Science.gov

Sample records for hot dipping processes

  1. Energy-efficient process for hot-dip batch galvanizing

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Hot-dip galvanizing of steel sheets, pipes, and other fabrication items is a popular method of corrosion protection. Currently, steel articles are immersed in molten zinc at 860{degrees}F, thereby forming a {open_quotes}frozen{close_quotes} metal (interfacial zinc iron intermetallic layer) on the surface. Drawbacks to the current technology include the expense of heating parts at such a high temperature and the generation of by-products such as zinc alloys, zinc oxides, and smoke. Furthermore, new federal regulations have significantly reduced acceptable lead levels in coatings, because lead from galvanized, coated steel will dissolve in water. Such dissolved lead may accumulate in human bodies with deleterious results. Additionally, the use of a molten salt layer on top of zinc (top-flux) causes kettle smoke and ash evolution. Ferro Technologies, Inc. has proposed a lead-free batch technology that will significantly improve the galvanizing process. The new Thermo Prep{trademark} process protects steel surfaces with a thermally stable flux by preheating parts to 400{degrees}F to 450{degrees}F in a separate furnace, and then immersing them in molten, lead-free zinc for a short period of time. The use of a thermally stable pre-flux would eliminate the need for top-flux, thereby reducing associated wastes.

  2. Coating Weight Model for the Continuous Hot-Dip Galvanizing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaadawy, E. A.; Hanumanth, G. S.; Balthazaar, A. K. S.; McDermid, J. R.; Hrymak, A. N.; Forbes, J. F.

    2007-06-01

    A coating weight model was developed to describe the pressure and wall shear stress distributions as functions of slot gap ( d) and impingement distance ( Z), for the air knife wiping of the liquid zinc coatings in continuous hot dip galvanizing at ratios of Z/ d ≤ 8. This model was then used in validation studies in order to predict the coating weight as a function of the process parameters. The model was based on improved correlations for pressure and shear stress developed by a combination of experimental and computation techniques, which has resulted in more accurate predictions of coating weight validated using industrial coil average coating weight data, particularly for coating weights of up to 75 g/m2. For this region, the maximum deviation between the predicted and measured coating weights was 8 pct. The coating weight model was further developed by incorporating a lumped heat-transfer analysis to predict the solidification “dry line” of the coating. For a typical continuous galvanizing process, the model predicts an 80 pct coating solid fraction for a coating weight of 130 g/m2 to occur at 15 m from the air knives, which agrees qualitatively with visual observations in continuous galvanizing lines.

  3. Material development of molten metal bath hardware for continuous hot-dip processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Sherman A.

    Development of corrosion resistant materials to molten zinc attack for applications in galvanizing pots has long been desired, because better corrosion resistance could lead to a longer production campaign. The research objectives of this project were to develop new bulk materials and surface treatments/coatings for life improvement of molten metal bath hardware (bearings, sink roll, stabilizing rolls, corrector rolls, and also support roll arms and snout tip) in continuous hot-dip process used for coated steel strip. The ultimate goal of the project is to increase the molten Zn bath components life by an order of magnitude which results in large energy saving (estimated at 2 trillion BTU/year). Estimated cost saving would be approximately $46 million/year for the 57 lines operating in the United States of America. Extensive experimental studies were conducted on over 60 different samples of various materials (monolithic alloys with and without treatment, weld overlays, and ceramics) in molten Zn-0.16Al at 465°C. Test durations were 1h to over 9000h in the static condition, over 50h in the dynamic condition, and up to 24h in the wear condition. Data were recorded as weight change per unit area as a function of time and temperature. The reaction products were analyzed for phase composition and their distribution using SEM, EDS, XRD, and optical microscope. Corrosion rates for each selected alloys were calculated. The SS Type 316L results were used as a baseline. Comparisons between the corrosion behaviors of the stainless steel type 316L and the selected materials were made. Based on our static, dynamic, and wear immersion experimental data a mechanism for alloy corrosion in molten zinc was proposed. Alloys containing Fe, Cr, and Al as its major components results in the formation of (Fe, Cr, Al)XZnY intermetallic phases and oxides at the alloy/zinc interface when exposed to molten zinc in air. Most of the alloys studied in present investigation, corrosion

  4. Life Improvement of Pot Hardware in Continuous Hot Dipping Processes Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Xingbo Liu

    2006-01-18

    The process of continuous galvanizing of rolled sheet steel includes immersion into a bath of molten zinc/aluminum alloy. The steel strip is dipped in the molten bath through a series of driving motors and rollers which control the speed and tension of the strip, with the ability to modify both the amount of coating applied to the steel as well as the thickness and width of the sheet being galvanized. There are three rolls used to guide the steel strip through the molten metal bath. The rolls that operate in the molten Zn/Al are subject to a severely corrosive environment and require frequent changing. The performance of this equipment, the metallic hardware submerged in the molten Zn/Al bath, is the focus of this research. The primary objective of this research is to extend the performance life of the metallic hardware components of molten Zn/Al pot hardware by an order of magnitude. Typical galvanizing operations experience downtimes on the order of every two weeks to change the metallic hardware submerged in the molten metal bath. This is an expensive process for industry which takes upwards of 3 days for a complete turn around to resume normal operation. Each roll bridle consists of a sink, stabilizer, and corrector roll with accompanying bearing components. The cost of the bridle rig with all components is as much as $25,000 dollars just for materials. These inefficiencies are of concern to the steel coating companies and serve as a potential market for many materials suppliers. This research effort served as a bridge between the market potential and industry need to provide an objective analytical and mechanistic approach to the problem of wear and corrosion of molten metal bath hardware in a continuous sheet galvanizing line. The approach of the investigators was to provide a means of testing and analysis that was both expeditious and cost effective. The consortium of researchers from West Virginia University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed

  5. Minispangling of hot dip galvanized steel

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.S.; Henger, G.W.; Glatthorn, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The surface appearance of hot dip galvanized steels can be changed by altering the nucleation and growth of zinc spangles during solidification. This paper describes the spangle nucleation mechanisms resulting from two minispangling techniques: steam impingement and zinc dust impingement. It also characterizes the microscopic surface features of these products and their impact on painted automotive applications.

  6. Metallographic preparation technique for hot-dip galvanized and galvannealed coatings on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.; Goggins, K.M.; Benscoter, A.O.; Marder, A.R. )

    1993-09-01

    A new metallographic technique for hot-dip galvanized and galvannealed coatings has been developed. The new polishing procedure and etchant have shown excellent results on commercial hot-dip galvanized and galvanneal coatings, as well as on laboratory-simulated hot-dip galvanneal produced under a variety of thermal processing parameters.

  7. Technigalva and other developments in batch hot-dip galvanizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. W.; Kennon, N. F.; See, J. B.; Barter, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Technigalva process is a batch hot-dip galvanizing process developed over the past ten years that uses nickel additions for better control of coating structure, especially when galvanizing "reactive" steels containing around 0.1 wt.% Si. Optimization of the process relies on understanding of the role of nickel in the galvanizing reaction and formation of dross. Increasing demand for more environmentally friendly galvanizing processes has helped to lead to development work in batch hot-dip galvanizing on chromatefree passivation, alternative fluxes for using Zn-Al alloys, and process optimization.

  8. Hot-Dipped Metal Films as Epitaxial Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Multistep process forms semiconductor devices on macrocrystalline films of cadmium or zinc. Solar-cell fabrication processes use hot-dipped macrocrystalline films on low-cost sheet-metal base as substrates for epitaxy. Epitaxial layers formed by variety of methods of alternative sequence paths. Solar cells made economically by forming desired surface substance directly on metal film by chemical reactions.

  9. Process and performance of hot dip zinc coatings containing ZnO and Ni-P under layers as barrier protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Z. Abdel; Aal, A. Abdel; Hassan, H. B.; Shaaban, A.

    2010-04-01

    A new coating system of under layer for hot dip zinc coating was explored as an effective coating for steel especially for application in relatively high aggressive environments. The influence of different barrier layers formed prior to hot dip galvanization was investigated to optimize high performance protective galvanic coatings. The deposition of ZnO and Ni-P inner layers and characteristics of hotdip zinc coatings were explored in this study. The coating morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The hot dip zinc coatings containing under layer showed substantial improvement in their properties such as good adhesion, and high hardness. In addition, a decrease in the thickness of the coating layer and an enhancement of the corrosion resistance were found. Open circuit potential (OCP) of different galvanized layers in different corrosive media viz. 5% NaCl and 0.5 M H 2SO 4 solutions at 25 ± 1 °C was measured as a function of time. A nobler OCP was exhibited for samples treated with ZnO and Ni than sample of pure Zn; this indicates a dissolution process followed by passivation due to the surface oxide formation. The high negative OCP can be attributed to the better alloying reaction between Zn and Fe and to the sacrificial nature of the top pure zinc layer.

  10. Texture development during the production of high Si steel by hot dipping and diffusion annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, J.; Ros-Yanez, T.; Fischer, O.; Schneider, J.; Houbaert, Y.

    2006-09-01

    The production of non-oriented high Si and Al electrical steel requires specific processing routes such as hot dipping followed by diffusion annealing. The evolution of texture during the different production steps is described. During the preheating and hot dipping the substrates recrystallize with a typical texture presenting an intense gamma fibre. A Fe3Si layer with cubic fibre texture is formed during the hot dipping. After hot dipping the substrate is further cold rolled with different levels of reduction and finally diffusion annealed delivering different final textures depending upon the Si content of the substrate and the thermomechanical processing.

  11. The status of chemical sensors for hot-dip galvanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    1996-09-01

    Alloying elements are added to the zinc used in the hot-dip galvanization of sheet steel to control the properties and appearance of the resulting coating. For example, aluminum is added to improve the corrosion resistance and adherence of the coating. Other additions, such as antimony, are added to control the grain size and, thus, the appearance of the coating. The concentrations of these alloying elements may change during the process, either deliberately according to product specifications or due to factors such as preferential oxidation. These changes may require replenishment of a depleted alloying element or adjustments in other processing parameters to maintain optimal efficiency. Intelligent adjustments require knowledge of the alloy composition, which requires inline measurement of the concentrations of alloying elements. This article presents recent developments in chemical sensors for use in hot-dip galvanization. In particular, electrochemical sensors for measuring the concentrations of aluminum and antimony in molten zinc are reviewed.

  12. Effect of Process Variables on the Grain Size and Crystallographic Texture of Hot-Dip Galvanized Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboli, Shirin; McDermid, Joseph R.

    2014-08-01

    A galvanizing simulator was used to determine the effect of galvanizing bath antimony (Sb) content, substrate surface roughness, and cooling rate on the microstructural development of metallic zinc coatings. Substrate surface roughness was varied through the use of relatively rough hot-rolled and relatively smooth bright-rolled steels, cooling rates were varied from 0.1 to 10 K/s, and bulk bath Sb levels were varied from 0 to 0.1 wt pct. In general, it was found that increasing bath Sb content resulted in coatings with a larger grain size and strongly promoted the development of coatings with the close-packed {0002} basal plane parallel to the substrate surface. Increasing substrate surface roughness tended to decrease the coating grain size and promoted a more random coating crystallographic texture, except in the case of the highest Sb content bath (0.1 wt pct Sb), where substrate roughness had no significant effect on grain size except at higher cooling rates (10 K/s). Increased cooling rates tended to decrease the coating grain size and promote the {0002} basal orientation. Calculations showed that increasing the bath Sb content from 0 to 0.1 wt pct Sb increased the dendrite tip growth velocity from 0.06 to 0.11 cm/s by decreasing the solid-liquid interface surface energy from 0.77 to 0.45 J/m2. Increased dendrite tip velocity only partially explains the formation of larger zinc grains at higher Sb levels. It was also found that the classic nucleation theory cannot completely explain the present experimental observations, particularly the effect of increasing the bath Sb, where the classical theory predicts increased nucleation and a finer grain size. In this case, the "poisoning" theory of nucleation sites by segregated Sb may provide a partial explanation. However, any analysis is greatly hampered by the lack of fundamental thermodynamic information such as partition coefficients and surface energies and by a lack of fundamental structural studies. Overall

  13. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of hot dip coating in artificial seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hu-Yuan; Hou, Bao-Rong; Ma, Shi-de; Wei, Xu-Jun

    1999-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of a zinc-based alloy (compared with that of pure zinc) coating was studied in this research on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of hot dip coating in artificial seawater. The electrochemical parameters of these two hot dip coatings were measured by the galvanostatic method and accelerated corrosion test. The two coatings showed uniform corrosion, but the corrosion of the pure zinc coating was actively sustained continuously. The corrosion of the zinc-based alloy coating was very slow because of the formation of a stable anti-corrosion membrane. The corrosion mechanisms of these two coatings were also compared by the weak polarization curve fitting method. The corrosion of the zinc-based alloy coating is typical of that in natural passive corrosion system.

  14. Wear Resistance and Wear Mechanism of a Hot Dip Aluminized Steel in Sliding Wear Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyong; Hao, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yao; Gu, Lingyun; Ren, Yu; Zheng, Ruipeng

    2016-12-01

    Sliding wear experiments were conducted on a hot dip aluminized steel to investigate its wear resistance and wear mechanism. The wear tests were also carried out on a hot dip galvanized steel and the base material (steel Q345) as a comparison. Results show that the wear resistance and hardness of the hot dip aluminized steel are significantly higher than that of the hot dip galvanized steel and the steel Q345 at room temperature. The better wear resistance of the hot dip aluminized steel attributes mainly to the formation of a transition layer containing abundant Fe-Al intermetallic compounds and the transformation of wear-resisting oxides during the friction process. The main phase in the transition layer is Fe2Al5. The thickness of the transition layer is about 90-120 μm. When the wear load increases from 3 N to 19 N, the wear type of the aluminized layer transform from adhesive wear (3 N) into abrasive wear (7 N) and finally into slight wear mixed with oxidation (higher than 11 N).

  15. Dip Process Thermal-Barrier Coatings for Superalloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    thermal barrier coatings are needed in aircraft gas turbine engines to increase the thermal efficiency and extend the life of the coated components. In... gas turbine alloys was investigated. This process involves hot dipping alloy substrates in low-melting cerium-nickel or zirconium-nickel eutectics...important conclusion from the work so far is that dense adherent ZrO 2 thermal barrier coatings can be successfully applied on gas turbine alloys by the hot

  16. Morphology development in hot-dip galvanneal coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.; Marder, A.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Hot-dip galvanized drawing quality special killed (DQSK) steel and titanium stabilized interstitial free (IF) steel substrates were annealed under varying temperature and time conditions in order to characterize the coating structure development which occurs during the annealing portion of the galvannealing process. Through the use of light optical microscopy, the coating morphology development (Fe-Zn alloy layer growth) observed in cross section on both substrates was defined in three distinct stages. The three characteristic microstructures were classified as type 0 (underalloyed), type 1 (marginally alloyed), and type 2 (overalloyed) morphologies. The morphology transitions were quantitatively defined by total iron content in the coating and by the thickness of an interfacial Fe-Zn gamma phase layer. The DQSK steel coating type 1 to type 2 morphology transition occurred at an iron content of 9 to 10 wt pct. For the titanium IF material, the same type 1 to type 2 morphology transition occurred at an iron content of 10.5 to 11.5 wt pct and at an interfacial layer thickness of approximately 1.0 [mu]m. An increased amount of aluminum in the galvanizing bath delayed the alloying reaction during galvannealing for both substrates. The overall inhibition effect of aluminum was less pronounced on the titanium stabilized IF material, indicating that its coating alloying kinetics were not as significantly influenced by bath aluminum content.

  17. Surface characterization of hot-dip Galfan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bluni, S.T.; Marder, A.R.; Goldstein, J.I. . Materials Science Engineering Dept.)

    1994-09-01

    The surface of a hot dipped Galfan (Zn-5wt.%Al-mischmetal) coating on sheet steel was characterized with the use of various microscopy techniques. Surface depressions, or dents, were found to occur at eutectic nodule boundaries and triple points, and were typically 10--15 [mu]m deep. The surface characteristics of the Galfan coating were reproduced by the solidification of Zn-5%Al-mischmetal alloy samples on an inert substrate, implying that surface depressions are not caused by substrate interactions. Chemical analyses of both the coating and the alloy samples indicate that impurities, particularly lead, are strongly segregated to eutectic nodule boundaries and triple points. Based on these observations, a mechanism for denting and cracking in Galfan coatings is suggested.

  18. 7 CFR 305.21 - Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. 305.21... Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. Mangoes may be treated using schedule T102-a: (a) Fruit must be presorted by weight class. Treatment of mixed loads is not allowed. (b) The mangoes must...

  19. Deformation and fatigue behavior of hot dip galvanized coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Camurri, Carlos P. . E-mail: ccamurri@udec.cl; Benavente, Raul G.; Roa, Isidoro S.; Carrasco, Claudia C.

    2005-09-15

    This paper reports on the results of a study of the effect of static and dynamic stresses on hot dip galvanized coatings on SAE 1020 steel substrates. Galvanizing was performed using baths maintained at 450 deg. C, the zinc containing 0.16% Ti and 0.02% Fe and with Al and Ni in the ranges 0-0.20% and 0-0.30%, respectively. Static three-point bend tests were conducted with applied stresses in the range 428-790 MPa. Dynamic bend-fatigue tests involved stresses in the range 228-578 MPa at a cyclic frequency of 0.25 Hz for up to 700 cycles. The total crack density in the coatings was measured before and after the tests using light optical and electron microscopy. The results showed that the crack density increased as the applied stress increased and crack propagation was promoted perpendicular to the substrate. The number of cycles had no effect on the crack density and propagation at stresses lower than 386 MPa. At higher stresses the number of applied cycles contributed only to crack propagation. It was concluded that the best bath composition for preventing fatigue crack propagation is one that minimized the formation of thinner brittle layers in the galvanized coatings.

  20. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-01

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry1,2,3. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago1. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear. First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test. All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  1. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-04

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear.First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test.All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  2. Morphology and antimony segregation of spangles on batch hot-dip galvanized coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shu; Lu, Jintang; Che, Chunshan; Kong, Gang; Xu, Qiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    Spangles produced by batch hot-dip galvanizing process have a rougher surface and a greater surface segregation of alloying element compared with those in continuous hot-dip galvanizing line (CGL), owing to the cooling rate of the former is much smaller than that of the later. Therefore, typical spangles on a batch hot-dipped Zn-0.05Al-0.2Sb alloy coating were investigated. The chemical, morphological characterization and identification of the phases on the spangles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), backscattered electron imaging (BSE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The results showed that the coating surface usually exhibited three kinds of spangles: shiny, feathery and dull spangle, of which extensively antimony surface segregation was detected. The nature of precipitate on the coating surface was identified as β-Sb 3Zn 4, The precipitated β-Sb 3Zn 4 particles distributed randomly on the shiny spangle surface, both β-Sb 3Zn 4 particles and dentritic segregation of antimony dispersed in the dendritic secondary arm spacings of the feathery spangle and on the whole dull spangle surface. The dentritic segregation of antimony and precipitation of Sb 3Zn 4 compound are discussed by a proposed model.

  3. Distribution of aluminum in hot-dip galvanized coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Furdanowicz, V.; Shastry, C.R.

    1999-12-01

    Hot-dip galvanized panels of low-carbon (LC) and interstitial-free (IF) steels were produced in a laboratory simulator with an average coating mass of 60 g/m{sup 2}. Three pot aluminum levels were used, viz. 0.10% (by wt), 0.15%, and 0.18%. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize coating and base steel microstructures. Wet chemical analysis and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were employed for compositional analyses. The aluminum content of the melt was found to be the predominant factor influencing the distribution of Al in the coating. At 0.18% melt aluminum, Al is partitioned between the aluminide inhibition layer at the coating-steel interface ({approximately}80%) and the zinc overlay ({approximately}20%). At 0.15%, it is partitioned among the aluminide layer ({approximately}75% to 80%), zinc-iron (FeZn{sub 13}, {zeta}) intermetallic layer ({approximately}5% to 15%), and the coating overlay ({approximately}10%). At 0.10%, the aluminum is divided almost equally between the overlay and the zinc-iron intermetallics. At the two lower aluminum levels is the distribution marginally influenced by the steel grade. The {zeta} was found to not preferentially nucleate at the ferrite grain boundaries. When both the aluminide and {zeta} occurred at the coating-steel interface, the {zeta} particles appeared near discontinuities and thinner regions in the aluminide layer. The coating, relative to the melt, is enriched in aluminum because of its concentration in the aluminide and in the zinc-iron intermetallics. This enrichment increases with melt aluminum through an increase in the aluminum content of the aluminide layer and not of its thickness.

  4. Improvement of hot-dip zinc coating by enriching the inner layers with iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibli, S. M. A.; Manu, R.

    2006-02-01

    The performance of hot-dip galvanic coating formed on steel not only depends on the alloy composition of the superficial layer but also significantly, on the composition of the inner alloy layers at the coating/substrate interface. Further, the presence of barrier oxide layers, if any can also improve the performance of galvanic coating. In the present work, the effect of inner iron oxide barrier layer formed prior to hot-dip galvanization was investigated. A continuous and adherent iron oxide layer was formed on steel by anodic oxidation of the steel substrate. Although the wettability of oxide surface by liquid zinc was initially poor, the increase in dipping time and the transition of the oxide layer to unstable form due to the presence of Cl - ion in the flux facilitated localized growth of Fe-Zn alloy phases. The inhibitive nature of the oxide layer was temporary, since the presence of Cl - induces micro cracks on the oxide surface thereby facilitating better zinc diffusion. The modification of the substrate structure during galvanization was found to influence the galvanizing process significantly. The present study predicts scope for application of this process for protection of rusted steel specimens too.

  5. The structure and deformation behavior of hot-dip galvanized coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, C.; Fujisawa, H.; Konishi, M.

    1996-08-01

    Hot-dip galvanized steel sheets have been widely used in the building industry, owing to their excellent corrosion resistance. Since galvanized steel sheets typically undergo a heavy working, the ductility of the coating is also an important property. In hot-dip galvanized coating, a suitable forming pre-treatment will presumably improve workability by relaxing the strong basically oriented texture. The aim of the present study is to examine the microstructure, deformation behavior, and variation of preferential orientation during uniaxial deformation of a hot-dip galvanized coating with wire-brushing pre-treatment.

  6. An evaluation of airborne nickel, zinc, and lead exposure at hot dip galvanizing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, D.K.; Shaw, D.S. )

    1991-12-01

    Industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at three hot dip galvanizing plants to determine occupational exposure to nickel, zinc, and lead. All three plants employed the dry process' and used 2% nickel, by weight, in their zinc baths. A total of 32 personal and area air samples were taken. The air samples were analyzed for nickel, zinc, and lead. Some samples were also analyzed for various species of nickel (i.e., metallic, soluble, and oxidic). The airborne concentrations observed for nickel and its three species, zinc, and lead at the three plants were all well below the current and proposed threshold limit values recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).

  7. Surface characteristics of hot-dip metallic coatings on steel strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbane, Farrell M.

    1982-05-01

    Surfaces of hot-dip metallic coatings are frequently enriched in minor alloying elements because of the large diffusion rates of elements in the liquid state. In this study, scanning Auger microscopy is used to measure the surface chemical compositions of zinc, aluminum, and lead coatings that were applied to steel strip on continuous coating lines. Comparisons are made between the surface and bulk compositions. Surface enrichments up to 1000X the bulk concentration are reported. Processing steps after coating application are shown to further alter the coatings' surface characteristics. Finally, the effects of the variable surfaces on the products' engineering properties are discussed.

  8. The Microstructure and Hardness of Hot Dip Galvanized Steel During Wire Drawing

    SciTech Connect

    Klmaku, Snukn; Syla, Nairn; Dilo, Teuta

    2010-01-21

    The steel wire samples are hot-dip-galvanized. The zinc coating is preformed using the standard method. To recognize the behavior of the zinc coated steel wire during the submission to deformation, the wire samples are drawn on a machine designed for this aim and then investigated. In this research is represented the phase structure of the zinc coated samples. Afterwards the thickness of the layer and the hardness of the hot-dip galvanized steel depending on the drawing is represented.

  9. The Microstructure and Hardness of Hot Dip Galvanized Steel During Wire Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinaku, Shukri; Dilo, Teuta; Syla, Naim

    2010-01-01

    The steel wire samples are hot-dip-galvanized. The zinc coating is preformed using the standard method. To recognize the behavior of the zinc coated steel wire during the submission to deformation, the wire samples are drawn on a machine designed for this aim and then investigated. In this research is represented the phase structure of the zinc coated samples. Afterwards the thickness of the layer and the hardness of the hot-dip galvanized steel depending on the drawing is represented.

  10. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection.

  11. Numerical Analysis of Edge Over Coating and Baffle Effect on Hot-Dip Galvanizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chengren; Kang, Yonglin; Li, Yan

    2017-06-01

    In hot-dip galvanizing process, air jet wiping control is so crucial to determine the coating thickness and uniformity of the zinc layer on the steel strip. A numerical simulation of gas-jet wiping in hot-dip galvanizing was conducted to minimize the occurrence of edge over coating (EOC). The causes of EOC were identified by contrasting and analyzing the airflow fields on the strip edge with and without a baffle. The factors influencing the airflow field on the strip edge during the change in the gap between the baffle and the strip edge were also analyzed. The effect of the distance between the air knife and the strip was evaluated. Technological parameters with on-site guidance role were obtained by combining them with the actual production to elucidate the role of the baffle in restraining the occurrence of EOC. The uniform distribution of pressure and coating thickness on the strip is achieved when the distance of the baffle from the strip edge is about 0.3 times of the jetting distance.

  12. Effect of nickel-rich barrier layer on improvement of hot-dip zinc coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibli, S. M. A.; Manu, R.; Dilimon, V. S.

    2005-05-01

    Performances of hot-dip galvanized coatings not only depend on composition of the bath or the coating but significantly on the structure too. Nickel has been reported to have significant role in the improvement of the process but there is lack of sufficient reported detailed evidences. As it has already been reported that a nickel-rich barrier layer is formed during galvanization, and that the layer efficiently suppresses pitting, the present study focuses on investigating the role of nickel on the performance of hot-dip zinc coating. The structural influence due to the presence of nickel in galvanized substrates is discussed in this paper. Influence of nickel-rich barrier layer is identified as the cause for substantial improvement of the coating performance. Nickel content in the galvanic coating was analyzed layer-by-layer. Different techniques like OCP measurement and anodic polarizations were adopted to investigate and study the correlation between the structural change and the galvanic performance of the coating. The formation of nickel-rich barrier inner layer has a key role in improving the galvanic performance of the coating.

  13. Dissolution-Induced Nanowire Synthesis on Hot-Dip Galvanized Surface in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, Aaretti; Saarimaa, Ville; Heinonen, Saara; Nikkanen, Juha-Pekka; Markkula, Antti; Väisänen, Pasi; Levänen, Erkki

    2017-07-11

    In this study, we demonstrate a rapid treatment method for producing a needle-like nanowire structure on a hot-dip galvanized sheet at a temperature of 50 °C. The processing method involved only supercritical carbon dioxide and water to induce a reaction on the zinc surface, which resulted in growth of zinc hydroxycarbonate nanowires into flower-like shapes. This artificial patina nanostructure predicts high surface area and offers interesting opportunities for its use in industrial high-end applications. The nanowires can significantly improve paint adhesion and promote electrochemical stability for organic coatings, or be converted to ZnO nanostructures by calcining to be used in various semiconductor applications.

  14. Dissolution-Induced Nanowire Synthesis on Hot-Dip Galvanized Surface in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Saarimaa, Ville; Heinonen, Saara; Nikkanen, Juha-Pekka; Markkula, Antti; Väisänen, Pasi; Levänen, Erkki

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a rapid treatment method for producing a needle-like nanowire structure on a hot-dip galvanized sheet at a temperature of 50 °C. The processing method involved only supercritical carbon dioxide and water to induce a reaction on the zinc surface, which resulted in growth of zinc hydroxycarbonate nanowires into flower-like shapes. This artificial patina nanostructure predicts high surface area and offers interesting opportunities for its use in industrial high-end applications. The nanowires can significantly improve paint adhesion and promote electrochemical stability for organic coatings, or be converted to ZnO nanostructures by calcining to be used in various semiconductor applications. PMID:28696374

  15. Mössbauer and XRD study of hot dip galvanized alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Speakman, R.; El-Sharif, M.; Stichleutner, S.; Homonnay, Z.; Klencsár, Z.; Sziráki, L.; Chisholm, C. U.; Lak, Gy. B.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to investigate the nature of the Zinc-Iron alloys present within the Hot Dip Galvanized (HDG) layers of steel with a silicon content of 0.35 %. The investigation also studied the impact of the powder coating pretreatment on the nature of the alloy layers. The acid etching process within the pretreatment process in particular would be expected to have a significant impact on the HDG layer. This study utilized 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy to examine identically processed samples prior to and post pre treatment. XRD and 57Fe CEMS measurements were performed on hot galvanized S355J2 + N samples, forming sandwiched structure. Both XRD and CEMS reveal the presence of dominant steel phase in accordance with its estimated occurrence on the surface of the sandwiched samples. Minor Γ-Fe3Zn10, ζ-FeZn15 and solid solution Fe-Zn as well as minor Fe-Si phases could also be identified.

  16. Coating transformations in the early stages of hot-dip galvannealing of steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Erin Todd

    The present, comprehensive study of the reactions occurring early in galvanneal processing under conditions typical of commercial production represents the first detailed investigation of the microstructural evolution of the coating in the early stages of galvannealing and the results shed new light on the course of the coating microstructural development. During hot dipping, an Fe2Al5 inhibition layer formed on the surface of the steel substrate in the first instants of immersion in Zn baths containing as low as 0.10 wt.% Al. When hot-dipping in a 0.14 wt.% Al, the as-dipped coating microstructure consisted of an Fe2Al 5 layer on the steel surface. That layer was covered by a layer of the Fe-Zn compound Gamma1, which was covered by the zeta phase or unalloyed Zn. Substrate chemistry did not affect coating microstructure development in the bath. Thermodynamic predictions of the precipitation behavior during the bath reactions agrees well with experimental observations. A mechanism for coating microstructure development in the Zn bath which is consistent with all the experimental results is proposed. From this information, the metallurgical variables which govern inhibition layer formation are discerned. The breakdown of the Fe2Al5 inhibition layer during galvannealing at 500°C occurred without the formation of outbursts. Instead, the grain boundary diffusion of Al into the steel substrate accounted for dissolution of the inhibition layer in the first second of galvannealing. A mechanism for inhibition layer breakdown is presented. P-additions affected only the rate at which the inhibition layer dissolved and did not affect the rate of Fe-Zn compound formation. P in the substrate blocked grain boundary diffusion of Al into the substrate thus slowing inhibition layer dissolution. The slower overall galvannealing behavior often observed on P-bearing substrates is due to a longer period of inhibition layer survival which results in a longer incubation period for the

  17. [Photodensitometry: microdensitometry (MD): digital image processing method (DIP)].

    PubMed

    Ohama, K; Sanada, M; Nakagawa, H

    1994-09-01

    The principles of microdensitometry (MD) and digital image processing method (DIP), as well as the application of these methods to measure bone mineral density in clinical practice, were mentioned in the report. MD and DIP assess bone mineral content and bone mineral density by analyzing relative contrast of the metacarpus II on X-ray image. However, the parameters obtained by these methods have been reported to be closely related to lumber vertebral bone mineral density and whole-body bone mineral content as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Being easy to use, MD and DIP are adequate for the screening of osteoporosis. Once any reduction in bone mineral content or bone mineral density is shown by MD or DIP, it is recommendable to measure bone mineral density of vertebrae and femoral neck by DXA.

  18. Identification and preliminary evaluation of polychlorinated naphthalene emissions from hot dip galvanizing plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Lv, Pu; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Nie, Zhiqiang; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Hot dip galvanizing (HDG) processes are sources of polychlorinated-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Close correlations have been found between the concentration of PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) that are produced and released during industrial thermal processes. We speculated, therefore, that HDG plants are potential PCN sources. In this preliminary study, PCNs were analyzed in solid residues, ash and precipitate from three HDG plants of different sizes. The total PCN concentrations (∑2-8PCNs) in the residue samples ranged from 60.3 to 226pgg(-1). The PCN emission factors for the combined ash and precipitate residues from the HDG plants ranged from 75 to 178ngt(-1) for the dichlorinated and octachlorinated naphthalenes. The preliminary results suggested that the HDG industry might not currently be a significant source of PCN emissions. The trichloronaphthalenes were the dominant homologs followed by the dichloronaphthalenes and the tetrachloronaphthalenes. The PCN congeners CN37/33/34, CN52/60, CN66/67, and CN73 dominated the tetrachlorinated, pentachlorinated, hexachlorinated, and heptachlorinated naphthalene homologs, respectively. The PCNs emitted from the HDG plants had similar homolog distributions and congener profiles to the PCNs emitted from combustion plants and other metallurgical processes. The identification and preliminary evaluation of PCN emissions from HDG plants presented here will help in the prioritization of measures for controlling PCN emissions from industrial sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface enrichment in hot-dipped metallic coatings investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payling, R.; Mercer, P. D.

    1985-05-01

    The treatment, appearance, and corrosion resistance of metallic coatings are largely governed by the chemical composition of the surface. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that the surfaces of hot-dipped metallic coatings differ markedly from the bulk compositions of the coatings. For example, the surfaces of terne coatings, lead-tin alloys, contain little lead. The conventional galvanized coating, which is more than 99% zinc, has a predominantly aluminium oxide surface. Typical surface compositions of a range of hot-dipped metallic coatings are provided. A qualitative prediction of the dominant metallic species present on the surface of each of these coatings is presented in terms of the relative oxygen affinities of the metals. Theoretical equations for various mechanisms, such as atomic size mismatch, solubility, and oxidation, which could lead to surface segregation are considered, in order to place the experimental observations on a more quantitative basis.

  20. Influence of hot water dip on fruit quality, phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of Satsuma mandarin during storage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhong, Liezhou; Sun, Yujing; Chen, Jianchu; Liu, Donghong; Ye, Xingqian

    2013-12-01

    The influence of hot water dips (50, 52 and 54  for 3 min) on fruit quality, phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of Satsuma mandarin during 60 days' storage at 10  was investigated. Hot water dips did not affect fruit quality attributes as well as ascorbic acid content, and 50  treatment significantly reduced fruit weight loss. Significant increases of flavonoids were found in all hot water treated fruit from after treatments till 15 days of storage, whereas phenolic acids were not greatly affected. Hot water dipping at 50  significantly increased total phenolics and antioxidant capacity of Satsuma mandarin immediately after treatment and maintained similar levels with control during storage, while 52 and 54  treatments showed relatively lower levels. The results suggested that hot water dipping at 50  for 3 min can be a promising way to retain functional quality of storing Satsuma mandarin.

  1. Stabilization/solidification of hot dip galvanizing ash using different binders.

    PubMed

    Vinter, S; Montanes, M T; Bednarik, V; Hrivnova, P

    2016-12-15

    This study focuses on solidification of hot dip-galvanizing ash with a high content of zinc and soluble substances. The main purpose of this paper is to immobilize these pollutants into a matrix and allow a safer way for landfill disposal of that waste. Three different binders (Portland cement, fly ash and coal fluidized-bed combustion ash) were used for the waste solidification. Effectiveness of the process was evaluated using leaching test according to EN 12457-4 and by using the variance analysis and the categorical multifactorial test. In the leaching test, four parameters were observed: pH, zinc concentration in leachate, and concentration of chlorides and dissolved substances in leachate. The acquired data was then processed using statistical software to find an optimal solidifying ratio of the addition of binder, water, and waste to the mixture, with the aim to fulfil the requirement for landfill disposal set by the Council Decision 2003/33/EC. The influence on the main observed parameters (relative amount of water and a binder) on the effectiveness of the used method and their influence of measured parameters was also studied.

  2. Effect of the silicon content in steel on the hot-dip zinc coating microstructure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondareva, O. S.; Melnikov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of the silicon content in steel on the structure of hot-dip galvanized zinc coating. It was found that in steel samples containing the silicon in an amount of about 0.1% and 0.5% the increased thickness coating was formed. This fact was associated with structural features of the ζ-phase. Energy dispersive microanalysis had shown the maximum concentration of silicon in the coating was observed in ζ-phase on St3 steel (Si = 0.1%) and in the fine mixture of δ and ζ-phase on 09G2S steel (Si>0.5%). This phenomenon was analyzed using a Zn-Fe-Si system diagram and its polytermic sections. It was found that there were eutectic reactions of decomposition the liquid to mixture (ζ+η+ FeSi) phases at the content of silicon in steel about 0.1% and more than 0.5%. Particles of FeSi-phase were involved in the dissolution of Г and δ phases, which led to a direct contact of the melt and the steel substrate. This process was accompanied by the intensive ζ-phase formation and the rapid growth of coating thickness.

  3. Interfacial layer development in hot-dip galvanneal coatings on interstitial free (IF) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Goggins, K. M.; Marder, A. R.

    1994-10-01

    During the annealing of hot-dip galvanized coatings on interstitial free (IF) steel, an interfacial layer was found to develop and grow at the steel/coating interface. The interfacial layer followed a three-step growth process in which there was initial rapid growth up to a thickness of approximately 1.0 µm, followed by a period of essentially no growth with continued zinc and iron interdiffusion into the coating, and finally renewed growth at long time (60 second) anneals. The interfacial layer did not inhibit zinc and iron interdiffusion or the development of the Fe-Zn alloy layer. Coating iron content increased rapidly before the interfacial layer grew to a thickness of 1.0 µm, however, once the coating reached a total iron content in excess of 11.0 wt pct, interfacial layer growth became active and coating iron content increased only slightly with continued annealing. Although powdering of the coating as evaluated by a 60 deg bend test was generally found to increase with an increase in interfacial layer thickness, particularly in excess of 1.0 µm, no definitive relationship between interfacial layer thickness and powdering was found. The thickness of this interfacial layer, however, can be used as an indicator of formability performance.

  4. Postharvest decay reduction of fig fruit (Ficus carica) by hot water sodium carbonate solutions dip.

    PubMed

    Molinu, M G; Venditti, T; Dore, A; D'Hallewin, G; Serusi, A; Del Caro, A; Agabbio, M

    2006-01-01

    Treatments as hot water dips or high temperature conditioning have been proven to be effective to control postharvest decay on various horticultural crops. These treatments reduce chilling injury and rot losses without causing detrimental effects on fruit firmness, flavour, taste or peel appearance. These technologies, aimed to control postharvest pathogens, can be easily matched with the use of "Generally Recognized as Safe" (G.R.A.S.) compounds and employed alternatively to pesticides, known to be harmful to health and environment. In this respect we studied the combined effect of sodium carbonate (SC) and hot water on the storability of black fig fruit cultivar 'Niedda Longa' of Sardinian germplasm. Second crop fig fruit, harvested in the middle of September, was dipped for one minute in water solutions containing 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 1% (w/v) of SC at 25 or 60 degrees C and then stored at 5 degrees C and 90% relative humidity (RH) for two weeks. After one and two weeks of storage decay, weight loss were monitored and visual assessment was scored. Treatments with hot solutions were more effective in controlling decay compared to cold ones and the best results were achieved with 0.5% of SC at 60 degrees C. This combination reduced the decay rate from 26% (control) to 0% after 1 week and from 50% to 14% after two weeks of storage, respectively. Lower or higher SC concentrations applied at 60 degrees C were less effective and, after two weeks of storage, decay percentages were 38 and 43.6%, respectively. Water dip at 60 degrees C did not affect the weight loss as compared to dips at 25 degrees C either after one or two weeks of storage. At the same time, a significant reduction was found only with 1% of SC at 25 degrees C. The fruit treated with 0.5% of SC at 60 degrees C also had the best visual assessment up to two weeks of storage.

  5. Evaluation of hot-water and sanitizer dip treatments of knives contaminated with bacteria and meat residue.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J; Dorsa, Warren J

    2007-03-01

    Hot water (HW; 82.2 degrees C, 180 degreesF) is used for sanitation of meat cutting implements in most slaughter facilities, but validation of actual practices against meat-borne bacterial pathogens and spoilage flora is lacking. Observed implement immersions in HW in two large pork processing plants were found to typically be < or = 1 s. Impact of these practices on bacteria on metal surfaces was assessed in the laboratory, and alternative treatments were investigated. Knives were inoculated with raw pork residues and Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, Clostridium perfringens, and Lactobacillus spp. and were sampled before and after 1- or 15-s dips of blades in HW, warm water (48.9 degrees C), or warm sanitizers (neutral or acid quaternary ammonium compounds [QAC] at 400 ppm, or peroxyacetic acid at 700 ppm H2O2 and 165 ppm peroxyacetic acid). Simultaneous scrubbing and 15-s dipping in HW or acid QAC was also evaluated. Reductions on knives dipped for 1 s were usually < 1 log and were not significantly different (P > 0.05) between treatments. Reductions of E. coli O157:H7 after 15 s in HW, neutral QAC, acid QAC, or peroxyacetic acid were 3.02, 2.38, 3.04, and 1.52 log, respectively. Reductions of other bacteria due to HW were not significantly different from sanitizers and were significantly greater than warm water for all bacteria except C. perfringens. Combined scrubbing and 15-s dipping in HW resulted in a 2.91- and 2.25-log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, respectively, whereas reduction caused by acid QAC was significantly less at about 1.7 log each. Brief dip treatments of contaminated knives have limited efficacy, but longer immersions cause greater reductions that were not enhanced by scrubbing. QAC is a suitable alternative to HW in this application.

  6. Competitive graphitization and diamond growth on hot-dip aluminized carbon steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. S.; Ma, H. T.; Yang, L. Z.; Zhang, C. Z.; Feng, R. F.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2014-09-01

    When carbon steel is directly exposed in 99%H2-1%CH4 gas mixture for plasma enhanced CVD deposition of diamond coatings, an intermediate graphite layer is preferentially formed on the substrate surface, and the substrate is subjected to a severe internal carburization attack. The diamond coatings formed easily delaminate from the steel substrate. Hot dip aluminizing treatment of the carbon steel has markedly promoted diamond nucleation, growth and interfacial adhesion. The formation of graphite intermediate phase on the substrate surface is effectively inhibited and the substrate carburization is also suppressed. The possible mechanism of this transition is discussed based on a series of analytical techniques.

  7. New approach to online monitoring of the Al depth profile of the hot-dip galvanised sheet steel using LIBS.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Herbert; Hoehne, Manuela; Noll, Reinhard; Sturm, Volker

    2006-05-01

    In this study a new approach to the online monitoring of the Al depth profile of hot-dip galvanised sheet steel is presented, based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The coating composition is measured by irradiating the traversing sheet steel with a series of single laser bursts, each at a different sheet steel position. An ablation depth in the same range as the coating thickness (about 10 microm) is achieved by applying a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm in collinear double-pulse and triple-pulse mode. The ablation depth is controlled by adjusting the burst energy with an external electro-optical attenuator. A fingerprint of the depth profile is gained by measuring the LIBS signals from zinc, aluminium and iron as a function of the burst energy, and by post-processing the data obtained. Up to three depths can be sampled simultaneously with a single laser burst by measuring the LIBS signals after each pulse within the laser burst. A concept for continuously monitoring the Al depth profile during the galvanising process is presented and applied to different hot-dip galvanised coatings. The method was tested on rotating sheet steel disks moving at a speed of up to 1 m/s. The potential and limitations of the new method are discussed.

  8. Engineering functionality gradients by dip coating process in acceleration mode.

    PubMed

    Faustini, Marco; Ceratti, Davide R; Louis, Benjamin; Boudot, Mickael; Albouy, Pierre-Antoine; Boissière, Cédric; Grosso, David

    2014-10-08

    In this work, unique functional devices exhibiting controlled gradients of properties are fabricated by dip-coating process in acceleration mode. Through this new approach, thin films with "on-demand" thickness graded profiles at the submillimeter scale are prepared in an easy and versatile way, compatible for large-scale production. The technique is adapted to several relevant materials, including sol-gel dense and mesoporous metal oxides, block copolymers, metal-organic framework colloids, and commercial photoresists. In the first part of the Article, an investigation on the effect of the dip coating speed variation on the thickness profiles is reported together with the critical roles played by the evaporation rate and by the viscosity on the fluid draining-induced film formation. In the second part, dip-coating in acceleration mode is used to induce controlled variation of functionalities by playing on structural, chemical, or dimensional variations in nano- and microsystems. In order to demonstrate the full potentiality and versatility of the technique, original graded functional devices are made including optical interferometry mirrors with bidirectional gradients, one-dimensional photonic crystals with a stop-band gradient, graded microfluidic channels, and wetting gradient to induce droplet motion.

  9. Hot water dipping of olives (Olea europaea) for virgin oil debittering.

    PubMed

    García, José M; Yousfi, Khaled; Oliva, Jesús; García-Diaz, M Teresa; Pérez-Camino, M Carmen

    2005-10-19

    Olives (Olea europaea L.) of the Manzanilla, Picual, and Verdial varieties harvested at the green mature stage of ripening were dipped in hot water at a range of temperatures between 60 and 72 degrees C for 3 min. Immediately after treatment, oils were physically extracted from the olives. Olive heating promotes a reduction of oil bitterness in direct relationship to the temperature used. Fruit heating at > or =60 degrees C for 3 min did not cause significant changes in acidity, UV absorption, peroxide index, and panel test score of the oils obtained but decreased its oxidative stability. Oils extracted from heated fruit showed higher concentrations of chlorophylls and carotenes and lower total phenol content.

  10. On The Effect Of Zinc Melt Composition On The Structure Of Hot-Dip Galvanized Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Konidaris, S.; Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-23

    Zinc hot-dip galvanizing is an effective method for the corrosion protection of ferrous materials. A way of improving the results is through the addition of various elements in the zinc melt. In the present work the effect of Ni, Bi, Cr, Mn, Se and Si at concentration of 0.5 or 1.5 wt.% was examined. Coupons of carbon steel St-37 were coated with zinc containing the above-mentioned elements and were exposed in a Salt Spray Chamber (SSC). The micro structure of these coatings was examined with SEM and XRD. In every case the usual morphology was observed, while differences at the thickness and the crystal size of each layer were induced. However the alloying elements were present in the coating affecting its reactivity and, at least in the case of Mn and Cr, improving corrosion resistance.

  11. Microstructural Study Of Zinc Hot Dip Galvanized Coatings with Titanium Additions In The Zinc Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Konidaris, S.; Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-23

    Zinc hot-dip galvanizing is a method for protecting iron and steel against corrosion. Galvanizing with pure Zn or Zn with additions like Ni, Al, Pb and Bi has been extensively studied, but there is a lack of scientific information about other additions. The present work examines the effect of a 0.5 wt% Ti addition in the Zn melt. The samples were exposed to accelerated corrosion in a salt spray chamber (SSC). The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were determined by Optical Microscopy, XRD and SEM associated with an EDS Analyzer. The results indicate that the coatings have a typical morphology, while Zn-Ti phases were also detected.

  12. On The Effect Of Zinc Melt Composition On The Structure Of Hot-Dip Galvanized Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konidaris, S.; Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Zinc hot-dip galvanizing is an effective method for the corrosion protection of ferrous materials. A way of improving the results is through the addition of various elements in the zinc melt. In the present work the effect of Ni, Bi, Cr, Mn, Se and Si at concentration of 0.5 or 1.5 wt.% was examined. Coupons of carbon steel St-37 were coated with zinc containing the above-mentioned elements and were exposed in a Salt Spray Chamber (SSC). The micro structure of these coatings was examined with SEM and XRD. In every case the usual morphology was observed, while differences at the thickness and the crystal size of each layer were induced. However the alloying elements were present in the coating affecting its reactivity and, at least in the case of Mn and Cr, improving corrosion resistance.

  13. Microstructural Study Of Zinc Hot Dip Galvanized Coatings with Titanium Additions In The Zinc Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konidaris, S.; Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Zinc hot-dip galvanizing is a method for protecting iron and steel against corrosion. Galvanizing with pure Zn or Zn with additions like Ni, Al, Pb and Bi has been extensively studied, but there is a lack of scientific information about other additions. The present work examines the effect of a 0.5 wt% Ti addition in the Zn melt. The samples were exposed to accelerated corrosion in a salt spray chamber (SSC). The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were determined by Optical Microscopy, XRD and SEM associated with an EDS Analyzer. The results indicate that the coatings have a typical morphology, while Zn-Ti phases were also detected.

  14. THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF THE NICKEL ADDITION IN ZINC HOT-DIP GALVANIZING BATHS

    SciTech Connect

    Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.

    2010-01-21

    A usual practice during zinc hot-dip galvanizing is the addition of nickel in the liquid zinc which is used to inhibit the Sandelin effect. Its action is due to the fact that the zeta(zeta) phase of the Fe-Zn system is replaced by the TAU(tau) phase of the Fe-Zn-Ni system. In the present work an attempt is made to explain the formation of the TAU phase with thermodynamics. For this reason the Gibbs free energy changes for TAU and zeta phases were calculated. The excess free energy for the system was calculated with the Redlich-Kister polyonyme. From this calculation it was deduced that the Gibbs energy change for the tau phase is negative. As a result its formation is spontaneous.

  15. Dip-movement processing for depth-variable velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Artley, C.T.

    1992-12-01

    Dip-moveout correction (DMO) has become commonplace in the seismic processing flow. The goal of DMO processing is to transform the NMO-corrected data to zero-offset, so that the application of zero-offset (poststack) migration is equivalent to full prestack migration of the recorded data. Nearly all DMO implementations assume that the seismic velocity is constant. Usually, this is an acceptable tradeoff because of the tremendous cost savings of DMO and poststack migration versus prestack migration. Where the velocity changes rapidly with depth, however, this constant velocity theory can yield inadequate results. For many areas, such as the Gulf Coast, a velocity function that varies with depth is a reasonable approximation to the true velocity field. Using ray tracing, I find the raypaths from the source and receiver to the reflection point with the given recording time. The time along the corresponding zero-offset ray gives the DMO correction. The relationships between the three rays are expressed by a system of nonlinear equations. By simultaneously solving the equations via Newton-Raphson iteration, I determine the mapping that transforms nonzero-offset data to zero-offset. Unlike previous schemes that approximately handle vertical velocity variation, this method makes no assumptions about the offset, dip, or hyperbolic moveout.

  16. Dip-moveout processing by Fourier transform in anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.; Tsvankin, I.

    1994-12-01

    Conventional dip-moveout (DMO) processing is designed for isotropic media and cannot handle angle-dependent velocity. The authors show that Hale`s isotropic DMO algorithm remains valid for elliptical anisotropy but may lead to serious errors for non-elliptical transversely isotropic models, even if velocity anisotropy is moderate. Here, they present an extension of Hale`s constant-velocity DMO method to anisotropic media. The DMO operator, to be applied to normal-moveout (NMO) corrected data, is based on the analytic expression for NMO velocity for dipping reflectors given by Tsvankin (1995a). Since the anisotropic DMO depends on the elastic parameters of the medium, it should be preceded by an inversion procedure designed to obtain the NMO velocity as a function of ray parameter. Another complication introduced by anisotropy is the influence of nonhyperbolic moveout not accounted for in the DMO operator. However, for spreads typical in conventional acquisition design, deviations from hyperbolic moveout for P-waves are not significant. Impulse responses and synthetic examples for typical transversely isotropic models with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this DMO technique. Once the inversion step has been completed, the NMO-DMO sequence does not take any more computing time than that for the generic Hale`s method in isotropic media. Their anisotropic DMO operator is not limited to VTI media; it can be applied in the same fashion in symmetry planes of more complicated models such as orthorhombic.

  17. On texture, corrosion resistance and morphology of hot-dip galvanized zinc coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, H.; Toroghinejad, M. R.; Golozar, M. A.

    2007-06-01

    Texture is an important factor which affects the coating properties. Chemical composition of the zinc bath can strongly influence the texture of hot-dip galvanized coatings. In this study, lead content of the zinc bath was changed from 0.01 wt.% to 0.11 wt.%. Specimens were prepared from zinc baths of different lead content and its texture was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behaviour was analyzed by Tafel extrapolation and linear polarization tests. To study the corrosion products of the specimens, salt spray test was employed. Also, the spangle size of the specimens was determined using line intercept method. From the experimental results it was found that (00.2) basal plane texture component would be weakened by increasing the lead content of the zinc and conversely, (20.1) high angle pyramidal texture components strengthened. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2) texture component and weaker (20.1) component have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2) and strong (20.1) texture components. In addition, surface morphology would be changed and presence of basal planes decreases at the coating surface due to the increase of lead in the zinc bath. Furthermore, spangle size would be increased by increasing the lead content of the zinc bath. Investigation on the effects of skin pass rolling showed that in this case, (00.2) basal texture component and corrosion resistance of the skin passed specimens, in comparison with non-skin passed specimens, have been decreased.

  18. High temperature corrosion of hot-dip aluminized steel in Ar/1%SO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abro, Muhammad Ali; Lee, Dong Bok

    2017-01-01

    Carbon steels were hot-dip aluminized in Al or Al-1at%Si baths, and corroded in Ar/1%SO2 gas at 700-800 °C for up to 50 h. The aluminized layers consisted of not only an outer Al(Fe) topcoat that had interdispersed needle-like Al3Fe particles but also an inner Al-Fe alloy layer that consisted of an outer Al3Fe layer and an inner Al5Fe2 layer. The Si addition in the bath made the Al(Fe) topcoat thin and nonuniform, smoothened the tongue-like interface between the Al-Fe alloy layer and the substrate, and increased the microhardness of the aluminized layer. The aluminized steels exhibited good corrosion resistance by forming thin α-Al2O3 scales, along with a minor amount of iron oxides on the surface. The interdiffusion that occurred during heating made the aluminized layer thick and diffuse, resulting in the formation of Al5Fe2, AlFe and AlFe3 layers. It also smoothened the tongue-like interface, and decreased the microhardness of the aluminized layer. The non-aluminized steel formed thick, nonadherent, nonprotective (Fe3O4, FeS)-mixed scales.

  19. Nanoscale analysis of surface oxides on ZnMgAl hot-dip-coated steel sheets.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Itani, H; Hesser, G; Riener, C K; Angeli, G; Preis, K; Stifter, D; Hingerl, K

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the first few nanometres of the surface of ZnMgAl hot-dip-galvanised steel sheets were analysed by scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Although the ZnMgAl coating itself is exhibiting a complex micro-structure composed of several different phases, it is shown that the topmost surface is covered by a smooth, homogeneous oxide layer consisting of a mixture of magnesium oxide and aluminium oxide, exhibiting a higher amount of magnesium than aluminium and a total film thickness of 4.5 to 5 nm. Especially by the combined analytical approach of surface-sensitive methods, it is directly demonstrated for the first time that within surface imprints--created by industrial skin rolling of the steel sheet which ensures a smooth surface appearance as well as reduced yield-point phenomenon--the original, smooth oxide layer is partly removed and that a layer of native oxides, exactly corresponding to the chemical structure of the underlying metal phases, is formed.

  20. Fabrication and mechanical properties of PLLA/PCL/HA composites via a biomimetic, dip coating, and hot compression procedure.

    PubMed

    Charles, L F; Shaw, M T; Olson, J R; Wei, M

    2010-06-01

    Currently, the bone-repair biomaterials market is dominated by high modulus metals and their alloys. The problem of stress-shielding, which results from elastic modulus mismatch between these metallic materials and natural bone, has stimulated increasing research into the development of polymer-ceramic composite materials that can more closely match the modulus of bone. In this study, we prepared poly(L: -lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PLLA/HA/PCL) composites via a four-step process, which includes surface etching of the fiber, the deposition of the HA coating onto the PLLA fibers through immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF), PCL coating through a dip-coating process, and hot compression molding. The initial HA-coated PLLA fiber had a homogeneous and continuous coating with a gradient structure. The effects of HA: PCL ratio and molding temperature on flexural mechanical properties were studied and both were shown to be important to mechanical properties. Mechanical results showed that at low molding temperatures and up to an HA: PCL volume ratio of 1, the flexural strain decreased while the flexural modulus and strength increased. At higher mold temperatures with a lower viscosity of the PCL a HA: PCL ratio of 1.6 gave similar properties. The process successfully produced composites with flexural moduli near the lower range of bone. Such composites may have clinical use for load bearing bone fixation.

  1. Performance of Flow and Heat Transfer in a Hot-Dip Round Coreless Galvanizing Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Qiang; Zhang, Chengbo; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Li; Kong, Hui; Wang, Jia

    2017-04-01

    Flow field in a coreless hot-dip galvanizing pot was investigated through a water modeling experiment. The corresponding velocity vector was measured using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The flow field of molten zinc in the bath was also analyzed. Steel strip velocities from 1.7 to 2.7 m/s were adopted to determine the effect of steel strip velocity on the molten zinc flow in the bath. A large vortex filled the space at the right side of the sink roll, under linear speed from 1.0 to 2.7 m/s and width from 1.0 to 1.3 m of the steel strip, because of the effects of wall and shear stress. The results of the water modeling experiment were compared with those of numerical simulations. In the simulation, Maxwell equations were solved using finite element method to obtain magnetic flux density, electromagnetic force, and Joule heating. The Joule heating rate reached the maximum and minimum values near the side wall and at the core of the bath, respectively, because of the effect of skin and proximity. In an industrial-sized model, the molten zinc flow and temperature fields driven by electromagnetic force and Joule heating in the inductor of a coreless galvanizing bath were numerically simulated. The results indicated that the direction of electromagnetic force concentrated at the center of the galvanizing pot horizontal planes and exerted a pinch effect on molten zinc. Consequently, molten zinc in the pot was stirred by electromagnetic force. Under molten zinc flow and electromagnetic force stirring, the temperature of the molten zinc became homogeneous throughout the bath. This study provides a basis for optimizing electromagnetic fields in coreless induction pot and fine-tuning the design of steel strip parameters.

  2. Performance of Flow and Heat Transfer in a Hot-Dip Round Coreless Galvanizing Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Qiang; Zhang, Chengbo; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Li; Kong, Hui; Wang, Jia

    2016-12-01

    Flow field in a coreless hot-dip galvanizing pot was investigated through a water modeling experiment. The corresponding velocity vector was measured using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The flow field of molten zinc in the bath was also analyzed. Steel strip velocities from 1.7 to 2.7 m/s were adopted to determine the effect of steel strip velocity on the molten zinc flow in the bath. A large vortex filled the space at the right side of the sink roll, under linear speed from 1.0 to 2.7 m/s and width from 1.0 to 1.3 m of the steel strip, because of the effects of wall and shear stress. The results of the water modeling experiment were compared with those of numerical simulations. In the simulation, Maxwell equations were solved using finite element method to obtain magnetic flux density, electromagnetic force, and Joule heating. The Joule heating rate reached the maximum and minimum values near the side wall and at the core of the bath, respectively, because of the effect of skin and proximity. In an industrial-sized model, the molten zinc flow and temperature fields driven by electromagnetic force and Joule heating in the inductor of a coreless galvanizing bath were numerically simulated. The results indicated that the direction of electromagnetic force concentrated at the center of the galvanizing pot horizontal planes and exerted a pinch effect on molten zinc. Consequently, molten zinc in the pot was stirred by electromagnetic force. Under molten zinc flow and electromagnetic force stirring, the temperature of the molten zinc became homogeneous throughout the bath. This study provides a basis for optimizing electromagnetic fields in coreless induction pot and fine-tuning the design of steel strip parameters.

  3. Outbursts formation on low carbon and trip steel grades during hot-dip galvanisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, E. J.; Lamm, L.; Gilles, M.

    2004-12-01

    Low carbon and TRIP grade steels have been hot dip galvanised in order to study outbursts formation. Microstructure and texture of intermetallic phases have been observed after selective electrochemical etching by scanning electron microscopy. Potential versus time (chronopotentiometric) characteristics were recorded in order to monitor surface modifications. This combination of techniques enable to quantify and observe intermetallic phase one by one. The overall thickness of coating on both substrates are similar. However, microstructures of Fe-Zn intermetallic phases are very different on both grades. In particular, the V phase is dense on standard steel but develops a highly branched filament structure on TRIP steel. The transformation of V phase to d and G1 are limited on TRIP steel. Differences of texture provide clues for understanding mechanisms of formation of outbursts. They can account for the differences of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Silicon from the substrate influences the reactivity of TRIP steels due to capping and local reactions. La formation des outbursts a été étudiée sur un acier bas carbone et sur un acier TRIP galvanisés. Les épaisseurs des revêtements sont similaires. Néanmoins, les observations microscopiques et les érosions électrochimiques montrent que la répartition des phases intermétalliques et leurs microstructures diffèrent sensiblement en fonction de la nature du substrat. Ces différences expliquent les propriétés mécaniques et anticorrosions. L’encapsulation de la surface par les oxydes de silicium freine la transformation de la phase dzêta en delta et gamma sur l’acier TRIP.

  4. Effect of chromium on the formation of intermetallic phases in hot-dipped aluminide Cr-Mo steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Jen; Wang, Chaur-Jeng

    2013-07-01

    Cr-Mo steels with different chromium contents were coated by hot-dipping into molten baths containing pure aluminum and Al-10 wt.% Si for 180 s. The effect of chromium content in the steels on the formation of the intermetallic phases in the aluminide coatings was studied. The results show that all the aluminide coatings can be distinguished into an outer pure aluminum or Al-Si topcoat and an inner intermetallic layer. The intermetallic layers, resulting from the steels hot-dipped in pure aluminum, have the same phase constitution, an outer minor FeAl3 and an inner major Fe2Al5. In the aluminide coatings on the steels with 0 and 2.25 wt.% chromium after hot-dipping in Al-10 wt.% Si, the intermetallic layers were composed of an outer layer of τ5(H)-Al7(Fe,Cr)2Si and an inner one of FeAl3/τ1-(Al,Si)5Fe3/Fe2Al5, while a small amount of polyhedral τ5(H)-Al7(Fe,Cr)2Si and plate-shaped τ6-Al4FeSi were observed in the Al-Si topcoats. In the aluminide coatings on the steels with 5 and 9 wt.% chromium after hot-dipping in Al-10 wt.% Si, the intermetallic layers were composed of only a τ5(H)-Al7(Fe,Cr)2Si phase. A large amount of scattered granular τ5(C)-Al7(Fe,Cr)2Si and a small amount of plate-shaped τ4-Al3FeSi2 and τ6-Al4FeSi were also found in the Al-Si topcoats. When the chromium content reached 5 wt.%, the amount of steel, which dissolved when samples were hot-dipped in Al-10 wt.% Si, increased. Also, the rate of dissolving went up as chromium content went up. The increase of dissolution is because the interdiffusion between steels and Al-10 wt.% Si bath was enhanced by the formation of scattered granular τ5(C)-Al7(Fe,Cr)2Si, which was stabilized by chromium.

  5. Comparative life cycle cost assessment of painted and hot-dip galvanized bridges.

    PubMed

    Rossi, B; Marquart, S; Rossi, G

    2017-07-15

    The study addresses the life cycle cost assessment (LCCA) of steel bridges, focusing on the maintenance activities and the maintenance scenario. Firstly, the unit costs of maintenance activities and their durability (i.e. the time between two activities) are evaluated. Pragmatic data are provided for the environment category C4 and for three activities: Patch Up, Overcoating and Remove & Replace. A comparative LCCA for a typical hypothetic steel girder bridge is carried out, either painted or hot-dip galvanized (HDG), in the environmental class C4. The LCC versus the cumulated life is provided for both options. The initial cost of the steel unpainted option is only 50.3% of the HDG option. It is shown that after 'Overcoating' occurring at 18.5 years, the total Net Present Value (NPV) of the painted option surpasses that of the HDG option. A sensitivity analysis of the NPV to the cost and service life parameters, the escalation and discount rates is then performed. The discount and escalation rates, considerably influences the total LCC, following a non-linear trend. The total LCC decreases with the discount rate increasing and, conversely, increases with the escalation rate increasing. Secondly, the influence of the maintenance scenario on the total LCC is assessed based on a probabilistic approach. A permutation of the three independent maintenance activities assumed to occur six times over the life of the bridge is considered and a probability of occurrence is associated to each unique scenario. The most probable scenarios are then classified according to their NPV or achieved service life. This approach leads to the definition of a cost-effective maintenance scenario i.e. the scenario, within all the considered permutations, that has the minimum LCC in a range of lifespan. Besides, the probabilistic analysis also shows that, whatever the scenario, the return on investment period ranges between 18.5 years and 24.2 years. After that period, the HDG option becomes

  6. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  7. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  8. Development of nano TiO2-incorporated phosphate coatings on hot dip zinc surface for good paintability and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibli, S. M. A.; Chacko, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Phosphating is one of the most important chemical conversion processes for the purpose of corrosion protection and primer for painting. In the present work, nano TiO2 incorporated phosphate coating was developed on hot dip galvanized zinc surface for achieving good paintability and corrosion resistance. Based on the results from preliminary studies, the amount of nano TiO2 incorporated into the phosphating bath was optimized as 0.1 g. TiO2 incorporation effectively reduced the extent of zinc dissolution during phosphating and activated the process to achieve the expected coating weight faster. Also it yielded coating with greater thickness than the normal phosphate coating. The TiO2 incorporation resulted in a well crystallized phosphate coating with large crystal size and greater surface coverage. Results from the electrochemical analysis revealed the better barrier protection characteristics and enhanced corrosion resistance of TiO2 incorporated phosphate coatings over the normal phosphate coatings.

  9. Laser interferometry method for measuring displacement field of crack tip of bimetal hot-dip specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiyong; Asundi, Anand

    2005-04-01

    The U and V distortion fields at the interface of cracked zinc alloy ZAS35/carbon steel have been obtained by means of a laser moire interferometry. The optimum cast preheating temperature has been decided based on the experimentally determined shear strength. The microstructure of the interface of bimetal composite of zinc alloy ZAS35/carbon steel is analyzed and studied using X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The phase component of the metallic interface bond of the alloy has been determined and the results of interface distribution of elements Fe and Zn have been obtained with dip coating at a temperature of 700°C. The above theory, the experimental technology and the results will be introduced and analyzed in this paper.

  10. The structure of coatings obtained in the Zn-31Al-3Mg bath by the batch hot dip method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, H.

    2012-05-01

    Zn-Al dip coatings provide effective protection of steel surface against corrosion - better than traditional zinc coatings. Corrosion resistance can be further increased by adding Mg to the bath. Coatings obtained in Zn-Al-Mg baths are produced on metal plates by applying the continuous method. In this paper the author presents the results of tests on obtaining Zn-Al-Mg coatings on products with limited shape by use of the batch hot dip method. The growth kinetics of coatings obtained in the Zn-31Al-3Mg bath on steel with low silicon contents has been defined. The structure has been developed and the chemical composition of particular structural components of the coating has be established. It has been determined that the structure of coatings obtained in the Zn-31Al-3Mg bath is continuous. The course of reaction between the tested steel and liquid Zn-31Al-3Mg alloy is very abrupt, which leads to the formation of coatings with excess and non-uniform thickness.

  11. Effect of Mg on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of the Continuously Hot-Dip Galvanizing Zn-Mg Coating

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Anping; Li, Baoping; Lu, Yanling; Zhu, Guoliang; Xing, Hui; Shu, Da; Sun, Baode; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of continuously hot-dip galvanizing Zn-Mg coating was investigated in order to obtain the mechanism of the effects of Mg on the corrosion resistance. In this paper, the vertical section of the Zn-0.20 wt % Al-Mg ternary phase diagram near the Al-low corner was calculated. The results indicates that the phase composition of the Zn-0.20 wt % Al-Mg ternary phase diagram near the Al-low corner is the same as Zn-Mg binary phase diagram, suggesting Al in the Zn-Mg (ZM) coatings mainly concentrates on the interfacial layer between the coating and steel substrate. The microstructure of continuously hot-dip galvanizing ZM coatings with 0.20 wt % Al containing 1.0–3.0 wt % Mg was investigated using tunneling electron microscopy (TEM). The morphology of Zn in the coating changes from bulk to strip and finally to mesh-like, and the MgZn2 changes from rod-like to mesh-like with the Mg content increasing. Al in the ZM coatings mainly segregates at the Fe2Al5 inhibition layer and the Mg added to the Zn bath makes this inhibition layer thinner and uneven. Compared to GI coating, the time of the first red rust appears increases by more than two-fold and expansion rate of red rust reduces by more than four-fold in terms of salt spray experiment. The ZM coating containing 2.0 wt % Mg has the best corrosion resistance. The enhanced corrosion resistance of ZM coatings mainly depends on different corrosion products. PMID:28829393

  12. Effect of Mg on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of the Continuously Hot-Dip Galvanizing Zn-Mg Coating.

    PubMed

    Dong, Anping; Li, Baoping; Lu, Yanling; Zhu, Guoliang; Xing, Hui; Shu, Da; Sun, Baode; Wang, Jun

    2017-08-22

    The microstructure of continuously hot-dip galvanizing Zn-Mg coating was investigated in order to obtain the mechanism of the effects of Mg on the corrosion resistance. In this paper, the vertical section of the Zn-0.20 wt % Al-Mg ternary phase diagram near the Al-low corner was calculated. The results indicates that the phase composition of the Zn-0.20 wt % Al-Mg ternary phase diagram near the Al-low corner is the same as Zn-Mg binary phase diagram, suggesting Al in the Zn-Mg (ZM) coatings mainly concentrates on the interfacial layer between the coating and steel substrate. The microstructure of continuously hot-dip galvanizing ZM coatings with 0.20 wt % Al containing 1.0-3.0 wt % Mg was investigated using tunneling electron microscopy (TEM). The morphology of Zn in the coating changes from bulk to strip and finally to mesh-like, and the MgZn₂ changes from rod-like to mesh-like with the Mg content increasing. Al in the ZM coatings mainly segregates at the Fe₂Al₅ inhibition layer and the Mg added to the Zn bath makes this inhibition layer thinner and uneven. Compared to GI coating, the time of the first red rust appears increases by more than two-fold and expansion rate of red rust reduces by more than four-fold in terms of salt spray experiment. The ZM coating containing 2.0 wt % Mg has the best corrosion resistance. The enhanced corrosion resistance of ZM coatings mainly depends on different corrosion products.

  13. Highly nonlinear varistors from oxygen-deficient zinc oxide thin films by hot-dipping in Bi2O3: Influence of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Peng, Zhijian; Wang, Qi; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-12-01

    Highly nonlinear varistors were fabricated by hot-dipping oxygen-deficient zinc oxide (ZnO1-x, x < 1) thin films in Bi2O3. The ZnO1-x films were deposited on conducting silicon chips by radio frequency magnetron sputtering of a sintered zinc oxide ceramic target. Then the films were hot-dipped at a temperature from 200 to 600 °C in Bi2O3. With the increase in hot-dipping temperature, the nonlinear coefficient (α) of the film varistors increases first and then decreases, and the leakage current (IL) correspondingly decreases initially and then increases, owing mainly to the formation and destroying of complete ZnO1-x/Bi2O3 grain boundaries and the roundness change of the ZnO1-x grains; and the varistor voltage (E1mA) decreases from 0.0268 to 0.0137 V/nm, due to the decreased number of effective grain boundaries in the materials. The film varistors prepared by hot-dipping at 400 °C exhibit the optimum nonlinear properties with the highest α = 15.1, lowest IL = 0.0223 mA/cm2, and E1mA = 0.0176 V/nm. Such nanoscaled film varistors will be very promising in electrical/electronic devices working in low-voltage.

  14. Organic acid formulation and dip to control listeria monocytogenes in hot dogs.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Processed meat products such as frankfurters, smoked sausage, and deli meat have gained popularity because consumers have less time for food preparation and demand more convenient meat items. Because these products are handled post processing and may not be reheated before consumption, the presence...

  15. Scanning auger microprobe study of hot-dipped regular-spangle galvanized steel: Part II. surface composition of chromated sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biber, H. E.

    1988-06-01

    Zinc coatings produced on a hot-dipped-coating pilot line from a zinc bath containing small amounts of aluminum, antimony, and lead were treated with a commercial chromating solution and then examined with a scanning Auger microprobe. The results show that the chromating solution attacked the thin aluminum oxide precipitates in the zinc surface. The invisible conversion-coating film that was formed on the zinc matrix consisted mainly of oxygen, zinc, and chromium in order of decreasing atomic concentration. Surprisingly, the thickness and composition of the film was the same for treatment in 8 and 15 grams-per-liter chromate solutions. The film that was formed on precipitates of lead in the surface of the zinc coating was much thicker and richer in chromium than the film formed on the surrounding zinc. Examination of chromated surfaces exposed to water-saturated air at 100 °F and to normal atmospheres showed that the surfaces corroded rapidly on a microscale. After only a few hours exposure the surface had numerous mounds composed of equal atom concentrations of zinc and oxygen. In each instance corrosion sites were associated with a lead precipitate.

  16. The characterization of continuous hot-dip galvanized and galvannealed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Sylvie

    2006-03-01

    The use of zinc-coated steels for automotive, construction, and appliance applications has grown continually during the past decade. An understanding of the effects of process parameters and substrate characteristics on the coating microstructure is critical for optimizing the performance of the zinc-based coatings. This paper presents an overview of the application of advanced electron and focused-ion-beam microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure of galvanized and galvannealed coatings.

  17. Theoretical Investigation of the Interfacial Reactions during Hot-Dip Galvanizing of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, G. K.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mehrotra, S. P.

    2009-03-01

    In the modern galvanizing line, as soon as the steel strip enters the aluminum-containing zinc bath, two reactions occur at the strip and the liquid-zinc alloy interface: (1) iron rapidly dissolves from the strip surface, raising the iron concentration in the liquid phase at the strip-liquid interface; and (2) aluminum forms a stable aluminum-iron intermetallic compound layer at the strip-coating interface due to its greater affinity toward iron. The main objective of this study is to develop a simple and realistic mathematical model for better understanding of the kinetics of galvanizing reactions at the strip and the liquid-zinc alloy interface. In the present study, a model is proposed to simulate the effect of various process parameters on iron dissolution in the bath, as well as, aluminum-rich inhibition layer formation at the substrate-coating interface. The transient-temperature profile of the immersed strip is predicted based on conductive and convective heat-transfer mechanisms. The inhibition-layer thickness at the substrate-coating interface is predicted by assuming the cooling path of the immersed strip consists of a series of isothermal holds of infinitesimal time-step. The influence of galvanizing reaction is assessed by considering nucleation and growth mechanisms at each hold time, which is used to estimate the total effect of the immersion time on the formation mechanism of the inhibition layer. The iron- dissolution model is developed based on well established principles of diffusion taking into consideration the area fraction covered by the intermetallic on the strip surface during formation of the inhibition layer. The model can be effectively used to monitor the dross formation in the bath by optimizing the process parameters. Theoretical predictions are compared with the findings of other researchers. Simulated results are in good agreement with the theoretical and experimental observation carried out by other investigators.

  18. Dip-Coating Process Engineering and Performance Optimization for Three-State Electrochromic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lu; Yang, Dejiang; Fei, Lixun; Huang, Yue; Wu, Fang; Sun, Yiling; Shi, Jiayuan; Xiang, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were modified onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) via dip-coating technique with different nanoparticle sizes, lifting speeds, precursor concentrations, and dipping numbers. Electrodeposition-based electrochromic device with reversible three-state optical transformation (transparent, mirror, and black) was fabricated subsequently by sandwiching a suitable amount of gel electrolyte between modified FTO electrode and flat FTO electrode. Correlation between dip-coating process engineering, morphological features of TiO2 thin films, i.e., thickness and roughness, as well as performance of electrochromic devices, i.e., optical contrast, switching time, and cycling stability, were investigated. The modified device exhibits high optical contrast of 57%, the short coloration/bleaching switching time of 6 and 20 s, and excellent cycling stability after 1500 cycles of only 27% decrement rate by adjusting dip-coating processes engineering. The results in this study will provide valuable guidance for rational design of the electrochromic device with satisfactory performance.

  19. Dip-Coating Process Engineering and Performance Optimization for Three-State Electrochromic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lu; Yang, Dejiang; Fei, Lixun; Huang, Yue; Wu, Fang; Sun, Yiling; Shi, Jiayuan; Xiang, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were modified onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) via dip-coating technique with different nanoparticle sizes, lifting speeds, precursor concentrations, and dipping numbers. Electrodeposition-based electrochromic device with reversible three-state optical transformation (transparent, mirror, and black) was fabricated subsequently by sandwiching a suitable amount of gel electrolyte between modified FTO electrode and flat FTO electrode. Correlation between dip-coating process engineering, morphological features of TiO2 thin films, i.e., thickness and roughness, as well as performance of electrochromic devices, i.e., optical contrast, switching time, and cycling stability, were investigated. The modified device exhibits high optical contrast of 57%, the short coloration/bleaching switching time of 6 and 20 s, and excellent cycling stability after 1500 cycles of only 27% decrement rate by adjusting dip-coating processes engineering. The results in this study will provide valuable guidance for rational design of the electrochromic device with satisfactory performance.

  20. The mechanism of oxide whisker growth and hot corrosion of hot-dipped Al-Si coated 430 stainless steels in air-NaCl (g) atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsiao-Hung; Cheng, Wei-Jen; Wang, Chaur-Jeng

    2011-10-01

    The mechanisms of oxide whisker growth and hot corrosion of 430 stainless steel (430SS) and aluminide 430 stainless steel hot-dipped in a Al-10 wt.%Si molten bath (430HDAS) were studied at 750 and 850 °C in air mixed with 500 and 990 vppm NaCl (g). The results showed that the loose Cr 2O 3 scale which formed on the 430SS could not prevent the corrosion of 430SS in a 500 vppm NaCl (g) atmosphere, resulting in the formation of Fe 2O 3 scale. Fe 2O 3 whiskers grew at the grain boundary of the Fe 2O 3 scale. However, no Fe 2O 3 whiskers formed on the Fe 2O 3 scale while 430SS was exposed in a 900 vppm NaCl (g) atmosphere. During the initial high-temperature corrosion of 430HDAS in a 500 vppm NaCl (g) atmosphere, a dense Al 2O 3 scale formed on the surface of the specimens. Also, Al 2O 3 whiskers grew on the Al 2O 3 scale. As exposure time increased, cyclic chlorination/oxidation degraded the protective aluminide layer and caused the formation of Fe 2O 3 scale and Fe 2O 3 whiskers. The morphology of Fe 2O 3 whiskers formed at 750 °C is more slender than those formed at 850 °C. The formation and growth of both Fe 2O 3 and Al 2O 3 whiskers may be attributed to the chloridation of both the steel substrate and aluminide layer, accelerating the diffusion rate of metallic ions in the oxide scales.

  1. Dip process thermal-barrier coatings for superalloys. Final report 1 Jul 79-30 Jun 80

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, I.M.; Bartlett, R.W.; Krishnan, G.N.

    1980-06-30

    A new technique of developing thermal-barrier coatings for superalloys has been investigated. It involves hot dipping of superalloy samples into a molten bath of low melting Ce-Co or Ce-Ni alloy. By internally oxidizing these coatings, it is possible to obtain a duplex with a CeO2-rich oxide scale as the outer layer (thermal barrier) and an inner layer composite of fine cerium oxide particles dispersed in a matrix of Ni(Co)CrAl. This inner layer, or subscale, grades into the superalloy. Appropriate heat treatment can produce recrystallized CeO2 particles in the subscale that should improve adherence of the oxide scale to the subscale and substrate superalloy. The coating process does involve limited reaction between the coating alloy and superalloy. The thickness of this interaction zone can be controlled and compensated for in the design (cross section) of the superalloy component.

  2. Studies of the morphology of the Al-Rich interfacial layer formed during the hot dip galvanizing of steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baril, Eric; L'Espérance, Gilles

    1999-03-01

    A small addition of Al in the liquid Zn bath inhibits the Fe/Zn reactions during hot dip galvanizing of steel sheets. Although it is well known that Al and Fe are tied up in an layer located at the interface between Fe and Zn, the effect of the galvanizing parameters on the formation of this Al-rich interfacial layer is not. This study has been carried out to determine the effect of the galvanizing parameters on the formation of this Al-rich layer. Five zinc baths containing 0.10, 0.12, 0.13, 0.16, and 0.18 wt pct Al were used to produce galvanized coatings of commercial ultra-low-carbon (ULC) steel substrate. Full inhibition of the Fe/Zn reactions was achieved in baths with Al content above 0.15 wt pct. The Al-rich layer is isomorphous to Fe2Al5 crystals and the Fe/Al ratio is close to Fe2Al5 with large amounts of Zn present (22 to 28 wt pct). The morphology of the Al-rich layer is strongly related to the Al content of the bath. Indeed, bath contents above 0.15 wt pct are associated with two sublayers of Fe2Al5 crystals, making up colonies of grains of similar crystallographic orientation and directly associated to the crystallographic orientation of the steel grains. In baths with contents below 0.15 wt pct, the Al-rich layer has only one sublayer of crystals and shows colonies of grains with similar orientation. Finally, the Fe2Al5 crystals have a strong crystallographic texture. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals that the (200) planes are parallel to the surface of the substrate.

  3. Modeling the effect of coating weight on the kinetics of iron enrichment in hot dip galvanneal coatings on interstitial-free steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, C.R.; Seixas, U.R.; Rios, P.R.

    1997-10-01

    The coating weight is shown to have a significant effect on the isothermal kinetics of iron enrichment in hot dip galvanized coatings on interstitial-free (IF) steel sheets during a postcoating heat treatment that simulates galvannealing. A simple quantitative model is proposed to account for this effect and is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results obtained for the kinetics of iron enrichment for coating weights of 60 and 80 g/m{sup 2}.

  4. Dynamic nanomechanical properties of novel Si-rich intermetallic coatings growth on a medical 316 LVM steel by hot dipping in a hypereutectic Al-25Si alloy.

    PubMed

    Frutos, E; González-Carrasco, J L

    2015-06-01

    This aim of this study is to determine the elastoplastic properties of Ni-free Al3FeSi2 intermetallic coatings grown on medical stainless steel under different experimental conditions. Elastoplastic properties are defined by the plasticity index (PI), which correlates the hardness and the Young's modulus. Special emphasis is devoted to correlate the PI with the wear resistance under sliding contact, determined by scratch testing, and fracture toughness, determined by using a novel method based on successive impacts with small loads. With regard to the substrate, the developed coatings are harder and exhibit a lower Young's reduced modulus, irrespective of the experimental conditions. It has been shown that preheating of the samples prior to hot dipping and immersion influences the type and volume fraction of precipitates, which in turn also affect the nanomechanical properties. The higher the preheating temperature is, the greater the Young's reduced modulus is. For a given preheating condition, an increase of the immersion time yields a decrease in hardness. Although apparent friction coefficients of coated specimens are smaller than those obtained on AISI 316 LVM, they increase when using preheating or higher immersion times during processing, which correlates with the PI. The presence of precipitates produces an increase in fracture toughness, with values greater than those presented by samples processed on melted AlSi alloys with lower Si content (12 wt%). Therefore, these intermetallic coatings could be considered "hard but tough", suitable to enhance the wear resistance, especially when using short periods of immersion.

  5. Influence of Gas Atmosphere Dew Point on the Selective Oxidation and the Reactive Wetting During Hot Dip Galvanizing of CMnSi TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Seok Jae; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Young Ha; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2013-01-01

    The selective oxidation and reactive wetting of intercritically annealed Si-bearing CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity steels were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In a N2 + 10 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point (DP) ranging from 213 K to 278 K (-60 °C to 5 °C), a continuous layer of selective oxides was formed on the surface. Annealing in a higher DP gas atmosphere resulted in a thinner layer of external oxidation and a greater depth of internal oxidation. The hot dipping was carried out in a Zn bath containing 0.22 mass pct Al, and the bath temperature was 733 K (460 °C). Coarse and discontinuous Fe2Al5- x Zn x grains and Fe-Zn intermetallics (ζ and δ) were observed at the steel/coating interface after the hot dip galvanizing (HDG) of panels were annealed in a low DP atmosphere 213 K (-60 °C). The Fe-Zn intermetallics were formed both in areas where the Fe2Al5- x Zn x inhibition layer had not been formed and on top of non-stoichiometric Fe-Al-Zn crystals. Poor wetting was observed on panels annealed in a low DP atmosphere because of the formation of thick film-type oxides on the surface. After annealing in higher DP gas atmospheres, i.e., 263 K and 278 K (-10 °C and 5 °C), a continuous and fine-grained Fe2Al5- x Zn x layer was formed. No Fe-Zn intermetallics were formed. The small grain size of the inhibition layer was attributed to the nucleation of the Fe2Al5- x Zn x grains on small ferrite sub-surface grains and the presence of granular surface oxides. A high DP atmosphere can therefore significantly contribute to the decrease of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steels processed in HDG lines.

  6. Effect of Dipping Treatments on Color Stabilization and Texture of Apple Cubes for Infrared Dry-Blanching Process

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research investigated the effectiveness of dipping treatments on reducing enzymatic browning of apple cubes for the infrared dry-blanching (IDB) process. Apple cubes were dipped in solutions with various combinations of ascorbic acid (AA), citric acid (CA) and calcium chloride (CC) at differen...

  7. Designing the Color of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Through Destructive Light Interference Using a Zn-Ti Liquid Metallic Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levai, Gabor; Godzsák, Melinda; Török, Tamas I.; Hakl, Jozsef; Takáts, Viktor; Csik, Attila; Vad, Kalman; Kaptay, George

    2016-07-01

    The color of hot-dip galvanized steel sheet was adjusted in a reproducible way using a liquid Zn-Ti metallic bath, air atmosphere, and controlling the bath temperature as the only experimental parameter. Coloring was found only for samples cooled in air and dipped into Ti-containing liquid Zn. For samples dipped into a 0.15 wt pct Ti-containing Zn bath, the color remained metallic (gray) below a 792 K (519 °C) bath temperature; it was yellow at 814 K ± 22 K (541 °C ± 22 °C), violet at 847 K ± 10 K (574 °C ± 10 °C), and blue at 873 K ± 15 K (600 °C ± 15 °C). With the increasing bath temperature, the thickness of the adhered Zn-Ti layer gradually decreased from 52 to 32 micrometers, while the thickness of the outer TiO2 layer gradually increased from 24 to 69 nm. Due to small Al contamination of the Zn bath, a thin (around 2 nm) alumina-rich layer is found between the outer TiO2 layer and the inner macroscopic Zn layer. It is proven that the color change was governed by the formation of thin outer TiO2 layer; different colors appear depending on the thickness of this layer, mostly due to the destructive interference of visible light on this transparent nano-layer. A complex model was built to explain the results using known relationships of chemical thermodynamics, adhesion, heat flow, kinetics of chemical reactions, diffusion, and optics. The complex model was able to reproduce the observations and allowed making predictions on the color of the hot-dip galvanized steel sample, as a function of the following experimental parameters: temperature and Ti content of the Zn bath, oxygen content, pressure, temperature and flow rate of the cooling gas, dimensions of the steel sheet, velocity of dipping the steel sheet into the Zn-Ti bath, residence time of the steel sheet within the bath, and the velocity of its removal from the bath. These relationships will be valuable for planning further experiments and technologies on color hot-dip galvanization of steel

  8. No dip or low dip

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.D.; Bengtson, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    How does one distinguish between zero homoclinal dip (no dip) and low homoclinal dip (low dip) using just the dipmeter tadpole plot Because of scatter, no-dip and low-dip settings both involve dip angles near zero that cannot be distinguished on tadpole plots on the basis of dip alone. They can, however, be distinguished on the basis of azimuth: on the A plot (azimuth vs depth plot), no-dip settings show completely random azimuth distributions, whereas low-dip settings show subtle concentrations of data at the true azimuth. Once they have chosen, on the basis of the A-plot pattern, one of the two settings, SCAT permits tests of this initial interpretation. No-dip and low-dip patterns are usually different on DVA (dip vs azimuth) and tangent plots; they are almost always different on azimuth-frequency histograms and on plots of apparent dip vs depth. Therefore, we can test their initial interpretation by examining the actual patterns on these plots, with special emphasis on the last two. This ability to test interpretations is made possible by SCAT's multiple-display approach, an invaluable strength. In low-dip settings, the tadpole plot does not clearly show the preferred azimuth that the A-plot reveals. Moreover, the tadpole-plot approach provides no way to test interpretations. Therefore, zero dip cannot confidently be distinguished from low dip using the tadpole plot.

  9. Direct deposition of highly conductive aluminum thin film on substrate by solution-dipping process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Moon; Choi, Si-Young; Jung, Areum

    2013-06-12

    A solution-dipping process consisting of 2 steps, including (i) a catalytic treatment of the substrate and (ii) an immersion of the catalytically treated substrate into an aluminum precursor solution of AlH3{O(C4H9)2}, is suggested for the low-cost and simple preparation of aluminum thin film. This process can be applied to electric devices in the way of not only various film geometry including large area (□ 100 mm (W) × 100 mm (L)) or patterned structure but also the diverse substrate selectivity including rigid or flexible substrate. More interestingly, preparations of aluminum film in this study can be unprecedentedly accomplished at room temperature with the help of chemical catalyst to decompose AlH3{O(C4H9)2} into Al, 1.5H2, and O(C4H9)2. Beyond the previously reported processes, the prepared Al films via solution-dipping process are comparable or even superior to Ag, Au, and Al films prepared by other solution processes and furthermore are found to be excellent in mechanical durability against external deformation.

  10. Study on Ceramic Interconnect Manufactured by Slurry Dip Coating and Plasma Spray Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Kim, Jong-Hee; Ryoo, Sung-Nam; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Shul, Yong-Gun; Shin, Dong-Ryul; Song, Rak-Hyun

    To get a stable and dense interconnect layer of anode-supported flat tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack, we have studied on the synthesis of precursors with a fine particle size and the ceramic interconnect coating technology. Coated interconnects by slurry dipping and air plasma spray processes were sintered by 2-step sintering method. Ca-doped LaCrO3 perovskites such as La0.75Ca0.27CrO3(LCC27), La0.6Ca0.41CrO3(LCC41), and La0.8Sr0.05Ca0.15CrO3(LSCC), were synthesized by Pechini process and their average particle sizes were about 1 μm. LSCC layer is a functional layer to prevent Ca migration and then LCC41 layer is coated onto it. The Ca migration in the LSCC layer did not occur. The LCC41 was coated on the air plasma spray-coated LCC27 layer by slurry dip coating process and sintered at 1200°C for 20hr. Its electrical conductivity indicated about 27 S/cm at 800°C and the bubble test showed that there is no gas permeation at pressure difference of 0.4 kgf/cm2 at room temperature.

  11. Electrochemical characterization of YSZ thick films deposited by dip-coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauvy, F.; Lenormand, P.; Lalanne, C.; Ansart, F.; Bassat, J. M.; Grenier, J. C.; Groupement de Recherches Cnrs "Pacte", Gdr 2985

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y 2O 3) thick films were coated on dense alumina substrates by a dip-coating process. The suspension was obtained by addition of a polymeric matrix in a stable suspension of commercial YSZ (Tosoh) powders dispersed in an azeotropic mixture MEK-EtOH. The suspension composition was improved by the addition of YSZ Tosoh particles encapsulated by zirconium alkoxide sol containing yttrium nitrate which are the precursors of the 8-YSZ oxide. This optimal formulation allowed preparing, via a dip-coating process, thick films which were, after thermal treatment, homogeneous, dense and crack-free. A specific method was performed to measure the electrical conductivity, i.e. to determine the ionic conductivity of the film: it uses the four-point probe technique combined with ac impedance spectroscopy. The good agreement between the classical two-electrode measurements performed on YSZ pellets and the four-electrode ones performed on YSZ films allows concluding that this method is relevant for characterizing the transport properties of thick films.

  12. Dip-movement processing for depth-variable velocity. [Correction for variation of velocity with depth

    SciTech Connect

    Artley, C.T.

    1992-12-01

    Dip-moveout correction (DMO) has become commonplace in the seismic processing flow. The goal of DMO processing is to transform the NMO-corrected data to zero-offset, so that the application of zero-offset (poststack) migration is equivalent to full prestack migration of the recorded data. Nearly all DMO implementations assume that the seismic velocity is constant. Usually, this is an acceptable tradeoff because of the tremendous cost savings of DMO and poststack migration versus prestack migration. Where the velocity changes rapidly with depth, however, this constant velocity theory can yield inadequate results. For many areas, such as the Gulf Coast, a velocity function that varies with depth is a reasonable approximation to the true velocity field. Using ray tracing, I find the raypaths from the source and receiver to the reflection point with the given recording time. The time along the corresponding zero-offset ray gives the DMO correction. The relationships between the three rays are expressed by a system of nonlinear equations. By simultaneously solving the equations via Newton-Raphson iteration, I determine the mapping that transforms nonzero-offset data to zero-offset. Unlike previous schemes that approximately handle vertical velocity variation, this method makes no assumptions about the offset, dip, or hyperbolic moveout.

  13. Effect of Immersion Time and Cooling Mode on the Electrochemical Behavior of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Sulfuric Acid Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekbir, Choukri; Dahoun, Nessrine; Guetitech, Asma; Hacid, Abdenour; Ziouche, Aicha; Ouaad, Kamel; Djadoun, Amar

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the influence of galvanizing immersion time and cooling modes environments on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized steel, in 1 M sulfuric acid electrolyte at room temperature using potentiodynamic polarization technique. In addition, the evolution of thickness, structure and microstructure of zinc coatings for different immersion times and two cooling modes (air and water) is characterized, respectively, by using of Elcometer scan probe, x-ray diffraction and metallography analysis. The analysis of the behavior of steel and galvanized steel, vis-a-vis corrosion, by means of corrosion characteristic parameters as anodic (β a) and cathodic (β c) Tafel slopes, corrosion potential (E corr), corrosion current density (i corr), corrosion rate (CR) and polarization resistance (R p), reveals that the galvanized steel has anticorrosion properties much better than that of steel. More the immersion time increases, more the zinc coatings thickness increases, and more these properties become better. The comparison between the two cooling modes shows that the coatings of zinc produced by hot-dip galvanization and air-cooled provides a much better protection to steel against corrosion than those cooled by quenching in water which exhibit a brittle corrosive behavior due to the presence of cracks.

  14. Steeply dipping heaving bedrock, Colorado: Part 3 - Environmental controls and heaving processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, D.C.; Higgins, J.D.; Olsen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the environmental processes and mechanisms that govern differential heaving in steeply dipping claystone bedrock near Denver, Colorado. Three potential heave mechanisms and causal processes were evaluated: (1) rebound expansion, from reduced overburden stress; (2) expansive gypsum-crystal precipitation, from oxidation of pyrite; and (3) swelling of clay minerals, from increased ground moisture. First, we documented the effect of short-term changes in overburden stress, atmospheric exposure, and ground moisture on bedrock at various field sites and in laboratory samples. Second, we documented differential heaving episodes in outcrops and at construction and developed sites. We found that unloading and exposure of the bedrock in construction-cut areas are essentially one-time processes that result in drying and desiccation of the near-surface bedrock, with no visible heaving response. In contrast, wetting produces a distinct swelling response in the claystone strata, and it may occur repeatedly as natural precipitation or from lawn irrigation. We documented 2.5 to 7.5 cm (1 to 3 in.) of differential heaving in 24 hours triggered by sudden infiltration of water at the exposed ground surface in outcrops and at construction sites. From these results, we interpret that rebound and pyrite weathering, both of which figure strongly into the long-term geologic evolution of the geologic framework, do not appear to be major heave mechanisms at these excavation depths. Heaving of the claystone takes two forms: (1) hydration swelling of dipping bentonitic beds or zones, and (2) hydration swelling within bedrock blocks accommodated by lateral, thrust-shear movements, along pre-existing bedding and fracture planes.

  15. High-performance varistors simply by hot-dipping zinc oxide thin films in Pr6O11: Influence of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Peng, Zhijian; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbiao; Fu, Xiuli

    2017-02-01

    High-performance ZnO-Pr6O11 thin-film varistors were fabricated simply by hot-dipping oxygen-deficient zinc oxide thin films in Pr6O11 powder. The films had a composition of ZnO0.81 and a thickness of about 200 nm, which were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering a sintered zinc oxide ceramic target. Special attention was paid on the temperature dependence of the varistors. In 50 min with hot-dipping temperature increased from 300–700 °C, the nonlinear coefficient (α) of the varistors increased, but with higher temperature it decreased again. Correspondingly, the leakage current (IL) decreased first and then increased, owing mainly to the formation and destroying of complete zinc oxide/Pr6O11 grain boundaries. The breakdown field (E1mA) decreased monotonously from 0.02217 to 0.01623 V/nm with increasing temperature (300–800 °C), due to the decreased number of effective grain boundaries in the varistors. The varistors prepared at 700 °C exhibited the optimum nonlinear properties with the highest α = 39.29, lowest IL = 0.02736 mA/cm2, and E1mA = 0.01757 V/nm. And after charge-discharge at room temperature for 1000 times, heating at 100 or 250 °C for up to 100 h, or applying at up to 250 °C, the varistors still performed well. Such nanoscaled thin-film varistors will be very promising in electrical/electronic devices working at low voltage.

  16. High-performance varistors simply by hot-dipping zinc oxide thin films in Pr6O11: Influence of temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Peng, Zhijian; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbiao; Fu, Xiuli

    2017-01-01

    High-performance ZnO-Pr6O11 thin-film varistors were fabricated simply by hot-dipping oxygen-deficient zinc oxide thin films in Pr6O11 powder. The films had a composition of ZnO0.81 and a thickness of about 200 nm, which were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering a sintered zinc oxide ceramic target. Special attention was paid on the temperature dependence of the varistors. In 50 min with hot-dipping temperature increased from 300–700 °C, the nonlinear coefficient (α) of the varistors increased, but with higher temperature it decreased again. Correspondingly, the leakage current (IL) decreased first and then increased, owing mainly to the formation and destroying of complete zinc oxide/Pr6O11 grain boundaries. The breakdown field (E1mA) decreased monotonously from 0.02217 to 0.01623 V/nm with increasing temperature (300–800 °C), due to the decreased number of effective grain boundaries in the varistors. The varistors prepared at 700 °C exhibited the optimum nonlinear properties with the highest α = 39.29, lowest IL = 0.02736 mA/cm2, and E1mA = 0.01757 V/nm. And after charge-discharge at room temperature for 1000 times, heating at 100 or 250 °C for up to 100 h, or applying at up to 250 °C, the varistors still performed well. Such nanoscaled thin-film varistors will be very promising in electrical/electronic devices working at low voltage. PMID:28155890

  17. Controlled Growth of Ultrathin Film of Organic Semiconductors by Balancing the Competitive Processes in Dip-Coating for Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kunjie; Li, Hongwei; Li, Liqiang; Zhang, Suna; Chen, Xiaosong; Xu, Zeyang; Zhang, Xi; Hu, Wenping; Chi, Lifeng; Gao, Xike; Meng, Yancheng

    2016-06-28

    Ultrathin film with thickness below 15 nm of organic semiconductors provides excellent platform for some fundamental research and practical applications in the field of organic electronics. However, it is quite challenging to develop a general principle for the growth of uniform and continuous ultrathin film over large area. Dip-coating is a useful technique to prepare diverse structures of organic semiconductors, but the assembly of organic semiconductors in dip-coating is quite complicated, and there are no reports about the core rules for the growth of ultrathin film via dip-coating until now. In this work, we develop a general strategy for the growth of ultrathin film of organic semiconductor via dip-coating, which provides a relatively facile model to analyze the growth behavior. The balance between the three direct factors (nucleation rate, assembly rate, and recession rate) is the key to determine the growth of ultrathin film. Under the direction of this rule, ultrathin films of four organic semiconductors are obtained. The field-effect transistors constructed on the ultrathin film show good field-effect property. This work provides a general principle and systematic guideline to prepare ultrathin film of organic semiconductors via dip-coating, which would be highly meaningful for organic electronics as well as for the assembly of other materials via solution processes.

  18. Harvest maturity and post-processing dip to improve quality of fresh-cut carambola fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    'Arkin' carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) fruit harvested at color break or full yellow stage were washed with or without an alkaline solution (pH 13.5), cut to 1 cm thick slices, dipped in calcium ascorbate (Ca ASA), ascorbic acid (ASA) or water, and packaged in perforated clamshells for up to 14 d...

  19. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation, pulsed electric field, hot water dip and ethanol vapours treatment on keeping and sensory quality of mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) sprouts.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ankit; Siddiqui, Saleem

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research work was to evaluate the effects of UV- irradiation, pulsed electric field (PEF), hot water dip (HWD) and ethanol vapours on the quality and storage life of mung bean sprouts (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). The sprouts were subjected to various treatments viz., UV-Irradiation (10 kJm(-2) in laminar flow chamber for 1 h), PEF (10,000 V for 10s), HWD (50 °C for 2 min) and ethanol vapours (1 h); and then stored in thermocol cups wrapped with perforated cling films at room (25 ± 1 °C) and low (7 ± 1 °C) temperature conditions. The sprouts were analyzed regularly at 24 h interval for sprout length, sprout weight, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity, non-enzymatic browning, total plate count and overall acceptability. Sprout length and weight increased during storage. There was no significant effect of various treatments on sprout length and weight, except in ethanol treatment, where suppression was observed. HWD showed higher TSS and acidity than that of control. The least browning was observed in ethanol treatment. The total plate count was not significantly affected by various treatments. Overall acceptability under various treatments decreased during storage period both at room and low temperature. Hot water and ethanol vapour treated sprouts showed higher acceptability than other treatments. However, the acceptability scores for sprouts remained within the acceptable range (≥6) up to 72 h at room temperature and 120 h at low temperature conditions.

  20. Influence of Minor Alloying Elements on Selective Oxidation and Reactive Wetting of CMnSi TRIP Steel during Hot Dip Galvanizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Lawrence; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Young Ha; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of the addition of minor alloying elements on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. Five TRIP steels containing small alloying additions of Cr, Ni, Ti, Cu, and Sn were investigated. After intercritical annealing (IA) at 1093 K (820 °C) in a N2 + 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of 213 K (-60 °C), two types of oxides were formed on the strip surface: Mn-rich xMnO·SiO2 ( x > 1.5) and Si-rich xMnO·SiO2 ( x < 0.3) oxides. The addition of the minor alloying elements changed the morphology of the Si-rich oxides from a continuous film to discrete islands and this improved the wettability by molten Zn. The improved wetting effect of the minor alloying elements was attributed to an increased area fraction of the surface where the oxides were thinner, enabling a direct unhindered reaction between Fe and the Al in the liquid Zn and the formation of the inhibition layer during the hot dip galvanizing. The addition of a small amount of Sn is shown to significantly decrease the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steels.

  1. Scanning auger microprobe study of hot-dipped regular-spangle galvanized steel: Part I. surface composition of As-produced sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biber, H. E.

    1988-06-01

    Untreated bright and dull zinc coatings produced on a hot-dipped-coating pilot line from a zinc bath containing small concentrations of aluminum, antimony, and lead were examined with a scanning Auger microprobe. The results show that the entire surface of the zinc coating was covered by a very thin, continuous film comprised of aluminum and oxygen. The thickness of this film, of the order of 5 nanometers, was the same for both bright and dull coatings and independent of zinc spangle roughness. Beneath this film the zinc surface contained numerous small precipitates that occupied a considerable portion of the total coating surface area, perhaps as much as 25 pct for some spangles. In all, five distinct types of precipitates were observed in the coatings. Aluminum was common to each type except for one which was essentially pure lead. In the others the principal element combined with aluminum was oxygen in one case, antimony in the second, iron in the third, and zinc in the fourth case. Based on the results of Auger electron spectrometry, these appear to be A12O3, AlSb, one of the aluminum-rich iron-aluminum intermetallic compounds, and the zinc-rich solid solution of zinc in aluminum, respectively. The size of these various precipitate particles tended to be larger and their frequency greater in rough than in smooth spangles.

  2. The behavior of lead during the solidification of Zn 0.1Al 0.1Pb coating on batch hot-dipped steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinhua; Lu, Jintang; Che, Chunshan; Kong, Gang

    2008-02-01

    The typical spangle on batch hot-dipped Zn-0.1Al-0.1Pb alloy coating was investigated. The morphology, distribution, chemical composition and identification of the phases on coating surface were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. It is found that most of spangles usually exhibit three distinct regions: smooth, feathery and coarse regions, of which lead surface segregation across the coating surface was detected increasingly more significant. Furthermore, lead micro-segregation with the form of tiny orthohexagonal particulates (<0.5 μm), mainly happens in the interdendritic spacing instead of the grain boundary probably owing to no sufficient diffusion. Based on the experimental results and compared to CGL, the solidification sequence of the Zn-0.1Al-0.1Pb coating was analyzed assisted with Zn-Pb phase diagram; the morphology of the spangle is modeled on consideration with the interaction of the thermal condition and the crystallization orientation; the profile of precipitated lead particulates is well explained in the view of crystallography.

  3. Processing map for hot working of powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna Bhat, B. V.; Mahajan, Y. R.; Roshan, H. Md.; Prasad, Yvrk

    1992-08-01

    The constitutive flow behavior of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with 2124 aluminum containing 20 vol pct silicon carbide particulates under hot-working conditions in the temperature range of 300 °C to 550 °C and strain-rate range of 0.001 to 1 s-1 has been studied using hot compression testing. Processing maps depicting the variation of the efficiency of power dissipation given by [2m/(m + 1)] (where m is the strain-rate sensitivity of flow stress) with temperature and strain rate have been established for the MMC as well as for the matrix material. The maps have been interpreted on the basis of the Dynamic Materials Model (DMM). [3] The MMC exhibited a domain of superplasticity in the temperature range of 450 °C to 550 °C and at strain rates less than 0.1 s-1. At 500 °C and 1 s-1 strain rate, the MMC undergoes dynamic recrystallization (DRX), resulting in a reconstitution of microstructure. In comparison with the map for the matrix material, the DRX domain occurred at a strain rate higher by three orders of magnitude. At temperatures lower than 400 °C, the MMC exhibited dynamic recovery, while at 550 °C and 1 s-1, cracking occurred at the prior particle boundaries (representing surfaces of the initial powder particles). The optimum temperature and strain-rate combination for billet conditioning of the MMC is 500 °C and 1 s-1, while secondary metalworking may be done in the super- plasticity domain. The MMC undergoes microstructural instability at temperatures lower than 400 °C and strain rates higher than 0.1 s-1.

  4. Hot-Dip Galvanizing Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Richard F.

    1987-08-01

    Activity in the development of hotdip galvanizing alloys has been quite successful in achieving two major goals. First, the use of a zinc-nickel bath provides a workable solution to the problem of batch galvanizing reactive steels, to achieve both an attractive surface appearance and a thin, durable and protective coating. Second, for continuously galvanized steel products, specific zinc-aluminum alloys have provided a means to greatly increase corrosion resistance, increase the maximum use temperature of zinc coatings, achieve the fabrication of severely formed products without damage to the zinc alloy coating, and allow such products to be formed from prepainted as well as unpointed coated steel.

  5. High temperature oxidation and sodium chloride-induced accelerated corrosion of hot-dip aluminized 9chromium-1molybdenum and 310 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, Charng-Cheng

    The behaviors of high temperature corrosion on hot-dip aluminized on 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steels when catalyzed by NaCl and cyclic heating environment were studied experimentally. The corrosion behavior and morphological development were investigated by weight gain kinetics, metallographs, depths of attack, metal losses, and X-ray analyses. The results of 310SS deposited with salt mixtures show that weight gain kinetics in simple oxidation reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law after 3 hr, while the kinetics with salt deposits display multi-stage growth rates. NaCl is the main corrosive specie in high-temperature corrosion involving mixtures of NaCl/Na2SO 4 and is responsible for the formation of internal attack. Uniform internal attack is the typical morphology of NaCl-induced hot corrosion, while the extent of intergranular attack is more pronounced as the content of Na 2SO4 in the mixture is increased. The thermal-cycling test results of 310SS deposited NaCl and coated 7wt%Si/93wt%Al show that the aluminized layers have good corrosion resistance during the first four cycles of testing, while degradation occurs after testing for five cycles. The reason for degradation of aluminized layers is attributed to the formation of inter-connecting voids caused by aluminum inward diffusion, chloridation/oxidation cyclic reactions and the penetration of molten NaCl through the voids into the alloy substrate. The 9Cr-1Mo steels coated with 7wt%Si/93wt%Al oxidized at 750, 850, and 950°C in static air show that oxidation kinetics followed a parabolic rate law at 750 and 850°C. The cracks propagated through the Fex Aly layer due to the growth of brittle FeAl2 and Fe2Al5 at 750 and 850°C. The voids condensed in the interface of intermetallics and substrate are attributed to the Kirkendall effect. At 950°C, the fast growing aluminide layer has a different expansion coefficient than oxide scale, leading to scale cracking, oxygen penetration, and internal oxidized

  6. TWRS tank waste pretreatment process development hot test siting report

    SciTech Connect

    Howden, G.F.; Banning, D.L.; Dodd, D.A.; Smith, D.A.; Stevens, P.F.; Hansen, R.I.; Reynolds, B.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the sixth in a series that have assessed the hot testing requirements for TWRS pretreatment process development and identified the hot testing support requirements. This report, based on the previous work, identifies specific hot test work packages, matches those packages to specific hot cell facilities, and provides recommendations of specific facilities to be employed for the pretreatment hot test work. Also identified are serious limitations in the tank waste sample retrieval and handling infrastructure. Recommendations are provided for staged development of 500 mL, 3 L, 25 L and 4000 L sample recovery systems and specific actions to provide those capabilities.

  7. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  8. Large-area sol-gel highly-reflective coatings processed by the dipping technique

    SciTech Connect

    Belleville, P.; Pegon, P.

    1997-12-01

    The Centre d`Etudes de Limeil-Valenton is currently involved in a project which consists of the construction of a 2 MJ/500TW (351-nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser devoted to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. With 240 laser beams, the proposed megajoule-class laser conceptual design necessitates 44-cm x 2 44-cm x 6-cm cavity-end mirrors (1053-nm) representing more than 50-m{sup 2} of coated area. These dielectric mirrors are made of quaterwave stacks of SiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-PVP (PolyVinylPyrrolidone) and are prepared from colloidal suspensions (sols) using the sol-gel route. After a sustained search effort. we have prepared (SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}-PVP){sup 10} mirrored coatings with up to 99% reflection at 1053-nm and for different incidence use. Adequate laser-conditioned damage thresholds ranging 14 - 15 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053-nm wavelength and with 3-ns pulse duration were achieved. Large-area mirrors with good coating uniformity and weak edge-effect were produced by dip-coating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

  9. Hot cheese: a processed Swiss cheese model.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Thimbleby, H

    2014-01-01

    James Reason's classic Swiss cheese model is a vivid and memorable way to visualise how patient harm happens only when all system defences fail. Although Reason's model has been criticised for its simplicity and static portrait of complex systems, its use has been growing, largely because of the direct clarity of its simple and memorable metaphor. A more general, more flexible and equally memorable model of accident causation in complex systems is needed. We present the hot cheese model, which is more realistic, particularly in portraying defence layers as dynamic and active - more defences may cause more hazards. The hot cheese model, being more flexible, encourages deeper discussion of incidents than the simpler Swiss cheese model permits.

  10. THERMAL PROCESSES GOVERNING HOT-JUPITER RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-20

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (1) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (2) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (3) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (4) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more similar to isotropically irradiated models when there is more heat redistributed from the dayside to the nightside. In addition, we consider the efficacy of ohmic heating in the atmosphere and/or convective interior in inflating hot Jupiters. Among our conclusions are that (1) the most highly irradiated planets cannot stably have uB {approx}> 10 km s{sup -1} G over a large fraction of their daysides, where u is the zonal wind speed and B is the dipolar magnetic field strength in the atmosphere, and (2) that ohmic heating cannot in and of itself lead to a runaway in planet radius.

  11. Development of relational processing in hot and cool tasks.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Katie M; Andrews, Glenda

    2012-01-01

    The research investigated the role of complexity and the hot-cool distinction in cognitive development. The 120, 3- to 6-year-old children completed four hot tasks, which involved an affective component and three cool tasks, which did not. All tasks included binary- and ternary-relational items. Complexity was a major source of difficulty on all tasks, especially for younger children. Consistent with a hot-cool distinction, ternary-relational processing emerged earlier and more 4- and 5-year-olds mastered ternary-relational items in hot than cool tasks. Overall performance was better in hot than cool tasks at 4 years but this pattern was reversed at 6 years.

  12. Process for making ceramic hot gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  13. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Harrison, W. B.; Scott, M. W.; Hendrickson, G.; Wolner, H. A.; Nelson, L. D.; Schuller, T. L.; Peterson, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain polycrystalline silicon was investigated. The dip-coating methods studied were directed toward a minimum cost process with the ultimate objective of producing solar cells with a conversion efficiency of 10% or greater. The technique shows excellent promise for low cost, labor-saving, scale-up potentialities and would provide an end product of sheet silicon with a rigid and strong supportive backing. An experimental dip-coating facility was designed and constructed, several substrates were successfully dip-coated with areas as large as 25 sq cm and thicknesses of 12 micron to 250 micron. There appears to be no serious limitation on the area of a substrate that could be coated. Of the various substrate materials dip-coated, mullite appears to best satisfy the requirement of the program. An inexpensive process was developed for producing mullite in the desired geometry.

  14. Hot compression process for making edge seals for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Dunyak, Thomas J.; Granata, Jr., Samuel J.

    1994-01-01

    A hot compression process for forming integral edge seals in anode and cade assemblies wherein the assemblies are made to a nominal size larger than a finished size, beads of AFLAS are applied to a band adjacent the peripheral margins on both sides of the assemblies, the assemblies are placed in a hot press and compressed for about five minutes with a force sufficient to permeate the peripheral margins with the AFLAS, cooled and cut to finished size.

  15. Anode-supported micro-tubular SOFCs fabricated by a phase-inversion and dip-coating process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Changcheng; Liu, Mingfei; Yang, Lei; Liu, Meilin

    2011-03-09

    A simple phase-inversion process is successfully combined with a dip-coating process to fabricate anode-supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several processing parameters were systematically investigated to optimize cell microstructure and performance, including the amount of pore former used in the support substrate and the number of electrolyte coatings. Single cells with ~240 μm thick NiO-YSZ support and 10 μm thick YSZ electrolyte were successfully fabricated, demonstrating peak power densities of 752 and 277 mW cm-2 at 800 and 600 °C, respectively, when a composite cathode consisting of La0.85Sr0.15MnO3 and Sm0.2Ce0.8O2-δ was used. This simple fabrication technique can be readily used for optimization of fuel cell microstructures and for cost-effective fabrication of high-performance SOFCs, potentially reducing the cost of SOFC technologies.

  16. Understanding the role of dip-coating process parameters in the mechanical performance of polymer-coated bioglass robocast scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Motealleh, Azadeh; Eqtesadi, Siamak; Perera, Fidel Hugo; Pajares, Antonia; Guiberteau, Fernando; Miranda, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The effect of different dip-coating variables-solvent, deposition temperature and polymer concentration-on the mechanical performance of polycaprolactone-coated 45S5 bioglass robocast scaffolds is systematically analyzed in this work. The reproducible geometry of the scaffolds produced by this additive manufacturing technique makes them an optimal model system and facilitates the analysis. The results suggest that the mechanical performance of the hybrid scaffolds is improved monotonically with polymer concentration, but this concentration cannot be increased indefinitely if the macroporosity interconnectivity, and thus the scaffold׳s capacity to promote tissue ingrowth, are to be preserved. An optimal concentration, and therefore viscosity (~1-4Pas in the present case), exists for any given set of process variables (scaffold geometry and material, polymer, solvent and process temperature) that yields coatings with optimal reinforcement and minimal reduction of scaffold functionality. Solvent and process temperature do not directly affect the strengthening provided by the polymeric coating. However they can determine the maximum concentration at the critical viscosity, and thereby the maximum achievable mechanical performance of the resulting hybrid scaffold. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Process window aware layout optimization using hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Sachiko; Kyoh, Suigen; Kotani, Toshiya; Inoue, Soichi

    2007-03-01

    The feasibility of Hot Spot Fixing (HSF) system in DfM flow is studied and reported. Hot spot fixing using process simulation is indispensable under low-k1 lithography process for logic devices with advanced design rule (DR). Hot spot such as pinching, bridging, line-end shortening will occur, mainly depending on local pattern context. Proper calibration of DR, mask data preparation (MDP), resolution enhancement technique (RET) and optical proximity effect correction (OPC) will reduce potential hot spots. However, pattern layout variety is so enormous that, even with most careful calibration of every process, unexpected potential hot spots are occasionally left in the design layout 1-2. OPC optimization is useful for maximizing common process margin, but it cannot expand individual pattern's process margin without modification of design layout. So, at an early design stage, hot spot extraction using lithography compliance check (LCC) and manual modification of design at hot spots will be a simple and useful method. The problem is that, it is difficult to determine how to modify layout in order to be consistent with DR, MDP/OPC rule. For proper layout modification, intimate knowledge of the entire process would be necessary, and moreover, the modification work often tends to be iterative, and thus time-consuming. Therefore, using our automated HSF system in the cell design stage and also the chip design stage is helpful for fixing design layout while avoiding fatal hot spot occurrence, with enough process margin and also with short turnaround time (TAT) 3-4. The basic system flow in the developed system is as follows; LCC extracts potential hot spots, and the hot spots are categorized by lithography error mode, grade, and surrounding context. And then, hot spot modification instructor, taking the surrounding situation into consideration, generates modification guide for every hot spot. Design data is automatically modified according to the instruction at every hot

  18. Investigation of hydrogeologic processes in a dipping layer structure - 2. Transport and biodegradation of organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfnes, E.; Breedveld, G. D.; Kinzelbach, W.; Aagaard, P.

    2004-04-01

    Numerical simulation tools have been used to study the dominating processes during transport of aromatic hydrocarbons in the unsaturated soil zone. Simulations were based on field observations at an experimental site located on a glacial delta plain with pronounced layered sedimentary structures. A numerical model for transport in the unsaturated zone, SWMS-3D, has been extended to incorporate coupled multispecies transport, microbial degradation following Monod kinetics and gas diffusive transport of oxygen and hydrocarbons. The flow field parameters were derived from previous work using nonreactive tracers. Breakthrough curves (BTC) from the hydrocarbon field experiment were used to determine sorption parameters and Monod kinetic parameters using a fitting procedure. The numerical simulations revealed that the assumption of homogeneous layers resulted in deviations from the field observations. The deviations were more pronounced with incorporation of reactive transport, compared with earlier work on nonreactive transport. To be able to model reasonable BTC, sorption had to be reduced compared to laboratory experiments. The initial biomass and the maximum utilisation rate could be adjusted to capture both the initial lag phase and the overall degradation rate. Nevertheless, local oxygen limitation is predicted by the model, which was not observed in the field experiment. Incorporation of evaporation and diffusive gas transport of the hydrocarbons did not significantly change the local oxygen demand. The main cause of the observed discrepancies between model and field are attributed to channelling as a result of small-scale heterogeneities such as biopores.

  19. Hot topics: Signal processing in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, James

    2002-05-01

    Signal processing represents a technology that provides the mechanism to extract the desired information from noisy acoustical measurement data. The desired result can range from extracting a single number like sound intensity level in the case of marine mammals to the seemingly impossible task of imaging the complex bottom in a hostile ocean environment. Some of the latest approaches to solving acoustical processing problems including sophisticated Bayesian processors in architectural acoustics, iterative flaw removal processing for non-destructive evaluation, time-reversal imaging for buried objects and time-reversal receivers in communications as well as some of the exciting breakthroughs using so-called blind processing techniques for deconvolution are discussed. Processors discussed range from the simple to the sophisticated as dictated by the particular application. It is shown how processing techniques are crucial to extracting the required information for success in the underlying application.

  20. Cooling system optimization analysis for hot forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoo, Bonyoung; Umezu, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Hot forming technology was developed to produce automotive panels having ultra-high tensile stress over 1500MPa. The elevated temperature corresponds with decreased flow stress and increased ductility. Furthermore, hot forming products have almost zero springback amounts. This advanced forming technology accelerates the needs for numerical simulations coupling with thermal-mechanical formulations. In the present study, 3-dimensional finite element analyses for hot forming processes are conducted using JSTAMP/NV and LS-DYNA considering cooling system. Special attention is paid to the optimization of cooling system using thermo-mechanical finite element analysis through the influence of various cooling parameters. The presented work shows an adequate cooling system functions and microstructural phase transformation material model together with a proper set of numerical parameters can give both efficient and accurate design insight in hot forming manufacturing process. JSTAMP/NV and LS-DYNA can become a robust combination set for complex hot forming analysis which needs thermo-mechanical and microstructural material modeling and various process modeling. The use of the new JSTAMP/NV function for multishot manufacturing process is shown good capabilities in cooling system evaluation. And the use of the advanced LS-DYNA microstructural phase transformation model is shown good evaluation results in martensite amount and Vickers hardness after quenching.

  1. ARCHITECTURAL FLOOR PLAN OF PROCESS AND ACCESS AREAS HOT PILOT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARCHITECTURAL FLOOR PLAN OF PROCESS AND ACCESS AREAS HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP-640). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0640-00-279-111679. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 8952-CPP-640-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Investigation on dip coating process by mathematical modeling of non-Newtonian fluid coating on cylindrical substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Mahyar; Pope, Michael A.; Hrymak, Andrew N.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model for the dip coating process has been developed for cylindrical geometries with non-Newtonian fluids. This investigation explores the effects of the substrate radius and hydrodynamic behavior of the non-Newtonian viscous fluid on the resulting thin film on the substrate. The coating fluid studied, Dymax 1186-MT, is a resin for fiber optics and used as a matrix to suspend 1 vol. % titanium dioxide particles. The coating substrate is a 100 μm diameter fiber optic diffuser. Ellis viscosity model is applied as a non-Newtonian viscous model for coating thickness prediction, including the influence of viscosity in low shear rates that occurs near the surface of the withdrawal film. In addition, the results of the Newtonian and power law models are compared with the Ellis model outcomes. The rheological properties and surface tension of fluids were analyzed and applied in the models and a good agreement between experimental and analytical solutions was obtained for Ellis model.

  3. Hot-Deformation Behavior and Hot-Processing Maps of AISI 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rong-Sheng; Jin, Miao; Guo, Bao-Feng; Liu, Xin-Gang; Chen, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The compressive deformation behaviors of 410 martensitic stainless steel were investigated on a Gleeble-1500 thermomechanical simulator, and the experimental stress-strain data were obtained. The measured flow stress was corrected for friction and temperature. A constitutive equation that accounts for the influence of strain was established, and the hot-processing maps at different strain were plotted. The microstructure evolution of the hot-deformation process was studied on the basis of microstructural observations at high temperatures. Phase-transformation experiments on 410 steel were conducted at high temperatures to elucidate the effects of temperature on the delta-ferrite content. The initial forging temperature and optimum process parameters were obtained on the basis of the processing map and the changes in the delta-ferrite content at high temperatures.

  4. Simulation of hot fragment conductive ignition processes of solid propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, K.K.; Hsieh, W.H.; Hsieh, K.C.; Miller, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed for characterizing the degree of vulnerability of various solid propellants. The model simulates the hot fragment conductive ignition (HFCI) experiments, employing hot inert particles in direct contact with solid propellant samples. The effect of binder chemistry on the ignition process is considered by including the temperature-dependent endothermic decomposition reaction of the binder. The mathematical model consists of governing equations for the hot particles, the propellant, and the foam layer formed by the liquefaction, pyrolysis, and decomposition of the propellant. To validate the theoretical model in the absence of the necessary chemical kinetic data, an ice melting and evaporation experiment was designed and conducted. These experiments simulate the conductive heating, melting, and evaporating processes of the HFCI experiments except the chemical reactions. Calculated results compare well with experimental data in temperature-time traces, spall particle sinking velocity, and displacement.

  5. FEM simulation of hot forging process to predict microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Hong; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Song, Hong-Wu; Cheng, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Two phase titanium alloy-TC11 alloy and Superalloy-IN718 alloy are being considered for high-temperature structural applications in aero-engine because of their excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties of their forgings are sensitive to the microstructure. Therefore, it is crucial to obtain a corresponding microstructure by controlling the hot working process. For the forging of TC11 alloy, the ingot break down in the subtransus region is an important process which acted as the primary role in the transformation of lamellar structure to equiaxed one as well as its poor formability because of lower deformation temperature. In this paper, the lamellar globularization kinetics and fracture behavior during forging are studied and modeled. For the hot forging of IN718 alloy. the grain size evolution is an important process. As the δ phase in the alloy can control grain growth through the strong pinning effect, the effect of δ phase on the microstructure evolution during hot working has been considered in this paper, and the microstructure evolution model has been established. As a applications, The lamellar globularization and fracture during the subtransus cogging process of large size TC11 alloy billet, and the microstructure development during the hot forging process of IN718 alloy turbine disk have been investigated commercial FE Software with user subroutines. The prediction results showed good agreement with the actual ones.

  6. 3 Surface water accumulation and subsequent drip loss for processed broiler carcasses subjected to a postchill water dip or spray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To estimate the potential residual carryover of antimicrobials, surface water accumulation and loss was measured for postchill carcasses either dipped or sprayed with water and allowed to drip for up to 5 min. In trials 1 and 2, 10 male broilers were slaughtered, and either soft or hard scalded, and...

  7. Harvest maturity, pre-cutting wash and post-processing dip to improve quality of fresh-cut carambola fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Arkin’ carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) fruit harvested at color break or full yellow stage were washed with or without an alkaline solution (pH 12), cut to 10 mm slices, dipped in calcium ascorbate (Ca ASA), ascorbic acid (ASA) or water, and packaged in perforated clamshells for up to 14 days sto...

  8. Triggering factor evolution and dynamic process simulation of the Formosa Highway dip-slope failure, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jen; Chiang, Yi-Lin; Chang, Ho-Shyang; Chang, Kuo-Jen

    2013-04-01

    Taiwan, due to the high seismicity and high annual rainfall, numerous landslides triggered every year and severe impacts affect the island. Accordingly, if the new-built construction does not take into account this threaten, tremendous disasters will occur. On April 25th 2010, Formosa Freeway dip-slope failure caused four deaths, resulted from artificial slope cutting and rock-bot supporting system weakening. This research integrates high resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and numerical simulation to evaluate the triggering mechanism and dynamic process of the landslide. First of all, to access the landslide geometry, the morphology of the event before and after landslide is constructed from high resolution DTM by means of aerial photos. The slid and the deposit volumes of the landslide are thus estimated accordingly. Only part of the surface of separation between slide block and slide slope is exposed. Based on the exposed planar strata/sliding surface, situated on the upper part of the slope, by means of extrapolating part of the plane to mimic the entire slide surface. From DTMs, the slide block is approximately 0.15 million cubic meters. The extrapolated planar surface serves as sliding surface for the numerical models. For numerical model preparation, the particle clusters produced by isotropic stress and the porosity are take into account. To ensure the production range should cover the entire slid mass from the source area, the particle clusters represent the slid block is been rotated, scaled and translated to the source area. Then, part of the particles are been eliminated if it is situated outside the upper and lower surface from the DTM before and after landslide. According to the geological map, the model of the particles to mimic the slide block can be divided into two parts: 1) the underneath interbedded sandstone and shale which may soften by water 2) the supposed upper layer composed of sandstone. Furthermore, set up a layer of particles to

  9. Dip-slope and Dip-slope Failures in Taiwan - a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.

    2011-12-01

    Taiwan is famous for dip-slope and dip-slope slides. Dip-slopes exist at many places in the fold-and-thrust belt of Taiwan. Under active cutting of stream channels and man-made excavations, a dip-slope may become unstable and susceptible for mass sliding. Daylight of a bedding parallel clay seam is the most dangerous type for dip-slope sliding. Buckling or shear-off features may also happen at toe of a long dip-slope. Besides, a dip-slope is also dangerous for shallow debris slides, if the slope angle is between 25 to 45 degrees and the debris (colluvium or slope wash) is thick (>1m). These unstable slopes may slide during a triggering event, earthquake or typhoon storm; or even slide without a triggering event, like the 2010 Tapu case. Initial buckling feature had been found in the dip-slope of the Feitsui arch dam abutment after detailed explorations. Shear-off feature have also been found in dip-slope located in right bank of the Nahua reservoir after field investigation and drilling. The Chiufengerhshan slide may also be shear-off type. On the other hand, the Tapu, the Tsaoling slides and others are of direct slide type. The Neihoo Bishan slide is a shallow debris slide on dip-slope. All these cases demonstrate the four different types of dip-slope slide. The hazard of a dip-slope should be investigated to cover these possible types of failure. The existence of bedding parallel clay seams is critical for the stability of a dip-slope, either for direct slide or buckling or shear-off type of failure, and is a hot point during investigation. Because, the stability of a dip-slope is changing with time, therefore, detailed explorations to including weathering and erosion rates are also very necessary to ensure the long-term stability of a dip-slope.

  10. Hot Forging of a Cladded Component by Automated GMAW Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad; Langlois, Laurent; Bigot, Régis

    2011-01-01

    Weld cladding is employed to improve the service life of engineering components by increasing corrosion and wear resistance and reducing the cost. The acceptable multi-bead cladding layer depends on single bead geometry. Hence, in first step, the relationship between input process parameters and the single bead geometry is studied and in second step a comprehensive study on multi bead clad layer deposition is carried out. This paper highlights an experimental study carried out to get single layer cladding deposited by automated Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process and to find the possibility of hot forming of the cladded work piece to get the final hot formed improved structure. GMAW is an arc welding process that uses an arc between a consumable electrode and the welding pool with an external shielding gas and the cladding is done by alongside deposition of weld beads. The experiments for single bead were conducted by varying the three main process parameters wire feed rate, arc voltage and welding speed while keeping other parameters like nozzle to work distance, shielding gas and its flow rate and torch angle constant. The effect of bead spacing and torch orientation on the cladding quality of single layer from the results of single bead deposition was studied. Effect of the dilution rate and nominal energy on the cladded layer hot bending quality was also performed at different temperatures.

  11. Stochastic behavior of cooling processes in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    de Oliveira, P.M.; Sa Martins, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    The collapse of structure effects observed in hot nuclei is interpreted in terms of a dynamic lattice model which describes the process of nucleon (clusters) evaporation from a hot nucleus, predicting the final mass distribution. Results are compared with experimental data for the {sup 10}B+{sup 9}Be and {sup 10}B+{sup 10}B reactions, and indicate that the structures observed in the low-energy mass distributions in both simulation and experiment are a consequence of the competition between the residual interactions and the thermalization dissipative process. As a characteristic feature of complex evolving systems, this competition leads to long term memory during the dissipative path, the observables becoming thus insensitive to the actual microscopic interactions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Residence time modeling of hot melt extrusion processes.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Elena; Podhaisky, Helmut; Ely, David; Thommes, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The hot melt extrusion process is a widespread technique to mix viscous melts. The residence time of material in the process frequently determines the product properties. An experimental setup and a corresponding mathematical model were developed to evaluate residence time and residence time distribution in twin screw extrusion processes. The extrusion process was modeled as the convolution of a mass transport process described by a Gaussian probability function, and a mixing process represented by an exponential function. The residence time of the extrusion process was determined by introducing a tracer at the extruder inlet and measuring the tracer concentration at the die. These concentrations were fitted to the residence time model, and an adequate correlation was found. Different parameters were derived to characterize the extrusion process including the dead time, the apparent mixing volume, and a transport related axial mixing. A 2(3) design of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of powder feed rate, screw speed, and melt viscosity of the material on the residence time. All three parameters affect the residence time of material in the extruder. In conclusion, a residence time model was developed to interpret experimental data and to get insights into the hot melt extrusion process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Process and equipment development for hot isostatic pressing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Ken; Wahlquist, Dennis; Malewitz, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), LLC, has developed processes and equipment for a pilot-scale hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatability study to stabilize and volume reduce radioactive calcine stored at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy signed a Record of Decision with the state of Idaho selecting HIP technology as the method to treat 5,800 yd^3 (4,400 m^3) of granular zirconia and alumina calcine produced between 1953 and 1992 as a waste byproduct of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Since the 1990s, a variety of radioactive and hazardous waste forms have been remotely treated using HIP within INL hot cells. To execute the remote process at INL, waste is loaded into a stainless-steel or aluminum can, which is evacuated, sealed, and placed into a HIP furnace. The HIP simultaneously heats and pressurizes the waste, reducing its volume and increasing its durability. Two 1 gal cans of calcine waste currently stored in a shielded cask were identified as candidate materials for a treatability study involving the HIP process. Equipment and materials for cask-handling and calcine transfer into INL hot cells, as well as remotely operated equipment for waste can opening, particle sizing, material blending, and HIP can loading have been designed and successfully tested. These results demonstrate BEA’s readiness for treatment of INL calcine.

  14. Experimental Validation for Hot Stamping Process by Using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzi Zamri, Mohd; Lim, Syh Kai; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demand for reduction in gas emissions, energy saving and producing safer vehicles has driven the development of Ultra High Strength Steel (UHSS) material. To strengthen UHSS material such as boron steel, it needed to undergo a process of hot stamping for heating at certain temperature and time. In this paper, Taguchi method is applied to determine the appropriate parameter of thickness, heating temperature and heating time to achieve optimum strength of boron steel. The experiment is conducted by using flat square shape of hot stamping tool with tensile dog bone as a blank product. Then, the value of tensile strength and hardness is measured as response. The results showed that the lower thickness, higher heating temperature and heating time give the higher strength and hardness for the final product. In conclusion, boron steel blank are able to achieve up to 1200 MPa tensile strength and 650 HV of hardness.

  15. Preparation and Properties of Double-Sided AgNWs/PVC/AgNWs Flexible Transparent Conductive Film by Dip-Coating Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cui-yu; Jing, Mao-xiang; Pi, Zhi-chao; Zhu, Sheng-wen; Shen, Xiang-qian

    2015-08-01

    The double-sided transparent conductive films of AgNWs/PVC/AgNWs using the silver nanowires and PVC substrate were fabricated by the dip-coating process followed by mechanical press treatment. The morphological and structural characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), the photoelectric properties and mechanical stability were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) spectrophotometer, four-point probe technique, 3M sticky tape test, and cyclic bending test. The results indicate that the structure and photoelectric performances of the AgNWs films were mainly affected by the dipping and lifting speeds. At the optimized dipping speed of 50 mm/min and lifting speed of 100 mm/min, the AgNWs are evenly distributed on the surface of the PVC substrate, and the sheet resistance of AgNWs film on both sides of PVC is about 60 Ω/sq, and the optical transmittance is 84.55 % with the figure of merit value up to 35.8. The film treated with the 10 MPa pressure shows excellent adhesion and low surface roughness of 17.8 nm and maintains its conductivity with the sheet resistance change of 17 % over 10,000 cyclic bends.

  16. Preparation and Properties of Double-Sided AgNWs/PVC/AgNWs Flexible Transparent Conductive Film by Dip-Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cui-Yu; Jing, Mao-Xiang; Pi, Zhi-Chao; Zhu, Sheng-Wen; Shen, Xiang-Qian

    2015-12-01

    The double-sided transparent conductive films of AgNWs/PVC/AgNWs using the silver nanowires and PVC substrate were fabricated by the dip-coating process followed by mechanical press treatment. The morphological and structural characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), the photoelectric properties and mechanical stability were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) spectrophotometer, four-point probe technique, 3M sticky tape test, and cyclic bending test. The results indicate that the structure and photoelectric performances of the AgNWs films were mainly affected by the dipping and lifting speeds. At the optimized dipping speed of 50 mm/min and lifting speed of 100 mm/min, the AgNWs are evenly distributed on the surface of the PVC substrate, and the sheet resistance of AgNWs film on both sides of PVC is about 60 Ω/sq, and the optical transmittance is 84.55 % with the figure of merit value up to 35.8. The film treated with the 10 MPa pressure shows excellent adhesion and low surface roughness of 17.8 nm and maintains its conductivity with the sheet resistance change of 17 % over 10,000 cyclic bends.

  17. Atomic processes in the hot gas in our galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2017-03-01

    Our galaxy contains vast regions of very hot, very low density plasma that provide scientists with unique opportunities to observe atomic processes in extreme conditions. With temperatures of ˜ 105 to ˜ 106 K, the atoms in these regions are ionized to high charge states. Collisional ionization and excitation dominate the atomic physics in the interiors of these regions, and charge exchange becomes important where the highly ionized gas borders cool gas. Examples of very hot regions include the bubbles blown by supernova explosions and the interstellar gas above and below the disk of our galaxy. Examples of charge exchange sites include the heliosphere, supernova shock fronts, and high velocity clouds. Highly ionized plasmas are primarily studied via ultraviolet and X-ray observations using telescopes mounted on satellites, rockets, or space shuttles. Observations have been made of both the emitted spectrum and the number of ions along a path. The sensitivity and spectral resolution of the observing instruments have already reached the stage where some individual transitions can be detected, even in weak plasmas. Where the spectrum is crowded with emission lines from multiple elements, ionization levels, and transitions, spectral modeling is performed in order to estimate the contribution from each. The goal of this paper is to provide examples of interesting atomic physics occurring in our galaxy especially that in the hot component of our galaxy, highlight some areas where new atomic calculations and measurements are needed, and explain how astrophysical atomic transitions are observed.

  18. Fully automated hot embossing processes utilizing high resolution working stamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinsner, T.; Veres, T.; Kreindl, G.; Roy, E.; Morton, K.; Wieser, T.; Thanner, C.; Treiblmayr, D.; Miller, R.; Lindner, P.

    2010-03-01

    Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) is a high throughput replication technology for structures ranging from micrometer down to few nanometers. NIL can be divided into UV-Nanoimprint (UV-NIL) and Hot embossing (HE). The main difference between these two techniques are the material types of both template and resist, i.e transparent templates and photosensitive resists for UV-NIL and non transparent templates and thermoplastic resists for HE. Hot embossing is a low-cost, high throughput fabrication technique of disposable, polymer based devices needed for emerging point-of care diagnostic or bio-sensing applications. This paper describes the technology for imprinting of polymer substrates as well as spin-on polymers by using soft working stamp materials on a fully automated hot embossing system, the EVGR750, built to use this rapid replication processes. Soft working stamps demonstrate the possibility to replicate both, high-aspect ratio features in thermoplastic materials as needed for microfluidic lab-on-chip applications as well as high resolution features down to 50 nm in polymers that can be used as templates for pattern transfer in the fabrication of plasmonic substrates for biosensing applications.

  19. Hot carrier transfer processes in nonstoichiometric titanium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Iles, Gail N.; Mole, Richard A.; Yu, Dehong; Wen, Xiaoming; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2017-08-01

    The absorber of the hot carrier solar cell (HCSC) needs to have a considerably reduced hot carrier thermalisation rate, in order to maintain the photo-generated hot carriers for enough time such that they can be extracted. The slow carrier cooling effect is predicted in materials in which the phononic band gap is sufficiently large to block the Klemens decay. Binary compounds with a large mass ratio between the constituent elements are likely to have large phononic band gap. Titanium hydride is one of these binary compounds that has the potential to become an absorber of the HCSC. Whilst a large phononic gap has been observed in stoichiometric TiH2, it has not been experimentally confirmed for hydrogen deficient TiH x (where x < 2). In this article, we report the phonon density of states of TiH1.65 measured using inelastic neutron scattering and presented to clearly show the phononic band gap. We also present the carrier thermalisation process of a TiH x (1< x <2) thin film by transient absorption, and estimate the carrier cooling time in this material.

  20. Influence of degassing on hot-melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saad M; Morott, Joseph T; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Tiwari, Roshan V; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Repka, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of degassing on an extrusion process, with respect to extrudate quality and drug release properties. Processed formulations were extruded with and without a degassing vent port at various locations along the barrel. All the experiments were performed under constant processing temperature, feeding rate, and screw speed. During the extrusion process, torque and pressure were monitored and recorded. The degassing process was beneficial when used over a conveying section after a mixing section. This is attributed to the large surface area available on the conveying elements, which minimizes the internal volume of the processed material, thereby facilitating the escape of entrapped gases. Degassing enhanced the homogeneity, physical appearance, and drug release properties of all the formulations. Furthermore, the degassing process also enhanced the cross-sectional uniformity of the extruded material, which is beneficial for visual monitoring during processing. Degassing considerably reduced the post-extrusion moisture content of Formula D3, which contains the highly hygroscopic polymer Kollidon® 17 PF, suggesting that the greatest influence of this process is on hygroscopic materials. The reduction in post-extrusion moisture content resulting from the inclusion of a degassing vent port, reduced fluctuations in the values of in-line monitoring parameters such as pressure and torque. Employing a degassing unit during hot-melt extrusion processing could help increase process efficacy and product quality.

  1. Hot blast stove process model and model-based controller

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Howse, J.W.; Hansen, G.A.; Cagliostro, D.J.; Chaubal, P.C.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed and verified using plant data. This model is used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The model is also used to predict maximum and minimum temperature constraint violations within the stove so that the controller can take corrective actions while still achieving the required stove performance.

  2. Microstructure and Thickness of 55 pct Al-Zn-1.6 pct Si-0.2 pct RE Hot-Dip Coatings: Experiment, Thermodynamic, and First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangxin; Zhang, Jieyu; Li, Qian; Chou, Kuochih; Wu, Xiaochun

    2012-02-01

    The microstructure and thickness of 55 pct A1-Zn-1.6 pct Si-0.2 pct RE coatings during continuous hot-dip on Q235 steel were investigated in this work. The experimental results revealed that the intermetallic layer was composed of the Fe2Al5, FeAl3, and α-FeAlSi phases. The results of thermodynamic calculations with Pandat software package (CompuTherm, LLC, Madison, WI) indicated that FeAl3 and α( β)-FeAlSi phase precipitated during the period of temperature cooling, which was consistent with experimental result. Then, the thickness of intermetallic layer was characterized. It was shown that the thickness of intermetallic layer decreased after 0.2 wt pct RE was added. Finally, a first-principles calculation was performed to interpret the effect mechanism of RE on the thickness of intermetallic layer. The results indicated that La substitution in Fe2Al5 and FeAl3 phases could grab electronic charges from Al atoms and weaken the formation of Fe-Al compounds.

  3. The influence of Si addition in 55AlZn bath on the coating structures obtained in the batch hot-dip metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendala, J.

    2011-05-01

    One of the methods of increasing the corrosion resistance of zinc coatings is the application of zinc and aluminium alloy baths in the metallization process. The coatings obtained are characterized by much better corrosion resistance thanks to the combination of aluminium properties, i.e. the barrier protection provided by naturally created aluminium oxides, with the capacity to protect the steel substrate, which is characteristic of zinc coatings. Zinc coatings with 55 wt. % Al and an addition of Si have gained industrial importance. The introduction of a third alloying component into the metallization bath is a technological addition, the aim of which is to reduce and possibly inhibit the aluminium diffusion towards the substrate. The article presents the results of the examination of coatings obtained in a 55AlZn bath at varied parameters of the technological process, as well as the specification of silicon addition influence on the structure and chemical composition of the coatings, and on the kinetics of growth. The coatings were obtained in three temperatures: 620, 640 and 660°C, and the process was conducted in a 55 wt. % Al bath with Si content of 0, 0.8 and 1.6 wt. % respectively, the remaining content was Zn. For the purposes of evaluating the microstructure and thickness of the coatings obtained, examinations on a light microscope were conducted. In order to determine the chemical composition of the coatings obtained, an EDS analysis was conducted. Quantitative examination of the chemical composition was carried out on the selected cross-sections of samples with coatings considered to be representative ones, using a SEM with a microanalysis system. Moreover, the linear distribution of elements on the cross-sections of the chosen coatings was determined. It is possible to state that the addition of silicon to 55AlZn baths allows reducing the uncontrolled growth of a layer. The layers obtained are more uniform, continuous and they show good adhesion to

  4. High-pressure combinatorial process integrating hot isostatic pressing.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kenjiro; Morita, Hiroki; Goshima, Yuji; Ito, Shigeru

    2013-12-09

    A high-pressure combinatorial process integrating hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was developed by providing a reaction vessel with a high-pressure tightness based on a commercial flange. The reaction vessel can be used up to 200 MPa and 500 °C under HIP processing condition. Preparation of spinel-type MgAl2O4 from Mg(OH)2, Al(OH)3 and AlOOH was performed using the reaction vessel under 200 MPa and 500 °C as demonstration. The entire powder library was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction patterns, and the single phase of spinel-type MgAl2O4 was obtained from Mg(OH)2+Al(OH)3. These assessments corresponded with previously published data.

  5. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-10-14

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to development of an advanced hot-gas process that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur

  6. Dynamic Simulation of the Tailing Process in Hot Finishing Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shinil; Lu, Cheng; Du, Xiaozhong; Tieu, Anh Kiet

    In this paper an explicit dynamic finite element method model has been developed to investigate the strip deformation behavior between two adjacent stands in hot finishing mill. The effect of the roll speed ratio of second stand to first stand on tension and the tailing behavior of the strip has been discussed in details. It has been found that the strip accumulation occurs if the roll speed ratio is small. The tensile stress increases with the roll speed ratio. During the tailing process the accumulated strip caused by the small roll speed ratios knocks onto the roll, while the swing of the strip tail occurs for the large roll speed ratios and it strikes the roll as well. Both tailing phenomena will result in the strip tail pincher or roll damage in the real operation.

  7. Enhancement of the triple alpha process in hot, dense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Austin, Sam M.; Cyburt, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The triple alpha process plays a particularly important role in nuclear astrophysics, bridging the A =5 and A =8 stability gaps, producing 12C. The reaction itself proceeds via the 0 + (Hoyle) resonance at 7.65 MeV in 12C, at a rate proportional to the radiative width of the state. For sufficiently hot and dense environments, the rate of the triple alpha reaction is significantly enhanced by hadronic inelastic scattering that de-excites the Hoyle state. We present theoretical calculations for the enhancement of the triple alpha rate based on inelastic n, p and alpha cross sections. For comparable densities, neutrons play the largest role. NSCL PHY11-02511, JINA-CEE PHY14-30152.

  8. The Process of Thinking among Junior High School Students in Solving HOTS Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakry, Md Nor Bin Bakar

    2015-01-01

    Higher order thinking skills (HOTS) is one of the important aspect of teaching and learning mathematics. By using HOTS, student will be able to acquire a deep understand of mathematical concepts and can be applied in real life. Students ability to develop the capacity of the HOTS is closely related with thinking processes while solving mathematics…

  9. Contaminated Metal Components in Dismantling by Hot Cutting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cesari, Franco G.; Conforti, Gianmario; Rogante, Massimo; Giostri, Angelo

    2006-07-01

    During the preparatory dismantling activities of Caorso's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), an experimental campaign using plasma and oxyacetylene metal cutting processes has been performed and applied to plates and tubes exposed to the coolant steam of the reactor. The plant (Boiling Water Reactor, 870 MWe) was designed and built in the 70's, and it was fully operating by 1981 to 1986 being shut down after 1987 Italy's poll that abrogated nuclear power based on U235 fission. The campaign concerns no activated materials, even if the analyses have been performed of by use contaminated components under the free release level, not yet taking into account radioactivity. In this paper, the parameters related to inhalable aerosol, solid and volatile residuals production have been, studied during hot processes which applies the same characteristics of the cutting in field for the dismantling programs of Caorso NPP. The technical parameters such as cutting time and cutting rate vs. pipe diameter/thickness/schedule or plate thickness for ferritic alloys and the emissions composition coming from the sectioning are also reported. The results underline the sort of trouble that can emerge in the cutting processes, in particular focusing on the effects comparison between the two cutting processes and the chemical composition of powders captured by filtering the gaseous emission. Some preliminary considerations on methodology to be used during the dismantling have been presented. (authors)

  10. Abduction of Toe-excavation Induced Failure Process from LEM and FDM for a Dip Slope with Rock Anchorage in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-S.; Lin, M.-L.; Liu, H.-C.; Lin, H.-H.

    2012-04-01

    On April 25, 2010, without rainfall and earthquake triggering a massive landslide (200000 m3) covered a 200m stretch of Taiwan's National Freeway No. 3, killing 4 people, burying three cars and destroying a bridge. The failure mode appears to be a dip-slope type failure occurred on a rock anchorage cut slope. The strike of Tertiary sedimentary strata is northeast-southwest and dip 15˚ toward southeast. Based on the investigations of Taiwan Geotechnical Society, there are three possible factors contributing to the failure mechanism as follow:(1) By toe-excavation during construction in 1998, the daylight of the sliding layer had induced the strength reduction in the sliding layer. It also caused the loadings of anchors increased rapidly and approached to their ultimate capacity; (2) Although the excavated area had stabilized soon with rock anchors and backfills, the weathering and groundwater infiltration caused the strength reduction of overlying rock mass; (3) The possible corrosion and age of the ground anchors deteriorate the loading capacity of rock anchors. Considering the strength of sliding layer had reduced from peak to residual strength which was caused by the disturbance of excavation, the limit equilibrium method (LEM) analysis was utilized in the back analysis at first. The results showed the stability condition of slope approached the critical state (F.S.≈1). The efficiency reduction of rock anchors and strength reduction of overlying stratum (sandstone) had been considered in following analysis. The results showed the unstable condition (F.S. <1). This research also utilized the result of laboratory test, geological strength index(GSI) and finite difference method (FDM, FLAC 5.0) to discuss the failure process with the interaction of disturbance of toe-excavation, weathering of rock mass, groundwater infiltration and efficiency reduction of rock anchors on the stability of slope. The analysis indicated that the incremental load of anchors have

  11. Advanced hot gas cleaning system for coal gasification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, R. A.; Bannister, R. L.

    1994-04-01

    The United States electric industry is entering a period where growth and the aging of existing plants will mandate a decision on whether to repower, add capacity, or do both. The power generation cycle of choice, today, is the combined cycle that utilizes the Brayton and Rankine cycles. The combustion turbine in a combined cycle can be used in a repowering mode or in a greenfield plant installation. Today's fuel of choice for new combined cycle power generation is natural gas. However, due to a 300-year supply of coal within the United States, the fuel of the future will include coal. Westinghouse has supported the development of coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past thirty years. Working with the U.S. Department of Energy and other organizations, Westinghouse is actively pursuing the development and commercialization of several coal-fueled processes. To protect the combustion turbine and environment from emissions generated during coal conversion (gasification/combustion) a gas cleanup system must be used. This paper reports on the status of fuel gas cleaning technology and describes the Westinghouse approach to developing an advanced hot gas cleaning system that contains component systems that remove particulate, sulfur, and alkali vapors. The basic process uses ceramic barrier filters for multiple cleaning functions.

  12. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    2000-04-17

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

  13. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-04-26

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3% of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to development of optimized low-cost zinc-oxide-based sorbents for Sierra-Pacific. The sorbent surface were modified to prevent

  14. Investigation of the beryllia ceramics molding process by the hot casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Sattinova, Z. K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of mathematical simulation of the ceramics molding process by the hot casting method are presented. The mathematical model describes the motion of beryllia liquid thermoplastic slurry in a form-building cavity subject to solidification. Velocity and temperature profiles providing homogeneous properties of the beryllia ceramics in the process of molding by the hot casting method are obtained.

  15. Iterative dip-steering median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Shoudong; Zhu, Weihong; Shi, Taikun

    2017-09-01

    Seismic data are always contaminated with high noise components, which present processing challenges especially for signal preservation and its true amplitude response. This paper deals with an extension of the conventional median filter, which is widely used in random noise attenuation. It is known that the standard median filter works well with laterally aligned coherent events but cannot handle steep events, especially events with conflicting dips. In this paper, an iterative dip-steering median filter is proposed for the attenuation of random noise in the presence of multiple dips. The filter first identifies the dominant dips inside an optimized processing window by a Fourier-radial transform in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The optimum size of the processing window depends on the intensity of random noise that needs to be attenuated and the amount of signal to be preserved. It then applies median filter along the dominant dip and retains the signals. Iterations are adopted to process the residual signals along the remaining dominant dips in a descending sequence, until all signals have been retained. The method is tested by both synthetic and field data gathers and also compared with the commonly used f-k least squares de-noising and f-x deconvolution.

  16. Deformation processes at the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone: The example of Shimanto accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzin, G.; Raimbourg, H.; Famin, V.; Jolivet, L.; Kusaba, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In order to constrain deformation processes close to the brittle-ductile transition in seismogenic zone, we have carried out a microstructural study in the Shimanto accretionary complex (Japan), the fossil equivalent of modern Nankai accretionary prisms. The Hyuga Tectonic Mélange was sheared along the plate interface at mean temperatures of 245 °C ± 30 °C, as estimated by Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material (RSCM). It contains strongly elongated quartz ribbons, characterized by very high fluid inclusions density, as well as micro-veins of quartz. Both fluid inclusion planes and micro-veins are preferentially developed orthogonal to the stretching direction. Furthermore, crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of quartz c-axes in the ribbons has maxima parallel to the stretching direction. Recrystallization to a small grain size is restricted to rare deformation bands cutting across the ribbons. In such recrystallized quartz domains, CPO of quartz c-axes are orthogonal to foliation plane. The evolution of deformation micro-processes with increasing temperature can be further analyzed using the Foliated Morotsuka, a slightly higher-grade metamorphic unit (342 ± 30 °C by RSCM) from the Shimanto accretionary complex. In this unit, in contrast to Hyuga Tectonic Mélange, recrystallization of quartz veins is penetrative. CPO of quartz c-axes is concentrated perpendicularly to foliation plane. These variations in microstructures and quartz crystallographic fabric reflect a change in the dominant deformation mechanism with increasing temperatures: above 300 °C, dislocation creep is dominant and results in intense quartz dynamic recrystallization. In contrast, below 300 °C, quartz plasticity is not totally activated and pressure solution is the major deformation process responsible for quartz ribbons growth. In addition, the geometry of the quartz ribbons with respect to the phyllosilicate-rich shear zones shows that bulk rheology is controlled by

  17. A controlled wet-spinning and dip-coating process for preparation of high-permeable TiO2 hollow fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Hua; Fan, Xinfei; Chen, Shuo; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the permeate flux of photocatalytic membranes, we present an approach for coupling TiO2 with ceramic hollow fiber membranes. The ceramic hollow fiber membranes with high permeate flux were fabricated by a controlled wet-spinning process using polyethersulfone (PESf) and ceramic powder as precursors and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone as solvent, and the subsequent TiO2 coating was performed by a dip-coating process using tetra-n-butyl titanate as precursor. It has been found that the PESf/ceramic powder ratio could influence the structure of the membranes. Here the as-prepared TiO2 hollow fiber membranes had a pure water flux of 4,450 L/(m(2)·h). The performance of the TiO2 hollow fiber membrane was evaluated using humic acid (HA) as a test substance. The results demonstrated that this membrane exhibited a higher permeate flux under UV irradiation than in the dark and the HA removal efficiency was enhanced. The approach described here provides an operable route to the development of high-permeable photocatalytic membranes for water treatment.

  18. Tackling a Hot Paradox: Laminar Soot Processes-2 (LSP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, Gerard M.; Urban, David L.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last place you want to be in traffic is behind the bus or truck that is belching large clouds of soot onto your freshly washed car. Besides looking and smelling bad, soot is a health hazard. Particles range from big enough to see to microscopic and can accumulate in the lungs, potentially leading to debilitating or fatal lung diseases. Soot is wasted energy, and therein lies an interesting paradox: Soot forms in a flame's hottest regions where you would expect complete combustion and no waste. Soot enhances the emissions of other pollutants (carbon monoxide and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) from flames and radiates unwanted heat to combustion chambers (a candle's yellowish glow is soot radiating heat), among other effects. The mechanisms of soot formation are among the most important unresolved problems of combustion science because soot affects contemporary life in so many ways. Although we have used fire for centuries, many fundamental aspects of combustion remain elusive, in part because of limits imposed by the effects of gravity on Earth. Hot or warm air rises quickly and draws in fresh cold air behind it, thus giving flames the classical teardrop shape. Reactions occur in a very small zone, too fast for scientists to observe, in detail, what is happening inside the flame. The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP-2) experiments aboard STS-107 will use the microgravity environment of space to eliminate buoyancy effects and thus slow the reactions inside a flame so they can be more readily studied. 'Laminar' means a simple, smooth fuel jet burning in air, somewhat like a butane lighter. This classical flame approximates combustion in diesel engines, aircraft jet propulsion engines, and furnaces and other devices. LSP-2 will expand on surprising results developed from its first two flights in 1997. The data suggest the existence of a universal relationship, the soot paradigm, that, if proven, will be used to model and control combustion systems on Earth. STS-107

  19. Tackling a Hot Paradox: Laminar Soot Processes-2 (LSP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, Gerard M.; Urban, David L.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last place you want to be in traffic is behind the bus or truck that is belching large clouds of soot onto your freshly washed car. Besides looking and smelling bad, soot is a health hazard. Particles range from big enough to see to microscopic and can accumulate in the lungs, potentially leading to debilitating or fatal lung diseases. Soot is wasted energy, and therein lies an interesting paradox: Soot forms in a flame's hottest regions where you would expect complete combustion and no waste. Soot enhances the emissions of other pollutants (carbon monoxide and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) from flames and radiates unwanted heat to combustion chambers (a candle's yellowish glow is soot radiating heat), among other effects. The mechanisms of soot formation are among the most important unresolved problems of combustion science because soot affects contemporary life in so many ways. Although we have used fire for centuries, many fundamental aspects of combustion remain elusive, in part because of limits imposed by the effects of gravity on Earth. Hot or warm air rises quickly and draws in fresh cold air behind it, thus giving flames the classical teardrop shape. Reactions occur in a very small zone, too fast for scientists to observe, in detail, what is happening inside the flame. The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP-2) experiments aboard STS-107 will use the microgravity environment of space to eliminate buoyancy effects and thus slow the reactions inside a flame so they can be more readily studied. 'Laminar' means a simple, smooth fuel jet burning in air, somewhat like a butane lighter. This classical flame approximates combustion in diesel engines, aircraft jet propulsion engines, and furnaces and other devices. LSP-2 will expand on surprising results developed from its first two flights in 1997. The data suggest the existence of a universal relationship, the soot paradigm, that, if proven, will be used to model and control combustion systems on Earth. STS-107

  20. Organic acids and their salts as dipping solutions to control listeria monocytogenes inoculated following processing of sliced pork bologna stored at 4 degrees C in vacuum packages.

    PubMed

    Samelis, J; Sofos, J N; Kain, M L; Scanga, J A; Belk, K E; Smith, G C

    2001-11-01

    Postprocessing contamination of cured meats with Listeria monocytogenes has become a major concern for the meat processing industry and an important food safety issue. This study evaluated aqueous dipping solutions of organic acids (2.5 or 5% lactic or acetic acid) or salts (2.5 or 5% sodium acetate or sodium diacetate, 5 or 10% sodium lactate, 5% potassium sorbate or potassium benzoate) to control L. monocytogenes on sliced, vacuum-packaged bologna stored at 4 degrees C for up to 120 days. Organic acids and salts were applied by immersing (1 min) in each solution inoculated (10(2) to 10(3) CFU/cm2) slices of bologna before vacuum packaging. Growth of L. monocytogenes (PALCAM agar) on inoculated bologna slices without treatment exceeded 7 log CFU/cm2 (P < 0.05) at 20 days of storage. No significant (P > 0.05) increase in L. monocytogenes populations occurred on bologna slices treated with 2.5 or 5% acetic acid, 5% sodium diacetate, or 5% potassium benzoate from day 0 to 120. Products treated with 5% potassium sorbate and 5% lactic acid were stored for 50 and 90 days, respectively, before a significant (P < 0.05) increase in L. monocytogenes occurred. All other treatments permitted growth of the pathogen at earlier days of storage, with sodium lactate (5 or 10%) permitting growth within 20 to 35 days. Extent of bacterial growth on trypticase soy agar plus 0.6% yeast extract (TSAYE) was similar to that on PALCAM, indicating that the major part of total bacteria grown on TSAYE agar plates incubated at 30 degrees C was L. monocytogenes. Further studies are needed to evaluate organic acids and salts as dipping solutions at abusive temperatures of retail storage, to optimize their concentrations in terms of product sensory quality, and to evaluate their effects against various other types of microorganisms and on product shelf life. In addition, technologies for the commercial application of postprocessing antimicrobial solutions in meat plants need to be developed.

  1. Effect of oxygen content of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnet on grain boundary diffusion process of DyH2 dip-coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kyoung-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Rae; Kim, Hyo-Jun; Lee, Min-Woo; Jang, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the effect of oxygen content on the microstructural and magnetic properties of a DyH2 dip-coated Nd-Fe-B sintered magnet. When the magnet had a low oxygen content (1500 ppm), the volume and size of the rare-earth-rich oxide (Nd-Dy-O) phase was reduced, and a uniform and continuous thin Nd-rich grain boundary phase (GBP) was well developed. The grain boundary diffusion depth of Dy increased from 200 to 350 μm with decreasing oxygen content from ˜3000 to 1500 ppm. The coercivity of the low-oxygen magnet increased from 19.98 to 23.59 kOe after grain boundary diffusion process (GBDP) while the remanence reduction was minimized. The formation of an fcc-NdOx Nd-rich phase in the high-oxygen magnet hindered the formation of a Nd-rich triple-junction phase and GBP. In contrast, a metallic dhcp-Nd phase, which was closely related to coercivity enhancement after GBDP, was formed in the low-oxygen magnet.

  2. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.; Ricks, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and or wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities.

  3. Discussion of Carbon Emissions for Charging Hot Metal in EAF Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling-zhi; Jiang, Tao; Li, Guang-hui; Guo, Yu-feng

    2017-07-01

    As the cost of hot metal is reduced for iron ore prices are falling in the international market, more and more electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking enterprises use partial hot metal instead of scrap as raw materials to reduce costs and the power consumption. In this paper, carbon emissions based on 1,000 kg molten steel by charging hot metal in EAF steelmaking is studied. Based on the analysis of material and energy balance calculation in EAF, the results show that 146.9, 142.2, 137.0, and 130.8 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 %, while 143.4, 98.5, 65.81, and 31.5 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 % by using gas waste heat utilization (coal gas production) for EAF steelmaking unit process. However, carbon emissions are increased by charging hot metal for the whole blast furnace-electric arc furnace (BF-EAF) steelmaking process. In the condition that the hot metal produced by BF is surplus, as carbon monoxide in gas increased by charging hot metal, the way of coal gas production can be used for waste heat utilization, which reduces carbon emissions in EAF steelmaking unit process.

  4. Numerical Prediction of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties During the Hot Stamping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Dongbin; Liu, Lizhong; Hu, Ping; Ma, Ning; Shen, Guozhe; Han, Xiaoqiang; Ying, Liang

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulation and prediction of microstructures and mechanical properties of products is very important in product development of hot stamping parts. With this method we can easily design changes of hot stamping products' properties prior to the manufacturing stage and this offers noticeable time and cost savings. In the present work, the hot stamping process of a U-channel with 22MnB5 boron steels is simulated by using a coupled thermo-mechanical FEM program. Then with the temperature evolution results obtained from the simulation, a model is applied to predict the microstructure evolution during the hot stamping process and mechanical properties of this U-channel. The model consists of a phase transformation model and a mechanical properties prediction model. The phase transformation model which is proposed by Li et al is used to predict the austenite decomposition into ferrite, pearlite, and bainite during the cooling process. The diffusionless austenite-martensite transformation is modeled using the Koistinen and Marburger relation. The mechanical properties prediction model is applied to predict the products' hardness distribution. The numerical simulation is evaluated by comparing simulation results with the U-channel hot stamping experiment. The numerically obtained temperature history is basically in agreement with corresponding experimental observation. The evaluation indicates the feasibility of this set of methods to be used to guide the optimization of hot stamping process parameters and the design of hot stamping tools.

  5. Modeling heterogeneous high explosive burn with an explicit hot-spot process

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.; Johnson, J.N.; Forest, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    We present a method of treating high explosive burn with a multi-step process which includes the hot-spot excitation, decomposition, and the propagation of reaction into the region outside the hot spots. The basic features of this model are the separation of the thermal-mechanical and chemical processes, and the partition of the explosive into hot spots and the region exclusive of the hot spots. The thermal-mechanical aspects are formulated in a way similar to the chemical process. The combined processes lead to a set of rate equations for the mass fractions of reactants, intermediate states, and final products. The rates are expressed initially in terms of general characteristic times, but with specific phenomenological correlations introduced in the final model. Computational examples are given of simulated flyer plate impacts, short-shock initiation, corner turning, and shock desensitization. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Harrison, W. B.; Wolner, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The research program to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon is reported. The initial effort concentrated on the design and construction of the experimental dip-coating facility. The design was completed and its experimental features are discussed. Current status of the program is reported, including progress toward solar cell junction diffusion and miscellaneous ceramic substrate procurement.

  7. Deformation and Fracture Testing for Hot Working Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, G.; Kuhn, H. A.; Venkateshwar, R.

    1981-05-01

    A hot workability testing apparatus has been designed and constructed for determining flow stress and fracture of materials at elevated temperatures. The system is composed of four major elements: a closed-loop servo-controlled hydraulic testing machine with programmable and custom-made control components; a high temperature tooling and radiant heating furnace for isothermal test conditions; a test specimen transfer device for ease of testing and rapid quenching; and a computerized data acquisition and reduction system. Isothermal, homogeneous compression tests are performed for flow stress determination, while upset and bend tests are used for workability evaluation. Test temperatures to 1200°C may be achieved, along with constant strain rates up to 20s'1 for both compression and bend tests. Specimens can be quenched within 0.5-0.75s to permit the study of the microstructures developed during hot deformation. In both compression and bending, interrupted deformation schedules can be programmed. Change of rate tests to measure strain rate sensitivites are also possible. Capabilities of the system are illustrated by results obtained for the multiphase alloy MP35N (35% Co, 35% Ni, 20%o Cr, and 10% Mo).

  8. Investigation of surface parameters during hot air streaming turning process of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwari, Anayet U.; Habib, Mohammad Ahsan; Mahmud, Md. Firoz; Islam, Md. Minhazul

    2017-06-01

    Different types of coolant are widely used in different metal cutting processes to improve the machining responses. But the suitability of using the correct cutting fluid is very important considering the concept of green environment. In this study, hot air is used as an alternative approach for hot machining process and coolant. Hot air is considered to initially heat the work-piece for easy machining operation. In this study, two different velocities of hot air has been applied during the machining of mild steel in turning process and its effect is investigated in terms of surface roughness. With the variation of different process parameters, it has also been observed that surface roughness at different cutting conditions using hot air is improved significantly. A clear comparison has been made to investigate the responses of surface roughness at different cutting conditions in between the hot air and normal machining processes. This procedure may be used as an alternative approach in the dry cutting research in the days to come.

  9. Structure and Process of Infrared Hot Electron Transistor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Richard

    2012-01-01

    An infrared hot-electron transistor (IHET) 5 × 8 array with a common base configuration that allows two-terminal readout integration was investigated and fabricated for the first time. The IHET structure provides a maximum factor of six in improvement in the photocurrent to dark current ratio compared to the basic quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), and hence it improved the array S/N ratio by the same factor. The study also showed for the first time that there is no electrical cross-talk among individual detectors, even though they share the same emitter and base contacts. Thus, the IHET structure is compatible with existing electronic readout circuits for photoconductors in producing sensitive focal plane arrays. PMID:22778655

  10. Structure and process of infrared hot electron transistor arrays.

    PubMed

    Fu, Richard

    2012-01-01

    An infrared hot-electron transistor (IHET) 5 × 8 array with a common base configuration that allows two-terminal readout integration was investigated and fabricated for the first time. The IHET structure provides a maximum factor of six in improvement in the photocurrent to dark current ratio compared to the basic quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), and hence it improved the array S/N ratio by the same factor. The study also showed for the first time that there is no electrical cross-talk among individual detectors, even though they share the same emitter and base contacts. Thus, the IHET structure is compatible with existing electronic readout circuits for photoconductors in producing sensitive focal plane arrays.

  11. Surface water accumulation and subsquent drip loss for processed broiler carcasses subjected to a post-chill water dip or spray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To estimate the potential for residual antimicrobial solution carryover, surface water accumulation and loss was measured on post-chill carcasses that were either dipped or sprayed with water. For all experiments, broilers were slaughtered, soft scalded or hard scalded, defeathered, and eviscerated....

  12. Terrane daylight mapping on large dip-slope terrain based on high-resolution DTM and semi-automatic geoprocessing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Lang; Chan, Yu-Chang; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2015-04-01

    "Daylight" in slope engineering means a lineament appearing on the ground surface casued by a internal weak plane of a rock slope. The morphology of the daylight implies the free surface condition of the rock mass upper the weak plane, directly affecting the slope stability and safety. Traditionally, the reconnaissance of daylight employs field investigation and drillings in local dip slope area, but when mapping in large area, it would be subjected to vegetation cover and budget limitation to get a simply result not used for engineering applications. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a rapid and reliable mapping program based on high-resolution DTM, and to generate a large-scale daylight map for large dip slope area. The methodology can be divided into two phases: the first is re-mapping terrane boundary lineaments using LiDAR data and 3D GIS mapping technology; the second is automatically mapping daylight tracks by trend surface analysis and python scripts based on above terrane boundary lineaments. This study takes the area of Keelung River north bank, which is mainly cuesta topography, for an example. Recently, in the area, the frequency of dip slope landslide occurrence becomes more higher because of human development. One major reason to cause the daylight appearing on downslope is the slope toe cutting or river incision. Hereby, according to the final results of the daylight map, we can assess where the potential landsides dip slops are, and further differentiate three different risks of dip slope from the daylight's morphology, expecting to provide more detail engineering and geological information for furture engineering site selection and the design and application of disaster prevention.

  13. Process window limiting hot spot monitoring for high-volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochemsen, Marinus; Anunciado, Roy; Timoshkov, Vadim; Hunsche, Stefan; Zhou, Xinjian; Jones, Chris; Callan, Neal

    2016-03-01

    As process window margins for cutting edge DUV lithography continue to shrink, the impact of systematic patterning defects on final yield increases. Finding process window limiting hot spot patterns and monitoring them in high volume manufacturing (HVM) is increasingly challenging with conventional methods, as the size of critical defects can be below the resolution of traditional HVM inspection tools. We utilize a previously presented computational method of finding hot spot patterns by full chip simulation and use this to guide high resolution review tools by predicting the state of the hot spots on all fields of production wafers. In experiments with a 10nm node Metal LELELE vehicle we show a 60% capture rate of after-etch defects down to 3nm in size, at specific hot spot locations. By using the lithographic focus and dose correction knobs we can reduce the number of patterning defects for this test case by ~60%.

  14. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2011-05-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  15. Bulk processing of radionuclide generator parents at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk radionuclide processing at Los Alamos includes isotopes with short-lived radioactive daughter nuclides ('generator parents') for medical applications. The generator radionuclide parents {sup 68}Ge, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 88}Zr and {sup 109}Cd are regularly processed at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility. Nuclear chemical aspects related to the production and processing of these generator parents are briefly outlined.

  16. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    The project goal is to develop a numerical modeling capability to optimize the hot rolling process used to produce aluminum plate. This tool will be used in the forming process so that loss of product will be minimized. Product lost in the rolling process requires the energy-intensive steps of remelting and reforming into an ingot.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

    2000-12-01

    The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H{sub 2}S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H{sub 2}S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H{sub 2}S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur.

  18. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Harrison, W. B.; Wolner, H. A.; Hendrickson, G.; Nelson, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    To date, an experimental dip-coating facility was constructed. Using this facility, relatively thin (1 mm) mullite and alumina substrates were successfully dip-coated with 2.5 - 3.0 ohm-cm, p-type silicon with areas of approximately 20 sq cm. The thickness and grain size of these coatings are influenced by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is pulled from the melt. One mullite substrate had dendrite-like crystallites of the order of 1 mm wide and 1 to 2 cm long. Their axes were aligned along the direction of pulling. A large variety of substrate materials were purchased or developed enabling the program to commence a substrate definition evaluation. Due to the insulating nature of the substrate, the bottom layer of the p-n junction may have to be made via the top surface. The feasibility of accomplishing this was demonstrated using single crystal wafers.

  19. Simulation and analysis of hot forging process for industrial locking gear elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarefdoust, M.; Kadkhodayan, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper hot forging process for industrial locking gear elevators is simulated and analyzed. An increase in demand of industrial locking gear elevators with better quality and lower price caused the machining process to be replaced by hot forging process. Production of industrial locking gear elevators by means of hot forging process is affected by many parameters such as billet temperature, geometry of die and geometry of pre-formatted billet. In this study the influences of billet temperature on effective plastic strain, radius of die corners on internal stress of billet and thickness of flash on required force of press are investigated by means of computer simulation. Three-dimensional modeling of initial material and die are performed by Solid Edge, while simulation and analysis of forging are performed by Super Forge. Based on the computer simulation the required dies are designed and the workpieces are formed. Comparison of simulation results with experimental data demonstrates great compatibility.

  20. Extended Characterization of Chemical Processes in Hot Cells Using Environmental Swipe Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Thomas, M-L; Lepel, Elwood A.; Brunson, Ronald R.; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer

    2012-09-15

    Environmental sampling is used extensively by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verification of information from State declarations or a facility’s design regarding nuclear activities occurring within the country or a specific facility. Environmental sampling of hot cells within a facility under safeguards is conducted using 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm cotton swipe material or cellulose swipes. Traditional target analytes used by the IAEA to verify operations within a facility include a select list of gamma-emitting radionuclides and total and isotopic U and Pu. Analysis of environmental swipe samples collected within a hot-cell facility where chemical processing occurs may also provide information regarding specific chemicals used in fuel processing. However, using swipe material to elucidate what specific chemical processes were/are being used within a hot cell has not been previously evaluated. Staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) teamed to evaluate the potential use of environmental swipe samples as collection media for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. This evaluation was initiated with sample collection during a series of Coupled End-to-End (CETE) reprocessing runs at ORNL. The study included measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides, total and isotopic U and Pu, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. These results allowed us to elucidate what chemical processes used in the hot cells during reprocessing of power reactor and identify other legacy chemicals used in hot cell operations which predate the CETE process.

  1. Production of spherical pellets by a hot-melt extrusion and spheronization process.

    PubMed

    Young, Christopher R; Koleng, John J; McGinity, James W

    2002-08-21

    Controlled-release theophylline containing spherical pellets were successfully produced by a hot-melt extrusion (HME) and spheronization process. A powder blend of anhydrous theophylline, Eudragit Preparation 4135 F, microcrystalline cellulose and polyethylene glycol 8000 powder was sieved, blended and then melt-extruded in a Randcastle Microtruder. The hot-melt extruded pellets were prepared by first cutting a thin, extruded composite rod into symmetrical pellets. The pellets were then spheronized in a traditional spheronizer at an elevated temperature. Thermal properties of the pellet formulation components and the hot-melt extrudate were studied to determine suitability of the formulation for HME. Pellets were examined using scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of spheronization time on surface morphology. The rate of release of theophylline from the hot-melt extruded spherical pellets was characterized using USP 24 Apparatus 2 dissolution testing after initial pellet production and after 1 year storage in sealed HDPE containers at 25 degrees C/60% RH.

  2. Quality and safety of fish curry processed by sous vide cook chilled and hot filled technology process during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Shakila, R Jeya; Raj, B Edwin; Felix, N

    2012-06-01

    Fish curry, a traditional Indian dish was prepared from farmed fish Cobia (Rachycentron canadum), packaged by two different cook-chill processes namely, sous vide cook chilled and hot filled technology and held at 2 °C. Biochemical composition revealed that fish curry contained 5% protein and 6% fat. Omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) retained 55.44% while docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) retained 29% during cook-chilling process. The major fatty acids in fish curry were C18:2, C12:0, C16:0 and C18:1. Shelf-life of sous vide cook chilled and hot filled technology processed fish curry were 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Total bacterial counts were detected after 4 weeks and 12 weeks in sous vide cook chilled and hot filled technology processes, respectively. Total staphylococci were detected in sous vide cook chilled and hot filled technology processed cobia fish curry after 4 and 12 weeks, respectively. Total bacilli, anaerobic sulfite reducing clostridia, Salmonella, and lactic acid bacteria were absent. Hot filled technology process was more efficient and could be applied for chilled fish curry preservation for 12 weeks without any safety problems.

  3. An Approach to Optimize Size Parameters of Forging by Combining Hot-Processing Map and FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H. E.; Wang, X. Y.; Deng, L.

    2014-11-01

    The size parameters of 6061 aluminum alloy rib-web forging were optimized by using hot-processing map and finite element method (FEM) based on high-temperature compression data. The results show that the stress level of the alloy can be represented by a Zener-Holloman parameter in a hyperbolic sine-type equation with the hot deformation activation energy of 343.7 kJ/mol. Dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization concurrently preceded during high-temperature deformation of the alloy. Optimal hot-processing parameters for the alloy corresponding to the peak value of 0.42 are 753 K and 0.001 s-1. The instability domain occurs at deformation temperature lower than 653 K. FEM is an available method to validate hot-processing map in actual manufacture by analyzing the effect of corner radius, rib width, and web thickness on workability of rib-web forging of the alloy. Size parameters of die forgings can be optimized conveniently by combining hot-processing map and FEM.

  4. Flow behavior of polymers during the roll-to-roll hot embossing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yujun; Yi, Peiyun; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Lin, Zhongqin

    2015-06-01

    The roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing process is a recent advancement in the micro hot embossing process and is capable of continuously fabricating micro/nano-structures on polymers, with a high efficiency and a high throughput. However, the fast forming of the R2R hot embossing process limits the time for material flow and results in complicated flow behavior in the polymers. This study presents a fundamental investigation into the flow behavior of polymers and aims towards the comprehensive understanding of the R2R hot embossing process. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model based on the viscoelastic model of polymers is established and validated for the fabrication of micro-pyramids using the R2R hot embossing process. The deformation and recovery of micro-pyramids on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film are analyzed in the filling stage and the demolding stage, respectively. Firstly, in the analysis of the filling stage, the temperature distribution on the PVC film is discussed. A large temperature gradient is observed along the thickness direction of the PVC film and the temperature of the top surface is found to be higher than that of the bottom surface, due to the poor thermal conductivity of PVC. In addition, creep strains are demonstrated to depend highly on the temperature and are also observed to concentrate on the top layer of the PVC film because of high local temperature. In the demolding stage, the recovery of the embossed micro-pyramids is obvious. The cooling process is shown to be efficient for the reduction of recovery, especially when the mold temperature is high. In conclusion, this research advances the understanding of the flow behavior of polymers in the R2R hot embossing process and might help in the development of the highly accurate and highly efficient fabrication of microstructures on polymers.

  5. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant potential in tomato pastes as affected by hot and cold break process.

    PubMed

    Kelebek, Hasim; Selli, Serkan; Kadiroğlu, Pınar; Kola, Osman; Kesen, Songul; Uçar, Burçak; Çetiner, Başak

    2017-04-01

    The effects of hot and cold break industrial tomato paste production steps on phenolic compounds, carotenoids, organic acids, hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) and other quality parameters of tomato pastes were investigated in this study. Phenolic compounds, carotenoids, organic acids, and HMF analyses were performed with LC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and LC-DAD-RID was used for the sugar analyses. Furthermore, the antioxidant capacities of tomato pastes were assessed via the DPPH and ABTS methods. The increase of phenol acids at the processing steps of cold break production method was higher than the hot break production method. According to PCA analyses, phenolic acids characterized cold break tomato pastes while hot break tomato pastes were characterized by flavanols and flavanones. The total amount of organic acids decreased with processing and the loss of organic acids was lower in cold break pastes. Heating and evaporation were determined as the most important processing steps in which the amount of different quality parameters change.

  6. Hot Deformation and Processing Maps of Al-15%B4C Composites Containing Sc and Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jian; Zhang, Zhan; Chen, X.-Grant

    2017-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior and processing maps of three Al-15%B4C composites denoted as the base composite (Al-15vol.%B4C), S40 (Al-15vol.%B4C-0.4wt.%Sc) and SZ40 (Al-15 vol.%B4C-0.4wt.%Sc-0.24wt.%Zr) were studied by uniaxial compression tests performed at various deformation temperatures and strain rates. The constitutive equations of the three composites were established to describe the effect of the temperature and strain rate on hot deformation behavior. Using the established constitutive equations, the predicted flow stresses on various deformation conditions agreed well with the experimental data. The peak flow stress of the composites increased with the addition of Sc and Zr, attributing to the synthetic effect of solute atoms and dynamic precipitation. The addition of Sc and Zr increased the activation energy for hot deformation of Al-B4C composites. The processing maps of the three composites were constructed to evaluate the hot workability of the composites. The safe domains with optimal deformation conditions were identified for all three composites. In the safe domains, dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization were involved as softening mechanisms. The addition of Sc and Zr limited the dynamic softening process, especially for dynamic recrystallization. The microstructure analysis revealed that the flow instability was attributed to the void formation, cracking and flow localization during hot deformation of the composites.

  7. Hot Deformation and Processing Maps of Al-15%B4C Composites Containing Sc and Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jian; Zhang, Zhan; Chen, X.-Grant

    2017-03-01

    Hot deformation behavior and processing maps of three Al-15%B4C composites denoted as the base composite (Al-15vol.%B4C), S40 (Al-15vol.%B4C-0.4wt.%Sc) and SZ40 (Al-15 vol.%B4C-0.4wt.%Sc-0.24wt.%Zr) were studied by uniaxial compression tests performed at various deformation temperatures and strain rates. The constitutive equations of the three composites were established to describe the effect of the temperature and strain rate on hot deformation behavior. Using the established constitutive equations, the predicted flow stresses on various deformation conditions agreed well with the experimental data. The peak flow stress of the composites increased with the addition of Sc and Zr, attributing to the synthetic effect of solute atoms and dynamic precipitation. The addition of Sc and Zr increased the activation energy for hot deformation of Al-B4C composites. The processing maps of the three composites were constructed to evaluate the hot workability of the composites. The safe domains with optimal deformation conditions were identified for all three composites. In the safe domains, dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization were involved as softening mechanisms. The addition of Sc and Zr limited the dynamic softening process, especially for dynamic recrystallization. The microstructure analysis revealed that the flow instability was attributed to the void formation, cracking and flow localization during hot deformation of the composites.

  8. The influences of fluorine and process variations on polysilicon film stress and MOSFET hot carrier effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Lynn E.; Macwilliams, Kenneth P.; Isaac, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The use of fluorinated gate oxides may provide an improvement in nMOSFET reliability by enhancing hot carrier resistance. In order to clarify the mechanisms by which polysilicon processing and fluorination influence the oxide behavior, a matrix of nMOSFET structures was prepared using various processing, doping, and implantation strategies. These structures were evaluated for crystalline morphology and chemical element distribution. Mechanical stress measurements were taken on the polysilicon films from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. These examinations showed that fluorination of a structure with randomly oriented polysilicon can reduce residual mechanical stress and improve hot carrier resistance at room temperature.

  9. The influences of fluorine and process variations on polysilicon film stress and MOSFET hot carrier effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Lynn E.; Macwilliams, Kenneth P.; Isaac, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The use of fluorinated gate oxides may provide an improvement in nMOSFET reliability by enhancing hot carrier resistance. In order to clarify the mechanisms by which polysilicon processing and fluorination influence the oxide behavior, a matrix of nMOSFET structures was prepared using various processing, doping, and implantation strategies. These structures were evaluated for crystalline morphology and chemical element distribution. Mechanical stress measurements were taken on the polysilicon films from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. These examinations showed that fluorination of a structure with randomly oriented polysilicon can reduce residual mechanical stress and improve hot carrier resistance at room temperature.

  10. Extraction of Lipids from Flax Processing Waste Using Hot Ethanol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cuticle of flax stems contain lipids that provide a protective barrier to pathogens and control moisture loss. These lipids include wax esters and long chain fatty alcohols or policosanols. Cuticle fragments generated during several different fiber processing operations retain these lipid compou...

  11. Current hot questions on the s process in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; Campbell, S. W.; D'Orazi, V.; Karakas, A. I.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Tagliente, G.; Iliadis, C.; Rauscher, T.

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are a main site of production of nuclei heavier than iron via the s process. In massive (>4 M⊙) AGB stars the operation of the 22Ne neutron source appears to be confirmed by observations of high Rb enhancements, while the lack of Tc in these stars rules out 13C as a main source of neutrons. The problem is that the Rb enhancements are not accompanied by Zr enhancements, as expected by s-process models. This discrepancy may be solved via a better understanding of the complex atmospheres of AGB stars. Second- generation stars in globular clusters (GCs), on the other hand, do not show enhancements in any s-process elements, not even Rb. If massive AGB stars are responsible for the composition of these GC stars, they may have evolved differently in GCs than in the field. In AGB stars of lower masses, 13C is the main source of neutrons and we can potentially constrain the effects of rotation and proton-ingestion episodes using the observed composition of post-AGB stars and of stardust SiC grains. Furthermore, independent asteroseismology observations of the rotational velocities of the cores of red giants and of white dwarves will play a fundamental role in helping us to better constrain the effect of rotation. Observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in both Ba and Eu may require a neutron flux in-between the s and the r process, while the puzzling increase of Ba as function of the age in open clusters, not accompanied by increase in any other element heavier than iron, require further observational efforts. Finally, stardust SiC provides us high-precision constraints to test nuclear inputs such as neutron-capture cross sections of stable and unstable isotopes and the impact of excited nuclear states in stellar environments.

  12. Effect of antibrowning dips and controlled atmosphere storage on the physico-chemical, visual and nutritional quality of minimally processed "Rojo Brillante" persimmons.

    PubMed

    Sanchís, Elena; Mateos, Milagros; Pérez-Gago, María B

    2017-01-01

    The combined effect of antibrowning dips and controlled atmosphere storage on fresh-cut "Rojo Brillante" persimmon quality was investigated. Persimmon slices were dipped in 10 g L(-1) ascorbic acid, 10 g L(-1) citric acid or water and were stored in different controlled atmospheres at 5 ℃. Controlled atmosphere conditions were 21 kPa O2 + 10 kPa CO2 (Atm-B), 21 kPa O2 + 20 kPa CO2 (Atm-C), 5 kPa O2 + 10 kPa CO2 (Atm-D) and 5 kPa O2 in the absence of CO2 (Atm-E). Air (Atm-A) was used as a control. Atmospheres with high CO2 concentrations induced darkening, associated with a flesh disorder known as "internal flesh browning". Only the samples placed in Atm-E, and treated with 10 g L(-1) ascorbic acid or 10 g L(-1) citric acid, controlled enzymatic browning, reduced firmness loss and prevented the "internal flesh browning" disorder. The maximum limit of marketability was achieved in the samples treated with 10 g L(-1) citric acid and stored in Atm-E for nine storage days at 5 ℃. The total vitamin C, free radical scavenging activity, total phenolic content and total carotenoids of the fresh-cut "Rojo Brillante" persimmons were affected by maturity stage at harvest, whereas antibrowning dips and controlled atmosphere storage had no clear effect.

  13. Pilot Plant Testing of Hot Gas Building Decontamination Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-30

    surfaces. * Method development of a solvent extraction process for HD in soil. A series of tests were designed within each subtask to evaluate the...perform thin task, a series of 5 X 5 inch square concrete B-6 coupons were spiked with 95 mg ( 75 uL ) of HD divided into 16 equally spaced drops of neat...decontamination of the structure. A series of tests has been designed to test a method of zbtaini-ig s-irface swab samples and subsurface drill samples of

  14. Synthesis of silicon nanowires using tin catalyst by hot wire chemical vapor processing

    SciTech Connect

    Meshram, Nagsen; Kumbhar, Alka; Dusane, R.O.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Silicon nanowires are grown by hot wire chemical vapor processing at 400 °C using Sn as catalyst material via VLS. ► For nanowire synthesis Sn nanotemplates are formed with hot wire generated atomic hydrogen. ► The TEM image reveals the crystalline nature of nanowire. - Abstract: Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been synthesized at temperatures in the range 300–400 °C by the hot wire chemical vapor processing (HWCVP) using tin nanotemplate. The tin nano-template is formed by hot wire atomic hydrogen treatment of thermally evaporated Sn films (∼300 nm thick) on glass substrates. Silicon nanowires are then grown using hot wire induced dissociation of SiH{sub 4} gas over the nanotemplate. Growth conditions like growth time and temperature were varied to study their effect on the tin nanoparticle size and on the silicon nanowire dimensions thereafter. From the observations, it is clear that the nanowire diameters and lengths depend on the size of nanoparticles and the growth time respectively. Though SiNWs were observed to grow at temperatures as low as 300 °C, nanowires with a narrow diameter distribution were achieved at 400 °C. Raman spectra and transmission electron microscope (TEM) reveal the crystalline nature of the silicon nanowires.

  15. Polycarbonate as an elasto-plastic material model for simulation of the microstructure hot imprint process.

    PubMed

    Narijauskaitė, Birutė; Palevičius, Arvydas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Janušas, Giedrius; Sakalys, Rokas

    2013-08-22

    The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC), as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc.) must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well.

  16. Processing Map and Mechanism of Hot Deformation of a Corrosion-Resistant Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Zuo, Q.; Cheng, J. J.; Chen, C. F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot deformation behavior of a corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy was studied in temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-10 s-1 by employing hot compression tests. An approach of processing map was used to reveal the hot workability and microstructural evolution during the hot deformation. The results show that different stable domains in the processing map associated with the microstructure evolution can be ascribed to different dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanisms. The discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) grains evolved by the necklace mechanism are finer than those evolved by the ordinary mechanism, respectively, arising from the strong nucleation process and the growth process. If subjected to low temperature and high strain rate, the flow instability domain occurs, due to the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) based on the evolution of deformation micro-bands within the deformed grains. Based on the processing map, a DRX mechanism map is established, which can provide an idea for designing desired microstructure.

  17. Polycarbonate as an Elasto-Plastic Material Model for Simulation of the Microstructure Hot Imprint Process

    PubMed Central

    Narijauskaitė, Birutė; Palevičius, Arvydas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Janušas, Giedrius; Šakalys, Rokas

    2013-01-01

    The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC), as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc.) must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well. PMID:23974153

  18. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Forming Quality of C-Shaped Thermosetting Composite Laminates in Hot Diaphragm Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, X. X.; Gu, Y. Z.; Sun, J.; Li, M.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of processing temperature and vacuum applying rate on the forming quality of C-shaped carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite laminates during hot diaphragm forming process were investigated. C-shaped prepreg preforms were produced using a home-made hot diaphragm forming equipment. The thickness variations of the preforms and the manufacturing defects after diaphragm forming process, including fiber wrinkling and voids, were evaluated to understand the forming mechanism. Furthermore, both interlaminar slipping friction and compaction behavior of the prepreg stacks were experimentally analyzed for showing the importance of the processing parameters. In addition, autoclave processing was used to cure the C-shaped preforms to investigate the changes of the defects before and after cure process. The results show that the C-shaped prepreg preforms with good forming quality can be achieved through increasing processing temperature and reducing vacuum applying rate, which obviously promote prepreg interlaminar slipping process. The process temperature and forming rate in hot diaphragm forming process strongly influence prepreg interply frictional force, and the maximum interlaminar frictional force can be taken as a key parameter for processing parameter optimization. Autoclave process is effective in eliminating voids in the preforms and can alleviate fiber wrinkles to a certain extent.

  19. Thermal performance of a photographic laboratory process: Solar Hot Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. A.; Jensen, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performance of a solar process hot water system is described. The system was designed to supply 22,000 liters (5,500 gallons) per day of 66 C (150 F) process water for photographic processing. The 328 sq m (3,528 sq. ft.) solar field has supplied 58% of the thermal energy for the system. Techniques used for analyzing various thermal values are given. Load and performance factors and the resulting solar contribution are discussed.

  20. Thermal performance of a photographic laboratory process: Solar Hot Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. A.; Jensen, R. N.

    1982-04-01

    The thermal performance of a solar process hot water system is described. The system was designed to supply 22,000 liters (5,500 gallons) per day of 66 C (150 F) process water for photographic processing. The 328 sq m (3,528 sq. ft.) solar field has supplied 58% of the thermal energy for the system. Techniques used for analyzing various thermal values are given. Load and performance factors and the resulting solar contribution are discussed.

  1. The Influence of Thermal Conductivity of Die Material on the Efficiency of Hot-Stamping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Zhou, Luhai; Wu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Junwan

    2016-11-01

    To improve the production efficiency of the hot-stamping process from the perspective of the die materials, a numerical model of a B-pillar component was established to investigate the effects of the thermal conductivity of the die material on the cooling behavior, microstructure, and mechanical evolution of the formed component, as well as the temperature distribution of the die during the hot-stamping process. The results showed that the thermal conductivity of the die material has a more significant influence on the quenching stage than the forming stage. Under the specified simulation and boundary conditions, when the thermal conductivity of the die material improves by 76.23% at 25-300 °C, the maximum cooling rate of the component increases by 48.49% and consequently improves the quenching efficiency of the hot-stamping process by 31.82%. As the thermal conductivity of the die steel increases, the maximum temperature of the die decreases and its temperature uniformity improves. Moreover, to improve the efficiency of the hot-stamping process, steels that possess high thermal conductivity at low temperature ranges are favorable.

  2. Layout and process hot carrier optimization of HV-nLEDMOS transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qinsong, Qian; Haisong, Li; Weifeng, Sun; Yangbo, Yi

    2009-03-01

    Two layout and process key parameters for improving high voltage nLEDMOS (n-type lateral extended drain MOS) transistor hot carrier performance have been identified. Increasing the space between Hv-pwell and n-drift region and reducing the n-drift implant dose can dramatically reduce the device hot carrier degradations, for the maximum impact ionization rate near the Bird Beak decreases or its location moves away from the Si/SiO2 interface. This conclusion has been analyzed in detail by using the MEDICI simulator and it is also confirmed by the test results.

  3. Electrical Detection of Quantum Dot Hot Electrons Generated via a Mn(2+)-Enhanced Auger Process.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Charles J; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Nagaoka, Hirokazu; deQuilettes, Dane W; Salvador, Michael; Chen, Jennifer I L; Ginger, David S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2017-01-05

    An all-solid-state quantum-dot-based photon-to-current conversion device is demonstrated that selectively detects the generation of hot electrons. Photoexcitation of Mn(2+)-doped CdS quantum dots embedded in the device is followed by efficient picosecond energy transfer to Mn(2+) with a long-lived (millisecond) excited-state lifetime. Electrons injected into the QDs under applied bias then capture this energy via Auger de-excitation, generating hot electrons that possess sufficient energy to escape over a ZnS blocking layer, thereby producing current. This electrically detected hot-electron generation is correlated with a quench in the steady-state Mn(2+) luminescence and the introduction of a new nonradiative excited-state decay process, consistent with electron-dopant Auger cross-relaxation. The device's efficiency at detecting hot-electron generation provides a model platform for the study of hot-electron ionization relevant to the development of novel photodetectors and alternative energy-conversion devices.

  4. Radioactive Spent Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Centner, B.; Vanderperre, S.

    2008-07-01

    Spent ion-exchange media are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during its immobilization to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. The waste acceptance criteria define, among others, the quality of waste forms for disposal, and therefore will sometimes define appropriate treatment options. The selection of treatment options for spent ion-exchange materials must consider their physical and chemical characteristics. Basically, the main methods for the treatment of spent organic ion-exchange materials, following to pre-treatment methods are: - Direct immobilization, producing a stable end product by using cement, bitumen, polymer or high integrity containers; - The destruction of the organic compounds by using thermochemical processes or oxidation to produce an inorganic intermediate product that may or may not be further conditioned for storage and/or disposal; - The complete removal of the resin inner structural water by a thermal process, followed by a supercompaction of the hot dried resins. At Tihange Nuclear Power Plant, spent ion-exchange resins were conditioned by embedding in a polymer matrix with a mobile processing installation. For safety and cost reasons, Electrabel, the Belgian Utility, decided to investigate by which process the former one should be replaced. To carry out this mission, Electrabel entrusted Tractebel Engineering with the selection of the most suitable process available on the international market. After a thorough technical economical analysis, Tractebel Engineering selected the Resin Hot Supercompaction Process to be installed at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. The Resin Hot Supercompaction Process is used to make water free dense homogeneous organic blocks from a wide range of particulate waste. In this process, spent resins are first dewatered and dried to remove the inner structural water content. The drying takes place in a drying vessel that holds the contents of

  5. Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment of the hot conditioning system and process

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1996-10-10

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was established to develop engineered solutions for the expedited removal, stabilization, and storage of spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. A series of analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the proposed Hot Conditioning System and process for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The analyses were performed using a series of thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety-related issues that may arise pertaining to the Hot Conditioning System. The subject efforts focus on independently investigating, quantifying, and establishing the governing heat production and removal mechanisms, flow distributions within the multi-canister overpack, and performing process simulations for various purge gases under consideration for the Hot Conditioning System, as well as obtaining preliminary results for comparison with and verification of other analyses, and providing technology- based recommendations for consideration and incorporation into the Hot Conditioning System design bases.

  6. Structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties of undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared using sol—gel dip coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhenoufa, N.; Mahamdi, R.; Rechem, D.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, sol—gel dip-coating technique was used to elaborate ZnO pure and ZnO/Al films. The impact of Al-doped concentration on the structural, optical, surface morphological and electrical properties of the elaborated samples was investigated. It was found that better electrical and optical performances have been obtained for an Al concentration equal to 5%, where the ZnO thin films exhibit a resistivity value equal to 1.64104 Ω·cm. Moreover, highest transparency has been recorded for the same Al concentration value. The obtained results from this investigation make the developed thin film structure a potential candidate for high optoelectronic performance applications.

  7. Continuous change of supersaturation and evolution of oriented structure in dipping LPE process of YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. S.; Chen, Y. Y.; Yao, X.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films was performed by vertical dipping along both the [0 0 1] and the [1 1 0] directions of (1 1 0) NdGaO3 (NGO) substrates. Remarkably, an evolution of oriented structure from c-axis to a-axis, corresponding to the supersaturation (σ) change from high to low level, was explicitly observed on a single NGO substrate. Distinctively, creeping along the [0 0 1] direction and forming a low-σ-related a-oriented film with a crack-free macrostructure, the liquid presented a strong anisotropic wettability with the NGO substrate. Most importantly, this work provides a unique method to achieve high-quality a-axis YBCO LPE films, which are potentially appropriate for Josephson junction devices.

  8. Hot Isostatic Press Manufacturing Process Development for Fabrication of RERTR Monolithic Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Crapps, Justin M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Katz, Joel D.; Alexander, David J.; Aikin, Beverly; Vargas, Victor D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Dombrowski, David E.; Mihaila, Bogdan

    2012-06-06

    We use experimentation and finite element modeling to study a Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) manufacturing process for U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Plates. Finite element simulations are used to identify the material properties affecting the process and improve the process geometry. Accounting for the high temperature material properties and plasticity is important to obtain qualitative agreement between model and experimental results. The model allows us to improve the process geometry and provide guidance on selection of material and finish conditions for the process strongbacks. We conclude that the HIP can must be fully filled to provide uniform normal stress across the bonding interface.

  9. Experiment Research on Hot-Rolling Processing of Nonsmooth Pit Surface

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yun-qing; Fan, Tian-xing; Mou, Jie-gang; Yu, Wei-bo; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Evan

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the nonsmooth surface drag reduction structure on the inner polymer coating of oil and gas pipelines and improve the efficiency of pipeline transport, a structural model of the machining robot on the pipe inner coating is established. Based on machining robot, an experimental technique is applied to research embossing and coating problems of rolling-head, and then the molding process rules under different conditions of rolling temperatures speeds and depth are analyzed. Also, an orthogonal experiment analysis method is employed to analyze the different effects of hot-rolling process apparatus on the embossed pits morphology and quality of rolling. The results also reveal that elevating the rolling temperature or decreasing the rolling speed can also improve the pit structure replication rates of the polymer coating surface, and the rolling feed has little effect on replication rates. After the rolling-head separates from the polymer coating, phenomenon of rebounding and refluxing of the polymer coating occurs, which is the reason of inability of the process. A continuous hot-rolling method for processing is used in the robot and the hot-rolling process of the processing apparatus is put in a dynamics analysis. PMID:27022235

  10. Hot Deformation Characteristics and Processing Maps of the Cu-Cr-Zr-Ag Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Chai, Zhe; Volinsky, Alex A.; Sun, Huili; Tian, Baohong; Liu, Ping; Liu, Yong

    2016-03-01

    The hot deformation behavior of the Cu-Cr-Zr-Ag alloy has been investigated by hot compressive tests in the 650-950 °C temperature and 0.001-10 s-1 strain rate ranges using Gleeble-1500D thermo-mechanical simulator. The microstructure evolution of the alloy during deformation was characterized using optical and transmission electron microscopy. The flow stress decreases with the deformation temperature and increases with the strain rate. The apparent activation energy for hot deformation of the alloy was 343.23 kJ/mol. The constitutive equation of the alloy based on the hyperbolic-sine equation was established to characterize the flow stress as a function of the strain rate and the deformation temperature. The processing maps were established based on the dynamic material model. The optimal processing parameters for hot deformation of the Cu-Cr-Zr-Ag alloy are 900-950 °C and 0.001-0.1 s-1 strain rate. The evolution of DRX microstructure strongly depends on the deformation temperature and the strain rate.

  11. Characterization of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient for hot stamping processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Xi; Liu, Xiaochuan; Fang, Haomiao; Ji, Kang; El Fakir, Omer; Wang, LiLiang

    2016-08-01

    In hot stamping processes, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) between the forming tools and hot blank is an essential parameter which determines the quenching rate of the process and hence the resulting material microstructure. The present work focuses on the characterization of the IHTC between an aluminium alloy 7075-T6 blank and two different die materials, cast iron (G3500) and H13 die steel, at various contact pressures. It was found that the IHTC between AA7075 and cast iron had values 78.6% higher than that obtained between AA7075 and H13 die steel. Die materials and contact pressures had pronounced effects on the IHTC, suggesting that the IHTC can be used to guide the selection of stamping tool materials and the precise control of processing parameters.

  12. Unit for combustion of process exhaust gas and production of hot air

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, J.O.; Eriksson, T.L.; Nystrom, O.

    1982-12-07

    Unit for thermal incineration of non-explosive gases with minor amounts of organic pollutants and for production of hot air, and which can be adapted to various types of supplementary fuel. There is a combustion chamber which consists of a flame pipe inside an outer jacket. Through the space therebetween, incoming process gas is led as coolant. At its front end, the combustion chamber has a burner for supplementary fuel and a mixing-in zone for process gas. The process gas rapidly mixes with the hot combustion gases in the flame, the gas reaching its reaction temperature directly. Powerful turbulence in the mixing-in zone gas, film-layer cooling, convective cooling and even flow give highly efficient and pure combustion while keeping the flame pipe temperature low enough to prevent corrosion.

  13. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Becker, R; Rhee, M; Li, M

    2004-09-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participated in a U. S. Department of Energy/Office of Industrial Technology sponsored research project 'Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery', as a Cooperative Agreement TC-02028 with the Alcoa Technical Center (ATC). The objective of the joint project with Alcoa is to develop a numerical modeling capability to optimize the hot rolling process used to produce aluminum plate. Product lost in the rolling process and subsequent recycling, wastes resources consumed in the energy-intensive steps of remelting and reprocessing the ingot. The modeling capability developed by project partners will be used to produce plate more efficiently and with reduced product loss.

  14. Effect of Initial Iron Content in a Zinc Bath on the Dissolution Rate of Iron During a Hot Dip Galvanizing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Myung; Lee, Suk Kyu; Paik, Doo-Jin; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of iron dissolution and the effect of initial Fe content in a Zn bath on the dissolution rate of iron were investigated using a finger rotating method (FRM). When the initial iron content, [Fe]°, in the zinc bath was less than the solubility limit, the iron content in the zinc bath showed a rapid increase, whereas a moderate increase was observed when [Fe]° was close to the solubility limit. Based on Eisenberg's kinetic model, the mass transfer coefficient of iron in the present experimental condition was calculated to be k M = 1.2 × 10-5 m/s, which was similar to the results derived by Giorgi et al. under industrial practice conditions. A dissolution of iron occurred even when the initial iron content in the zinc bath was greater than the solubility limit, which was explained by the interfacial thermodynamics in conjunction with the morphology of the surface coating layer. By analyzing the diffraction patterns using TEM, the outermost dendritic-structured coating layer was confirmed as FeZn13 (ζ). In order to satisfy the local equilibrium based on the Gibbs-Thomson equation, iron in the dendrite-structured phase spontaneously dissolved into the zinc bath, resulting in the enrichment of iron in front of the dendrite tip. Through the diffusion boundary layer in front of the dendritic-structured layer, dissolved Fe atoms diffused out and reacted with Zn and small amounts of Al, resulting in the formation of dross particles such as FeZn10Al x (δ). It was experimentally confirmed that the smaller the difference between the initial iron content in the zinc bath and the iron solubility limit at a given temperature, the lower the number of formed dross particles.

  15. Effect of Initial Iron Content in a Zinc Bath on the Dissolution Rate of Iron During a Hot Dip Galvanizing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Myung; Lee, Suk Kyu; Paik, Doo-Jin; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of iron dissolution and the effect of initial Fe content in a Zn bath on the dissolution rate of iron were investigated using a finger rotating method (FRM). When the initial iron content, [Fe]°, in the zinc bath was less than the solubility limit, the iron content in the zinc bath showed a rapid increase, whereas a moderate increase was observed when [Fe]° was close to the solubility limit. Based on Eisenberg's kinetic model, the mass transfer coefficient of iron in the present experimental condition was calculated to be k M = 1.2 × 10-5 m/s, which was similar to the results derived by Giorgi et al. under industrial practice conditions. A dissolution of iron occurred even when the initial iron content in the zinc bath was greater than the solubility limit, which was explained by the interfacial thermodynamics in conjunction with the morphology of the surface coating layer. By analyzing the diffraction patterns using TEM, the outermost dendritic-structured coating layer was confirmed as FeZn13 ( ζ). In order to satisfy the local equilibrium based on the Gibbs-Thomson equation, iron in the dendrite-structured phase spontaneously dissolved into the zinc bath, resulting in the enrichment of iron in front of the dendrite tip. Through the diffusion boundary layer in front of the dendritic-structured layer, dissolved Fe atoms diffused out and reacted with Zn and small amounts of Al, resulting in the formation of dross particles such as FeZn10Al x ( δ). It was experimentally confirmed that the smaller the difference between the initial iron content in the zinc bath and the iron solubility limit at a given temperature, the lower the number of formed dross particles.

  16. KIC 8462852 optical dipping event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2017-05-01

    T. Boyajian (Louisiana State University) et al. reported in ATel #10405 that an optical dip is underway in KIC 8462852 (Boyajian's Star, Tabby's Star) beginning on 2017 May 18 UT. Tentative signs of small dips had been seen beginning April 24, and enhanced monitoring had begun at once at Fairborn Observatory (Tennessee State University). Photometry and spectroscopy from there on May 18 and 19 UT showed a dip underway. Cousins V photometry showed a drop of 0.02 magnitude, the largest dip (and the first clear one) seen in more than a year of monitoring. AAVSO observer Bruce Gary (GBL, Hereford, AZ) carried out V photometry which showed a fading from 11.906 V ± 0.004 to 11.9244 V ± 0.0033 between UT 2017 May 14 and May 19, a drop of 1.7%. Swift/UVOT observations obtained May 18 15:19 did not show a statistically significant drop in v, but Gary's photometry is given more weight. r'-band observations from Las Cumbres Observatory obtained 2017 May 17 to May 19 showed a 2% dip. Spectra by I. Steele (Liverpool JMU) et al. taken on 2017 May 20 with the 2.0 meter Liverpool Telescope, La Palma, showed no differences in the source compared to a reference spectrum taken 2016 July 4 when the system was not undergoing a dip (ATel #10406).Dips typically last for a few days, and larger dips can last over a week. It is not clear that this dip is over. Precision time-series V photometry is urgently requested from AAVSO observers, although all photometry is welcome. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). See full Alert Notice for more details. KIC 8462852 was the subject of AAVSO Alert Notices 532 and 542. See also Boyajian et al. 2016, also available as a preprint (http://arxiv.org/abs/1509.03622). General information about KIC 8462852 may be found at http://www.wherestheflux.com/.

  17. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Cool and Hot Cognitive Processes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María José; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Although emotion and cognition were considered to be separate aspects of the psyche in the past, researchers today have demonstrated the existence of an interplay between the two processes. Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand, and regulate emotions, is a relatively young concept that attempts to connect both emotion and cognition. While EI has been demonstrated to be positively related to well-being, mental and physical health, and non-aggressive behaviors, little is known about its underlying cognitive processes. The aim of the present study was to systematically review available evidence about the relationship between EI and cognitive processes as measured through "cool" (i.e., not emotionally laden) and "hot" (i.e., emotionally laden) laboratory tasks. We searched Scopus and Medline to find relevant articles in Spanish and English, and divided the studies following two variables: cognitive processes (hot vs. cool) and EI instruments used (performance-based ability test, self-report ability test, and self-report mixed test). We identified 26 eligible studies. The results provide a fair amount of evidence that performance-based ability EI (but not self-report EI tests) is positively related with efficiency in hot cognitive tasks. EI, however, does not appear to be related with cool cognitive tasks: neither through self-reporting nor through performance-based ability instruments. These findings suggest that performance-based ability EI could improve individuals' emotional information processing abilities.

  18. Imaging-based optical caliper for objects in hot manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Howard

    2013-04-03

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT), in conjunction with its industrial and academic partners, proposes to develop an Imaging-Based Optical Caliper (hereafter referred to as OC) for Objects in Hot Manufacturing Processes. The goal is to develop and demonstrate the OC with the synergy of OGT's current technological pool and other innovations to provide a light weight, robust, safe and accurate portable dimensional measurement device for hot objects with integrated wireless communication capacity to enable real time process control. The technical areas of interest in this project are the combination of advanced imaging, Sensor Fusion, and process control. OGT believes that the synergistic interactions between its current set of technologies and other innovations could deliver products that are viable and have high impact in the hot manufacture processes, such as steel making, steel rolling, open die forging, and glass industries, resulting in a new energy efficient control paradigm in the operations through improved yield, prolonged tool life and improved quality. In-line dimension measurement and control is of interest to the steel makers, yet current industry focus is on the final product dimension only instead of whole process due to the limit of man power, system cost and operator safety concerns. As sensor technologies advances, the industry started to see the need to enforce better dimensional control throughout the process, but lack the proper tools to do so. OGT along with its industrial partners represent the indigenous effort of technological development to serve the US steel industry. The immediate market that can use and get benefited from the proposed OC is the Steel Industry. The deployment of the OC has the potential to provide benefits in reduction of energy waste, CO2 emission, waste water amount, toxic waste, and so forth. The potential market after further expended function includes Hot Forging and Freight Industries. The OC prototypes were fabricated, and

  19. Microstructural control in hot working of IN-718 superalloy using processing map

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, N.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1994-10-01

    the hot-working characteristics of IN-718 are studied in the temperature range 900 C to 1,200 C and strain rate range 0.001 to 100 s[sup [minus]1] using hot compression tests. Processing maps for hot working are developed on the basis of the strain-rate sensitivity variations with temperature and strain rate and interpreted using a dynamic materials model. The map exhibits two domains of dynamic recrystallization (DRX): one occurring at 950 C and 0.001 s[sup [minus]1] with an efficiency of power dissipation of 37 pct and the other at 1200 C and 0.1 s[sup [minus]1] with an efficiency of 40 pct. Dynamic recrystallization in the former domain is nucleated by the [delta](Ni[sub 3]Nb) precipitates and results in fine-grained microstructure. In the high-temperature DRX domain, carbides dissolve in the matrix and make interstitial carbon atoms available for increasing the rate of dislocation generation for DRX nucleation. It is recommended that IN-718 may be hot-forged initially at 1,200 C and 0.1 s[sup [minus]1] and finish-forged at 950 C and 0.001 s [sup [minus]1] so that fine-grained structure may be achieved. The available forging practice validates these results from processing maps. At temperatures lower than 1,000 C and strain rates higher than 1 s[sup [minus]1], the material exhibits adiabatic shear bands. Also, at temperatures higher than 1150 C and strain rates more than 1 s[sup [minus]1], IN-718 exhibits intercrystalline cracking. Both these regimes may be avoided in hot-working IN-718.

  20. Application of a hot-melt granulation process to enhance fenofibrate solid dose manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rakesh Singh; Amankwaa, Edward; Kumar, Sandeep; Hu, Tom; Chan, Mohamed; Sanghvi, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of hot-melt granulation of fenofibrate and croscarmellose sodium and its cooling time for the molten mass in a ratio of 55:45 was conducted to assess the manufacturing process capability to produce an acceptable granulation which flows well on Korsch PH300 tablet compression machine. The formation of the drug-polymer eutectic mixture was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The physical properties of the hot-melt was determined by examining the milled blocks after solidification and milling after cooling periods of 10, 20 and 30 d. The milled material was assessed for the effect of hold time of the blend on the solid dose compression characteristics. The impact of cooling on the processing of the blocks was assessed after 10, 20 and 30 d of cooling. The study suggests that after the hot-melt formed the fenofibrate crystallized independently and a solid solution with croscarmellose sodium was not formed. The age of the blocks determined the hardness of the crystals, changing the processing nature of the granules with respect to compression and powder flow characteristics. The blocks processed after 20 d and beyond produced granules with a characteristic suitable for holding the blend for 14 d in the bin with no impact on flow properties and compressibility of the blend. There was no chipping, capping, sticking or picking observed and a higher compression speed was achieved.

  1. Experimental investigation on influence of porous material properties on drying process by a hot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.

    2012-11-01

    The drying process of porous media is a subject of scientific interest, and different mathematical approaches can be found in the literature. A previous paper by the same authors showed that the celebrated Martin correlation for hot air jet heat and mass transfer yields different degrees of accuracy (from 15% to 65%, increasing at high values of input power) if tested on different fabrics, the remaining conditions being the same. In this paper the fabric drying has been experimentally investigated more in depth. A dedicated experimental apparatus for hot jet drying was assembled and operated, in which a hot jet impinges perpendicularly onto a wet fabric. A calibrated orifice was adopted to measure the jet flow rate, with an accuracy better than 3%. The drying power was determined by continuously weighing with a precision scale a moistened patch exposed to the drying jet. The effect of the time of the exposure and the initial amount of water has been evaluated for each sample. During the hot jet exposure, the temperature distribution over the wet patch has been observed by an infrared thermo-camera. A mathematical model of water transport inside and outside the fabric was developed, in order to evidence the governing transport resistances. The theoretical predictions have been compared with the experimental results, and showed the necessity to modify correlations and models accounting for fabric properties.

  2. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility hot test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    Prior to initial operation with radioactive feed or ``hot`` operation, the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal (LET&D) Facility underwent extensive testing. This report provides a detailed description and analysis of this testing. Testing has determined that LET&D is capable of processing radioactive solutions between the design flowrates of 275 gph to 550 gph. Modifications made to prevent condensation on the off-gas HEPA filters, to the process vacuum control, bottoms cooler rupture disks, and feed control system operation were successful. Unfortunately, two mixers failed prior to ``hot`` testing due to manufacturer`s error which limited operation of the PEW Evaporator System and sampling was not able to prove that design removal efficiencies for Mercury, Cadmium, Plutonium, and Non-Volatile Radionuclides.

  3. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of ZnO thin films deposited by sol-gel dip-coating process at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soaram; Nam, Giwoong; Yoon, Hyunsik; Park, Hyunggil; Choi, Hyonkwang; Kim, Jong Su; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Do Yeob; Kim, Sung-O.; Leem, Jae-Young

    2014-07-01

    Sol-gel dip-coating was used to prepare ZnO thin films with relaxed residual stress by lowering the deposition temperature from room temperature (25°C) to -25°C. The effect of deposition temperature on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the films was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and reflectance accessory, and the van der Pauw method. All the thin films were deposited successfully onto quartz substrates and exhibited fibrous root morphology. At low temperature, the deposition rate was higher than at room temperature (RT) because of enhanced viscosity of the films. Further, lowering the deposition temperature affected the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the ZnO thin films. The surface morphology, residual stress, PL properties, and optical transmittance and reflectance of the films were measured, and this information was used to determine the absorption coefficient, optical band gap, Urbach energy, refractive index, refractive index at infinite wavelength, extinction coefficient, single-oscillator energy, dispersion energy, average oscillator wavelength, moments M -1 and M -3, dielectric constant, optical conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the ZnO thin films.

  4. Supervisory control system for monitoring a pharmaceutical hot melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Markl, Daniel; Wahl, Patrick R; Menezes, José C; Koller, Daniel M; Kavsek, Barbara; Francois, Kjell; Roblegg, Eva; Khinast, Johannes G

    2013-09-01

    Continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing processes are of increased industrial interest and require uni- and multivariate Process Analytical Technology (PAT) data from different unit operations to be aligned and explored within the Quality by Design (QbD) context. Real-time pharmaceutical process verification is accomplished by monitoring univariate (temperature, pressure, etc.) and multivariate (spectra, images, etc.) process parameters and quality attributes, to provide an accurate state estimation of the process, required for advanced control strategies. This paper describes the development and use of such tools for a continuous hot melt extrusion (HME) process, monitored with generic sensors and a near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer in real-time, using SIPAT (Siemens platform to collect, display, and extract process information) and additional components developed as needed. The IT architecture of such a monitoring procedure based on uni- and multivariate sensor systems and their integration in SIPAT is shown. SIPAT aligned spectra from the extrudate (in the die section) with univariate measurements (screw speed, barrel temperatures, material pressure, etc.). A multivariate supervisory quality control strategy was developed for the process to monitor the hot melt extrusion process on the basis of principal component analysis (PCA) of the NIR spectra. Monitoring the first principal component and the time-aligned reference feed rate enables the determination of the residence time in real-time.

  5. Prediction of Proper Temperatures for the Hot Stamping Process Based on the Kinetics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadian, P.; Parsa, M. H.; Mirzadeh, H.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, the application of kinetics models for predicting microstructures of steels subjected to thermo-mechanical treatments has increased to minimize direct experimentation, which is costly and time consuming. In the current work, the final microstructures of AISI 4140 steel sheets after the hot stamping process were predicted using the Kirkaldy and Li kinetics models combined with new thermodynamically based models in order for the determination of the appropriate process temperatures. In this way, the effect of deformation during hot stamping on the Ae3, Acm, and Ae1 temperatures was considered, and then the equilibrium volume fractions of phases at different temperatures were calculated. Moreover, the ferrite transformation rate equations of the Kirkaldy and Li models were modified by a term proposed by Åkerström to consider the influence of plastic deformation. Results showed that the modified Kirkaldy model is satisfactory for the determination of appropriate austenitization temperatures for the hot stamping process of AISI 4140 steel sheets because of agreeable microstructure predictions in comparison with the experimental observations.

  6. Hot Workability and Processing Maps of 7150 Aluminum Alloys with Zr and V Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cangji; Chen, X.-Grant

    2015-05-01

    The hot workability and processing maps of 7150 aluminum alloys with different Zr additions (0-0.15 wt.%) and V additions (0.01-0.15 wt.%) were investigated using uniaxial compression tests conducted at various temperatures (300-450 °C) and strain rates (0.001-10 s-1). The results reveal that the processing map of the 7150 base alloy exhibits a single domain (Domain I) associated with dynamic recovery and partially dynamic recrystallization. With the increasing Zr and V additions, Domain I shrinks toward higher temperatures and higher strain rates and exhibits decreases in efficiency of power dissipation due to a restrained level of dynamic recovery caused by the pinning effect of Al3Zr and Al21V2 dispersoids. When the added Zr and V contents reach 0.15%, another domain (Domain II) is formed, corresponding to cavity formation in the microstructure. Flow instability during hot deformation of 7150 alloys is attributed to the formation of adiabatic shear bands and deformation bands. The instability region extends toward lower strain rates when alloyed with Zr and V. The optimum hot-working parameters for those alloys are determined to be a deformation temperature of 450 °C and a strain rate of 0.01 s-1.

  7. Automatic simulation of a sequence of hot-former forging processes by a rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Joun, M.S.; Moon, H.K.; Shivpuri, R.

    1998-10-01

    A fully automatic forging simulation technique in hot-former forging is presented in this paper. A rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method is employed together with automatic simulation techniques. A realistic analysis model of the hot-former forging processes is given with emphasis on thermal analysis and simulation automation. The whole processes including forming, dwelling, ejecting, and transferring are considered in the analysis model and various cooling conditions are embedded in the analysis model. The approach is applied to a sequence of three-stage hot former forging process. Nonisothermal analysis results are compared with isothermal ones and the effect of heat transfer on predicted metal flows is discussed.

  8. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas F.; Robin, Allen M.; Wolfenbarger, James K.; Suggitt, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  9. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  10. Experiences of the Application of Hot Gas Filtration to Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, B.T.

    2002-09-18

    Hot Gas Filtration (HGF) is defined as the dry scrubbing of gaseous process effluent above 250 degrees. The potential applications for this technology can be found in Atmospheric Pollution Control (APC) and In-Line Equipment Protection (ILETP). In recent years novel rigid refractory filter media have emerged with several advantages over conventional fabric bag filters and other particulate arrestment systems e.g. electrostatic precipitators. A study has been made of the effect of a wide range of operational conditions, including gas volume and velocity, temperature, particle size distribution, and organic/moisture content, in real process situations on filter elements performance and life expectancy.

  11. Research on Flow Stress During Hot Deformation Process and Processing Map for 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baofeng; Ji, Haipeng; Liu, Xingang; Gao, Lu; Dong, Rongmei; Jin, Miao; Zhang, Qinghua

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the hot deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical simulator at deformation temperatures in the range of 900-1200 °C and strain rates in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. The effects of initial austenitic grain size and deformation conditions on hot deformation behavior of 316LN were analyzed through true stress-strain curves under different deformation conditions. Both the constitutive equation and processing map for 316LN were obtained. The results show that, with the increase of the deformation temperature and the decrease of the strain rate, the peak stress decreases, and the initial austenitic grain size has a little influence on the peak stress. The relative error between the peak stress values calculated using the constitutive equation and the values measured is less than 10%. Using the processing map, the best hot-working condition for 316LN in the range of experimental deformation parameters appears when T = 1200 °C and dot{\\upvarepsilon } = 0.001 {{s}}^{-1}.

  12. Review of the phenomenon of dips in spectral lines emitted from plasmas and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E.; Dalimier, E.; Faenov, A.; Renner, O.

    2014-11-01

    The review covers theoretical and experimental studies of two kinds of dips (local depressions) in spectral line profiles emitted by plasmas: Langmuir-wave-caused dips (L-dips) and charge-exchange-caused dips (X-dips). Positions of L-dips (relative to the unperturbed wavelength of a spectral line) scale with the electron density Ne roughly as Ne1/2, while positions of X-dips are almost independent of Ne. L-dips and X-dips phenomena are interesting and important both fundamentally and practically. The fundamental interest is due to a rich physics behind each of these phenomena. As for important practical applications, they are as follows. Observation of L-dips constitutes a very accurate method to measure the electron density in plasmas - the method that does not require the knowledge of the electron temperature. L-dips also allow measuring the amplitude of the electric field of Langmuir waves - the only one spectroscopic method available for this purpose. In the most recent laser plasma experiments, L-dips were found to be a spectroscopic signature of the two-plasmon decay instability. This instability causes hot-electron generation and is a critical part in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion program. As for observations of X-dips, they serve to determine rates of charge exchange between multicharged ions. This is an important reference data virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. The rates of charge exchange are essential for magnetic fusion in tokamaks, for population inversion in the soft x-ray and VUV ranges, for ion storage devices, as well as for astrophysics (e.g., for the solar plasma and for determining the physical state of planetary nebulae).

  13. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Cool and Hot Cognitive Processes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María José; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Although emotion and cognition were considered to be separate aspects of the psyche in the past, researchers today have demonstrated the existence of an interplay between the two processes. Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand, and regulate emotions, is a relatively young concept that attempts to connect both emotion and cognition. While EI has been demonstrated to be positively related to well-being, mental and physical health, and non-aggressive behaviors, little is known about its underlying cognitive processes. The aim of the present study was to systematically review available evidence about the relationship between EI and cognitive processes as measured through “cool” (i.e., not emotionally laden) and “hot” (i.e., emotionally laden) laboratory tasks. We searched Scopus and Medline to find relevant articles in Spanish and English, and divided the studies following two variables: cognitive processes (hot vs. cool) and EI instruments used (performance-based ability test, self-report ability test, and self-report mixed test). We identified 26 eligible studies. The results provide a fair amount of evidence that performance-based ability EI (but not self-report EI tests) is positively related with efficiency in hot cognitive tasks. EI, however, does not appear to be related with cool cognitive tasks: neither through self-reporting nor through performance-based ability instruments. These findings suggest that performance-based ability EI could improve individuals’ emotional information processing abilities. PMID:27303277

  14. The Hanford spent nuclear metal fuel multi-canister overpack and vacuum drying & hot conditioning process

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, L.H.; Irwin, J.J.; Miska, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear production reactors operated at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site from 1944 until 1988 to produce plutonium. Most of the irradiated fuel from these reactors was processed onsite to separate and recover the plutonium. When the processing facilities were closed in 1992, about 1,900 metric tons of unprocessed irradiated fuel remained in storage. Additional fuel was irradiated for research purposes or was shipped to the Hanford Site from offsite reactor facilities for storage or recovery of nuclear materials. The fuel inventory now in storage at the Hanford Site is predominantly N Reactor irradiated fuel, a metallic uranium alloy that is coextruded into zircaloy-2 cladding. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has committed to an accelerated schedule for removing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford Site K Basins to a new interim storage facility in the 200 Area. The Westinghouse Hanford Company has developed an integrated process to deal with the K Basin spent fuel inventory. The process consists of cleaning the fuel, packaging it into MCOs, vacuum drying it at the K Basins, then transporting it to the Canister Storage Building for staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage. This presentation describes the MCO function, design, and life-cycle, including an overview of the vacuum drying and hot conditioning processes.

  15. Hot Deformation Characteristics of 13Cr-4Ni Stainless Steel Using Constitutive Equation and Processing Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishor, Brij; Chaudhari, G. P.; Nath, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    Hot compression tests were performed to study the hot deformation characteristics of 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel. The tests were performed in the strain rate range of 0.001-10 s-1 and temperature range of 900-1100 °C using Gleeble® 3800 simulator. A constitutive equation of Arrhenius type was established based on the experimental data to calculate the different material constants, and average value of apparent activation energy was found to be 444 kJ/mol. Zener-Hollomon parameter, Z, was estimated in order to characterize the flow stress behavior. Power dissipation and instability maps developed on the basis of dynamic materials model for true strain of 0.5 show optimum hot working conditions corresponding to peak efficiency range of about 28-32%. These lie in the temperature range of 950-1025 °C and corresponding strain rate range of 0.001-0.01 s-1 and in the temperature range of 1050-1100 °C and corresponding strain rate range of 0.01-0.1 s-1. The flow characteristics in these conditions show dynamic recrystallization behavior. The microstructures are correlated to the different stability domains indicated in the processing map.

  16. Special wettable nanostructured copper mesh achieved by a facile hot water treatment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, Nawzat S.; Hassan, Laylan B.; Brozak, Matt; Karabacak, Tansel

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a special wettable copper mesh with superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity properties is reported using a low-cost, eco-friendly, rapid, and scalable synthesis method. Hot water treatment (HWT) method is used to integrate the micro-textured copper mesh surface with a nanoscale roughness to achieve a hierarchical micro-nano structured surface. The surface energy of the nanoscale roughened copper mesh reduced by coating the hot water treated mesh with polymer ligands containing thiol or fluorine functional groups of low energy. Surface morphology characterization showed the formation of copper oxide nanostructures on the mesh surface by hot water process performed at 95 °C and under a low dissolved oxygen condition. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the development of stable, uniformly distributed, and compactly arranged, cubic and plate-like nanostructures of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) on the copper mesh surface. The surface wettability of the as-prepared copper mesh was assessed by contact angle (CA) measurement for water and several oils and organic solvents. CA values showed the formation of special wettable copper mesh surface with superhydrophobic property with water contact angle of about 157° and superoleophilic property with oil contact angle as low as 0°. In addition, the effect of the mesh’s geometry on the wetting property was examined through correlations between wire diameter, pore size, and optimal values for the highest water CA.

  17. Setting Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steels for Rapid Hot Forming Processes

    PubMed Central

    Löbbe, Christian; Hering, Oliver; Hiegemann, Lars; Tekkaya, A. Erman

    2016-01-01

    Hot stamping of sheet metal is an established method for the manufacturing of light weight products with tailored properties. However, the generally-applied continuous roller furnace manifests two crucial disadvantages: the overall process time is long and a local setting of mechanical properties is only feasible through special cooling techniques. Hot forming with rapid heating directly before shaping is a new approach, which not only reduces the thermal intervention in the zones of critical formability and requested properties, but also allows the processing of an advantageous microstructure characterized by less grain growth, additional fractions (e.g., retained austenite), and undissolved carbides. Since the austenitization and homogenization process is strongly dependent on the microstructure constitution, the general applicability for the process relevant parameters is unknown. Thus, different austenitization parameters are analyzed for the conventional high strength steels 22MnB5, Docol 1400M, and DP1000 in respect of the mechanical properties. In order to characterize the resulting microstructure, the light optical and scanning electron microscopy, micro and macro hardness measurements, and the X-ray diffraction are conducted subsequent to tensile tests. The investigation proves not only the feasibility to adjust the strength and ductility flexibly, unique microstructures are also observed and the governing mechanisms are clarified. PMID:28773354

  18. Night time blood pressure dip.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Dennis; Park, Alex

    2015-07-26

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure, called the "dip", is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%, referred to as blunted or absent, have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load, whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon, whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors.

  19. Camber measurement at hot strip mill at Voestalpine by using image processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlobil, Helmut; Niel, Kurt; Prinz, Markus; Trinkl, Gerhard; Seyruck, Wolfgang; Reisinger, Johann

    2005-02-01

    The environmental conditions at hot strip mills are characterized by hot objects (up to 1100 °C), dust and dense steam. Conventional methods for characterizing product parameters fail in these unfavorable measurement conditions. An alternative is optical measurement technique. It is non-contact and can be positioned in a safe location in the plant. One parameter of interest at hot strip mills that is to be observed is the geometry of the transfer bar. During the reduction of thickness of the stock in several reversing passes a deviation of the straightness, a so-called camber, can occur. This distortion can cause disturbances at the following steps of production, e.g. at the finishing mill. The value and direction of the camber is determined by means of a CCD-matrix camera and a segmented capture of the shape. The unique character of the measuring system discussed in this paper lies in the use of a single camera system to meet the requirements in contrast to other systems using two or more cameras. In the rolling process of the roughing mill with varying speed additional phenomena like lateral shift and rarely twist can occur, which make the measurement more difficult. Lateral movements of the strip are taken into consideration by checking single edges twice, the twist can be neglected. Finally the results of the camber values are statistically evaluated. One significant result shows the influence of the arrangement of stocks in the pusher-type furnaces on the camber. The results of the measurement are helpful for understanding the rolling process in more detail and even to take measures to avoid cambers and improve quality and process stability.

  20. A Review of Hot-Melt Extrusion: Process Technology to Pharmaceutical Products

    PubMed Central

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Boateng, Joshua S.; Snowden, Martin J.; Douroumis, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades industrial adaptability has allowed hot-melt extrusion (HME) to gain wide acceptance and has already established its place in the broad spectrum of manufacturing operations and pharmaceutical research developments. HME has already been demonstrated as a robust, novel technique to make solid dispersions in order to provide time controlled, modified, extended, and targeted drug delivery resulting in improved bioavailability as well as taste masking of bitter active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). This paper reviews the innumerable benefits of HME, based on a holistic perspective of the equipment, processing technologies to the materials, novel formulation design and developments, and its varied applications in oral drug delivery systems. PMID:23326686

  1. Microstructure evolution in hot rolled 7075 Al via friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mei Ling; Tan, Ming Jen; Liu, Feng Chao; Song, Xu; Chua, Beng Wah

    2016-10-01

    Friction stir processed (FSP) hot rolled 7075 Al alloy with grain size of 5.2 μm was investigated in the temperature range 350 °C-500 °C and strain rates from 3x10-4 to 10-1 s-1. Maximum superplastic elongation of 776.4 % was achieved at 500 °C and strain rate 10-3 s-1. The microstructure evolution of FSP 7075 Al during superplastic deformation was studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Further analyses of superplastic results indicated the main deformation mechanism of FSP 7075 Al was grain boundary sliding (GBS).

  2. A New Process for Hot Metal Production at Low Fuel Rate - Phase 1 Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wei-Kao Lu

    2006-02-01

    The project is part of the continuing effort by the North American steel industry to develop a coal-based, cokeless process for hot metal production. The objective of Phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of designing and constructing a pilot scale facility with the capacity of 42,000 mtpy of direct reduced iron (DRI) with 95% metallization. The primary effort is performed by Bricmont, Inc., an international engineering firm, under the supervision of McMaster University. The study focused on the Paired Straight Hearth furnace concept developed previously by McMaster University, The American Iron and Steel Institute and the US Department of Energy.

  3. Using Dip Vectors to Analyze Structural Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisonant, Robert Clyde; Watts, Chester Frederick

    1989-01-01

    A method of plotting planes on stereonets is described including great circles, poles, and dip vectors. Teaching applications of dip vectors in engineering geology and structural geology are discussed. (CW)

  4. Development and optimization of ketoconazole oral strips by means of continuous hot-melt extrusion processing.

    PubMed

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Farias, Smirna; Slipper, Ian J; Boateng, Joshua S; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Nair, Arun; Douroumis, Dennis

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop mucoadhesive oral strips using hot-melt extrusion as a continuous manufacturing process. Powder blends of ketoconazole, a water-insoluble drug - either hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) or soluplus (SOL), sorbitol (SRB) and magnesium aluminometasilicate (MAS) were extruded to manufacture thin strips with 0.5-mm thickness. The presence of the inorganic metasilicate facilitated smooth processing of the extruded strips as it worked as an absorbent directly impacting on the extensive mixing of the drug/excipients inside the extruder barrel. The use of MAS also favoured the rapid hydration, swelling and eventual disintegration of the strips. Differential scanning calorimetry and transmission X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the existence of the amorphous drug within the extruded strips. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray undertaken on the formulations showed a homogeneous drug distribution within the extruded strips. The strips produced via continuous hot-melt extrusion processing showed significantly faster release of ketoconazole compared to the bulk drug substance. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. 9 CFR 72.16 - Designated dipping stations to be approved by the Administrator, APHIS on recommendations of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., noninfectious pens constructed in accordance with § 72.17 and a roofed or covered section of pens of sufficient size to protect all dipped animals from exposure to rain or hot sun. All alleys, chutes, and pens shall...

  6. Dip-molded t-shaped cannula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1978-01-01

    Cannula, fabricated out of polyetherurethane, has been designed for long-term service. Improved cannula is T-shaped to collect blood from both directions, thus replacing two conventional cannulas that are usually required and eliminating need for large surgical wound. It is fabricated by using dip-molding process that can be adapted to other elastomeric objects having complex shapes. Dimensions of cannula were chosen to optimize its blood-flow properties and to reduce danger of excessive clotting, making it suitable for continuous service up to 21 days in vein or artery of patient.

  7. Process improvement in laser hot wire cladding for martensitic stainless steel based on the Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zilin; Wang, Gang; Wei, Shaopeng; Li, Changhong; Rong, Yiming

    2016-09-01

    Laser hot wire cladding, with the prominent features of low heat input, high energy efficiency, and high precision, is widely used for remanufacturing metal parts. The cladding process, however, needs to be improved by using a quantitative method. In this work, volumetric defect ratio was proposed as the criterion to describe the integrity of forming quality for cladding layers. Laser deposition experiments with FV520B, one of martensitic stainless steels, were designed by using the Taguchi method. Four process variables, namely, laser power ( P), scanning speed ( V s), wire feed rate ( V f), and wire current ( I), were optimized based on the analysis of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Metallurgic observation of cladding layer was conducted to compare the forming quality and to validate the analysis method. A stable and continuous process with the optimum parameter combination produced uniform microstructure with minimal defects and cracks, which resulted in a good metallurgical bonding interface.

  8. Texture Prediction of Cold and Hot Rolled Titanium Using Processing Path Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhattate, Jamaa; Li, Dongsheng; Castello Branco, Gilberto A.; Bacaltchuk, Cristiane M.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2010-04-01

    Titanium alloys have very attractive properties, which are highly dependent on the material microstructure. Accurately predicting the microstructure of such materials during processing for materials design is, therefore, very important. In this work texture evolution of titanium alloys cold rolled at room temperature and hot rolled at 260oC is simulated using a processing path model. Texture coefficients, a set of weights in spherical harmonics expansion of texture, are utilized as descriptors of materials to represent the texture state of polycrystalline materials during processing. This model is based on the conservation principle in the orientation space. Deriving from experimental texture input at different deformation stages, the texture evolution matrix was calculated. This matrix is used to predict texture evolution for the specified deformation mode. The simulated texture evolution results agree well with experimental results.

  9. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... immersion in a chemical solution in a dip vat, or by spraying with a chemical solution using a spray-dip...

  10. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... immersion in a chemical solution in a dip vat, or by spraying with a chemical solution using a spray-dip...

  11. Environmental natural processes that achieve thermal comfort in multifamily buildings in hot-arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Paola

    Buildings, especially in hot climates, consume a lot of energy when people want to be comfortable inside them, which translates to very expensive fees each month. The most innovative response to this problem is renewable energy, that is used, in this case, to run mechanical HVAC systems. Renewable energy is the solution for many problems, but to avoid urban heat islands when using excessive HVAC systems (powered by renewables), and to solve thermal comfort-related problems, there has to be other solution. The major challenge to find it would be to have a change of thinking process. If a building in a hot-arid region uses natural processes to emulate the functions of HVAC systems, and the proper passive strategies, then, it will provide thermal comfort to its users, diminishing the need of a mechanical system. This hypothesis will be carried out by extracting the natural processes found in a specific case in nature, applying them into a building's design, and then simulating its energy efficiency with the adequate software. There will be a comparison of the same proposed building without the natural processes, to have tangible numbers showing that these proposed strategies, in fact, work. With explanatory detailed diagrams and the energy analysis, the hypothesis could be proven correct or incorrect. The significance of this approach relies on the proximity to the natural processes that have been working in different aspects of life since the beginning of time. They have been there all the time, waiting until architects, engineers, and people in general use them, instead of making more new energy-using inventions. By having the numbers from a conventional building and the ones of the proposed building, and the right environmental diagrams, the experiment should be valid. In the near future, there should be more research focused on nature and its processes, in order to be able to reduce the use of mechanical systems, and with that, reduce the energy use and the carbon

  12. Manufacturing of SiCp Reinforced Magnesium Composite Tubes by Hot Extrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Huang, Song-Jeng; Huang, Yu-San

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium alloys have higher specific strength compared with other metals, such as aluminum, copper and steel. Nevertheless, their ductility is still not good for further metal forming and their strength is not large enough for real structure applications. The aim of this paper is to develop magnesium alloy composite tubes reinforced with SiC particulates by the stir-casting method and hot extrusion processes. At first, AZ61/SiCp composite ingots reinforced with 5 wt% SiC particulates are fabricated by the melt-stirring technique. Then, finite element simulations are conducted to analyze the plastic flow of magnesium alloy AZ61 within the die and the temperature distribution of the products. AZ61/SiCp composite tubes are manufactured by hot extrusion using a specially designed die-set for obtaining uniform thickness distribution tubes. Finally, the mechanical properties of the reinforced AZ61/SiCp composite and Mg alloy AZ61 tubes are compared with those of the billets to manifest the advantages of extrusion processes and reinforcement of SiC particulates. The microstructures of the billet and extruded tubes are also observed. Through the improvement of the strength of the tube product, its life cycle can be extended and the energy consumption can be reduced, and eventually the environmental sustainability is achieved.

  13. Manufacturing of SiCp Reinforced Magnesium Composite Tubes by Hot Extrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Huang, Song-Jeng; Huang, Yu-San

    2011-05-04

    Magnesium alloys have higher specific strength compared with other metals, such as aluminum, copper and steel. Nevertheless, their ductility is still not good for further metal forming and their strength is not large enough for real structure applications. The aim of this paper is to develop magnesium alloy composite tubes reinforced with SiC particulates by the stir-casting method and hot extrusion processes. At first, AZ61/SiCp composite ingots reinforced with 5 wt% SiC particulates are fabricated by the melt-stirring technique. Then, finite element simulations are conducted to analyze the plastic flow of magnesium alloy AZ61 within the die and the temperature distribution of the products. AZ61/SiCp composite tubes are manufactured by hot extrusion using a specially designed die-set for obtaining uniform thickness distribution tubes. Finally, the mechanical properties of the reinforced AZ61/SiCp composite and Mg alloy AZ61 tubes are compared with those of the billets to manifest the advantages of extrusion processes and reinforcement of SiC particulates. The microstructures of the billet and extruded tubes are also observed. Through the improvement of the strength of the tube product, its life cycle can be extended and the energy consumption can be reduced, and eventually the environmental sustainability is achieved.

  14. Simulation and Analysis of Finite Volume of Hot Forging Process of Nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarefdoust, M.; Hosseyni, M.

    2011-08-01

    In this study the forging operations of nut has been modeled. This nut is a part which is manufactured with the help of hot forging. The aim of this research is utilizing computers in designing forming process, and in particular, modeling of hot forging in the nut and to inquire the stresses appeared on the mold. For this purpose Pro/Engineer software for modeling, and SuperForge2004 software for analyzing the process have been used. This part is formed in two stages. To enrich the results coming out of the use of the software, the findings achieved from the modeling of the first stage are compared with its analytic dissolving. In the second stage modeling of metal forming the effect of rake on increasing the stresses imposed to the die mold is studied. The aim of this research is to correct the molds and the volume of the raw materials so that we can produce high qualified parts in spite of raw material low volume and low pressure on the molds.

  15. Hot Deformation Processing Map and Microstructural Evaluation of the Ni-Based Superalloy IN-738LC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjadi, S. A.; Chaichi, A.; Ezatpour, H. R.; Maghsoudlou, A.; Kalaie, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of the Ni-based superalloy IN-738LC was investigated by means of hot compression tests over the temperature range of 1000-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.01-1 s-1. The obtained peak flow stresses were related to strain rate and temperature through the hyperbolic sine equation with activation energy of 950 kJ/mol. Dynamic material model was used to obtain the processing map of IN-738LC. Analysis of the microstructure was carried out in order to study each domain's characteristic represented by the processing map. The results showed that dynamic recrystallization occurs in the temperature range of 1150-1200 °C and strain rate of 0.1 s-1 with the maximum power dissipation efficiency of 35%. The unstable domain was exhibited in the temperature range of 1000-1200 °C and strain rate of 1 s-1 on the occurrence of severe deformation bands and grain boundary cracking.

  16. Evaluation of the surface strength of glass plates shaped by hot slumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Basso, Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta; Ghigo, Mauro; Pareschi, Giovanni; Salmaso, Bianca; Sironi, Giorgia; Spiga, Daniele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; D'Este, Alberto; Dall'Igna, Roberto; Silvestri, Mirko; Parodi, Giancarlo; Martelli, Francesco; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hot slumping technology is under development by several research groups in the world for the realization of grazing-incidence segmented mirrors for x-ray astronomy, based on thin glass plates shaped over a mold at temperatures above the transformation point. The performed thermal cycle and related operations might have effects on the strength of the glass, with consequences for the structural design of the elemental optical modules and, consequently, on the entire x-ray optic for large astronomical missions such as IXO and ATHENA. The mechanical strength of glass plates after they underwent the slumping process was tested through destructive double-ring tests in the context of a study performed by the Astronomical Observatory of Brera with the collaboration of Stazione Sperimentale del Vetro and BCV Progetti. The entire study was done on more than 200 D263 Schott borosilicate glass specimens of dimensions 100 mm×100 mm and a thickness 0.4 mm, either flat or bent at a radius of curvature of 1000 mm through the pressure-assisted hot slumping process developed by INAF-OAB. The collected experimental data have been compared with nonlinear finite element model analyses and treated with the Weibull statistic to assess the current IXO glass x-ray telescope design, in terms of survival probability, when subjected to static and acoustic loads characteristic of the launch phase. The paper describes the activities performed and presents the obtained results.

  17. Novel Controlled Release Polymer-Lipid Formulations Processed by Hot Melt Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Islam, Muhammad T; Halsey, Sheelagh; Amin, Devyani; Douroumis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of novel polymer/lipid formulations on the dissolution rates of the water insoluble indomethacin (INM), co-processed by hot melt extrusion (HME). Formulations consisted of the hydrophilic hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose polymer (HPMCAS) and stearoyl macrogol-32 glycerides-Gelucire 50/13 (GLC) were processed with a twin screw extruder to produce solid dispersions. The extrudates characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and hot stage microscopy (HSM) indicated the presence of amorphous INM within the polymer/lipid matrices. In-line monitoring via near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy revealed significant peak shifts indicating possible interactions and H-bonding formation between the drug and the polymer/lipid carriers. Furthermore, in vitro dissolution studies showed a synergistic effect of the polymer/lipid carrier with 2-h lag time in acidic media followed by enhanced INM dissolution rates at pH > 5.5.

  18. Solar production of industrial process hot water: Operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, J. I.; Neimeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1980-12-01

    The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation and of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment is provided.

  19. Investigation of the Hot-Stamping Process for Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheet by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. S.; Xing, Z. W.; Bao, J.; Song, B. Y.

    2010-04-01

    Hot forming is a new way to manufacture complex-shaped components of advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) sheet with a minimum of spring-back. Numerical simulation is an effective way to examine the hot-forming process, particularly to determine thermal and thermo-mechanical characteristics and their dependencies on temperature, strain and strain rate. The flow behavior of the 22MnB5 AHSS is investigated through hot tensile tests. A 3D finite element (FE) model of hot-stamping process for the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] shaped part is built under the ABAQUS/Explicit environment based on the solutions of several key problems, such as treatment of contact between blank and tools, determination of material characteristics and meshing, etc. Numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the influence of blank holder force (BHF) and die gap on the hot-forming process for the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] shaped part. Numerical results show the FE model is effective in simulation of hot-forming process. Large BHF reduces the amount of spring-back and improves the contact of flange with tools while avoiding cracking of stamped part. Die gap has a considerable influence on the distribution of temperature on side walls; the larger the die gap, higher is the temperature on the sidewall of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] shaped part.

  20. Evolution of Oxide Inclusions in Si-Mn Killed Steels During Hot-Rolling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Guo, Changbo; Zhang, Lifeng; Ling, Haitao; Li, Chao

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of oxide inclusions in Si-Mn killed steels refined by slags of different basicity during a four-pass industrial hot-rolling process was investigated using an automated microscopy system. High-basicity refining slag induced the formation of CaO- and Al2O3-containing inclusions, while refining slag with 0.8 basicity induced dominant inclusions of SiO2 and MnO-SiO2. CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions mainly formed endogenously during solidification and cooling of Ca-containing steels, where Ca originated from slag-steel reactions. However, the larger-sized higher-CaO inclusions originated from slag entrainment. Different inclusions presented different hot-rolling behaviors. The inclusion composition changed by deformation and new phase formation. The dominant oxide types were unchanged under refinement by low-basicity slag; however, they changed under refinement with high-basicity slag. The deformation index of inclusions decreased with increasing accumulated reduction (AR) of the steel. The difference in deformation index between different inclusion types was the largest in the first rolling stage and decreased in subsequent stages. SiO2-CaO and SiO2-MnO-CaO inclusions had larger deformation indices during hot rolling but smaller indices in the last two stages. High-basicity slag increased inclusion complexity; from the perspective of cold-drawing performance, low-basicity refining slag is better for the industrial production of tire-cord steels.

  1. Evolution of Oxide Inclusions in Si-Mn Killed Steels During Hot-Rolling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Guo, Changbo; Zhang, Lifeng; Ling, Haitao; Li, Chao

    2017-07-01

    The evolution of oxide inclusions in Si-Mn killed steels refined by slags of different basicity during a four-pass industrial hot-rolling process was investigated using an automated microscopy system. High-basicity refining slag induced the formation of CaO- and Al2O3-containing inclusions, while refining slag with 0.8 basicity induced dominant inclusions of SiO2 and MnO-SiO2. CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions mainly formed endogenously during solidification and cooling of Ca-containing steels, where Ca originated from slag-steel reactions. However, the larger-sized higher-CaO inclusions originated from slag entrainment. Different inclusions presented different hot-rolling behaviors. The inclusion composition changed by deformation and new phase formation. The dominant oxide types were unchanged under refinement by low-basicity slag; however, they changed under refinement with high-basicity slag. The deformation index of inclusions decreased with increasing accumulated reduction (AR) of the steel. The difference in deformation index between different inclusion types was the largest in the first rolling stage and decreased in subsequent stages. SiO2-CaO and SiO2-MnO-CaO inclusions had larger deformation indices during hot rolling but smaller indices in the last two stages. High-basicity slag increased inclusion complexity; from the perspective of cold-drawing performance, low-basicity refining slag is better for the industrial production of tire-cord steels.

  2. Dip-coating of yield stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, M.; Bleyer, J.; Andrieux, A. L.; Boujlel, J.; Coussot, P.

    2016-05-01

    We review and discuss the characteristics of dip-coating of yield stress fluids on the basis of theoretical considerations, numerical simulations of the flow in the bath, and experimental data with different materials. We show that in general, due to the yield stress, viscous dissipations are sufficiently large for capillary effects to be negligible in the process. Dip-coating with yield stress fluids is thus essentially governed by an equilibrium between viscous and gravity effects. In contrast with simple liquids, the coated thickness is uniform and remains fixed to the plate. At low velocities, it appears to tend to a value significantly smaller than the Derjaguin and Levi prediction [B. V. Derjaguin and S. M. Levi, Film Coating Theory (The Focal Press, London, 1964)], i.e., critical thickness of stoppage of a free surface flow along a vertical plate. We show that this comes from the fact that in the bath only a relatively small layer of fluid is in its liquid regime along the moving plate, while the rest of the material is in a solid regime. From numerical simulations, we describe the general trends of this liquid layer, and in particular, its thickness as a function of the rheological characteristics and plate velocity. We finally propose a model for the dip-coating of yield stress fluid, assuming that the solid volume of fluid finally fixed to the plate results from the mass flux of the liquid layer in the bath minus a mass flux due to some downward flow under gravity in the transition zone. A good agreement between this model and experimental data is found for a fluid with a yield stress larger than 20 Pa.

  3. Analysis of Operational Parameters Affecting the Sulfur Content in Hot Metal of the COREX Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengli; Wang, Laixin; Kou, Mingyin; Wang, Yujue; Zhang, Jiacong

    2017-02-01

    The COREX process, which has obvious advantages in environment protection, still has some disadvantages. It has a higher sulfur content in hot metal (HM) than the blast furnace has. In the present work, the distribution and transfer of sulfur in the COREX have been analyzed and several operational parameters related to the sulfur content in HM ([pct S]) have been obtained. Based on this, the effects of the coal rate, slag ratio, temperature of HM, melting rate, binary basicity ( R 2), the ratio of MgO/Al2O3, utilization of reducing gas, top gas consumption per ton burden solid, metallization rate, oxidation degree of reducing gas, and coal and DRI distribution index on the sulfur content in HM are investigated. What's more, a linear model has been developed and subsequently used for predicting and controlling the S content in HM of the COREX process.

  4. Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

  5. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  6. Evaluation of a Mobile Hot Cell Technology for Processing Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; R.P. Miklos; F. Yapuncich; L. Care

    2009-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) currently does not have the necessary capabilities to process all remote-handled wastes resulting from the Laboratory’s nuclear-related missions. Over the years, various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored programs undertaken at the INL have produced radioactive wastes and other materials that are categorized as remote-handled (contact radiological dose rate > 200 mR/hr). These materials include Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), transuranic (TRU) waste, waste requiring geological disposal, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (both radioactive and hazardous per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]), and activated and/or radioactively-contaminated reactor components. The waste consists primarily of uranium, plutonium, other TRU isotopes, and shorter-lived isotopes such as cesium and cobalt with radiological dose rates up to 20,000 R/hr. The hazardous constituents in the waste consist primarily of reactive metals (i.e., sodium and sodium-potassium alloy [NaK]), which are reactive and ignitable per RCRA, making the waste difficult to handle and treat. A smaller portion of the waste is contaminated with other hazardous components (i.e., RCRA toxicity characteristic metals). Several analyses of alternatives to provide the required remote-handling and treatment capability to manage INL’s remote-handled waste have been conducted over the years and have included various options ranging from modification of existing hot cells to construction of new hot cells. Previous analyses have identified a mobile processing unit as an alternative for providing the required remote-handled waste processing capability; however, it was summarily dismissed as being a potentially viable alternative based on limitations of a specific design considered. In 2008 INL solicited expressions of interest from Vendors who could provide existing, demonstrated technology that could be applied to the retrieval, sorting, treatment (as required), and

  7. A Processing Map for Hot Deformation of an Ultrafine-Grained Aluminum-Magnesium-Silicon Alloy Prepared by Mechanical Milling and Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hamed; Rahbar Niazi, Masoud; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-12-01

    Uniaxial compression test at different temperatures [573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C)] and strain rates (0.01 to 1 s-1) was employed to study the hot deformation behavior of an ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al6063 alloy prepared by the powder metallurgy route. The UFG alloy with an average grain size of ~0.3 µm was prepared by mechanical milling of a gas-atomized aluminum alloy powder for 20 hours followed by hot powder extrusion at 723 K (450 °C). To elaborate the effect of grain size, the aluminum alloy powder was extruded without mechanical milling to attain a coarse-grained (CG) structure with an average grain size of about 2.2 µm. By employing the dynamic materials model, processing maps for the hot deformation of the UFG and CG Al alloy were constructed. For investigation of microstructural evolutions and deformation instability occurring upon hot working, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were utilized. It is shown that the grain refinement increases the deformation flow stress while reducing the strain hardening and power dissipation efficiency during the deformation process at the elevated temperatures. Restoration mechanisms, including dynamic recovery and recrystallization are demonstrated to control microstructural evolutions and thus the deformation behavior. Coarsening of the grain structure in the UFG alloy is illustrated, particularly when the deformation is performed at high temperatures and low strain rates. The manifestations of instability are observed in the form of cracking and void formation.

  8. Ultrafast scattering processes of hot electrons in InSb studied by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, H.; Kanasaki, J.; Tanimura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast scattering processes of hot electrons photoinjected into the conduction band of InSb have been studied using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The nascent distributions of hot-electron packets are captured directly in energy and momentum spaces, and their ultrafast scattering processes are traced at femtosecond temporal resolution on a state-resolved basis. Hot electrons injected in the Γ valley with excess energies above the minimum of the L valley show ultrafast intervalley scattering, with transition times of the order of 40 fs. The relaxation processes in the L valley are resolved in energy and momentum spaces, including their backscattering into the Γ valley during relaxation. In contrast, relaxation of hot electrons with excess energy below the minimum of the L valley is governed by the direct impact ionization (IMP). We reveal state-selective features of the IMP process, and we have determined the direct IMP rate to be 7 ×1012s-1 for hot electrons with excess energy in the range of 0.35 to 0.6 eV. The direct IMP process results in a rapid increase, within 300 fs after excitation, of the electron density at the conduction band minimum (CBM), and phonon-assisted IMP by hot electrons scattered in the L valley and those backscattered into the Γ valley persistently enhances the electron density up to 8 ps after excitation. By analyzing correlations between the IMP rates of hot electrons and the electron densities near the CBM, an important role of a transient Auger recombination is proposed to quantify the yield of low-energy electrons generated in the IMP process.

  9. Night time blood pressure dip

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Dennis; Park, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure, called the “dip”, is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%, referred to as blunted or absent, have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load, whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon, whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors. PMID:26225196

  10. Fusion processing of itraconazole solid dispersions by kinetisol dispersing: a comparative study to hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    DiNunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-03-01

    KinetiSol Dispersing (KSD) is a novel high energy manufacturing process investigated here for the production of pharmaceutical solid dispersions. Solid dispersions of itraconazole (ITZ) and hypromellose were produced by KSD and compared to identical formulations produced by hot melt extrusion (HME). Materials were characterized for solid state properties by modulated differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Dissolution behavior was studied under supersaturated conditions. Oral bioavailability was determined using a Sprague-Dawley rat model. Results showed that KSD was able to produce amorphous solid dispersions in under 15 s while production by HME required over 300 s. Dispersions produced by KSD exhibited single phase solid state behavior indicated by a single glass transition temperature (T(g)) whereas compositions produced by HME exhibited two T(g)s. Increased dissolution rates for compositions manufactured by KSD were also observed compared to HME processed material. Near complete supersaturation was observed for solid dispersions produced by either manufacturing processes. Oral bioavailability from both processes showed enhanced AUC compared to crystalline ITZ. Based on the results presented from this study, KSD was shown to be a viable manufacturing process for the production of pharmaceutical solid dispersions, providing benefits over conventional techniques including: enhanced mixing for improved homogeneity and reduced processing times.

  11. Application of mixed models to assess exposures monitored by construction workers during hot processes.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, S M; Weaver, M; Taylor, D; Kupper, L; Susi, P

    1999-10-01

    Particulate exposures were assessed among construction workers engaged in hot processes in four jobs (boilermakers, ironworkers, pipefitters and welder-fitters) at nine sites in the U.S. After being trained by occupational hygienists, the workers obtained shift-long personal samples at each site for total particulates (TP). Selected samples were also assayed for manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr). Workers provided information about process- and task-related covariates that were present on the days of monitoring. Data were investigated with mixed-model regression analyses that designated the jobs and covariates as fixed effects and the worker and error terms as random effects. Results indicated that the within-worker variance components, but not the between-worker variance components, could be pooled among jobs. Mean air levels for a given agent varied by roughly six to 100 fold among the jobs, with boilermakers and ironworkers experiencing much higher levels of TP and Mn than pipefitters and welder-fitters. Limited data also suggested that welder-fitters were exposed to greater levels of Ni and Cr than pipefitters. Sufficient sample sizes were available to evaluate the effects of covariates upon exposures to TP and Mn. As expected, processes involving more than 50% hot work led to substantially higher levels of TP and Mn than those involving shorter durations of hot work. Local-exhaust or mechanical ventilation reduced exposure to TP (but not Mn) by as much as 44%, and shielded or manual arc welding increased exposure to Mn (but not TP) by about 80%. Parameters estimated with these mixed models were used to calculate probabilities that workers were exposed at levels above U.S. occupational exposure limits (OELs). Regarding TP and Mn, these calculations suggested that 26-95% of exposures to boilermakers and pipefitters and 2-13% of exposures to pipefitters and welder-fitters exceeded the current Threshold Limit Values. Among welder-fitters, limited data

  12. Effect of hot water treatment of beef trimmings on processing characteristics and eating quality of ground beef.

    PubMed

    Pietrasik, Z; Gaudette, N J; Klassen, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of hot water treatment of beef trimmings on the processing characteristics, shelf-life and consumer acceptability of ground beef was evaluated. Hot water treatment (85°C for 40s) substantially enhanced the microbial quality of trimmings during refrigerated storage and this was independent of the fat level of the trimmings. Treatment had no effect on the oxidative stability of trimmings stored up to 7days, ground beef displayed in a retail cabinet for up to 3days, and had minimal effect on textural properties. Instrumental results demonstrate that ground beef from hot water treated trimmings was slightly lighter and tended to have less red color compared to non-treated beef. These color differences did not impact the consumer acceptance of raw patties, and in addition, hot water treatment did not significantly affect the consumer acceptability of cooked patty attributes.

  13. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-01

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  14. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  15. Reliability of nocturnal blood pressure dipping.

    PubMed

    Dimsdale, J E; von Känel, R; Profant, J; Nelesen, R; Ancoli-Israel, S; Ziegler, M

    2000-08-01

    Increasing evidence documents the fact that individuals whose blood pressure drops or 'dips' relatively little at night have a higher risk of numerous cardiovascular illnesses. To examine the reliability of various measures of nocturnal blood pressure dipping. This study examined 17 individuals with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on three 24 h recordings while they pursued a schedule similar to that of in-patients on a clinical research unit. Nocturnal dipping of blood pressure was scored three ways: as the drop in blood pressure between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. ('clocktime'), as the drop in blood pressure tailored to each individual's reported bedtime ('bedtime'), and as the drop in blood pressure accompanying polysomnographically verified sleep ('sleeptime'). Adequate reliability was obtained for all three measures of dipping. There was, in general, a significant correlation across testing occasions (P<0.05). The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.5 to 0.8, depending on which criterion of dipping was selected and whether the endpoint was systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, or mean arterial blood pressure. The reliability of systolic blood pressure dipping was somewhat lower than that of diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure dipping. Dipping appears to be a reliable construct. While no one definition of dipping was demonstrably better than another, the most sensible definition of dipping would allow some adjustment for defining 'night' on the basis of each individual's idiosyncratic bed time.

  16. Microstructural Homogeneity and Hot Deformation of Various Friction-Stir-Processed 5083 Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Bernal, M. A.; Mishra, R. S.; Hernández-Silva, D.; Sauce-Rangel, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Diverse studies on FSP of 5083 Al alloys have been conducted, and some have made comparisons with previous studies of similar alloys, but many times such comparisons could be invalid because of differences in the parameters used during FSP, above all, tool profile. Five 5083 Al alloys produced by different production routes were friction-stir-processed and compared among themselves and with other two superplastic forming (SPF) grade 5083 Al alloys. Results suggest that the grain size refinement is independent of the original microstructure and that there is a relationship between the size of the second phase before and after FSP. The combination of continuous casting 5083 Al alloys + FSP had an outstanding behavior in hot deformation in comparison with rolled or extruded 5083 Al alloys + FSP, and even SPF 5083 Al alloys.

  17. Recent developments in modeling of hot rolling processes: Part II - Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Gerhard; Bambach, Markus; Seuren, Simon; Henke, Thomas; Lohmar, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    This publication gives a short overview of current developments in modeling and simulation of hot rolling processes of metals at the Institute of Metal Forming of RWTH Aachen University. It is based on the fundamentals treated in Part I also contained in this conference issue. It features applications in the field of fast on-line models, where a fast multi-stage rolling model and an analytical approach for predicting the through-thickness shear distribution are presented. In addition, a new concept for sensitivity analysis by automatic differentiation is introduced and discussed. Finally, applications of rolling simulations in the field of integrated computational materials engineering are presented with a focus on TWIP and linepipe steels as well as aluminum.

  18. Microstructural Homogeneity and Hot Deformation of Various Friction-Stir-Processed 5083 Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Bernal, M. A.; Mishra, R. S.; Hernández-Silva, D.; Sauce-Rangel, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Diverse studies on FSP of 5083 Al alloys have been conducted, and some have made comparisons with previous studies of similar alloys, but many times such comparisons could be invalid because of differences in the parameters used during FSP, above all, tool profile. Five 5083 Al alloys produced by different production routes were friction-stir-processed and compared among themselves and with other two superplastic forming (SPF) grade 5083 Al alloys. Results suggest that the grain size refinement is independent of the original microstructure and that there is a relationship between the size of the second phase before and after FSP. The combination of continuous casting 5083 Al alloys + FSP had an outstanding behavior in hot deformation in comparison with rolled or extruded 5083 Al alloys + FSP, and even SPF 5083 Al alloys.

  19. Information Use Differences in Hot and Cold Risk Processing: When Does Information About Probability Count in the Columbia Card Task?

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Łukasz; Kubińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This paper aims to provide insight into information processing differences between hot and cold risk taking decision tasks within a single domain. Decision theory defines risky situations using at least three parameters: outcome one (often a gain) with its probability and outcome two (often a loss) with a complementary probability. Although a rational agent should consider all of the parameters, s/he could potentially narrow their focus to only some of them, particularly when explicit Type 2 processes do not have the resources to override implicit Type 1 processes. Here we investigate differences in risky situation parameters' influence on hot and cold decisions. Although previous studies show lower information use in hot than in cold processes, they do not provide decision weight changes and therefore do not explain whether this difference results from worse concentration on each parameter of a risky situation (probability, gain amount, and loss amount) or from ignoring some parameters. Methods: Two studies were conducted, with participants performing the Columbia Card Task (CCT) in either its Cold or Hot version. In the first study, participants also performed the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) to monitor their ability to override Type 1 processing cues (implicit processes) with Type 2 explicit processes. Because hypothesis testing required comparison of the relative importance of risky situation decision weights (gain, loss, probability), we developed a novel way of measuring information use in the CCT by employing a conjoint analysis methodology. Results: Across the two studies, results indicated that in the CCT Cold condition decision makers concentrate on each information type (gain, loss, probability), but in the CCT Hot condition they concentrate mostly on a single parameter: probability of gain/loss. We also show that an individual's CRT score correlates with information use propensity in cold but not hot tasks. Thus, the affective dimension of

  20. Recrystallization behavior of Ti40 burn-resistant titanium alloy during hot working process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yun-jin; Xin, She-wei; Zhang, Ping-xiang; Zhao, Yong-qing; Ma, Fan-jiao; Liu, Xiang-hong; Feng, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The recrystallization behavior of deformed Ti40 alloy during a heat-treatment process was studied using electron backscatter diffraction and optical microscopy. The results show that the microstructural evolution of Ti40 alloy is controlled by the growth behavior of grain-boundary small grains during the heating process. These small grains at the grain boundaries mostly originate during the forging process because of the alloy's inhomogeneous deformation. During forging, the deformation first occurs in the grain-boundary region. New small recrystallized grains are separated from the parent grains when the orientation between deformation zones and parent grains exceeds a certain threshold. During the heating process, the growth of these small recrystallized grains results in a uniform grain size and a decrease in the average grain size. The special recrystallization behavior of Ti40 alloy is mainly a consequence of the alloy's high β-stabilized elemental content and high solution strength of the β-grains, which partially explains the poor hot working ability of Ti-V-Cr-type burn-resistant titanium alloys. Notably, this study on Ti40 burn-resistant titanium alloy yields important information related to the optimization of the microstructures and mechanical properties.

  1. Hot granules medium pressure forming process of AA7075 conical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guojiang; Zhao, Changcai; Peng, Yaxin; Li, Ying

    2015-05-01

    High strength aluminum alloy plate has a low elongation at room temperature, which leads to the forming of its components need a high temperature. Liquid or gas is used as the pressure-transfer medium in the existing flexible mould forming process, the heat resistance of the medium and pressurizing device makes the application of aluminum alloy plate thermoforming restricted. To solve this problem, the existing medium is replaced by the heat-resisting solid granules and the general pressure equipments are applied. Based on the pressure-transfer performance test of the solid granules medium, the feasibility that the assumption of the extended Drucker-Prager linear model can be used in the finite element analysis is proved. The constitutive equation, the yield function and the theoretical forming limit diagram(FLD) of AA7075 sheet are established. Through the finite element numerical simulation of hot granules medium pressure forming(HGMF) process, not only the influence laws of the process parameters, such as forming temperature, the blank-holder gap and the diameter of the slab, on sheet metal forming performance are discussed, but also the broken area of the forming process is analyzed and predicted, which are coincided with the technological test. The conical part whose half cone angle is 15° and relative height H/d 0 is 0.57, is formed in one process at 250°C. The HGMF process solves the problems of loading and seal in the existing flexible mould forming process and provides a novel technology for thermoforming of light alloy plate, such as magnesium alloy, aluminium alloy and titanium alloy.

  2. Liquid sodium dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Richard L.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1980-01-01

    A system for spraying liquid sodium onto impurities associated with liquid dip seals of nuclear reactors. The liquid sodium mixing with the impurities dissolves the impurities in the liquid sodium. The liquid sodium having dissolved and diluted the impurities carries the impurities away from the site thereby cleaning the liquid dip seal and surrounding area. The system also allows wetting of the metallic surfaces of the dip seal thereby reducing migration of radioactive particles across the wetted boundary.

  3. Characterization and performance assessment of solid dispersions prepared by hot melt extrusion and spray drying process.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Dudhedia, Mayur S; Patel, Ashwinkumar D; Raikes, Michelle S

    2013-11-30

    The present study investigated effect of manufacturing methods such as hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray drying (SD) on physicochemical properties, manufacturability, physical stability and product performance of solid dispersion. Solid dispersions of compound X and PVP VA64 (1:2) when prepared by SD and HME process were amorphous by polarized light microscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry analyses with a single glass transition temperature. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopic analyses revealed similar molecular level interactions between compound X and PVP VA64 as evident by overlapping FT-IR and FT Raman spectra in SD and HME solid dispersions. The compactibility, tabletability, disintegration and dissolution performance were similar for solid dispersions prepared by both processing techniques. Differences in material properties such as surface area, morphological structure, powder densities, and flow characteristics were observed between SD and HME solid dispersion. The SD solid dispersion was physically less stable compared to HME solid dispersion under accelerated stability conditions. Findings from this study suggest that similar product performance could be obtained if the molecular properties of the solid dispersion processed by two different techniques are similar. However differences in material properties might affect the physical stability of the solid dispersions.

  4. DIP: The Database of Interacting Proteins

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DIP Database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. By interaction, the DIP Database creators mean that two amino acid chains were experimentally identified to bind to each other. The database lists such pairs to aid those studying a particular protein-protein interaction but also those investigating entire regulatory and signaling pathways as well as those studying the organisation and complexity of the protein interaction network at the cellular level. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. It is a relational database that can be searched by protein, sequence, motif, article information, and pathBLAST. The website also serves as an access point to a number of projects related to DIP, such as LiveDIP, The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) and JDIP. Users have free and open access to DIP after login. [Taken from the DIP Guide and the DIP website] (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

  5. Efficacy of a hot washing process for pretreated yellow poplar to enhance bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Nicholas J; Elander, Richard T; Newman, Mildred M; Rohrback, Brian T; Ruiz, Raymond O; Torget, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    Cost reductions for pretreatment and bioconversion processes are key objectives necessary to the successful deployment of a bioethanol industry. These unit operations have long been recognized for their impact on the production cost of ethanol. One strategy to achieve this objective is to improve the pretreatment process to produce a pretreated substrate resulting in reduced bioconversion time, lower cellulase enzyme usage, and/or higher ethanol yields. Previous research produced a highly digestible pretreated yellow poplar substrate using a multistage, continuously flowing, very dilute sulfuric acid (0.07% (w/v)) pretreatment. This process reduced the time required for the bioconversion of pretreated yellow poplar sawdust to ethanol. This resulted in a substantially improved yield of ethanol from cellulose. However, the liquid volume requirements, steam demand, and complexity of the flow-through reactor configuration were determined to be serious barriers to commercialization of that process. A reconfigured process to achieve similar performance has been developed using a single-stage batch pretreatment followed by a separation of solids and liquids and washing of the solids at a temperatures between 130 and 150 degrees C. Separation and washing at the elevated temperature is believed to prevent a large fraction of the solubilized lignin and xylan from reprecipitating and/or reassociating with the pretreated solids. This washing of the solids at elevated temperature resulted in both higher recovered yields of soluble xylose sugars and a more digestible pretreated substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Key operating variables and process performance indicators included acid concentration, temperature, wash volume, wash temperature, soluble xylose recovery, and performance of the washed, pretreated solids in bioconversion via simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Initial results indicated over a 50% increase in ethanol yield at 72 h for the hot washed

  6. Dip Process Thermal Barrier Coating for Superalloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-02

    the Project Supervisor is Dr. David J. Rowcliffe, Program Manager, Ceramics . Dr. Kai-Hung Lau, Materials Chemist performed the thermogravimetric...ever increasing demand for higher turbine inlet temperature in gas turbines has created an extensive interest in using ceramic materials to protect...airfoil surfaces. During the past decade, a concentrated effort was devoted to developing ceramic thermal barrier coatings to improve turbine

  7. Effect of calcinations temperature on microstructures, photocatalytic activity and self-cleaning property of TiO2 and SnO2/TiO2 thin films prepared by sol-gel dip coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangchay, Weerachai

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of calcinations temperature on phase transformation, crystallite size, morphology, photocatalytic activity and self-cleaning properties of TiO2 and SnO2/TiO2 thin films. The thin films were preparation by sol-gel dip coating process and calcinations at the temperature of 500 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C for 2 h with the heating rate of 10 °C/mim. The microstructures of the fabricated thin films were characterized by XRD and SEM techniques. The photocatalytic activity of the thin films was also tested via the degradation of methylene blue solution under UV irradiation. Finally, self-cleaning properties of thin films were evaluated by measuring the contact angle of water droplet on the thin films with and without UV irradiation. It was found that SnO2/TiO2 thin films calcinations at the temperature of 500 °C shows the highest of photocatalytic activity and self-cleaning properties.

  8. Piezoresistive pens for dip-pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, A. K.; Fragala, J.; Shile, R.; Simao, P.

    2013-03-01

    The conventional approach to measurement of the deflection of microfabricated cantilevers centers on the use of an optical lever. The use of optical lever technology increases the size, complexity, and cost of systems using microfabricated cantilevers. Occasionally, piezoresistors have been used to sense deflection. But, for atomic force microscope applications in particular, topographical sensitivity has demanded the higher sensitivity of the optical lever. For dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) microfabricated cantilevers do not require the same degree of deflection sensitivity. So, for these applications, piezoresistors can be used to sense deflection. In this work, we present a novel approach to an integrated DPN pen. Piezoresistive silicon stress sensors are integrated into a silicon nitride cantilever. The device design, process design, and fabrication methods for building these sensors, and sensor-actuators, are demonstrated. Integration of heaters, along with the piezoresistors, is also demonstrated.

  9. Mass loss and a possible Population II lithium dip

    SciTech Connect

    Dearborn, D.S.P.; Schramm, D.N.; Hobbs, L.M. Chicago, Universita Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI )

    1992-08-01

    It is shown that the recent observation of a subplateau lithium abundance for a high-surface-temperature Population II star relative to the Population II lithium plateau can be explained by main-sequence mass loss. This explanation is identical to a previously proposed explanation for the Population I lithium dip and predicts a similar dip for Population II. It is assumed that the main-sequence mass loss in both cases is associated with the instability strip intersecting the main sequence. This mass-loss process can also decrease globular cluster ages by about 1 Gyr. 21 refs.

  10. Fabrication of Luminescent Nanostructures by Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; Miller, A E; Klare, J E; Weeks, B L; Woods, B W; DeYoreo, J J

    2002-06-25

    We used a combination of dip-pen nanolithography and scanning optical confocal microscopy to fabricate and visualize luminescent nanoscale patterns of various materials on glass substrates. We show that this method can be used successfully to push the limits of dip-pen nanolithography down to controlled deposition of single molecules. We also demonstrate that this method is able to create and visualize protein patterns on surfaces. Finally, we show that our method can be used to fabricate polymer nanowires of controlled size using conductive polymers. We also present a kinetic model that accurately describes the deposition process.

  11. Application of annular centrifugal contactors in the hot test of the improved total partitioning process for high level liquid waste.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wuhua; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianchen; Wang, Shuwei; Feng, Xiaogui; Wang, Xinghai; Li, Shaowei; Xu, Chao

    2014-08-15

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) produced from the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel still contains moderate amounts of uranium, transuranium (TRU) actinides, (90)Sr, (137)Cs, etc., and thus constitutes a permanent hazard to the environment. The partitioning and transmutation (P&T) strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of HLLW, in which the partitioning of HLLW is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a TRPO (tri-alkylphosphine oxide) process for the removal of actinides, a CESE (crown ether strontium extraction) process for the removal of Sr, and a CECE (calixcrown ether cesium extraction) process for the removal of Cs, has been developed to treat Chinese HLLW. A 160-hour hot test of the improved total partitioning process was carried out using 72-stage 10-mm-dia annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) and genuine HLLW. The hot test results showed that the average DFs of total α activity, Sr and Cs were 3.57 × 10(3), 2.25 × 10(4) and 1.68 × 10(4) after the hot test reached equilibrium, respectively. During the hot test, 72-stage 10-mm-dia ACCs worked stable, continuously with no stage failing or interruption of the operation.

  12. Dynamic recrystallization and texture evolution of Mg–Y–Zn alloy during hot extrusion process

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.B.; Li, X.; Zhang, D.P.; Cheng, L.R.; Meng, J.; Zhang, H.J.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and texture evolution of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} and Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} (atomic percent) alloys during hot extrusion were systematically investigated. The coarse LPSO phases with higher volume fraction (∼ 57%) suppressed the twinning generation in the initial stage of extrusion, and accelerated the dynamic recrystallization through the particle deformation zones. Therefore, the volume fraction of DRXed grains in as-extruded Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy was much higher than that of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} alloy. The intensive recrystallization process resulted in the conventional basal texture weakening, although the texture evolution was mainly dominated by flow behavior. The dynamic recrystallization behavior in Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy restricted the formation of deformation texture, and thus the more random texture was observed during the whole extrusion process. - Highlights: • The densely coarse LPSO phases suppressed the twinning deformation. • Coarse LPSO phases induced the particle stimulated nucleation effect. • Dynamic recrystallization resulted in the basal texture weakening effect.

  13. Process analytical techniques for hot-melt extrusion and their application to amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Hitzer, Patrick; Bäuerle, Tim; Drieschner, Tobias; Ostertag, Edwin; Paulsen, Katharina; van Lishaut, Holger; Lorenz, Günter; Rebner, Karsten

    2017-07-01

    Newly developed active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are often poorly soluble in water. As a result the bioavailability of the API in the human body is reduced. One approach to overcome this restriction is the formulation of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs), e.g., by hot-melt extrusion (HME). Thus, the poorly soluble crystalline form of the API is transferred into a more soluble amorphous form. To reach this aim in HME, the APIs are embedded in a polymer matrix. The resulting amorphous solid dispersions may contain small amounts of residual crystallinity and have the tendency to recrystallize. For the controlled release of the API in the final drug product the amount of crystallinity has to be known. This review assesses the available analytical methods that have been recently used for the characterization of ASDs and the quantification of crystalline API content. Well-established techniques like near- and mid-infrared spectroscopy (NIR and MIR, respectively), Raman spectroscopy, and emerging ones like UV/VIS, terahertz, and ultrasonic spectroscopy are considered in detail. Furthermore, their advantages and limitations are discussed with regard to general practical applicability as process analytical technology (PAT) tools in industrial manufacturing. The review focuses on spectroscopic methods which have been proven as most suitable for in-line and on-line process analytics. Further aspects are spectroscopic techniques that have been or could be integrated into an extruder.

  14. Advanced numerical models for the thermo-mechanical-metallurgical analysis in hot forging processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducato, Antonino; Fratini, Livan; Micari, Fabrizio

    2013-05-01

    In the paper a literature review of the numerical modeling of thermo-mechanical-metallurgical evolutions of a metal in hot forging operations is presented. In particular models of multiaxial loading tests are considered for carbon steels. The collected examples from literature regard phases transformations, also martensitic transformations, morphologies evolutions and transformation plasticity phenomena. The purpose of the tests is to show the correlation between the mechanical and the metallurgical behavior of a carbon steel during a combination of several types of loads. In particular a few mechanical tests with heat treatment are analyzed. Furthermore, Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy is considered. Such material is a multi-phasic alloy, at room temperature made of two main different phases, namely Alpha and Beta, which evolve during both cooling and heating stages. Several numerical applications, conducted using a commercial implicit lagrangian FEM code are presented too. This code can conduct tri-coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical simulations of forming processes. The numerical model has been used to carry out a 3D simulation of a forging process of a complex shape part. The model is able to take into account the effects of all the phenomena resulting from the coupling of thermal, mechanical and metallurgical events. As simulation results strongly depend on the accuracy of input data, physical simulation experiments on real-material samples are carried out to characterize material behavior during phase transformation.

  15. 78 FR 21159 - Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's Approval of the Information... Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)). DATES: Comments must be submitted (postmarked... on Dipping and Coating Operations (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)) requires employers to post a...

  16. Study on the Hot Processing Parameters-Impact Toughness Correlation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaohui; Zeng, Weidong; Sun, Yu; Han, Yuanfei; Zhao, Yongqing

    2016-05-01

    In this research, the hot processing parameters-impact toughness correlation of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy is studied. Fifty-four groups of hot processing treatments with different forging temperatures (930, 950, 970 °C), deformation degrees (20, 50, 80%), annealing temperatures (600, 700, 800 °C), and annealing time (1 and 5 h) were conducted. The orthogonal design was used to find the primary hot processing parameters influencing the impact toughness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results show that the annealing temperature can exert the biggest influence on impact toughness. Low annealing temperature is essential to achieve high impact toughness value. In addition, the BP neural network was used to describe the quantitative correlation between hot processing parameters and impact toughness. The results show that the BP neural network exhibits good performance in predicting the impact toughness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The prediction error is within 5%. The BP neural network and the orthogonal design method are mutually confirmed in the present work. Finally, based on the microstructure analysis, the reasons responsible for above experimental results are explained.

  17. Hydrogen-exchange reactions via hot hydrogen atoms produced in the dissociation process of molecular hydrogen on Ir{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Okada, Michio; Nakamura, Mamiko; Kasai, Toshio; Murata, Yoshitada

    2001-12-01

    Adsorption and reaction of hydrogen (deuterium) on the Ir{111} surface has been studied with temperature-programmed desorption and direct measurements of desorbing molecules using a quadrupole mass spectrometer at ˜100 K. H2 exposure of the D-precovered Ir{111} surface was found to induce the desorption of HD and D2 molecules. This result suggests that energetic H atoms (hot H atoms) produced in the dissociation process of incident H2 molecules react with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as HD molecules or produce secondary energetic D atoms via energy transfer. Secondary energetic D atoms (secondary hot D atoms) also induce the associative reactions with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as D2 molecules. We will discuss the hot-H-atom-mediated reaction based on both empirical and steady-state approximation models for interpreting the present experimental results.

  18. Hot-melt extrusion as a continuous manufacturing process to form ternary cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Justine; Krier, Fabrice; Ratwatte, Shenelka; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Jerome, Christine; Evrard, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hot-melt extrusion (HME) as a continuous process to form cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes in order to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of itraconazole (ITZ), a class II model drug molecule of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. Different CD derivatives were tested in a 1:1 (CD:ITZ) molar ratio to obtain CD ternary inclusion complexes in the presence of a polymer, namely Soluplus(®) (SOL). The CD used in this series of experiments were β-cyclodextrin (βCD), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) with degrees of substitution of 0.63 and 0.87, randomly methylated β-cyclodextrin (Rameb(®)), sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (Captisol(®)) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (Crysmeb(®)). Rheology testing and mini extrusion using a conical twin screw mini extruder were performed to test the processability of the different CD mixtures since CD are not thermoplastic. This allowed Captisol(®) and Crysmeb(®) to be discarded from the study due to their high impact on the viscosity of the SOL/ITZ mixture. The remaining CD were processed by HME in an 18mm twin screw extruder. Saturation concentration measurements confirmed the enhancement of solubility of ITZ for the four CD formulations. Biphasic dissolution tests indicated that all four formulations had faster release profiles compared to the SOL/ITZ solid dispersion. Formulations of HPβCD 0.63 and Rameb(®) even reached 95% of ITZ released in both phases after 1h. The formulations were characterized using thermal differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance infra-red analysis. These analyses confirmed that the increased release profile was due to the formation of ternary inclusion complexes.

  19. )/Al Composites Fabricated by Hot Pressing and Subsequent Friction-Stir Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Xiao, B. L.; Wang, Q. Z.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2014-06-01

    In situ (Al3Ti + Al2O3)/Al composites were fabricated in an Al-TiO2 system by the combination of hot pressing (HP) and friction-stir processing (FSP). The effects of HP and FSP parameters on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the in situ composites were studied. The Al-TiO2 reaction extent increased with increasing the temperature and holding time of HP. Subsequent FSP not only induced Al-TiO2 reaction, resulting in the formation of nanosized Al3Ti and Al2O3, but also rounded the polygonal Al3Ti particles formed during HP. The tensile strength of the FSP sample in which the Al-TiO2 reaction took place completely during HP was lower than that of the FSP samples in which the Al-TiO2 reaction took place hardly or partly during HP. For the FSP samples in which the Al-TiO2 reaction took place hardly during HP, the volume fraction of reinforcing particles increased with decreasing the traverse speed, resulting in the increase in tensile strength of the FSP samples. At a traverse speed of 25 mm/min, increasing the rotation rate from 1000 to 2000 rpm produced little influence on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the in situ composites. Additional 2-pass FSP in water refined the matrix grains, resulting in the significant increase in the tensile strength.

  20. Processing and microstructure of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite by hot-pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Katsumi; Budiyanto; Imai, Masamitsu; Yano, Toyohiko

    1998-10-01

    Continuous 2D woven fiber-reinforced SiC composites were fabricated by hot-pressing in Ar at 1750°C under a pressure of 40 MPa using Al-B-C or Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3-CaO system as sintering additives. In this study, fracture behavior and microstructure of the composites fabricated by this process were investigated. These composites achieved nearly full density in both cases. In the case of the composite with Al-B-C additives, the load-displacement behavior of the composite with non-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed completely brittle fracture, whereas that of the composite with BN-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed ductile fracture with a lot of fiber pull-out. On the contrary, in the case of the composite with Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3-CaO additives, the load-displacement behavior of the composite with non-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed slight ductile fracture with small tails, whereas that of the composite with BN-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed completely brittle fracture.

  1. Optimization of hot working parameters of as-forged Nitinol 60 shape memory alloy using processing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiaoyong; Lu, Shiqiang; Wang, Kelu; Li, Guifa

    2015-07-01

    The hot deformation behavior of as-forged Nitinol 60 alloy (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti) was studied over the ranges of temperature, 650-850 °C, and strain rate, 0.01-1 s-1, using isothermal constant strain rate compression tests in a Gleeble-3500 simulator. The processing maps, based on the dynamic materials model, were developed to optimize the hot working parameters. The results show that the deformation parameters have a marked effect on the power dissipation efficiency and the instability parameter. A single unstable region (650-775 °C, 0.037-1 s-1), associated with flow localization and/or adiabatic shear, is detected from the processing map. This should be avoided in hot working process. The optimized hot working conditions correspond to 680-790 °C, 0.01-0.025 s-1 with peak efficiency of 0.45 at 720 °C, 0.01 s-1, and 820-850 °C, 0.1-1 s-1 with peak efficiency of 0.5 at 850 °C, 1 s-1. Microstructure observations indicate that the main deformation mechanism of optimized domains involves dynamic recrystallization.

  2. Narrow groove welding of titanium using the hot-wire gas tungsten arc process

    SciTech Connect

    Crement, D.J. )

    1993-04-01

    From this study of automatic gas tungsten arc welding of commercially pure titanium, the following may be concluded: (1) automatic cold-wire GTAW and automatic hot-wire GTAW may be used to weld titanium in the open without contamination from the atmosphere when proper shielding is used; (2) automatic hot-wire GTAW exhibits substantial reductions in transverse weld shrinkage, as compared to manual GTAW; (3) increased deposition rates can be achieved with hot-wire additions to automatic gas tungsten arc welding; (4) automatic cold-wire GTAW and automatic hot-wire GTAW may be used with narrow groove joint designs; (5) direct viewing of the arc may be used to aid in torch placement and wire entry position.

  3. The r-process nucleosynthesis in an expanding hot bubble in supernovae explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Rulee; Duorah, H. L.; Duorah, K.

    2006-08-01

    The r-process is one of the major nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the production of heavy elements beyond iron. Recent models of r-process nucleosynthesis rely on a neutrino-heated bubble developing at late times, which provides both the necessary conditions and the requisite amount of ejected mass for the r-process (Wooseley et al '94) . In the neutrino-driven explosion, only a small amount of matter is heated to the requisite high specific energy and entropy. Meyer et al (1992) first calculated the r-process under conditions appropriate to a neutrino-heated bubble and found that the solar r-process abundances could be replicated. They showed that the hot bubble that forms outside the protoneutron star during a SN explosion may be a viable site for the r-process as long as the entropy per baryon can be made sufficiently high. But in a very neutron rich environment such as a neutron star , the r-process could occur even at low entropy (Cowan and Thielemann, 2004). The high entropy wind is not the correct r-process site , owing to the inherent deficiencies in the abundance pattern below A=110 as well as the problems in obtaining the high entropies in SN II explosions required for producing the massive r-process nuclei up to A ≅ 195 and beyond ( Freiburghaus et al., 1999). Modelers of r-process nucleosynthesis find the entropy of the expanding matter and the overall n/p ratio to be more useful parameter than the temp and neutron density. We have tried to associate the explosion entropies with the site-independent classical approach (n[n] and T) and thereby compare the results of the two approaches from the abundances at different entropy conditions. We find that en entropy of ≈ 300 with Y[e] ≈ 0.45 can lead to a successful r-process. This is in agreement with the r-process abundance peaks at n[n] ≈ 10^32 cm^-3 and T[9] ≈ 1.5 . References : 1. Cowan J.J. and Thielemann F. K., Physics Today, 2004 2. Woosley S.E., Wilson J.R., Mathews G. J., Hoffman

  4. Investigation of passive and active silica-tin oxide nanostructured optical fibers fabricated by "inverse dip-coating" and "powder in tube" method based on the chemical sol-gel process and laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, G.; Restoin, C.; Roy, P.; Jamier, R.; Rougier, S.; Duclere, J.-R.; Lecomte, A.; Dauliat, R.; Blondy, J.-M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a study of original nanostructured optical fibers based on the SiO2-SnO2-(Yb3+) system. Two different processes have been developed and compared: the sol-gel chemical method associated to the "inverse dip-coating" (IDC) and the "powder in tube" (PIT). The microstructural and optical properties of the fibers are studied according to the concentration of SnO2. X-Ray Diffraction as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy studies show that the SnO2 crystallizes into the cassiterite phase as nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 4 to 50 nm as a function of tin oxide concentration. A comparative study highlights a better conservation of SnO2 into the fiber core with the PIT approach according to the refractive index profile and energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry measurement. The attenuation evaluated by the classic cut-back method gives respectively values higher than 3 dB/m and 0.2 dB/m in the visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) ranges for the PIT fibers whereas background losses reach 0.5 dB/m in the VIS range for IDC fibers. The introduction of ytterbium ions into the core of PIT fibers, directly in the first chemical step, leads to a laser emission (between 1050 and 1100 nm) according to the fiber length under 850 nm wavelength pumping. Luminescence studies have demonstrated the influence of the tin oxide on the rare earth optical properties especially by the modification of the absorption (850 to 1000 nm) and emission (950 to 1100 nm) by discretization of the bands, as well as on the IR emission lifetime evaluated to 10 μs.

  5. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6: MICROSTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING IN HOT-STRIP MILLS Part 2 of 2: Constitutive Behavior Modeling of Steels Under Hot-Rolling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yi-Wen Cheng; Patrick Purtscher

    1999-07-30

    This report describes the development of models for predicting (1) constitutive behaviors and (2) mechanical properties of hot-rolled steels as functions of chemical composition, microstructural features, and processing variables. The study includes the following eight steels: A36, DQSK, HSLA-V, HSLA-Nb, HSLA-50/Ti-Nb, and two interstitial-free (IF) grades. These developed models have been integrated into the Hot-Strip Mill Model (HSMM), which simulates the hot strip rolling mills and predicts the mechanical properties of hot-rolled products. The HSMM model has been developed by the University of British Columbia-Canada as a part of project on the microstructural engineering in hot-strip mills.

  6. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to prevent...

  7. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to prevent...

  8. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to prevent...

  9. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.13 Permitted dips and procedures. (a) Dipping requirements; facilities; handling. The dipping of cattle for interstate movement shall be done only with a permitted dip and at places where proper equipment is provided for dipping and for handling the cattle in a manner to prevent...

  10. Synthesis of ZnO nanorods by a hot-wall high-temperature laser deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Hwan; Hwang, In-Sung; Choi, Young-Jin; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2005-03-01

    ZnO nanorods with diameter 30-300 nm were synthesized by a pulsed laser deposition process in a hot-wall type chamber at the elevated temperatures above 800 °C. At temperatures 500-800 °C, ZnO thin films and wrinkles were synthesized. Above 800 °C, vertically aligned ZnO nanorods were grown on the Si and sapphire substrate without any catalysts. The range of diameter was 100-300 nm. When Au catalyst were deposited on the substrate prior to the deposition, the process range of ZnO nanorod become wider and the diameter of ZnO smaller. Especially, ZnO could be grown selectively along the pattern of Au catalyst with the aid of Au-Zn alloy. The feasibility of doping of P, as a p-type dopant, was identified with this hot-wall type and high-temperature compatible process.

  11. Effects of low-frequency electromagnetic field on the surface quality of 7050 aluminum alloy ingots during the hot-top casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Jie; Cui, Jian-Zhong; Zuo, Yu-Bo; Zhao, Zhi-Hao; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2011-04-01

    To improve the quality of 7050 aluminum alloy ingots, low-frequency electromagnetic (LFE) field was applied during the conventional hot-top casting process. Macrostructures and microstructures of the ingots by the conventional and LFE hot-top casting processes were studied. The experimental results show that when the LFE field is turn off during the hot-top casting process, cold folding appears, and the as-cast structure becomes very coarse. Additionally, the thickness of the shell zone is much thinner during the low-frequency electromagnetic hot-top casting process than that during the conventional hot-top casting process. Some reasons for low-frequency electromagnetic field improving the surface quality, refining the structure of the ingot, and minimizing the thickness of the shell zone have been studied.

  12. Dip-separated structural filtering using seislet transform and adaptive empirical mode decomposition based dip filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangkang

    2016-07-01

    The seislet transform has been demonstrated to have a better compression performance for seismic data compared with other well-known sparsity promoting transforms, thus it can be used to remove random noise by simply applying a thresholding operator in the seislet domain. Since the seislet transform compresses the seismic data along the local structures, the seislet thresholding can be viewed as a simple structural filtering approach. Because of the dependence on a precise local slope estimation, the seislet transform usually suffers from low compression ratio and high reconstruction error for seismic profiles that have dip conflicts. In order to remove the limitation of seislet thresholding in dealing with conflicting-dip data, I propose a dip-separated filtering strategy. In this method, I first use an adaptive empirical mode decomposition based dip filter to separate the seismic data into several dip bands (5 or 6). Next, I apply seislet thresholding to each separated dip component to remove random noise. Then I combine all the denoised components to form the final denoised data. Compared with other dip filters, the empirical mode decomposition based dip filter is data-adaptive. One only needs to specify the number of dip components to be separated. Both complicated synthetic and field data examples show superior performance of my proposed approach than the traditional alternatives. The dip-separated structural filtering is not limited to seislet thresholding, and can also be extended to all those methods that require slope information.

  13. Replication of microchannel structures in WC-Co feedstock using elastomeric replica moulds by hot embossing process.

    PubMed

    Sahli, M; Gelin, J-C; Barrière, T

    2015-10-01

    Hot embossing is a net shaping process that is able to produce the micro-components of polymers with intrinsic and complex shapes at lower cost compared with machining and injection moulding. However, the emboss of hard metals, such as WC-Co, is more challenging due to their high thermal conductivity and ease of agglomeration. Thus, a WC-Co alloy mixed with a wax-based binder feedstock was selected. The formed feedstock exhibited pseudo-plastic flow and was successfully embossed (green part). Here, we developed a novel process that is used to replicate polymer microfluidic chips while simultaneously reducing the channel surface roughness of the mould insert, yielding optical-grade (less than 100 nm surface roughness) channels and reservoirs. This paper concerns the replication of metallic microfluidic mould inserts in WC-Co and the parameters associated with feedstock formation via a hot embossing process. A suitable formulation for micro-powder hot embossing has been established and characterised by thermogravimetric analyses and measurements of mixing torques to verify and quantify the homogeneity of the proposed feedstocks. The relative density of the samples increased with processing temperature, and almost fully dense materials were obtained. In this work, the effects of the sintering temperature on the physical properties were systematically analysed. The evolution of the metal surface morphology during the hot embossing process was also investigated. The results indicate that the feedstock can be used to manufacture micro-fluidic die mould cavities with a low roughness, proper dimensions and good shape retention. The shrinkage of the sintered part was approximately 19-24% compared with that of the brown part. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. "Dip-Pen" nanolithography on semiconductor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ivanisevic, A; Mirkin, C A

    2001-08-15

    Dip-Pen Nanolithography (DPN) uses an AFM tip to deposit organic molecules through a meniscus onto an underlying substrate under ambient conditions. Thus far, the methodology has been developed exclusively for gold using alkyl or aryl thiols as inks. This study describes the first application of DPN to write organic patterns with sub-100 nm dimensions directly onto two different semiconductor surfaces: silicon and gallium arsenide. Using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as the ink in the DPN procedure, we were able to utilize lateral force microscopy (LFM) images to differentiate between oxidized semiconductor surfaces and patterned areas with deposited monolayers of HMDS. The choice of the silazane ink is a critical component of the process since adsorbates such as trichlorosilanes are incompatible with the water meniscus and polymerize during ink deposition. This work provides insight into additional factors, such as temperature and adsorbate reactivity, that control the rate of the DPN process and paves the way for researchers to interface organic and biological structures generated via DPN with electronically important semiconductor substrates.

  15. Preparation of monolithic matrices for oral drug delivery using a supercritical fluid assisted hot melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John G; Hallinan, Mark; Kennedy, James E; Devine, Declan M; Geever, Luke M; Blackie, Paul; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2007-02-01

    The use of supercritical fluids as plasticisers in polymer processing has been well documented. The body of work described in this research paper outlines the use of a supercritical CO(2) assisted extrusion process in the preparation of a hot melt extruded monolithic polymer matrix for oral drug delivery. Several batches of matrix material were prepared with Carvedilol used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). These batches were subsequently extruded both with and without supercritical CO(2) incorporation. The resultant matrices were characterised using steady-state parallel plate rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-thermal analysis (microTA) and dissolution testing. Dissolution analysis showed that the use of supercritical CO(2) during the extrusion process resulted in a faster dissolution of API when compared with unassisted extrusion. The supercritical CO(2) incorporation also resulted in reduced viscosity during processing, therefore allowing for quicker throughput and productivity. The results detailed within this paper indicate that supercritical fluid assisted hot melt extrusion is a viable enhancement to conventional hot melt extrusion for the production of monolithic dosage forms.

  16. Metallurgical investigation into ductility dip cracking in nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Fredrick F., II

    A690 is a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy with excellent resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However, the companion filler metal for A690, EN52, has been shown by several researchers to be susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC), which limits its widespread use in joining applications. The Gleeble hot ductility test was used to evaluate the DDC susceptibility of A600 and A690, along with their filler metals, EN82H and EN52, throughout the heating and cooling portions of a simulated weld reheat thermal cycle. Both macroscopic mechanical measures and microscopic measures of DDC were quantified and compared. Water quenching was conducted at select temperatures for subsequent microstructural characterization. Microstructural and microchemical characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques. The greatest resistance to DDC was observed in A600 and A690 during heating, where no DDC cracks formed even when the samples were fractured. Both A690 and EN52 were found to form an intermediate on-cooling dip in ductility and UTS, which corresponded to an increase in ductility dip crack length. The hot ductility and cracking resistance of EN82H remained high throughout the entire thermal cycle. DDC susceptibility in both EN52 and EN82H decreased when the thermal cycle was modified to promote coarsening/precipitation of intergranular carbides prior to straining. AEM analysis did not reveal any sulfur or phosphorous intergranular segregation in EN52 at 1600°F on-heating, on-cooling or after a 60 second hold. The ductility dip cracks were preferentially oriented at a 45° to the tensile axis and were of a wedge type appearance, both of which are characteristic of grain boundary sliding (GBS). Samples with microstructures that consisted of coarsened carbides and/or serrated grain boundaries, which are expected to decrease GBS, were found to be

  17. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., APHIS. Before a dip will be specifically approved as a permitted dip for the eradication of ticks, APHIS... effectually eradicate ticks without injury to the animals dipped. (d) Tissue residues; restriction...

  18. Sheep dip chemicals and water pollution.

    PubMed

    Virtue, W A; Clayton, J W

    1997-02-24

    The Tweed River Purification Board's objective of reducing the numbers and significance of water pollution incidents by a proactive approach based on persuasion and education is described. This has consisted of prioritising potential pollutant sources which have then been investigated in detail followed by discussion and agreement with dischargers as to remedial measures. The paper describes in detail the Board's investigation of pollution from the organophosphate (OP) sheep dips, Diazinon and Propetamphos, and their effects on surface waters throughout its area. Examination of historical incidents and a preliminary survey of sheep farms in the Ettrick Water catchment in 1989 confirmed the potential for serious pollution. Comparison of OP concentrations in the Ettrick with strategic sites throughout the catchment confirmed the widespread nature of the problem and led to visits to every sheep farmer in the Board's area in 1990 and 1991, when 795 dippers were investigated. The study involved risk assessments of the location of dippers and the spent dip disposal practice which confirmed that poor siting, inadequate disposal and particularly poor management of the dipping operation were responsible for the pollution problems observed. Practical advice on the management of dipping and disposal of spent dip was given individually to farmers. The success of the project in reducing pollution is reflected in a significant and sustained reduction in OP concentrations in environmental samples. The future of ectoparasitic treatments for sheep, the potential for antidotes to spent sheep dip and legal obligations relating to its safe disposal is also considered.

  19. Large Capacity SMES for Voltage Dip Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatani, Yu; Saito, Fusao; Ito, Toshinobu; Shimada, Mamoru; Ishida, Satoshi; Shimanuki, Yoshio

    Voltage dips of power grids due to thunderbolts, snow damage, and so on, cause serious damage to production lines of precision instruments, for example, semiconductors. In recent years, in order to solve this problem, uninterruptible power supply systems (UPS) are used. UPS, however, has small capacity, so a great number of UPS are needed in large factories. Therefore, we have manufactured the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system for voltage dip compensation able to protect loads with large capacity collectively. SMES has advantages such as space conservation, long lifetime and others. In field tests, cooperating with CHUBU Electric Power Co., Inc. we proved that SMES is valuable for compensating voltage dips. Since 2007, 10MVA SMES improved from field test machines has been running in a domestic liquid crystal display plant, and in 2008, it protected plant loads from a number of voltage dips. In this paper, we report the action principle and components of the improved SMES for voltage dip compensation, and examples of waveforms when 10MVA SMES compensated voltage dips.

  20. The effects of polymer carrier, hot melt extrusion process and downstream processing parameters on the moisture sorption properties of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Vo, Anh; Patil, Hemlata; Tiwari, Roshan V; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Pimparade, Manjeet B; Repka, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polymer carrier, hot melt extrusion and downstream processing parameters on the water uptake properties of amorphous solid dispersions. Three polymers and a model drug were used to prepare amorphous solid dispersions utilizing the hot melt extrusion technology. The sorption-desorption isotherms of solid dispersions and their physical mixtures were measured by the dynamic vapour sorption system, and the effects of polymer hydrophobicity, hygroscopicity, molecular weight and the hot melt extrusion process were investigated. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging was performed to understand the phase separation driven by the moisture. Solid dispersions with polymeric carriers with lower hydrophilicity, hygroscopicity and higher molecular weight could sorb less moisture under the high relative humidity (RH) conditions. The water uptake ability of polymer-drug solid dispersion systems were decreased compared with the physical mixture after hot melt extrusion, which might be due to the decreased surface area and porosity. The FTIR imaging indicated that the homogeneity of the drug molecularly dispersed within the polymer matrix was changed after exposure to high RH. Understanding the effect of formulation and processing on the moisture sorption properties of solid dispersions is essential for the development of drug products with desired physical and chemical stability. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Effects of oxide layers on surface defects during hot rolling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyungzoon; Kim, Kisoo; Kim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Doh-Jae

    2012-04-01

    An oxide layer, which developed on the surface of a commercial hot rolling mill, was examined by forcibly stopping the roller between mill stands during activity. Liquid quartz was sprayed on the strip to prevent further oxide layer growth during cooling after stopping the hot-rolling mills. Then the thickness and shape of the oxide layer was examined in a cross-sectional view using an optical microscope. The thickness of the oxide layer increased through the 1st and 2nd passes of hot rolling, and then decreased through successive rolling, because the thickening rate by growth is larger than the thinning rate by deformation in high temperature. The temperature distributions of the oxide layer as well as the strip were predicted using the thermo-mechanical finite element method. As thermal conductivity of the oxide layer is low, the temperature deviation of the oxide layer increases and average temperature decreases as the thickness of the oxide layer increases, suggesting the increased formation of surface defects. With these results, a new cooling device was installed between the hot rolling mills to decrease the surface temperature and the thickness of the oxide layer, resulting in improved surface quality of the strip.

  2. Effects of press sizes on internal steam pressure during particleboard hot-pressing process

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai; Michael Birkeland; James M. Wescott; Jane O' Dell; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2009-01-01

    Internal steam pressure produced during the hot-pressing cycle in particleboard production is critical to the newly developed bond strength that will determine the overall performance of particleboard. The difference between the accumulation of internal steam pressure for small panels made in the laboratory and that of large commercial-sized panels makes it difficult...

  3. Design of Channel Type Indirect Blank Holder for Prevention of Wrinkling and Fracture in Hot Stamping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hong-seok; Ha, Se-yoon; Cha, Seung-hoon; kang, Chung-gil; Kim, Byung-min

    2011-08-01

    The hot stamping process has been used in the automotive industry to reduce the weight of the body-in-white and to increase passenger safety via improved crashworthiness. In this study, a new form die with a simple structure that can prevent defects such as wrinkle and fracture is proposed for the manufacture of hot stamped components. The wrinkling at the flange cannot be eliminated when using a conventional form die. It is known that the initiation of wrinkling is influenced by many factors such as the mechanical properties of the sheet material, geometry of the sheet and tool, and other process parameters, including the blank holding force (BHF) and the contact conditions. In this research, channel type indirect blank holder (CIBH) is introduced to replace general blank holder for manufacturing the hot stamped center pillar. First, we investigate the tension force acting on the blank according to the channel shapes. We determine the appropriate range by comparing the tension force with the upper and lower BHFs in a conventional stamping process. We then use FE-analysis to study the influence of the slope angle and corner radius of the channel on the formability. Finally, the center pillar is manufactured using the form die with the selected channel.

  4. Strain-rate sensitivity of powder metallurgy superalloys associated with steady-state DRX during hot compression process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Y. Q.; Xie, B. C.; Zhou, C.; Liang, H. Q.; Fu, M. W.

    2017-03-01

    Strain-rate sensitivity (SRS) is an important parameter to describe the thermodynamic behavior in plastic deformation process. In this research, the variation of SRS associated with steady-state DRX in P/M superalloys was quantitatively investigated. Based on the theoretical analysis and microstructural observation of the alloy after deformation, the SRS coefficient was employed to identify the deformation mechanism of the alloy. Meanwhile, the corresponding relationship between SRS coefficient m, stress exponent n and deformation mechanism was revealed. The stress exponent n in the Arrhenius constitutive model of P/M superalloys was calculated. In addition, it is found there is a relatively stable stress exponent range ( n = 4-6), indicating that dislocation evolution played as the major hot deformation mechanism for P/M FGH4096 superalloy. Furthermore, the Bergstrom model and Senkov model were used and combined together to estimate the SRS coefficient in the steady-state DRX and the m value maintains at 0.2-0.22, which are consistent with the microstructural evolution during hot deformation process. The SRS coefficient distribution map and power dissipation efficiency distribution map were finally constructed associated with the microstructural evolution during hot deformation, which can be used to optimize the processing parameters of the superalloys.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  6. Development of expert systems for the design of a hot-forging process based on material workability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, R.; Prasad, Y. V. R. K.; Sarma, V. V. S.

    2003-12-01

    Most of the time (and cost) involved in planning hot forging process is related to activities strongly dependent on human expertise, intuition, and creativity, and also to iterative procedure involving extensive experimental work. In this paper, the development of an expert system for forging process design, which emphasizes materials’ workability, is discussed. Details of the forging process design expert system, its basic modules, design and implementation details, and deliverables are explained. The system uses the vast database available on the hot workability of more than 200 technologically important materials and the knowledge acquired from a materials’ expert. The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) has been adopted to develop this expert system. The expert system can address three types of functions, namely, forging process design, materials information system, and forging defect analysis. The expert system will aid and prompt a novice engineer in designing a forging process by providing accurate information of the process parameters, lubricants, type of machine, die material, and type of process (isothermal versus non-isothermal) for a given material with a known specification or code and prior history.

  7. Optimizing microfluidic ink delivery for dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debjyoti; Amro, Nabil A.; Fragala, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This work demonstrates the design optimization, fabrication process development, process optimization and testing of a microfluidic ink delivery apparatus (called "Inkwells") for simultaneously coating an array of DPN pens with different inks. The objective of this work is to deliver between 4 and 10 different inks from reservoirs into appropriately spacd microwell array. A tips of the multi-pen array are coated with different inks by dipping them into the microwell array. The reservoirs, microwells and their connecting micro-channels were etched in silicon wafers using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Fluid actuation was achieved by capillary wicking. The optimum layouts for different applications were selected with respect to the volume requirement of inks, the efficacy of ink-well filling, to obviate the problem of bubble formation, and to test the operations of dipping and writing with a parallel array of pens.

  8. Optimizing microfluidic ink delivery for dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debjyoti; Amro, Nabil A.; Fragala, Joe

    2003-12-01

    This work demonstrates the design optimization, fabrication process development, process optimization and testing of a microfluidic ink delivery apparatus (called "Inkwells") for simultaneously coating an array of DPN pens with different inks. The objective of this work is to deliver between 4 and 10 different inks from reservoirs into appropriately spacd microwell array. A tips of the multi-pen array are coated with different inks by dipping them into the microwell array. The reservoirs, microwells and their connecting micro-channels were etched in silicon wafers using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Fluid actuation was achieved by capillary wicking. The optimum layouts for different applications were selected with respect to the volume requirement of inks, the efficacy of ink-well filling, to obviate the problem of bubble formation, and to test the operations of dipping and writing with a parallel array of pens.

  9. What Can Be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Both solar wind charge exchange emission and diffuse thermal emission from the Local Bubble are strongly dominated in the soft X-ray band by lines from highly ionized elements. While both processes share many of the same lines, the spectra should differ significantly due to the different production mechanisms, abundances, and ionization states. Despite their distinct spectral signatures, current and past observatories have lacked the spectral resolution to adequately distinguish between the two sources. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation proposed for future missions has the potential to answer fundamental questions such as whether there is any hot plasma in the Local Hot Bubble, and if so, what are the abundances of the emitting plasma and whether the plasma is in equilibrium. Such instrumentation will provide dynamic information about the solar wind including data on ion species which are currently difficult to track. It will also make possible remote sensing of the solar wind.

  10. Thermal Contact Resistance Estimation: Influence of the Pressure Contact and the Coating Layer during a Hot Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhay, B.; Bourouga, B.; Dessain, C.

    2011-05-01

    The application of hot stamping in the automotive industry has experienced a fast growth due to the need for higher passive safety and weight reduction. Today, it is absolutely necessary to have reliable and accurate simulation predictions in order to assess the forming feasibility of a part as early as possible during the car design phase. In this paper, an original experimental procedure developed to estimate the thermal conductance at the Part-Tools interfaces during a hot stamping process, is presented. The tools set (punch and die) have been designed to form samples with an omega shape. Two types of material have been stamped: the Usibor 1500P® and the 22MnB5 galvanized steel. The object is to describe correctly the thermal boundary conditions at the Part-Tools interfaces; the adopted procedure consists in estimating accurately the thermal contact resistance TCR at different contact points for different contact pressure values.

  11. The chemistry of sodium chloride involvement in processes related to hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium chloride is one of the primary contaminants that enter gas turbine engines and contribute, either directly or indirectly, to the hot corrosion degradation of hot-gas-path components. The paper surveys the results of laboratory experiments along with thermodynamic and mass transport calculations, intended for elucidating the behavior of sodium chloride in combustion environments. It is shown that besides being a source of sodium for the formation of corrosive liquid Na2SO4, the NaCl itself contributes in other indirect ways to the material degradation associated with the high-temperature environmental attack. In addition, the experimental results lend credence to the conceptual scheme presented schematically (behavior of NaCl in a turbine engine combustion gas environment) and resolve conflicting aspects of relevant NaCl misconceptions.

  12. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition chamber and process with multiple gas inlets

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Povolny, Henry S.

    2004-06-29

    A thin film deposition method uses a vacuum confinement cup that employs a dense hot filament and multiple gas inlets. At least one reactant gas is introduced into the confinement cup both near and spaced apart from the heated filament. An electrode inside the confinement cup is used to generate plasma for film deposition. The method is used to deposit advanced thin films (such as silicon based thin films) at a high quality and at a high deposition rate.

  13. Mathematical modeling of heat and mass transfer processes at the ignition of a liquid condensed substance by an immersed hot particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Dmitrii; Kuznetsov, Genii; Strizhak, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    A numerical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes at the heating of combustible liquid was carried out at the interaction of hot small-size steel particle with gasoline. Developed mathematical model considers at two-dimensional statement thermal conduction, thermal convection, transfer of energy by phase change (evaporation of liquid fuel and crystallization of particle material), partial immersion of hot particle in liquid fuel, forming of vapor gap between hot particle and liquid fuel, diffusion of fuel vapors in oxidizer, dependence of thermophysical characteristics of interactive substances on temperature. It was established that the highest rates of heat and mass transfer processes in a system "hot particle - gasoline - air" are possible at temperature of hot particle higher than melting temperature of it material due to the additional heat released at the crystallization of material.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Studies on the Formability of Materials in Hot Stamping and Cold Die Quenching Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Mohamed, M. S.; Cai, J.; Lin, J.; Balint, D.; Dean, T. A.

    2011-05-01

    Formability of steel and aluminium alloys in hot stamping and cold die quenching processes is studied in this research. Viscoplastic-damage constitutive equations are developed and determined from experimental data for the prediction of viscoplastic flow and ductility of the materials. The determined unified constitutive equations are then implemented into the commercial Finite Element code Abaqus/Explicit via a user defined subroutine, VUMAT. An FE process simulation model and numerical procedures are established for the modeling of hot stamping processes for a spherical part with a central hole. Different failure modes (failure takes place either near the central hole or in the mid span of the part) are obtained. To validate the simulation results, a test programme is developed, a test die set has been designed and manufactured, and tests have been carried out for the materials with different forming rates. It has been found that very close agreements between experimental and numerical process simulation results are obtained for the ranges of temperatures and forming rates carried out.

  15. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  16. Hot Deformation and Processing Window Optimization of a 70MnSiCrMo Carbide-Free Bainitic Steel

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ying; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The hot deformation behavior of a high carbon carbide-free bainitic steel was studied through isothermal compression tests that were performed on a Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator at temperatures of 1223–1423 K and strain rates of 0.01–5 s−1. The flow behavior, constitutive equations, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) characteristics, and processing map were respectively analyzed in detail. It is found that the flow stress increases with increasing the strain rate and decreases with increasing the temperature, and the single-peak DRX can be easily observed at high temperatures and/or low strain rates. The internal relationship between the flow stress and processing parameters was built by the constitutive equations embracing a parameter of Z/A, where the activation energy for hot deformation is 351.539 kJ/mol and the stress exponent is 4.233. In addition, the DRX evolution and the critical conditions for starting DRX were discussed. Then the model of the DRX volume fraction was developed with satisfied predictability. Finally, the processing maps at different strains were constructed according to the dynamic material model. The safety domains and flow instability regions were identified. The best processing parameters of this steel are within the temperature range of 1323–1423 K and strain rate range of 0.06–1 s−1. PMID:28772678

  17. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Studies on the Formability of Materials in Hot Stamping and Cold Die Quenching Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Mohamed, M. S.; Cai, J.; Lin, J.; Balint, D.; Dean, T. A.

    2011-05-04

    Formability of steel and aluminium alloys in hot stamping and cold die quenching processes is studied in this research. Viscoplastic-damage constitutive equations are developed and determined from experimental data for the prediction of viscoplastic flow and ductility of the materials. The determined unified constitutive equations are then implemented into the commercial Finite Element code Abaqus/Explicit via a user defined subroutine, VUMAT. An FE process simulation model and numerical procedures are established for the modeling of hot stamping processes for a spherical part with a central hole. Different failure modes (failure takes place either near the central hole or in the mid span of the part) are obtained. To validate the simulation results, a test programme is developed, a test die set has been designed and manufactured, and tests have been carried out for the materials with different forming rates. It has been found that very close agreements between experimental and numerical process simulation results are obtained for the ranges of temperatures and forming rates carried out.

  19. High-temperature ultrasonic sensor for in-situ monitoring of hot isostatic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, David A.; Dutton, Rollie E.

    1996-11-01

    A sensor has been developed and tested that is capable of emitting and receiving ultrasonic energy at temperatures exceeding 900 degrees C and pressures above 150 MPa. The sensor is based on a unique form of aluminum nitride that retains tits piezoelectric properties at high temperatures. The sensor works with standard ultrasonic pulse-receivers and has demonstrated the capability of measuring workpiece deformation during hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Details of the sensor design, performance, and coupling of the ultrasound to the workpiece are described. Ultrasonic data acquired by the sensor, in situ, during HIP runs and at elevated temperatures in air are presented.

  20. 75 FR 17162 - Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's Approval of the Information Collection (Paperwork) Requirement... collection requirement specified in its Standard on Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR...

  1. Hot press molding process for pyramid-type glass optical multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Myeong-Jin; Park, Soon-Sub

    2014-12-01

    By developing a pyramid-shaped reflector, we were able to remove the optical filter that causes the decline in light efficiency in existing systems. A pyramid-type glass optical multiplexer (MUX) can be designed for beam coupling efficiency >60% in a combined module. The module was designed and optimized using CODE V, which utilizes nonlinear curve fitting numerical analysis. Based on optical design data, aspheric grinding paths were developed using ULG APS software. Tungsten carbide optical MUX mold cores were fabricated with an ultraprecision grinding machining device [ULG-100C(H3)] and optimum grinding machining of optical surface roughness (<60 nm, angle tolerance <±0.05 deg). Pyramid-type optical MUX was fabricated using the hot press molding technique, and it was measured by using a contact geometry measuring device for reflection angle and angle uniformity. The measurement data were suitable for 49±0.05 deg, which was the design criterion. In addition, angle uniformity was >99.985%. A pyramid-type glass optical MUX molding technique was developed using an optical mold design, ultraprecision grinding machining technology, and a hot press molding system.

  2. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  3. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties and Structural Changes of Ceramic Filter Materials for Hot Gas Cleaning under Simulated Process Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Westerheide, R.; von der Wehd, C.; Adler, J.; Rehak, P.

    2002-09-19

    The objective of this study is to evaluate changes in structure and mechanical properties of ceramic filter materials under simulated corrosive process conditions. Due to an analysis of the mechanisms of degradation firstly an optimization of materials shall be enabled and secondly a material selection for specific applications shall be relieved. This publication describes the investigations made on many ceramic support materials based on oxides and carbides. Both commercially available and newly developed support materials have been evaluated for specific applications in hot gas cleaning.

  4. Dips in the pulse profiles of accretion powered X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devasia, Jincy; Paul, Biswajit; James, Marykutty; Indulekha, Kavila

    We will report detection of sharp dips in the pulse profiles of several persistent and transient accretion powered X-ray pulsars using RXTE observations.The pulse profiles of accretion pow-ered pulsars carry a lot of information regarding the radiative processes near the surface of the star, magnetic fields that channel the accretion flow etc. The dips in pulse profiles can be due to the interaction of accretion column with the emitting radiation as it passes through the line of sight. We have also investigated the energy dependence and phase width of these dips to get a better understanding of the nature of this feature.

  5. Arch mineral pursues multiple dipping seams

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouls, M.W.

    1981-07-01

    Arch Mineral's three Hanna Basin mines in Carbon County, WY, recover about eight million tpy from more than a dozen coal seams. Arch's experience has proven stripping techniques for dipping seams, and has revealed better methods for recontouring and revegetating mined land.

  6. 9 CFR 72.25 - Dipping methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dipping methods. 72.25 Section 72.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER...

  7. Hot deformation behavior of uniform fine-grained GH4720Li alloy based on its processing map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiu-ying; Yao, Zhi-hao; Dong, Jian-xin

    2016-01-01

    The hot deformation behavior of uniform fine-grained GH4720Li alloy was studied in the temperature range from 1040 to 1130°C and the strain-rate range from 0.005 to 0.5 s-1 using hot compression testing. Processing maps were constructed on the basis of compression data and a dynamic materials model. Considerable flow softening associated with superplasticity was observed at strain rates of 0.01 s-1 or lower. According to the processing map and observations of the microstructure, the uniform fine-grained microstructure remains intact at 1100°C or lower because of easily activated dynamic recrystallization (DRX), whereas obvious grain growth is observed at 1130°C. Metallurgical instabilities in the form of non-uniform microstructures under higher and lower Zener-Hollomon parameters are induced by local plastic flow and primary γ' local faster dissolution, respectively. The optimum processing conditions at all of the investigated strains are proposed as 1090-1130°C with 0.08-0.5 s-1 and 0.005-0.008 s-1 and 1040-1085°C with 0.005-0.06 s-1.

  8. Hot Deformation Behaviors and Processing Maps of 2024 Aluminum Alloy in As-cast and Homogenized States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Guoqun; Gong, Jie; Chen, Xiaoxue; Chen, Mengmeng

    2015-12-01

    The isothermal hot compression tests of as-cast and homogenized 2024 aluminum alloy were carried out under wide range of deformation temperatures (623-773 K) and strain rates (0.001-10 s-1). The constitutive equations for both initial states were established based on Arrhenius model, and the processing maps were constructed based on the dynamic material model. The results show that the flow stress of samples is evidently affected by both the strain rate and deformation temperature, and the flow stress in homogenized state is always higher than that in as-cast state. Through calculating the correlation coefficient ( R) and average absolute relative error of the established constitutive equations, it indicates that Arrhenius model can only provide a rough estimation on the flow stress. However, a much more precise value of the flow stress was obtained by introducing the strain compensation into Arrhenius model, since the effects of strain on the material constants were well considered. Furthermore, according to the processing maps, a suggested range of deformation temperature and strain rate for hot forming process were given then: temperature range 710-773 K and strain rate range 0.001-1 s-1 for as-cast state, and temperature range 680-773 K and strain rate range 0.003-0.22 s-1 for homogenized state.

  9. Dynamic Recrystallization and Processing Map of Pb-30Mg-9Al-1B Alloy During Hot Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yonghua; Li, Ping; Ma, Lishi; Li, Runyue

    2017-07-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior of Pb-30Mg-9Al-1B alloy was investigated during hot compression at temperatures ranging from 513 K to 693 K (240 °C to 420 °C) and stain rates ranging from 0.01 to 10 s-1. Based on the experimental results, the stress-strain curve shows the typical nature of DRX—that a peak flow stress is reached at low strains followed by a steady state at high strain. The correlation between flow stress, temperature, and strain rate can be well expressed by a modified sine hyperbolic type constitutive equation. The value of the Avrami exponent M (nearly equal to 1) in the Avrami equation suggests that the grain boundaries are prior to nucleation sites for DRX, and DRX is controlled by grain growth for Pb-30Mg-9Al-1B alloy. The variation of instability and cracking regions in the constructed processing maps at different strains exhibits the high sensitivity of processing maps to strains. According to the processing maps of Pb-30Mg-9Al-1B alloy, the optimized parameters for hot working were determined to be in the temperature range of 603 K to 693 K (330 °C to 420 °C) and strain rate of 0.01 to 0.1 s-1.

  10. Integration and testing of hot desulfurization and entrained-flow gasification for power generation systems. Phase 2, Process optimization: Volume 3, Effect/fate of chlorides in the zinc titanate hot-gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Paar, T.M.; McMichael, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this project was to support Texaco`s effort to develop the zinc titanate hot-gas desulfurization process for gases produced from their oxygen-blown coal gasifier by answering two key questions that had remained unanswered to date. These questions were: Will chloride in the coal gas affect the performance of the sorbent? Where would the chloride end up following sulfidation and regeneration? Previously, Research Triangle Institute (RTI) completed a bench-scale test series, under a subcontract to Texaco, Inc., for their contract with the US Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC), in which zinc titanate was shown to be a highly promising sorbent for desulfurizing the Texaco O{sub 2}-blown simulated coal gas. The next step was to evaluate the effect of coal gas contaminants, particularly chloride, on the sorbent. No tests have been carried out in the past that evaluate the effect of chloride on zinc titanate. If ZnO in the sorbent reacts with the chloride, zinc chloride may form which may evaporate causing accelerated zinc loss. Zinc chloride may revert back to the oxide during oxidative regeneration. This may be enhanced in the presence of steam. This report provides results of a three-test series which was designed to give some definitive answers about the fate of chloride in the hot-gas desulfurization process and the effect of chloride on the performance of zinc titanate.

  11. Dip-coated multi-core (Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O x tape process - an alternative way of fabricating multi-core (Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O x tape conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Y. S.; Kumakura, H.; Togano, K.

    2000-04-01

    The dip-coating-then-stacking (DIS) process, which is simpler and easier than the oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) process, was developed to fabricate multi-core (Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O x conductors. In the DIS process, multi-core tapes were prepared by stacking several layers of single side dip-coated Ag strips then wrapping them with Ag foil. After burning at 500°C to remove organic materials, tape samples were rolled to increase the packing density of oxide core, then were heat-treated twice at 838°C in air with an intermediate pressing. There was no bubbling problem throughout the heat treatment and the interface between oxide core and Ag was very smooth. By the DIS process, transport critical current ( Ic) ∼73 A and transport critical current density ( Jc) ∼17 600 A/cm 2 at 77 K, 0 T were so far obtained. Considering the easiness and simplicity of the DIS process relative to OPIT with reasonably high Ic and Jc values so far obtained, it appears that the DIS process can be applied as an alternative way to OPIT for fabricating multi-core (Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O x tape conductors.

  12. Elastic modeling and steep dips: unraveling the reflected wavefield

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelting, C. J.; Gherasim, M.; House, L. S.; Marfurt, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger elastic numerical modeling project, we have been investigating how energy reflected from steeply dipping interfaces is recorded using typical multicomponent acquisition geometries. Specifically, we have been interpreting how rcflection events from the flanks of salt dome structures are distributed on 3C and 4C phones for vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) and ocean bottom seismic (OBS) or land surface surveys. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to improve the structural imaging of steeply dipping interfaces and eventually to evaluate the usc of the recorded elastic wavefield for fluid description near these interfaces. In the current work, we focus on a common assumption used when processing converted wave reflection seismic data that most PP energy is recorded on the vertical geophone and/or the hydrophone and that most PS energy is recorded on the horizontal geophones. This is a useful assumption when it is valid, because it eliminates the need for separation of the recorded wavefield into P and S wavetypes. Using two elastic models and different acquisition geometries, we examine the validity of this assumption in the presence of steeply dipping interfaces and discuss the implications for converted-wave and vector imaging of salt flanks.

  13. Diamond-coated fiber Bragg grating through the hot filament chemical vapor process for chemical durability improvement.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Nélia; José Kalinowski, Hypolito; Neto, Victor; Nogueira, Rogério

    2017-02-20

    In recent years, the coating of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with a specific material has opened up the possibility to broaden the limits of applicability of this technology. Diamond has a set of properties that makes it an attractive candidate to protect the optical fiber against chemically harsh environments, whose sensing is also a great challenge. One of the most used techniques to obtain these coatings is through the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD); in this process, the temperature reaches, typically, around 850°C-900°C. In this work, the regeneration of a seed FBG during its coating with a nanocrystalline diamond thin film through the HFCVD process is presented. Simultaneously, the thermal monitoring of the process was also performed using the same grating. The resistance test in a corrosive medium reveals an improvement on the durability of the sensing properties of the diamond-coated FBG compared with an uncoated FBG, foreseeing a vast range of applications.

  14. Magnetization reversal processes in hot-extruded τ-MnAl-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielsch, J.; Bittner, F.; Woodcock, T. G.

    2017-03-01

    The magnetic domain structure of hot-extruded bulk τ-Mn53Al45C2 was studied by Kerr microscopy under application of a magnetic field in-situ. The microstructure consists of recrystallized, fine-grained regions and large non-recrystallized grains which contain a high density of twins. Within these large polytwinned grains, a clear pinning interaction of magnetic domain walls at twin boundaries was observed but with a rather small pinning force. The smaller, recrystallized grains show a higher resistance to magnetization reversal. The critical single domain particle size of this material was estimated at 773 nm and the fine, recrystallized grains are in the range of this size. Demagnetizing the sample following saturation using a 3 T field pulse revealed that individual fine grains reverse independently from their neighbours.

  15. A new approach to predicting partial recrystallization in the multi-pass hot rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sangwoo; Lee, Youngseog

    2002-02-01

    An exploratory approach to handling partial recrystallization in multi-pass hot rolling where the heterogeneity of steel microstructures is inherent is presented. The proposed model is based on a modification of the conventional model in which the microstructure of deformed austenite at each pass is simply taken as homogeneous during the multi-pass rolling. The usefulness of the modified model is demonstrated by applying it to a four-pass oval-round (or round-oval) rod rolling sequence. The pass-by-pass recrystallized fraction and austenite grain size (AGS) computed from the modified model are compared with those from the conventional model. The result showed that in multi-pass rolling at higher rolling speed, the recrystallization behavior and evolution of the austenite grain size at a given pass was strongly influenced by the modeling method of the partial recrystallization attributed to microstructural heterogeneity.

  16. Systematic identification of thermal degradation products of HPMCP during hot melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Hrushikesh; Ambardekar, Rohan; Kelly, Adrian; Gough, Tim; Paradkar, Anant

    2015-01-01

    A systematic identification of the degradation products of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP) during hot melt extrusion (HME) has been performed. A reverse phase HPLC method was developed for the extrudates of both hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) and HPMCP polymers to quantify their thermal hydrolytic products: acetic acid (AA), succinic acid (SA) for HPMCAS and phthalic acid (PA) for HPMCP, without hydrolysing the polymers in strong alkaline solutions. The polymers were extruded in the temperature range of 160-190 °C at different screw rotation speeds and hydrolytic impurities were analysed. Investigation of extruded HPMCP showed an additional thermal degradation product, who is structural elucidation revealed to be phthalic anhydride (PAH). Moreover, two environmental analytical impurities, dimethyl phthalate and methyl benzoate formed in situ were recorded on GC-MS and their origin was found to be associated with PAH derivatization. Using the experimental data gathered during this study, a degradation mechanism for HPMCP is proposed.

  17. Yb:Y2O3 transparent ceramics processed with hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Peng; Luo, Dewei; Yin, Danlei; Tang, Dingyuan; Kong, Ling Bing

    2017-09-01

    Highly transparent 5 at.% Yb:Y2O3 ceramics were fabricated by using a combination method of vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Co-precipitated Yb:Y2O3 powders, with 1 at.% ZrO2 as the sintering aid, were used as the starting material. The Yb:Y2O3 ceramics, vacuum sintered at 1700 °C for 2 h and HIPed at 1775 °C for 4 h, exhibited small grain size of 1.9 μm and highly dense microstructure. In-line optical transmittance of the ceramics reached 83.4% and 78.9% at 2000 and 600 nm, respectively. As the ceramic slab was pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode at about 940 nm, a maximum output power of 0.77 W at 1076 nm was achieved, with a corresponding slope efficiency of 10.6%.

  18. The Hanford spent nuclear metal fuel multi-canister overpack and vacuum drying {ampersand} hot conditioning process

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1996-05-15

    Nuclear production reactors operated at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site from 1944 until 1988 to produce plutonium. Most of the irradiated fuel from these reactors was processed onsite to separate and recover the plutonium. When the processing facilities were closed in 1992, about 1,900 metric tons of unprocessed irradiated fuel remained in storage. Additional fuel was irradiated for research purposes or was shipped to the Hanford Site from offsite reactor facilities for storage or recovery of nuclear materials. The fuel inventory now in storage at the Hanford Site is predominantly N Reactor irradiated fuel, a metallic uranium alloy that is coextruded into zircaloy-2 cladding. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has rommitted to an accelerated schedule for removing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford Site K Basins to a new interim storage facility in the 200 Area. Under the current proposed accelerated schedule, retrieval of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K East and West Basins must begin by December 1997 and be completed by December 1999. A key part of this action is retrieving fuel canisters from the water-filled K Basin storage pools and transferring them into multi@ister overpacks (MCOS) that will be used to handle and process the fuel, then store it after conditioning. The Westinghouse Hanford Company has developed an integrated process to deal with the K Basin spent fuel inventory. The process consists of cleaning the fuel, packaging it into MCOS, vacuum drying it at the K Basins, then transporting it to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) for staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage. This presentation dekribes the MCO function, design, and life-cycle, including an overview of the vacuum drying and hot conditioning processes.

  19. Investigation of the differences between the "Cold" and "Hot" nature of Coptis chinensis Franch and its processed materials based on animal's temperature tropism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, CanPing; Wang, JiaBo; Zhang, XueRu; Zhao, YanLing; Xia, XinHua; Zhao, HaiPing; Ren, YongShen; Xiao, XiaoHe

    2009-11-01

    The description and differentiation of the so-called "Cold" and "Hot" natures, the primary "Drug Naure" of Chinese medicine, is the focus of theoretical research. In this study, the divergency between the "Cold" and the "Hot" natures was investigated through examining the temperature tropism of mice affected by Coptis chinensis Franch and its processed materials by using a cold/hot plate differentiating technology. After exposure to C. chinensis Franch, the macroscopic behavioral index of the remaining rate (RR) on a warm pad (40 degrees C) significantly increased (P<0.05), suggesting the enhancement of Hot tropism. The internal indexes of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and oxygen consuming volume decreased significantly (P<0.05), suggesting the decapability of energy metabolism. This external behavior of Hot tropism might reflect the internal Cold nature of C. chinensis Franch. However, the processed materials of C. chinensis Franch exhibited a different Cold nature in temperature tropism compared with crude C. chinensis Franch (CC): the Cold nature of bile-processed C. chinensis Franch (BC) enhanced while the ginger-processed C. chinensis Franch (GC) changed inversely. The changing sequence was consistent with the theoretical prognostication. It is indicated that the external Cold & Hot natures of Chinese medicine may possibly reflect in an ethological way for the changes of animal's temperature tropism which might be internally regulated by the body's energy metabolism.

  20. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yongqi

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the methodology and preliminary results of a techno-economic analysis on a hot carbonate absorption process (Hot-CAP) with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC). This analysis was based on the Hot-CAP that is fully integrated with a sub-critical steam cycle, pulverized coal-fired power plant adopted in Case 10 of the DOE/NETL’s Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants. The techno-economic analysis addressed several important aspects of the Hot-CAP for PCC application, including process design and simulation, equipment sizing, technical risk and mitigation strategy, performance evaluation, and cost analysis. Results show that the net power produced in the subcritical power plant equipped with Hot-CAP is 611 MWe, greater than that with Econoamine (550 MWe). The total capital cost for the Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} compression, is $399 million, less than that for the Econoamine PCC ($493 million). O&M costs for the power plant with Hot-CAP is $175 million annually, less than that with Econoamine ($178 million). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the power plant with Hot-CAP, including CO2 transportation and storage, is 119.4 mills/kWh, a 59% increase over that for the plant without CO2 capture. The LCOE increase caused by CO{sub 2} capture for the Hot-CAP is 31% lower than that for its Econoamine counterpart.

  1. The coupled thermo-mechanical-microstructural finite element modeling of hot stamping process in 22MnB5 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangjun; Xiao, Namin; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Guangyao; Sun, Guangyong

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a coupled thermo-mechanical-microstructural finite element model based on the subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS is developed to predict the hot stamping process in 22MnB5 steel. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov type model with Scheil' additivity rule and Koistinen-Marburger model are adopted to simulate the diffusional phase transformation and diffusionless one respectively. During the calculation of temperature and stress/strain field, the contributions of microstructure evolution, e.g. transformation latent heat, transformation strain, and transformation plasticity are taken into account, which give more insight of the material response. The model allows to evaluate the transient stress and strain distributions, the final microstructure constituent and the final distortion of the sheet part during the press quenching process. The effect of transformation plasticity on the geometry precision and the residual stress are discussed.

  2. Dominant root locus in state estimator design for material flow processes: A case study of hot strip rolling.

    PubMed

    Fišer, Jaromír; Zítek, Pavel; Skopec, Pavel; Knobloch, Jan; Vyhlídal, Tomáš

    2017-02-13

    The purpose of the paper is to achieve a constrained estimation of process state variables using the anisochronic state observer tuned by the dominant root locus technique. The anisochronic state observer is based on the state-space time delay model of the process. Moreover the process model is identified not only as delayed but also as non-linear. This model is developed to describe a material flow process. The root locus technique combined with the magnitude optimum method is utilized to investigate the estimation process. Resulting dominant roots location serves as a measure of estimation process performance. The higher the dominant (natural) frequency in the leftmost position of the complex plane the more enhanced performance with good robustness is achieved. Also the model based observer control methodology for material flow processes is provided by means of the separation principle. For demonstration purposes, the computer-based anisochronic state observer is applied to the strip temperatures estimation in the hot strip finishing mill composed of seven stands. This application was the original motivation to the presented research.

  3. Temperature Adaptations in the Terminal Processes of Anaerobic Decomposition of Yellowstone National Park and Icelandic Hot Spring Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Sandbeck, Kenneth A.; Ward, David M.

    1982-01-01

    The optimum temperatures for methanogenesis in microbial mats of four neutral to alkaline, low-sulfate hot springs in Yellowstone National Park were between 50 and 60°C, which was 13 to 23°C lower than the upper temperature for mat development. Significant methanogenesis at 65°C was only observed in one of the springs. Methane production in samples collected at a 51 or 62°C site in Octopus Spring was increased by incubation at higher temperatures and was maximal at 70°C. Strains of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum were isolated from 50, 55, 60, and 65°C sites in Octopus Spring at the temperatures of the collection sites. The optimum temperature for growth and methanogenesis of each isolate was 65°C. Similar results were found for the potential rate of sulfate reduction in an Icelandic hot spring microbial mat in which sulfate reduction dominated methane production as a terminal process in anaerobic decomposition. The potential rate of sulfate reduction along the thermal gradient of the mat was greatest at 50°C, but incubation at 60°C of the samples obtained at 50°C increased the rate. Adaptation to different mat temperatures, common among various microorganisms and processes in the mats, did not appear to occur in the processes and microorganisms which terminate the anaerobic food chain. Other factors must explain why the maximal rates of these processes are restricted to moderate temperatures of the mat ecosystem. PMID:16346109

  4. Dynamic recrystallization during hot deformation of aluminum: A study using processing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, N.; Prasad, Y. V. R. K.

    1991-10-01

    The hot deformation behavior of aluminum of different purities has been studied in the temperature range of 250 °C to 600 °C and strain-rate range of 10 3 to 102 s’1. On the basis of the flow stress data, the strain-rate sensitivity (m) of the material is evaluated and used for establishing power dissipation maps following the Dynamic Materials Model. These maps depict the variation of the efficiency of power dissipation [η = 2m/(m +1)] with temperature and strain rate. A domain of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) could be identified in these maps. While the strain rate at which the efficiency peak occurred in this domain is 10-3 s-1 the DRX temperature is purity dependent and is 375 °C for 99.999 pct Al, 450 °C for 99.995 pct Al, 550 °C for 99.94 pct Al, and 600 °C for 99.5 pct Al. The maximum efficiency of power dissipation for DRX in aluminum is about 55 pct. The sigmoidal increase of grain size with temperature in the DRX domain and the decrease in the DRX temperature with increase in the purity of aluminum are very similar to that observed in static recrystallization, although DRX occurred at much higher temperatures.

  5. Preparation of Substrate for Flavorant from Chicken Bone Residue with Hot-Pressure Process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Zhi; Dong, Xian-Bing; Yue, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Jia, Wei; Li, Xia

    2016-03-01

    Hot-pressure extraction (HPE), which is regarded as a "green" technology, was applied to extract nutrients (protein, collagen, and minerals) from chicken bone residue (CBR). Amino acids (AA), color, and volatile flavor compounds of chicken bone extract (CBE) were also investigated. Results showed that contents of protein, total soluble solids, minerals, and collagen of CBE were positively correlated with extraction time and temperature. High ratios of protein (83.51%) and collagen (96.81%) were obtained with 135 °C and 120 min. Essential AA accounted for 31.03% to 47.73% of total AA in CBE. The percentage of bitter AA in TAA decreased from 28.94% to 25.02% at 0 min to 20.19% and 21.41% at 120 min, although fresh AA increased from 46.35% to 50.84% (0 min) to 53.14% (120 min) at 130 and 135 °C, respectively, indicating CBE was nutritionally beneficial with good flavor. Color and volatile flavor of CBE improved significantly after extraction, although calcium in CBE (4.2 to 4.8 mg/100 g) was relatively low compared with that of CBR (1078 mg/100 g). It can be concluded that HPE is a promising way to transform CBR into a nutritious flavorant substrate, but it is not an efficient way to extract calcium.

  6. Spike-dip transformation of Setaria viridis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Prasenjit; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Traditional method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the generation of tissue culture had limited success for Setaria viridis, an emerging C4 monocot model. Here we present an efficient in planta method for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of S. viridis using spike dip. Pre-anthesis developing spikes were dipped into a solution of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1 harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter to standardize and optimize conditions for transient as well as stable transformations. A transformation efficiency of 0.8 ± 0.1% was obtained after dipping of 5-day-old S3 spikes for 20 min in Agrobacterium cultures containing S. viridis spike-dip medium supplemented with 0.025% Silwet L-77 and 200 μm acetosyringone. Reproducibility of this method was demonstrated by generating stable transgenic lines expressing β-glucuronidase plus (GUSplus), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed) reporter genes driven by either CaMV35S or intron-interrupted maize ubiquitin (Ubi) promoters from three S. viridis genotypes. Expression of these reporter genes in transient assays as well as in T1 stable transformed plants was monitored using histochemical, fluorometric GUS activity and fluorescence microscopy. Molecular analysis of transgenic lines revealed stable integration of transgenes into the genome, and inherited transgenes expressed in the subsequent generations. This approach provides opportunities for the high-throughput transformation and potentially facilitates translational research in a monocot model plant.

  7. Dip-pen nanolithography in tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Sowards, Laura A; Naik, Rajesh R; Stone, Morley O

    2003-01-15

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is becoming a popular nano-patterning technique for depositing materials onto a substrate using the probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here, we demonstrate the deposition of a short synthetic peptide by DPN using the Tapping Mode of AFM rather than the commonly used contact mode. DPN in Tapping Mode requires drive amplitude modifications for deposition, yet allows for gentle imaging of the deposited material and enables deposition on soft surfaces.

  8. The application of a hot deformation SEM stage, backscattered electron imaging and EBSD to the study of thermomechanical processing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Humphreys, F J; Brough, I

    2002-10-01

    The technique of combining in situ hot-deformation and high resolution electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) has been applied to study the mechanisms operating during the thermomechanical processing of metals. A simple hot tensile-straining stage is installed in a field emission gun scanning electron microscope equipped with an EBSD system and has been used successfully for a number of preliminary investigations. These investigations include substructure formation, dynamic subgrain and grain growth, superplastic deformation in aluminium alloys, and dynamic recrystallization in copper. Despite the surface topography, which inevitably increases during plastic deformation, channelling contrast backscattered electron micrographs have been successfully obtained after strains of up to approximately 50%. Good quality EBSD maps have been obtained after strains of up to 100%. Most observations and measurements from the in situ experiments are consistent with what is known about the mechanisms occurring in the bulk. The microstructures revealed in the centre of the in situ samples after later repolishing are generally similar to those at the surface.

  9. Hot-gas desulfurization. II. Use of gasifier ash in a fluidized-bed process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schrodt, J.T.

    1981-02-01

    Three gasifier coal ashes were used as reactant/sorbents in batch fluidized-beds to remove hydrogen sulfide from hot, made-up fuel gases. It is predominantly the iron oxide in the ash that reacts with and removes the hydrogen sulfide; the sulfur reappears in ferrous sulfide. Sulfided ashes were regenerated by hot, fluidizing streams of oxygen in air; the sulfur is recovered as sulfur dioxide, exclusively. Ash sorption efficiency and sulfur capacity increase and stabilize after several cycles of use. These two parameters vary directly with the iron oxide content of the ash and process temperature, but are independent of particle size in the range 0.01 - 0.02 cm. A western Kentucky No. 9 ash containing 22 weight percent iron as iron oxide sorbed 4.3 weight percent sulfur at 1200/sup 0/F with an ash sorption efficiency of 0.83 at ten percent breakthrough. A global, fluidized-bed, reaction rate model was fitted to the data and it was concluded that chemical kinetics is the controlling mechanism with a predicted activation energy of 19,600 Btu/lb mol. Iron oxide reduction and the water-gas-shift reaction were two side reactions that occurred during desulfurization. The regeneration reaction occurred very rapidly in the fluid-bed regime, and it is suspected that mass transfer is the controlling phenomenon.

  10. Micromagnetic simulation for the magnetization reversal process of Nd-Fe-B hot-deformed nanocrystalline permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, Hiroshi; Iwano, Kaoru; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Ono, Kanta

    2017-05-01

    We numerically demonstrated the magnetization reversal process inside a hot-deformed nanocrystalline permanent magnet. We performed large-scale micromagnetics simulation based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with 0.1 billion calculation cells. The simulation model for the hot-deformed nanocrystalline permanent magnet consists of 2622 tabular grains that interact with each other by inter-grain exchange and dipole interactions. When the strength of the external field approached a coercive force, nucleation cores were created at the grain surface. The magnetization reversal was propagated by the inter-grain and dipole interactions. When the grains had overlapping regions parallel to the external field, the magnetization reversal propagated quickly between the grains due to the dipole interaction. In contrast, the motion of the magnetic domain wall was inhibited at interfaces between the grains perpendicular to the external field. Reversal magnetic domains had a pillar-shaped structure that is parallel to the external field. In the perpendicular direction, the reversal magnetic domain expanded gradually because of the inhibition of the domain wall motion.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 7075 aluminum alloy nanostructured composites processed by mechanical milling and indirect hot extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Campos, R.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Martinez-Sanchez, R.; Herrera-Ramirez, J.M.

    2012-01-15

    Nanostructured composites of 7075 aluminum alloy and carbon coated silver nanoparticles were produced by mechanical milling and indirect hot extrusion. The milling products were obtained in a high energy SPEX ball mill, and then were compacted by uniaxial load and pressure-less sintered under argon atmosphere. Finally, the sintered product was hot extruded. Carbon coated silver nanoparticles were well distributed in the matrix of the extruded material. Tensile tests were carried out to corroborate the hypothesis that second phase particles, well dispersed in the matrix, improve the strength of the material. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was employed to locate and make sure that the silver nanoparticles were homogeneously and finely dispersed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 7075 Al nanostructured composites can be produced by mechanical milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coated silver nanoparticles are well dispersed into aluminum matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ductile Ag-C NP's improve the mechanical properties of the 7075 Al-alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-C NP's content has an important effect in the particle and crystallite size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-C NP's keep their morphology after milling and conformation processes.

  12. Interfacial layers evolution during annealing in Ti-Al multi-laminated composite processed using hot press and roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assari, A. H.; Eghbali, B.

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Al multi-laminated composites have great potential in high strength and low weight structures. In the present study, tri-layer Ti-Al composite was synthesized by hot press bonding under 40 MPa at 570 °C for 1 h and subsequent hot roll bonding at about 450 °C. This process was conducted in two accumulative passes to 30% and to 67% thickness reduction in initial and final passes, respectively. Then, the final annealing treatments were done at 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 °C for 2, 4 and 6 h. Investigations on microstructural evolution and thickening of interfacial layers were performed by scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction and micro-hardness tests. The results showed that the thickening of diffusion layers corresponds to amount of deformation. In addition to thickening of the diffusion layers, the thickness of aluminum layers decreased and after annealing treatment at 750 °C for 6 h the aluminum layers were consumed entirely, which occurred because of the enhanced interdiffusion of Ti and Al elements. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer showed that the sequence of interfacial layers as Ti3Al-TiAl-TiAl2-TiAl3 which are believed to be the result of thermodynamic and kinetic of phase formation. Micro-hardness results presented the variation profile in accordance with the sequence of intermetallic phases and their different structures.

  13. Advanced Spin Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Process for Global Planarization with Dielectric-Material-Viscosity Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Yano, Masaki; Kudou, Kazuhisa; Kyuragi, Hakaru

    2002-04-01

    A novel method of controlling the viscosity of dielectric material was developed for global planarization by the spin coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technique. In the STP technique, a base film is spin-coated with a dielectric, the dielectric is hot-pressed to a wafer in vacuum, and the base film is then peeled off from the dielectric. For global planarization in the above steps, the viscosity of the dielectric material is one of the most important factors. We propose controlling the viscosity by vacuum drying in the process chamber. The relationship between viscosity and vacuum drying was investigated experimentally, and the effect of viscosity on gap-filling was clarified by analytical modeling. We applied the control method to STP experiments using patterned wafers and a low-k organic material, and found that it achieves complete gap-filling and good uniformity in film thickness. STP planarized line-and-spaces as large as 100 μm wide achieving a small variation in planarity of ± 0.43%. With this viscosity-control method, the STP technique is applicable to low-k materials.

  14. Rheology Guided Rational Selection of Processing Temperature To Prepare Copovidone-Nifedipine Amorphous Solid Dispersions via Hot Melt Extrusion (HME).

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhang, Jingtao; DiNunzio, James; Leone, Anthony; Huang, Chengbin; Brown, Chad D

    2016-10-03

    The production of amorphous solid dispersions via hot melt extrusion (HME) relies on elevated temperature and prolonged residence time, which can result in potential degradation and decomposition of thermally sensitive components. Herein, the rheological properties of a physical mixture of polymer and an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) were utilized to guide the selection of appropriate HME processing temperature. In the currently studied copovidone-nifedipine system, a critical temperature, which is substantially lower (∼13 °C) than the melting point of crystalline API, was captured during a temperature ramp examination and regarded as the critical point at which the API could molecularly dissolve into the polymer. Based on the identification of this critical point, various solid dispersions were prepared by HME processing below, at, and above the critical temperature (both below and above the melting temperature (Tm) of crystalline API). In addition, the resultant extrudates along with two control solid dispersions prepared by physical mixing and cryogenic milling were assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, hot stage microscopy, rheology, and solid-state NMR. Physicochemical properties of resultant solid dispersions indicated that the identified critical temperature is sufficient for the polymer-API system to reach a molecular-level mixing, manifested by the transparent and smooth appearance of extrudates, the absence of API crystalline diffraction and melting peaks, dramatically decreased rheological properties, and significantly improved polymer-API miscibility. Once the critical temperature has been achieved, further raising the processing temperature only results in limited improvement of API dispersion, reflected by slightly reduced storage modulus and complex viscosity and limited improvement in miscibility.

  15. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    , Japan in 2008, for example, seem to support the need for careful mechanical consideration. In this contribution, utilizing two-dimensional dynamic photoelasticity in conjunction with high speed digital cinematography, we try to perform "fully controlled" laboratory experiments of dip-slip faulting and observe the propagation of interface pulses and corner waves mentioned above. A birefringent material containing a (model) dip-slip fault plane is prepared, and rupture is initiated in that material using an Nd:YAG laser system, and the evolution of time-dependent isochromatic fringe patterns (contours of maximum in-plane shear stress) associated with the dynamic process of shallow dip-slip faulting is recorded. Use of Nd:YAG laser pulses, instead of ignition of explosives, for rupture initiation may enhance the safety of laboratory fracture experiments and enable us to evaluate the energy entering the material (and hence the energy balance in the system) more precisely, possibly in a more controlled way.

  16. Mass balances for underground coal gasification in steeply dipping beds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeman, R.; Ahner, P.; Davis, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    Two different mass balances were used during the recent underground coal gasification tests conducted in steeply dipping coal beds at Rawlins, Wyoming. The combination of both mass balances proved extremely useful in interpreting the test results. One mass balance which assumed char could be formed underground required the solution of 3 simultaneous equations. The assumption of no char decouples the 3 equations in the other mass balance. Both mass balance results are compared to the test data to provide an interpretation of the underground process.

  17. "Hot" Facilitation of "Cool" Processing: Emotional Distraction Can Enhance Priming of Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Arni; Oladottir, Berglind; Most, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional stimuli often capture attention and disrupt effortful cognitive processing. However, cognitive processes vary in the degree to which they require effort. We investigated the impact of emotional pictures on visual search and on automatic priming of search. Observers performed visual search after task-irrelevant neutral or emotionally…

  18. A Comparison of Various Non-Destructive Inspection Processes Using Hot Isostatically Pressed Powder Turbine Parts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    and photon scattering (Compton) methods offer much promise. Both I are readily adaptable to fully automatic inspection of hardware. Both appear cost ...effective based on projected production inspection costs . Both make it possible to reduce metal envelopes of raw material thus decreasing material... costs . The acoustical holography process represents a later stage of development than the photon scattering method but both processes require additional

  19. "Hot" Facilitation of "Cool" Processing: Emotional Distraction Can Enhance Priming of Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Arni; Oladottir, Berglind; Most, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional stimuli often capture attention and disrupt effortful cognitive processing. However, cognitive processes vary in the degree to which they require effort. We investigated the impact of emotional pictures on visual search and on automatic priming of search. Observers performed visual search after task-irrelevant neutral or emotionally…

  20. Phase-equilibria for design of coal-gasification processes: dew points of hot gases containing condensible tars. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1980-05-01

    This research is concerned with the fundamental physical chemistry and thermodynamics of condensation of tars (dew points) from the vapor phase at advanced temperatures and pressures. Fundamental quantitative understanding of dew points is important for rational design of heat exchangers to recover sensible heat from hot, tar-containing gases that are produced in coal gasification. This report includes essentially six contributions toward establishing the desired understanding: (1) Characterization of Coal Tars for Dew-Point Calculations; (2) Fugacity Coefficients for Dew-Point Calculations in Coal-Gasification Process Design; (3) Vapor Pressures of High-Molecular-Weight Hydrocarbons; (4) Estimation of Vapor Pressures of High-Boiling Fractions in Liquefied Fossil Fuels Containing Heteroatoms Nitrogen or Sulfur; and (5) Vapor Pressures of Heavy Liquid Hydrocarbons by a Group-Contribution Method.

  1. FTIR and XRD investigations on the thermal stability of hydroxyapatite during hot pressing and pressureless sintering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapacz-Kmita, A.; Paluszkiewicz, C.; Ślósarczyk, A.; Paszkiewicz, Z.

    2005-06-01

    Performance of hydroxyapatite material in a living body depends on a number of factors. Stability of hydroxyapatite structure, which is influenced by both, preparation conditions of the starting precursor powders and fabrication method of the implant materials, is an important one. Inappropriate preparation conditions of synthesis, calcination of powder and sintering of formed samples result in dehydroxylation and even in decomposition of HAp which lead to the change in the physicochemical properties of implants. In the work samples of hydroxyapatite ceramics have been obtained by two methods, i.e. by hot pressing and by pressureless sintering in the temperature range of 1150-1300 °C. The materials prepared have been studied using FTIR and XRD in order to identify the dehydroxylation processes and the possible hydroxyapatite decomposition during thermal treatment. The usefulness of both methods in identification of thermal stability of hydroxyapatite was confirmed.

  2. Hot-pressed porcelain process for porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations.

    PubMed

    McPhee, E R

    1975-05-01

    A technique has been described that simplifies the production of full-coverage, porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations. The process utilizes a furnace-flask system in which the restoration is invested in a high-temperature refractory material and processed at an elevated temperature (1,850 degrees F.) under pressure. Shrinkage of 0.001 to 0.005 inch at the supporting cusp tips and fossae has been recorded. Tests indicate that the porcelain produced has a tensile strength and wear rate similar to those of porcelain processed by conventional methods.

  3. Process design and control of a twin screw hot melt extrusion for continuous pharmaceutical tamper-resistant tablet production.

    PubMed

    Baronsky-Probst, J; Möltgen, C-V; Kessler, W; Kessler, R W

    2016-05-25

    Hot melt extrusion (HME) is a well-known process within the plastic and food industries that has been utilized for the past several decades and is increasingly accepted by the pharmaceutical industry for continuous manufacturing. For tamper-resistant formulations of e.g. opioids, HME is the most efficient production technique. The focus of this study is thus to evaluate the manufacturability of the HME process for tamper-resistant formulations. Parameters such as the specific mechanical energy (SME), as well as the melt pressure and its standard deviation, are important and will be discussed in this study. In the first step, the existing process data are analyzed by means of multivariate data analysis. Key critical process parameters such as feed rate, screw speed, and the concentration of the API in the polymers are identified, and critical quality parameters of the tablet are defined. In the second step, a relationship between the critical material, product and process quality attributes are established by means of Design of Experiments (DoEs). The resulting SME and the temperature at the die are essential data points needed to indirectly qualify the degradation of the API, which should be minimal. NIR-spectroscopy is used to monitor the material during the extrusion process. In contrast to most applications in which the probe is directly integrated into the die, the optical sensor is integrated into the cooling line of the strands. This saves costs in the probe design and maintenance and increases the robustness of the chemometric models. Finally, a process measurement system is installed to monitor and control all of the critical attributes in real-time by means of first principles, DoE models, soft sensor models, and spectroscopic information. Overall, the process is very robust as long as the screw speed is kept low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  5. Effect of Mg content on the thermal stability and mechanical behaviour of PLLA/Mg composites processed by hot extrusion.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, S C; Lieblich, M; López, F A; Benavente, R; González-Carrasco, J L

    2017-03-01

    In the field of bioabsorbable composites for biomedical applications, extrusion has been employed as a method to prepare homogeneous blends of polymeric matrices with bioactive ceramic fillers. In this work, the suitability of processing poly-l-lactic acid/Magnesium (PLLA/Mg) composites by hot extrusion has been assessed by a systematic characterization of PLLA/Mg composites containing different amounts of Mg particles up to 7wt%. The results show that extrusion causes a reduction of almost 20% in the viscosity average molecular weight of PLLA, which further decreases with increasing Mg content. Extrusion gave always rise to a homogeneous distribution of Mg particles within the PLLA matrix. This composite processing was not compromised by the degradation of the polymeric matrix because the processing temperature was always below the onset degradation temperature. In the processing conditions employed in the present work, degradation of the composite slightly increases as more Mg is added up to 5wt%, but is very high at 7wt%. This was also evident from the mechanical behaviour, so that Mg particles improved the stiffness and compression strength of neat PLLA until 5wt% of Mg content, which dropped drastically when the material had 7wt% of Mg. The filler strengthening factor decreases with the increment in Mg content. In order to obtain an optimised contribution of Mg particles, a balance between thermal degradation and mechanical resistance of PLLA must be achieved.

  6. Low temperature diffusion process using rare earth-Cu eutectic alloys for hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B bulk magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Akiya, T. Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Liu, J.; Hono, K.; Hioki, K.; Hattori, A.

    2014-05-07

    The low temperature grain boundary diffusion process using RE{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} (RE = Pr, Nd) eutectic alloy powders was applied to sintered and hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B bulk magnets. Although only marginal coercivity increase was observed in sintered magnets, a substantial enhancement in coercivity was observed when the process was applied to hot-deformed anisotropic bulk magnets. Using Pr{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} eutectic alloy as a diffusion source, the coercivity was enhanced from 1.65 T to 2.56 T. The hot-deformed sample expanded along c-axis direction only after the diffusion process as RE rich intergranular layers parallel to the broad surface of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B are thickened in the c-axis direction.

  7. Hot and Cold: Complex Biochemical Processes in a Mud Volcano Setting on the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, S.; Aharon, P.; Pape, T.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps on the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) seafloor are conventionally defined as "cold", being characterized by hydrocarbon-rich fluid emissions at ambient sea floor temperature, mineralization of gas hydrates, precipitation of carbonates depleted in 13C, association with chemosynthetic fauna (mussel beds, tube worms etc.) and dominance of microbial processes fueled by venting hydrocarbons within the sediments. Analyses of carbonate phases, pore-fluids and biomarkers from cores (length~25cm) taken by ALVIN from an active mud volcano on the northern Gulf of Mexico slope (GC-272, 27°41`25"; 91°32`28") point towards a vent setting far more complex than sites previously investigated. We argue that the mud volcano setting in GC-272 is distinguished by episodes of cold methane venting when gas hydrates are forming in the sediment pore spaces (visually confirmed) alternating with periodic hot venting of warm brines (formation fluids) advected on the sea floor. We support our argument with the evidence that follows. Scalenohedral calcite crystals (1-2 mm in size) scattered within the sediment exhibit unusually negative δ18O values (down to -6‰ PDB) and δ13C values ranging from -2 ‰ to - 20‰ PDB. Temperature calculations based on the δ18O composition of the calcites and coexisting pore fluids yield a fluid temperature of ~45°C which is far higher than the recorded bottom water temperatures of ~8°C at a depth of 680 m. Pore fluid Na/Cl ratios (0.92-1.2) confirm the mixing of cold GOM bottom waters (Na/Cl=0.82) with advecting hot brines (Na/Cl=~1.0) resulting in a brine fluid at 45°C. The δ13C of the calcites is isotopically heavier by comparison with typical seep carbonates from the GOM suggesting a mixed carbon source consisting of pore fluid DIC, brine DIC and bottom seawater DIC. Hence the scalenohedral calcites are the product of hot venting episodes and are precipitated within the sediments from calcite-saturated pore-fluids (SI= ~5). Biomarker assays

  8. UV spectroscopy of Z Chamaeleontis. I - Time dependent dips in superoutburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlaftis, E. T.; Hassall, B. J. M.; Naylor, T.; Charles, P. A.; Sonneborn, G.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive IUE observations of the dwarf nova Z Cha during the 1987 April superoutburst and IUE-Exosat observations during the 1985 July superoutburst are presented. The UV light curve shows two dips when folded on the orbital period. One dip, at orbital phase 0.8 becomes shallower as the superoutburst progresses and can be associated with decreasing mass transfer rate from the secondary star. The other dip, at orbital phase 0.15, appears after the development of the superhump and some days after the occurrence of the largest dip at phase 0.8. The continuum flux distribution during superoutbursts is fainter and redder than in low-inclination dwarf novae during superoutbursts. This is interpreted in terms of the extended vertical disk structure which occults the hot inner parts of the disk with the development of a 'cool' bulge on the edge of the disk at orbital phase 0.75. Details of the behaviour of the UV emission lines during eclipse and away from eclipse are discussed.

  9. Formation of inversely graded, downstream-dipping, low-angle cross-stratification by antidunes

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    Antidunes migrating upstream during aggradation produce a distinctive internal structure that results from the upstream climb of the bed form. This structure differs markedly from the upstream-dipping foresets usually ascribed to antidunes. Most studies on antidune internal structures focus on equilibrium conditions where there is no net deposition and preservation potential of structures is limited. Experiments where aggradation was induced in small coastal streams show that upstream-climbing antidunes produce low-angle, downstream-dipping, cross-stratification 1-10 mm thick. The stratification results from grain size and density segregation between the antidune trough and crest. Studies show that small, dense grains form a lag in the antidune trough while coarser, less-dense grains accumulate at the crest. The grain segregation causes inverse grading within the stratification as the antidune body and crest pass over the finer grained lag in the trough. Upstream-dipping foresets are not commonly formed by this process as there is no avalanching of grains over the bed form. Temporal variations in flow velocity may produce upstream-dipping foresets bounded by the downstream-dipping cross-stratification, but these features are subtle. The studies above suggest that antidune cross-stratification may be more common in fluvial deposits than previously thought. Deposits along the Toutle River in southern Washington show numerous examples of inversely graded, downstream-dipping, low-angle (up to 15) cross-stratification 1-5 cm thick, quite similar to antidune cross-stratification produced experimentally. Local upstream-dipping cross-stratification bounded by the downstream-dipping strata strengthens the interpretation.

  10. The Phosphodiesterase DipA (PA5017) Is Essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ankita Basu; Petrova, Olga E.

    2012-01-01

    Although little is known regarding the mechanism of biofilm dispersion, it is becoming clear that this process coincides with alteration of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) levels. Here, we demonstrate that dispersion by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in response to sudden changes in nutrient concentrations resulted in increased phosphodiesterase activity and reduction of c-di-GMP levels compared to biofilm and planktonic cells. By screening mutants inactivated in genes encoding EAL domains for nutrient-induced dispersion, we identified in addition to the previously reported ΔrbdA mutant a second mutant, the ΔdipA strain (PA5017 [dispersion-induced phosphodiesterase A]), to be dispersion deficient in response to glutamate, nitric oxide, ammonium chloride, and mercury chloride. Using biochemical and in vivo studies, we show that DipA associates with the membrane and exhibits phosphodiesterase activity but no detectable diguanylate cyclase activity. Consistent with these data, a ΔdipA mutant exhibited reduced swarming motility, increased initial attachment, and polysaccharide production but only somewhat increased biofilm formation and c-di-GMP levels. DipA harbors an N-terminal GAF (cGMP-specific phosphodiesterases, adenylyl cyclases, and FhlA) domain and two EAL motifs within or near the C-terminal EAL domain. Mutational analyses of the two EAL motifs of DipA suggest that both are important for the observed phosphodiesterase activity and dispersion, while the GAF domain modulated DipA function both in vivo and in vitro without being required for phosphodiesterase activity. Dispersion was found to require protein synthesis and resulted in increased dipA expression and reduction of c-di-GMP levels. We propose a role of DipA in enabling dispersion in P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:22493016

  11. DISMISS: detection of stranded methylation in MeDIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Umar; Geyer, Kathrin K; Vickers, Martin J; Hoffmann, Karl F; Swain, Martin T

    2016-07-29

    DNA methylation is an important regulator of gene expression and chromatin structure. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) is commonly used to identify regions of DNA methylation in eukaryotic genomes. Within MeDIP-Seq libraries, methylated cytosines can be found in both double-stranded (symmetric) and single-stranded (asymmetric) genomic contexts. While symmetric CG methylation has been relatively well-studied, asymmetric methylation in any dinucleotide context has received less attention. Importantly, no currently available software for processing MeDIP-Seq reads is able to resolve these strand-specific DNA methylation signals. Here we introduce DISMISS, a new software package that detects strand-associated DNA methylation from existing MeDIP-Seq analyses. Using MeDIP-Seq datasets derived from Apis mellifera (honeybee), an invertebrate species that contains more asymmetric- than symmetric- DNA methylation, we demonstrate that DISMISS can identify strand-specific DNA methylation signals with similar accuracy as bisulfite sequencing (BS-Seq; single nucleotide resolution methodology). Specifically, DISMISS is able to confidently predict where DNA methylation predominates (plus or minus DNA strands - asymmetric DNA methylation; plus and minus DNA stands - symmetric DNA methylation) in MeDIP-Seq datasets derived from A. mellifera samples. When compared to DNA methylation data derived from BS-Seq analysis of A. mellifera worker larva, DISMISS-mediated identification of strand-specific methylated cytosines is 80 % accurate. Furthermore, DISMISS can correctly (p <0.0001) detect the origin (sense vs antisense DNA strands) of DNA methylation at splice site junctions in A. mellifera MeDIP-Seq datasets with a precision close to BS-Seq analysis. Finally, DISMISS-mediated identification of DNA methylation signals associated with upstream, exonic, intronic and downstream genomic loci from A. mellifera MeDIP-Seq datasets outperforms MACS2 (Model

  12. Hot water treatments to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in mung bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Bari, M L; Inatsu, Y; Isobe, S; Kawamoto, S

    2008-04-01

    The majority of the seed sprout-related outbreaks have been associated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. Therefore, an effective method is needed to inactivate these organisms on the seeds before they are sprouted. This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of various hot water treatments to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella populations on mung beans seeds intended for sprout production and to determine the effect of these treatments on seed germination after the seeds were dipped in chilled water for 30 s. Mung bean seed inoculated with four-strain cocktails of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella were soaked into hot water at 80 and 90 degrees C with shaking for various periods and then dipped in chilled water for 30 s. The treated seeds were then assessed for the efficacy of the treatment for reducing populations of the pathogens and the effects of the treatment on germination. After inoculation and air drying, 6.08 +/- 0.34 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 and 5.34 +/- 0.29 log CFU/g Salmonella were detected on the seeds. After hot water treatment at 90 degrees C for 90 s followed by dipping in chilled water for 30 s, no viable pathogens were found and no survivors were found in the enrichment medium and during the sprouting process. The germination yield of the seed was not affected significantly. Therefore, hot water treatment followed by dipping in chilled water for 30 s could be an effective seed decontamination method for mung bean seeds intended for sprout production.

  13. Dipping Thermospheric Explorer CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, B.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Doe, R. A.; Herrero, F.; Hickey, M. P.; Vadas, S.; Malsbury, J.; Fuller, S.; Huang, A.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the Dipping Thermospheric Explorer (DipTE) mission is to provide a data set that can be used to characterize the impact of gravity waves (GWs) on the thermosphere, and to open the door to many future thermospheric missions. The momentum deposited by dissipation of GWs which originate in the lower atmosphere and in the auroral region drives thermospheric variability, and hence is a key parameter in space weather research. The DipTE satellite, proposed for the NSF “CubeSat-based Science Missions for Space Weather and Atmospheric Research,” solicitation 09-523, is a 3U(0.34 x 0.1 x 0.1 m)CubeSat, with a spectrometer payload. The satellite employs a propulsion system to maneuver from the initial circular release orbit into an elliptic orbit that passes through the thermosphere, and uses passive aerodynamic stabilization. The spectrometer will measure perturbations in the neutral wind and temperature, in the ion velocity and temperature, and in the densities of the primary neutral and ionic species as the orbit decays down to the lowest altitude of radio contact (≈150 km). The resulting data set will have many applications to thermospheric and ionospheric science: for example, characterization of the GW spectrumas a function of altitude, latitude, longitude, and local time; study of GW sources by ray-tracing individual waves back to their sources; and determining the spatial variability in the neutral winds. The presentation describes the science objectives, the mission and the concept of operations, and the spacecraft configuration and its subsystems.

  14. Are 'hot spots' hot spots?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, Gillian R.

    2012-07-01

    built by volcanism distributed throughout hundreds, even thousand of kilometres, and as yet no unequivocal evidence has been produced that any of them have high temperature anomalies compared with average mantle temperature for the same (usually unknown) depth elsewhere. Critical investigation of the genesis processes of 'anomalous' volcanic regions would be encouraged if use of the term 'hot spot' were discontinued in favour of one that does not assume a postulated origin, but is a description of unequivocal, observed characteristics.

  15. High pressure processing with hot sauce flavoring enhances sensory quality for raw oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the feasibility of flavoring raw oysters by placing them under pressure in the presence of selected flavorings. Hand-shucked raw oysters were processed at high pressure (600 MPa), in the presence or absence of (Sriracha®) flavoring, and evaluated by a trained sensory panel 3 an...

  16. Rapid low-temperature epitaxial growth using a hot-element assisted chemical vapor deposition process

    DOEpatents

    Iwancizko, Eugene; Jones, Kim M.; Crandall, Richard S.; Nelson, Brent P.; Mahan, Archie Harvin

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides a process for depositing an epitaxial layer on a crystalline substrate, comprising the steps of providing a chamber having an element capable of heating, introducing the substrate into the chamber, heating the element at a temperature sufficient to decompose a source gas, passing the source gas in contact with the element; and forming an epitaxial layer on the substrate.

  17. Evolution of r-process elements in the hot supernova bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Woosley, S.E.

    1993-02-01

    We review some of the recent arguments as to why the r-process is thought to be associated with supernovae and how the high-temperature, high-entropy inner region of a core-collapse supernova is an ideal r-process site. We present preliminary extensions of our earlier work on the formation of the high-entropy ``bubble`` that describe more accurately its late-time evolution and the ejection of the neutrino-energized wind from the surface of the nascent neutron star. This site leads naturally to a distribution of temperature, density, neutron excess, and entropy for material ejected at different times in the wind as required by Solar abundances. We present simple analytic expressions which approximate these distributions. This site also predicts an amount of reprocess material ejected per event in agreement with simple galactic evolution arguments. However, it is not yet clear whether the entropy in this model is high enough (or the electron fraction is low enough) to produce an optimum fit to the Solar r-process abundance curve and additional mechanisms may be required to increase the entropy per baryon. We conclude with a discussion of nuclear measurements which would help to probe this r-process environment.

  18. Optimising Drug Solubilisation in Amorphous Polymer Dispersions: Rational Selection of Hot-melt Extrusion Processing Parameters.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Tian, Yiwei; Jones, David S; Andrews, Gavin P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this article was to construct a T-ϕ phase diagram for a model drug (FD) and amorphous polymer (Eudragit® EPO) and to use this information to understand the impact of how temperature-composition coordinates influenced the final properties of the extrudate. Defining process boundaries and understanding drug solubility in polymeric carriers is of utmost importance and will help in the successful manufacture of new delivery platforms for BCS class II drugs. Physically mixed felodipine (FD)-Eudragit(®) EPO (EPO) binary mixtures with pre-determined weight fractions were analysed using DSC to measure the endset of melting and glass transition temperature. Extrudates of 10 wt% FD-EPO were processed using temperatures (110°C, 126°C, 140°C and 150°C) selected from the temperature-composition (T-ϕ) phase diagrams and processing screw speed of 20, 100 and 200rpm. Extrudates were characterised using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), optical, polarised light and Raman microscopy. To ensure formation of a binary amorphous drug dispersion (ADD) at a specific composition, HME processing temperatures should at least be equal to, or exceed, the corresponding temperature value on the liquid-solid curve in a F-H T-ϕ phase diagram. If extruded between the spinodal and liquid-solid curve, the lack of thermodynamic forces to attain complete drug amorphisation may be compensated for through the use of an increased screw speed. Constructing F-H T-ϕ phase diagrams are valuable not only in the understanding drug-polymer miscibility behaviour but also in rationalising the selection of important processing parameters for HME to ensure miscibility of drug and polymer.

  19. Hot isostatic pressing-processed hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants: light microscopic and scanning electron microscopy investigations.

    PubMed

    Wie, H; Herø, H; Solheim, T

    1998-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used in a new procedure to produce hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on a commercially pure titanium (cpTi) substrate for osseous implantation. Eighteen HIP-processed HA-coated implants were placed in the inferior border of the mandibles in 2 Labrador retriever dogs and left submerged for 3 months. As control specimens, 12 sandblasted cpTi implants were placed in the same mandibles and, to compare the bone reaction, 2 additional plasma-sprayed HA-coated implants (Integral) were placed. Tissue reactions at the bony interfaces of the implants were studied in ground sections with the implants in situ, using ordinary, fluorescent, and polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The HIP-processed HA coatings displayed an increased density in light microscopy and SEM as compared to plasma-sprayed coatings. Direct bone-implant contact was found in all 3 types of surfaces. However, the production of new bone was far more abundant for the HA-coated implants than for sandblasted cpTi implants. The presence of bone-forming and bone-resorbing cells indicated active bone remodeling in the interface area at 3 months after implant placement. The present results support the view that epitaxial bone growth may occur from the HA-coated implant surface. It was concluded that the increased density of the present HIP-processed HA material does not reduce the bioactive properties of the coatings.

  20. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    ... are due to menopause — the time when menstrual periods become irregular and eventually stop. In fact, hot flashes are the most common symptom of the menopausal transition. How often hot flashes occur varies among women ...

  1. Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1980-12-01

    The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

  2. Hot microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroy, Klaus; Chakraborty, Dipanjan; Cichos, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Hot microswimmers are self-propelled Brownian particles that exploit local heating for their directed self-thermophoretic motion. We provide a pedagogical overview of the key physical mechanisms underlying this promising new technology. It covers the hydrodynamics of swimming, thermophoresis and -osmosis, hot Brownian motion, force-free steering, and dedicated experimental and simulation tools to analyze hot Brownian swimmers.

  3. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Hot flashes By Mayo Clinic Staff Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the ... skin may redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause profuse sweating and may ...

  4. Theoretical study on the cooperative exciton dissociation process based on dimensional and hot charge-transfer state effects in an organic photocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Nakajima, Takahito

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the exciton dissociation process at the donor-acceptor interface in organic photocells. In our previous study, we introduced a local temperature to handle the hot charge-transfer (CT) state and calculated the exciton dissociation probability based on the 1D organic semiconductor model [T. Shimazaki and T. Nakajima, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 17, 12538 (2015)]. Although the hot CT state plays an essential role in exciton dissociations, the probabilities calculated are not high enough to efficiently separate bound electron-hole pairs. This paper focuses on the dimensional (entropy) effect together with the hot CT state effect and shows that cooperative behavior between both effects can improve the exciton dissociation process. In addition, we discuss cooperative effects with site-disorders and external-electric-fields.

  5. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm2, which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10−11 cm−1 absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10−23 cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed. PMID:27263858

  6. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm2, which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10-11 cm-1 absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10-23 cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed.

  7. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-06-06

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm(2), which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10(-11) cm(-1) absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10(-23) cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed.

  8. Metallurgical and process variables affecting the resistance spot weldability of galvanized sheet steels

    SciTech Connect

    Geden, S.A.; Schrock, D.; LaPointe, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Zinc coating integrity, composition, thickness, roughness, and the presence of Fe-Zn intermetallics are being investigated with regard to the mechanism of weld nugget formation. This information is being used in conjunction with the optimization of the weld process parameters; such as upsloping, downsloping, preheating, postheating, and double pulsing, to provide the widest range of acceptable welding conditions. Dynamic inspection monitoring of the welding current, voltage, force, and nugget displacement is being used to follow the progression of nugget formation and to assist in the evaluation of optimum process and material characteristics. It has been found that hot-dipped galvanized materials with coatings which have a very thin Fe-Zn alloy layer, have a wider range of acceptable welding conditions than the commercial galvannealed products, which have a fully alloyed Fe-Zn coating. Small variations in the thickness and roughness of the G90 hot-dipped coatings studied seem to have no significant effect on the welding current range. Upsloping and downsloping of the weld current increases the welding range of hot-dipped products when using truncated cone electrodes, whereas sloped current has no advantage for galvannealed or uncoated materials. Radiused electrodes can increase the lobe width of hot-dipped products but are not beneficial when using sloped current or when welding galvannealed or uncoated materials.

  9. Optimization of quenching process in hot press forming of 22MnB5 steel for high strength properties for publication in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Nuraini; Aqida, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents hot press forming of 22MnB5 steel blanks for high strength automotive components. The hot press forming was performed using Schenck press PEZ0673 machine with maximum press force of 1000 kN. Samples were square 22MnB5 blanks, of 50 × 60 mm dimension. A high temperature furnace was used to heat up the blanks to austenite temperature of 950°C. Samples were held at the austenite temperature prior to forming and quenching process. Three independent controlled parameters were cooling water temperature, press holding time and flow rate of water. Pressed samples were characterized for metallographic study, hardness properties and tensile properties. Metallographic study was conducted using Meiji optical microscope. Hardness was measured using Vickers indenter with load 1000gf. From metallographic study, the hot pressed 22MnB5 boron steel samples produced lath martensitic microstructure. Hardness of hot pressed samples increased with decreasing cooling time. The yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of samples after hot forming were between 1546 and 1923 N/mm2. These findings were important to design tailored ultra-high strength in automotive components at different process parameter settings.

  10. High pressure processing improves the tenderness and quality of hot-boned beef.

    PubMed

    Morton, James D; Pearson, R Grant; Lee, Hannah Y-Y; Smithson, Stephanie; Mason, Susan L; Bickerstaffe, Roy

    2017-11-01

    Strip loins from different grades of cattle were subjected to two levels of high pressure processing (HPP) within 1h of slaughter at a commercial meat processing plant and chilled for 1day before freezing. The physical and eating quality characteristics of longissimus thoracis (strip loin) steaks from HPP were compared to meat that was chill aged for 1 or 28days. HPP produced meat after 1day with 60% lower shear force and higher sensory eating quality scores than 1day chill aged meat. Extended chill storage for 28days produced steaks of similar tenderness to HPP meat. HPP also increased the ultimate pH and decreased the cooking loss. Chilled storage of the gluteus medius from prime cattle for 28days significantly improved the shear force by 18%, whilst HPP improved both the shear force by 43% and the sensory eating quality scores. HPP can produce high eating quality eye of rump medallions within 1day of slaughter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of higher-order processes to the damping of hot giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh Dang, Nguyen; Tanabe, Kosai; Arima, Akito

    1998-12-01

    A systematic study is presented for three characteristics of the giant dipole resonance (GDR): (i) its width, (ii) its shape, and (iii) the integrated yield of emitted γ rays in 120Sn and 208Pb as a function of temperature T. The double-time Green's function method has been used to derive a complete set of equations, which allow one to calculate explicitly the GDR width due to coupling to all forward-going processes up to two-phonon ones at most in the second order of the interaction strength. The numerical calculations have been performed using the single-particle energies defined from the Woods-Saxon potentials. An overall agreement between theory and experiment is found for all three characteristics. The results show that the total width of the GDR due to coupling of the GDR phonon to all ph, pp, and hh configurations increases sharply at low temperatures up to T~ 3 MeV and saturates at T~4-6 MeV. The quantal width ΓQ due to coupling to ph configurations decreases slowly with increasing T. It becomes almost independent of T only when the contribution of two-phonon processes at T≠0 is omitted. The observed saturation of the integrated yield above E*~300 MeV is reproduced in both the GDR region and the region above it.

  12. Evaluation of the Cult-Dip Plus dip slide method for urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, J M; Yaschuk, Y; Galenzoski, D; Hrabok, D; Isaacson, M; Lee, L; Link, H; Walshaw, L

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To evaluate the Cult-Dip Plus (Merck, Germany), a bacteriological culture test for detecting uropathogens. METHODS--Cult-Dip Plus consists of Brolacin (CLED) and MacConkey agar, each containing methylumbelliferylglucuronide (MUG). Using 1022 urine samples, this product was compared with the routine method of calibrated loop inoculated CLED and blood agar for screening urine for uropathogens. The MUG test for identifying Escherichia coli was also evaluated. RESULTS--Compared with the routine method, Cult-Dip Plus has a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 88.3%, 98.0%, 91.9%, and 97.1%, respectively. The MUG test correctly identified 92% of E coli isolates with a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 91.6%, 95.2%, and 93.6%, respectively. CONCLUSION--Cult-Dip Plus appears to be an alternative method to the calibrate loop method for detecting uropathogens. The MUG test permits rapid, reliable and inexpensive identification of E coli. PMID:7560194

  13. Enzymatic saccharification of woody biomass micro/nanofibrillated by continuous extrusion process II: effect of hot-compressed water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Inoue, Seiichi; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Endo, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    An extrusion process involving a twin-screw extruder was used for the micro/nanofibrillation of Douglas fir and Eucalyptus treated with hot-compressed water (HCW). Partial removal of hemicellulose and lignin by HCW treatment effectively improved the fibrillation by extrusion. Only HCW treatment produced glucose less than 5 weight percent (wt.%) in Douglas fir in a temperature range of 140-180 degrees C by enzymatic hydrolysis. Glucose production yields of 18 and 26 wt.% were obtained by HCW treatment at 170 and 180 degrees C, respectively, in Eucalyptus. Use of extrusion after HCW treatment drastically improved monosaccharide production yield in both woods. In the case of Douglas fir, the obtained values were 5 times higher than those obtained by HCW treatment alone. Total monosaccharide production yields were higher in Eucalyptus than in Douglas fir. The extruded production had a fine fibrous morphology on a sub-micro/nanoscopic scale. This result shows the great potential of the extrusion process after HCW treatment as a cost-effective pretreatment for enzymatic saccharification of woody biomass.

  14. Remediation approach for organic compounds and arsenic co-contaminated soil using pressurized hot water extraction process.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Jo, Young-Tae; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2017-09-15

    Successful remediation of soil with co-existing organics contaminants and arsenic (As) is a challenge as the chemical and remediation technologies are different for each group of pollutants. In this study, the treatment effectiveness of pressurized hot water (PHW) extraction process was investigated for remediation of soil co-contaminated with phenol, crude oil, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and As. An elimination percentage of about 99% was achieved for phenol, and in the range of 63-100% was observed for the PAHs at 260 °C for 90 min operation. The performance of PHW extraction in the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons was found to be 86%. Of the 87 mg/kg of As in untreated soil, 67% of which was eliminated after treatment. The removal of organic contaminants was mainly via desorption, dissolution and degradation in subcritical water, while As was eliminated probably by oxidation and dissolution of arsenic-bearing minerals. According to the experimental results, PHW extraction process can be suggested as an alternative cleaning technology, instead of using any organic solvents for remediation of such co-contaminated soil.

  15. Assessing Mixing Quality of a Copovidone-TPGS Hot Melt Extrusion Process with Atomic Force Microscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Matthew S; DiNunzio, James; Khawaja, Nazia N; Crocker, Louis S; Pecora, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) were used to evaluate the extent of mixing of a hot melt extrusion process for producing solid dispersions of copovidone and D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS 1000). In addition to composition, extrusion process parameters of screw speed and thermal quench rate were varied. The data indicated that for 10% TPGS and 300 rpm screw speed, the mixing was insufficient to yield a single-phase amorphous material. AFM images of the extrudate cross section for air-cooled material indicate round domains 200 to 700 nm in diameter without any observed alignment resulting from the extrusion whereas domains in extrudate subjected to chilled rolls were elliptical in shape with uniform orientation. Thermal analysis indicated that the domains were predominantly semi-crystalline TPGS. For 10% TPGS and 600 rpm screw speed, AFM and mDSC data were consistent with that of a single-phase amorphous material for both thermal quench rates examined. When the TPGS concentration was reduced to 5%, a single-phase amorphous material was achieved for all conditions even the slowest screw speed studied (150 rpm).

  16. Dissolution enhancement of poorly water-soluble APIs processed by hot-melt extrusion using hydrophilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Maniruzzaman, M; Rana, M M; Boateng, J S; Mitchell, J C; Douroumis, D

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of hydrophilic polymers to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) processed by hot-melt extrusion (HME). Indomethacin (INM) and famotidine (FMT) were selected as model active substances while polyvinyl caprolactam graft copolymer, soluplus (SOL) and vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer grades, Kollidon VA64 (VA64) and Plasdone S630 (S630) were used as hydrophilic polymeric carriers. For the purpose of the study, drug-polymer binary blends at various ratios were processed by a Randcastle single screw extruder. The physicochemical properties and the morphology of the extrudates were evaluated through X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increased drug loadings of up to 40% were achieved in the extruded formulations for both drugs. INM and FMT exhibited strong plasticization effects with increasing concentrations and were found to be molecularly dispersed within the polymer blends. The in vitro dissolution studies showed increased INM/FMT release rates for all formulations compared to that of pure APIs alone.

  17. Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi

    2008-01-15

    Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

  18. The chemistry of sodium chloride involvement in processes related to hot corrosion. [in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Thermodynamic and mass transport calculations, and laboratory experiments elucidating the behavior of sodium chloride in combustion environments, in the deposition process, and in reactions with certain oxides on the surfaces of superalloys are summarized. It was found that some of the ingested salt is separated out of the air stream by the compressor. However, sodium chloride does pass from the compressor to the combustor where numerous chemical reactions take place. Here some of the salt is vaporized to yield gaseous sodium chloride molecules. Hydrogen and oxygen atoms present in the combustion products react with some sodium chloride to yield other gaseous species such as sodium, and a fraction of the salt remains as particulates. Both the gas phase and condensed sodium chloride can lead to sodium sulfate formation by various routes, all of which involve reaction with sulfur oxides and oxygen. In addition to contributing to the formation of sodium sulfate, the sodium chloride can contribute to corrosion directly.

  19. NdFeB thin anisotropic magnets obtained by hot working process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. T.; Cho, S. H.; Kim, Y. B.; Ryu, K. S.; Kapustin, G. A.; Kim, H. S.

    2004-05-01

    The current-applied pressure-assisted process has been applied to obtain anisotropic thin NdFeB magnets. The magnetic properties and microstructure of Nd14Fe80B6 and Nd12Dy2Fe73.2Co6.6Ga0.6B5.6 magnets with thickness of millimeter and sub-millimeter scale were investigated. For the thin magnets, the remanence and coercivity are lower than those of the thick magnet in spite of higher thickness reduction ratio due to the poor c-axis texture and abnormal grain growth. The optimized magnetic properties of the thin Nd12Dy2Fe73.2Co6.6Ga0.6B5.6 magnet with thickness of 780μm are Br=12.4kG, iHc=164kOe, and (BH)max=37.1MGOe.

  20. Hot deformation characterization of duplex low-density steel through 3D processing map development

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamadizadeh, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H.R.; Mehtonen, S.; Porter, D.

    2015-09-15

    The high temperature deformation behavior of duplex low-density Fe–18Mn–8Al–0.8C steel was investigated at temperatures in the range of 600–1000 °C. The primary constitutive analysis indicated that the Zener–Hollomon parameter, which represents the coupled effects of temperature and strain rate, significantly varies with the amount of deformation. Accordingly, the 3D processing maps were developed considering the effect of strain and were used to determine the safe and unsafe deformation conditions in association with the microstructural evolution. The deformation at efficiency domain I (900–1100 °C\\10{sup −} {sup 2}–10{sup −} {sup 3} s{sup −} {sup 1}) was found to be safe at different strains due to the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization in austenite. The safe efficiency domain II (700–900 °C\\1–10{sup −} {sup 1} s{sup −} {sup 1}), which appeared at logarithmic strain of 0.4, was characterized by deformation induced ferrite formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the microband formation and crack initiation at ferrite\\austenite interphases were the main causes of deformation instability at 600–800 °C\\10{sup −} {sup 2}–10{sup −} {sup 3} s{sup −} {sup 1}. The degree of instability was found to decrease by increasing the strain due to the uniformity of microbanded structure obtained at higher strains. The shear band formation at 900–1100 °C\\1–10{sup −} {sup 1} s{sup −} {sup 1} was verified by electron backscattered diffraction. The local dynamic recrystallization of austenite and the deformation induced ferrite formation were observed within shear-banded regions as the results of flow localization. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The 3D processing map is developed for duplex low-density Fe–Mn–Al–C steel. • The efficiency domains shrink, expand or appear with increasing strain. • The occurrence of DRX and DIFF increases the power efficiency. • Crack initiation

  1. Experiments to Further the Understanding of the Triple-Alpha Process in Hot Astrophysical Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N. R.; Greife, U.; Rehm, K. E.; Greene, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lee, H. Y.; Pardo, R.; Teh, K.; Deibel, C. M.; Notani, M.; Marley, S. T.; Tang, X. D.

    2009-03-04

    In astrophysics, the first excited 0{sup +} state of {sup 12}C at 7.654 MeV (Hoyle state) is the most important in the triple-{alpha} process for carbon nucleosynthesis. In explosive scenarios like supernovae, where temperatures of several 10{sup 9} K are achieved, the interference of the Hoyle state with the second 0{sup +} state located at 10.3 MeV in {sup 12}C becomes significant. The recent NACRE compilation of astrophysical reaction rates assumes a 2{sup +} resonance at 9.1 MeV for which no experimental evidence exists. Thus, it is critical to explore in more detail the 7-10 MeV excitation energy region, especially the minimum between the two 0{sup +} resonances for carbon nucleosynthesis. The states in {sup 12}C were populated through the {beta}-decay of {sup 12}B and {sup 12}N produced at the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) in-flight facility. The decay of {sup 12}C into three alphas is detected in a Frisch grid twin ionization chamber, acting as a low-threshold calorimeter. This minimizes the effects of {beta}-summing and allowed us to investigate the minimum above the Hoyle state with much higher accuracy than previously possible. A detailed data analysis will include an R-matrix fit to determine an upper limit on the 2{sup +} resonance width.

  2. Numerical investigations on hot-zone modified DS furnace for mc-Si growth process

    SciTech Connect

    Sanmugavel, S.; Srinivasan, M.; Aravinth, K.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-05-23

    A transient global numerical model has been carried out to simulate the multi-crystalline silicon growth process by the directional solidification method using CGSim 15.1. A two dimensional axisymmetric model was used. The conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer problems were coupled with our model and these problems were solved iteratively using the finite volume method. In the present work we have modified the heater element to produce a high quality ingot from multi-crystalline silicon. The change has been made to control the temperature distribution. By controlling the temperature distribution, we can also control the melt crystal interface of the ingot. The shape of the melt-crystal interface of the ingot, the temperature distribution in the crucible and the heat flux from the melt as well as from the crystal have been studied. Finally, the simulation results show that the modification in the heater element keeps the melt-crystal interface as planar in the DS system, also it gives better results than conventional system.

  3. NITRIC ACID PICKLING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Boller, E.R.; Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-19

    An improved process is described for the treatment of metallic uranium surfaces preparatory to being given hot dip coatings. The process consists in first pickling the uraniunn surInce with aqueous 50% to 70% nitric acid, at 60 to 70 deg C, for about 5 minutes, rinsing the acid solution from the uranium article, promptly drying and then passing it through a molten alkali-metal halide flux consisting of 42% LiCl, 53% KCla and 5% NaCl into a molten metal bath consisting of 85 parts by weight of zinc and 15 parts by weight of aluminum

  4. Use of hot formaldehyde fixative in processing plant-parasitic nematodes for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeikus, J A; Aldrich, H C

    1975-07-01

    A preparative technique is formulated for processing plant-parasitic nematodes of the order Tylenchida for electron microscopy. A population of Dolichodorus heterocephalus is used as test objects. One and a half grams of paraformaldehyde are dissolved in 25 ml of water at 60 C. Five drops of 1 N sodium hydroxide are added to clear the solution, which is then cooled to room temperature. Two and a half milliliters of 25% glutaraldehyde are added with 23 ml 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.3, and 0.2 M with respect to sucrose. The final solution contains 3% formaldehyde and 1% glutaraldehyde and is pH 7.2. It is heated to 70 C, poured over specimens, and allowed to cool to 4 C in 2 hr. The nematodes are then incised in a fixative containing 2% glutaraldehyde and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide at 4 C for 16-24 hr. Five milliliters of 25% glutaraldehyde and 2.5 ml of dimethyl sulfoxide are combined in 17.5 ml of water. Twenty-five milliliters of phosphate buffer (supplemented as above) are added. The final pH is 7.2. The glutaraldehyde, aided by dimethyl sulfoxide, uniformly and permanently fixes the nematode tissues. The specimens are embedded in agar. Following a 30-min buffer wash (4 C) they are postfixed in buffered 2% osmium tetroxide for 2 hr at room temperature, washed, and dehydrated through an ethanol series and two acetone baths. Dehydration includes a 2-hr stop in 75% ethanol containing 2% uranyl acetate. After embedding in Spurr's epoxy resin, specimens are sectioned and poststained in 0.5% aqueous acetate for 6 min and saturated aqueous lead citrate 3--4 min. This technique reduces killing time to less than 2 sec, straightens specimens for easier orientation, and eliminates the typically high internal pressure of nematodes which causes displacement of internal structures observed with other fixation techniques.

  5. A Study on Hot Tearing Behavior of Al-1 Wt Pct Cu Alloy Under Various Strain Rates During Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Majid; Alizadeh, Mostafa; Ahmadi, Ali R.

    2017-04-01

    Objective of this work is to study the generation of hot tears during solidification of Al-1 wt pct Cu alloy, which contain both columnar and equiaxed structures at various strain rates. To reach this goal, an experimental test was designed for applying tensile load on the solidifying shell. The shells were loaded at various pull-rates of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm/s. The produced samples were studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy probe and metallography techniques. SEM images revealed that both segregated hot tear ( i.e., filled or healed crack) and open hot tears were formed. Hot tears had created severely segregated zones with high concentration of Cu and Fe elements formed in between dendrite arms along the primary grain boundaries. In all cases, open hot tears were formed due to cracking of the segregated zones. With increasing strain rate, lengths of segregated hot tears were increased, moving closer toward the center of the cast. At the highest strain rate, segregated hot tears were formed in the equiaxed grain region along the primary grain boundary.

  6. Surfactant Activated Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2005-03-01

    Direct nanoscale patterning of maleimide-linked biotin on mercaptosilane-functionalized glass substrates using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is facilitated by the addition of a small amount of the biocompatible nonionic surfactant Tween-20. A correlation was found between activated ink transfer from the AFM tip when surfactant was included in the ink and an increase in the wettability of the partially hydrophobic silanized substrate. Surfactant concentration represents a new control variable for DPN that complements relative humidity, tip-substrate contact force, scan speed, and temperature. Using surfactants systematically as ink additives expands the possible ink-substrate combinations that can be used for patterning biotin and other molecules. For example, we are currently exploring the possibility of developing nickel/nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-maleimide based inks that will bind to mercaptosilanized glass surfaces for the reversible immobilization of biomolecules containing polyhistidine tags.

  7. Ocular Dipping in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Sara; Gonzalo, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Sánchez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular dipping (OD), or inverse ocular bobbing, consists of slow, spontaneous downward eye movements with rapid return to the primary position. It has been mainly reported following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, but has also been described in association with other types of diffuse or multifocal encephalopathies and structural brainstem damage. Case Report We report the case of a previously asymptomatic 66-year-old woman who presented with confusion, recent memory disturbances, and abnormal involuntary movements, followed by a coma. Abnormal spontaneous vertical eye movements consistent with OD developed from the fourth day after admission, and the patient died 20 days later. The pathological examination of the brain confirmed the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Conclusions The precise location of damage causing OD is unknown. In contrast to ocular bobbing, OD has no localizing value itself, but structural brainstem damage is likely when it appears combined with other spontaneous vertical eye movements. PMID:24829603

  8. Magnetic dips in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolny, M.; Bavassano, B.; Mariani, F.; Ness, N.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1978-01-01

    Using magnetic data from the HELIOS 1 fluxgate magnetometer, with a 0.2 sec resolution, the structures of several interplanetary discontinuities involving magnetic dips and rotations of the magnetic field vector were investigated. A minimum variance analysis illustrates the behavior of the magnetic field through the transition in the plane of its maximum variation. Using this analysis, quite different structures have been individuated and, in particular, narrow transitions resembling almost one dimensional reconnected neutral sheets. For the thinner cases (scale lengths of the magnetic rotation of the order or smaller than 1,000 km), results show the observed structures could be the nonlinear effect of a resistive tearing mode instability having developed on an originally one dimensional neutral sheet at the solar corona.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of High-Temperature Constitutive Equations and Hot Processing Maps for As-Cast SA508-3 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Dashan; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Lingling; Gao, Liang; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-11-01

    The hot deformation behavior and hot workability characteristics of as-cast SA508-3 steel were studied by modeling the constitutive equations and developing hot processing maps. The isothermal compression experiments were carried out at temperatures of 950°C, 1050°C, 1150°C, and 1250°C and strain rates of 0.001 s-1, 0.01 s-1, 0.1 s-1, and 1 s-1 respectively. The two-stage flow stress models were established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening, and the solution of activation energy for hot deformation was 355.0 kJ mol-1 K-1. Based on the dynamic material model, the power dissipation and instability maps were developed separately at strains of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. The power dissipation rate increases with both the increase of temperature and the decrease of strain rate, and the instable region mainly appears on the conditions of low temperature and high strain rate. The optimal hot working parameters for as-cast SA508-3 steel are 1050-1200°C/0.001-0.1 s-1, with about 25-40% peak efficiency of power dissipation.

  10. Statistical and clustering analysis for disturbances: A case study of voltage dips in wind farms

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia-Sanchez, Tania; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Muljadi, Eduard; ...

    2016-01-28

    This study proposes and evaluates an alternative statistical methodology to analyze a large number of voltage dips. For a given voltage dip, a set of lengths is first identified to characterize the root mean square (rms) voltage evolution along the disturbance, deduced from partial linearized time intervals and trajectories. Principal component analysis and K-means clustering processes are then applied to identify rms-voltage patterns and propose a reduced number of representative rms-voltage profiles from the linearized trajectories. This reduced group of averaged rms-voltage profiles enables the representation of a large amount of disturbances, which offers a visual and graphical representation ofmore » their evolution along the events, aspects that were not previously considered in other contributions. The complete process is evaluated on real voltage dips collected in intense field-measurement campaigns carried out in a wind farm in Spain among different years. The results are included in this paper.« less

  11. Statistical and clustering analysis for disturbances: A case study of voltage dips in wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sanchez, Tania; Kessler, Mathieu; Molina-Garcia, Angel

    2016-01-28

    This study proposes and evaluates an alternative statistical methodology to analyze a large number of voltage dips. For a given voltage dip, a set of lengths is first identified to characterize the root mean square (rms) voltage evolution along the disturbance, deduced from partial linearized time intervals and trajectories. Principal component analysis and K-means clustering processes are then applied to identify rms-voltage patterns and propose a reduced number of representative rms-voltage profiles from the linearized trajectories. This reduced group of averaged rms-voltage profiles enables the representation of a large amount of disturbances, which offers a visual and graphical representation of their evolution along the events, aspects that were not previously considered in other contributions. The complete process is evaluated on real voltage dips collected in intense field-measurement campaigns carried out in a wind farm in Spain among different years. The results are included in this paper.

  12. TiO2 Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reli, Martin; Kobielusz, Marcin; Matějová, Lenka; Daniš, Stanislav; Macyk, Wojciech; Obalová, Lucie; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Anatase-brookite TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents-water/methanol/water (TiO2(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO2(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO2 Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO2(M) appeared more active than TiO2(E) in the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide due to a lower density of defects created in the crystal lattice.

  13. Investigation of the interactions of enteric and hydrophilic polymers to enhance dissolution of griseofulvin following hot melt extrusion processing.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ryan C; Keen, Justin M; Bi, Yunxia Vivian; Porter, Stuart; Dürig, Thomas; McGinity, James W

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on the application of hot melt extrusion (HME) to produce solid dispersions containing griseofulvin (GF) and investigates the in-vitro dissolution performance of HME powders and resulting tablet compositions containing HME-processed dispersions. Binary, ternary and quaternary dispersions containing GF, enteric polymer (Eudragit L100-55 or AQOAT-LF) and/or vinyl pyrrolidone-based polymer (Plasdone K-12 povidone or S-630 copovidone) were processed by HME. Two plasticizers, triethyl citrate (TEC) and acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC), were incorporated to aid in melt processing and to modify release of GF in neutral media following a pH-change in dissolution. Products were characterized for GF recovery, degrees of compositional amorphous character, intermolecular interactions and non-sink dissolution performance. Binary dispersions exhibited lower maximum observed concentration values and magnitudes of supersaturated GF in neutral media dissolution in comparison with the ternary dispersions. The quaternary HME products, 1 : 2 : 1 : 0.6 GF : L100-55 : S-630 : ATBC and GF : AQOAT-LF : K-12 : ATBC, were determined as the most optimal concentration-enhancing compositions due to increased hydrogen bonding of enteric functional groups with carbonyl/acetate groups of vinyl pyrrolidone-based polymers, reduced compositional crystallinity and presence of incorporated hydrophobic plasticizer. HME products containing combinations of concentration-enhancing polymers can supersaturate and sustain GF dissolution to greater magnitudes in neutral media following the pH-transition and be compressed into immediate-release tablets exhibiting similar dissolution profiles. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. The relationship between dipping-non-dipping arterial blood pressure pattern and frequency of restless leg syndrome with related factors.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Sena Memnune; Ahsen, Ahmet; Akcı, Önder; Yaman, Fatima; Demir, Kasım; Yaman, Gökhan; Yüksel, Şeref; Acartürk, Gürsel

    2015-04-01

    The lack of nocturnal decline in blood pressure (BP) is associated with an increase in cardiovascular events. Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is an uncomfortable feeling in which the patient wants to budge the legs with ache in the legs. RLS also increases the hypertension and cardiovascular risk. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between dipping and non-dipping blood pressure patterns with RLS and its severity. Two hundred patients who had 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were enrolled into this cross-sectional study. They were classified by blood pressure pattern as dipping and non-dipping. Then, 100 patients with the dipper pattern and 100 patients with the non-dipper pattern were chosen. A questionnaire for RLS diagnosis that was prepared by the International RLS Study Group was given performed to the patients. RLS symptom score was higher in patients with non-dipping blood pressure patterns (NDBPP), and patients with NDBPP had more severe RLS. Beside this, there were no differences in terms of RLS frequency in dipping and non-dipping blood pressure patterns. As a conclusion, dipping and non-dipping blood pressure patterns do not increase RLS risk. But, if patients with NDBPP have RLS, they have more severe RLS. So, we suggest that evaluating a patient with a non-dipping blood pressure pattern, considering RLS, would be helpful to ameliorate the quality of life of the patient.

  15. Production of thin glass mirrors by hot slumping for x-ray telescopes: present process and ongoing development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2014-07-01

    Thin glass foils are considered good candidates to build a segmented X-ray telescope with effective area as large as 2 m2 and angular resolution better than 5 arcsec. In order to produce thin glass mirror segments, we developed a direct hot slumping technique assisted by pressure, in which the shape of a mould is replicated onto the optical surface of the glass. In this paper we present the result obtained with AF32 (by Schott) and EAGLE XG (by Corning) glass types. The selected mould material is Zerodur K20, as it does not require any anti-sticking layer and has a good matching, in terms of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion, with both glass types. Our group already produced a few prototypes, reaching angular resolution near 20 arcsec. In this work, relevant steps forward aimed at attaining a 5 arcsec angular resolution are described, along with the tuning of few key parameters in the slumping process. The results obtained on a newly procured cylindrical Zerodur K20 mould are presented.

  16. Carbon nanofiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite fabricated by combined process of spark plasma sintering and hot extrusion.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Kurita, Hiroki; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-05-01

    Spark plasma sintering and hot extrusion processes have been employed for fabricating carbon nanofiber (CNF)-aluminum (Al) matrix bulk materials. The Al powder and the CNFs were mixed in a mixing medium of natural rubber. The CNFs were well dispersed onto the Al particles. After removal of the natural rubber, the Al-CNF mixture powders were highly densified. From the microstructural viewpoint, the composite materials were observed by optical, field-emission scanning electron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopies. The CNFs were found to be located on every grain boundary and aligned with the extrusion direction of the Al-CNF bulk materials. Some Al carbides (Al4C3) were also observed at the surface of the CNFs. This carbide was created by a reaction between the Al and the disordered CNF. The CNFs and the formation of Al4C3 play an important role in the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the Al-CNF bulk material. The CNFs can also be used for engineering reinforcement of other matrix materials such as ceramics, polymers and more complex matrices.

  17. Hot-melt granulation in a twin screw extruder: effects of processing on formulations with caffeine and Ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Weatherley, Sharleen; Mu, Bo; Thompson, Michael R; Sheskey, Paul J; O'Donnell, Kevin P

    2013-12-01

    Hot-melt granulation (HMG) by twin screw extrusion is a novel technology for the continuous processing of pharmaceuticals but confidence must still be gained regarding whether the environment affects drug properties. In this preliminary study, granulation was studied for a model product containing lactose monohydrate and active ingredients of differing water solubility, namely ibuprofen versus caffeine. The formulations were granulated at 220 rpm and 100°C with polyethylene glycol binders of differing molecular weights and at concentrations between 6.5% and 20%. In terms of granule properties, the low melting point of ibuprofen had a dominant influence by producing larger, stronger granules, whereas the caffeine products were more comparable to a blank containing no active ingredient. Drug degradation was study by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. The only detected change was the dehydration of lactose monohydrate for the caffeine and blank products, whereas the lubricating influence of the ibuprofen protected its granules. The short residence time (∼60 s) was consider to be influential in minimizing damage of the drug despite the high temperature and shear attributed to HMG inside a twin screw extruder.

  18. Dual stable isotopes of CH4 from Yellowstone hot-springs suggest hydrothermal processes involving magmatic CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Jay, Zackary J.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Beam, Jacob P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2017-07-01

    Volcanism and post-magmatism contribute significant annual methane (CH4) fluxes to the atmosphere (on par with other natural sources such as forest fire and wild animal emissions) and have been implicated in past climate-change events. The Yellowstone hot spot is one of the largest volcanic systems on Earth and is known to emit CH4 (as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases), but the ultimate sources of this CH4 flux have not been elucidated. Here we use dual stable isotope analysis (δ2H and δ13C) of CH4 sampled from ten high-temperature geothermal pools in Yellowstone National Park along with other isotopic and gas analyses to evaluate potential sources of methane. The average δ13C and δ2H values of CH4 emitted from hot springs (26.7 (± 2.4) and - 236.9 (± 12.0) ‰, respectively) are inconsistent with microbial methanogenesis but do not allow distinction between thermogenic and abiotic sources. Correlation between δ13CCH4 and δ13C of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) is consistent with DIC as the parent C source for the observed CH4, or with equilibration of CH4 and DIC. Methane formation temperatures estimated by isotopic geothermometry based on δ13CCH4 and δ13CCO2 ranged from 250-350 °C, which is just below previous temperature estimates for the hydrothermal reservoir. Further, the δ2HH2O of the thermal springs and the measured δ2HCH4 values are consistent with equilibration between the source water and the CH4 at the formation temperatures. Though the ultimate origin of the CH4 could be attributed to either abiotic of themorgenic processes with subsequent isotopic equilibration, the C1/C2 + composition of the gases is more consistent with abiotic origins for most of the samples. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that subsurface rock-water interactions are responsible for at least a significant fraction of the CH4 flux from the Yellowstone National Park volcanic system.

  19. Dual stable isotopes of CH4 from Yellowstone hot-springs suggest hydrothermal processes involving magmatic CO2

    DOE PAGES

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Jay, Zackary J.; ...

    2017-05-16

    Volcanism and post-magmatism contribute significant annual methane (CH4) fluxes to the atmosphere (on par with other natural sources such as forest fire and wild animal emissions) and have been implicated in past climate-change events. The Yellowstone hot spot is one of the largest volcanic systems on Earth and is known to emit CH4 (as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases), but the ultimate sources of this CH4 flux have not been elucidated. In this paper, we use dual stable isotope analysis (δ2H and δ13C) of CH4 sampled from ten high-temperature geothermal pools in Yellowstone National Park along withmore » other isotopic and gas analyses to evaluate potential sources of methane. The average δ13C and δ2H values of CH4 emitted from hot springs ( 26.7 (± 2.4) and - 236.9 (± 12.0) ‰, respectively) are inconsistent with microbial methanogenesis but do not allow distinction between thermogenic and abiotic sources. Correlation between δ13CCH4 and δ13C of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) is consistent with DIC as the parent C source for the observed CH4, or with equilibration of CH4 and DIC. Methane formation temperatures estimated by isotopic geothermometry based on δ13CCH4 and δ13CCO2 ranged from ~ 250–350 °C, which is just below previous temperature estimates for the hydrothermal reservoir. Further, the δ2HH2O of the thermal springs and the measured δ2HCH4 values are consistent with equilibration between the source water and the CH4 at the formation temperatures. Though the ultimate origin of the CH4 could be attributed to either abiotic of themorgenic processes with subsequent isotopic equilibration, the C1/C2+ composition of the gases is more consistent with abiotic origins for most of the samples. Finally, our data support the hypothesis that subsurface rock-water interactions are responsible for at least a significant fraction of the CH4 flux from the Yellowstone National Park volcanic system.« less

  20. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O'Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily

  1. Aerosol mass spectrometer for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Kyum; Winterer, Markus

    2005-09-01

    We present a modified aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors and describe the transfer function of the velocity and kinetic-energy measurement. The AMS is a combination of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and a particle mass spectrometer (PMS) and enables the in situ analysis of aerosols with high number concentrations up to 1018m-3. Size distributions of ultrafine particles in the range of 104-107u (amu) can be measured in the PMS. Simultaneously, molecular species up to 300u can be detected in the QMS. In the setup described here a furnace was developed to enable measurement directly at the reactor exit. The formation of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) was investigated. TMS started to decompose at about 900K and carbosilanes with two [-Si-C-] units were identified as growth species in the synthesis of SiC from TMS. With increasing temperatures particles were formed and grew by coagulation. At higher temperatures sintering of the particles became an important process. Although the particle mass reduced slightly due to a smaller residence time at higher temperatures in the reactor, the particle velocity in the molecular beam of the AMS decreased significantly. A simple model is used to compare the particle velocity in a molecular beam as a function of particle mass. The significant difference in the particle velocity can be explained by a change in the particle shape factor (κp) due to sintering.

  2. DipM, a new factor required for peptidoglycan remodeling during cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J.; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In bacteria, cytokinesis is dependent on lytic enzymes that facilitate remodeling of the cell wall during constriction. In this work, we identify a thus far uncharacterized periplasmic protein, DipM, that is required for cell division and polarity in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM is composed of four peptidoglycan-binding (LysM) domains and a C-terminal lysostaphin-like (LytM) peptidase domain. It binds to isolated murein sacculi in vitro, and is recruited to the site of constriction through interaction with the cell division protein FtsN. Mutational analyses showed that the LysM domains are necessary and sufficient for localization of DipM, while its peptidase domain is essential for function. Consistent with a role in cell wall hydrolysis, DipM was found to interact with purified murein sacculi in vitro and to induce cell lysis upon overproduction. Its inactivation causes severe defects in outer-membrane invagination, resulting in a significant delay between cytoplasmic compartmentalization and final separation of the daughter cells. Overall, these findings indicate that DipM is a periplasmic component of the C. crescentus divisome that facilitates remodeling of the peptidoglycan layer and, thus, coordinated constriction of the cell envelope during the division process. PMID:20497502

  3. Characterization of DIP0733, a multi-functional virulence factor of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Camila Azevedo; Sanches dos Santos, Louisy; Hacker, Elena; Köhler, Stefanie; Bösl, Korbinian; Ott, Lisa; de Luna, Maria das Graças; Hirata, Raphael; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston de Carvalho; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana-Luíza; Burkovski, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is typically recognized as an extracellular pathogen. However, a number of studies revealed its ability to invade epithelial cells, indicating a more complex pathogen-host interaction. The molecular mechanisms controlling and facilitating internalization of Cor. diphtheriae are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of DIP0733 as virulence factor to elucidate how it contributes to the process of pathogen-host cell interaction. Based on in vitro experiments, it was suggested recently that the DIP0733 protein might be involved in adhesion, invasion of epithelial cells and induction of apoptosis. A corresponding Cor. diphtheriae mutant strain generated in this study was attenuated in its ability to colonize and kill the host in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model system. Furthermore, the mutant showed an altered adhesion pattern and a drastically reduced ability to adhere and invade epithelial cells. Subsequent experiments showed an influence of DIP0733 on binding of Cor. diphtheriae to extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen and fibronectin. Furthermore, based on its fibrinogen-binding activity, DIP0733 may play a role in avoiding recognition of Cor. diphtheriae by the immune system. In summary, our findings support the idea that DIP0733 is a multi-functional virulence factor of Cor. diphtheriae.

  4. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability.

    PubMed

    Bougher, S; Jakosky, B; Halekas, J; Grebowsky, J; Luhmann, J; Mahaffy, P; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Larson, D; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D N; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Brain, D; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, J-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Ma, Y; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-06

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability.

  5. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S.; Jakosky, B.; Halekas, J.; Grebowsky, J.; Luhmann, J.; Mahaffy, P.; Connerney, J.; Eparvier, F.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; Mitchell, D.; Schneider, N.; Zurek, R.; Mazelle, C.; Andersson, L.; Andrews, D.; Baird, D.; Baker, D. N.; Bell, J. M.; Benna, M.; Brain, D.; Chaffin, M.; Chamberlin, P.; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Clarke, J.; Collinson, G.; Combi, M.; Crary, F.; Cravens, T.; Crismani, M.; Curry, S.; Curtis, D.; Deighan, J.; Delory, G.; Dewey, R.; DiBraccio, G.; Dong, C.; Dong, Y.; Dunn, P.; Elrod, M.; England, S.; Eriksson, A.; Espley, J.; Evans, S.; Fang, X.; Fillingim, M.; Fortier, K.; Fowler, C. M.; Fox, J.; Gröller, H.; Guzewich, S.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Holsclaw, G.; Jain, S. K.; Jolitz, R.; Leblanc, F.; Lee, C. O.; Lee, Y.; Lefevre, F.; Lillis, R.; Livi, R.; Lo, D.; Ma, Y.; Mayyasi, M.; McClintock, W.; McEnulty, T.; Modolo, R.; Montmessin, F.; Morooka, M.; Nagy, A.; Olsen, K.; Peterson, W.; Rahmati, A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Russell, C. T.; Sakai, S.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Seki, K.; Steckiewicz, M.; Stevens, M.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Stiepen, A.; Stone, S.; Tenishev, V.; Thiemann, E.; Tolson, R.; Toublanc, D.; Vogt, M.; Weber, T.; Withers, P.; Woods, T.; Yelle, R.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability.

  6. Dip coating in the presence of an opposing Marangoni stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Tiwari, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the dip coating process of uniformly wetting and selectively wetting substrates with a shear-thinning power-law fluid is presented. The viscosity is modeled by a three-constant Ellis model that allows for Newtonian and power-law fluids at low and high shear, respectively. The effect of an opposing Marangoni stress is studied on the entrained film thickness. Ellis number and Marangoni number are the important parameters in the analysis that control the film thickness. Numerical results show that the film thickness is a monotonically decreasing function of these two parameters. A correlation between the parameters is found for both the surfaces to obtain an apparent "dry" substrate with a microscopically thin film attached to the surfaces.

  7. Influence of Molecular Weight of Carriers and Processing Parameters on the Extrudability, Drug Release, and Stability of Fenofibrate Formulations Processed by Hot-Melt Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Alsulays, Bader B; Park, Jun-Bom; Alshehri, Sultan M; Morott, Joseph T; Alshahrani, Saad M; Tiwari, Roshan V; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Langley, Nigel; Kolter, Karl; Gryczke, Andreas; Repka, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the extrudability, drug release, and stability of fenofibrate (FF) formulations utilizing various hot-melt extrusion processing parameters and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) polymers of various molecular weights. The different PVP grades selected for this study were Kollidon(®) 12 PF (K12), Kollidon(®) 30 (K30), and Kollidon(®) 90 F (K90). FF was extruded with these polymers at three drug loadings (15%, 25%, and 35% w/w). Additionally, for FF combined with each of the successfully extruded PVP grades (K12 and K30), the effects of two levels of processing parameters for screw design, screw speed, and barrel temperature were assessed. It was found that the FF with (K90) was not extrudable up to 35% drug loading. With low drug loading, the polymer viscosity significantly influenced the release of FF. The crystallinity remaining was vital in the highest drug-loaded formulation dissolution profile, and the glass transition temperature of the polymer significantly affected its stability. Modifying the screw configuration resulted in more than 95% post-extrusion drug content of the FF-K30 formulations. In contrast to FF-K30 formulations, FF release and stability with K12 were significantly influenced by the extrusion temperature and screw speed.

  8. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived,…

  9. Recovery comparisons--hot nitrogen Vs steam regeneration of toxic dichloromethane from activated carbon beds in oil sands process.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Shivaji G; Pré, Pascaline; Giraudet, Sylvain; Le Coq, Laurence; Le Cloirec, Pierre; Baudouin, Olivier; Déchelotte, Stéphane

    2012-02-29

    The regeneration experiments of dichloromethane from activated carbon bed had been carried out by both hot nitrogen and steam to evaluate the regeneration performance and the operating cost of the regeneration step. Factorial Experimental Design (FED) tool had been implemented to optimize the temperature of nitrogen and the superficial velocity of the nitrogen to achieve maximum regeneration at an optimized operating cost. All the experimental results of adsorption step, hot nitrogen and steam regeneration step had been validated by the simulation model PROSIM. The average error percentage between the simulation and experiment based on the mass of adsorption of dichloromethane was 2.6%. The average error percentages between the simulations and experiments based on the mass of dichloromethane regenerated by nitrogen regeneration and steam regeneration were 3 and 12%, respectively. From the experiments, it had been shown that both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration had regenerated 84% of dichloromethane. But the choice of hot nitrogen or steam regeneration depends on the regeneration time, operating costs, and purity of dichloromethane regenerated. A thorough investigation had been made about the advantages and limitations of both the hot nitrogen and steam regeneration of dichloromethane.

  10. Novel blast furnace operation process involving charging with low-titanium vanadium-titanium magnetite carbon composite hot briquette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Chu, Man-sheng; Wang, Hong-tao; Liu, Zheng-gen; Tang, Ya-ting

    2016-05-01

    An innovative process of blast furnace (BF) operation involving charging with low-titanium vanadium-titanium magnetite carbon composite hot briquette (LVTM-CCB) was proposed for utilizing LVTM and conserving energy. In this study, the effect of LVTM-CCB charging ratio on the softening, melting, and dripping behaviors of the mixed burden was explored systemically, and the migration of valuable elements V and Cr was extensively investigated. The results show that with increasing LVTM-CCB charging ratio, the softening interval T 40 - T 4 increases from 146.1°C to 266.1°C, and the melting interval T D - T S first decreases from 137.2°C to 129.5°C and then increases from 129.5°C to 133.2°C. Moreover, the cohesive zone becomes narrower and then wider, and its location shifts slightly downward. In addition, the recovery ratios of V and Cr in dripped iron first increase and then decrease, reaching maximum values of 14.552% and 28.163%, respectively, when the charging ratio is 25%. A proper LVTM-CCB charging ratio would improve the softening-melting behavior of the mixed burden; however, Ti(C,N) would be generated rapidly in slag when the charging ratio exceeds 25%, which is not favorable for BF operation. When considering the comprehensive softening-melting behavior of the mixed burden and the recovery ratios of V and Cr, the recommended LVTM-CCB charging ratio is 20%.

  11. Opportunity's First Dip into Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity entered Victoria Crater during the rover's 1,291st Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 11, 2007). The rover team commanded Opportunity to drive just far enough into the crater to get all six wheels onto the inner slope, and then to back out again and assess how much the wheels slipped on the slope. The driving commands for the day included a precaution for the rover to stop driving if the wheels were slipping more than 40 percent. Slippage exceeded that amount on the last step of the drive, so Opportunity stopped with its front pair of wheels still inside the crater. The rover team planned to assess results of the drive, then start Opportunity on an extended exploration inside the crater.

    This wide-angle view taken by Opportunity's front hazard-identification camera at the end of the day's driving shows the wheel tracks created by the short dip into the crater. The left half of the image looks across an alcove informally named 'Duck Bay' toward a promontory called 'Cape Verde' clockwise around the crater wall. The right half of the image looks across the main body of the crater, which is 800 meters (half a mile) in diameter.

  12. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions of...

  13. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions of...

  14. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN CATTLE § 73.10 Permitted dips; substances allowed. (a) The dips at present permitted by the Department for the treatment, as required in this part, of cattle affected with or exposed to scabies, are as... of scabies in cattle, the APHIS 3 will require that the product be registered under the provisions of...

  15. Void and pore formation inside the hair cortex by a denaturation and super-contraction process occurring during hair setting with hot irons.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Garcia, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of hair fibers from donors that frequently use hot irons for hair straightening showed the presence of multiple pores and voids (φ approximately 0.1-1.5 μm) that extend from the cuticle sheath to regions inside the hair cortex. Pore formation in the cortex was found to be confined at its periphery and could be reproduced in the laboratory with virgin hair fibers after the application of various hot-iron straightening cycles. The appearance of pores and voids in the cortex was found to be associated to the production of hot water vapor while the fiber is undergoing mechanical elongation or contraction. The number of pores was seen to rapidly increase with temperature in the range from 190 to 220°C and also with the number of straightening cycles. Larger hair voids (φ approximately 2-5 μm) were also detected in the cortex. The small pores found at the cortex periphery appear to occur by the simultaneous occurrence of rearrangement of hair proteins, fiber mechanical contraction/expansion, and the flow of super-heated steam. Hot irons create, thus, the conditions for the onset of pore formation as the high temperatures produce superheated steam and soften the native state of hair proteins by a process involving denaturation and changes in the crystalline regions.

  16. Upscaling and in-line process monitoring via spectroscopic techniques of ethylene vinyl acetate hot-melt extruded formulations.

    PubMed

    Almeida, A; Saerens, L; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2012-12-15

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate drug release and quality of EVA/drug matrices at different PEO 7M concentrations (5 and 15%), manufactured using two different hot-melt extruders: a lab-scale mini extruder and a pilot-scale extruder. The process parameters used on both extruders (temperature and screw speed) and drug release from the matrices were compared. On the lab-scale extruder all formulations were extruded at 90 °C, whereas on the pilot-scale extruder the temperature of the die was adjusted to 100 °C in order to achieve a constant pressure at the extrusion die, hence constant material flow through the die to yield smooth extrudates. Screw speed was also adjusted from 60 rpm (lab-scale extruder) to 90 rpm (pilot-scale extruder) in order to obtain a balance between feeding rate and screw speed. Drug release from the obtained matrices on both extruders was also assessed. Despite the differences in diameter (diameter of 2 and 3mm for the lab-scale extruder and pilot-scale extruder, respectively), temperature and screw speed, drug release per surface area was similar. DSC analysis of a formulation [EVA40/MPT (50/50, w/w) with 5% PEO] indicated small changes in its solid state after extrusion on both extruders: drug crystallinity was reduced by max. 20%, PEO recrystallized after cooling and EVA remained semi-crystalline. Extrusion experiments on the pilot-scale extruder of EVA/MPT, 50/50 (w/w) formulations were also monitored in-line using Raman and NIR spectroscopy in order to evaluate the material behavior at a molecular level in the extrusion barrel as function of the process settings (extrusion temperature: 90, 110 and 140 °C; screw speed: 90 and 110 rpm). At 90 and 110 °C the crystallinity of the drug was reduced, but the majority of MPT remained in its crystalline state as specific peaks in the Raman spectra of the drug became broader. These differences were accentuated when extrusion was performed at 140 °C as the drug completely melted

  17. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6 Microstructure Engineering in Hot Strip Mills, Part 1 of 2: Integrated Mathematical Model

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Brimacombe; I.V. Samarasekera; E.B. Hawbolt; T.R. Meadowcroft; M. Militzer; W.J. Pool; D.Q. Jin

    1999-07-31

    This report describes the work of developing an integrated model used to predict the thermal history, deformation, roll forces, microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip in a hot-strip mill. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AIS) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S. DOE and fifteen North American Steelmakers.

  18. dipIQ: Blind Image Quality Assessment by Learning-to-Rank Discriminable Image Pairs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kede; Liu, Wentao; Liu, Tongliang; Wang, Zhou; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-05-26

    Objective assessment of image quality is fundamentally important in many image processing tasks. In this work, we focus on learning blind image quality assessment (BIQA) models which predict the quality of a digital image with no access to its original pristine-quality counterpart as reference. One of the biggest challenges in learning BIQA models is the conflict between the gigantic image space (which is in the dimension of the number of image pixels) and the extremely limited reliable ground truth data for training. Such data are typically collected via subjective testing, which is cumbersome, slow, and expensive. Here we first show that a vast amount of reliable training data in the form of quality-discriminable image pairs (DIP) can be obtained automatically at low cost by exploiting largescale databases with diverse image content. We then learn an opinion-unaware BIQA (OU-BIQA, meaning that no subjective opinions are used for training) model using RankNet, a pairwise learning-to-rank (L2R) algorithm, from millions of DIPs, each associated with a perceptual uncertainty level, leading to a DIP inferred quality (dipIQ) index. Extensive experiments on four benchmark IQA databases demonstrate that dipIQ outperforms state-of-the-art OU-BIQA models. The robustness of dipIQ is also significantly improved as confirmed by the group MAximum Differentiation (gMAD) competition method. Furthermore, we extend the proposed framework by learning models with ListNet (a listwise L2R algorithm) on quality-discriminable image lists (DIL). The resulting DIL Inferred Quality (dilIQ) index achieves an additional performance gain.

  19. Origin of Dips in 4U1915-05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2003-01-01

    This grant supported our participation in a proposal submitted by Didier Barret to conduct a study of the dipping LMXB 4U1915-05. In this Final Report, we summarize the Scientific Objectives of this investigation and the results achieved. Data analysis is still in progress and publication of results will be forthcoming.Our objectives in this work have been to study: 1. Spectra of dips in 4 Ul916-05: This low mass x-ray binary (LMXB) is a 50min binary system and the first to show x-ray dip behaviour. Our XMM observation was proposed to study the x-ray spectra of the dips to better constrain their physical properties. Of primary interest is the variation of the absorbing column density as a function of flux in the dip. We wish to isolate the absorption from Compton scattering components in the dip spectra, and to use the large throughput of XMM to better constrain short timescale variations of the spectrum in the dips. 2. Period of the dips and long-term ephemeris: We also seek to improve upon the long- term ephemeris of the dips by combining these more recent XMM data with earlier RXTE data to update the ephemeris for dips and the determination of the dip period to further test whether the dip period represents the true binary period of this LMXB. We shall extend the ephemeris published by Chou, Grindlay and Bloser 2001, ApJ, 549, 1135) to test the assertion of Retter, Chou et a1 2002, MNRAS, 330, 37 that the dips are indeed the binary period and not a precession period. 1 3 Results Achieved The observations for this program were delayed, presumably for reasons related to the general difficulty of scheduling XMM targets in this region moderately close to the Cygnus region. 4'171916-05 was finally observed (2lksec) on April 24, 2002, but the data have not been delivered. A second observation was conducted on September 9, 2002 (18ksec) and the data are still being analyzed. 4 Papers Presented and Published A paper is in preparation for Astronomy and Astrophysics in

  20. Visualization and process understanding of material behavior in the extrusion barrel during a hot-melt extrusion process using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saerens, Lien; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-06-04

    The aim of this research was to improve understanding of material behavior in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion by implementing a Raman probe in each section of the barrel. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to confirm the Raman observations. Metoprolol tartrate (MPT) concentration (10 and 40% in Eudragit RSPO), extrusion temperature (100, 120, and 140 °C), and screw speed (80 and 160 rpm) were varied to examine their influence on polymer-drug solid state throughout the barrel. When extruding a formulation with a 40% MPT concentration, the broadening of MPT peaks indicates melting of MPT between sections 2 and 3, caused by the first kneading zone. Decreasing the concentration to 10% shows an additional spectral difference (i.e., peak shifts indicating interactions between MPT and the carrier) between sections 5 and 6, due to formation of a solid solution. At a 10% MPT load, increasing the extrusion temperature does not influence the solid state or the barrel section where the final solid state is obtained. At a drug load of 40%, the solid state of the end product is reached further down the barrel when the temperature decreases. Doubling the screw speed when processing a 10% MPT formulation does not affect the solid state of the product or the location where it is obtained. In contrast, at a 40% drug load, the section where the final product is produced, is situated earlier in the barrel, when applying a higher speed. The Raman spectra provide real-time information about polymer-drug behavior throughout the barrel, facilitating process understanding and optimization.

  1. The Near-Omniprescence of Coalescence in Warm Clouds: A Different Explanation for the Hoppel Dip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    The formation of rain through warm processes (no ice) proceeds by condensational growth of cloud droplets on soluble aerosol particles, the so-called cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Once these drops have grown sufficiently large, they may settle at different speeds and collect smaller droplets in their way, thus initiating the coalescence process. While attempting to explain the rate of precipitation formed (often invoking deep clouds, clean air, turbulence or giant aerosol particles), the coalescence in non-precipitating clouds has been largely overlooked. Multiple cycles of CCN through even non-precipitating clouds provides a rapid pathway for reduction of the CCN concentration. The result of the coalescence is that a dip develops in the size distribution, and this dip can be attributed to removal of drops formed on small CCN as these small drops are being collected by larger drops. In the past this dip separating the Aitken and accumulation modes, the so-called Hoppel dip, has been explained as a result of wet sulfur chemistry adding mass to aerosol particles in cloud droplets. Detailed model calculations incorporating stochastic Monte-Carlo coalescence demonstrate that the separation of the Aitken and accumulation modes can also be explained as a result of coalescence between small cloud droplets. Initial CCN spectrum: N = 1000S^0.3. Final spectrum after 24-hours of cycling in the marine boundary layer. After 24 hours there is a total loss of 47% of the aerosols that activate at any time.

  2. Hot microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Baranski, Andrzej S

    2002-03-15

    Heat generation at disk microelectrodes by a high-amplitude (few volt) and high-frequency (0.1-2 GHz) alternating voltage is described. This method allows changing electrode temperature very rapidly and maintaining it well above the boiling point of solution for a very long time without any indication of boiling. The size of the hot zone in solution is determined by the radius of the electrode. There is no obvious limit in regard to the electrode size, so theoretically, by this method, it should be possible to create hot spots that are much smaller than those created with laser beams. That could lead to potential applications in medicine and biology. The heat-generating waveform does not electrically interfere with normal electroanalytical measurements. The noise level at hot microelectrodes is only slightly higher, as compared to normal microelectodes, but diffusion-controlled currents at hot microelectrodes may be up to 7 times higher, and an enhancement of kinetically controlled currents may be even larger. Hot microelectrodes can be used for end-column detection in capillary electrophoresis and for in-line or in vivo analyses. Temperature gradients at hot microelectrodes may exceed 1.5 x 10(5) K/cm, which makes them useful in studies of Soret diffusion and thermoelectric phenomena.

  3. Process optimization and consumer acceptability of salted ground beef patties cooked and held hot in flavored marinade.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Subash; Cornforth, Daren; Nummer, Brian A

    2010-09-01

    Food safety is paramount for cooking hamburger. The center must reach 71 °C (or 68 °C for 15 s) to assure destruction of E. coli O157:H7 and other food pathogens. This is difficult to achieve during grilling or frying of thick burgers without overcooking the surface. Thus, the feasibility of partially or completely cooking frozen patties in liquid (93 °C water) together with hot holding in liquid was investigated. Initial studies demonstrated that compared to frying, liquid cooking decreased (P < 0.05) patty diameter (98 compared with 93 mm) and increased (P < 0.05) thickness (18.1 compared with 15.6 mm). Liquid cooked patties had greater weight loss (P < 0.05) immediately after cooking (29 compared with 21%), but reabsorbed moisture and were not different from fried patties after 1 h hot water holding (61 °C). Protein and fat content were not affected by cooking method. However, liquid cooked patties were rated lower (P < 0.05) than fried patties for appearance (5.7 compared with 7.5) and flavor (5.9 compared with 7.5). An 8-member focus group then evaluated methods to improve both appearance and flavor. Salted, grill-marked patties were preferred, and caramel coloring was needed in the marinade to obtain acceptable flavor and color during liquid cooking or hot holding. Patties with 0.75% salt that were grill-marked and then finish-cooked in hot marinade (0.75% salt, 0.3% caramel color) were rated acceptable (P < 0.05) by consumers for up to 4 h hot holding in marinade, with mean hedonic panel ratings > 7.0 (like moderately) for appearance, juiciness, flavor, and texture. Grill-marked and marinade-cooked ground beef patties reached a safe internal cooking temperature without overcooking the surface. Burgers cooked using this method maintained high consumer acceptability right after cooking and for up to 4 h of hot holding. Consumers and foodservice operations could use this method without specialized equipment, and instead use inexpensive and common equipment

  4. Host to Hot Jupiter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-16

    This image zooms into a small portion of NASA Kepler full field of view -- an expansive, 100-square-degree patch of sky in our Milky Way galaxy. At the center of the field is a star with a known "hot Jupiter" planet, named "TrES-2," zipping closely around it every 2.5 days. Kepler will observe TrES-2 and other known planets as a test to demonstrate that it is working properly, and to obtain new information about those planets. The area pictured is one-thousandth of Kepler's full field of view, and shows hundreds of stars at the very edge of the constellation Cygnus. The image has been color-coded so that brighter stars appear white, and fainter stars, red. It is a 60-second exposure, taken on April 8, 2009, one day after the spacecraft's dust cover was jettisoned. Kepler was designed to hunt for planets like Earth. The mission will spend the next three-and-a-half years staring at the same stars, looking for periodic dips in brightness. Such dips occur when planets cross in front of their stars from our point of view in the galaxy, partially blocking the starlight. To achieve the level of precision needed to spot planets as small as Earth, Kepler's images are intentionally blurred slightly. This minimizes the number of saturated stars. Saturation, or "blooming," occurs when the brightest stars overload the individual pixels in the detectors, causing the signal to spill out into nearby pixels. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11985

  5. A simple calibration approach based on film-casting for confocal Raman microscopy to support the development of a hot-melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Netchacovitch, L; Thiry, J; De Bleye, C; Dumont, E; Dispas, A; Hubert, C; Krier, F; Sacré, P-Y; Evrard, B; Hubert, Ph; Ziemons, E

    2016-07-01

    When developing a new formulation, the development, calibration and validation steps of analytical methods based on vibrational spectroscopy are time-consuming. For each new formulation, real samples must be produced and a "reference method" must be used in order to determine the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) content of each sample. To circumvent this issue, the paper presents a simple approach based on the film-casting technique used as a calibration tool in the framework of hot-melt extrusion process. Confocal Raman microscopic method was successfully validated for the determination of itraconazole content in film-casting samples. Then, hot-melt extrusion was carried out to produce real samples in order to confront the results obtained with confocal Raman microscopy and Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC). The agreement between both methods was demonstrated using a comparison study based on the Bland and Altman's plot.

  6. TEM studies of the effects of Zr additions on some HDDR-processed, high boron, NdFeB-type powders and hot-pressed magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, G.; Chapman, J. N.; Brown, D. N.; Harris, I. R.

    2000-10-01

    The transmission electron microscope has been used to study the physical and magnetic microstructures of two HDDR-processed NdFeB-type alloys, one without Zr and the other containing 1.1 at% Zr. Studies were made of the as-produced powders and the solids produced following hot-pressing at 900°C. In the HDDR powders, the principal effects of adding Zr were to reduce the average grain size by ≈ {1}/{3} and made the grain size distribution more uniform. In the hot-pressed samples, the effect of Zr was more dramatic in that grain growth was very significantly reduced. Zr-containing phases were identified and a simple model, due to Zener, used to provide a plausible explanation of how the small amount of Zr present could stabilise the grain size to ≈0.5 μm. The microstructural results correlated well with measured magnetic properties.

  7. Chemical processes involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium sulfate induced hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA at 900 C was studied with special emphasis on the chemical reactions occurring during and immediately after the induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for set periods of time after which the samples were washed with water and water soluable metal salts and/or residual sulfates were analyzed chemically. Element distributions within the oxide layer were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. A third set of samples were subjected to surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of SO2 was monitored throughout many of the hot corrosion tests. Results are interpreted in terms of acid-base fluxing mechanisms.

  8. Hot ductility of steel 09G2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    Hot ductility of steel 09G2S is studied in a temperature range of 600 - 1000°C on the branch of cooling after heating to a high (1150°C) temperature. The causes of the nonmonotonic variation of the hot ductility are determined, and ways for removing the ductility dip are suggested. Recommendations are given for developing the modes of forming of sheet preforms.

  9. P-wave seismic imaging through dipping transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Jennifer Meryl

    2000-10-01

    P-wave seismic anisotropy is of growing concern to the exploration industry. The transmissional effects through dipping anisotropic strata, such as shales, cause substantial depth and lateral positioning errors when imaging subsurface targets. Using anisotropic physical models the limitations of conventional isotropic migration routines were determined to be significant. In addition, these models were used to validate both anisotropic depth migration routines and an anisotropic, numerical raytracer. In order to include anisotropy in these processes, one must be able to quantify the anisotropy using two parameters, epsilon and delta. These parameters were determined from headwave velocity measurements on anisotropic strata, in the parallel-, perpendicular- and 45°-to-bedding directions. This new method was developed using refraction seismic techniques to measure the necessary velocities in the Wapiabi Formation shales, the Brazeau Group interbedded sandstones and shales, the Cardium Formation sandstones and the Palliser Formation limestones. The Wapiabi Formation and Brazeau Group rocks were determined to be anisotropic with epsilon = 0.23 +/- 0.05, delta = --0.05 +/- 0.07 and epsilon = 0.11 +/- 0.04, delta = 0.42 +/- 0.06, respectively. The sandstones and limestones of the Cardium and Palliser formations were both determined to be isotropic, in these studies. In a complementary experiment, a new procedure using vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques was developed to measure the anisotropic headwave velocities. Using a multi-offset source configuration on an appropriately dipping, uniform panel of anisotropic strata, the required velocities were measured directly and modelled. In this study, the geologic model was modelled using an anisotropic raytracer, developed for the experiment. The anisotropy was successfully modelled using anisotropic parameters based on the refraction seismic results. With a firm idea of the anisotropic parameters from the

  10. Detection of pyridaben residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: effect of household processes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Choi, Ok-Ja; Rhee, Gyu-Seek; Chang, Moon-Ik; Kim, Heejung; Abid, Morad D N; Shin, Sung Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2015-07-01

    Following quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) and LC/MS/MS analysis, pyridaben residual levels were determined in unprocessed and processed hot pepper fruit and leaves. The linearities were satisfactory with determination coefficients (R(2)) in excess of 0.995 in processed and unprocessed pepper fruit and leaves. Recoveries at various concentrations were 79.9-105.1% with relative standard deviations ≤15%. The limits of quantitation of 0.003-0.012 mg/kg were very low compared with the maximum residue limits (2-5 mg/kg) set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Republic of Korea. The effects of various household processes, including washing, blanching, frying and drying under different conditions (water volume, blanching time and temperature) on residual concentrations were evaluated. Both washing and blanching (in combination with high water volume and time factor) significantly reduced residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves compared with other processes. In sum, the developed method was satisfactory and could be used to accurately detect residues in unprocessed and processed pepper fruit and leaves. It is recommended that pepper fruit/leaves be blanched after washing before being consumed to protect consumers from the negative health effects of detected pesticide residues.

  11. 3D Model of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    The Neal Hot Springs geothermal system lies in a left-step in a north-striking, west-dipping normal fault system, consisting of the Neal Fault to the south and the Sugarloaf Butte Fault to the north (Edwards, 2013). The Neal Hot Springs 3D geologic model consists of 104 faults and 13 stratigraphic units. The stratigraphy is sub-horizontal to dipping <10 degrees and there is no predominant dip-direction. Geothermal production is exclusively from the Neal Fault south of, and within the step-over, while geothermal injection is into both the Neal Fault to the south of the step-over and faults within the step-over.

  12. Effect of Si-H bond on the gas-phase chemistry of trimethylsilane in the hot wire chemical vapor deposition process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y J; Li, X M; Toukabri, R; Tong, L

    2011-09-22

    The effect of the Si-H bond on the gas-phase reaction chemistry of trimethylsilane in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) process has been studied by examining its decomposition on a hot tungsten filament and the secondary gas-phase reactions in a reactor using a soft laser ionization source coupled with mass spectrometry. Trimethylsilane decomposes on the hot filament via Si-H and Si-CH(3) bond cleavages. A short-chain mechanism is found to dominate in the secondary reactions in the reactor. It has been shown that the hydrogen abstractions of both Si-H and C-H occur simultaneously, with the abstraction of Si-H being favored. Tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane are the two major products formed from the radical recombination reactions in the termination steps. Three methyl-substituted disilacyclobutane molecules, i.e., 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane, 1,1,3-trimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane, and 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane are also produced in reactor from the cycloaddition reactions of methyl-substituted silene species. Compared to tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane, a common feature with trimethylsilane is that the short-chain mechanism still dominates. However, a more active involvement of the reactive silene intermediates has been found with trimethylsilane.

  13. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Phosphorus Partition between CaO-based Slags and Hot Metal during Hot Metal Dephosphorization Pretreatment Process Based on the Ion and Molecule Coexistence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    A thermodynamic model for predicting phosphorus partition L P between a CaO-based slags and hot metal during hot metal dephosphorization pretreatment process has been developed based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT), i.e., the IMCT- L P model. The reaction abilities of structural units or ion couples in the CaO-based slags have been represented by the calculated mass action concentrations N i through the developed IMCT- N i model based on the IMCT. The developed IMCT- L P model has been verified to be valid through comparing with the measured L P as well as the predicted L P by two reported L P models from the literature. Besides the total phosphorus partition L P between the CaO-based slag and hot metal, the respective phosphorus partitions L P, i of nine dephosphorization products as P2O5, 3FeO·P2O5, 4FeO·P2O5, 2CaO·P2O5, 3CaO·P2O5, 4CaO·P2O5, 2MgO·P2O5, 3MgO·P2O5, and 3MnO·P2O5 can also be accurately predicted by the developed IMCT- L P model. The formed 3CaO·P2O5 accounts for 99.20 pct of dephosphorization products comparing with the generated 4CaO·P2O5 for 0.08 pct. The comprehensive effect of CaO+Fe t O, which can be described by the mass percentage ratio (pct Fe t O)/(pct CaO) or the mass action concentration ratio N_{Fe}t O/N_{Fe}t O N_{CaO}. N_{CaO}} as well as the mass percentage product (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) or the mass action concentration product N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}5 × N_{{CaO}}3 , controls dephosphorization ability of the CaO-based slags. A linear relationship of L P against (pct Fe t O)/(pct CaO) can be correlated compared with a parabolic relationship of L P against N_{Fe}t O/N_{Fe}t O N_{CaO}. N_{CaO}, while the linear relationship of L P against (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) or N_{Fe}t O5 × N_{CaO}3 can be established. Thus, the mass percentage product (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) and the mass action concentration product N_{Fe}t O5 × N_{CaO}3 are recommended to represent the comprehensive effect of CaO+Fe t O on

  14. SAS 3 observations of Cygnus X-1 - The intensity dips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Canizares, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    In general, the dips are observed to occur near superior conjunctions of the X-ray source, but one pair of 2-minute dips occurs when the X-ray source is closer to the observer than is the supergiant companion. The dips are analyzed spectrally with the aid of seven energy channels in the range 1.2-50 keV. Essentially, there is no change in the spectral index during the dips. Reductions in the count rates are observed at energies exceeding 6 keV for some of the dips, but the dip amplitude is always significantly greater in the 1.2-3 keV band. It is believed that absorption by partially ionized gas may best explain these results, since the observations of Pravdo et al. (1980) rule out absorption by unionized material. Estimates for the intervening gas density, extent, and distance from the X-ray source are presented. Attention is also given to the problems confronting the models for the injection of gas through the line of sight, believed to be inclined by approximately 30 deg from the binary pole.

  15. Antimicrobial efficacy of Acacia nilotica, Murraya koenigii L. Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, and Psidium guajava on primary plaque colonizers: An in vitro comparison between hot and cold extraction process

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Chandra; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Singh, Rupal; Thakur, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential drawbacks of the existing antiplaque agents call for innovative strategies that are safe, effective, and easily available. Objective: The objective was to assess and compare antimicrobial efficacy of four plant extracts derived using hot and cold extraction methods against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus salivarius. Materials and Methods: The leaves of Acacia nilotica, P. guajava, Eucalyptus hybrid, and Murraya konigii L. Sprengel were collected from the surrounding areas, identified and authenticated by a taxonomist. The leaves were washed, shade-dried, and hand crushed to obtain coarse powder. This was subsequently ground into a fine powder and extracted using ethanol by cold infusion and hot extraction process. The antimicrobial efficacy testing was done on American Type Culture Collection strains of S. mutans, S. sanguis, and S. salivarius using agar well diffusion method. 0.2% chlorhexidine and dimethyl sulfoxide were used as positive and negative controls. The mean inhibition zone using 10% concentration of these extracts was compared using independent sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance. Results: All the four plant extracts inhibited the growth of S. mutans, S. sanguis, and S. salivarius irrespective of the method of extraction. The extracts of A. nilotica, P. guajava, and E. hybrid derived from both the methods of extraction exhibited a significantly higher inhibition zone against S. mutans in comparison with Murraya koenigii L. Sprengel and chlorhexidine. The cold extracts of A. nilotica and E. hybrid exhibited higher zone of inhibition against S. sanguis while the hot extracts of M. koenigii L. Sprengel exhibited a higher zone of inhibition against S. mutans. Conclusion: All the four plant extracts derived using either hot or cold extraction were effective against these bacteria and have the potential to be used as antiplaque agents. PMID:26015668

  16. Antimicrobial efficacy of Acacia nilotica, Murraya koenigii L. Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, and Psidium guajava on primary plaque colonizers: An in vitro comparison between hot and cold extraction process.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Chandra; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Singh, Rupal; Thakur, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    The potential drawbacks of the existing antiplaque agents call for innovative strategies that are safe, effective, and easily available. The objective was to assess and compare antimicrobial efficacy of four plant extracts derived using hot and cold extraction methods against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus salivarius. The leaves of Acacia nilotica, P. guajava, Eucalyptus hybrid, and Murraya konigii L. Sprengel were collected from the surrounding areas, identified and authenticated by a taxonomist. The leaves were washed, shade-dried, and hand crushed to obtain coarse powder. This was subsequently ground into a fine powder and extracted using ethanol by cold infusion and hot extraction process. The antimicrobial efficacy testing was done on American Type Culture Collection strains of S. mutans, S. sanguis, and S. salivarius using agar well diffusion method. 0.2% chlorhexidine and dimethyl sulfoxide were used as positive and negative controls. The mean inhibition zone using 10% concentration of these extracts was compared using independent sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance. All the four plant extracts inhibited the growth of S. mutans, S. sanguis, and S. salivarius irrespective of the method of extraction. The extracts of A. nilotica, P. guajava, and E. hybrid derived from both the methods of extraction exhibited a significantly higher inhibition zone against S. mutans in comparison with Murraya koenigii L. Sprengel and chlorhexidine. The cold extracts of A. nilotica and E. hybrid exhibited higher zone of inhibition against S. sanguis while the hot extracts of M. koenigii L. Sprengel exhibited a higher zone of inhibition against S. mutans. All the four plant extracts derived using either hot or cold extraction were effective against these bacteria and have the potential to be used as antiplaque agents.

  17. Laboratory and Performance Studies of Anti-wear Coatings Deposited on Nitrided Surfaces of Tools used in an Industrial Hot Die Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawryluk, Marek; Widomski, Paweł; Smolik, Jerzy; Kaszuba, Marcin; Ziemba, Jacek; Gronostajski, Zbigniew

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory studies performed on produced anti-wear coatings as well as the results of performance tests conducted on tools with these coatings in industrial conditions, in the process of hot die forging. Three different coatings were selected: AlCrTiSiN, Cr/CrN and AlCrTiN, deposited by means of the vacuum-arc method on test samples as well as forging tools used in the hot forging process of a lid. The first part of the paper discusses the results of the studies performed in laboratory conditions, which included: surface morphology by means of SEM, hardness and Young modulus measurements, determination of the chemical composition by means of the EDS method, adhesion tests by means of the scratch method and tribological tests by means of the ball-on-disk method. The obtained results were correlated and applied in the analysis of the performance tests on forging punches with these coatings at an early stage of their performance (up to 4000 produced forgings), which were tested on 19 tools, of which 3 representatives were selected for each coating. A thorough analysis was performed of the wear phenomena and mechanisms and the manner of wear of hybrid layers as well as their resistance to the particular destructive mechanisms. Based on the performed laboratory and performance studies as well as their analysis, it was possible to select the optimal hybrid layer, which enables an increase in the durability of forging tools used in industrial hot die forging processes. The preliminary results showed that the best results for the whole working surface of the tool were obtained for the Cr/CrN layer, which characterizes in high adhesion as well as a lower Young modulus and hardness. In the case of high pressures and the correlated friction, better results were obtained for the AlCrTiN coating, which, besides its good adhesion properties, also exhibited the highest frictional resistance.

  18. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  19. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  20. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  1. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  2. Life prediction of thermally highly loaded components: modelling the damage process of a rocket combustion chamber hot wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, W.; Schwub, S.; Quering, K.; Wiedmann, D.; Höppel, H. W.; Göken, M.

    2011-09-01

    During their operational life-time, actively cooled liners of cryogenic combustion chambers are known to exhibit a characteristic so-called doghouse deformation, pursued by formation of axial cracks. The present work aims at developing a model that quantitatively accounts for this failure mechanism. High-temperature material behaviour is characterised in a test programme and it is shown that stress relaxation, strain rate dependence, isotropic and kinematic hardening as well as material ageing have to be taken into account in the model formulation. From fracture surface analyses of a thrust chamber it is concluded that the failure mode of the hot wall ligament at the tip of the doghouse is related to ductile rupture. A material model is proposed that captures all stated effects. Basing on the concept of continuum damage mechanics, the model is further extended to incorporate softening effects due to material degradation. The model is assessed on experimental data and quantitative agreement is established for all tests available. A 3D finite element thermo-mechanical analysis is performed on a representative thrust chamber applying the developed material-damage model. The simulation successfully captures the observed accrued thinning of the hot wall and quantitatively reproduces the doghouse deformation.

  3. Process and apparatus for utilization of the sensible heat of hot coke for drying and preheating coking coal

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

    1981-08-18

    A heat carrier gas is passed through a coke dry cooling plant in direct contact with hot coke therein to form dry cooled coke while simultaneously increasing the temperature of the heat carrier gas. The heat carrier gas is then passed through a coal preheating plant to directly contact and dry and preheat moist coking coal contained therein. The entire system is open, such that a given quantity of the heat carrier gas passes only once through the dry cooling plant and the coal drying and preheating plant. The heat carrier gas may be a flue gas which is passed directly to the coke dry cooling plant without any preliminary pretreatment, and preferably is a flue gas which is supplied directly from a regenerator or recuperator of a coke oven battery. Alternatively, the heat carrier gas may be in the form of a fuel gas which is inert with respect to the hot coke, for example a waste gas or stack gas supplied from an adjacent metallurgical installation, such as a steel mill.

  4. Effect of phosphorous surface segregation on iron-zinc reaction kinetics during hot-dip galvanizing

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.; Zuhr, R.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    Phosphorous was ion implanted on one surface of a large grain (10 to 20 mm) low-carbon steel sheet in order to study the effect of surface segregation on the formation of Fe-Zn phases during galvanizing. Both an Al-free and a 0.20 wt pct Al-Zn bath at 450 C were used in this investigation. It was found that P surface segregation did not affect the kinetics of Fe-Zn phase growth for the total alloy layer or the individual Fe-Zn gamma, delta, and zeta phase alloy layers in the 0.00 wt pct Al-Zn baths. In the 0.20 wt pct Al-Zn bath, the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} inhibition layer formed with kinetics, showing linear growth on both the P-ion implanted and non-P-ion implanted surfaces. Fe-Zn phase growth only occurred after extended reaction times on both surfaces and was found to directly correspond to the location of substrate grain boundary sites. These results indicate that P surface segregation does not affect the growth of Fe-Zn phases or the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} inhibition layer. It was shown that in the 0.20 wt pct Al-Zn bath, substrate grain boundaries are the dominant steel substrate structural feature that controls the kinetics of Fe-Zn alloy phase growth.

  5. FIB and TEM observations of defects in hot-dip zinc coatings.

    PubMed

    Hong, Moon-Hi; Saka, Hiroyasu

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic ability of FIB (focused ion beam) fabrication to remove materials from a very small and/or precisely located slab using an accelerated Ga ion beam were employed to prepare cross-sectional thin films of zinc-coated steel sheets composed of Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds. A few defects observed frequently on the galvannealed (GA) coating surface were analyzed. Streaky marks indicated the rich concentration of oxides at the interface between the galvannealed coating and the steel substrate. The annealing experiment indicated the existence of Mn and Si oxides on the steel substrate. The grain size of ferrite in the extreme surface of the substrate was smaller as compared with conventional IF (Interstitial Free) steels. Furthermore, some superlattice spots were observed at the fine ferrite grain. Defects that are termed 'wavy pattern' and 'dross' were also analyzed by the combination of the FIB and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) techniques.

  6. The effect of processing on the properties of CuInS2 nanomaterials synthesized by simple hot injection route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin-Miao; Zhou, Fang-Fang; Yuan, Hong-Chun; Chen, Jin; Ni, Yi; Zhu, Xi-Fang; Dou, Xiao-Ming

    2017-07-01

    Chalcopyrite and wurtzite CuInS2 (CIS) nanomaterials were synthesized from Cu2+, In3+, thiourea with or without triethanolamine (TEA) by simple hot injection method at low temperature. The effect of synthesis duration on the various properties of the synthesized CIS nanomaterials was studied. It shows that for chalcopyrite CIS, the optimal synthesis duration is 60 min and the synthesized nanomaterial is in spherical shape with diameter of about 90 nm. However, for the wurtzite CIS, the optimal synthesis duration should reach 150 min and the synthesized nanomaterial looks like nanoplate with thicknesses of ˜10 nm and diameters near 100 nm. The photovoltaic characteristics of two types of nanomaterials are quite different. This study may contribute to the synthesis of CIS nanomaterials at low temperatures.

  7. Design route and optical analysis of curved compound-eyes towards thermal reflow and hot embossing fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Si; Jin, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Compound-eyes have several characters such as big vision field angle, small volume and multi-channels imaging. Therefore, it is applicable in the field of machine vision. Based on the thermal reflow and hot embossing technology, this paper put forward a new route to design the compound-eyes imaging system and analysis the optical aberration by use of ray tracing. Furthermore, in order to getting the optimal imaging ability, non-homogeneous micro-lens array is adopted as the compound-eyes structure. The ray-tracing results show that the design scheme can reach the expected requirements. Therefore, this paper can guide the design of compound-eyes imaging system.

  8. Time Resolved X-Ray Spectral Analysis of Class II YSOs in NGC 2264 During Optical Dips and Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Mario Giuseppe; Flaccomio, Ettore; Micela, Giuseppina; Argiroffi, Costanza; Venuti, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Pre-Main Sequence stars are variable sources. The main mechanisms responsible for their variability are variable extinction, unsteady accretion, and rotational modulation of both hot and dark photospheric spots and X-ray active regions. In stars with disks this variability is thus related to the morphology of the inner circumstellar region (<0.1 AU) and that of photosphere and corona, all impossible to be spatially resolved with present day techniques. This has been the main motivations of the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC2264, a set of simultaneous observations of NGC2264 with 15 different telescopes.We analyze the X-ray spectral properties of stars with disks extracted during optical bursts and dips in order to unveil the nature of these phenomena. Stars are analyzed in two different samples. In stars with variable extinction a simultaneous increase of optical extinction and X-ray absorption is searched during the optical dips; in stars with accretion bursts we search for soft X-ray emission and increasing X-ray absorption during the bursts. In 9/33 stars with variable extinction we observe simultaneous increase of X-ray absorption and optical extinction. In seven dips it is possible to calculate the NH/AV ratio in order to infer the composition of the obscuring material. In 5/27 stars with optical accretion bursts, we observe soft X-ray emission during the bursts that we associate to the emission of accreting gas. It is not surprising that these properties are not observed in all the stars with dips and bursts since favorable geometric configurations are required. The observed variable absorption during the dips is mainly due to dust-free material in accretion streams. In stars with accretion bursts we observe in average a larger soft X-ray spectral component not observed in non accreting stars. This indicates that this soft X-ray emission arises from the accretion shocks.

  9. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  10. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  11. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  12. Transient Charge Transfer Processes at Surfaces: From Ion Scattering to Laser-, Tunnel-junction-, and STM- Initiated Hot-Electron Femtochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzuk, J. W.

    2000-03-01

    Transient charge transfer (CT) between solid surfaces and external atoms, molecules, or clusters can give rise to time-dependent forces that drive a broad class of processes involving energy transfer between excited electronic states and the nuclear motion(translational, vibrational, and/or rotational arrow TVR) of the external entity. Realizations of such CT processes occur in ion-surface scattering, resonant electron spectroscopy, surface femtochemistry (initiated by hot electrons produced both by ultrafast pulsed lasers and by solid state devices such as a tunnel junction, STM, or photo-excited thin film structure), and in STM atom-manipulation and switching.(J. W. Gadzuk, Phys. Rev. Letters, 76), 4234 (1996); J. Elec. Spect. 98-99, 321 (1999). Ion scattering, as practiced by Barbara Cooper and coworkers, involves mainly T-to-electronic energy flow whereas the hot-electron processes depend upon the time-reversed excited electron-to-TVR direction of energy flow. Viewed from this perspective, it is apparent that a single, unified theoretical framework, which will be presented here, can/should be used to most effectively organize our understanding and to guide us in chosing future directions of experimental inquiry. The crucial role of multiple CT events in such processes has recently been under study. New theoretical insights into this important aspect of the many-faceted family of dynamic CT processes at surfaces will also be discussed, particularly with respect to femtosecond-laser-initiated events.(Special Issue of Chem. Phys. on "Electron Dynamics in Metals" (in press).) note

  13. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds.

    PubMed

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Odeen, Anders

    2005-09-22

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory.

  14. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds

    PubMed Central

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Ödeen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory. PMID:17148194

  15. LWD borehole images/dips aid offshore California evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.A.; Lovell, J.R.; Rosthal, R.A.; Buffington, L.; Arceneaux, C. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Quantitative, fullbore, azimuthal resistivity images of the borehole wall, acquired while drilling, can reveal large-scale structural bedding, fractures, faults, unconformities and other useful geologic events. While these images cannot resolve fine structural features or stratigraphic details, they can help identify those intervals requiring higher resolution wireline logging after drilling, and can be used to calculate general structural dips prior to wireline image/dipmeter runs. These images and dips have proven useful for time-critical drilling decisions and for subsequent geological interpretation and formation evaluation. This article presents discussions on: data acquisition at the bit with the Resistivity-at-the-Bit (RAB) tool, including tool functions and depth control, specific benefits derived from while-drilling resistivity images in two offshore California wells, and a favorable RAB outlook including a new RAB method for calculating high angle dips.

  16. Low power DIPS design for NASA missions. [Pu 238

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.; Determan, W. ); Shirbacheh, M. )

    1991-01-05

    Conceptual designs of low power dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS) for NASA's future deep space missions are being developed to characterize the power system's unique features in the 0.5--1.0 kilowatt-electric (kWe) range. The August 1990 Mariner Mark II spacecraft design was used for the spacecraft integration study. One basic design with slight mission specific variations was developed for the Cassini, Comet Nucleus Sample Return, and Outer Planet Orbiter Probe missions. A low power DIPS flight unit offers comparable specific power values to the MOD-RTG unit with a factor-of-three improvement in radioisotope fuel requirements. This was accomplished by fully exploiting the dynamic power conversion technology available in the DIPS program.

  17. Floral-dip transformation of flax (Linum usitatissimum) to generate transgenic progenies with a high transformation rate.

    PubMed

    Bastaki, Nasmah K; Cullis, Christopher A

    2014-12-19

    Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation via floral-dip is a widely used technique in the field of plant transformation and has been reported to be successful for many plant species. However, flax (Linum usitatissimum) transformation by floral-dip has not been reported. The goal of this protocol is to establish that Agrobacterium and the floral-dip method can be used to generate transgenic flax. We show that this technique is simple, inexpensive, efficient, and more importantly, gives a higher transformation rate than the current available methods of flax transformation. In summary, inflorescences of flax were dipped in a solution of Agrobacterium carrying a binary vector plasmid (T-DNA fragment plus the Linum Insertion Sequence, LIS-1) for 1 - 2 min. The plants were laid flat on their side for 24 hr. Then, plants were maintained under normal growth conditions until the next treatment. The process of dipping was repeated 2 - 3 times, with approximately 10 - 14 day intervals between dipping. The T1 seeds were collected and germinated on soil. After approximately two weeks, treated progenies were tested by direct PCR; 2 - 3 leaves were used per plant plus the appropriate T-DNA primers. Positive transformants were selected and grown to maturity. The transformation rate was unexpectedly high, with 50 - 60% of the seeds from treated plants being positive transformants. This is a higher transformation rate than those reported for Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using floral-dip transformation. It is also the highest, which has been reported so far, for flax transformation using other methods for transformation.

  18. Floral-Dip Transformation of Flax (Linum usitatissimum) to Generate Transgenic Progenies with a High Transformation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bastaki, Nasmah K.; Cullis, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation via floral-dip is a widely used technique in the field of plant transformation and has been reported to be successful for many plant species. However, flax (Linum usitatissimum) transformation by floral-dip has not been reported. The goal of this protocol is to establish that Agrobacterium and the floral-dip method can be used to generate transgenic flax. We show that this technique is simple, inexpensive, efficient, and more importantly, gives a higher transformation rate than the current available methods of flax transformation. In summary, inflorescences of flax were dipped in a solution of Agrobacterium carrying a binary vector plasmid (T-DNA fragment plus the Linum Insertion Sequence, LIS-1) for 1 - 2 min. The plants were laid flat on their side for 24 hr. Then, plants were maintained under normal growth conditions until the next treatment. The process of dipping was repeated 2 - 3 times, with approximately 10 - 14 day intervals between dipping. The T1 seeds were collected and germinated on soil. After approximately two weeks, treated progenies were tested by direct PCR; 2 - 3 leaves were used per plant plus the appropriate T-DNA primers. Positive transformants were selected and grown to maturity. The transformation rate was unexpectedly high, with 50 - 60% of the seeds from treated plants being positive transformants. This is a higher transformation rate than those reported for Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using floral-dip transformation. It is also the highest, which has been reported so far, for flax transformation using other methods for transformation. PMID:25549243

  19. A case study of an erosion control practice: the broad-based dip

    Treesearch

    Kevin Bold; Pamela Edwards; Karl Williard

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, 19 gravel haul roads with broad-based dips within the Monongahela National Forest were examined to determine if those dips adhered to Forest specifications for cut depth and dip outslope. Data on the azimuth, contributing road lengths, slopes of the contributing lengths, landscape position of the dip, and soil texture of the road bed materials also were...

  20. [Differences between cold and hot natures of processed Radix ginseng rubra and Panax quinquefolius L. based upon mice temperature tropism].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Ru; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wang, Jia-Bo; Zhou, Can-Ping; Liu, Ta-Si; Zhao, Hai-Ping; Ren, Yong-Shen; Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2009-07-28

    To establish an objective method to estimate the disparity between the cold and hot natures on the basis of an intrinsic correlation between temperature tropism of mice and the cold and hot natures of Chinese medicines. Male KM mice were randomly divided into 7 groups of 6 each, namely the normal group (NM), the weak model group (WM), the strong model group (SM), the weak model plus Radix ginseng rubra group (WM + RG), the weak model plus Panax quinquefolius L. group (WM + PQ), the strong model plus Radix ginseng rubra group (SM + RG) and the strong model plus Panax quinquefolius L. group (SM +PQ). The specific herbal drugs were administered intragastricly. To induce the weak model, mice were fed with a limited supply of feed and forced to swim in cold water until almost drowning while the strong model induced by feeding a high-protein diet with an unlimited feed access. The doses of Radix ginseng rubra and Panax quinquefolius L. were 35 mg/g of body weight per day (counted by the quantity of crude material) and lasting for seven days. The NM and model groups without dosing were intragastricly administered with physiological saline of the same volume to the dosing groups. The percentage of the remaining time of mouse on a high temperature (40 degrees C) pad to the total monitoring time was recorded by a self-designed intelligent animal behavior monitoring system. Meanwhile, the drinking volume of mice in each group was measured. Immediately after experiment, the activities of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver tissue were measured by assay kits of phosphorus and xanthine oxidase methods respectively. The features of deficient and cold symptom, such as fatigue, stagnant weight growth, decreased water intake, cold limbs and tail etc, were observed in WM group. And the features of heat symptom, such as increased weight and water intake, hyperactivity etc, were observed in SM group. The percentage of time that the mouse remained on 40 degrees C