hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride (GaN) films were investigated to improve film crystallinity and optical properties. The GaN films were deposited on SiC/Si(111) substrates using an alternating-source gas supply or an intermittent supply of source gases such as ammonia (NH3) and trimethylgallium (TMG) in hot-mesh CVD after deposition of an aluminum nitride (AlN) buffer layer. The AlN layer was deposited using NH3 and trimethylaluminum (TMA) on a SiC layer grown by carbonization of a Si substrate using propane (C3H8). GaN films were grown on the AlN layer by a reaction between NHx radicals generated on a ruthenium (Ru)-coated tungsten (W) mesh and TMG molecules. After testing various gas supply modes, GaN films with good crystallinity and surface morphology were obtained using an intermittent supply of TMG and a continuous supply of NH3 gas. An optimal interval for the TMG gas supply was also obtained for the apparatus employed.

  9. Atomic charges of individual reactive chemicals in binary mixtures determine their joint effects: an example of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Yin, Daqiang; Zhang, Yalei; Kong, Deyang

    2012-02-01

    Environmental contaminants are usually encountered as mixtures, and many of these mixtures yield synergistic or antagonistic effects attributable to an intracellular chemical reaction that pose a potential threat on ecological systems. However, how atomic charges of individual chemicals determine their intracellular chemical reactions, and then determine the joint effects for mixtures containing reactive toxicants, is not well understood. To address this issue, the joint effects between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes on Photobacterium phosphoreum were observed in the present study. Their toxicological joint effects differed from one another. This difference is inherently related to the two atomic charges of the individual chemicals: the oxygen charge of -CHO (O(aldehyde toxicant)) in aldehyde toxicants and the carbon-atom charge of a carbon chain in the cyanogenic toxicant (C(cyanogenic toxicant)). Based on these two atomic charges, the following QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) model was proposed: When (O(aldehyde toxicant) -C(cyanogenic toxicant) )> -0.125, the joint effect of equitoxic binary mixtures at median inhibition (TU, the sum of toxic units) can be calculated as TU = 1.00 ± 0.20; when (O(aldehyde toxicant) -C(cyanogenic toxicant) ) ≤ -0.125, the joint effect can be calculated using TU = - 27.6 x O (aldehyde toxicant) - 5.22 x C (cyanogenic toxicant) - 6.97 (n = 40, r = 0.887, SE = 0.195, F = 140, p < 0.001, q(2) (Loo) = 0.748; SE is the standard error of the regression, F is the F test statistic). The result provides insight into the relationship between the atomic charges and the joint effects for mixtures containing cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes. This demonstrates that the essence of the joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reactions depends on the atomic charges of individual chemicals. The present study provides a possible approach for the development of a QSAR model for mixtures containing reactive

  10. Boron nitride phosphide thin films grown on quartz substrate by hot-filament and plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Xu, S. Y.; Han, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    Boron nitride phosphide films are, for the first time, grown on transparent quartz substrate by hot filament and radio-frequency plasma co-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. XPS, XRD, SEM, and UV measurements are performed to study the chemical composition, crystallization, microstructure, and optical absorption, respectively. A centipede-like microstructure and undulating ground morphology on the film surface are observed, and their growth mechanism is speculated upon. The chemical composition is determined as BN1-xPx, whose characteristic XRD peak is preliminarily identified. The optical band gap can be modulated between 5.52 eV and 3.74 eV, simply by adjusting the phosphorus content in BN1-xPx through modifying the PH3 flux during the film-deposition process. The merits of the BN1-xPx film, such as high ultraviolet photoelectric sensitivity with negligible sensitivity in the visible region, modifiable wide optical band gap, and good adhesion on transparent substrate, suggest potential applications for ultraviolet photo-electronics.

  11. Chemical and Physical Weathering in a Hot-arid, Tectonically Active Alluvial System (Anza-Borrego Desert, CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Y. J.; Elwood Madden, M.; Soreghan, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and tectonics are primary controls on bedrock erosion, and sediment production, transport, and deposition. Additionally, silicate weathering in tectonically active regions is known to play a significant role in global climate owing to the high rates of physical erosion and exposure of unweathered bedrock to chemical weathering, which removes CO2 from the atmosphere. Therefore, the feedback between weathering and climate is key to understanding climate change through Earth history. This study investigates chemical and physical weathering of alluvial sediments in the Anza-Borrego Desert, California, located in the southern part of the San Andreas Fault System. This setting provides an ideal opportunity to study weathering in a hot and arid climate with mean annual temperatures of ~23 °C and mean annual precipitation of ~160 mm in the basin. Samples were collected along a proximal-to-distal transect of an alluvial-fan system sourced exclusively from Cretaceous tonalite of the Peninsular Range. The single bedrock lithology enables exploration of the effects of other variables — climate, transport distance, drainage area, and tectonics— on the physical and chemical properties of the sediments. Although minimal overall (CIA = 56-61), the degree of chemical weathering increases down transect, dominated by plagioclase dissolution. BET surface area of the mud (<63µm) fraction decreases distally, which is consistent with coarsening grain-size. Chemical alteration and BET surface area both increase in a distal region, within the active Elsinore Fault zone. Extensive fracturing here, together with a more-humid Pleistocene climate likely facilitated in-situ bedrock weathering; specifically, dissolution of primary minerals (e.g. plagioclase), preceding the arid alluvial erosion, transport, and deposition in the Holocene. This study further seeks to disentangle the complex record of the climate and tectonic signals imprinted in these sediments.

  12. Hot-wall low pressure chemical vapor deposition growth and characterization of AlN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinselman, Karen N.; Brown, Richard J.; Shealy, James R.

    2017-10-01

    Hot-wall low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of highly crystalline epitaxial thin-film AlN grown on silicon (1 1 1) substrates is reported for the first time. Deposition was carried out in a modified commercial LPCVD at 1000 °C and 2 torr. Preflow time for the aluminum precursor, trimethylaluminum, was varied to nucleate Al, and the resulting variation in X-ray diffraction (XRD) crystalline AlN peaks is presented. With a 30 s dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) pretreatment at 700 °C and the optimal TMAl preflow time, the FWHM of the resulting film was 1116 arcsec for the AlN (0 0 2) 2 θ - ω peak, and the AlN (0 0 2) peak had an omega rocking curve FWHM of 1.6°. This AlN film was shown to be epitaxially aligned to the Si (1 1 1) substrate.

  13. Computer Modeling Of Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M.; Ibrahim, E.; Przekwas, A.; Cheuch, S.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mathematical models based on fundamental principles of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum developed for use in computer simulation of atomization of jets of liquid fuel in rocket engines. Models also used to study atomization in terrestrial applications; prove especially useful in designing improved industrial sprays - humidifier water sprays, chemical process sprays, and sprays of molten metal. Because present improved mathematical models based on first principles, they are minimally dependent on empirical correlations and better able to represent hot-flow conditions that prevail in rocket engines and are too severe to be accessible for detailed experimentation.

  14. Survey of reproductive hazards among oil, chemical, and atomic workers exposed to halogenated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Harley, B.; Krekel, S.; Marshall, J.; Bondy, J.; Orleans, M.

    1984-01-01

    Several halogenated hydrocarbons are suspected of causing adverse reproductive effects. Because of such concerns, the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union surveyed the reproductive histories of two groups of workers. One group worked at plants engaged in the production or use of halogenated hydrocarbons (exposed) whereas the others had no such opportunity for exposure (nonexposed). Although a low response rate precludes firm conclusions, the 1,280 completed questionnaires provide useful data for generating hypotheses in this developing field of interest. A history of diagnosed cancer was reported more frequently among exposed workers. The infant mortality rate was also significantly elevated among the offspring of exposed workers. No risk gradient was observed for episodes of infertility, fetal loss, congenital defects, or low-birthweight offspring. Concerns with nonresponse, exposure characterization, possible confounding factors, and limited statistical power are addressed. The results provide further suggestions which help to direct studies of occupational reproductive risks.

  15. Survey of reproductive hazards among oil, chemical, and atomic workers exposed to halogenated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Savitz, D A; Harley, B; Krekel, S; Marshall, J; Bondy, J; Orleans, M

    1984-01-01

    Several halogenated hydrocarbons are suspected of causing adverse reproductive effects. Because of such concerns, the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union surveyed the reproductive histories of two groups of workers. One group worked at plants engaged in the production or use of halogenated hydrocarbons (exposed) whereas the others had no such opportunity for exposure (nonexposed). Although a low response rate precludes firm conclusions, the 1,280 completed questionnaires provide useful data for generating hypotheses in this developing field of interest. A history of diagnosed cancer was reported more frequently among exposed workers. The infant mortality rate was also significantly elevated among the offspring of exposed workers. No risk gradient was observed for episodes of infertility, fetal loss, congenital defects, or low-birthweight offspring. Concerns with nonresponse, exposure characterization, possible confounding factors, and limited statistical power are addressed. The results provide further suggestions which help to direct studies of occupational reproductive risks.

  16. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  17. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  18. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  19. Regioselective Atomic Rearrangement of Ag-Pt Octahedral Catalysts by Chemical Vapor-Assisted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yung-Tin; Yan, Linqing; Shao, Yu-Tsun; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yang, Hong

    2016-12-14

    Thermal annealing is a common, and often much-needed, process to optimize the surface structure and composition of bimetallic nanoparticles for high catalytic performance. Such thermal treatment is often carried out either in air or under an inert atmosphere by a trial-and-error approach. Herewith, we present a new chemical vapor-assisted treatment, which can preserve the octahedral morphology of Ag-Pt nanoparticles while modifying the surface into preferred composition arrangements with site-selectivity for high catalytic activity. In situ environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) study reveals a relatively homogeneous distribution of Ag and Pt is generated on the surface of Ag-Pt nanoparticles upon exposure to carbon monoxide (CO), whereas Pt atoms preferably segregate to the edge regions when the gas atmosphere is switched to argon. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest stabilization of Pt atoms is energetically favored in the form of mixed surface alloys when CO vapor is present. Without CO, Ag and Pt phase separate under the similar mild treatment condition. There exists a close correlation between the tunable surface structures and the catalytic activities of Ag-Pt octahedral nanoparticles.

  20. Determination of cadmium by flow injection-chemical vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Razo, C; Tyson, J F

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed for the generation of a "cold vapor" of cadmium by means of flow injection-chemical vapor generation from aqueous samples, the determination being conducted with an atomic absorption spectrometer (Pyrex glass T-cell). Several gas-liquid separator designs, atomizer designs, and the effect of several reagents previously reported as sensitivity enhancers (including cobalt, nickel, thiourea and didodecyl-dimethylammonium bromide) were investigated. The limit of detection, calculated as the concentration giving a signal equal to three times the standard deviation of the blank, was 16 ng L(-1), and the relative standard deviation was 1.4% for a concentration of 2 microg L(-1) and 3.8% for 0.1 microg L(-1). The addition of nickel and thiourea to the samples provided improved tolerance to the interference of coexisting ions. Two NIST certified reference materials, Montana Soil and Apple Leaves (respectively containing 41.7+/-0.25 mg kg(-1) Cd and 0.013+/-0.002 mg kg(-1) Cd) were accurately analyzed. The interference of lead was overcome by coprecipitation with barium sulfate, and the experimental values obtained were 41+/-1 mg kg(-1) Cd and 0.013+/-0.002 mg kg(-1) Cd, respectively.

  1. Highly scalable, atomically thin WSe2 grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Eichfeld, Sarah M; Hossain, Lorraine; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Piasecki, Aleksander F; Kupp, Benjamin; Birdwell, A Glen; Burke, Robert A; Lu, Ning; Peng, Xin; Li, Jie; Azcatl, Angelica; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M; Kim, Moon J; Mayer, Theresa S; Redwing, Joan M; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-02-24

    Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) is a two-dimensional material that is of interest for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to its direct bandgap of 1.65 eV in the monolayer form and excellent transport properties. However, technologies based on this 2D material cannot be realized without a scalable synthesis process. Here, we demonstrate the first scalable synthesis of large-area, mono and few-layer WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) and dimethylselenium ((CH3)2Se). In addition to being intrinsically scalable, this technique allows for the precise control of the vapor-phase chemistry, which is unobtainable using more traditional oxide vaporization routes. We show that temperature, pressure, Se:W ratio, and substrate choice have a strong impact on the ensuing atomic layer structure, with optimized conditions yielding >8 μm size domains. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm crystalline monoto-multilayer WSe2 is achievable. Finally, TEM and vertical current/voltage transport provide evidence that a pristine van der Waals gap exists in WSe2/graphene heterostructures.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of High-Quality and Atomically Layered ReS₂.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexia; Liu, Fucai; Hu, Peng; Fu, Wei; Wang, Xingli; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhao, Wu; Liu, Zheng

    2015-10-28

    Recently, anisotropic 2D materials, such as black phosphorus and rhenium disulfides (ReS2 ), have attracted a lot attention because of their unique applications on electronics and optoelectronics. In this work, the direct growth of high-quality ReS2 atomic layers and nanoribbons has been demonstrated by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. A possible growth mechanism is proposed according to the controlled experiments. The CVD ReS2-based filed-effect transistors (FETs) show n-type semiconducting behavior with a current on/off ratio of ≈10(6) and a charge carrier mobility of ≈9.3 cm(2) Vs(-1). These results suggested that the quality of CVD grown ReS2 is comparable to mechanically exfoliated ReS2, which is also further supported by atomic force microscopy imaging, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and thickness-dependent Raman spectra. The study here indicates that CVD grown ReS2 may pave the way for the large-scale fabrication of ReS2-based high-performance optoelectronic devices, such as anisotropic FETs and polarization detection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  4. Chemical nature of boron and nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene strongly influences its electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Zbořil, Radek; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-07-21

    Boron and nitrogen doped graphenes are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, such as energy storage, generation and sensing. The doped graphenes can be prepared by a broad variety of chemical approaches. The substitution of a carbon atom should induce n-type behavior in the case of nitrogen and p-type behavior in the case of boron-doped graphene; however, the real situation is more complex. The electrochemical experiments show that boron-doped graphene prepared by hydroboration reaction exhibits similar properties as the nitrogen doped graphene; according to theory, the electrochemical behavior of B and N doped graphenes should be opposite. Here we analyze the electronic structure of N/B-doped graphene (at ∼5% coverage) by theoretical calculations. We consider graphene doped by both substitution and addition reactions. The density of states (DOS) plots show that graphene doped by substitution of the carbon atom by N/B behaves as expected, i.e., as an n/p-doped material. N-doped graphene also has a lower value of the workfunction (3.10 eV) with respect to that of the pristine graphene (4.31 eV), whereas the workfunction of B-doped graphene is increased to the value of 5.57 eV. On the other hand, the workfunctions of graphene doped by addition of -NH2 (4.77 eV) and -BH2 (4.54 eV) groups are both slightly increased and therefore the chemical nature of the dopant is less distinguishable. This shows that mode of doping depends significantly on the synthesis method used, as it leads to different types of behaviour, and, in turn, different electronic and electrochemical properties of doped graphene, as observed in electrocatalytic experiments. This study has a tremendous impact on the design of doped graphene systems from the point of view of synthetic chemistry.

  5. Chemical studies of selected trace elements in hot-spring drainages of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, R.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Ball, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive chemical studies were made of S(-II), O/sub 2/, Al, Fe, Mn, P, As(III), As(V), and Li in waters from two high-Cl, low Ca-Mg hotspring drainages in the Lower Geyser Basin, a warm spring system rich in Ca and Mg in the Yellowstone Canyon area, and the Madison River system above Hebgen Lake. Analyses were also made of other representative thermal waters from the Park.

  6. Modeling of the Role of Atomic Hydrogen in Heat Transfer During Hot Filament Assisted Deposition of Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-12

    recombination of atomic hydrogen at the tip of the thermocouple in addition to the contributions of conduction , convection and radiation. Since helium is...Figure 2. Since the rate of heat transfer by conduction , convection and radiation is roughly equal in helium and hydrogen, the above evidence suggests an

  7. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shirasaki, Toshihiro; Yonetani, Akira; Imai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L(-1) when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS.

  8. Morphological stability of the atomically clean surface of silicon (100) crystals after microwave plasma-chemical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yafarov, R. K. Shanygin, V. Ya.

    2016-01-15

    The morphological stability of atomically clean silicon (100) surface after low-energy microwave plasma-chemical etching in various plasma-forming media is studied. It is found that relaxation changes in the surface density and atomic bump heights after plasma processing in inert and chemically active media are multidirectional in character. After processing in a freon-14 medium, the free energy is minimized due to a decrease in the surface density of microbumps and an increase in their height. After argon-plasma processing, an insignificant increase in the bump density with a simultaneous decrease in bump heights is observed. The physicochemical processes causing these changes are considered.

  9. Thin film solar cells with Si nanocrystallites embedded in amorphous intrinsic layers by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungil; Parida, Bhaskar; Kim, Keunjoo

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the thin film growths of hydrogenated silicon by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition with different flow rates of SiH4 and H2 mixture ambient and fabricated thin film solar cells by implementing the intrinsic layers to SiC/Si heterojunction p-i-n structures. The film samples showed the different infrared absorption spectra of 2,000 and 2,100 cm(-1), which are corresponding to the chemical bonds of SiH and SiH2, respectively. The a-Si:H sample with the relatively high silane concentration provides the absorption peak of SiH bond, but the microc-Si:H sample with the relatively low silane concentration provides the absorption peak of SiH2 bond as well as SiH bond. Furthermore, the microc-Si:H sample showed the Raman spectral shift of 520 cm(-1) for crystalline phase Si bonds as well as the 480 cm(-1) for the amorphous phase Si bonds. These bonding structures are very consistent with the further analysis of the long-wavelength photoconduction tail and the formation of nanocrystalline Si structures. The microc-Si:H thin film solar cell has the photovoltaic behavior of open circuit voltage similar to crystalline silicon thin film solar cell, indicating that microc-Si:H thin film with the mixed phase of amorphous and nanocrystalline structures show the carrier transportation through the channel of nanocrystallites.

  10. Surface morphology and bond characterization of nanocrystalline diamonds grown on tungsten carbide via hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, E.; Yong, T. M.; Mat Yajid, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamonds (NCDs) were deposited on chemically prepared tungsten carbide substrates via hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The surface morphology of the NCDs was examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The NCDs formed a ballas morphology evenly across the tungsten carbide surface. Overetching affected the diamond deposition by causing the ballas to form aggregations. Cross-sectional fragmentation using a diamond wafering blade caused the nanocrystalline diamond to fragment at overetched boundaries, and delamination only occurred 30-50 µm off the edge and revealed that the thickness of the diamond film was 6 µm. Grazing XRD is an effective method to identify diamonds even at the nanoscale. The crystallite size was calculated to be 18.4 nm by modeling. Cross-sectional TEM analysis indicated that the diamond grain size was approximately 10-30 nm near the interface. Amorphous carbon, an embedded diamond and voids were also observed. TEM also revealed that the tungsten carbide surface undulates. The nanocrystalline diamonds nucleated and grew on the tungsten carbide (100) planes in the <111> direction, forming (111) planes, as observed from HRTEM, d-spacing measurements, SAD and FFT analyses for a FIB-prepared sample.

  11. The aging of tungsten filaments and its effect on wire surface kinetics in hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason K.; Swiatek, Maribeth; Goodwin, David G.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2002-10-01

    Wire-desorbed radicals present during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition growth have been measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry. New wires produce Si as the predominant radical for temperatures above 1500 K, with a minor contribution from SiH3, consistent with previous measurements; the activation energy for the SiH3 signal suggests its formation is catalyzed. Aged wires also produce Si as the predominant radical (above 2100 K), but show profoundly different radical desorption kinetics. In particular, the Si signal exhibits a high temperature activation energy consistent with evaporation from liquid silicon. The relative abundance of the other SiHx species suggests that heterogeneous pyrolysis of SiH4 on the wire may be occurring to some extent. Chemical analysis of aged wires by Auger electron spectroscopy suggests that the aging process is related to the formation of a silicide at the surface, with silicon surface concentrations as high as 15 at. %. A limited amount (2 at. %) of silicon is observed in the interior as well, suggesting that diffusion into the wire occurs. Calculation of the relative rates for the various wire kinetic processes, coupled with experimental observations, reveals that silicon diffusion through the silicide is the slowest process, followed by Si evaporation, with SiH4 decomposition being the fastest.

  12. State-to-state dynamics of elementary chemical reactions using Rydberg H-atom translational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xueming

    In this review, a few examples of state-to-state dynamics studies of both unimolecular and bimolecular reactions using the H-atom Rydberg tagging TOF technique were presented. From the H2O photodissociation at 157 nm, a direction dissociation example is provided, while photodissociation of H2O at 121.6 has provided an excellent dynamical case of complicated, yet direct dissociation process through conical intersections. The studies of the O(1D) + H2 → OH + H reaction has also been reviewed here. A prototype example of state-to-state dynamics of pure insertion chemical reaction is provided. Effect of the reagent rotational excitation and the isotope effect on the dynamics of this reaction have also been investigated. The detailed mechanism for abstraction channel in this reaction has also been closely studied. The experimental investigations of the simplest chemical reaction, the H3 system, have also been described here. Through extensive collaborations between theory and experiment, the mechanism for forward scattering product at high collision energies for the H + HD reaction was clarified, which is attributed to a slow down mechanism on the top of a quantized barrier transition state. Oscillations in the product quantum state resolved different cross sections have also been observed in the H + D2 reaction, and were attributed to the interference of adiabatic transition state pathways from detailed theoretical analysis. The results reviewed here clearly show the significant advances we have made in the studies of the state-to-state molecular reaction dynamics.

  13. Highly sensitive fiber grating chemical sensors: An effective alternative to atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxmeshwar, Lata. S.; Jadhav, Mangesh S.; Akki, Jyoti. F.; Raikar, Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; prakash, Om; Raikar, U. S.

    2017-06-01

    Accuracy in quantitative determination of trace elements like Zinc, present in drinking water in ppm level, is a big challenge and optical fiber gratings as chemical sensors may provide a promising solution to overcome the same. This paper presents design of two simple chemical sensors based on the principle of shift in characteristic wavelength of gratings with change in their effective refractive index, to measure the concentration of Zinc in drinking water using etched short period grating (FBG) and Long period grating (LPG) respectively. Three samples of drinking water from different places have been examined for presence of Zinc. Further, the results obtained by our sensors have also been verified with the results obtained by a standard method, Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The whole experiment has been performed by fixing the fibers in a horizontal position with the sensor regions at the center of the fibers, making it less prone to disturbance and breaking. The sensitivity of LPG sensor is about 205 times that of the FBG sensor. A few advantages of Fiber grating sensors, besides their regular features, over AAS have also been discussed, that make our sensors potential alternatives for existing techniques in determination of trace elements in drinking water.

  14. From Petascale to Exascale: Prospects for Transforming Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Dynamics with Leadership Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jack

    2013-05-01

    Modeling and simulation with petascale computing has supercharged the process of innovation and understanding, dramatically accelerating time-to-insight and time-to-discovery. From petascale modeling of combustion for advanced engines, to designing bio-inspired catalysts for renewable energy, to exploring the evolution of complex systems such as our earth's climate, or breakthroughs gained from quantum many-body applications in chemical and nuclear physics, petascale computing is delivering high impact results that are transforming science and engineering. This presentation will provide an overview of the unique computational resources and user programs at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, discuss a range of ambitious computational research projects underway in atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and discuss scientific opportunities and challenges associated with advancing computational capabilities to the exascale. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  15. Method development for the determination of lead in wine using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry comparing platform and filter furnace atomizers and different chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Souza, Anderson S; Ferreira, Sérgio L C; Welz, Bernhard; Katskov, Dmitri A

    2008-02-15

    A method has been developed for the determination of lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without any sample preparation and calibration against aqueous standards, using 7.5 microg Pd as a chemical modifier. The results obtained for seven wines using the proposed method and an acid digestion procedure did not show any significant difference using a Student's t-test. Atomization in a transversally heated filter atomizer (THFA) was compared with atomization in a conventional transversally heated platform furnace. The former provided a 2.6-fold higher sensitivity, improving the characteristic mass from 34 to 12 pg and a 1.6-fold better limit of detection (0.3 microg L(-1) compared to 0.5 microg L(-1)) for aqueous solutions using the same injection volume of 20 microL. However, the average precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation for the determination of lead in wine under routine conditions was improved from 4.6% with platform atomization to 0.6% in the THFA. The lead content found in seven arbitrarily chosen white and red wines, five from Brazil, one from Chile and one from Spain, ranged from 6 to 60 microg L(-1) Pb with an average content of 11.4 microg L(-1) Pb for the wines from South America.

  16. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars: accurate atomic data applied on a large scale as driver of recent breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Schaffenroth, V.; Nieva, M. F.; Butler, K.

    2016-10-01

    OB-type stars present hotbeds for non-LTE physics because of their strong radiation fields that drive the atmospheric plasma out of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We report on recent breakthroughs in the quantitative analysis of the optical and UV-spectra of OB-type stars that were facilitated by application of accurate and precise atomic data on a large scale. An astrophysicist's dream has come true, by bringing observed and model spectra into close match over wide parts of the observed wavelength ranges. This allows tight observational constraints to be derived from OB-type stars for a wide range of applications in astrophysics. However, despite the progress made, many details of the modelling may be improved further. We discuss atomic data needs in terms of laboratory measurements and also ab-initio calculations. Particular emphasis is given to quantitative spectroscopy in the near-IR, which will be the focus in the era of the upcoming extremely large telescopes.

  17. Does IRAS 16293-2422 have a hot core? Chemical inventory and abundance changes in its protostellar environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöier, F. L.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.

    2002-08-01

    A detailed radiative transfer analysis of the observed continuum and molecular line emission toward the deeply embedded young stellar object IRAS 16293-2422 is performed. Accurate molecular abundances and abundance changes with radius are presented. The continuum modelling is used to constrain the temperature and density distributions in the envelope, enabling quantitative estimates of various molecular abundances. The density structure is well described by a single power-law falling off as r-1.7, i.e., in the range of values predicted by infall models. A detailed analysis of the molecular line emission strengthens the adopted physical model and lends further support that parts of the circumstellar surroundings of IRAS 16293-2422 are in a state of collapse. The molecular excitation analysis reveals that the emission from some molecular species is well reproduced assuming a constant fractional abundance throughout the envelope. The abundances and isotope ratios are generally close to typical values found in cold molecular clouds in these cases, and there is a high degree of deuterium fractionation. There are, however, a number of notable exceptions. Lines covering a wide range of excitation conditions indicate for some molecules, e.g., H_2CO, CH_3OH, SO, SO_2 and OCS, a drastic increase in their abundances in the warm and dense inner region of the circumstellar envelope. The location at which this increase occurs is consistent with the radius at which ices are expected to thermally evaporate off the grains. In all, there is strong evidence for the presence of a ``hot core'' close to the protostar, whose physical properties are similar to those detected towards most high mass protostars except for a scaling factor. However, the small scale of the hot gas and the infalling nature of the envelope lead to very different chemical time scales between low mass and high mass hot cores, such that only very rapidly produced second-generation complex molecules can be formed in

  18. Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi

    2008-01-15

    Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

  19. Hot spot initiation and chemical reaction in shocked polymeric bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Zybin, Sergey; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William; Materials; Process Simulation Center, Caltech Team

    2011-06-01

    A polymer bonded explosive (PBX) model based on PBXN-106 is studied via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using reactive force field (ReaxFF) under shock loading conditions. Hotspot is observed when shock waves pass through the non-planar interface of explosives and elastomers. Adiabatic shear localization is proposed as the main mechanism of hotspot ignition in PBX for high velocity impact. Our simulation also shows that the coupling of shear localization and chemical reactions at hotspot region play important rules at stress relaxtion for explosives. The phenomenon that shock waves are obsorbed by elastomers is also observed in the MD simulations. This research received supports from ARO (W911NF-05-1-0345; W911NF-08-1-0124), ONR (N00014-05-1-0778), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  20. A study of diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition on Nc coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polini, R.; Kumashiro, S.; Jackson, M. J.; Amar, M.; Ahmed, W.; Sein, H.

    2006-04-01

    Deposition of diamond films onto various substrates can result in significant technological advantages in terms of functionality and improved life and performance of components. Diamond is hard, wear resistant, chemically inert, and biocompatible. It is considered to be the ideal material for surfaces of cutting tools and biomedical components. However, it is well known that diamond deposition onto technologically important substrates, such as co-cemented carbides and steels, is problematic due to carbon interaction with the substrate, low nucleation densities, and poor adhesion. Several papers previously published in the relevant literature have reported the application of interlayer materials such as metal nitrides and carbides to provide bonding between diamond and hostile substrates. In this study, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond on TiN/SiN x nc (nc) interlayers deposited at relatively low temperatures has been investigated for the first time. The nc layers were deposited at 70 or 400 °C on Si substrates using a dual ion beam deposition system. The results showed that a preliminary seeding pretreatment with diamond suspension was necessary to achieve large diamond nucleation densities and that diamond nucleation was larger on nc films than on bare sc-Si subjected to the same pretreatment and CVD process parameters. TiN/SiN x layers synthesized at 70 or 400 °C underwent different nanostructure modifications during diamond CVD. The data also showed that TiN/SiN x films obtained at 400 °C are preferable in so far as their use as interlayers between hostile substrates and CVD diamond is concerned.

  1. Highly conducting phosphorous doped Nc-Si:H thin films deposited at high deposition rate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Waman, V S; Kamble, M M; Ghosh, S S; Mayabadi, Azam; Sathe, V G; Amalnekar, D P; Pathan, H M; Jadkar, S R

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of highly conducting phosphorous doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films at substantially low substrate temperature (200 degrees C) by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) method using pure silane (SiH4) and phosphine (PH3) gas mixture without hydrogen dilution. Structural, optical and electrical properties of these films were investigated as a function of PH3 gas-phase ratio. The characterization of these films by low-angle X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that, the incorporation of phosphorous in nc-Si:H induces an amorphization in the nc-Si:H film structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that hydrogen predominately incorporated in phosphorous doped n-type nc-Si:H films mainly in di-hydrogen species (Si-H2) and poly-hydrogen (Si-H2)n bonded species signifying that the films become porous, and micro-void rich. We have observed high band gap (1.97-2.37 eV) in the films, though the hydrogen content is low (< 1.4 at.%) over the entire range of PH3 gas-phase ratio studied. Under the optimum deposition conditions, phosphorous doped nc-Si:H films with high dark conductivity (sigma Dark -5.3 S/cm), low charge-carrier activation energy (E(act) - 132 meV) and high band gap (- 2.01 eV), low hydrogen content (- 0.74 at.%) were obtained at high deposition rate (12.9 angstroms/s).

  2. Rapid localization of point mutations in PCR products by chemical (HOT) modification.

    PubMed

    Tindall, K R; Whitaker, R A

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of mutational mechanisms in mammalian cells use the AS52 Chinese hamster ovary cell line. AS52 mutants can be selected as 6-thioguanine resistant colonies and mutations are studied at a chromosomally integrated gpt locus. Mutant gpt sequences are amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to distinguish deletions from putative point mutations. PCR is efficiently performed from a few thousand lysed cells or from isolated genomic DNA. Amplified mutant PCR fragments carrying putative point mutations are further characterized by localizing the site of the mutation using chemical modification. A heteroduplex molecule consisting of one wild-type and one mutant DNA strand is generated. A base mismatch will be produced at the site of the mutation. Mismatched cytosine or thymine residues are sensitive to modification by hydroxylamine or osmium tetroxide, respectively. The modified DNA heteroduplex is then sensitive to piperidine cleavage. If one strand is 32P-end labeled, then the cleavage product can be separated on a denaturing acrylamide sequencing gel and visualized using autoradiography. Thus, the site of a mutation can be localized to a specific region of the gene, thereby simplifying the DNA sequence analysis and facilitating the rapid generation of mutational sequence spectra.

  3. Fast chemical and isotopic exchange of nitrogen during reaction with hot molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokochi, Reika; Marty, Bernard

    2006-07-01

    Molybdenum crucibles are commonly used to extract nitrogen from geological samples by induction heating. Because nitrogen is known to be reactive with certain metals (e.g., Ti and Fe), we have tested the reactivity of gaseous nitrogen with a Mo crucible held at 1800°C. The consumption of nitrogen, determined by monitoring the N2/40Ar ratio of the gas phase, varied between 25 and 100%, depending on the reaction duration. Nitrogen of the reacted gas was found to be systematically enriched in 15N relative to 14N by 10‰ compared to the initial isotopic composition, without any correlation with nitrogen consumption. We propose that a rapid isotopic exchange occurs between nitrogen originally trapped in the crucible and nitrogen from the gas phase, which modifies the isotopic composition of the reacted gas. This process can significantly bias the isotopic determination of nitrogen in rocks and minerals when a Mo furnace is used for gas extraction. Meanwhile, the rate of N-Mo chemical bonding may be controlled by the formation of nitride (rather than solid solution), a process slower than the isotopic exchange. The use of a Mo furnace for the extraction of trace nitrogen from rocks and minerals should therefore be avoided.

  4. Examinations of Chemical Resistance and Thermal Behaviour of Ceramic Filter Materials for Hot-Gas Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Angermann, J.; Meyer, B.; Horlbeck, W.

    2002-09-19

    Increasing prosperity and the steady growth of the world population lead to a strongly rising energy requirement. Therefore the saving of the available resources as well as the limitation of CO{sub 2}-emission are the main reasons for developing highly efficient power stations. The use of combined cycle technology for advanced coal fired power plants allow a significantly higher conversion efficiency than it is possible in an only steam power plant. In order to increase the gas turbine inlet temperature, the filtration of fine particles is necessary. Therefore the filtration unit is one of the key components of the circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology (PFBC). To use this technology more effectively, gas cleaning at high temperatures or in an reducing atmosphere is necessary. A possibility of the effective gas cleaning at high temperatures is the use of porous ceramic candle filters. The structure of such filter elements usually consists of a highly porous sup port which ensures the mechanical strength and a layer which operates as the functional part for the particle removal. To ensure a guaranteed lifetime of about 16000 h the effect of combustion or gasification atmosphere and temperature on the thermal and mechanical properties of the filter material has to be studied. The examinations and results, described in this article, are part of some previous work. This paper focuses especially on the chemical resistance and the thermal behaviour of the used ceramic filter materials.

  5. Chemical enrichment in the hot intra-cluster medium seen with XMM-Newton/EPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J.; Kosec, P.; Zhang, Y.; Mao, J.; Werner, N.

    2016-06-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM), permeating the large gravitational potential well of galaxy clusters and groups, is rich in metals, which can be detected via their emission lines in the soft X-ray band. These heavy elements (typically from O to Ni) have been synthesized by Type Ia (SNIa) and core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae within the galaxy members, and continuously enrich the ICM since the cosmic star formation peak (z ≃ 2-3). Because the predicted chemical yields of supernovae depend on either their explosion mechanisms (SNIa) or the initial mass and metallicity of their progenitors (SNcc), measuring the abundances in the ICM can help to constrain supernovae models. In this study, we use XMM-Newton/EPIC to measure the abundances of 9 elements (Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni) in a sample of 44 cool-core galaxy clusters, groups and ellipticals (the CHEERS catalog). Combining these results with the O and Ne abundances measured using RGS, we establish an average X/Fe abundance pattern in the ICM, and we determine the best-fit SNIa and SNcc models, as well as the relative fraction of SNIa/SNcc responsible for the enrichment.

  6. Rapid localization of point mutations in PCR products by chemical (HOT) modification

    SciTech Connect

    Tindall, K.R.; Whitaker, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The studies of mutational mechanisms in mammalian cells use the AS52 Chinese hamster ovary cell line. Mutant gpt sequences are amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to distinguish deletions from putative point mutations. PCR is efficiently performed from a few thousand lysed cells or from isolated genomic DNA. Amplified mutant PCR fragments carrying putative point mutations are further characterized by localizing the site of the mutation using chemical modification. A heteroduplex molecule consisting of one wild-type and one mutant DNA strand is generated. A base mismatch will be produced at the site of the mutation. Mismatched cytosine or thymine residues are sensitive to modification by hydroxylamine or osmium tetroxide, respectively. The modified DNA heteroduplex is then sensitive to piperidine cleavage. If one strand is {sup 32}P-end labeled, then the cleavage product can be separated on a denaturing acrylamide sequencing gel and visualized using autoradiography. Thus, the site of a mutation can be localized to a specific region of the gene, thereby simplifying the DNA sequence analysis and facilitating the rapid generation of mutational sequence spectra.

  7. Learning about Atoms, Molecules, and Chemical Bonds: A Case Study of Multiple-Model Use in Grade 11 Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allan G.; Treagust, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Reports in detail on a year-long case study of multiple-model use at grade 11. Suggests that students who socially negotiated the shared and unshared attributes of common analogical models for atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds used these models more consistently in their explanations. (Author/CCM)

  8. Chemical Properties of Electronically Excited Halogen Atoms X(2P1/2) (X=F,Cl,Br,I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichinin, A. I.

    2006-06-01

    The experimental data on elementary processes (collisional deactivation, chemical reactions, photodissociation) involving spin-orbitally excited X(2P1/2) atoms (X=F,Cl,Br,I) published up to the middle of 2005 are summarized in the present compilation. Critical evaluation of the data and limited comparison to theoretical calculations are also presented.

  9. Learning about Atoms, Molecules, and Chemical Bonds: A Case Study of Multiple-Model Use in Grade 11 Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allan G.; Treagust, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Reports in detail on a year-long case study of multiple-model use at grade 11. Suggests that students who socially negotiated the shared and unshared attributes of common analogical models for atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds used these models more consistently in their explanations. (Author/CCM)

  10. Studies on Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type Bi-Sb-Te Based Alloys by Gas Atomization and Hot Extrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki-Chan; Madavali, Babu; Kim, Eun-Bin; Koo, Kyung-Wan; Hong, Soon-Jik

    2016-10-01

    p-Type Bi2Te3 + 75% Sb2Te3 based thermoelectric materials were fabricated via gas atomization and the hot extrusion process. The gas atomized powder showed a clean surface with a spherical shape, and expanded in a wide particle size distribution (average particle size 50 μm). The phase of the fabricated extruded and R-extruded bars was identified using x-ray diffraction. The relative densities of both the extruded and R-extruded samples were measured by Archimedes principle with ˜98% relative density. The R-extruded bar exhibited finer grain microstructure than that of single extrusion process, which was attributed to a recrystallization mechanism during the fabrication. The R-extruded sample showed improved Vickers hardness compared to the extruded sample due to its fine grain microstructure. The electrical conductivity improved for the extruded sample whereas the Seebeck coefficient decreases due to its high carrier concentration. The peak power factor, ˜4.26 × 10-3 w/mK2 was obtained for the single extrusion sample, which is higher than the R-extrusion sample owing to its high electrical properties.

  11. Studies on Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type Bi-Sb-Te Based Alloys by Gas Atomization and Hot Extrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki-Chan; Madavali, Babu; Kim, Eun-Bin; Koo, Kyung-Wan; Hong, Soon-Jik

    2017-05-01

    p-Type Bi2Te3 + 75% Sb2Te3 based thermoelectric materials were fabricated via gas atomization and the hot extrusion process. The gas atomized powder showed a clean surface with a spherical shape, and expanded in a wide particle size distribution (average particle size 50 μm). The phase of the fabricated extruded and R-extruded bars was identified using x-ray diffraction. The relative densities of both the extruded and R-extruded samples were measured by Archimedes principle with ˜98% relative density. The R-extruded bar exhibited finer grain microstructure than that of single extrusion process, which was attributed to a recrystallization mechanism during the fabrication. The R-extruded sample showed improved Vickers hardness compared to the extruded sample due to its fine grain microstructure. The electrical conductivity improved for the extruded sample whereas the Seebeck coefficient decreases due to its high carrier concentration. The peak power factor, ˜4.26 × 10-3 w/mK2 was obtained for the single extrusion sample, which is higher than the R-extrusion sample owing to its high electrical properties.

  12. Average atom transport properties for pure and mixed species in the hot and warm dense matter regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Starrett, C. E.; Kress, J. D.; Collins, L. A.; Hanson, D. E.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.

    2012-10-15

    The Kubo-Greenwood formulation for calculation of optical conductivities with an average atom model is extended to calculate thermal conductivities. The method is applied to species and conditions of interest for inertial confinement fusion. For the mixed species studied, the partial pressure mixing rule is used. Results including pressures, dc, and thermal conductivities are compared to ab initio calculations. Agreement for pressures is good, for both the pure and mixed species. For conductivities, it is found that the ad hoc renormalization method with line broadening, described in the text, gives best agreement with the ab initio results. However, some disagreement is found and the possible reasons for this are discussed.

  13. Investigation of chemical modifiers for phosphorus in a graphite furnace using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, Fábio G.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe

    2006-08-01

    Phosphorus is not one of the elements that are typically determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, but this technique nevertheless offers several advantages that make it attractive, such as the relatively great freedom from interferences. As the main resonance lines for phosphorus are in the vacuum-ultraviolet, inaccessible by conventional atomic absorption spectrometry equipment, Ĺvov and Khartsyzov proposed to use the non-resonance doublet at 213.5 / 213.6 nm. Later it turned out that with conventional equipment it is necessary to use a chemical modifier in order to get reasonable sensitivity, and lanthanum was the first one suggested for that purpose. In the following years more than 30 modifiers have been proposed for the determination of this element, and there is no consensus about the best one. In this work high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry has been used to investigate the determination of phosphorus without a modifier and with the addition of selected modifiers of very different nature, including the originally recommended lanthanum modifier, several palladium-based modifiers and sodium fluoride. As high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry is revealing the spectral environment of the analytical line at high resolution, it became obvious that without the addition of a modifier essentially no atomic phosphorus is formed, even at 2700 °C. The absorption measured with line source atomic absorption spectrometry in this case is due to the PO molecule, the spectrum of which is overlapping with the atomic line. Palladium, with or without the addition of calcium or ascorbic acid, was found to be the only modifier to produce almost exclusively atomic phosphorus. Lanthanum and particularly sodium fluoride produced a mixture of P and PO, depending on the atomization temperature. This fact can explain at least some of the discrepancies found in the literature and some of the phenomena observed in the

  14. DFT-chemical pressure analysis: visualizing the role of atomic size in shaping the structures of inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2012-04-04

    Atomic size effects have long played a role in our empirical understanding of inorganic crystal structures. At the level of electronic structure calculations, however, the contribution of atomic size remains difficult to analyze, both alone and relative to other influences. In this paper, we extend the concepts outlined in a recent communication to develop a theoretical method for revealing the impact of the space requirements of atoms: the density functional theory-chemical pressure (DFT-CP) analysis. The influence of atomic size is most pronounced when the optimization of bonding contacts is impeded by steric repulsion at other contacts, resulting in nonideal interatomic distances. Such contacts are associated with chemical pressures (CPs) acting upon the atoms involved. The DFT-CP analysis allows for the calculation and interpretation of the CP distributions within crystal structures using DFT results. The method is demonstrated using the stability of the Ca(2)Ag(7) structure over the simpler CaCu(5)-type alternative adopted by its Sr-analogue, SrAg(5). A hypothetical CaCu(5)-type CaAg(5) phase is found to exhibit large negative pressures on each Ca atom, which are concentrated in two symmetry-related interstitial spaces on opposite sides of the Ca nucleus. In moving to the Ca(2)Ag(7) structure, relief comes to each Ca atom as a defect plane is introduced into one of these two negative-pressure regions, breaking the symmetry equivalence of the two sides and yielding a more compact Ca coordination environment. These results illustrate how the DFT-CP analysis can visually and intuitively portray how atomic size interacts with electronics in determining structure, and bridge theoretical and experimental approaches toward understanding the structural chemistry of inorganic materials.

  15. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  16. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition chemistry in the gas phase and on the catalyst surface with organosilicon compounds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yujun

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), also referred to as catalytic CVD (Cat-CVD), has been used to produce Si-containing thin films, nanomaterials, and functional polymer coatings that have found wide applications in microelectronic and photovoltaic devices, in automobiles, and in biotechnology. The success of HWCVD is largely due to its various advantages, including high deposition rate, low substrate temperatures, lack of plasma-induced damage, and large-area uniformity. Film growth in HWCVD is induced by reactive species generated from primary decomposition on the metal wire or from secondary reactions in the gas phase. In order to achieve a rational and efficient optimization of the process, it is essential to identify the reactive species and to understand the chemical kinetics that govern the production of these precursor species for film growth. In this Account, we report recent progress in unraveling the complex gas-phase reaction chemistry in the HWCVD growth of silicon carbide thin films using organosilicon compounds as single-source precursors. We have demonstrated that laser ionization mass spectrometry is a powerful diagnostic tool for studying the gas-phase reaction chemistry when combined with the methods of isotope labeling and chemical trapping. The four methyl-substituted silane molecules, belonging to open-chain alkylsilanes, dissociatively adsorb on W and Ta filaments to produce methyl radical and H2 molecule. Under the typical deposition pressures, with increasing number of methyl substitution, the dominant chemistry occurring in the gas phase switches from silylene/silene reactions to free-radical short chain reactions. This change in dominant reaction intermediates from silylene/silene to methyl radicals explains the observation from thin film deposition that silicon carbide films become more C-rich with a decreasing number of Si-H bonds in the four precursor molecules. In the case of cyclic monosilacyclobutanes, we have

  17. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  18. Hot bubbles of planetary nebulae with hydrogen-deficient winds. I. Heat conduction in a chemically stratified plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, C.; Steffen, M.; Schönberner, D.; Rühling, U.

    2016-02-01

    Heat conduction has been found a plausible solution to explain discrepancies between expected and measured temperatures in hot bubbles of planetary nebulae (PNe). While the heat conduction process depends on the chemical composition, to date it has been exclusively studied for pure hydrogen plasmas in PNe. A smaller population of PNe show hydrogen-deficient and helium- and carbon-enriched surfaces surrounded by bubbles of the same composition; considerable differences are expected in physical properties of these objects in comparison to the pure hydrogen case. The aim of this study is to explore how a chemistry-dependent formulation of the heat conduction affects physical properties and how it affects the X-ray emission from PN bubbles of hydrogen-deficient stars. We extend the description of heat conduction in our radiation hydrodynamics code to work with any chemical composition. We then compare the bubble-formation process with a representative PN model using both the new and the old descriptions. We also compare differences in the resulting X-ray temperature and luminosity observables of the two descriptions. The improved equations show that the heat conduction in our representative model of a hydrogen-deficient PN is nearly as efficient with the chemistry-dependent description; a lower value on the diffusion coefficient is compensated by a slightly steeper temperature gradient. The bubble becomes somewhat hotter with the improved equations, but differences are otherwise minute. The observable properties of the bubble in terms of the X-ray temperature and luminosity are seemingly unaffected.

  19. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  20. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  1. High-angle tilt boundary graphene domain recrystallized from mobile hot-wire-assisted chemical vapor deposition system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinsup; Baek, Jinwook; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Mi Jin; Oh, Seran; Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Seok-Hee; Cho, Byung Jin; Lee, Zonghoon; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2014-08-13

    Crystallization of materials has attracted research interest for a long time, and its mechanisms in three-dimensional materials have been well studied. However, crystallization of two-dimensional (2D) materials is yet to be challenged. Clarifying the dynamics underlying growth of 2D materials will provide the insight for the potential route to synthesize large and highly crystallized 2D domains with low defects. Here, we present the growth dynamics and recrystallization of 2D material graphene under a mobile hot-wire assisted chemical vapor deposition (MHW-CVD) system. Under local but sequential heating by MHW-CVD system, the initial nucleation of nanocrystalline graphenes, which was not extended into the growth stage due to the insufficient thermal energy, took a recrystallization and converted into a grand single crystal domain. During this process, the stitching-like healing of graphene was also observed. The local but sequential endowing thermal energy to nanocrystalline graphenes enabled us to simultaneously reveal the recrystallization and healing dynamics in graphene growth, which suggests an alternative route to synthesize a highly crystalline and large domain size graphene. Also, this recrystallization and healing of 2D nanocrystalline graphenes offers an interesting insight on the growth mechanism of 2D materials.

  2. Role of oxygen and nitrogen in n-type microcrystalline silicon carbide grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomaska, Manuel; Mock, Jan; Köhler, Florian; Zastrow, Uwe; Perani, Martina; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Cavalcoli, Daniela; Carius, Reinhard; Finger, Friedhelm; Ding, Kaining

    2016-12-01

    N-type microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H(n)) deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition provides advantageous opto-electronic properties for window layer material in silicon-based thin-film solar cells and silicon heterojunction solar cells. So far, it is known that the dark conductivity (σd) increases with the increase in the crystallinity of μc-SiC:H(n)films. However, due to the fact that no active doping source is used, the mechanism of electrical transport in these films is still under debate. It is suggested that unintentional doping by atmospheric oxygen (O) or nitrogen (N) contamination plays an important role in the electrical transport. To investigate the impact of O and N, we incorporated O and N in μc-SiC:H(n) films and compared the influence on the microstructural, electronic, and optical properties. We discovered that, in addition to increasing the crystallinity, it is also possible to increase the σd by several orders of magnitude by increasing the O-concentration or the N-concentration in the films. Combining a high concentration of O and N, along with a high crystallinity in the film, we optimized the σd to a maximum of 5 S/cm.

  3. Chemical vapour deposition of silicon under reduced pressure in a hot-wall reactor: Equilibrium and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Francis; Hottier, François; Cadoret, Robert

    1982-02-01

    Silicon chemical vapour deposition (SiH 2Cl 2/H 2 system), under reduced pressure conditions, in a hot-wall reactor, is presented. The vapour phase composition is assessed by evaluating two distnct equilbria. The "homogeneous equilibrium", which assumes that the vapour phase is not in equilibrium with solid silicon, is thought to give an adequate description of the vapour phase in the case of low pressure, high gas velocities, good temperature homogeneity conditions. A comparison with "heterogeneous equilibrium" enables us to calculate the supersaturation so evidencing a highly irreversible growth system. The experimental determination of the growth rate reveals two distinct temperature ranges: below 1000°C, polycrystalline films are usually obtained with a thermally activated growth rate (+40 kcal mole -1) and a reaction order, with respect to the predominant species SiCl 2, close to one; above 1000°C, the films are always monocrystalline and their growth rate exhibits a much lower or even negative activation energy, the reaction order in SiCl 2 remaining about one.

  4. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  5. Desorption chemical ionization and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric studies of the glucuronide metabolites of doxylamine.

    PubMed

    Lay, J O; Korfmacher, W A; Miller, D W; Siitonen, P; Holder, C L; Gosnell, A B

    1986-11-01

    Three glucuronide metabolites of doxylamine succinate were collected in a single fraction using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) from the urine of dosed male Fischer 344 rats. The metabolites were then separated using an additional HPLC step into fractions containing predominantly a single glucuronide metabolite. Analysis of the metabolites by methane and ammonia desorption chemical ionization, with and without derivatization, revealed fragment ions suggestive of a hydroxylated doxylamine moiety. Identification of the metabolites as glucuronides of doxylamine, desmethyldoxylamine and didesmethyldoxylamine was accomplished, based on determination of the molecular weight and exact mass of each metabolite using fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization. This assignment was confirmed by the fragmentation observed in FAB mass spectrometric and tandem mass spectrometric experiments. Para-substitution of the glucuronide on the phenyl moiety was observed by 500-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. A fraction containing all three glucuronide metabolites, after a single stage of HPLC separation, was also analysed by FAB mass spectrometry, and the proton- and potassium-containing quasimolecular ions for all three metabolites were observed.

  6. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Broas, Mikael Vuorinen, Vesa; Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri; Sajavaara, Timo; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  7. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  8. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  9. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers’ global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  10. Pressure and electrical resistivity measurements on hot expanded nickel: comparisons with quantum molecular dynamics simulations and average atom approaches.

    PubMed

    Clérouin, Jean; Starrett, Charles; Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe; Noiret, Pierre; Renaudin, Patrick

    2010-10-01

    We present experimental results on pressure and resistivity on expanded nickel at a density of 0.1 g/cm3 and temperature of a few eV. These data, corresponding to the warm dense matter regime, are used to benchmark different theoretical approaches. A comparison is presented between fully three-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) methods, based on density functional theory, with average atom methods, that are essentially one dimensional. In this regime the evaluation of the thermodynamic properties as well as electrical properties is difficult due to the concurrence of density and thermal effects which directly drive the metal-nonmetal transition. Experimental pressures and resistivities are given in a tabular form with temperatures deduced from QMD simulations.

  11. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A.; Lopaev, D.; Lee, C. J.; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, V.; Yakushev, O.; Bijkerk, F.

    2015-10-01

    Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that are typical for a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film. It was experimentally observed that the film consists of carbon (∼70 at.%), oxygen (∼20 at.%) and hydrogen (bound to oxygen and carbon), along with a few at.% of tin. Most of the oxygen and hydrogen are most likely present as OH groups, chemically bound to carbon, indicating an important role for adsorbed water during the film formation process. It was observed that the film is predominantly sp3 hybridized carbon, as is typical for diamond-like carbon. The Raman spectra of the film, under 514 and 264 nm excitation, are typical for hydrogenated diamond-like carbon. Additionally, the lower etch rate and higher energy threshold in chemical ion sputtering in H2 plasma, compared to magnetron-sputtered carbon films, suggests that the film exhibits diamond-like carbon properties.

  12. Comparative study of chemical modifiers for the determination of molybdenum in milk by electrothermal atomisation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Barrera, P; Calvo, C P; Bermejo-Martinez, F

    1990-05-01

    A comparative study of various chemical modifiers for the determination of molybdenum in milk by electrothermal atomisation atomic absorption spectrometry was carried out. Methods with nitric acid or barium difluoride as the chemical modifier and in the absence of a chemical modifier were studied by introducing the milk samples directly into the graphite furnace with octyl alcohol. The graphite furnace programme, amount of modifier and the calibration and additions graphs were studied in all instances. The characteristic masses were 17.82, 18.64 and 12.08 pg of molybdenum in the absence of a chemical modifier and with nitric acid or barium difluoride as the chemical modifier, respectively. The precision, accuracy and interferences of the method were also investigated.

  13. Imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction of chemical groups inside a protein complex using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duckhoe; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopes can be used to image and chemically characterize surfaces down to the atomic scale. However, the localized tip-sample interactions in scanning probe microscopes limit high-resolution images to the topmost atomic layer of surfaces, and characterizing the inner structures of materials and biomolecules is a challenge for such instruments. Here, we show that an atomic force microscope can be used to image and three-dimensionally reconstruct chemical groups inside a protein complex. We use short single-stranded DNAs as imaging labels that are linked to target regions inside a protein complex, and T-shaped atomic force microscope cantilevers functionalized with complementary probe DNAs allow the labels to be located with sequence specificity and subnanometre resolution. After measuring pairwise distances between labels, we reconstruct the three-dimensional structure formed by the target chemical groups within the protein complex using simple geometric calculations. Experiments with the biotin-streptavidin complex show that the predicted three-dimensional loci of the carboxylic acid groups of biotins are within 2 Å of their respective loci in the corresponding crystal structure, suggesting that scanning probe microscopes could complement existing structural biological techniques in solving structures that are difficult to study due to their size and complexity.

  14. Origin of central abundances in the hot intra-cluster medium. II. Chemical enrichment and supernova yield models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kosec, P.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Mao, J.; Werner, N.; Pols, O. R.; Vink, J.

    2016-11-01

    The hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is rich in metals, which are synthesised by supernovae (SNe) and accumulate over time into the deep gravitational potential well of clusters of galaxies. Since most of the elements visible in X-rays are formed by type Ia (SNIa) and/or core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae, measuring their abundances gives us direct information on the nucleosynthesis products of billions of SNe since the epoch of the star formation peak (z 2-3). In this study, we compare the most accurate average X/Fe abundance ratios (compiled in a previous work from XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS observations of 44 galaxy clusters, groups, and ellipticals), representative of the chemical enrichment in the nearby ICM, to various SNIa and SNcc nucleosynthesis models found in the literature. The use of a SNcc model combined to any favoured standard SNIa model (deflagration or delayed-detonation) fails to reproduce our abundance pattern. In particular, the Ca/Fe and Ni/Fe ratios are significantly underestimated by the models. We show that the Ca/Fe ratio can be reproduced better, either by taking a SNIa delayed-detonation model that matches the observations of the Tycho supernova remnant, or by adding a contribution from the "Ca-rich gap transient" SNe, whose material should easily mix into the hot ICM. On the other hand, the Ni/Fe ratio can be reproduced better by assuming that both deflagration and delayed-detonation SNIa contribute in similar proportions to the ICM enrichment. In either case, the fraction of SNIa over the total number of SNe (SNIa+SNcc) contributing to the ICM enrichment ranges within 29-45%. This fraction is found to be systematically higher than the corresponding SNIa/(SNIa+SNcc) fraction contributing to the enrichment of the proto-solar environnement (15-25%). We also discuss and quantify two useful constraints on both SNIa (i.e. the initial metallicity on SNIa progenitors and the fraction of low-mass stars that result in SNIa) and SNcc (i.e. the effect of

  15. Size-segregated aerosol in a hot-spot pollution urban area: Chemical composition and three-way source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Bernardoni, V; Elser, M; Valli, G; Valentini, S; Bigi, A; Fermo, P; Piazzalunga, A; Vecchi, R

    2017-08-24

    In this work, a comprehensive characterisation and source apportionment of size-segregated aerosol collected using a multistage cascade impactor was performed. The samples were collected during wintertime in Milan (Italy), which is located in the Po Valley, one of the main pollution hot-spot areas in Europe. For every sampling, size-segregated mass concentration, elemental and ionic composition, and levoglucosan concentration were determined. Size-segregated data were inverted using the program MICRON to identify and quantify modal contributions of all the measured components. The detailed chemical characterisation allowed the application of a three-way (3-D) receptor model (implemented using Multilinear Engine) for size-segregated source apportionment and chemical profiles identification. It is noteworthy that - as far as we know - this is the first time that three-way source apportionment is attempted using data of aerosol collected by traditional cascade impactors. Seven factors were identified: wood burning, industry, resuspended dust, regional aerosol, construction works, traffic 1, and traffic 2. Further insights into size-segregated factor profiles suggested that the traffic 1 factor can be associated to diesel vehicles and traffic 2 to gasoline vehicles. The regional aerosol factor resulted to be the main contributor (nearly 50%) to the droplet mode (accumulation sub-mode with modal diameter in the range 0.5-1 μm), whereas the overall contribution from the two factors related to traffic was the most important one in the other size modes (34-41%). The results showed that applying a 3-D receptor model to size-segregated samples allows identifying factors of local and regional origin while receptor modelling on integrated PM fractions usually singles out factors characterised by primary (e.g. industry, traffic, soil dust) and secondary (e.g. ammonium sulphate and nitrate) origin. Furthermore, the results suggested that the information on size

  16. ProCS15: a DFT-based chemical shift predictor for backbone and Cβ atoms in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Anders S.; Bratholm, Lars A.; Christensen, Anders S.; Channir, Maher

    2015-01-01

    We present ProCS15: a program that computes the isotropic chemical shielding values of backbone and Cβ atoms given a protein structure in less than a second. ProCS15 is based on around 2.35 million OPBE/6-31G(d,p)//PM6 calculations on tripeptides and small structural models of hydrogen-bonding. The ProCS15-predicted chemical shielding values are compared to experimentally measured chemical shifts for Ubiquitin and the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G through linear regression and yield RMSD values of up to 2.2, 0.7, and 4.8 ppm for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms. These RMSD values are very similar to corresponding RMSD values computed using OPBE/6-31G(d,p) for the entire structure for each proteins. These maximum RMSD values can be reduced by using NMR-derived structural ensembles of Ubiquitin. For example, for the largest ensemble the largest RMSD values are 1.7, 0.5, and 3.5 ppm for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen. The corresponding RMSD values predicted by several empirical chemical shift predictors range between 0.7–1.1, 0.2–0.4, and 1.8–2.8 ppm for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms, respectively. PMID:26623185

  17. Physical and chemical kinetic processes in the CVD of silicon from SiH 2Cl 2/H 2 gaseous mixtures in a vertical cylindrical hot-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, F.; Prebende, C.; Couderc, J. P.

    1991-09-01

    The kinetic process of the CVD of silicon is studied in the Si-H-Cl system on the basis of a large-scale experimental investigation of the growth rates. A cylindrical hot-wall LPCVD reactor was specifically built up and equipped with a sensitive microbalance. The physical transport phenomena are theoretically studied for a cylindrical geometry of both the hot reactional zone and the substrate itself: by solving the heat equation, a large isothermal area is found to extend around the substrate; the study of the momentum transfers reveals, by calculating gas velocities and streamlines, a very low disturbance of the gas flow by the occurrence of the substrate, due to a creeping laminar flow; at last, a coupled modelling of momentum and mass transfers shows, by computing gaseous species concentrations and deposition thicknesses profiles, that the growth rate is not influenced by total pressure, hardly by temperature, is increased by increasing the total flow rate and decreased by increasing the dilution ratio. Then, on the basis of thermodynamic approaches and considerations on adsorption phenomena, two theoretical mechanisms are proposed for the chemical process, depending on the experimental conditions. Taking into account theoretical and experimental kinetics, the temperature, the total flow rate and the total pressure are found to induce the transition between physical and chemical kinetic control. In both proposed chemical mechanisms, the limiting step is found to be the surface reaction between SiCl 2 adsorbed species and H 2 molecules. The predominant process is those with an activation energy of about 170 kJ mol -1 and a reaction order close to one with respect to H 2 species. The second mechanism, which involves an inhibition of the surface by atomic Cl species, occurs under more specifics conditions, i.e., high temperature, high dilution ratio and low total pressure.

  18. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2002-08-05

    We describe a solid state Br atom source for surface etching, kinetics, or reaction dynamics studies. Pulsed laser irradiation of crystalline KBr, near the bulk absorption threshold at 6eV, produces hyperthermal Br atmos in dense plumes. The Br atom density and velocities may be controlled by choice of laser pulse power and photon energy. Single and multiple pulse excitation of KBr produces Br and Br* in controllable quantities and velocities, thus providing an attractive UHV compatible solid-state radical atom source. The solid-state atom source is in principle extensible to other halogens using other alkali halides and perhaps other materials.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  20. Physical bounds of metallic nanofingers obtained by mechano-chemical atomic force microscope nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, O.; Abdolahad, M.

    2009-01-01

    To obtain metallic nanofingers applicable in surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, a mechano-chemical atomic force microscope (AFM) nanolithography on a metallic thin film (50 nm in thickness)/piezoelectric substrate covered by a spin-coated polymeric mask layer (50-60 nm in thickness) was implemented. The effective shape of cross-section of the before and after etching grooves have been determined by using the AFM tip deconvolution surface analysis, structure factor, and power spectral density analyses. The wet-etching process improved the shape and aspect ratio (height/width) of the grooves and also smoothed the surface within them. We have shown that the relaxed surface tension of the polymeric mask layer resulted in a down limitation in width and length of the lithographed nanofingers. The surface tension of the mask layer can be changed by altering the initial concentration of the polymer in the deposition process. As the surface tension reduced, the down limitation decreased. In fact, an extrapolation of the analyzed statistical data has indicated that by decreasing the surface tension from 39 to 10 nN/nm, the minimum obtainable width and length of the metallic nanofingers was changed from about 55 nm and 2 μm to 15 nm and 0.44 μm, respectively. Using the extrapolation's results, we have shown that the future SAW sensors buildable by this nanolithography method possess a practical bound in their synchronous frequency (˜58 GHz), mass sensitivity (˜6125 MHz-mm 2/ng), and the limit of mass resolution (˜4.88 × 10 -10 ng/mm 2).

  1. Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesized Atomically Thin Molybdenum Disulfide with Optoelectronic-Grade Crystalline Quality.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ismail; Liu, Fangze; Vargas, Anthony; Winchester, Andrew; Man, Michael K L; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Dani, Keshav M; Gupta, Gautam; Talapatra, Saikat; Mohite, Aditya D; Kar, Swastik

    2015-09-22

    The ability to synthesize high-quality samples over large areas and at low cost is one of the biggest challenges during the developmental stage of any novel material. While chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods provide a promising low-cost route for CMOS compatible, large-scale growth of materials, it often falls short of the high-quality demands in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We present large-scale CVD synthesis of single- and few-layered MoS2 using direct vapor-phase sulfurization of MoO2, which enables us to obtain extremely high-quality single-crystal monolayer MoS2 samples with field-effect mobility exceeding 30 cm(2)/(V s) in monolayers. These samples can be readily synthesized on a variety of substrates, and demonstrate a high-degree of optoelectronic uniformity in Raman and photoluminescence mapping over entire crystals with areas exceeding hundreds of square micrometers. Because of their high crystalline quality, Raman spectroscopy on these samples reveal a range of multiphonon processes through peaks with equal or better clarity compared to past reports on mechanically exfoliated samples. This enables us to investigate the layer thickness and substrate dependence of the extremely weak phonon processes at 285 and 487 cm(-1) in 2D-MoS2. The ultrahigh, optoelectronic-grade crystalline quality of these samples could be further established through photocurrent spectroscopy, which clearly reveal excitonic states at room temperature, a feat that has been previously demonstrated only on samples which were fabricated by micro-mechanical exfoliation and then artificially suspended across trenches. Our method reflects a big step in the development of atomically thin, 2D-MoS2 for scalable, high-quality optoelectronics.

  2. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; ...

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 groundmore » state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.« less

  3. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf69/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  4. Design, Modeling, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators with Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposited Polysilicon as Thermoelement Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Maria Theresa; Tarazona, Antulio; Chong, Harold; Kraft, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, fabrication, and evaluation of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with p-type polysilicon deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) as thermoelement material. A thermal model is developed based on energy balance and heat transfer equations using lumped thermal conductances. Several test structures were fabricated to allow characterization of the boron-doped polysilicon material deposited by HWCVD. The film was found to be electrically active without any post-deposition annealing. Based on the tests performed on the test structures, it is determined that the Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the HWCVD polysilicon are 113 μV/K, 126 W/mK, and 3.58 × 10-5 Ω m, respectively. Results from laser tests performed on the fabricated TEG are in good agreement with the thermal model. The temperature values derived from the thermal model are within 2.8% of the measured temperature values. For a 1-W laser input, an open-circuit voltage and output power of 247 mV and 347 nW, respectively, were generated. This translates to a temperature difference of 63°C across the thermoelements. This paper demonstrates that HWCVD, which is a cost-effective way of producing solar cells, can also be applied in the production of TEGs. By establishing that HWCVD polysilicon can be an effective thermoelectric material, further work on developing photovoltaic-thermoelectric (PV-TE) hybrid microsystems that are cost-effective and better performing can be explored.

  5. Aerosol mass spectrometer for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Kyum; Winterer, Markus

    2005-09-01

    We present a modified aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors and describe the transfer function of the velocity and kinetic-energy measurement. The AMS is a combination of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and a particle mass spectrometer (PMS) and enables the in situ analysis of aerosols with high number concentrations up to 1018m-3. Size distributions of ultrafine particles in the range of 104-107u (amu) can be measured in the PMS. Simultaneously, molecular species up to 300u can be detected in the QMS. In the setup described here a furnace was developed to enable measurement directly at the reactor exit. The formation of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) was investigated. TMS started to decompose at about 900K and carbosilanes with two [-Si-C-] units were identified as growth species in the synthesis of SiC from TMS. With increasing temperatures particles were formed and grew by coagulation. At higher temperatures sintering of the particles became an important process. Although the particle mass reduced slightly due to a smaller residence time at higher temperatures in the reactor, the particle velocity in the molecular beam of the AMS decreased significantly. A simple model is used to compare the particle velocity in a molecular beam as a function of particle mass. The significant difference in the particle velocity can be explained by a change in the particle shape factor (κp) due to sintering.

  6. Kinetic and spectroscopic requirements for the inference of chemical heating rates and atomic hydrogen densities from OH Meinel band measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Adler-Golden, Steven M.

    We present the accuracy requirements for specific kinetic and spectroscopic parameters used in modeling populations of vibrationally excited hydroxyl. The requirements are based on simulations of the inference of chemical energy deposition rates and atomic hydrogen densities from satellite observations of the hydroxyl Meinel band emission rates. Improvement in the rate constants which describe the collisional removal of the high-lying υ states of OH and the reaction of highlying υ states with atomic oxygen is required in addition to improved specification of the nascent distribution of energy within OH upon reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone. These improvements are necessary for the interpretation of Meinel band measurements to be made from a new spaceflight experiment in less than 3 years.

  7. Atomic-level structural and chemical analysis of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Kepaptsoglou, D.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Ramasse, Q.; Hesjedal, T.; Lazarov, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of the structure and chemical composition of the Cr-doped 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Single-crystalline thin films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Al2O3 (0001), and their structural and chemical properties determined on an atomic level by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. A regular quintuple layer stacking of the Bi2Se3 film is found, with the exception of the first several atomic layers in the initial growth. The spectroscopy data gives direct evidence that Cr is preferentially substituting for Bi in the Bi2Se3 host. We also show that Cr has a tendency to segregate at internal grain boundaries of the Bi2Se3 film.

  8. Determination of bismuth in environmental samples by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using combined chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Dobrzyńska, Joanna; Gawrońska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry technique was applied for the determination of Bi in environmental samples. The study focused on the effect of Zr, Ti, Nb and W carbides, as permanent modifiers, on the Bi signal. Because of its highest thermal and chemical stability and ability to substantially increase Bi signal, NbC was chosen as the most effective modifier. The temperature programme applied for Bi determination was optimized based on the pyrolysis and atomization curves obtained for slurries prepared from certified reference materials (CRMs) of the soil and sediments. To overcome interferences caused by sulfur compounds, Ba(NO₃)₂ was used as a chemical modifier. Calibration was performed using the aqueous standard solutions. The analysis of the CRMs confirmed the reliability of the proposed analytical method. The characteristic mass for Bi was determined to be 16 pg with the detection limit of 50 ng/g for the optimized procedure at the 5% (w/v) slurry concentration.

  9. Substrate patterning with NiOx nanoparticles and hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of WO3x and carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, Z. S.

    2011-10-01

    The first part of the thesis treats the formation of nickel catalyst nanoparticles. First, a patterning technique using colloids is employed to create ordered distributions of monodisperse nanoparticles. Second, nickel films are thermally dewetted, which produces mobile species that self-arrange in non-ordered distributions of polydisperse particles. Third, the mobility of the nickel species is successfully reduced by the addition of air during the dewetting and the use of a special anchoring layer. Thus, non-ordered distributions of self-arranged monodisperse nickel oxide nanoparticles (82±10 nm x 16±2 nm) are made. Studies on nickel thickness, dewetting time and dewetting temperature are conducted. With these particle templates, graphitic carbon nanotubes are synthesised using catalytic hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), demonstrating the high-temperature processability of the nanoparticles. The second part of this thesis treats the non-catalytic HWCVD of tungsten oxides (WO3-x). Resistively heated tungsten filaments exposed to an air flow at subatmospheric pressures, produce tungsten oxide vapour species, which are collected on substrates and are subsequently characterised. First, a complete study on the process conditions is conducted, whereby the effects of filament radiation, filament temperature, process gas pressure and substrate temperature, are investigated. The thus controlled growth of nanogranular smooth amorphous and crystalline WO3-x thin films is presented for the first time. Partially crystalline smooth hydrous WO3-x thin films consisting of 20 nm grains can be deposited at very high rates. The synthesis of ultrafine powders with particle sizes of about 7 nm and very high specific surface areas of 121.7±0.4 m2·g-1 at ultrahigh deposition rates of 36 µm·min-1, is presented. Using substrate heating to 600°C or more, while using air pressures of 3·10-5 mbar to 0.1 mbar, leads to pronounced crystal structures, from nanowires, to

  10. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is It Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Merce; Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process…

  11. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is It Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Merce; Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process…

  12. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  13. Cold interactions and chemical reactions of linear polyatomic anions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał

    2017-06-28

    We consider collisional studies of linear polyatomic ions immersed in ultracold atomic gases and investigate the intermolecular interactions and chemical reactions of several molecular anions (OH(-), CN(-), NCO(-), C2H(-), C4H(-)) with alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) and alkaline-earth-metal (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) atoms. State-of-the-art ab initio techniques are applied to compute the potential energy surfaces (PESs) for these systems. The coupled cluster method restricted to single, double, and noniterative triple excitations, CCSD(T), is employed and the scalar relativistic effects in heavier metal atoms are modeled within the small-core energy-consistent pseudopotentials. The leading long-range isotropic and anisotropic induction and dispersion interaction coefficients are obtained within the perturbation theory. The PESs are characterized in detail and their universal similarities typical for systems dominated by the induction interaction are discussed. The two-dimensional PESs are provided for selected systems and can be employed in scattering calculations. The possible channels of chemical reactions and their control are analyzed based on the energetics of the reactants. The present study of the electronic structure is the first step towards the evaluation of prospects for sympathetic cooling and controlled chemistry of linear polyatomic ions with ultracold atoms.

  14. Atomic-scale chemical imaging and quantification of metallic alloy structures by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M J; Smith, David J

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L2(1) phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B(Ι)-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B(ΙΙ)-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  15. Fourier series of atomic radial distribution functions: A molecular fingerprint for machine learning models of quantum chemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Rupp, Matthias; Knoll, Aaron

    2015-08-15

    We introduce a fingerprint representation of molecules based on a Fourier series of atomic radial distribution functions. This fingerprint is unique (except for chirality), continuous, and differentiable with respect to atomic coordinates and nuclear charges. It is invariant with respect to translation, rotation, and nuclear permutation, and requires no preconceived knowledge about chemical bonding, topology, or electronic orbitals. As such, it meets many important criteria for a good molecular representation, suggesting its usefulness for machine learning models of molecular properties trained across chemical compound space. To assess the performance of this new descriptor, we have trained machine learning models of molecular enthalpies of atomization for training sets with up to 10 k organic molecules, drawn at random from a published set of 134 k organic molecules with an average atomization enthalpy of over 1770 kcal/mol. We validate the descriptor on all remaining molecules of the 134 k set. For a training set of 10 k molecules, the fingerprint descriptor achieves a mean absolute error of 8.0 kcal/mol. This is slightly worse than the performance attained using the Coulomb matrix, another popular alternative, reaching 6.2 kcal/mol for the same training and test sets. (c) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Atom probe study of the carbon distribution in a hardened martensitic hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1.

    PubMed

    Lerchbacher, Christoph; Zinner, Silvia; Leitner, Harald

    2012-07-01

    The microstructure of the hardened common hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1 has been characterized by atom probe tomography with the focus on the carbon distribution. Samples quenched with technically relevant cooling parameters λ from 0.1 (30 K/s) to 12 (0.25 K/s) have been investigated. The parameter λ is an industrially commonly used exponential cooling parameter, representing the cooling time from 800 to 500 °C in seconds divided with hundred. In all samples pronounced carbon segregation to dislocations and cluster formation could be observed after quenching. Carbon enriched interlath films with peak carbon levels of 6-10 at.%, which have been identified to be retained austenite by TEM, show a thickness increase with increasing λ. Therefore, the fraction of total carbon staying in the austenite grows. This carbon is not available for the tempering induced precipitation of secondary carbides in the bulk. Through all samples no segregation of any substitutional elements takes place. Charpy impact testing and fracture surface analysis of the hardened samples reveal the cooling rate induced microstructural distinctions.

  17. Quantum chemical and solution phase evaluation of metallocenes as reducing agents for the prospective atomic layer deposition of copper.

    PubMed

    Dey, Gangotri; Wrench, Jacqueline S; Hagen, Dirk J; Keeney, Lynette; Elliott, Simon D

    2015-06-14

    We propose and evaluate the use of metallocene compounds as reducing agents for the chemical vapour deposition (and specifically atomic layer deposition, ALD) of the transition metal Cu from metalorganic precursors. Ten different transition metal cyclopentadienyl compounds are screened for their utility in the reduction of Cu from five different Cu precursors by evaluating model reaction energies with density functional theory (DFT) and solution phase chemistry.

  18. Organometallic Bonding in an Ullmann-Type On-Surface Chemical Reaction Studied by High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Takeya, Jun; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-10-01

    The on-surface Ullmann-type chemical reaction synthesizes polymers by linking carbons of adjacent molecules on solid surfaces. Although an organometallic compound is recently identified as the reaction intermediate, little is known about the detailed structure of the bonded organometallic species and its influence on the molecule and the reaction. Herein atomic force microscopy at low temperature is used to study the reaction with 3,9-diiododinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-d]thiophene (I-DNT-VW), which is polymerized on Ag(111) in vacuum. Thermally sublimated I-DNT-VW picks up a Ag surface atom, forming a CAg bond at one end after removing an iodine. The CAg bond is usually short-lived, and a CAgC organometallic bond immediately forms with an adjacent molecule. The existence of the bonded Ag atoms strongly affects the bending angle and adsorption height of the molecular unit. Density functional theory calculations reveal the bending mechanism, which reveals that charge from the terminus of the molecule is transferred via the Ag atom into the organometallic bond and strengths the local adsorption to the substrate. Such deformations vanish when the Ag atoms are removed by annealing and CC bonds are established. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ultracold Chemical Reactions of a Single Rydberg Atom in a Dense Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Liebisch, Tara Cubel; Engel, Felix; Kleinbach, Kathrin S.; Böttcher, Fabian; Hermann, Udo; Westphal, Karl M.; Gaj, Anita; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-07-01

    Within a dense environment (ρ ≈1014 atoms /cm3 ) at ultracold temperatures (T <1 μ K ), a single atom excited to a Rydberg state acts as a reaction center for surrounding neutral atoms. At these temperatures, almost all neutral atoms within the Rydberg orbit are bound to the Rydberg core and interact with the Rydberg atom. We have studied the reaction rate and products for n S 87Rb Rydberg states, and we mainly observe a state change of the Rydberg electron to a high orbital angular momentum l , with the released energy being converted into kinetic energy of the Rydberg atom. Unexpectedly, the measurements show a threshold behavior at n ≈100 for the inelastic collision time leading to increased lifetimes of the Rydberg state independent of the densities investigated. Even at very high densities (ρ ≈4.8 ×1014 cm-3 ), the lifetime of a Rydberg atom exceeds 10 μ s at n >140 compared to 1 μ s at n =90 . In addition, a second observed reaction mechanism, namely, Rb2+ molecule formation, was studied. Both reaction products are equally probable for n =40 , but the fraction of Rb2+ created drops to below 10% for n ≥90 .

  20. Ultracold Chemical Reactions of a Single Rydberg Atom in a Dense Gas

    DOE PAGES

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Liebisch, Tara Cubel; Engel, Felix; ...

    2016-08-10

    Within a dense environment (ρ ≈ 1014 atoms/cm3) at ultracold temperatures (T < 1 μK), a single atom excited to a Rydberg state acts as a reaction center for surrounding neutral atoms. At these temperatures, almost all neutral atoms within the Rydberg orbit are bound to the Rydberg core and interact with the Rydberg atom. We have studied the reaction rate and products for nS 87Rb Rydberg states, and we mainly observe a state change of the Rydberg electron to a high orbital angular momentum l, with the released energy being converted into kinetic energy of the Rydberg atom. Unexpectedly, the measurements show a threshold behavior at n ≈ 100 for the inelastic collision time leading to increased lifetimes of the Rydberg state independent of the densities investigated. Even at very high densities (ρ ≈ 4.8 x 1014 cm-3), the lifetime of a Rydberg atom exceeds 10 μs at n > 140 compared to 1 μs at n = 90. In addition, a second observed reaction mechanism, namely, Rbmore » $$+\\atop{2}$$ molecule formation, was studied. Both reaction products are equally probable for n = 40, but the fraction of Rb+2 created drops to below 10% for n ≥ 90.« less

  1. Geochemistry, Comparative Analysis, and Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Thermal Waters East of Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kresse, Timothy M.; Hays, Phillip D.

    2009-01-01

    rock collapse for uncased wells completed in highly fractured rock. However, the propagation of newly formed large fractures that potentially could damage well structures or result in pirating of water from production wells appears to be of limited possibility based on review of relevant studies. Characteristics of hydraulic conductivity, storage, and fracture porosity were interpreted from flow rates observed in individual wells completed in the Bigfork Chert and Stanley Shale; from hydrographs produced from continuous measurements of water levels in wells completed in the Arkansas Novaculite, the Bigfork Chert, and Stanley Shale; and from a potentiometric-surface map constructed using water levels in wells throughout the study area. Data gathered from these three separate exercises showed that fracture porosity is much greater in the Bigfork Chert relative to that in the Stanley Shale, shallow groundwater flows from elevated recharge areas with exposures of Bigfork Chert along and into streams within the valleys formed on exposures of the Stanley Shale, and there was no evidence of interbasin transfer of groundwater within the shallow flow system. Fifteen shallow wells and two cold-water springs were sampled from the various exposed formations in the study area to characterize the water quality and geochemistry for the shallow groundwater system and for comparison to the geochemistry of the hot springs in Hot Springs National Park. For the quartz formations (novaculite, chert, and sandstone formations), total dissolved solids concentrations were very low with a median concentration of 23 milligrams per liter, whereas the median concentration for groundwater from the shale formations was 184 milligrams per liter. Ten hot springs in Hot Springs National Park were sampled for the study. Several chemical constituents for the hot springs, including pH, total dissolved solids, major cations and anions, and trace metals, show similarity with the shale formations

  2. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at filament temperatures between 1500 and 1900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogueira, P.; Conde, J. P.; Arekat, S.; Chu, V.

    1996-06-01

    The optical, electronic and structural properties of thin films deposited by Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition with filament temperatures, Tfil, between 1500 and 1900 °C from silane and hydrogen are studied. The substrate temperature, Tsub, was kept constant at 220 °C. Amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) are obtained at high filament temperatures, low deposition pressures and low hydrogen-to-silane flow rate ratio (Tfil˜1900 °C, p<30 mTorr and FH2/FSiH4≤1). At these deposition conditions, high growth rates are observed (rd≥10 Ås-1) both with and without hydrogen dilution, and no silicon deposition was observed on the filaments. However, if a lower filament temperature is used (Tfil˜1500 °C) a transition from a-Si:H to microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) occurs as the pressure is decreased from above 0.3 Torr to below 0.1 Torr. The highest dark conductivity and lowest activation energy, of ˜1 Scm-1 and <0.1 eV, respectively, were observed for μc-Si:H deposited at p˜50 mTorr. In this Tfil regime, μc-Si:H growth is achieved without hydrogen dilution, for substrate temperatures as low as ˜150 °C, and for very thin films (˜0.05 μm). Silicon growth on the filaments is observed. For both Tfil regimes, an amorphous to microcrystalline transition is also observed when the hydrogen dilution is increased (FH2/FSiH4≳4). A kinetic growth model is developed, which suggests that the transition from amorphous to microcrystalline can be explained by considering a balance between the concentration of atomic hydrogen and the concentration of the precursor to silicon deposition (SixHz with z≤3x) near the sample. This concentration ratio is shown to be controlled both by the deposition pressure, p, and the filament temperature, Tfil.

  3. Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of ZrO2-based dielectric films: Nanostructure and nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S. K.; Wang, C.-G.; Tang, D.; Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Werkhoven, C.; Shero, E.

    2003-04-01

    A 4 nm layer of ZrOx (targeted x˜2) was deposited on an interfacial layer (IL) of native oxide (SiO, t˜1.2 nm) surface on 200 mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition technique at 300 °C. Some as-deposited layers were subjected to a postdeposition, rapid thermal annealing at 700 °C for 5 min in flowing oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The experimental x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, which we call the Zr-O/IL/Si stack. The as-deposited Zr-O layer was amorphous ZrO2-rich Zr silicate containing about 15% by volume of embedded ZrO2 nanocrystals, which transformed to a glass nanoceramic (with over 90% by volume of predominantly tetragonal-ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) and monoclinic-ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) nanocrystals) upon annealing. The formation of disordered amorphous regions within some of the nanocrystals, as well as crystalline regions with defects, probably gave rise to lattice strains and deformations. The interfacial layer (IL) was partitioned into an upper SiO2-rich Zr silicate and the lower SiOx. The latter was substoichiometric and the average oxidation state increased from Si0.86+ in SiO0.43 (as-deposited) to Si1.32+ in SiO0.66 (annealed). This high oxygen deficiency in SiOx was indicative of the low mobility of oxidizing specie in the Zr-O layer. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric properties in the Pt/{Zr-O/IL}/Si metal oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) configuration. The measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was not consistent with the calculated EOT using a bilayer model of ZrO2 and SiO2, and the capacitance in accumulation (and therefore, EOT and kZr-O) was frequency dispersive, trends well documented in literature. This behavior is qualitatively explained in terms of the multilayer nanostructure and nanochemistry that

  4. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Valeria; Biagi, Simona; Ghimenti, Silvia; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2011-11-01

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg 0, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H 2 microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10 - 5 mol L - 1 ), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L - 1 (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 μmol L - 1 were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were never less than 91%. Flow injection-chemical

  5. Fullerene C70 as a Nanoflask that Reveals the Chemical Reactivity of Atomic Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Morinaka, Yuta; Zhang, Rui; Sato, Satoru; Nikawa, Hidefumi; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Furukawa, Ko; Yamada, Michio; Maeda, Yutaka; Murata, Michihisa; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Nagase, Shigeru; Akasaka, Takeshi; Murata, Yasujiro

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the intrinsic reactivity of atomic nitrogen, which had previously been accomplished only by examining its decay in the gas phase using special equipment, a nitrogen atom was inserted into a series of molecule-encapsulating C60 and C70 fullerenes. Among the studied endofullerenes, H2 @C70 was able to encapsulate an additional nitrogen atom within the fullerene cage under radiofrequency plasma conditions. The product was analyzed by ESR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in solution, which revealed that the nitrogen atom with a quartet ground state does not react but weakly interact with the H2 molecule, thus demonstrating the utility of such fullerenes as "nanoflasks". © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. New horizons in chemical propulsion. [processes using free radicals, atomic hydrogen, excited species, etc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, W.

    1973-01-01

    After a review of the work of the late-Fifties on free radicals for propulsion, it is concluded that atomic hydrogen would provide a potentially large increase in specific impulse. Work conducted to find an approach for isolating atomic hydrogen is considered. Other possibilities for obtaining propellants of greatly increased capability might be connected with the technology for the generation of activated states of gases, metallic hydrogen, fuels obtained from other planets, and laser transfer of energy.

  7. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  8. The effect of different chemical agents on human enamel: an atomic force and scanning electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominu, Roxana O.; Rominu, Mihai; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Pop, Daniela; Petrescu, Emanuela

    2010-12-01

    PURPOSE: The goal of our study was to investigate the changes in enamel surface roughess induced by the application of different chemical substances by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. METHOD: Five sound human first upper premolar teeth were chosen for the study. The buccal surface of each tooth was treated with a different chemical agent as follows: Sample 1 - 38% phosphoric acid etching (30s) , sample 2 - no surface treatment (control sample), 3 - bleaching with 37.5 % hydrogen peroxide (according to the manufacturer's instructions), 4 - conditioning with a self-etching primer (15 s), 5 - 9.6 % hydrofluoric acid etching (30s). All samples were investigated by atomic force microscopy in a non-contact mode and by scanning electron microscopy. Several images were obtained for each sample, showing evident differences regarding enamel surface morphology. The mean surface roughness and the mean square roughness were calculated and compared. RESULTS: All chemical substances led to an increased surface roughness. Phosphoric acid led to the highest roughness while the control sample showed the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid also led to an increase in surface roughness but its effects have yet to be investigated due to its potential toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: By treating the human enamel with the above mentioned chemical compounds a negative microretentive surface is obtained, with a morphology depending on the applied substance.

  9. Computer simulation of bulk and surface chemical diffusion of light atoms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Murch, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The lattice gas as a model for interstitial solid solution and adsorption systems is reviewed with emphasis on the generation of ordered structures. Then, as a prelude to the main discourse on chemical diffusion, the tracer diffusion coefficient is discussed in conjunction with the presentation of Monte Carlo results. Next, chemical diffusion is treated in detail with emphasis on the Danken equation. Monte Carlo results are then presented for the chemical diffusion coefficient. The large maximum in the chemical diffusivity observed within the ordered phase is traced back to the very strong driving force provided by the chemical potential derivative.

  10. COIL Operation with All-Gas Chemical Generation of Atomic Iodine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-31

    4, where atomic iodine is generated according to the known reaction scheme [5, 6] ClO2 + 2NO → Cl + 2NO2 (18) Cl...11 Fig 4. Cross section of the COIL nozzle with injection of I atoms from two side reactors 1 - reactor body, 2 - primary flow, 3 – ClO2 ...gain diagnostic region Each reactor consists of rectangular space with the inlet for ClO2 , and injectors of NO and HI. Each NO and HI injector has 32

  11. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris; Jen, Tien Chien

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  12. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  13. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  14. Atomic and Molecular Structure in Chemical Education: A Critical Analysis from Various Perspectives of Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    1997-01-01

    Provides a critical analysis of the role that atomic theory plays in the science curriculum from elementary through secondary school. Examines structural concepts from the perspective of the theory of meaningful learning, information processing theory, and the alternative conceptions movement. Contains 54 references. (DDR)

  15. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  16. Measurement of Fluorine Atom Concentrations and Reaction Rates in Chemical Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Lindholm-Foley theory, using available ab initio and experimentally-derived fluorine atom-rare gas interaction potentials, as well as semiempirical Lennard ... Jones potentials. Good agreement is obtained for broadening by argon and for the temperature dependence of broadening by helium.

  17. Atomic and Molecular Structure in Chemical Education: A Critical Analysis from Various Perspectives of Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    1997-01-01

    Provides a critical analysis of the role that atomic theory plays in the science curriculum from elementary through secondary school. Examines structural concepts from the perspective of the theory of meaningful learning, information processing theory, and the alternative conceptions movement. Contains 54 references. (DDR)

  18. Abstraction of D on Ag( 1 0 0 ) and Ag( 1 1 1 ) surfaces by gaseous H atoms . The role of electron-hole excitations in hot atom reactions and the transition to Eley-Rideal kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovos-Vellianitis, D.; Küppers, J.

    2004-01-01

    H and D were adsorbed on Ag(1 0 0) and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces and characterized by thermal desorption spectroscopy. On Ag(1 0 0) surfaces hydrogen desorption from surface sites at 150 K and subsurface sites around 110 K was observed. Similarly, desorption of deuterium desorption around 150 and 110 K indicated surface and subsurface bound D. On Ag(1 1 1) surfaces only adsorption related desorption near 160 K was monitored. Abstraction of adsorbed D by gaseous H on Ag(1 0 0) is affected by reconstruction of the surface and the HD kinetics exhibits a H fluence (coverage) dependant cross-section. On Ag(1 1 1) adsorbed D is abstracted by gaseous H with a HD kinetics strictly according to the Eley-Rideal phenomenology. These features are close analogues of those observed on Cu(1 0 0) and Cu(1 1 1) surfaces. A comparison of the abstraction kinetics on various transition metals suggests that sticking of hot atoms, the reacting species on the surface, is controlled by electron-hole excitations. By this effect, the HD kinetics in abstraction on noble d-metals like Cu and Ag with a small density of states at the Fermi level and a small probability for e-h excitation exhibit Eley-Rideal phenomenology. Due to the small Ag-D bond energy on Ag(1 1 1) the attraction between incoming H and adsorbed D causes an increase of the abstraction cross-section at low D coverage, as was recently predicted by theory and verified by experiments on graphite surfaces.

  19. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, H.; Kato, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Sekiguchi, H.; Wakahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2014-02-20

    Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma is investigated. Feasibility of precursors of triethylsilane (TES) and bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) is discussed based on a calculation of bond energies by computer simulation. Refractive indices of 1.81 and 1.71 are obtained for deposited films with TES and BDMADMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the deposited film revealed that TES-based film coincides with the stoichiometric thermal silicon nitride.

  20. Hot spots revealed by simultaneous experimental measurement of the two-dimensional concentration and temperature fields of an exothermic chemical front during finger-pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Grosfils, P; Dubois, F; Yourassowsky, C; De Wit, A

    2009-01-01

    A noninvasive optical technique combining digital interferometry in transmission and transparency measurement of concentration is developed to analyze spatiotemporal dynamics of physicochemical systems. This technique allows one to measure simultaneously the two-dimensional (2D) dynamics of concentration and temperature fields in both reactive and nonreactive systems contained inside a transparent cell. When used to experimentally analyze buoyancy-driven fingering of an exothermic autocatalytic chemical front, this method reveals in the 2D temperature field the presence of hot spots where the temperature locally exceeds the adiabatic one.

  1. Atom-At Chemistry of the Transactinide Element, Rutherfordium (element 104) Towards Experimental Verification of Relativistic Effects in Chemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagame, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Asai, M.; Toyoshima, A.; Akiyama, K.; Ishii, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Sato, T. K.; Hirata, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Haba, H.; Goto, S.; Sakama, M.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical properties of the transactinide element, rutherfordium (Rf), produced in the reaction 248Cm(18O,5n) have been studied at an atom-at-a-time scale. Ion-exchange experiments of Rf together with the lighter homologues in the periodic table of the elements, group-4 elements Zr and Hf, in hydrofluoric acid solutions have been conducted with a rapid ion-exchange separation apparatus. From the systematic study of the anion-exchange behavior of Rf, we have observed an unexpected chemical behavior of Rf; the fluoride complex formation of Rf is significantly different from those of the homologues. Characteristics of the complexing strength of the Rf fluoride are briefly discussed by comparing with those of Zr and Hf and also with theoretical predictions by relativistic molecular density-functional calculations.

  2. Effect of Si-H bond on the gas-phase chemistry of trimethylsilane in the hot wire chemical vapor deposition process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y J; Li, X M; Toukabri, R; Tong, L

    2011-09-22

    The effect of the Si-H bond on the gas-phase reaction chemistry of trimethylsilane in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) process has been studied by examining its decomposition on a hot tungsten filament and the secondary gas-phase reactions in a reactor using a soft laser ionization source coupled with mass spectrometry. Trimethylsilane decomposes on the hot filament via Si-H and Si-CH(3) bond cleavages. A short-chain mechanism is found to dominate in the secondary reactions in the reactor. It has been shown that the hydrogen abstractions of both Si-H and C-H occur simultaneously, with the abstraction of Si-H being favored. Tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane are the two major products formed from the radical recombination reactions in the termination steps. Three methyl-substituted disilacyclobutane molecules, i.e., 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane, 1,1,3-trimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane, and 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane are also produced in reactor from the cycloaddition reactions of methyl-substituted silene species. Compared to tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane, a common feature with trimethylsilane is that the short-chain mechanism still dominates. However, a more active involvement of the reactive silene intermediates has been found with trimethylsilane.

  3. The evolution of structural and chemical heterogeneity during rapid solidification at gas atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, V. M.; Sufiiarov, V. Sh

    2017-04-01

    Gas atomization is a high-performance process for manufacturing superfine metal powders. Formation of the powder particles takes place primarily through the fragmentation of alloy melt flow with high-pressure inert gas, which leads to the formation of non-uniform sized micron-scale particles and subsequent their rapid solidification due to heat exchange with gas environment. The article presents results of computer modeling of crystallization process, simulation and experimental studies of the cellular-dendrite structure formation and microsegregation in different size particles. It presents results of adaptation of the approach for local nonequilibrium solidification to conditions of crystallization at gas atomization, detected border values of the particle size at which it is possible a manifestation of diffusionless crystallization.

  4. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  5. Most probable distance between the nucleus and HOMO electron: the latent meaning of atomic radius from the product of chemical hardness and polarizability.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Paweł; Grochala, Wojciech

    2014-11-06

    The simple relationship between size of an atom, the Pearson hardness, and electronic polarizability is described. The estimated atomic radius correlates well with experimental as well as theoretical covalent radii reported in the literature. Furthermore, the direct connection of atomic radius to HOMO electron density and important notions of conceptual DFT (such as frontier molecular orbitals and Fukui function) has been shown and interpreted. The radial maximum of HOMO density distribution at (αη)(1/2) minimizes the system energy. Eventually, the knowledge of the Fukui function of an atom is sufficient to estimate its electronic polarizability, chemical potential, and hardness.

  6. The mystery of gold's chemical activity: local bonding, morphology and reactivity of atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Baker, Thomas A; Liu, Xiaoying; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-01-07

    Recently, gold has been intensely studied as a catalyst for key synthetic reactions. Gold is an attractive catalyst because, surprisingly, it is highly active and very selective for partial oxidation processes suggesting promise for energy-efficient "green" chemistry. The underlying origin of the high activity of Au is a controversial subject since metallic gold is commonly thought to be inert. Herein, we establish that one origin of the high activity for gold catalysis is the extremely reactive nature of atomic oxygen bound in 3-fold coordination sites on metallic gold. This is the predominant form of O at low concentrations on the surface, which is a strong indication that it is most relevant to catalytic conditions. Atomic oxygen bound to metallic Au in 3-fold sites has high activity for CO oxidation, oxidation of olefins, and oxidative transformations of alcohols and amines. Among the factors identified as important in Au-O interaction are the morphology of the surface, the local binding site of oxygen, and the degree of order of the oxygen overlayer. In this Perspective, we present an overview of both theory and experiments that identify the reactive forms of O and their associated charge density distributions and bond strengths. We also analyze and model the release of Au atoms induced by O binding to the surface. This rough surface also has the potential for O(2) dissociation, which is a critical step if Au is to be activated catalytically. We further show the strong parallels between product distributions and reactivity for O-covered Au at low pressure (ultrahigh vacuum) and for nanoporous Au catalysts operating at atmospheric pressure as evidence that atomic O is the active species under working catalytic conditions when metallic Au is present. We briefly discuss the possible contributions of oxidants that may contain intact O-O bonds and of the Au-metal oxide support interface in Au catalysis. Finally, the challenges and future directions for fully

  7. Atomic Data for Zn II: Improving Spectral Diagnostics of Chemical Evolution in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielius, Romas; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Som, Debopam; Lykins, Matt L.

    2015-05-01

    Damped Lyα (DLA) and sub-DLA absorbers in quasar spectra provide the most sensitive tools for measuring the element abundances of distant galaxies. The estimation of abundances from absorption lines depends sensitively on the accuracy of the atomic data used. We have started a project to produce new atomic spectroscopic parameters for optical and UV spectral lines using state-of-the-art computer codes employing a very broad configuration interaction (CI) basis. Here we report our results for Zn ii, an ion used widely in studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) as well as DLAs and sub-DLAs. We report new calculations of many energy levels of Zn ii and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations use the CI approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework. We use both nonrelativistic and quasi-relativistic one-electron radial orbitals. We have incorporated the results of these atomic calculations into the plasma simulation code Cloudy and applied them to a lab plasma and examples of a DLA and a sub-DLA. Our values of the Zn ii λ λ 2026, 2062 oscillator strengths are higher than previous values by 0.10 dex. The Cloudy calculations for representative absorbers with the revised Zn atomic data imply ionization corrections lower than calculated earlier by 0.05 dex. The new results imply that Zn metallicities should be lower by 0.1 dex for DLAs and by 0.13-0.15 dex for sub-DLAs than in past studies. Our results can be applied to other studies of Zn ii in the Galactic and extragalactic ISM.

  8. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  9. Large-area high-throughput synthesis of monolayer graphene sheet by Hot Filament Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hawaldar, Ranjit; Merino, P.; Correia, M. R.; Bdikin, Igor; Grácio, José; Méndez, J.; Martín-Gago, J. A.; Singh, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report hot filament thermal CVD (HFTCVD) as a new hybrid of hot filament and thermal CVD and demonstrate its feasibility by producing high quality large area strictly monolayer graphene films on Cu substrates. Gradient in gas composition and flow rate that arises due to smart placement of the substrate inside the Ta filament wound alumina tube accompanied by radical formation on Ta due to precracking coupled with substrate mediated physicochemical processes like diffusion, polymerization etc., led to graphene growth. We further confirmed our mechanistic hypothesis by depositing graphene on Ni and SiO2/Si substrates. HFTCVD can be further extended to dope graphene with various heteroatoms (H, N, and B, etc.,), combine with functional materials (diamond, carbon nanotubes etc.,) and can be extended to all other materials (Si, SiO2, SiC etc.,) and processes (initiator polymerization, TFT processing) possible by HFCVD and thermal CVD. PMID:23002423

  10. Structural and chemical characteristics of atomically smooth GaN surfaces prepared by abrasive-free polishing with Pt catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Junji; Sadakuni, Shun; Okamoto, Takeshi; Hattori, Azusa N.; Yagi, Keita; Sano, Yasuhisa; Arima, Kenta; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the structural and chemical characteristics of atomically flat gallium nitride (GaN) surfaces prepared by abrasive-free polishing with platinum (Pt) catalyst. Atomic force microscopy revealed regularly alternating wide and narrow terraces with a step height equivalent to that of a single bilayer on the flattened GaN surfaces, which originate from the differences in etching rate of two neighboring terraces. The material removal characteristics of the method for GaN surfaces were investigated in detail. We confirmed that an atomically smooth GaN surface with an extremely small number of surface defects, including pits and scratches, can be achieved, regardless of the growth method, surface polarity, and doping concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the flattening method produces clean GaN surfaces with only trace impurities such as Ga oxide and metallic Ga. Contamination with the Pt catalyst was also evaluated using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. A wet cleaning method with aqua regia is proposed, which markedly eliminates this Pt contamination without affecting the surface morphology.

  11. Descriptions and Implementations of DL_F Notation: A Natural Chemical Expression System of Atom Types for Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Yong, Chin W

    2016-08-22

    DL_F Notation is an easy-to-understand, standardized atom typesetting expression for molecular simulations for a range of organic force field (FF) schemes such as OPLSAA, PCFF, and CVFF. It is implemented within DL_FIELD, a software program that facilitates the setting up of molecular FF models for DL_POLY molecular dynamics simulation software. By making use of the Notation, a single core conversion module (the DL_F conversion Engine) implemented within DL_FIELD can be used to analyze a molecular structure and determine the types of atoms for a given FF scheme. Users only need to provide the molecular input structure in a simple xyz format and DL_FIELD can produce the necessary force field file for DL_POLY automatically. In commensurate with the development concept of DL_FIELD, which placed emphasis on robustness and user friendliness, the Engine provides a single-step solution to setup complex FF models. This allows users to switch from one of the above-mentioned FF seamlessly to another while at the same time provides a consistent atom typing that is expressed in a natural chemical sense.

  12. Atomic-resolution chemical mapping of ordered precipitates in Al alloys using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Sigurd; Jones, Lewys; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2017-05-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a common technique for chemical mapping in thin samples. Obtaining high-resolution elemental maps in the STEM is jointly dependent on stepping the sharply focused electron probe in a precise raster, on collecting a significant number of characteristic X-rays over time, and on avoiding damage to the sample. In this work, 80kV aberration-corrected STEM-EDS mapping was performed on ordered precipitates in aluminium alloys. Probe and sample instability problems are handled by acquiring series of annular dark-field (ADF) images and simultaneous EDS volumes, which are aligned and non-rigidly registered after acquisition. The summed EDS volumes yield elemental maps of Al, Mg, Si, and Cu, with sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise ratio to determine the elemental species of each atomic column in a periodic structure, and in some cases the species of single atomic columns. Within the uncertainty of the technique, S and β" phases were found to have pure elemental atomic columns with compositions Al2CuMg and Al2Mg5Si4, respectively. The Q' phase showed some variation in chemistry across a single precipitate, although the majority of unit cells had a composition Al6Mg6Si7.2Cu2.

  13. Combined chemical and topographic imaging at atmospheric pressure via microprobe laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, James A; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Meyer, Kent A; Goeringer, Douglas E

    2009-12-01

    The operational characteristics and imaging performance are described for a new instrument comprising an atomic force microscope coupled with a pulsed laser and a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating mode of the atomic force microscope is used to produce topographic surface images having sub-micrometer spatial and height resolution. Spatially resolved mass spectra of ions, produced from the same surface via microprobe-mode laser desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure, are also used to create a 100 x 100 microm chemical image. The effective spatial resolution of the image (approximately 2 microm) was constrained by the limit of detection (estimated to be 10(9)-10(10) molecules) rather than by the diameter of the focused laser spot or the step size of the sample stage. The instrument has the potential to be particularly useful for surface analysis scenarios in which chemical analysis of targeted topographic features is desired; consequently, it should have extensive application in a number of scientific areas. Because the number density of desorbed neutral species in laser desorption/ionization is known to be orders-of-magnitude greater than that of ions, it is expected that improvements in imaging performance can be realized by implementation of post-ionization methods.

  14. Low temperature silicon nitride by hot wire chemical vapour deposition for the use in impermeable thin film encapsulation on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Spee, D A; van der Werf, C H M; Rath, J K; Schropp, R E I

    2011-09-01

    High quality non porous silicon nitride layers were deposited by hot wire chemical vapour deposition at substrate temperatures lower than 110 degrees C. The layer properties were investigated using FTIR, reflection/transmission measurements and 1:6 buffered HF etching rate. A Si-H peak position of 2180 cm(-1) in the Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum indicates a N/Si ratio around 1.2. Together with a refractive index of 1.97 at a wavelength of 632 nm and an extinction coefficient of 0.002 at 400 nm, this suggests that a transparent high density silicon nitride material has been made below 110 degrees C, which is compatible with polymer films and is expected to have a high impermeability. To confirm the compatibility with polymer films a silicon nitride layer was deposited on poly(glycidyl methacrylate) made by initiated chemical vapour deposition, resulting in a highly transparent double layer.

  15. Influence of ultrasonic pretreatment on the yield of bio-oil prepared by thermo-chemical conversion of rice husk in hot-compressed water.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen; Jia, Jingfu; Gao, Yahui; Zhao, Yaping

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the feasibility of thermo-chemical conversion of rice husk in hot-compressed water via ultrasonic pretreatment to increase the bio-oil yield. The results show that ultrasonic pretreatment remarkably changes the structures of the rice husk, such as enhancing swelling and surface area, eroding lignin structure, and resulting in more exposure of the cellulose and hemicellulose. The highest bio-oil yield of 42.8% was obtained from the thermo-chemical conversion at 300 °C and 0 min of the residence time for the 1 h pretreated rice husk. GC-MS analysis indicates that the relative contents of phenols, 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural, and lactic acid are higher in bio-oils obtained from the pretreated rice husks than that from the raw rice husk.

  16. Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass

    DOEpatents

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

    1982-09-02

    Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

  17. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Composition and Bonding at Perovskite Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitting Kourkoutis, L.

    2010-03-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study buried perovskite oxide heterointerfaces. With the recent addition of 3^rd order and now 5^th order aberration correction, which provides a factor of 100x increase in signal over an uncorrected system, we are now able to record 2D maps of composition and bonding of oxide interfaces at atomic resolution [1]. Here, we present studies of the microscopic structure of oxide/oxide multilayers and heterostructures by STEM in combination with EELS and its effect on the properties of the film. Using atomic-resolution spectroscopic imaging we show that the degradation of the magnetic and transport properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayers correlates with atomic intermixing at the interfaces and the presence of extended defects in the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 layers. When these defects are eliminated, metallic ferromagnetism at room temperature can be stabilized in 5 unit cell thick manganite layers, almost 40% thinner than the previously reported critical thickness of 3-5 nm for sustaining metallic ferromagnetism below Tc in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3.[4pt] [1] D.A. Muller, L. Fitting Kourkoutis, M. Murfitt, J.H. Song, H.Y. Hwang, J. Silcox, N. Dellby, O.L. Krivanek, Science 319, 1073-1076 (2008).

  18. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, Arkady A; Rubtsov, Igor V; Maksymov, Andrii O; Burin, Alexander L

    2016-07-21

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  19. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, Arkady A.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Maksymov, Andrii O.; Burin, Alexander L.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  20. The Formation of Glycine in Hot Cores: New Gas-grain Chemical Simulations of Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Robin

    2012-07-01

    Organic molecules of increasing complexity have been detected in the warm envelopes of star-forming cores, commonly referred to as "hot cores". Spectroscopic searches at mm/sub-mm wavelengths have uncovered both amines and carboxylic acids in these regions, as well as a range of other compounds including alcohols, ethers, esters, and nitriles. However, the simplest amino acid, glycine (NH2CH2COOH), has not yet been reliably detected in the ISM. There has been much interest in this molecule, due to its importance to the formation of proteins, and to life, while the positive identification of interstellar molecules of similar or greater complexity suggests that its existence in star-forming regions is plausible. I will present the results of recent models of hot-core chemistry that simulate the formation of both simple and complex molecules on the surfaces or within the ice mantles of dust grains. I will also present results from the first gas-grain astrochemical model to approach the question of amino-acid formation in hot cores. The formation of glycine in moderate abundance is found to be as efficient as that for similarly complex species, while its sublimation from the grains occurs at somewhat higher temperatures. However, simulated emission spectra based on the model results show that the degree of compactness of high-abundance regions, and the density and temperature profiles of the cores may be the key variables affecting the future detection of glycine, as well as other amino acids, and may explain its non-detection to date.

  1. Simulation of hydration/dehydration of CaO/Ca(OH){sub 2} chemical heat pump reactor for cold/hot heat generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Hironao; Shimojyo, Rui; Kage, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Yoshizo; Mujumdar, A.S.

    1999-09-01

    A chemical heat pump (CHP) utilizes reversible reactions involving significant endothermic and exothermic heats of reaction in order to develop a heat pump effect by storing and releasing energy while transforming it from chemical to thermal energy and vice versa. In this paper, the authors present a mathematical model and its numerical solution for the heat and mass transport phenomena occurring in the reactant particle bed of the CHP for heat storage and cold/hot heat generation based on the CaO/Ca(OH){sub 2} reversible hydration/dehydration reaction. Transient conservation equations of mass and energy transport including chemical kinetics are solved numerically subject to appropriate boundary and initial conditions to examine the influence of the mass transfer resistance on the overall performance of this CHP configuration. These results are presented and discussed with the aim of enhancing the CHP performance in the next generation reactor designs. The CHP can store thermal energy in industrial waste heat, solar heat, terrestrial heat, etc. in the form of chemical energy, and release it at various temperature levels during the heat-demand period.

  2. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  3. Atomic Scale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Ceramic Oxide Heterostructure Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R. K.

    2003-04-16

    The research plan was divided into three tasks: (a) growth of oxide heterostructures for interface engineering using standard thin film deposition techniques, (b) atomic level characterization of oxide heterostructure using such techniques as STEM-2 combined with AFM/STM and conventional high-resolution microscopy (HRTEM), and (c) property measurements of aspects important to oxide heterostructures using standard characterization methods, including dielectric properties and dynamic cathodoluminescence measurements. Each of these topics were further classified on the basis of type of oxide heterostructure. Type I oxide heterostructures consisted of active dielectric layers, including the materials Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (BST), Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}. Type II heterostructures consisted of ferroelectric active layers such as lanthanum manganate and Type III heterostructures consist of phosphor oxide active layers such as Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. Three-dimensional chemical imaging of embedded nanoparticles using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Shutthanandan, V; Prosa, T J; Adusumilli, P; Arey, B; Buxbaum, A; Wang, Y C; Tessner, T; Ulfig, R; Wang, C M; Thevuthasan, S

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of nanoparticles is often challenging especially when they are embedded in a matrix. Hence, we have used laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) to analyze the Au nanoclusters synthesized in situ using ion-beam implantation in a single crystal MgO matrix. APT analysis along with scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (STEM-EDX) indicated that the nanoparticles have an average size ~8-12 nm. While it is difficult to analyze the composition of individual nanoparticles using STEM, APT analysis can give three-dimensional compositions of the same. It was shown that the maximum Au concentration in the nanoparticles increases with increasing particle size, with a maximum Au concentration of up to 50%.

  5. ESCA study of oxidation and hot corrosion of nickel-base superalloys. [Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. R.; Carter, W. J., III; Mateescu, G. D.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Stearns, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the high-temperature oxidation and Na2SO4-induced hot corrosion of nickel-base superalloys has been accomplished by using ESCA to determine the surface composition of the oxidized or corroded samples. Oxidation was carried out at 900 or 1000 C in slowly flowing O2 for samples of B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C, and IN-738. Hot corrosion of B-1900 was induced by applying a coating of Na2SO4 to preoxidized samples, then heating to 900 C in slowly flowing O2. For oxidized samples, the predominant type of scale formed by each superalloy showed a marked surface enrichment of Ti. For corroded samples, the transfer of significant amounts of material from the oxide layer to the surface of the salt layer was observed before the onset of rapidly accelerating weight gain. Marked changes in surface composition coincided with the beginning of accelerating corrosion, the most striking of which were a tenfold decrease in the sulfur to sodium ratio and an increase in the Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ratio.

  6. Nanocatalysis and Nanostructures: Atomic - Scale Design of Chemical and Sensing Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Archival Publications 1. "Charging Effects on Bonding and catalyzed oxidation of CO on Aug Clusters Supported on MgO", B. Yoon, H. Hakkinen , U...Huber, H. Hakkinen , U. Landman, M, Moseler, Comput. Mater. Sci. 35, 371-374 (2006). 5. "Bonding Trends and Dimensionality Crossover of Gold...and chemical reactivity of gold nanosclusters: AuN", N=15-24", B. Yoon, P. Koshkinen, B. Huber, O. Kostki, B. von Issendorff, H. Hakkinen , M

  7. Two-Dimensional Atomic-Layered Alloy Junctions for High-Performance Wearable Chemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byungjin; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Dong Jae; Chung, Hee-Suk; Choi, Sun Young; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Yonghun; Lee, Byoung Hun; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Nam, Jaewook; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2016-08-03

    We first report that two-dimensional (2D) metal (NbSe2)-semiconductor (WSe2)-based flexible, wearable, and launderable gas sensors can be prepared through simple one-step chemical vapor deposition of prepatterned WO3 and Nb2O5. Compared to a control device with a Au/WSe2 junction, gas-sensing performance of the 2D NbSe2/WSe2 device was significantly enhanced, which might have resulted from the formation of a NbxW1-xSe2 transition alloy junction lowering the Schottky barrier height. This would make it easier to collect charges of channels induced by molecule adsorption, improving gas response characteristics toward chemical species including NO2 and NH3. 2D NbSe2/WSe2 devices on a flexible substrate provide gas-sensing properties with excellent durability under harsh bending. Furthermore, the device stitched on a T-shirt still performed well even after conventional cleaning with a laundry machine, enabling wearable and launderable chemical sensors. These results could pave a road toward futuristic gas-sensing platforms based on only 2D materials.

  8. Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale

    DOE PAGES

    Chae, Jungseok; An, Sangmin; Ramer, Georg; ...

    2017-08-03

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a rich observation window on the nanoscale, yet many dynamic phenomena are too fast and too weak for direct AFM detection. Integrated cavity-optomechanics is revolutionizing micromechanical sensing; however, it has not yet impacted AFM. Here, we make a groundbreaking advance by fabricating picogram-scale probes integrated with photonic resonators to realize functional AFM detection that achieve high temporal resolution (<10 ns) and picometer vertical displacement uncertainty simultaneously. The ability to capture fast events with high precision is leveraged to measure the thermal conductivity (η), for the first time, concurrently with chemical composition at the nanoscalemore » in photothermal induced resonance experiments. The intrinsic η of metal–organic-framework individual microcrystals, not measurable by macroscale techniques, is obtained with a small measurement uncertainty (8%). The improved sensitivity (50×) increases the measurement throughput 2500-fold and enables chemical composition measurement of molecular monolayer-thin samples. In conclusion, our paradigm-shifting photonic readout for small probes breaks the common trade-off between AFM measurement precision and ability to capture transient events, thus transforming the ability to observe nanoscale dynamics in materials.« less

  9. Bias-assisted atomic force microscope nanolithography on NbS2 thin films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bark, Hunyoung; Kwon, Sanghyuk; Lee, Changgu

    2016-12-01

    Niobium disulfide, one of the metallic transition metal dichalcogenides, has a high potential as an electrode material for electronic devices made of 2D materials. Here, we investigated the bias-assisted atomic force microscope nanolithography of NbS2 thin films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. We analyzed the lithographed pattern using Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and friction force microscopy. These analyses showed that lines having various widths and thicknesses could be generated using the lithography technique by simply varying the scan speed and applied voltage. These analyses also revealed that the NbS2 film transformed from a layered crystalline structure into an amorphous structure upon being lithographed. By generating four line segments forming a square and measuring I/V curves inside and outside of the square, the electrical properties of the lithographed material were characterized. These analyses indicate that NbS2 became hydrogenated and an insulator upon being lithographed.

  10. The application of solid sorbents for the purification of aluminum contaminated chemicals used as modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bulska, E; Pyrzyńska, K

    1996-06-01

    Various microcolumns with solid sorbents (ion exchange resins, functionalised cellulose sorbents, chelating resins) have been tested with respect to their ability for the purification of aluminum contaminated chemicals used as modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The purification of NaNO(3), Mg(NO(3))(2), K(2)SO(4) and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) has been the most effective with an almost 100% efficiency, when Spheron-Oxine was used as chelating resin. The sorption of aluminum from KOH solution has been found to be very high (around 90%) for all investigated sorbents. However, the best results have been obtained with anion-exchange resins. It has been difficult to purify concentrated mineral acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4)). A retention of aluminum above 80% has been achieved only when Cellex P, Chelex 100 or Amberlite XAD-2 have been used.

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy of Physical and Chemical Processes at the Solid-Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, Srinivas

    This thesis describes research using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study dynamics of solid surfaces in contact with liquids. Specifically, three applications are described: electrochemistry (Chapters 1-3), crystal growth (Chapters 4 and 5), and biomineralization (Chapter 6). Chapter 1 shows the feasibility of using AFM to image metal atoms in liquid, which sets the stage for high -resolution electrochemistry. Chapter 2 describes methods to convert the standard AFM liquid cell into an electrochemical cell and shows images of a gold electrode during oxidation/reduction cycling. Chapter 3 follows an electroplating cycle, wherein copper is deposited from electrolyte onto a gold electrode and then stripped off. The surface lattice is shown to change from that of bulk gold to bulk copper during plating, and back to bulk gold after stripping. Moreover, the first monolayer of copper--which deposits at an "underpotential", before the bulk deposition--is shown to have a lattice which differs from the bulk and is electrolyte dependent. Like electrochemistry, the study of crystal growth is also perfectly suited to a surface technique such as AFM. AFM makes it possible to image "elemental steps" (i.e., steps one unit cell thick) on a single crystal and quantify their motion during growth and dissolution. This is illustrated for the inorganic crystal calcite (Chapter 4) and the more fragile organic crystal L-leucine (Chapter 5). In both cases it is shown that step speed is independent of spacing between steps, indicating that motion occurs by direct interaction of the step-site molecules with the solvent. Chapter 5 also describes techniques for growing and imaging organic crystals. Living organisms also use crystal growth, modified by inorganic and organic additives, to grow mineralized structures such as bones, teeth and seashells. In Chapter 6, AFM reveals the three-dimensional structure of the nacreous or pearly layer of mollusc shells by slowly etching away successive

  12. Quantum chemical evaluation of the astrochemical significance of reactions between S atom and acetylene or ethylene.

    PubMed

    Woon, David E

    2007-11-08

    Addition-elimination reactions of S atom in its 3P ground state with acetylene (C2H2) and ethylene (C2H4) were characterized with both molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations employing correlation consistent basis sets in order to assess the likelihood that either reaction might play a general role in astrochemistry or a specific role in the formation of S2 (X3Sigmag-) via a mechanism proposed by Saxena, P. P.; Misra, A. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 1995, 272, 89. The acetylene and ethylene reactions proceed through C2H2S (3A' ') and C2H4S (3A' ') intermediates, respectively, to yield HCCS (2Pi) and C2H3S (2A'). Substantial barriers were found in the exit channels for every combination of method and basis set considered in this work, which effectively precludes hydrogen elimination pathways for both S + C2H2 and S + C2H4 in the ultracold interstellar medium where only very modest barriers can be surmounted and processes without barriers tend to predominate. However, if one or both intermediates are formed and stabilized efficiently under cometary or dense interstellar cloud conditions, they could serve as temporary reservoirs for the S atom and participate in reactions such as S + C2H2S --> S2 + C2H2 or S + C2H4S --> S2 + C2H4. For formation and stabilization to be efficient, the reaction must possess a barrier height small enough to be surmountable at low temperatures yet large enough to prevent redissociation to reactants. Barrier heights computed with B3LYP and large basis sets are very low, but more rigorous QCISD(T) and RCCSD(T) results indicate that the barrier heights are closer to 3-4 kcal/mol. The calculations therefore indicate that S + C2H2 or S + C2H4 could contribute to the formation of S2 in comets and may serve as a means to gauge coma temperature. The energetics of the ethylene reaction are more favorable.

  13. Quantum Chemical Evaluation of the Astrochemical Significance of Reactions between S Atom and Acetylene or Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Addition-elimination reactions of S atom in its P-3 ground state with acetylene (C2H2) and ethylene (C2H4) were characterized with both molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations employing correlation consistent basis sets in order to assess the likelihood either reaction might play a general role in astrochemistry or a specific role in the formation of S2 (X (sup 3 SIGMA (sub g) (sup -)) via a mechanism proposed by Saxena and Misra (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 1995, 272, 89). The acetylene and ethylene reactions proceed through C2H2S ((sup 3)A")) and C2H4S ((sup 3)A")) intermediates, respectively, to yield HCCS ((sup 2)II)) and C2H3S ((sup 2)A')). Substantial barriers were found in the exit channels for every combination of method and basis set considered in this work, which effectively precludes hydrogen elimination pathways for both S + C2H2 and S + C2H4 in the ultracold interstellar medium where only very modest barriers can be surmounted and processes without barriers tend to predominate. However, if one or both intermediates is formed and stabilized efficiently under cometary or dense interstellar cloud conditions, they could serve as temporary reservoirs for S atom and participate in reactions such as S + C2H2S (right arrow) S2 = C2H2 or S + C2H4S (right arrow) S2 + C2H4. For formation and stabilization to be efficient, the reaction must possess a barrier height small enough to be surmountable at low temperatures yet large enough to prevent redissociation to reactants. Barrier heights computed with B3LYP and large basis sets are very low, but more rigorous QCISD(T) and RCCSD(T) results indicate that the barrier heights are closer to 3-4 kcal/mol. The calculations therefore indicate that S + C2H2 or S + C2H4 could contribute to the formation of S2 in comets and may serve as a means to gauge coma temperature. The energetics of the ethylene reaction are more favorable.

  14. Quantum Chemical Evaluation of the Astrochemical Significance of Reactions between S Atom and Acetylene or Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Addition-elimination reactions of S atom in its P-3 ground state with acetylene (C2H2) and ethylene (C2H4) were characterized with both molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations employing correlation consistent basis sets in order to assess the likelihood either reaction might play a general role in astrochemistry or a specific role in the formation of S2 (X (sup 3 SIGMA (sub g) (sup -)) via a mechanism proposed by Saxena and Misra (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 1995, 272, 89). The acetylene and ethylene reactions proceed through C2H2S ((sup 3)A")) and C2H4S ((sup 3)A")) intermediates, respectively, to yield HCCS ((sup 2)II)) and C2H3S ((sup 2)A')). Substantial barriers were found in the exit channels for every combination of method and basis set considered in this work, which effectively precludes hydrogen elimination pathways for both S + C2H2 and S + C2H4 in the ultracold interstellar medium where only very modest barriers can be surmounted and processes without barriers tend to predominate. However, if one or both intermediates is formed and stabilized efficiently under cometary or dense interstellar cloud conditions, they could serve as temporary reservoirs for S atom and participate in reactions such as S + C2H2S (right arrow) S2 = C2H2 or S + C2H4S (right arrow) S2 + C2H4. For formation and stabilization to be efficient, the reaction must possess a barrier height small enough to be surmountable at low temperatures yet large enough to prevent redissociation to reactants. Barrier heights computed with B3LYP and large basis sets are very low, but more rigorous QCISD(T) and RCCSD(T) results indicate that the barrier heights are closer to 3-4 kcal/mol. The calculations therefore indicate that S + C2H2 or S + C2H4 could contribute to the formation of S2 in comets and may serve as a means to gauge coma temperature. The energetics of the ethylene reaction are more favorable.

  15. Modification of REE distribution of ordinary chondrites from Atacama (Chile) and Lut (Iran) hot deserts: Insights into the chemical weathering of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed; D'Orazio, Massimo; Rochette, Pierre; Valenzuela, Millarca; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Mirnejad, Hassan; Sutter, Brad; Hutzler, Aurore; Aboulahris, Maria

    2017-09-01

    The behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) during hot desert weathering of meteorites is investigated. Ordinary chondrites (OCs) from Atacama (Chile) and Lut (Iran) deserts show different variations in REE composition during this process. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) data reveal that hot desert OCs tend to show elevated light REE concentrations, relative to OC falls. Chondrites from Atacama are by far the most enriched in REEs and this enrichment is not necessarily related to their degree of weathering. Positive Ce anomaly of fresh chondrites from Atacama and the successive formation of a negative Ce anomaly with the addition of trivalent REEs are similar to the process reported from Antarctic eucrites. In addition to REEs, Sr and Ba also show different concentrations when comparing OCs from different hot deserts. The stability of Atacama surfaces and the associated old terrestrial ages of meteorites from this region give the samples the necessary time to interact with the terrestrial environment and to be chemically modified. Higher REE contents and LREE-enriched composition are evidence of contamination by terrestrial soil. Despite their low degrees of weathering, special care must be taken into account while working on the REE composition of Atacama meteorites for cosmochemistry applications. In contrast, chondrites from the Lut desert show lower degrees of REE modification, despite significant weathering signed by Sr content. This is explained by the relatively rapid weathering rate of the meteorites occurring in the Lut desert, which hampers the penetration of terrestrial material by forming voluminous Fe oxide/oxyhydroxides shortly after the meteorite fall.

  16. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions.

  17. Liquid hot water pretreatment of energy grasses and its influence of physico-chemical changes on enzymatic digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Liu, Jing; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Wang, Wen; Qi, Wei; Wang, Qiong; Tan, Xuesong; Kong, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Pennisetum hybrid I, II and switchgrass were pretreated with liquid hot water to enhance the release of sugars. The optimum hydrolysis factor for three energy grasses was 5.98, and the total xylose yield was 88.4%, 98.1% and 83.6% for grass I, II and S. It was indicated that the ratio of syringyl and guaiacyl units of lignin played an important role on the hemicellulose hydrolysis in LHW than branch degree, but latter contributed more on the characterization of xylooligomers degree of polymerization. Moreover, the analysis of multi-scale changes of substrate suggested that cellulose crystallinity index and degree of polymerization seemed no direct relationships for increase of enzymatic digestibility. While lignin barrier was the main factor limiting efficiency of sugar release, and Pennisetum hybrid with low lignin content and high sugar recovery was proved to be a prospective plant feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production.

  18. Chemical probing of RNA with the hydroxyl radical at single-atom resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Shakti; Azad, Robert N.; Jain, Swapan S.; Tullius, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    While hydroxyl radical cleavage is widely used to map RNA tertiary structure, lack of mechanistic understanding of strand break formation limits the degree of structural insight that can be obtained from this experiment. Here, we determine how individual ribose hydrogens of sarcin/ricin loop RNA participate in strand cleavage. We find that substituting deuterium for hydrogen at a ribose 5′-carbon produces a kinetic isotope effect on cleavage; the major cleavage product is an RNA strand terminated by a 5′-aldehyde. We conclude that hydroxyl radical abstracts a 5′-hydrogen atom, leading to RNA strand cleavage. We used this approach to obtain structural information for a GUA base triple, a common tertiary structural feature of RNA. Cleavage at U exhibits a large 5′ deuterium kinetic isotope effect, a potential signature of a base triple. Others had noted a ribose-phosphate hydrogen bond involving the G 2′-OH and the U phosphate of the GUA triple, and suggested that this hydrogen bond contributes to backbone rigidity. Substituting deoxyguanosine for G, to eliminate this hydrogen bond, results in a substantial decrease in cleavage at G and U of the triple. We conclude that this hydrogen bond is a linchpin of backbone structure around the triple. PMID:25313156

  19. Chemical probing of RNA with the hydroxyl radical at single-atom resolution.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Shakti; Azad, Robert N; Jain, Swapan S; Tullius, Thomas D

    2014-11-10

    While hydroxyl radical cleavage is widely used to map RNA tertiary structure, lack of mechanistic understanding of strand break formation limits the degree of structural insight that can be obtained from this experiment. Here, we determine how individual ribose hydrogens of sarcin/ricin loop RNA participate in strand cleavage. We find that substituting deuterium for hydrogen at a ribose 5'-carbon produces a kinetic isotope effect on cleavage; the major cleavage product is an RNA strand terminated by a 5'-aldehyde. We conclude that hydroxyl radical abstracts a 5'-hydrogen atom, leading to RNA strand cleavage. We used this approach to obtain structural information for a GUA base triple, a common tertiary structural feature of RNA. Cleavage at U exhibits a large 5' deuterium kinetic isotope effect, a potential signature of a base triple. Others had noted a ribose-phosphate hydrogen bond involving the G 2'-OH and the U phosphate of the GUA triple, and suggested that this hydrogen bond contributes to backbone rigidity. Substituting deoxyguanosine for G, to eliminate this hydrogen bond, results in a substantial decrease in cleavage at G and U of the triple. We conclude that this hydrogen bond is a linchpin of backbone structure around the triple. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; ...

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymermore » substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.« less

  1. Inner-shell electron spectroscopy and chemical properties of atoms and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    T. Darrah Thomas

    2009-01-21

    The program has been concerned with gas-phase carbon 1s photoelectron spectroscopy of a number of molecules of potential chemical interest. The primary goals have been to determine carbon 1s ionization energies with a view of relating these to other chemical properties such as electronegativity, acidity, basicity, and reactivity, in order to provide a better understanding of these fundamental properties. The role of electron-donating (methyl) and electron-withdrawing (fluoro) substituents on the carbon 1s ionization energies of substituted benzenes has been studied., and these results have been related to measurements of the reactivities of the same molecule as well as to their affinities for protons (basicity). Opportunities for investigation in unplanned areas have arisen, and the program has been modified to take advantage of these. One has been the realization that, under certain circumstances, inner-shell ionization energies may depend on the molecular conformation. Several examples of this phenomenon have been investigated and it has been shown that this technique provides a tool for the measurement of the energy differences between different conformers of the same substance. The other has been the demonstration that photoelectron recoil can lead to the excitation of vibrational modes that are forbidden in the normal view of photoemission and to rotational heating of the molecule that increases with the energy of the exciting radiation.

  2. Competition of silene/silylene chemistry with free radical chain reactions using 1-methylsilacyclobutane in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process.

    PubMed

    Badran, I; Forster, T D; Roesler, R; Shi, Y J

    2012-10-18

    The gas-phase reaction chemistry of using 1-methylsilacyclobutane (MSCB) in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has been investigated by studying the decomposition of MSCB on a heated tungsten filament and subsequent gas-phase reactions in a reactor. Three pathways exist to decompose MSCB on the filament to form ethene/methylsilene, propene/methylsilylene, and methyl radicals. The activation energies for forming propene and methyl radical, respectively, are determined to be 68.7 ± 1.3 and 46.7 ± 2.5 kJ·mol(-1), which demonstrates the catalytic nature of the decomposition. The secondary gas-phase reactions in the hot-wire CVD reactor are characterized by the competition between a free radical chain reaction and the cycloaddition of silene reactive species produced either from the primary decomposition of MSCB on the filament or the isomerization of silylene species. At lower filament temperatures of 1000-1100 °C and short reaction time (t ≤ 15 min), the free radical chain reaction is equally important as the silene chemistry. With increasing filament temperature and reaction time, silene chemistry predominates.

  3. Low cost fabrication of diamond nano-tips on porous anodic alumina by hot filament chemical vapor deposition and the field emission effects.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Yin; Liu, Hsuan-Chun; Chen, Jhih-Hong; Yeh, Chih-Cheng

    2011-06-10

    A novel growth method for diamond nano-tips on porous anodic alumina (PAA) by hot filament chemical vapor deposition has been investigated for the first time. Before diamond film deposition could be carried out, nano-diamond particles were deposited onto the pore surface of PAA by electrophoretic deposition at the nucleation sites. Diamond nano-tips were then successfully formed by the shape of porous alumina. The results show that a diamond nano-tip with a smaller radius has superior effects of field emission. Its threshold field and current density are 1.2 V µm(-1) and 4.0 mA cm(-2), respectively, for the case of a tip radius of about 20-30 nm.

  4. Annealing effects on capacitance-voltage characteristics of a-Si/SiN(x) multilayer prepared using hot-wire chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Panchal, A K; Rai, D K; Solanki, C S

    2011-04-01

    Post-deposition annealing of a-Si/SiN(x) multilayer films at different temperature shows varying shift in high frequency (1 MHz) capacitance-voltage (HFCV) characteristics. Various a-Si/SiN(x) multilayer films were deposited using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and annealed in the temperature range of 800 to 900 degrees C to precipitate Si quantum dots (Si-QD) in a-Si layers. HFCV measurements of the as-deposited and annealed films in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures show hysterisis in C-V curves. The hysteresis in the as-deposited films and annealed films is attributed to charge trapping in Si-dangling bonds in a-Si layer and in Si-QD respectively. The charge trapping density in Si-QD increases with temperature while the interface defects density (D(it)) remains constant.

  5. The role of radial nodes of atomic orbitals for chemical bonding and the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Martin

    2007-01-15

    The role of radial nodes, or of their absence, in valence orbitals for chemical bonding and periodic trends is discussed from a unified viewpoint. In particular, we emphasize the special role of the absence of a radial node whenever a shell with angular quantum number l is occupied for the first time (lack of "primogenic repulsion"), as with the 1s, 2p, 3d, and 4f shells. Although the consequences of the very compact 2p shell (e.g. good isovalent hybridization, multiple bonding, high electronegativity, lone-pair repulsion, octet rule) are relatively well known, it seems that some of the aspects of the very compact 3d shell in transition-metal chemistry are less well appreciated, e.g., the often weakened and stretched bonds at equilibrium structure, the frequently colored complexes, and the importance of nondynamical electron-correlation effects in bonding. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of chemically different atomic species with widely tunable interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Santiago, Ibon; Tiecke, Tobias; Will, Sebastian; Ahmadi, Peyman; Zwierlein, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We have created a quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of ^23Na and ^40K with widely tunable interactions via broad interspecies Feshbach resonances. Over thirty Feshbach resonances between ^23Na and ^40K were identified, including p-wave multiplet resonances. The large and negative triplet background scattering length between ^23Na and ^40K causes a sharp enhancement of the fermion density in the presence of a Bose condensate. As explained via the asymptotic bound-state model (ABM), this strong background scattering leads to wide Feshbach resonances observed at low magnetic fields. Our work opens up the prospect to create chemically stable, fermionic ground state molecules of ^23Na--^40K where strong, long-range dipolar interactions would set the dominant energy scale.

  7. Quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of chemically different atomic species with widely tunable interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Santiago, Ibon; Tiecke, Tobias; Ahmadi, Peyman; Zwierlein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    We have created a quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of 23Na and 40K with widely tunable interactions via broad interspecies Feshbach resonances. Twenty Feshbach resonances between 23Na and 40K were identified. The large and negative triplet background scattering length between 23Na and 40K causes a sharp enhancement of the fermion density in the presence of a Bose condensate. As explained via the asymptotic bound-state model (ABM), this strong background scattering leads to a series of wide Feshbach resonances observed at low magnetic fields. Our work opens up the prospect to create chemically stable, fermionic ground state molecules of 23Na-40K where strong, long-range dipolar interactions will set the dominant energy scale.

  8. Spectacular enhancement of thermoelectric phenomena in chemically synthesized graphene nanoribbons with substitution atoms.

    PubMed

    Zberecki, K; Swirkowicz, R; Wierzbicki, M; Barnaś, J

    2016-07-21

    We analyze theoretically the transport and thermoelectric properties of graphene nanoribbons of a specific geometry, which have been synthesized recently from polymers [Cai, et al., Nature, 2011, 466, 470]. When such nanoribbons are modified at one of the two edges by Al or N substitutions, they acquire a ferromagnetic moment localized at the modified edge. We present numerical results on the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties (including also spin thermoelectricity) of the modified nanoribbons. The results show that such nanoribbons can display large thermoelectric efficiency in certain regions of chemical potential, where the corresponding electric and spin figures of merit achieve unusually large values. The enhancement of thermoelectric efficiency follows from a reduced phonon heat conductance of the nanoribbons and from their peculiar electronic band structure. Thus, such nanoribbons are promising for practical applications in nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  9. O(3P) atoms as a chemical probe of surface ordering in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Waring, Carla; Bagot, Paul A J; Slattery, John M; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2010-04-15

    The reactivity of photolytically generated, gas-phase, ground-state atomic oxygen, O((3)P), with the surfaces of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([NTf(2)]) ionic liquids has been investigated. The liquids differ only in the length of the linear C(n)H(2n+1) alkyl side chain on the cation, with n = 2, 4, 5, 8, and 12. Laser-induced fluorescence was used to detect gas-phase OH v' = 0 radicals formed at the gas-liquid interface. The reactivity of the ionic liquids increases nonlinearly with n, in a way that cannot simply be explained by stoichiometry. We infer that the alkyl chains must be preferentially exposed at the interface to a degree that is dependent on chain length. A relatively sharp onset of surface segregation is apparent in the region of n = 4. The surface specificity of the method is confirmed through the nonthermal characteristics of both the translational and rotational distributions of the OH v' = 0. These reveal that the dynamics are dominated by a direct, impulsive scattering mechanism at the outer layers of the liquid. The OH v' = 0 yield is effectively independent of the bulk temperature of the longest-chain ionic liquid in the range 298-343 K, also consistent with a predominantly direct mechanism. These product attributes are broadly similar to those of the benchmark pure hydrocarbon liquid, squalane, but a more detailed analysis suggests that the interface may be microscopically smoother for the ionic liquids.

  10. The Local Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding in Sodium Tin Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Bridges, Craig A.; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; Mullins, David R.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Meisner, Roberta; Crumlin, Ethan; Liu, Xiason; Yang, Wanli; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand these electrochemically-derived materials we have reinvestigated the formation of Na-Sn alloys to identify all the phases which form when x ≥ 1 (NaxSn) and characterized the local bonding around the Sn atoms with X-ray diffraction, 119Sn M ssbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The results from the well-defined crystallographic materials were compared to the spectroscopic measurements of the local Sn structures in the electrochemically prepared materials. The reinvestigation of the Na-Sn compounds yields a number of new results: (i) Na7Sn3 is a new thermodynamically-stable phase with a rhombohedral structure and R-3m space group; (ii) orthorhombic Na9Sn4 (Cmcm) has relatively slow formation kinetics suggesting why it does not form at room temperature during the electrochemical reaction; (iii) orthorhombic Na14.78Sn4 (Pnma), better described as Na16-xSn4, is Na-richer than cubic Na15Sn4 (I-43d). Characterization of electrochemically prepared Na-Sn alloys indicate that, at the exception of Na7Sn3 and Na15Sn4, different crystal structures than similar Na-Sn compositions prepared via classic solid state reactions are formed. These phases are composed of disordered structures characteristic of kinetic-driven solid-state amorphization reactions. In these structures, Sn coordinates in asymmetric environments, which differ significantly from the environments present in Na-Sn model compounds.

  11. The Local Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding in Sodium Tin Phases

    DOE PAGES

    Baggetto, Loic; Bridges, Craig A.; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; ...

    2014-01-01

    To understand these electrochemically-derived materials we have reinvestigated the formation of Na-Sn alloys to identify all the phases which form when x ≥ 1 (NaxSn) and characterized the local bonding around the Sn atoms with X-ray diffraction, 119Sn M ssbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The results from the well-defined crystallographic materials were compared to the spectroscopic measurements of the local Sn structures in the electrochemically prepared materials. The reinvestigation of the Na-Sn compounds yields a number of new results: (i) Na7Sn3 is a new thermodynamically-stable phase with a rhombohedral structure and R-3m space group; (ii) orthorhombic Na9Sn4 (Cmcm) hasmore » relatively slow formation kinetics suggesting why it does not form at room temperature during the electrochemical reaction; (iii) orthorhombic Na14.78Sn4 (Pnma), better described as Na16-xSn4, is Na-richer than cubic Na15Sn4 (I-43d). Characterization of electrochemically prepared Na-Sn alloys indicate that, at the exception of Na7Sn3 and Na15Sn4, different crystal structures than similar Na-Sn compositions prepared via classic solid state reactions are formed. These phases are composed of disordered structures characteristic of kinetic-driven solid-state amorphization reactions. In these structures, Sn coordinates in asymmetric environments, which differ significantly from the environments present in Na-Sn model compounds.« less

  12. Structural and chemical characterization of novel NixZn1-xGa2O4 nanocatalysts at atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Wu, Zhaochun; Hong, Jinhua; Chang, Xiaofeng; Li, Xueji; Yan, Shicheng; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    NixZn1-xGa2O4 has already been demonstrated as a noteworthy example of potentially useful catalytic properties such as NOx reduction. In our previous work, it was interesting to find out that the operating temperature of NiGa2O4 catalyst in NOx reduction can be tuned by simple chemical substitution of Ni2+ by Zn2+. It is believed that the mechanism behind such stoichiometry-dependence on operating temperature should be strongly correlated with microstructure, surface morphology as well as the local composition of the nanocatalysts. In the present investigation, NixZn1-xGa2O4 solid solution was synthesized via a hydrothermal ion-exchange reaction, using NaGaO2 and the corresponding acetic salts as the starting materials. By means of a state-of-the-art aberration corrected STEM and high resolution TEM, the structural and chemical characterization at the atomic scale on the NixZn1-xGa2O4 nanocatalyst was carried out, including the crystal structure, size, morphology, surface structure and local composition. It is found that the catalyst was solid solution and most possible exposed facets may be (1 1 1).

  13. Novel chemical route for atomic layer deposition of MoS₂ thin film on SiO₂/Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenyu; Shin, Seokhee; Kwon, Do Hyun; Han, Seung-Joo; Min, Yo-Sep

    2014-11-06

    Recently MoS₂ with a two-dimensional layered structure has attracted great attention as an emerging material for electronics and catalysis applications. Although atomic layer deposition (ALD) is well-known as a special modification of chemical vapor deposition in order to grow a thin film in a manner of layer-by-layer, there is little literature on ALD of MoS₂ due to a lack of suitable chemistry. Here we report MoS₂ growth by ALD using molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dimethyldisulfide as Mo and S precursors, respectively. MoS₂ can be directly grown on a SiO₂/Si substrate at 100 °C via the novel chemical route. Although the as-grown films are shown to be amorphous in X-ray diffraction analysis, they clearly show characteristic Raman modes (E(1)₂g and A₁g) of 2H-MoS₂ with a trigonal prismatic arrangement of S-Mo-S units. After annealing at 900 °C for 5 min under Ar atmosphere, the film is crystallized for MoS₂ layers to be aligned with its basal plane parallel to the substrate.

  14. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    ... are due to menopause — the time when menstrual periods become irregular and eventually stop. In fact, hot flashes are the most common symptom of the menopausal transition. How often hot flashes occur varies among women ...

  15. Theoretical investigations of the γ- gauche effect on the 13C chemical shifts produced by oxygen atoms at the γ position by quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji; Horii, Fumitaka; Kurosu, Hiromichi

    2009-02-01

    The γ- gauche effect on 13C chemical shifts that is produced by the O atoms located at the γ positions has been evaluated by quantum chemistry calculations based on the GAIO-CHF procedure. The γ- gauche effects produced by the O and Cl atoms in n-propanol and n-propyl chloride are found to be, respectively, +1.4 and -0.7 ppm, whereas that due to the C atom in n-butane is -3.0 ppm in good agreement of the values previously calculated. The apparent cause of such a difference in the γ- gauche effect is mainly relatively higher shielding of the CH 3 carbon in the trans conformation for the n-propanol and n-propyl chloride. Extending the n-propanol chain at both ends causes no significant change in the γ- gauche effect produced by the O atom. In 2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-butanol as examples of secondarily and tertiarily substituted compounds, the γ- gauche effects produced by the γ-OH groups are estimated to be -7 to -9 ppm. In addition, the γ- gauche effect due to the C atom is found to increase in n-butane, secondary, and tertiary butanols in this order. The γ- gauche effect produced by the O atom in hydroxyethylcyclohexane is as negligibly small as -0.7 ppm, whereas that produced by the C atom in ethylcyclohexane is about -5 ppm. These results suggest that the γ- gauche effect, including downfield shift, produced by the O atom in a compound greatly depends on its chemical structure, whereas upfield shifts of -3 to -7 ppm are induced in all examined compounds as the γ- gauche effect due to the C atom.

  16. Hot microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroy, Klaus; Chakraborty, Dipanjan; Cichos, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Hot microswimmers are self-propelled Brownian particles that exploit local heating for their directed self-thermophoretic motion. We provide a pedagogical overview of the key physical mechanisms underlying this promising new technology. It covers the hydrodynamics of swimming, thermophoresis and -osmosis, hot Brownian motion, force-free steering, and dedicated experimental and simulation tools to analyze hot Brownian swimmers.

  17. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Hot flashes By Mayo Clinic Staff Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the ... skin may redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause profuse sweating and may ...

  18. Use of sodium tungstate as a permanent chemical modifier for slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of indium in soils.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Rivas, Ricardo E; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2008-06-01

    A number of chemical modifiers have been assessed for the direct determination of indium in soils using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and slurry sampling. The best results were obtained when the graphite atomizer was impregnated with sodium tungstate, which acts as a permanent chemical modifier. Slurries were prepared by suspending 100 mg sample in a solution containing 1% (v/v) concentrated nitric acid and 10% (v/v) concentrated hydrofluoric acid and then 15-microL aliquots were directly introduced into the atomizer. Standard indium solutions prepared in the suspension medium in the range 4-80 microg L(-1) indium were used for calibration. The relative standard deviation for ten consecutive measurements of a 40 microg L(-1) indium solution was 2.8%. The limit of detection in soils was 0.1 microg g(-1). The reliability of the procedures was confirmed by analysing two standard reference materials and by using an alternative procedure.

  19. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    DOE PAGES

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; ...

    2016-02-18

    This article describes how the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  20. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-02-18

    This article describes how the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  1. Polymeric systems for amorphous Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol produced by a hot-melt method. Part I: chemical and thermal stability during processing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, Manish; Stodghill, Steven P; Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Repka, Michael A

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present research was to investigate the stability of an amorphous drug, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in polymer-based transmucosal systems. THC was incorporated in polyethylene oxide and hydroxypropylcellulose matrices by a hot-melt fabrication procedure, utilizing various processing aids. The chemical stability of the drug in the polymeric matrices was investigated with respect to processing temperature, processing time, formulation additives, and storage conditions. HPLC analysis of the THC-loaded systems indicated that the extent of drug degradation was influenced by all of the above mentioned variables. THC was particularly unstable in the vitamin E succinate-processed films, indicating a potential incompatibility. Thermal stability of the drug, polymers, and other ingredients at the elevated processing temperatures during the fabrication procedure, was evaluated using the isothermal mode of thermo-gravimetric analysis. When held at 160 and 200 degrees C, the weight percentage of THC decreased linearly as a function of time. Weight loss was controlled by blending the drug with polymers, PEO and HPC, of which PEO was determined to be more effective. Although higher temperatures lowered the polymer melt viscosity, THC and other materials were chemically and thermally unstable at such high temperatures. Due to this, matrix fabrication was found to be favorable at relatively lower temperatures, such as 120 degrees C.

  2. N-type crystalline silicon films free of amorphous silicon deposited on glass by HCl addition using hot wire chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-09-01

    Since n-type crystalline silicon films have the electric property much better than those of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films, they can enhance the performance of advanced electronic devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). Since the formation of amorphous silicon is unavoidable in the low temperature deposition of microcrystalline silicon on a glass substrate at temperatures less than 550 degrees C in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), crystalline silicon films have not been deposited directly on a glass substrate but fabricated by the post treatment of amorphous silicon films. In this work, by adding the HCl gas, amorphous silicon-free n-type crystalline silicon films could be deposited directly on a glass substrate by HWCVD. The resistivity of the n-type crystalline silicon film for the flow rate ratio of [HCl]/[SiH4] = 7.5 and [PH3]/[SiH4] = 0.042 was 5.31 x 10(-4) ohms cm, which is comparable to the resistivity 1.23 x 10(-3) ohms cm of films prepared by thermal annealing of amorphous silicon films. The absence of amorphous silicon in the film could be confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Study of tungsten filament aging in hot-wire chemical vapor deposition with silacyclobutane as a source gas and the H{sub 2} etching effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Ling; Sveen, Chris E.; Shi Yujun

    2008-06-15

    The tungsten filament aging when using silacyclobutane (SCB) as a source gas in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition reactor was systematically studied by the characterization of surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy and the chemical composition analysis of the filament surfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy. It is shown that filament aging involves the formation of silicides and under more severe conditions, a pure silicon deposit. At low pressures of SCB samples, e.g., 0.06 and 0.03 Torr, only Si{sub 3}W{sub 5} alloy was formed. Silicon-rich silicide, Si{sub 2}W, was found when using a higher pressure of SCB at 0.12 Torr. At the high SCB pressure of 0.12 Torr and low temperatures, pure silicon was deposited on the W filament surface. It is also demonstrated that H{sub 2} can etch the aged filament at high temperatures above 1900 deg. C. The etching products detected by the 10.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet laser single photon ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometer include SiH{sub 4}, SiCH{sub x} (x=2-5), and SiC{sub 2}H{sub y} (y=4-7)

  4. Study of tungsten filament aging in hot-wire chemical vapor deposition with silacyclobutane as a source gas and the H2 etching effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ling; Sveen, Chris E.; Shi, Yujun

    2008-06-01

    The tungsten filament aging when using silacyclobutane (SCB) as a source gas in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition reactor was systematically studied by the characterization of surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy and the chemical composition analysis of the filament surfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy. It is shown that filament aging involves the formation of silicides and under more severe conditions, a pure silicon deposit. At low pressures of SCB samples, e.g., 0.06 and 0.03Torr, only Si3W5 alloy was formed. Silicon-rich silicide, Si2W, was found when using a higher pressure of SCB at 0.12Torr. At the high SCB pressure of 0.12Torr and low temperatures, pure silicon was deposited on the W filament surface. It is also demonstrated that H2 can etch the aged filament at high temperatures above 1900°C. The etching products detected by the 10.5eV vacuum ultraviolet laser single photon ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometer include SiH4, SiCHx (x =2-5), and SiC2Hy (y =4-7).

  5. Heavy atomic-layer doping of B in low-temperature Si epitaxial growth on Si(1 0 0) by ultraclean low-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanno, Hiroki; Sakuraba, Masao; Tillack, Bernd; Murota, Junichi

    2008-07-01

    Electrical characteristics of B atomic-layer doped Si epitaxial films on Si(1 0 0) formed by B atomic-layer formation on Si(1 0 0) at 180 °C and subsequent capping Si deposition at 500 °C using ultraclean low-pressure chemical vapor deposition were investigated. From evaluation results of carrier concentration in the films, by low-temperature SiH 4 exposure at 180-300 °C before the capping Si deposition at 500 °C, 70% improvement of B electrical activity was confirmed, and it is suggested that lowering the temperatures for B atomic-layer formation on Si(1 0 0) as well as SiH 4 exposure before the capping Si deposition is effective to suppress B clustering and to achieve B atomic-layer doped Si films with extremely high carrier concentration.

  6. Woody biomass: Niche position as a source of sustainable renewable chemicals and energy and kinetics of hot-water extraction/hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijie

    2010-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to chemicals and energy is imperative to sustaining our way of life as known to us today. Fossil chemical and energy sources are traditionally regarded as wastes from a distant past. Petroleum, natural gas, and coal are not being regenerated in a sustainable manner. However, biomass sources such as algae, grasses, bushes and forests are continuously being replenished. Woody biomass represents the most abundant and available biomass source. Woody biomass is a reliably sustainable source of chemicals and energy that could be replenished at a rate consistent with our needs. The biorefinery is a concept describing the collection of processes used to convert biomass to chemicals and energy. Woody biomass presents more challenges than cereal grains for conversion to platform chemicals due to its stereochemical structures. Woody biomass can be thought of as comprised of at least four components: extractives, hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. Each of these four components has a different degree of resistance to chemical, thermal and biological degradation. The biorefinery concept proposed at ESF (State University of New York - College of Environmental Science and Forestry) aims at incremental sequential deconstruction, fractionation/conversion of woody biomass to achieve efficient separation of major components. The emphasis of this work is on the kinetics of hot-water extraction, filling the gap in the fundamental understanding, linking engineering developments, and completing the first step in the biorefinery processes. This first step removes extractives and hemicellulose fractions from woody biomass. While extractives and hemicellulose are largely removed in the extraction liquor, cellulose and lignin largely remain in the residual woody structure. Xylo-oligomers and acetic acid in the extract are the major components having the greatest potential value for development. Extraction/hydrolysis involves at least 16 general reactions that could

  7. Chemical analyses of hot springs, pools, geysers, and surface waters from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and vicinity, 1974-1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, James W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Jenne, Everett A.; Vivit, Davison V.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents all analytical determinations for samples collected from Yellowstone National Park and vicinity during 1974 and 1975. Water temperature, pH, Eh, and dissolved O2 were determined on-site. Total alkalinity and F were determined on the day of sample collection. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was used to determine concentrations of Li, Na, K, Ca, and Mg. Ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry was used to determine concentrations of Fe(II), Fe(III), As(III), and As(V). Direct-current plasma-optical-emission spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of B, Ba, Cd, Cs, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zn. Two samples collected from Yellowstone Park in June 1974 were used as reference samples for testing the plasma analytical method. Results of these tests demonstrate acceptable precision for all detectable elements. Charge imbalance calculations revealed a small number of samples that may have been subject to measurement errors in pH or alkalinity. These data represent some of the most complete analyses of Yellowstone waters available.

  8. Numerical study of He/CF{sub 3}I pulsed discharge used to produce iodine atom in chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiao; Wang Yanhui; Wang Dezhen; Duo Liping; Li Guofu

    2013-04-15

    The pulsed discharge for producing iodine atoms from the alkyl and perfluoroalky iodides (CH{sub 3}I, CF{sub 3}I, etc.) is the most efficient method for achieving the pulse operating mode of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of pulsed discharge in CF{sub 3}I-He mixture. By solving continuity equation, momentum equation, Poisson equation, Boltzmann equation, and an electric circuit equation, the temporal evolution of discharge current density and various discharge products, especially the atomic iodine, are investigated. The dependence of iodine atom density on discharge parameters is also studied. The results show that iodine atom density increases with the pulsed width and pulsed voltage amplitude. The mixture ratio of CF{sub 3}I and helium plays a more significant role in iodine atom production. For a constant voltage amplitude, there exists an optimal mixture ratio under which the maximum iodine atom concentration is achieved. The bigger the applied voltage amplitude is, the higher partial pressure of CF{sub 3}I is needed to obtain the maximum iodine atom concentration.

  9. From {sup 3}He{at}C{sub 60} to {sup 3}H{at}C{sub 60}: Hot-atom incorporation of tritium in C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Khong, A.; Cross, R.J.; Saunders, M.

    2000-05-04

    The introduction of tritium into the cavity of C{sub 60} using hot-atom chemistry was studied. Neutron irradiation of {sup 3}He in {sup 3}He{at}C{sub 60} produced tritium ions and atoms which enter the C{sub 60}. {sup 3}H{at}C{sub 60} was detected with a scintillation counter. The Bingel reaction was carried out on this material under conditions so that the monoadduct formed predominantly, and the products were probed for tritium activity. Analysis with {sup 3}He NMR gave a peak with the characteristic {sup 3}He shift for the malonate product. The product fractions gave only 33% of the original activity; most was recovered in the unreacted C{sub 60} portion. No reaction was observed between C{sub 60} and the stable radical di-tert-butylnitroxide; all tritium activity was recovered in the C{sub 60} peak. These results suggest similarities in properties between {sup 3}H{at}C{sub 60} and pure C{sub 60}, implying that the tritium exists as a free atom inside the molecule.

  10. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2012-12-01

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X+ + H- have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  11. Pressure and chemical substitution effects in the local atomic structure of BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granado, E.; Mendonça-Ferreira, L.; Garcia, F.; Azevedo, G. De M.; Fabbris, G.; Bittar, E. M.; Adriano, C.; Garitezi, T. M.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Bufaiçal, L. F.; Avila, M. A.; Terashita, H.; Pagliuso, P. G.

    2011-05-01

    The effects of K and Co substitutions and quasihydrostatic applied pressure (P<9 GPa) in the local atomic structure of BaFe2As2, Ba(Fe0.937Co0.063)2As2 and Ba0.85K0.15Fe2As2 superconductors were investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements in the As K absorption edge. The As-Fe bond length is found to be slightly reduced (≲0.01 Å) by both Co and K substitutions, without any observable increment in the corresponding Debye-Waller factor. Also, this bond is shown to be compressible [κ=3.3(3)×10-3 GPa-1]. The observed contractions of As-Fe bond under pressure and chemical substitutions are likely related with a reduction of the local Fe magnetic moments, and should be an important tuning parameter in the phase diagrams of the Fe-based superconductors.

  12. Chemical vapor generation for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy: vaporization of antimony(III) with bromide.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Molinero, A; Mendoza, O; Callizo, A; Chamorro, P; Castillo, J R

    2002-10-01

    A new method for antimony determination in soils is proposed. It is based on the chemical vapor generation of Sb(III) with bromide, after a reaction in sulfuric acid media and transport of the gaseous phase into an inductively coupled plasma for atomic emission spectrometry. The experimental variables influencing the method were delimited by experimental design and the most important were finally optimized by the modified Simplex method. In optimized conditions the method involves the reaction of 579 microl concentrated sulfuric acid with 120 microl 5% w/v KBr and 250 microl antimony solution. Measurement of antimony emission intensity at 217.581 nm provides a method with an absolute detection limit of 3.5 ng and a precision (RSD) of 5.8% for the injection of five replicates of 175 ng Sb(III) (250 microl of 0.7 microg ml(-1) solution). The interference of common anions and cations on the antimony signal was evaluated. A 21% Sb(III) volatilization efficiency was calculated from the mean of six experiments at optimum conditions. The accuracy of the methodology was checked by the analysis of one standard reference soil after acid decomposition heating in a microwave oven.

  13. An integrated chemical and stable-isotope model of the origin of Midocean Ridge Hot Spring Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Teresa Suter; Taylor, Hugh P., Jr.

    1985-12-01

    Chemical and isotopic changes accompanying seawater-basalt interaction in axial midocean ridge hydrothermal systems are modeled with the aid of chemical equilibria and mass transfer computer programs, incorporating provision for addition and subtraction of a wide-range of reactant and product minerals, as well as cation and oxygen and hydrogen isotopic exchange equilibria. The models involve stepwise introduction of fresh basalt into progressively modified seawater at discrete temperature intervals from 100° to 350°C, with an overall water-rock ratio of about 0.5 being constrained by an assumed δ18OH2O at 350°C of +2.0 per mil (H. Craig, personal communication, 1984). This is a realistic model because: (1) the grade of hydrothermal metamorphism increases sharply downward in the oceanic crust; (2) the water-rock ratio is high (>50) at low temperatures and low (<0.5) at high temperatures; and (3) it allows for back-reaction of earlier-formed minerals during the course of reaction progress. The results closely match the major-element chemistry (Von Damm et al., 1985) and isotopic compositions (Craig et al., 1980) of the hydrothermal solutions presently emanating from vents at 21°N on the East Pacific Rise. The calculated solution chemistry, for example, correctly predicts complete loss of Mg and SO4 and substantial increases in Si and Fe; however, discrepancies exist in the predicted pH (5.5 versus 3.5 measured) and state of saturation of the solution with respect to greenschist-facies minerals. The calculated δDH2O is +2.6 per mil, in excellent agreement with analytical determinations. The calculated chemical, mineralogic, and isotopic changes in the rocks are also in good accord with observations on altered basalts dredged from midocean ridges (Humphris and Thompson, 1978; Stakes and O'Neil, 1982), as well as with data from ophiolites (Gregory and Taylor, 1981). Predicted alteration products include anhydrite and clay minerals at low temperatures and a typical

  14. Measurement of a large chemical reaction rate between ultracold closed-shell 40Ca atoms and open-shell 174Yb+ ions held in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rellergert, Wade G; Sullivan, Scott T; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Petrov, Alexander; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-12-09

    Ultracold 174Yb+ ions and 40Ca atoms are confined in a hybrid trap. The charge exchange chemical reaction rate constant between these two species is measured and found to be 4 orders of magnitude larger than recent measurements in other heteronuclear systems. The structure of the CaYb+ molecule is determined and used in a calculation that explains the fast chemical reaction as a consequence of strong radiative charge transfer. A possible explanation is offered for the apparent contradiction between typical theoretical predictions and measurements of the radiative association process in this and other recent experiments.

  15. Measurement of a Large Chemical Reaction Rate between Ultracold Closed-Shell {sup 40}Ca Atoms and Open-Shell {sup 174}Yb{sup +} Ions Held in a Hybrid Atom-Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rellergert, Wade G.; Sullivan, Scott T.; Chen Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J.; Hudson, Eric R.; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Petrov, Alexander

    2011-12-09

    Ultracold {sup 174}Yb{sup +} ions and {sup 40}Ca atoms are confined in a hybrid trap. The charge exchange chemical reaction rate constant between these two species is measured and found to be 4 orders of magnitude larger than recent measurements in other heteronuclear systems. The structure of the CaYb{sup +} molecule is determined and used in a calculation that explains the fast chemical reaction as a consequence of strong radiative charge transfer. A possible explanation is offered for the apparent contradiction between typical theoretical predictions and measurements of the radiative association process in this and other recent experiments.

  16. Toward Comprehensive Physical/Chemical Understanding of the Circumstellar Environments - Simultaneous Probing of Each of the Ionized/Atomic/Molecular Gas and Dust Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya

    We propose to continue our successful investigations into simultaneous probing of each of the ionized/atomic/molecular gas and dust components in planetary nebulae using primarily far-IR broadband images and spatially-resolved spectroscopic data cubes obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory to enhance our understanding of the circumstellar environments. This research originally started as the Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS) - an open time 1 program of the Herschel Space Observatory - in which 11 high-excitation PNs were observed to study the nebular energetics that involves very hot X-ray emitting plasma to very cold dust grains, whose density ranges over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and temperature ranges over 7 orders of magnitude. The HerPlaNS data include broadband maps, IFU spectral data cubes, and bolometer array spectral data cubes covering 50 to 670 microns. Because of the sheer volume and complexity of the data set, the original funding was exhausted almost exclusively to the initial data reduction and not much to the subsequent science analysis. However, we managed to perform a nearly full science analysis for one target, NGC 6781, for which the broadband maps confirm the nearly pole-on barrel structure of the amorphous carbonrich dust shell and the surrounding halo having temperatures of 26-40 K. We also demonstrated that spatially resolved far-IR line diagnostics would yield the (Te, ne) profiles, from which distributions of ionized, atomic, and molecular gases can be determined. Direct comparison of the dust and gas column mass maps constrained by the HerPlaNS data allowed to construct an empirical gas-to-dust mass ratio map, which shows a range of ratios with the median of 195 with a standard deviation of 110. The analysis also yielded estimates of the total mass of the shell to be 0.86 M_sun, consisting of 0.54 M_sun of ionized gas, 0.12 M_sun of atomic gas, 0.2 M_sun of molecular gas, and 0.004 M_sun of dust grains. These estimates

  17. High-contrast sub-Doppler absorption spikes in a hot atomic vapor cell exposed to a dual-frequency laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Brazhnikov, Denis; Coget, Grégoire; Taichenachev, Alexei; Yudin, Valeriy; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2017-07-01

    The saturated absorption technique is an elegant method widely used in atomic and molecular physics for high-resolution spectroscopy, laser frequency standards and metrology purposes. We have recently discovered that a saturated absorption scheme with a dual-frequency laser can lead to a significant sign reversal of the usual Doppler-free dip, yielding a deep enhanced-absorption spike. In this paper, we report detailed experimental investigations of this phenomenon, together with a full in-depth theoretical description. It is shown that several physical effects can support or oppose the formation of the high-contrast central spike in the absorption profile. The physical conditions for which all these effects act constructively and result in very bright Doppler-free resonances are revealed. Apart from their theoretical interest, results obtained in this manuscript are of great interest for laser spectroscopy and laser frequency stabilization purposes, with applications in laser cooling, matter-wave sensors, atomic clocks or quantum optics.

  18. Development of hot-pressed and chemical-vapor-deposited zinc sulfide and zinc selenide in the United States for optical windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel C.

    2007-04-01

    By the mid 1950s, there was a need for infrared-transmitting materials with improved optical and mechanical characteristics for military and commercial instruments. The newly invented "heat-seeking" missile also required a more durable infrared-transmitting dome. Some properties of ZnS were known from studies of natural minerals. More properties of pure ZnS and ZnSe were measured with single crystals grown in Air Force and industrial laboratories in the 1950s. In 1956, a team led by William Parsons at the Eastman Kodak Hawk-Eye Works in Rochester, New York began to apply the technique of hot pressing to make infrared-transmitting ceramics from powders. This work led to commercial production of six materials, including ZnS (IRTRAN® 2) and ZnSe (IRTRAN® 4) in the 1960s. Because the hot pressed materials could not be made in very large sizes and suffered from undesirable optical losses, the Air Force began to look for alternative manufacturing methods around 1970. Almost immediately, highly successful materials were produced by chemical vapor deposition under Air Force sponsorship by a team led by James Pappis at the Raytheon Research Division in Waltham, Massachusetts. Chemical-vapor-deposited materials replaced hot pressed materials in most applications within a few years. From a stream of Air Force contracts in the 1970s and early 1980s, Raytheon produced two different grades of ZnS for windows and domes, one grade of ZnSe for high-energy CO II laser windows, and a composite ZnS/ZnSe window for aircraft sensor pods. In 1980, a competitor called CVD, Inc., was formed by Robert Donadio, who came from the Raytheon Research Division. CVD began with a license from Raytheon, but soon sued Raytheon, arguing that the license violated the Sherman Antitrust Act. Raytheon countersued for breach of employment contracts and misappropriation of trade secrets. In 1984, a jury ruled in favor of CVD, which went on to build a lucrative business in ZnSe and ZnS. CVD was eventually

  19. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    PubMed

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The infrared chemical imaging component of the system utilized photothermal expansion of the sample at the tip of the atomic force microscopy probe recorded at infrared wave numbers specific to the different surface constituents. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for thermolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup, operation, and image correlation procedures are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated poly(2-vinylpyridine)/poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer thin film. The topography and both the infrared and mass spectral chemical images showed that the valley regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of poly(2-vinylpyridine) and hill or plateau regions were primarily poly(methyl methacrylate). The spatial resolution of the mass spectral chemical images was estimated to be 1.6 μm based on the ability to distinguish surface features in those images that were also observed in the topography and infrared images of the same surface.

  20. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification.

  1. The influence of charge effect on the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Nelson, B.P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Mahan, A.H.; Crandall, R.S.; Benner, J.

    1998-09-01

    The authors observe at lower substrate temperatures that the scatter in the dark conductivity on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films grown on insulating substrates (e.g., Corning 7059 glass) by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique (HWCVD) can be five orders of magnitude or more. This is especially true at deposition temperatures below 350 C. However, when the authors grow the same materials on substrates with a conductive grid, virtually all of their films have acceptable dark conductivity (< 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} S/cm) at all deposition temperatures below 425 C. This is in contrast to only about 20% of the materials grown in this same temperature range on insulating substrates having an acceptable dark conductivity. The authors estimated an average energy of 5 eV electrons reaching the growing surface in vacuum, and did additional experiments to see the influence of both the electron flux and the energy of the electrons on the film growth. Although these effects do not seem to be important for growing a-Si:H by HWCVD on conductive substrates, they help better understand the important parameters for a-Si:H growth, and thus, to optimize these parameters in other applications of HWCVD technology.

  2. Nanocrystalline Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network with intense white light emission fabricated by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Y. Dutt, A.; Santana-Rodríguez, G.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Aceves-Mijares, M.

    2015-04-27

    We report the fabrication of a stable Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on a silicon substrate at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 °C. Structural investigations using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the presence of nanocrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide quantum dots in the form of a core-shell network embedded in the amorphous SiO{sub x} matrix, while selected area electron diffraction confirms the formation of a core-shell structure. The core-shell structure exhibits a bright white emission that can be seen with the unaided eye at room temperature without any post-annealing treatments, and the observed photoemission does not alter in color or intensity after prolonged laser exposure. Additional measurements are performed while varying the laser power and optical gain is found in the as-deposited material. Intense stable white luminescence is observed and shows the prospective for various optical and biological applications in the future.

  3. Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition prepared aluminum doped p-type microcrystalline silicon carbide window layers for thin film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Köhler, Florian; Heidt, Anna; Carius, Reinhard; Finger, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    Al-doped p-type microcrystalline silicon carbide (µc-SiC:H) thin films were deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at substrate temperatures below 400 °C. Monomethylsilane (MMS) highly diluted in hydrogen was used as the SiC source in favor of SiC deposition in a stoichiometric form. Aluminum (Al) introduced from trimethylaluminum (TMAl) was used as the p-type dopant. The material property of Al-doped p-type µc-SiC:H thin films deposited with different deposition pressure and filament temperature was investigated in this work. Such µc-SiC:H material is of mainly cubic (3C) SiC polytype. For certain conditions, like high deposition pressure and high filament temperature, additional hexagonal phase and/or stacking faults can be observed. P-type µc-SiC:H thin films with optical band gap E04 ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 eV and dark conductivity ranging from 10-5 to 0.1 S/cm can be prepared. Such transparent and conductive p-type µc-SiC:H thin films were applied in thin film silicon solar cells as the window layer, resulting in an improved quantum efficiency at wavelengths below 480 nm.

  4. Physical and chemical parameter correlations with technical and technological characteristics of heating systems and the presence of Legionella spp. in the hot water supply.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Anita; Štambuk-Giljanović, Nives

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Legionella spp. and compare the quality of hot water between four facilities for accommodation located in Southern Croatia (the Split-Dalmatian County). The research included data collection on the technical and technological characteristics in the period from 2009 to 2012. The survey included a type of construction material for the distribution and internal networks, heating system water heater type, and water consumption. Changes in water quality were monitored by determination of the physical and chemical parameters (temperature, pH, free chlorine residual concentrations, iron, zinc, copper and manganese) in the samples, as well as the presence and concentration of bacteria Legionella spp. The temperature is an important factor for the development of biofilms, and it is in negative correlation with the appearance of Legionella spp. Positive correlations between the Fe and Zn concentrations and Legionella spp. were established, while the inhibitory effect of a higher Cu concentration on the Legionella spp. concentration was proven. Legionella spp. were identified in 38/126 (30.2%) of the water samples from the heating system with zinc-coated pipes, as well as in 78/299 (26.1%) of the samples from systems with plastic pipes. A similar number of Legionella spp. positive samples were established regardless of the type of the water heating system (central or independent). The study confirms the necessity of regular microbial contamination monitoring of the drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs).

  5. Investigation of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on TiN substrates using CupraSelect as precursor.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    Copper films were deposited on oxidized Si substrates covered with TiN using a novel chemical vapor deposition reactor in which reactions were assisted by a heated tungsten filament (hot-wire CVD, HWCVD). Liquid at room temperature hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) was directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a direct-liquid injection (DLI) system using N2 as carrier gas. The deposition rates of HWCVD Cu films obtained on TiN covered substrates were found to increase with filament temperature (65 and 170 degrees C were tested). The resistivities of HWCVD Cu films were found to be higher than for thermally grown films due to the possible presence of impurities into the Cu films from the incomplete dissociation of the precursor and W impurities caused by the presence of the filament. For HWCVD films grown at a filament temperature of 170 degrees C, smaller grains are formed than at 65 degrees C as shown from the taken SEM micrographs. XRD diffractograms taken on Cu films deposited on TiN could not reveal the presence of W compounds originating from the filament because the relative peak was masked by the TiN [112] peak.

  6. Effect of the initial structure on the electrical property of crystalline silicon films deposited on glass by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Ki; Jung, Jae-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2012-07-01

    Crystalline silicon films on an inexpensive glass substrate are currently prepared by depositing an amorphous silicon film and then crystallizing it by excimer laser annealing, rapid thermal annealing, or metal-induced crystallization because crystalline silicon films cannot be directly deposited on glass at a low temperature. It was recently shown that by adding HCI gas in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) process, the crystalline silicon film can be directly deposited on a glass substrate without additional annealing. The electrical properties of silicon films prepared using a gas mixture of SiH4 and HCl in the HWCVD process could be further improved by controlling the initial structure, which was achieved by adjusting the delay time in deposition. The size of the silicon particles in the initial structure increased with increasing delay time, which increased the mobility and decreased the resistivity of the deposited films. The 0 and 5 min delay times produced the silicon particle sizes of approximately 10 and approximately 28 nm, respectively, in the initial microstructure, which produced the final films, after deposition for 300 sec, of resistivities of 0.32 and 0.13 Omega-cm, mobilities of 1.06 and 1.48 cm2 V(-1) S(-1), and relative densities of 0.87 and 0.92, respectively.

  7. Carburization of tungsten filaments in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process using 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane.

    PubMed

    Tong, L; Shi, Y J

    2009-09-01

    The alloying of tungsten filament when using 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane (TMDSCB) in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition reactor was systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, analysis of the power consumed by the filament, and in situ mass spectrometric measurements of the gas-phase species produced in the process. Only carburization of the W filament was observed. The carburization is mainly caused by the interaction of methyl radicals with the filament. Graphite as well as both WC and W2C alloys can form on the filament surface, depending on the filament temperatures and source gas pressures. Both WC and graphite are converted to W2C with the diffusion of C into the filament. It is shown that filament carburization affects the consumption rate of the source gas and the intensities of gas-phase reaction products. Gas-phase reactions dominate at T < or = 1400 degrees C. The carburization rate increases with increasing filament temperatures and dominates at T > or = 1800 degrees C.

  8. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  9. Use of Optical Microscopy to Examine Crystallite Nucleation and Growth in Thermally Annealed Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A. H.; Dabney, M. S.; Reedy, Jr R. C.; Molina, D.; Ginley, D. S.

    2012-05-15

    We report a simple method to investigate crystallite nucleation and growth in stepwise, thermally annealed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot wire chemical vapor deposition a-Si:H films. By confining film thicknesses to the range 500-4000 {angstrom}, optical microscopy in the reflection mode can be used to readily detect crystallites in the thermally annealed a-Si:H lattice. Measurements of the crystallite density versus annealing time for identically prepared films of different thickness show that the crystallite nucleation rate is smaller for thinner films, suggesting that crystallite nucleation is homogeneous, in agreement with previous results. A comparison of film nucleation rates with those obtained by other methods on identically prepared films shows excellent agreement, thus establishing the validity of the current technique. The potential effect of impurity (oxygen) incorporation during the stepwise annealing in air is shown not to affect crystallite nucleation and growth, in that SIMS oxygen profiles for stepwise versus continuous annealing show not only similar impurity profiles but also similar bulk impurity densities.

  10. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  11. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived,…

  12. Characterizing seasonal variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: comparing patterns in hot spots and hot moments for nutrient and sediment export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Thelusma, Gilbert; Humbert, Guillaume; Dupas, Rémi; Faucheux, Mikael; Gilliet, Nicolas; Hamon, Yannick; Jaffrezic, Anne; Grimaldi, Catherine; Gruau, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Storm events are critical hot moments of emission for several dissolved and particulate chemical species at major stake for water quality (e.g. dissolved organic carbon DOC, suspended sediments, phosphorus). During such events, the solutes or particles are exported from heterogeneous sources through various pathways to stream leading to specific integrated signals at the outlet characterized by very short dynamics. This is merely true in headwater catchments where the total duration of such events ranges over 10h to 3 days, with very quick variations in stream flow and concentrations at the outlet occurring in a few hours. Thus for investigating properly event processes, high frequency monitoring of flow and water quality is required. We analysed 103 storm events in a 5 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, part of the AgrHys Observatory, on the basis of a 3-year-long data set which combined meterological (Rainfall), hydrological (flow and piezometry), and water quality (turbidity, conductivity, DOC and NO3 concentrations) data recorded at very high frequencies (from 1 to 20 min) thanks to dedicated sensors. We proposed a range of quantitative storm descriptors for characterizing input (rainfall), antecedent and initial conditions (groundwater levels and saturated area), and stream response in terms of level and dynamics of flow (Q), groundwater levels, and concentrations (C) but also the C-Q relationships. Three intra annual periods have been previously defined for base flow dynamic according to shallow groundwater table variations so that they correspond to different connectivity status in the catchment. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the storm events have been analysed using the descriptors and based on these predefined periods. Results show that the hydrological flowpaths and the consequent storm chemistry were controlled by the hydrological base flow regime rather than by the rain input characteristics. This highlights that the exports of NO3

  13. Two Regimes of Interaction of a Hot Jupiter’s Escaping Atmosphere with the Stellar Wind and Generation of Energized Atomic Hydrogen Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Prokopov, P. A.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Posukh, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    The interaction of escaping the upper atmosphere of a hydrogen-rich non-magnetized analog of HD 209458b with a stellar wind (SW) of its host G-type star at different orbital distances is simulated with a 2D axisymmetric multi-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model. A realistic Sun-like spectrum of X-ray and ultraviolet radiation, which ionizes and heats the planetary atmosphere, together with hydrogen photochemistry, as well as stellar-planetary tidal interaction are taken into account to generate self-consistently an atmospheric HD outflow. Two different regimes of the planetary and SW interaction have been modeled. These are: (1) the “captured by the star” regime, when the tidal force and pressure gradient drive the planetary material beyond the Roche lobe toward the star, and (2) the “blown by the wind” regime, when sufficiently strong SW confines the escaping planetary atmosphere and channels it into the tail. The model simulates in detail the HD interaction between the planetary atoms, protons and the SW, as well as the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) around the planet due to charge exchange between planetary atoms and stellar protons. The revealed location and shape of the ENA cloud, either as a paraboloid shell between the ionopause and bowshock (for the “blown by the wind” regime), or a turbulent layer at the contact boundary between the planetary stream and SW (for the “captured by the star” regime) are of importance for the interpretation of Lyα absorption features in exoplanetary transit spectra and characterization of the plasma environments.

  14. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  15. Retained Austenite Decomposition and Carbide Formation During Tempering a Hot-Work Tool Steel X38CrMoV5-1 Studied by Dilatometry and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerchbacher, Christoph; Zinner, Silvia; Leitner, Harald

    2012-12-01

    The microstructural development of a hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1 during continuous heating to tempering temperature has been investigated with the focus on the decomposition of retained austenite (Stage II) and carbide formation (Stages III and IV). Investigations have been carried out after heating to 673.15 K, 773.15 K, 883.15 K (400 °C, 500 °C, 610 °C) and after a dwell time of 600 seconds at 883.15 K (610 °C). Dilatometry and atom probe tomography were used to identify tempering reactions. A distinctive reaction takes place between 723.15 K and 823.15 K (450 °C and 550 °C) which is determined to be the formation of M3C from transition carbides. Stage II could be evidenced with the atom probe results and indirectly with dilatometry, indicating the formation of new martensite during cooling. Retained austenite decomposition starts with the precipitation of alloy carbides formed from nanometric interlath retained austenite films which are laminary arranged and cause a reduction of the carbon content within the retained austenite. Preceding enrichment of substitutes at the matrix/carbide interface in the early stages of Cr7C3 alloy carbide formation could be visualised on the basis of coarse M3C carbides within the matrix. Atom probe tomography has been found to be very useful to complement dilatational experiments in order to characterise and identify microstructural changes.

  16. Half-flat vs. atomically flat: Alkyl monolayers on morphologically controlled Si(100) and Si(111) have very similar structure, density, and chemical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBenedetti, William J. I.; Li, Thomas L.; Hines, Melissa A.

    2017-02-01

    Chemists have long preferred the Si(111) surface for chemical functionalization, as a simple aqueous etch can be used to produce ideal, atomically flat H/Si(111) surfaces for subsequent reactions. In contrast, industry-standard etches produce rough H/Si(100) surfaces terminated by nanohillocks. The recent discovery of an aqueous etch that produces morphologically controlled H/Si(100) surfaces with a near atomically flat or "half-flat" morphology challenges the assumption that Si(111) is an inherently preferable starting point for chemical functionalization. This study shows that alkyl functionalization of morphologically controlled, "half-flat" Si(100) surfaces by terminal alkenes produces dense, tightly packed monolayers that are essentially identical to those on atomically flat Si(111). The striking similarity between the infrared spectra on these two surfaces — in terms of absolute absorbance, line shape and position, and polarization dependence — strongly suggests that alkyl monolayers on morphologically controlled Si(111) and Si(100) have essentially identical structures. The principle difference between the two surfaces is the amount of residual H at the Si/organic interface, a difference that is dictated by the structure of the Si(100) surface. Alkyl monolayers on morphologically controlled Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces were shown to be equally resistant to harsh oxidants. As a result, there appears to be no chemical reason to prefer one surface over the other, at least for functionalization with terminal alkenes.

  17. Half-flat vs. atomically flat: Alkyl monolayers on morphologically controlled Si(100) and Si(111) have very similar structure, density, and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    DeBenedetti, William J I; Li, Thomas L; Hines, Melissa A

    2017-02-07

    Chemists have long preferred the Si(111) surface for chemical functionalization, as a simple aqueous etch can be used to produce ideal, atomically flat H/Si(111) surfaces for subsequent reactions. In contrast, industry-standard etches produce rough H/Si(100) surfaces terminated by nanohillocks. The recent discovery of an aqueous etch that produces morphologically controlled H/Si(100) surfaces with a near atomically flat or "half-flat" morphology challenges the assumption that Si(111) is an inherently preferable starting point for chemical functionalization. This study shows that alkyl functionalization of morphologically controlled, "half-flat" Si(100) surfaces by terminal alkenes produces dense, tightly packed monolayers that are essentially identical to those on atomically flat Si(111). The striking similarity between the infrared spectra on these two surfaces - in terms of absolute absorbance, line shape and position, and polarization dependence - strongly suggests that alkyl monolayers on morphologically controlled Si(111) and Si(100) have essentially identical structures. The principle difference between the two surfaces is the amount of residual H at the Si/organic interface, a difference that is dictated by the structure of the Si(100) surface. Alkyl monolayers on morphologically controlled Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces were shown to be equally resistant to harsh oxidants. As a result, there appears to be no chemical reason to prefer one surface over the other, at least for functionalization with terminal alkenes.

  18. Reactivity of electrophilic chlorine atoms due to σ-holes: a mechanistic assessment of the chemical reduction of a trichloromethyl group by sulfur nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Caballero-García, Guillermo; Romero-Ortega, Moisés; Barroso-Flores, Joaquín

    2016-10-05

    σ-Holes are shown to promote the electrophilic behavior of chlorine atoms in a trichloromethyl group when bound to an electron-withdrawing moiety. A halogen bond-type non-covalent interaction between a chlorine atom and a negatively charged sulfur atom takes place, causing the abstraction of such a chlorine atom while leaving a carbanion, subsequently driving the chemical reduction of the trichloromethyl group to a sulfide in a stepwise process. The mechanism for the model reaction of trichloromethyl pyrimidine 1 with thiophenolate and thiophenol to yield phenylsulfide 4 was followed through (1)H-NMR and studied using DFT transition state calculations, and the energy profile for this transformation is fully discussed. MP2 calculations of the electrostatic potential were performed for a series of trichloromethyl compounds in order to assess the presence of σ-holes and quantify them by means of the maximum surface electrostatic potential. Such calculations showed that the chlorine atoms behave as electrophilic leaving groups toward a nucleophilic attack, opening a new possibility in the synthetic chemistry of the trichloromethyl group.

  19. First-principles molecular-dynamics calculations on chemical reactions and atomic structures induced by H radical impinging onto Si(001)2 x 1:H surface.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Kouji; Kanai, Ryota; Hirose, Kikuji; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2011-04-01

    Chemical reactions between hydrogen terminated Si(001)2 x 1 surface and impinging H radical are investigated by means of first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations. Reaction probabilities of abstraction of surface terminating H atom with H2 formation, adsorption onto Si surface and reflection of impinging H atom are analyzed with respect to the kinetic energy of incident H radical. The probabilities of abstraction and adsorption turn out to be ranging from 0.81 to 0.58 and from 0.19 to 0.42, respectively, while that of reflection almost zero. As initial kinetic energy of the impinging atom increases, the reaction probability of abstraction decreases and that of absorption increases. Metastable H-absorbed atomic configurations are also derived by optimizing the structures obtained in the impinging dynamics calculations. They are candidates of the so-called reservoir site which is a key to understand the unity hydrogen coverage observed after an exposure to gaseous H atom ambient despite existing residual vacant sites due to abstraction.

  20. First-Principles Elucidation of Atomic Size Effects Using DFT-Chemical Pressure Analysis: Origins of Ca36Sn23's Long-Period Superstructure.

    PubMed

    Engelkemier, Joshua; Berns, Veronica M; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2013-07-09

    The space requirements of atoms are empirically known to play key roles in determining structure and reactivity across compounds ranging from simple molecules to extended solid state phases. Despite the importance of this concept, the effects of atomic size on stability remain difficult to extract from quantum mechanical calculations. Recently, we outlined a quantitative yet visual and intuitive approach to the theoretical analysis of atomic size in periodic structures: the DFT-Chemical Pressure (DFT-CP) analysis. In this Article, we describe the methodological details of this DFT-CP procedure, with a particular emphasis on refinements of the method to make it useful for a wider variety of systems. A central improvement is a new integration scheme with broader applicability than our earlier Voronoi cell method: contact volume space-partitioning. In this approach, we make explicit our assumption that the pressure at each voxel is most strongly influenced by its two closest atoms. The unit cell is divided into regions corresponding to individual interatomic contacts, with each region containing all points that share the same two closest atoms. The voxel pressures within each contact region are then averaged, resulting in effective interatomic pressures. The method is illustrated through the verification of the role of Ca-Ca repulsion (deduced earlier from empirical considerations by Corbett and co-workers) in the long-period superstructure of the W5Si3 type exhibited by Ca36Sn23.

  1. Spatial characterization of hot melt extruded dispersion systems using thermal atomic force microscopy methods: the effects of processing parameters on phase separation.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jonathan G; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2014-07-01

    In this study we explore the use of nano-scale localized thermal analysis (LTA) and transition temperature microcopy (TTM) as a novel combined approach to studying phase separation in HME dispersions of cyclosporine A in Eudragit EPO. Modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC), attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, nano-LTA and TTM were performed on raw materials and dispersions prepared by hot melt extrusion (HME) and spin coating. For samples prepared by HME, two mixing temperatures (110°C and 150°C) and residence times (5 and 15 min) were investigated. Spin coated samples showed an intermediate T g for the mixed systems consistent with molecular dispersion formation. The HME samples prepared at 110°C showed evidence of inhomogeneity using MTDSC and FTIR, while those produced at 150°C h showed evidence for the formation of a single phase system using MTDSC. The nanothermal methods, however, indicated the presence of phase separated cyclosporine A at the higher preparation temperature while the TTM was able to map regions of differing penetration temperatures, indicating the presence of compositionally inhomogeneous regions in all but the high processing temperature/high residence time samples. TTM is a potentially important new method for studying phase separation and that such separation may remain undetected or poorly understood using conventional bulk analytical techniques.

  2. Vertically aligned ZnO nanorods on hot filament chemical vapor deposition grown graphene oxide thin film substrate: solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Song, Minwu; Shin, Hyung Shik

    2012-08-01

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) were grown by the low-temperature hydrothermal method on graphene oxide (GO) coated FTO substrates, where GO was directly deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates using hydrogen (H(2), 65 sccm) and methane (CH(4), 50 sccm) through hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. The vertically aligned ZnO NRs were applied as effective photoanode for the fabrication of efficient dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Highly uniform ZnO NRs were grown on GO deposited FTO substrate with the average length of ∼2-4 μm and diameter of ∼200-300 nm. The possible mechanism of grown ZnO NRs clearly revealed the significant role of GO on FTO in architecting the aligned growth of ZnO NRs. The grown vertically aligned ZnO NRs possessed a typical wurtzite hexagonal crystal structure. The structural and the optical studies confirmed the formation of partial hydrogen bonding between surface functional groups of GO and ZnO NRs. A solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency of ∼2.5% was achieved by DSSC fabricated with ZnO NRs deposited on graphene oxide (GO-ZnO NRs) thin film photoanode. The presence of GO on FTO substrate expressively increased the surface area of GO-ZnO photoanode, which resulted in high dye loading as well as high light harvesting efficiency and thus ensued the increased photocurrent density and the improved performance of DSSCs.

  3. Effects of hydrogen on the structural and optical properties of MoSe2 grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. B.; Zhu, M. K.; Levchenko, I.; Zheng, K.; Gao, B.; Xu, S.; Ostrikov, K.

    2017-10-01

    The role of reactive environment and hydrogen specifically in growth and structure of molybdenum selenide (MoSe2) nanomaterials is presently debated, and it is not clear whether hydrogen can promote the growth of MoSe2 sheets and alter their electronic properties. To find efficient, convenient methods for controlling the nucleation, growth and resultant properties of MoSe2 nanomaterials, MoSe2 nanoflakes were synthesized on silicon substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition using molybdenum trioxide and selenium powders in pure hydrogen, nitrogen gases and hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures. The structures and composition of synthesized MoSe2 nanoflakes were studied using the advanced characterization instruments including field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The analysis of the growth process indicates that hydrogen can improve the formation of MoSe2 nanoflakes and significantly alter their properties due to the high reduction capacity of hydrogen and the creation of more nucleation centers of MoSe2 nanoflakes on the silicon surface. The study of photoluminescent (PL) properties reveals that the MoSe2 nanoflakes can generate a strong PL band at about 631 nm, differently from the plain MoSe2 nanoflakes. The major difference in the PL properties may be related to the edges of MoSe2 nanoflakes. These results can be used to control the growth and structure of MoSe2-based nanomaterials and contribute to the development of advanced MoSe2-based optoelectronic devices.

  4. Hot microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Baranski, Andrzej S

    2002-03-15

    Heat generation at disk microelectrodes by a high-amplitude (few volt) and high-frequency (0.1-2 GHz) alternating voltage is described. This method allows changing electrode temperature very rapidly and maintaining it well above the boiling point of solution for a very long time without any indication of boiling. The size of the hot zone in solution is determined by the radius of the electrode. There is no obvious limit in regard to the electrode size, so theoretically, by this method, it should be possible to create hot spots that are much smaller than those created with laser beams. That could lead to potential applications in medicine and biology. The heat-generating waveform does not electrically interfere with normal electroanalytical measurements. The noise level at hot microelectrodes is only slightly higher, as compared to normal microelectodes, but diffusion-controlled currents at hot microelectrodes may be up to 7 times higher, and an enhancement of kinetically controlled currents may be even larger. Hot microelectrodes can be used for end-column detection in capillary electrophoresis and for in-line or in vivo analyses. Temperature gradients at hot microelectrodes may exceed 1.5 x 10(5) K/cm, which makes them useful in studies of Soret diffusion and thermoelectric phenomena.

  5. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  6. Chemical stabilization and improved thermal resilience of molecular arrangements: possible formation of a surface network of bonds by multiple pulse atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    de Pauli, Muriel; Matos, Matheus J S; Siles, Pablo F; Prado, Mariana C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Mazzoni, Mário S C; Malachias, Angelo

    2014-08-14

    In this work, we make use of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction based on trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and water to modify O-H terminated self-assembled layers of octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The structural modifications were investigated by X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. We observed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of ALD-modified molecules, with the existence of a supramolecular packing structure up to 500 °C. Following the experimental observations, density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate the possibility of formation of a covalent network with aluminum atoms connecting OPA molecules at terrace surfaces. Chemical stability is also achieved on top of such a composite surface, inhibiting further ALD oxide deposition. On the other hand, in the terrace edges, where the covalent array is discontinued, the chemical conditions allow for oxide growth. Analysis of the DFT results on band structure and density of states of modified OPA molecules suggests that besides the observed thermal resilience, the dielectric character of OPA layers is preserved. This new ALD-modified OPA composite is potentially suitable for applications such as dielectric layers in organic devices, where better thermal performance is required.

  7. Quantum Chemical Insight into the LiF Interlayer Effects in Organic Electronics: Reactions between Al Atom and LiF Clusters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shui-Xing; Kan, Yu-He; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Liang; Wu, Yong; Su, Zhong-Min

    2015-08-06

    It is well known that the aluminum cathode performs dramatically better when a thin lithium fluoride (LiF) layer inserted in organic electronic devices. The doping effect induced by the librated Li atom via the chemical reactions producing AlF3 as byproduct was previously proposed as one of possible mechanisms. However, the underlying mechanism discussion is quite complicated and not fully understood so far, although the LiF interlayer is widely used. In this paper, we perform theoretical calculations to consider the reactions between an aluminum atom and distinct LiF clusters. The reaction pathways of the Al-(LiF)n (n = 2, 4, 16) systems were discovered and the energetics were theoretically evaluated. The release of Li atom and the formation of AlF3 were found in two different chemical reaction routes. The undissociated Al-(LiF)n systems have chances to change to some structures with loosely bound electrons. Our findings about the interacted Al-(LiF)n systems reveal new insights into the LiF interlayer effects in organic electronics applications.

  8. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Allylic Sites by (3)O2; Implications for Combustion Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Somers, Kieran P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Curran, Henry J

    2017-03-09

    Hydrogen atom abstraction from allylic C-H bonds by molecular oxygen plays a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules having allylic hydrogen atoms. Rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by molecular oxygen from molecules with allylic sites have been calculated. A series of molecules with primary, secondary, tertiary, and super secondary allylic hydrogen atoms of alkene, furan, and alkylbenzene families are taken into consideration. Those molecules include propene, 2-butene, isobutene, 2-methylfuran, and toluene containing the primary allylic hydrogen atom; 1-butene, 1-pentene, 2-ethylfuran, ethylbenzene, and n-propylbenzene containing the secondary allylic hydrogen atom; 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-isopropylfuran, and isopropylbenzene containing tertiary allylic hydrogen atom; and 1-4-pentadiene containing super allylic secondary hydrogen atoms. The M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory was used to optimize the geometries of all of the reactants, transition states, products and also the hinder rotation treatments for lower frequency modes. The G4 level of theory was used to calculate the electronic single point energies for those species to determine the 0 K barriers to reaction. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunnelling corrections was used to calculate the rate constants. The comparison between our calculated rate constants with the available experimental results from the literature shows good agreement for the reactions of propene and isobutene with molecular oxygen. The rate constant for toluene with O2 is about an order magnitude slower than that experimentally derived from a comprehensive model proposed by Oehlschlaeger and coauthors. The results clearly indicate the need for a more detailed investigation of the combustion kinetics of toluene oxidation and its key pyrolysis and oxidation intermediates. Despite this, our computed barriers and rate constants retain an important internal consistency. Rate constants

  9. Quantitative chemical-structure evaluation using atom probe tomography: Short-range order analysis of Fe-Al.

    PubMed

    Marceau, R K W; Ceguerra, A V; Breen, A J; Raabe, D; Ringer, S P

    2015-10-01

    Short-range-order (SRO) has been quantitatively evaluated in an Fe-18Al (at%) alloy using atom probe tomography (APT) data and by calculation of the generalised multicomponent short-range order (GM-SRO) parameters, which have been determined by shell-based analysis of the three-dimensional atomic positions. The accuracy of this method with respect to limited detector efficiency and spatial resolution is tested against simulated D03 ordered data. Whilst there is minimal adverse effect from limited atom probe instrument detector efficiency, the combination of this with imperfect spatial resolution has the effect of making the data appear more randomised. The value of lattice rectification of the experimental APT data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated through improved information sensitivity.

  10. Atomic-scale and pit-free flattening of GaN by combination of plasma pretreatment and time-controlled chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2015-08-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) combined with atmospheric-pressure plasma pretreatment was applied to a GaN (0001) substrate. The irradiation of a CF4-containing plasma was proven to be very useful for modifying the surface of GaN. When CMP was conducted on a plasma-irradiated surface, a modified layer of GaF3 acted as a protective layer on GaN by preventing the formation of etch pits. Within a short duration (8 min) of CMP using a commercially available CeO2 slurry, an atomically flat surface with a root mean square (rms) roughness of 0.11 nm was obtained. Moreover, etch pits, which are inevitably introduced in conventional CMP, could not be observed at the dislocation sites on the polished GaN surface. It was revealed that CMP combined with the plasma pretreatment was very effective for obtaining a pit-free and atomically flat GaN surface.

  11. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD)

    PubMed Central

    Nazarov, Denis V.; Zemtsova, Elena G.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Smirnov, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD), chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD). For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions) and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material. PMID:28793716

  12. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Denis V; Zemtsova, Elena G; Valiev, Ruslan Z; Smirnov, Vladimir M

    2015-12-02

    In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD), chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD). For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions) and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO₂ films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material.

  13. Spectroscopy and reactions of molecules important in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research includes: (1) hot hydrogen atom reactions in terms of the nature of products produced, mechanism of the reactions and the implication and application of such reactions for molecules existing in interstellar clouds, in planetary atmospheres, and in chemical evolution; (2) photochemical reactions that can lead to molecules important in chemical evolution, interstellar clouds and as constituents in planetary atmospheres; and (3) spectroscopic and theoretical properties of biomolecules and their precursors and where possible, use these to understand their photochemical behavior.

  14. Computer modeling of a hot filament diamond deposition reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Washlock, Paul A.; Angus, John C.

    1991-01-01

    A commercial fluid mechanics program, FLUENT, has been applied to the modeling of a hot-filament diamond deposition reactor. Streamlines and contours of constant temperature and species concentrations are obtained for practical reactor geometries and conditions. The modeling is presently restricted to two-dimensional simulations and to a chemical mechanism of ten independent homogeneous and surface reactions. Comparisons are made between predicted power consumption, substrate temperature, and concentrations of atomic hydrogen and methyl-radical with values taken from the literature. The results to date indicate that the modeling can aid in the rational design and analysis of practical reactor configurations.

  15. Theoretical chemical kinetic study of the H-atom abstraction reactions from aldehydes and acids by Ḣ atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2014-12-26

    We have performed a systematic, theoretical chemical kinetic investigation of H atom abstraction by Ḣ atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals from aldehydes (methanal, ethanal, propanal, and isobutanal) and acids (methanoic acid, ethanoic acid, propanoic acid, and isobutanoic acid). The geometry optimizations and frequencies of all of the species in the reaction mechanisms of the title reactions were calculated using the MP2 method and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment for reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations were also determined at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. For the reactions of methanal and methanoic acid with Ḣ atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals, the calculated relative electronic energies were obtained with the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T, and Q) method and were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The electronic energies obtained with the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ method were benchmarked against the CCSD(T)/CBS energies and were found to be within 1 kcal mol(-1) of one another. Thus, the energies calculated using the less expensive CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ method were used in all of the reaction mechanisms and in calculating our high-pressure limit rate constants for the title reactions. Rate constants were calculated using conventional transition state theory with an asymmetric Eckart tunneling correction, as implemented in Variflex. Herein, we report the individual and average rate constants, on a per H atom basis, and total rate constants in the temperature range 500-2000 K. We have compared some of our rate constant results to available experimental and theoretical data, and our results are generally in good agreement.

  16. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-05

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  17. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  18. Tungsten permanent chemical modifier for fast estimation of Se contents in soil by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Cassia Regina; Freschi, GianPaulo Giovanni; De Moraes, Mercedes; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; Nóbrega, Joaquim Araújo; Araújo Nogueira, Ana Rita; Sacramento, Luís Vitor

    2003-07-02

    A tungsten carbide coating on the integrated platform of a transversely heated graphite atomizer was used as a modifier for the direct determination of Se in soil extracts by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (0.0050 mol L(-1)) plus ammonium hydrogencarbonate (1.0 mol L(-1)) extracted predominantly available inorganic selenate from soil. The formation of a large amount of carbonaceous residue inside the atomizer was avoided with a first pyrolysis step at 600 degrees C assisted by air during 30 s. For 20 microL of soil extracts delivered to the atomizer and calibration by matrix matching, an analytical curve (10.0-100 microgram of L(-1)) with good linear correlation (r = 0.999) between integrated absorbance and analyte concentration was established. The characteristic mass was approximately 63 pg of Se, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 750 firings. The limit of detection was 1.6 microgram L(-1), and the relative standard deviations (n = 12) were typically <4% for a soil extract containing 50 microgram of L(-1). The accuracy of the determination of Se was checked for soil samples by means of addition/recovery tests. Recovery data of Se added to four enriched soil samples varied from 80 to 90% and indicated an accurate method.

  19. Practical hot oiling and hot watering for paraffin control

    SciTech Connect

    Mansure, A.J.; Barker, K.M.

    1994-03-01

    One of the common oil-field wellbore problems is paraffin deposition. Even though hot oiling or hot watering is usually the first method tried for removing paraffin, few operators appreciate the limitations of ``hot oiling`` and the potential for the fluid to aggravate well problems and cause formation damage. Field tests have shown that the chemical and thermal processes that occur during ``hot oiling`` are very complex and that there are significant variations in practices among operators. Key issues include: (1) During a typical hot oiling job, a significant amount of the fluid injected into the well goes into the formation, and hence, particulates and chemicals in the fluid have the potential to damage the formation. (2) Hot oiling can vaporize oil in the tubing faster than the pump lifts oil. This interrupts paraffin removal from the well, and thus the wax is refined into harder deposits, goes deeper into the well, and can stick rods. These insights have been used to determine good ``hot oiling`` practices designed to maximize wax removal and minimize formation damage.

  20. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  1. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  2. Quantum chemical approach to atomic manipulation of chlorobenzene on the Si(111)-7 ×7 surface: Resonance localization, vibrational activation, and surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utecht, M.; Palmer, R. E.; Klamroth, T.

    2017-07-01

    We present a cluster model to describe the localization of hot charge carriers on the Si(111)-7 ×7 surface, which leads to (nonlocal) desorption of chlorobenzene molecules in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) manipulation experiments. The localized charge carriers are modeled by a small cluster. By means of quantum chemical calculations, this cluster model explains many experimental findings from STM manipulation. We show that the negative charge is mainly localized in the surface, while the positive one also resides on the molecule. Both resonances boost desorption: In the negative resonance the adatom is elevated; in the positive one the chemisorption bond between the silicon surface adatom and chlorobenzene is broken. We find normal modes promoting desorption matching experimental low-temperature activation energies for electron- and hole-induced desorption.

  3. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Coatings Significantly Improve Thermal, Chemical, and Mechanical Stability of Anodic TiO2 Nanotube Layers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report on a very significant enhancement of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes layers, provided by thin Al2O3 coatings of different thicknesses prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). TiO2 nanotube layers coated with Al2O3 coatings exhibit significantly improved thermal stability as illustrated by the preservation of the nanotubular structure upon annealing treatment at high temperatures (870 °C). In addition, a high anatase content is preserved in the nanotube layers against expectation of the total rutile conversion at such a high temperature. Hardness of the resulting nanotube layers is investigated by nanoindentation measurements and shows strongly improved values compared to uncoated counterparts. Finally, it is demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings guarantee unprecedented chemical stability of TiO2 nanotube layers in harsh environments of concentrated H3PO4 solutions. PMID:28291942

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Coatings Significantly Improve Thermal, Chemical, and Mechanical Stability of Anodic TiO2 Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Zazpe, Raul; Prikryl, Jan; Gärtnerova, Viera; Nechvilova, Katerina; Benes, Ludvik; Strizik, Lukas; Jäger, Ales; Bosund, Markus; Sopha, Hanna; Macak, Jan M

    2017-04-04

    We report on a very significant enhancement of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes layers, provided by thin Al2O3 coatings of different thicknesses prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). TiO2 nanotube layers coated with Al2O3 coatings exhibit significantly improved thermal stability as illustrated by the preservation of the nanotubular structure upon annealing treatment at high temperatures (870 °C). In addition, a high anatase content is preserved in the nanotube layers against expectation of the total rutile conversion at such a high temperature. Hardness of the resulting nanotube layers is investigated by nanoindentation measurements and shows strongly improved values compared to uncoated counterparts. Finally, it is demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings guarantee unprecedented chemical stability of TiO2 nanotube layers in harsh environments of concentrated H3PO4 solutions.

  5. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  6. The Nature of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  7. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  8. Investigation of Chemical Generation of Atomic Iodine for COIL, and its Testing in the Supersonic COIL, Using a Diode Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    step involves further a set of side production or loss reactions. Cl atom generation ClO2 + 2NO → Cl + 2 NO2 (Cl-1) with Cl and ClO as...the chain carriers. Individual steps: ClO2 + NO → ClO + NO2 k2 = 3.4 x 10-13 (Cl-2) ClO + NO→ Cl + NO2 k3 = 1.7 x 10-11e120/T (Cl-3...Cl + ClO2 → 2 ClO k4 = 5.9 x 10-11 (Cl-4) Cl atoms prevail as a product of reaction (Cl-3) if initial concentration ratio of NO:ClO2 is 2:1, while

  9. Atomic-Scale Observations of (010) LiFePO4 Surfaces Before and After Chemical Delithiation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Fisher, Craig A J; Kato, Takeharu; Ukyo, Yoshio; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-14

    The ability to view directly the surface structures of battery materials with atomic resolution promises to dramatically improve our understanding of lithium (de)intercalation and related processes. Here we report the use of state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques to probe the (010) surface of commercially important material LiFePO4 and compare the results with theoretical models. The surface structure is noticeably different depending on whether Li ions are present in the topmost surface layer or not. Li ions are also found to migrate back to surface regions from within the crystal relatively quickly after partial delithiation, demonstrating the facile nature of Li transport in the [010] direction. The results are consistent with phase transformation models involving metastable phase formation and relaxation, providing atomic-level insights into these fundamental processes.

  10. Photoswitching behavior of a novel single molecular tip for noncontact atomic force microscopy designed for chemical identification.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Daiko; Yamakoshi, Yoko; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2006-02-09

    A tripod molecule with an azobenzene arm was designed as a single molecular tip for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). The azobenzene moiety showed photoisomerization that enabled measurements of the same position of the sample by different tip apexes with different interactions. Photoswitching behavior of the molecule synthesized and adsorbed on Au surfaces was examined and reversible switching between the trans- and cis forms was successfully confirmed by NC-AFM measurements.

  11. A Flexible Method for Production of Stable Atomic Clusters with Variable Size for Chemical and Catalytic Activity Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    predicted, as it does not correspond to a magic number and the less stable sizes were likely etched away by oxidizing impurities. Both problems appear... oxidizing impurities. Both problems appear solvable for future research. Thus up to date, we were neither able to prove nor to disprove the...specific numbers of atoms of a number of metallic elements. The paper predicts the highest transition temperatures for clusters of zinc and gallium

  12. A chromium(III)-superoxo complex in oxygen atom transfer reactions as a chemical model of cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeheung; Woo, Jaeyoung; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-07-11

    Metal-superoxo species are believed to play key roles in oxygenation reactions by metalloenzymes. One example is cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) that catalyzes the oxidation of cysteine with O(2), and an iron(III)-superoxo species is proposed as an intermediate that effects the sulfoxidation reaction. We now report the first biomimetic example showing that a chromium(III)-superoxo complex bearing a macrocyclic TMC ligand, [Cr(III)(O(2))(TMC)(Cl)](+), is an active oxidant in oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions, such as the oxidation of phosphine and sulfides. The electrophilic character of the Cr(III)-superoxo complex is demonstrated unambiguously in the sulfoxidation of para-substituted thioanisoles. A Cr(IV)-oxo complex, [Cr(IV)(O)(TMC)(Cl)](+), formed in the OAT reactions by the chromium(III)-superoxo complex, is characterized by X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic methods. The present results support the proposed oxidant and mechanism in CDO, such as an iron(III)-superoxo species is an active oxidant that attacks the sulfur atom of the cysteine ligand by the terminal oxygen atom of the superoxo group, followed by the formation of a sulfoxide and an iron(IV)-oxo species via an O-O bond cleavage.

  13. Atomic data for S II—toward better diagnostics of chemical evolution in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielius, Romas; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Lykins, Matt L.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (≈0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  14. Interference of nitrite and nitrogen dioxide on mercury and selenium determination by chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Dayana Lopes; dos Santos, Eliane Pereira; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Mortari, Sergio Roberto; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; de Moraes Flores, Érico Marlon

    2005-06-01

    In this study, a systematic investigation was performed concerning the interference of nitrogen oxides on the determination of selenium and mercury by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS) and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). The effect of nitrate, nitrite and NO 2 dissolved in the condensed phase was evaluated. No effect of NO 3- on Se and Hg determination was observed up to 100 mg of sodium nitrate added to the reaction vessel. The Se signal was reduced by about 80% upon the addition of 6.8 mg NO 2-. For Hg, no interference of nitrite was observed up to 20 mg of NO 2-. A complete suppression of the Se signal was observed when gaseous NO 2 was introduced into analytical solutions. For Hg, a signal decrease between 8 and 13% occurred. For Se, bubbling argon or heating the solution was not able to recover the original absorbance values, whereas Hg signals were recovered with these procedures. When gaseous NO 2 was passed directly into the atomizer, Se signals decreased similarly to when NO 2 was bubbled in analytical solutions. The addition of urea, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sulfamic acid (SA) was investigated to reduce the NO 2 effect in sample digests containing residual NO 2, but only SA was effective in reducing the interference. Based on the results, it is possible to propose the use of SA to prevent interferences in Se and Hg determinations by HG AAS and CV AAS, respectively.

  15. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  16. Toward the Development of a Fundamentally Based Chemical Model for Cyclopentanone: High-Pressure-Limit Rate Constants for H Atom Abstraction and Fuel Radical Decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M.; Pitz, William J.; ...

    2016-08-25

    Theoretical aspects of the development of a chemical kinetic model for the pyrolysis and combustion of a cyclic ketone, cyclopentanone, are considered. We present calculated thermodynamic and kinetic data for the first time for the principal species including 2- and 3-oxo-cyclopentyl radicals, which are in reasonable agreement with the literature. Furthermore, these radicals can be formed via H atom abstraction reactions by H and Ö atoms and OH, HO2, and CH3 radicals, the rate constants of which have been calculated. Abstraction from the β-hydrogen atom is the dominant process when OH is involved, but the reverse holds true for HO2more » radicals. We also determined the subsequent β-scission of the radicals formed, and it is shown that recent tunable VUV photoionization mass spectrometry experiments can be interpreted in this light. The bulk of the calculations used the composite model chemistry G4, which was benchmarked in the simplest case with a coupled cluster treatment, CCSD(T), in the complete basis set limit.« less

  17. Toward the Development of a Fundamentally Based Chemical Model for Cyclopentanone: High-Pressure-Limit Rate Constants for H Atom Abstraction and Fuel Radical Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M.; Pitz, William J.; Curran, Henry J.

    2016-08-25

    Theoretical aspects of the development of a chemical kinetic model for the pyrolysis and combustion of a cyclic ketone, cyclopentanone, are considered. We present calculated thermodynamic and kinetic data for the first time for the principal species including 2- and 3-oxo-cyclopentyl radicals, which are in reasonable agreement with the literature. Furthermore, these radicals can be formed via H atom abstraction reactions by H and Ö atoms and OH, HO2, and CH3 radicals, the rate constants of which have been calculated. Abstraction from the β-hydrogen atom is the dominant process when OH is involved, but the reverse holds true for HO2 radicals. We also determined the subsequent β-scission of the radicals formed, and it is shown that recent tunable VUV photoionization mass spectrometry experiments can be interpreted in this light. The bulk of the calculations used the composite model chemistry G4, which was benchmarked in the simplest case with a coupled cluster treatment, CCSD(T), in the complete basis set limit.

  18. Toward the Development of a Fundamentally Based Chemical Model for Cyclopentanone: High-Pressure-Limit Rate Constants for H Atom Abstraction and Fuel Radical Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Pitz, William J; Curran, Henry J

    2016-09-15

    Theoretical aspects of the development of a chemical kinetic model for the pyrolysis and combustion of a cyclic ketone, cyclopentanone, are considered. Calculated thermodynamic and kinetic data are presented for the first time for the principal species including 2- and 3-oxo-cyclopentyl radicals, which are in reasonable agreement with the literature. These radicals can be formed via H atom abstraction reactions by Ḣ and Ö atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals, the rate constants of which have been calculated. Abstraction from the β-hydrogen atom is the dominant process when ȮH is involved, but the reverse holds true for HȮ2 radicals. The subsequent β-scission of the radicals formed is also determined, and it is shown that recent tunable VUV photoionization mass spectrometry experiments can be interpreted in this light. The bulk of the calculations used the composite model chemistry G4, which was benchmarked in the simplest case with a coupled cluster treatment, CCSD(T), in the complete basis set limit.

  19. Interfacial diffusion of metal atoms during air annealing of chemically deposited ZnS-CuS and PbS-CuS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Zingaro, R.A.; Meyers, E.A. . Dept. of Chemistry); Nair, P.K.; Nair, M.T.S. . Lab. de Energia Solar)

    1994-09-01

    The authors report on the interfacial diffusion of metal ions occurring during air annealing of multilayer CuS films (0.15-0.6[mu]m) deposited on thin coating of ZnS or PbS ([approximately]0.06 [mu]m) on glass substrates. All the films are deposited from chemical baths at room temperature. The interfacial diffusion on the metal atoms during the air annealing is illustrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. A multilayer of 0.3 [mu]m thick CuS film deposited over a thin film of ZnS upon annealing at 150 C shows atomic ratios of Zn to Cu of [approximately]0.15 and [approximately]0.48 at the surface layers of the samples annealed for 12 and 24 h, respectively. In the case of CuS on PbS film, the corresponding Pb to Cu atomic ratios at the surface layers are 0.43 and 0.83. The optical transmittance spectra and sheet resistance of these multilayer films indicate thermal stabilities superior to that of the CuS-only coatings. Application of the interfacial diffusion process in the production of thermally stable solar control coatings, solar absorber coating, or p-type films for solar cell structures is discussed.

  20. Toward the Development of a Fundamentally Based Chemical Model for Cyclopentanone: High-Pressure-Limit Rate Constants for H Atom Abstraction and Fuel Radical Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M.; Pitz, William J.; Curran, Henry J.

    2016-08-25

    Theoretical aspects of the development of a chemical kinetic model for the pyrolysis and combustion of a cyclic ketone, cyclopentanone, are considered. We present calculated thermodynamic and kinetic data for the first time for the principal species including 2- and 3-oxo-cyclopentyl radicals, which are in reasonable agreement with the literature. Furthermore, these radicals can be formed via H atom abstraction reactions by H and Ö atoms and OH, HO2, and CH3 radicals, the rate constants of which have been calculated. Abstraction from the β-hydrogen atom is the dominant process when OH is involved, but the reverse holds true for HO2 radicals. We also determined the subsequent β-scission of the radicals formed, and it is shown that recent tunable VUV photoionization mass spectrometry experiments can be interpreted in this light. The bulk of the calculations used the composite model chemistry G4, which was benchmarked in the simplest case with a coupled cluster treatment, CCSD(T), in the complete basis set limit.

  1. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  2. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  3. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  4. QSTR with extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices. 15. Development of predictive models for toxicity of organic chemicals against fathead minnow using second-generation ETA indices.

    PubMed

    Roy, K; Das, R Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Modern industrialisation has led to the production of millions of toxic chemicals having hazardous effects on the ecosystem. It is impracticable to determine the toxic potential of a large number of chemicals in animal models, making the use of quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models an alternative strategy for toxicity prediction. Recently we introduced a set of second-generation extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices for predictive modelling. Here we have developed predictive toxicity models on a large dataset of 459 diverse chemicals against fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using the second-generation ETA indices. These descriptors can be easily calculated from two-dimensional molecular representation without the need of time-consuming conformational analysis and alignment, making the developed models easily reproducible. Considering the importance of hydrophobicity for toxicity prediction, AlogP98 was used as an additional predictor in all the models, which were validated rigorously using multiple strategies. The ETA models were comparable in predictability to those involving various non-ETA topological parameters and those previously reported using various descriptors including computationally demanding quantum-chemical ones.

  5. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  6. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  7. On the Functionality of Complex Intermetallics: Frustration, Chemical Pressure Relief, and Potential Rattling Atoms in Y11Ni60C6.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiming; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2016-10-17

    Intermetallic carbides provide excellent model systems for exploring how frustration can shape the structures and properties of inorganic materials. Combinations of several metals with carbon can be designed in which the formation of tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) intermetallics conflicts with the C atoms' requirement of trigonal prismatic or octahedral coordination environments, as offered by the simple close-packings (SCP) of equally sized spheres. In this Article, we explore the driving forces that lead to the coexistence of these incompatible arrangements in the Yb11Ni60C6-type compound Y11Ni60C6 (cI154), as well as potential consequences of this intergrowth for the phase's physical properties. Our focus begins on the structure's SCP regions, which appear as C-stuffed versions of a AuCu3-type YNi3 phase that is not observed on its own in the Y-Ni system. DFT-Chemical Pressure (DFT-CP) calculations on this hypothetical YNi3 phase reveal large negative pressures within the Ni sublattice, as it is stretched to accommodate the size requirements of the Y atoms. In the Y11Ni60C6 structure, two structural mechanisms for addressing these CP issues appear: the incorporation of interstitial C atoms, and the presence of interfaces with CaCu5-type domains. The relative roles of these two mechanisms are investigated with the CP analysis on a hypothetical YNi3Cx series of C-stuffed AuCu3-type phases, the Y-Ni sublattice of Y11Ni60C6, and finally the full Y11Ni60C6 structure. Through these calculations, the C atoms appear to play the roles of relieving positive Y CPs and supporting relaxation at the AuCu3-type/CaCu5-type interfaces, where the cancellation occurs between opposite CPs experienced by the Y atoms in the two parent structures (following the epitaxial stabilization mechanism). The CP analysis of Y11Ni60C6 also highlights a sublattice of Y and Ni atoms with large negative CPs (and thus the potential for soft vibrational modes), illustrating how frustrated

  8. Using magnetic levitation to distinguish atomic-level differences in chemical composition of polymers, and to monitor chemical reactions on solid supports.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Phillips, Scott T; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2008-12-31

    This communication describes a density-based method that uses magnetic levitation for monitoring solid-supported reactions and for distinguishing differences in chemical composition of polymers. The method is simple, rapid, and inexpensive and is similar to thin-layer chromatography (TLC; for solution-phase chemistry) in its potential for monitoring reactions in solid-phase chemistry. The technique involves levitating a sample of beads (taken from a reaction mixture) in a cuvette containing a paramagnetic solution (e.g., GdCl(3) dissolved in H(2)O) positioned between two NdFeB magnets. The vertical position at which the beads levitate corresponds to the density of the beads and correlates with the progress of a chemical reaction on a solid support. The method is particularly useful for monitoring the kinetics of reactions occurring on polymer beads.

  9. Hydrogen Atomic Positions of O-H···O Hydrogen Bonds in Solution and in the Solid State: The Synergy of Quantum Chemical Calculations with ¹H-NMR Chemical Shifts and X-ray Diffraction Methods.

    PubMed

    Siskos, Michael G; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2017-03-07

    The exact knowledge of hydrogen atomic positions of O-H···O hydrogen bonds in solution and in the solid state has been a major challenge in structural and physical organic chemistry. The objective of this review article is to summarize recent developments in the refinement of labile hydrogen positions with the use of: (i) density functional theory (DFT) calculations after a structure has been determined by X-ray from single crystals or from powders; (ii) ¹H-NMR chemical shifts as constraints in DFT calculations, and (iii) use of root-mean-square deviation between experimentally determined and DFT calculated ¹H-NMR chemical shifts considering the great sensitivity of ¹H-NMR shielding to hydrogen bonding properties.

  10. Mechanistic study of dielectric chemical mechanical polishing by spectral and scaling analysis of atomic force microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, M.L.

    1999-12-22

    Thermal oxide and PETEOS oxide surfaces, polished on an IPEC 472 with different combinations of polish pad, slurry, and polishing conditions, were studied with ex situ atomic force microscopy. The post polish surfaces were analyzed qualitatively by visual inspection and quantitatively by spectral and scaling analyses. Spectral and scaling analyses gave consistent interpretations of morphology evolution. Polishing with either a fixed abrasive pad or alumina-based slurry occurred via a mechanism for which asperities are removed and recesses are filled. A sputtering-type mechanism may contribute to material removal when polishing with silica- or ceria-based slurries.

  11. Search for methylamine in high mass hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligterink, N. F. W.; Tenenbaum, E. D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We aim to detect methylamine, CH3NH2, in a variety of hot cores and use it as a test for the importance of photon-induced chemistry in ice mantles and mobility of radicals. Specifically, CH3NH2 cannot be formed from atom addition to CO whereas other NH2-containing molecules such as formamide, NH2CHO, can. Methods: Submillimeter spectra of several massive hot core regions were taken with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Abundances are determined with the rotational diagram method where possible. Results: Methylamine is not detected, giving upper limit column densities between 1.9-6.4 × 1016 cm-2 for source sizes corresponding to the 100 K envelope radius. Combined with previously obtained JCMT data analysed in the same way, abundance ratios of CH3NH2, NH2CHO and CH3CN with respect to each other and to CH3OH are determined. These ratios are compared with Sagittarius B2 observations, where all species are detected, and to hot core models. Conclusions: The observed ratios suggest that both methylamine and formamide are overproduced by up to an order of magnitude in hot core models. Acetonitrile is however underproduced. The proposed chemical schemes leading to these molecules are discussed and reactions that need further laboratory studies are identified. The upper limits obtained in this paper can be used to guide future observations, especially with ALMA. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Rotating optical tubes for vertical transport of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rsheed, Anwar; Lyras, Andreas; Aldossary, Omar M.; Lembessis, Vassilis E.

    2016-12-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation of the HOT induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely, the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an optical Archimedes' screw for atoms.

  13. The Calculation of NMR Chemical Shifts in Periodic Systems Based on Gauge Including Atomic Orbitals and Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Skachkov, Dmitry; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Kadantsev, Eugene; Ziegler, Tom

    2010-05-11

    We present here a method that can calculate NMR shielding tensors from first principles for systems with translational invariance. Our approach is based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory and gauge-including atomic orbitals. Our scheme determines the shielding tensor as the second derivative of the total electronic energy with respect to an external magnetic field and a nuclear magnetic moment. The induced current density due to a periodic perturbation from nuclear magnetic moments is obtained through numerical differentiation, whereas the influence of the responding perturbation in terms of the external magnetic field is evaluated analytically. The method is implemented into the periodic program BAND. It employs a Bloch basis set made up of Slater-type or numeric atomic orbitals and represents the Kohn-Sham potential fully without the use of effective core potentials. Results from calculations of NMR shielding constants based on the present approach are presented for isolated molecules as well as systems with one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity. The reported values are compared to experiment and results from calculations on cluster models.

  14. Chemical, mechanical and sensory monitoring of hot air- and infrared-roasted hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L.) during nine months of storage.

    PubMed

    Belviso, Simona; Dal Bello, Barbara; Giacosa, Simone; Bertolino, Marta; Ghirardello, Daniela; Giordano, Manuela; Rolle, Luca; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2017-02-15

    Roasted hazelnuts can be consumed as whole nuts, or as an ingredient in the confectionary and bakery industries and are highly appreciated for their typical taste, aroma and crunchy texture. In this work, two hazelnut types (TGT, Ordu) from two harvests were roasted using two different systems (hot air, infrared) at different time/temperature combinations, and the evolution of oxidative stability, the total phenolic content (TPC), the antioxidant capacity, the mechanical and acoustic properties and the sensory perception were determined during storage. The results showed that the oxidative stability was increased by roasting hazelnuts at 120°C for 40min with hot air system. Similar overall trends were not found for the TPC, the antioxidant capacity and the mechanical-acoustic properties. However, for the maintenance of high antioxidant activity, a storage time of 6months at 4°C is recommended. The two roasting systems gave hazelnuts with significant sensory differences only at high roasting temperature.

  15. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  16. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoğlu, Salih Zeki

    2010-06-01

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho), photon interaction cross sections (sigma(t)), effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and effective electron densities (N(e)) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25keV and gamma-rays at 88keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition.

  17. Quantum mechanical limits to the control of atom-diatom chemical reactions through the polarisation of the reactants.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, Jesús; Javier Aoiz, F; de Miranda, Marcelo P

    2008-02-28

    This article considers the extent to which one can control the reactivity of atom-diatom systems through reactant polarisation. Three different limits for reactivity manipulation are defined: "absolute" limits that do not depend on the reaction dynamics but can only be obtained for particular combinations of quantum numbers, "unconstrained" limits that depend on dynamics but not on constraints imposed by any particular experimental setup, and "constrained" limits that depend on dynamics and also on the constraints imposed by a particular experimental setup. Methods for calculation of these limits are presented and applied to the benchmark F + H2 reaction. The variations of the maximum and minimum reactivity one can obtain are analysed in terms of reaction mechanisms and steric constraints. Tables listing the minimum and maximum values of angular momentum polarisation moments of rank up to 4, and integer and half-integer quantum numbers up to 5, are also presented.

  18. Physical/chemical properties of tin oxide thin film transistors prepared using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung Kook; Jung, Eunae; Kim, Seok Hwan; Moon, Dae Chul; Lee, Sun Sook; Park, Bo Keun; Hwang, Jin Ha; Chung, Taek-Mo; Kim, Chang Gyoun; An, Ki-Seok

    2012-10-15

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) with tin oxide films as the channel layer were fabricated by means of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD). The as-deposited tin oxide films show n-type conductivity and a nano-crystalline structure of SnO{sub 2}. Notwithstanding the relatively low deposition temperatures of 70, 100, and 130 °C, the bottom gate tin oxide TFTs show an on/off drain current ratio of 10{sup 6} while the device mobility values were increased from 2.31 cm{sup 2}/V s to 6.24 cm{sup 2}/V s upon increasing the deposition temperature of the tin oxide films.

  19. Nonequilibrium electronic phenomena and the chemical energy accommodation during heterogeneous recombination of atomic hydrogen on the manganese doped willemite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, D. V.; Grankin, V. P.; Styrov, V. V.; Sushchikh, M.

    2016-03-01

    The surface chemiluminescence of Zn2SiO4-Mn phosphor (λmax = 525 nm) has been studied under excitation by exoergic interaction of H-atoms with its surface. We have found that the pre-irradiation of the Zn2SiO4-Mn by UV light results in the transient increase in the luminescence intensity by two orders of magnitude. On the other hand, deposition of Pd-nanoparticles on the surface leads to luminescence quenching. These two effects are associated with the energy accommodation in the gas-surface interaction via electronic channel by the filled electron traps of the insulating phosphor or by metallic electrons of the Pd-nanoparticles.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition of Chemical Passivation Layers and High Performance Anti-Reflection Coatings on Back-Illuminated Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A back-illuminated silicon photodetector has a layer of Al2O3 deposited on a silicon oxide surface that receives electromagnetic radiation to be detected. The Al2O3 layer has an antireflection coating deposited thereon. The Al2O3 layer provides a chemically resistant separation layer between the silicon oxide surface and the antireflection coating. The Al2O3 layer is thin enough that it is optically innocuous. Under deep ultraviolet radiation, the silicon oxide layer and the antireflection coating do not interact chemically. In one embodiment, the silicon photodetector has a delta-doped layer near (within a few nanometers of) the silicon oxide surface. The Al2O3 layer is expected to provide similar protection for doped layers fabricated using other methods, such as MBE, ion implantation and CVD deposition.