Science.gov

Sample records for hot massive stars

  1. X-ray emission of hot massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L.

    2014-07-01

    Massive hot stars are important cosmic engines that severely influence their environment by powerful stellar wind and strong ionizing radiation. Modern observations of X-ray emission from massive stars provide deep insight into the structure and dynamics of their winds and allow to study the very hot gas in wind blown bubbles. I will review the recent findings on X-ray emission from OB and Wolf-Rayet stars and massive star clusters. While our knowledge about the X-ray emission from massive stars is increasing, a small fraction of massive stars that have strong magnetic fields are often unusual in their X-ray light. Massive star clusters provide an excellent opportunity to study stellar feedback and the hot gas filling the intracluster medium. The most massive stars are often binaries where the stellar winds collide and produce X-ray or even gamma-ray radiation. Finally, I will discuss the progress towards an unified view of stellar winds in single stars and in high mass X-ray binaries.

  2. Hot, Massive Stars in I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, D.; Malumuth, E.

    2011-01-01

    I Zw 18 is one of the most primitive blue, compact dwarf galaxies. The ionized gas in I Zw 18 has a low oxygen abundance (O approx.1/30 Osun) and nitrogen abundance (N-1/100 Nsun) (Pequignot 2008). We have obtained a far-UV spectrum of the northwest massive star cluster of I Zw 18 using Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). The spectrum is compatible with continuous star-formation over the past approx.10 Myr, and a very low metallicity, log Z/Zsun 1.7, although the stellar surface may be enhanced in carbon. Stellar wind lines are very weak, and the edge velocity of wind lines is very low (approx.250 km/s).

  3. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  4. Hot, Massive Stars in the Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxy, I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.

    2010-01-01

    The extremely metal-poor galaxy I Zw 18, is the Rosetta Stone for understanding z=7-8 galaxies now being discovered by Hubb|e's Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). Using HST/STIS images and recently obtained HST/COS ultraviolet spectra, we derive information about the hot, massive stars in this galaxy including stellar abundances, constraints on the stellar IMF and mass distribution of young clusters containing hot, massive stars.

  5. A LIBRARY OF THEORETICAL ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF MASSIVE, HOT STARS FOR EVOLUTIONARY SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitherer, Claus; Ortiz Otalvaro, Paula A.; Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lo Faro, Barbara; Pauldrach, Adalbert W. A.; Pettini, Max; Rix, Samantha A. E-mail: pauortizo@gmail.co E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.ed E-mail: uh10107@usm.uni-muenchen.d E-mail: srix@ing.iac.e

    2010-08-15

    We computed a comprehensive set of theoretical ultraviolet spectra of hot, massive stars with the radiation-hydrodynamics code WM-Basic. This model atmosphere and spectral synthesis code is optimized for computing the strong P Cygni type lines originating in the winds of hot stars, which are the strongest features in the ultraviolet spectral region. The computed set is suitable as a spectral library for inclusion in evolutionary synthesis models of star clusters and star-forming galaxies. The chosen stellar parameters cover the upper left Hertzsprung-Russell diagram at L {approx}> 10{sup 2.75} L {sub sun} and T {sub eff} {approx}> 20,000 K. The adopted elemental abundances are 0.05 Z {sub sun}, 0.2 Z {sub sun}, 0.4 Z {sub sun}, Z {sub sun}, and 2 Z {sub sun}. The spectra cover the wavelength range from 900 to 3000 A and have a resolution of 0.4 A. We compared the theoretical spectra to data of individual hot stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer satellites and found very good agreement. We built a library with the set of spectra and implemented it into the evolutionary synthesis code Starburst99 where it complements and extends the existing empirical library toward lower chemical abundances. Comparison of population synthesis models at solar and near-solar composition demonstrates consistency between synthetic spectra generated with either library. We discuss the potential of the new library for the interpretation of the rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies. Properties that can be addressed with the models include ages, initial mass function, and heavy-element abundance. The library can be obtained both individually or as part of the Starburst99 package.

  6. Hot, Massive Stars in the Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxy, I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-enhanced metal-poor galaxy, I Zw 18, is the Rosetta Stone for understanding galaxies in the early universe by providing constraints on the IMF of massive stars, the role of galaxies in reionization of the universe, mixing of newly synthesized material in the ISM, and gamma-ray bursts at low metallicity, and on the earliest generations of stars producing the observed abundance pattern. We describe these constraints as derived from analyses of HST/COS spectra of I Zw 18 including stellar atmosphere analysis and photo-ionization modeling of both the emission and absorption spectra of the nebular material and interstellar medium.

  7. The Massive Stellar Content in the Starburst NGC 3049: A Test for Hot-Star Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Leitherer, Claus; Stasińska, Grażyna; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this work is twofold. First, we seek evidence for or against the depletion of massive stars in metal-rich starbursts. A second, equally important goal is to perform a consistency test of the latest generation of starburst models in such a high-metallicity environment. We have obtained high spatial resolution ultraviolet and optical STIS spectroscopy and imaging of the metal-rich nuclear starburst in NGC 3049. The stellar continuum and the absorption-line spectrum in the ultraviolet are used to constrain the massive stellar population. The strong, blueshifted stellar lines of C IV and Si IV detected in the UV spectra indicate a metal-rich, compact, massive (~106 Msolar) cluster of age 3-4 Myr emitting the UV-optical continuum. We find strong evidence against a depletion of massive stars in this metal-rich cluster. The derived age and the upper mass-limit cutoff of the initial mass function are also consistent with the detection of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) features at optical wavelengths. As a second, independent constraint on the massive stellar content, the nebular emission-line spectrum is modeled with photoionization codes using stellar spectra from evolutionary synthesis models. The morphology of the nuclear starburst of NGC 3049 from the STIS images indicates a simple geometry for the nebular emission-line region. However, the nebular lines are badly reproduced by 3-4 Myr instantaneous bursts, as required by the UV line spectrum, when unblanketed W-R and/or Kurucz stellar atmospheres are used. The corresponding number of photons above 24 and 54 eV in the synthetic models is too high in comparison with values suggested by the observed line ratios. Since the ionizing spectrum in this regime is dominated by emission from W-R stars, this discrepancy between observations and models is most likely the result of incorrect assumptions about the W-R stars. Thus, we conclude that the nebular spectrum of high-metallicity starbursts is poorly reproduced by models

  8. Bow shock nebulae of hot massive stars in a magnetized medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Mignone, A.; Kuiper, R.; Raga, A.; Kley, W.

    2016-10-01

    A significant fraction of OB-type, main-sequence massive stars are classified as runaway and move supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM). Their strong stellar winds interact with their surroundings where the typical strength of the local ISM magnetic field is about 3.5-7 μ G, which can result in the formation of bow shock nebulae. We investigate the effects of such magnetic fields, aligned with the motion of the flow, on the formation and emission properties of these circumstellar structures. Our axisymmetric, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations with optically-thin radiative cooling, heating and anisotropic thermal conduction show that the presence of the background ISM magnetic field affects the projected optical emission our bow shocks at Hα and [OIII] λ 5007 which become fainter by about 1-2 orders of magnitude, respectively. Radiative transfer calculations against dust opacity indicate that the magnetic field slightly diminishes their projected infrared emission and that our bow shocks emit brightly at 60 μ m. This may explain why the bow shocks generated by ionizing runaway massive stars are often difficult to identify. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of the bow shock of ζ Ophiuchi and we support the interpretation of its imperfect morphology as an evidence of the presence of an ISM magnetic field not aligned with the motion of its driving star.

  9. On the Weak-Wind Problem in Massive Stars: X-Ray Spectra Reveal a Massive Hot Wind in mu Columbae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Ignace, Richard; Waldron, Wayne L.; Todt, Helge; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Kitamoto, Shunji

    2012-01-01

    Mu Columbae is a prototypical weak-wind O star for which we have obtained a high-resolution X-ray spectrum with the Chandra LETG/ACIS instrument and a low-resolution spectrum with Suzaku. This allows us, for the first time, to investigate the role of X-rays on the wind structure in a bona fide weak-wind system and to determine whether there actually is a massive hot wind. The X-ray emission measure indicates that the outflow is an order of magnitude greater than that derived from UV lines and is commensurate with the nominal wind-luminosity relationship for O stars. Therefore, the "weak-wind problem"--identified from cool wind UV/optical spectra--is largely resolved by accounting for the hot wind seen in X-rays. From X-ray line profiles, Doppler shifts, and relative strengths, we find that this weak-wind star is typical of other late O dwarfs. The X-ray spectra do not suggest a magnetically confined plasma-the spectrum is soft and lines are broadened; Suzaku spectra confirm the lack of emission above 2 keV. Nor do the relative line shifts and widths suggest any wind decoupling by ions. The He-like triplets indicate that the bulk of the X-ray emission is formed rather close to the star, within five stellar radii. Our results challenge the idea that some OB stars are "weak-wind" stars that deviate from the standard wind-luminosity relationship. The wind is not weak, but it is hot and its bulk is only detectable in X-rays.

  10. ON THE WEAK-WIND PROBLEM IN MASSIVE STARS: X-RAY SPECTRA REVEAL A MASSIVE HOT WIND IN {mu} COLUMBAE

    SciTech Connect

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Todt, Helge; Ignace, Richard; Waldron, Wayne L.; Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2012-09-10

    {mu} Columbae is a prototypical weak-wind O star for which we have obtained a high-resolution X-ray spectrum with the Chandra LETG/ACIS instrument and a low-resolution spectrum with Suzaku. This allows us, for the first time, to investigate the role of X-rays on the wind structure in a bona fide weak-wind system and to determine whether there actually is a massive hot wind. The X-ray emission measure indicates that the outflow is an order of magnitude greater than that derived from UV lines and is commensurate with the nominal wind-luminosity relationship for O stars. Therefore, the {sup w}eak-wind problem{sup -}identified from cool wind UV/optical spectra-is largely resolved by accounting for the hot wind seen in X-rays. From X-ray line profiles, Doppler shifts, and relative strengths, we find that this weak-wind star is typical of other late O dwarfs. The X-ray spectra do not suggest a magnetically confined plasma-the spectrum is soft and lines are broadened; Suzaku spectra confirm the lack of emission above 2 keV. Nor do the relative line shifts and widths suggest any wind decoupling by ions. The He-like triplets indicate that the bulk of the X-ray emission is formed rather close to the star, within five stellar radii. Our results challenge the idea that some OB stars are 'weak-wind' stars that deviate from the standard wind-luminosity relationship. The wind is not weak, but it is hot and its bulk is only detectable in X-rays.

  11. THE ASTROPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS OF DUST FORMATION DURING THE ERUPTIONS OF HOT, MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2011-12-10

    Dust formation in the winds of hot stars is inextricably linked to the classic eruptive state of luminous blue variables because it requires very high mass-loss rates, M-dot {approx}>10{sup -2.5} M{sub sun} year{sup -1}, for grains to grow and for the non-dust optical depth of the wind to shield the dust formation region from the true stellar photosphere. Thus, dusty shells around hot stars trace the history of 'great' eruptions, and the statistics of such shells in the Galaxy indicate that these eruptions are likely the dominant mass-loss mechanism for evolved, M{sub ZAMS} {approx}> 40 M{sub Sun} stars. Dust formation at such high M-dot also explains why very large grains (a{sub max} {approx}> 1 {mu}m) are frequently found in these shells, since a{sub max}{proportional_to} M-dot . The statistics of these shells (numbers, ages, masses, and grain properties such as a{sub max}) provide an archaeological record of this mass-loss process. In particular, the velocities v{sub shell}, transient durations (where known), and ejected masses M{sub shell} of the Galactic shells and the supernova (SN) 'impostors' proposed as their extragalactic counterparts are very different. While much of the difference is a selection effect created by shell lifetimes {proportional_to}(v{sub shell}{radical}(M{sub shell})){sup -1}, more complete Galactic and extragalactic surveys are needed to demonstrate that the two phenomena share a common origin given that their observed properties are essentially disjoint. If even small fractions (1%) of SNe show interactions with such dense shells of ejecta, as is currently believed, then the driving mechanism of the eruptions must be associated with the very final phases of stellar evolution, suggestive of some underlying nuclear burning instability.

  12. Theoretical Modelling of Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Hillier, D. J.; Figer, D. F.; Geballe, T. R.

    1999-06-01

    Recent progress towards model atmospheres for hot stars is discussed. A new generation of NLTE wind blanketed models, together with high S/N spectra of the hot star population in the central parsec, which are currently being obtained, will allow metal abundance determinations (Fe, Si, Mg, Na, etc). Metallicity studies of hot stars in the IR will provide major constraints not only on the theory of evolution of massive stars but also on our efforts to solve the puzzle of the central parsecs of the Galaxy. Preliminary results suggest that the metallicity of the Pistol Star is 3 times solar, thus indicating strong chemical enrichment of the gas in the Galactic Center.

  13. KEPLER-14b: A MASSIVE HOT JUPITER TRANSITING AN F STAR IN A CLOSE VISUAL BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Latham, David W.; Carter, Joshua A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Torres, Guillermo; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Charbonneau, David B.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Fressin, Francois; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2011-11-01

    We present the discovery of a hot Jupiter transiting an F star in a close visual (0.''3 sky projected angular separation) binary system. The dilution of the host star's light by the nearly equal magnitude stellar companion ({approx}0.5 mag fainter) significantly affects the derived planetary parameters, and if left uncorrected, leads to an underestimate of the radius and mass of the planet by 10% and 60%, respectively. Other published exoplanets, which have not been observed with high-resolution imaging, could similarly have unresolved stellar companions and thus have incorrectly derived planetary parameters. Kepler-14b (KOI-98) has a period of P = 6.790 days and, correcting for the dilution, has a mass of M{sub p} = 8.40{sup +0.35}{sub -0.34} M{sub J} and a radius of R{sub p} = 1.136{sup +0.073}{sub -0.054} R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of {rho}{sub p} = 7.1 {+-} 1.1 g cm{sup -3}.

  14. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  15. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  16. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  17. Massive soliton stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hongyee )

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers. 27 refs.

  18. Spectropolarimetry of hot, luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.

    1994-01-01

    I review polarimetric observations of presumably single, hot luminous stars. The stellar types discussed are OB stars. B(e) supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBV), Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, and type II supernovae (SN). It is shown that variable, intrinsic polarization is a common phenomenon in that part of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram which these stars occupy. However, much observational work remains to be done before we can answer the most basic, statistical questions about the polarimetric properties of different groups of hot, luminous stars. Insight into the diagnostic power of polarization observations has been gained, but cannot be exploited without detailed models. Thus, while polarimetric observations do tell us that the mass-loss processes of all types of massive stars are time-dependent and anisotropic, the significance that this might have for the accuracy of their stellar parameters and evolutionary paths remains elusive.

  19. Constraining massive star evolution from massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Herve, Anthony; Martins, Fabrice; Bouret, Jean-Claude; Borissova, Jordanka; Ramirez, Sebastian; Kurtev, Radostin; Kumar, Nanda; Amigo, Pia; Fierro, Celia

    2013-06-01

    The exact evolution of massive stars is not accurately known at present. The general trend is that stars with masses above 40 - 60 Mo go from O-type stars to H-rich WN stars, and Luminous Blue Variables (?), before turning into H-poor WN stars and finally WC stars. At lower masses, the H-rich WN and LBV phases are replaced by a blue and a red supergiant phases, respectively. However, what are the details of such evolutionary sequences? The study of massive clusters is a golden opportunity to establish this. Indeed, the turn-off mass of massive clusters can be directly translated into the mass, and hence the nature, of the progenitors of their evolved objects contents. So far, only the Arches, Quintuplet, NGC3603, NGC2244 and central clusters have been studied this way. But 6 newly discovered heavily-obscured clusters in the large survey â"VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea" (VVV) have been found to have Wolf-Rayet stars as well as blue and/or red supergiants, together with many main sequence OB stars. This poster presents our efforts to model the massive star components of these clusters using CMFGEN, bringing new blocks to the pavement of massive stellar evolution and more than doubling the number of clusters in which such evolutionary sequence are established.

  20. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  1. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  2. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  3. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  4. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  5. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  6. Hot Ammonia in the Densest Massive Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddi, CiriacoIVE); Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    Hot molecular cores are believed to be the birthplace of high-mass (O-B type) stars. Their formation process is however still a matter of debate, chiefly owing to the lack of observational evidence of accreting O-type young stars. In this context, imaging of optically-thin, highly-excited molecular lines at cm-wavelengths provide the best tool for probing the hottest and densest gas at small radii from O-type forming stars, i.e. in centrifugally-supported disks and/or infalling envelopes, whose innermost regions can be inaccessible even to (sub)mm interferometry because of large optical depth of dust emission. In particular, ammonia is an excellent "thermometer" of dense molecular gas and it can trace excitation up to temperatures of 2000 K by observing its inversion transitions within a relatively narrow frequency range, 20-40 GHz, which are sensitive to gas of different temperatures and densities. I will report initial results from an imaging survey of hot-cores in the Galaxy in the ammonia lines from (6,6) up to (14,14) with the JVLA. Towards NGC7538 IRS1 and W51, the multi-transition data sets enabled us to identify the densest massive hot cores known and to probe kinematics of rotating disks and infalling envelopes around O-type young stars.

  7. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  8. Formation of Massive Stars in Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2004-12-01

    There are two scenarios for the formation of massive stars: the ``accretion'' and the ``coalescence'' scenario. Here we discuss the conditions for coalescence (mergers) to occur in very dense young star clusters. We also ask whether the observed multiplicity of tight massive stars in young clusters is consistent with failed mergers and tidal capture. Finally, we propose some ideas for the origin of many massive stars in the heart of the 30 Doradus cluster and other extragalactic starburst clusters. We believe that all massive star formation is triggered and propose a 4-stage process of massive star birth in dense clusters.

  9. Hot stars with disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstrom, Erika D.

    The evolutionary paths of the massive O and B type stars are often defined by angular momentum transformations that involve circumstellar gas disks. This circumstellar gas is revealed in several kinds of observations, and here I describe a series of investigations of the hydrogen line emission from such disk using detailed studies of five massive binaries and a survey of 128 Be stars. By examining three sets of spectra of the active mass-transfer binary system RY Scuti, I determined masses of 7.1±1.2 [Special characters omitt ed.] for the bright supergiant and 30.0±2.1 [Special characters omitted.] for the massive companion that is hidden by an accretion torus. I also present a cartoon model of the complex mass flows in the system. Using optical spectroscopy and X-ray flux data, I investigated the mass transfer processes in four massive X-ray binaries (a massive B star with mass flowing onto a compact, neutron star companion). The B-supergiant system LS I +65 010 transfers mass via stellar winds. I find the X-ray flux modulates with the orbital period. In the other three X-ray binary systems (LS I +61 303, HDE 245770, and X Per), an outflowing circumstellar disk is responsible for the mass transfer, and in all three systems, the disk appears to be truncated by gravitational interactions with the compact companion. The disk in the microquasar system LS I +61 303 is limited in radius by the periastron separation and an increase in both Ha equivalent width and X-ray flux following periastron may be due to a density wave in the disk induced by tidal forces. Observations of HDE 245770 document what appears to be the regeneration of a circumstellar disk. The disk of X Per appears to have grown to near record proportions and the X-ray flux has dramatically increased. Tidal interaction may generate a spiral density wave in the disk and cause an increase in Ha equivalent width and mass transfer to the compact companion. During the course of the analysis of the X

  10. The Massive Star Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, Skyler H.

    five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into the modeled ratios, we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant. Though photometry has proven to be a powerful tool to identify candidate evolved massive stars and their effects on their host galaxy, spectroscopy is necessary to study the physical properties of individual stars. We observed moderate-resolution optical spectra for 56 of the brightest stars in the direction to M101 using the Multiple Mirror Telescope. We also created light curves for each target using multi-epoch U BV R images from the Large Binocular Telescope. We separate the spectroscopially confirmed members of M101 into four groups: hot supergiants, intermediate supergiants, emission-line stars, and LBVs. Several stars in each group are discussed in detail. Of the spectroscopically confirmed members, we find that eight meet our criterion for variability. We present light curves for the known LBV candidates, V2, V4, and V9, and introduce a new candidate: 9492 &barbelow;14 &barbelow;11998. Additionally, we identify 20 new variables in M101. Lacking spectra, we separated the variables, by their photometric properties, into three groups: hot, intermediate, and cool. We find two hot stars with V-band variability of +/-1 magnitude; we flag these stars as LBV candidates. Of the intermediate and cool variables, we identify several stars with low- to moderate-amplitude variability (0.1--0.5 magnitudes).

  11. Properties of Massive Stars in VVV Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.; Martins, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Bouret, J.-C.; Borrissova, J.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars (Borrissova et al. [1]). We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. For the cluster with the largest number of objects, we establish firmly that the WN and WC stars were initially more massive than the O stars still present in the cluster.

  12. Speckle Interferometry of Massive and Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    2006-02-01

    Conducted on NOAO 4-m telescopes in 1994, the first speckle survey of O stars (Mason et al. 1998) had success far in excess of our expectations. In addition to the frequently cited multiplicity analysis, many of the new systems which were first resolved in this paper are of significant astrophysical importance. Now, some ten years after the original survey, we propose to re-investigate all systems analyzed before (N=195). Improvements in detector technology will allow for the detection of companions missed before as well as systems which may have been closer than the resolution limit in 1994. We will also make a first high-resolution inspection of the additional O stars (N=108) in the recent Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz- Apellaniz & Walborn (2004). Further, we propose to investigate several additional samples of interesting objects, including 15 accessible Galactic WR stars from the speckle survey of Hartkopf et al. (1999), 16 massive, hot stars with separations which would indicate their applicability for mass determinations (for fully detached O stars masses are presently known for only twelve pairs), and 56 multiple stars for a study of their co- planarity statistics.

  13. Speckle Interferometry of Massive and Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Torres, Guillermo

    2005-08-01

    Conducted on NOAO 4-m telescopes in 1994, the first speckle survey of O stars (Mason et al. 1998) had success far in excess of our expectations. In addition to the frequently cited multiplicity analysis, many of the new systems which were first resolved in this paper are of significant astrophysical importance. To date, this paper has resulted in 86 citations in the refereed literature. Now, some ten years after the original survey, we propose to re-investigate all systems analyzed before (N=98) as well as make a first high-resolution inspection of the additional O stars (N=62) in the recent Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz-Apellaniz & Walborn (2004). In addition, we propose to investigate several additional samples of interesting objects, including 10 accessible Galactic WR stars from the speckle survey of Hartkopf et al. (1999), 16 massive, hot stars with separations which would indicate their applicability for mass determinations (for fully detached O stars, we have only twelve mass determinations), 92 members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters to complement RV studies of these clusters, and 197 Hyades & Pleiades stars, reobserved from the 1991 lists (Mason et al. 1993a,b).

  14. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  15. MASSIVE INFANT STARS ROCK THEIR CRADLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    that are responsible for lighting up this cloud of gas. The apparently innocuous-looking star at the very center of the nebula, just below the brightest region, is actually about 30 times more massive and almost 200,000 times brighter than our Sun. The intense light and powerful stellar 'winds' from this ultra-bright star have cleared away the surrounding gas to form a large cavity. The bubble is approximately 25 light-years in diameter - about the same size as the famous star-forming Orion Nebula. The Orion Nebula is sculpted by intense radiation from newly born stars in the same way as N83B. Astronomers estimate that the spherical void in N83B must have been carved out of the nebula very recently - in astronomical terms - maybe as little as 30,000 years ago. The hottest star in N83B is 45 times more massive than the Sun and is embedded in the brightest region in the nebula. This bright region, situated just above the center, is only about 2 light-years across. The region's small size and its intense glow are telltale signs of a very young, massive star. This star is the youngest newcomer to this part of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Hubble image shows a bright arc structure just below the luminous star. This impressive ridge may have been created in the glowing gas by the hot star's powerful wind. Measurements of the age of this star and neighboring stars in the nebula show that they are younger than the nebula's central star. Their formation may have been 'triggered' by the violent wind from the central star. This 'chain-reaction' of stellar births seems to be common in the Universe. About 20 young and luminous stars have been identified in the region, but it may well be that many more massive stars remain undetected in other areas of the Large Magellanic Cloud, hidden by dust in small clusters like N83B. To the right of the glowing N83B is a much larger diffuse nebula, known as DEM22d, which is partly obscured by an extended lane of dust and gas. This image is

  16. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Hummer, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A review on the quantitative spectroscopy (QS) of hot stars is presented, with particular attention given to the study of photospheres, optically thin winds, unified model atmospheres, and stars with optically thick winds. It is concluded that the results presented here demonstrate the reliability of Qs as a unique source of accurate values of the global parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and elemental abundances) of hot stars.

  17. Massive Star Formation: The Role of Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallscheer, Cassandra L.; Beuther, H.; Sauter, J.; Wolf, S.; Zhang, Q.; Keto, E.; Sridharan, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained multiple data sets from the SMA, PdBI, and IRAM 30m telescope of the Infrared Dark Cloud IRDC18223-3, the High-Mass Protostellar Object IRAS18151-1208, and the hot core source IRAS18507+0121 in order to search for clues regarding the role of rotation and disks in high mass star formation. These three objects allow us to compare the central-most regions surrounding the embedded continuum source at three different evolutionary stages of the formation process. Toward all three regions we see rotational or elongated structures perpendicular to the molecular outflows. Similarities and differences in the evolutionary sequence are discussed in the context of core and disk evolution. We have also carried out continuum and line radiative transfer modeling of the disk-like structures. Having a more complete picture of the evolutionary process that a massive star experiences will contribute significantly to the future of massive star formation research. Support for this project comes from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the International Max-Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg.

  18. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  19. Perspectives for hot stars in the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.

    2016-06-01

    XMM-Newton has deeply changed our picture of X-ray emission of hot, massive stars. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy as well as monitoring of these objects revealed a number of previously unexpected features that challenge our understanding of the dynamics of the stellar winds of massive stars. In this contribution, I will briefly summarize the results obtained over the past 15 years and highlight the perspectives for the next decade. It is anticipated that coordinated (X-ray and optical or UV) monitoring and time-critical observations of either single or binary massive stars will become the most important topics in this field over the coming years. Synergies with existing or forthcoming X-ray observatories (NuStar, Astro-H, eROSITA) will also play a major role and will further enhance the importance of XMM-Newton in our quest for understanding the physics of hot, massive stars.

  20. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  1. First Circumstellar Disk around a Massive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    Observations with an infrared-sensitive instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla have for the first time shown the presence of a disk around a hot and massive star, known as G339.88-1.26 . Until now, disks have only been found around less massive stars. Planets are formed in such disks. The new discovery may thus have important implications for our understanding of the formation of planetary systems around stars. TIMMI observations Observations at mid-infrared wavelengths were carried out in July 1997 by Bringfried Stecklum (Landessternwarte Thüringen, Tautenburg, Germany) and Hans-Ulrich Käufl (ESO), using the TIMMI instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. Additional measurements were carried out in March 1998. TIMMI ( T hermal I nfrared M ulti M ode I nstrument) is a general-purpose camera spectrometer operating at a wavelength of 10 µm. To reach sufficient sensitivity, the camera must be cooled to approx. -260 o C, i.e. a few degrees above the absolute minimum, by use of liquid Helium. Astronomical objects whose temperatures are between -120 o C and 300 o C radiate most of their energy at this wavelength. In addition, dust and haze that are absolutely impenetrable for light visible to the human eye, are often found to be nearly transparent at this wavelength. This is why fire-fighters now use similar equipment to look through smoke. G339.88-1.26: A very special object ESO PR Photo 22a/98 ESO PR Photo 22a/98 [JPEG, 800k] This image is a true-color composite of near-infrared observations of the sky region around the radio source G339.88-1.26 with the ESO/MPI 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. In this image, the visible colors red, green and blue have been used to represent the infrared filters J, H and K (at 1.25, 1.63 and 2.2 µm wavelength, respectively). No object is visible at the position of the radio source, even at these near-infrared wavelengths. A dark band of absorbing dust is clearly visible, exactly at the position of the object (indicated by an

  2. HAT-P-56b: A bright highly inflated massive Hot Jupiter around An F star in K2.0 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b, a transiting high inflated hot-jupiter orbiting a F type star in the field 0 of the NASA K2 mission, by the HATNet survey. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with the highprecision photometry obervation by the K2 mission, as well as radial velocity to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass around ~2.2 Mjunp, a radius of ~1.5 Rjup, and transits its host star with a period of 2.79d. The host star has a V band magnitude of 10.9, Mass of 1.29 Msun, and radius of 1.433 Rsun. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among one of the largest compare to planets with similar mass, making it an interesting target for following up atmospherical observations.

  3. Physics of Mass Loss in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Joachim; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Markova, Nevena

    2015-01-01

    We review potential mass-loss mechanisms in the various evolutionary stages of massive stars, from the well-known line-driven winds of O-stars and BA-supergiants to the less-understood winds of Red Supergiants. We discuss optically thick winds from Wolf-Rayet stars and Very Massive Stars, and the hypothesis of porosity-moderated, continuum-driven mass loss from stars formally exceeding the Eddington limit, which might explain the giant outbursts from Luminous Blue Variables. We finish this review with a glance on the impact of rapid rotation, magnetic fields and small-scale inhomogeneities in line-driven winds.

  4. Gamma Ray Emission from Chaotic Winds of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal was to search for gamma-ray emission from the winds of hot, massive stars. According to our theoretical calculations, shocks in the winds of massive stars accelerate particles to high energies. The high-energy particles emit synchrotron radio emission (observed by ground-based radio telescopes) and high-energy gamma-ray emission that we predicted should be detectable by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory between 100 MeV and a few GeV. We obtained EGRET from phases 1, 2, and 3 of the Cygnus OB2 association, a cluster of massive, young stars, to search for this gamma-ray emission. The data products and analysis show a source consistent with the position of Cyg OB2 with approximately the predicted count rate and spectrum.

  5. Massive Stars: Input Physics and Stellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, M. F.; The, L.-S.; Meyer, B. S.

    2009-10-01

    We present a general overview of the structure and evolution of massive stars of masses ≥12 M ⊙ during their pre-supernova stages. We think it is worth reviewing this topic owing to the crucial role of massive stars in astrophysics, especially in the evolution of galaxies and the universe. We have performed several test computations with the aim to analyze and discuss many physical uncertainties still encountered in massive-star evolution. In particular, we explore the effects of mass loss, convection, rotation, 12C( α, γ)16O reaction and initial metallicity. We also compare and analyze the similarities and differences among various works and ours. Finally, we present useful comments on the nucleosynthesis from massive stars concerning the s-process and the yields for 26Al and 60Fe.

  6. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  7. Circumstellar bubble created by two massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; van Marle, A. J.; Marcowith, A.

    2013-11-01

    The massive stars are formed in clusters then numerical models of wind-blown bubble should evolve bubble created by several stars. Aims. We develop a two-dimensional (2D) model of the circumstellar bubble created by two massive stars, a 40 M_{odot} star and a 25 M_{odot} star, and follow its evolution with MPI-AMRVAC hydrodynamics code until the end of the stellar evolution and he supernova explosion of each star. The stars are separated by approximately 16 pc and surrounded by a cold medium with a density of 20 particles per cm3. The simulations showed that the evolution of a wind-blown bubble created by two stars deviates from that of the bubbles around single stars. In particular, once one of the stars has exploded, the bubble is too large for the wind of the remaining star to maintain and the outer shell starts to disintegrate. The lack of thermal pressure inside the bubble also changes the behavior of circumstellar features close to the remaining star. The supernovae are contained inside the bubble, which reflects part of the energy back into the circumstellar medium.

  8. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  9. Hot Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; Gauba, G.; Fujii, T.; Nakada, Y.

    2001-08-01

    From the study of IRAS sources with far-IR colors similar to planetary nebulae (PNe), several proto-planetary nebulae with hot (OB) post-AGB central stars have been detected. These stars form an evolutionary link between the cooler G,F,A supergiant stars that have evolved off the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and the hot (OB) central stars of PNe. The optical spectra of these objects show strong Balmer emission lines and in some cases low excitation nebular emission lines such as [NII] and [SII] superposed on the OB stellar continuum. The absence of of [OIII] 5007Å line and the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines indicate that photoionisation has just started. The UV(IUE) spectra of some of these objects revealed violet shifted stellar wind P-Cygni profiles of CIV, SiIV and NV, indicating hot and fast stellar wind and post-AGB mass loss. These objects appear to be rapildy evolving into the early stages of PNe similar to that observed in the case of Hen1357 IRAS 17119-5926 (Stingray Nebula) and IRAS 18062+2410 SAO85766.

  10. Near-Infrared Mass Loss Diagnostics for Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Bouret, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Stellar wind mass loss is a key process which modifies surface abundances, luminosities, and other physical properties of hot, massive stars. Furthermore, mass loss has to be understood quantitatively in order to accurately describe and predict massive star evolution. Two urgent problems have been identified that challenge our understanding of line-driven winds, the so-called weak-wind problem and wind clumping. In both cases, mass-loss rates are drastically lower than theoretically expected (up to a factor 1001). Here we study how the expected spectroscopic capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), especially NIRSpec, could be used to significantly improve constraints on wind density structures (clumps) and deep-seated phenomena in stellar winds of massive stars, including OB, Wolf-Rayet and LBV stars. Since the IR continuum of objects with strong winds is formed in the wind, IR lines may sample different depths inside the wind than UV-optical lines and provide new information about the shape of the velocity field and clumping properties. One of the most important applications of IR line diagnostics will be the measurement of mass-loss rates in massive stars with very weak winds by means of the H I Bracket alpha line, which has been identified as one of the most promising diagnostics for this problem.

  11. Triggered star formation in the environment of young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Naab, T.; Heitsch, F.; Burkert, A.

    Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope show clear evidence that star formation takes place in the surrounding of young massive O-type stars, which are shaping their environment due to their powerful radiation and stellar winds. In this work we investigate the effect of ionising radiation of massive stars on the ambient interstellar medium (ISM): In particular we want to examine whether the UV-radiation of O-type stars can lead to the observed pillar-like structures and can trigger star formation. We developed a new implementation, based on a parallel Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code (VINE), that allows an efficient treatment of the effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their turbulent gaseous environment. Here we present first results at very high resolution. We show that ionising radiation can trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable molecular cloud. The arising structures resemble observed structures (e.g. the pillars of creation in the Eagle Nebula (M16) or the Horsehead Nebula B33). Including the effect of gravitation we find small regions that can be identified as formation places of individual stars. We conclude that ionising radiation from massive stars alone can trigger substantial star formation in molecular clouds.

  12. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  13. RCW 108: Massive Young Stars Trigger Stellar Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    RCW 108 is a region where stars are actively forming within the Milky Way galaxy about 4,000 light years from Earth. This is a complicated region that contains young star clusters, including one that is deeply embedded in a cloud of molecular hydrogen. By using data from different telescopes, astronomers determined that star birth in this region is being triggered by the effect of nearby, massive young stars.

    This image is a composite of X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue) and infrared emission detected by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (red and orange). More than 400 X-ray sources were identified in Chandra's observations of RCW 108. About 90 percent of these X-ray sources are thought to be part of the cluster and not stars that lie in the field-of-view either behind or in front of it. Many of the stars in RCW 108 are experiencing the violent flaring seen in other young star-forming regions such as the Orion nebula. Gas and dust blocks much of the X-rays from the juvenile stars located in the center of the image, explaining the relative dearth of Chandra sources in this part of the image.

    The Spitzer data show the location of the embedded star cluster, which appears as the bright knot of red and orange just to the left of the center of the image. Some stars from a larger cluster, known as NGC 6193, are also visible on the left side of the image. Astronomers think that the dense clouds within RCW 108 are in the process of being destroyed by intense radiation emanating from hot and massive stars in NGC 6193.

    Taken together, the Chandra and Spitzer data indicate that there are more massive star candidates than expected in several areas of this image. This suggests that pockets within RCW 108 underwent localized episodes of star formation. Scientists predict that this type of star formation is triggered by the effects of radiation from bright, massive stars such as those in NGC 6193. This radiation may cause the interior of gas

  14. Modeling populations of rotationally mixed massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brott, I.

    2011-02-01

    Massive stars can be considered as cosmic engines. With their high luminosities, strong stellar winds and violent deaths they drive the evolution of galaxies through-out the history of the universe. Despite the importance of massive stars, their evolution is still poorly understood. Two major issues have plagued evolutionary models of massive stars until today: mixing and mass loss On the main sequence, the effects of mass loss remain limited in the considered mass and metallicity range, this thesis concentrates on the role of mixing in massive stars. This thesis approaches this problem just on the cross road between observations and simulations. The main question: Do evolutionary models of single stars, accounting for the effects of rotation, reproduce the observed properties of real stars. In particular we are interested if the evolutionary models can reproduce the surface abundance changes during the main-sequence phase. To constrain our models we build a population synthesis model for the sample of the VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive stars, for which star-formation history and rotational velocity distribution are well constrained. We consider the four main regions of the Hunter diagram. Nitrogen un-enriched slow rotators and nitrogen enriched fast rotators that are predicted by theory. Nitrogen enriched slow rotators and nitrogen unenriched fast rotators that are not predicted by our model. We conclude that currently these comparisons are not sufficient to verify the theory of rotational mixing. Physical processes in addition to rotational mixing appear necessary to explain the stars in the later two regions. The chapters of this Thesis have been published in the following Journals: Ch. 2: ``Rotating Massive Main-Sequence Stars I: Grids of Evolutionary Models and Isochrones'', I. Brott, S. E. de Mink, M. Cantiello, N. Langer, A. de Koter, C. J. Evans, I. Hunter, C. Trundle, J.S. Vink submitted to Astronomy & Astrop hysics Ch. 3: ``The VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive

  15. Eruptive outflow phases of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    I review recent progress on understanding eruptions of unstable massive stars, with particular attention to the diversity of observed behavior in extragalatic optical transient sources that are generally associated with giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs). These eruptions are thought to represent key mass loss episodes in the lives of massive stars. I discuss the possibility of dormant LBVs and implications for the duration of the greater LBV phase and its role in stellar evolution. These eruptive variables show a wide range of peak luminosity, decay time, expansion speeds, and progenitor luminosity, and in some cases they have been observed to suffer multiple eruptions. This broadens our view of massive star eruptions compared to prototypical sources like Eta Carinae, and provides important clues for the nature of the outbursts. I will also review and discuss some implications about the possible physical mechanisms involved, although the cause of the eruptions is not yet understood.

  16. HAT-P-56b: An Inflated Massive Hot Jupiter Transiting a Bright F Star Followed Up with K2 Campaign 0 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bhatti, W.; Bieryla, A.; de Val-Borro, M.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Béky, B.; Falco, E.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M. L.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F-type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph on the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.5 m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of 2.18 {M}{{J}}, radius of 1.47 {R}{{J}}, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of 2.7908 day. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with {M}p\\gt 2 {M}{{J}}. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 {M}⊙ , and radius of 1.43 {R}⊙ . The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests that the star is a γ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Based in part on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Based in part on observations obtained with the Kepler Space Craft in the K2 Campaign 0 Mission.

  17. Massive Stars in the Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; McLean, Ian S.; Morris, Mark

    1999-03-01

    We present near-infrared photometry and K-band spectra of newly identified massive stars in the Quintuplet cluster, one of the three massive clusters projected within 50 pc of the Galactic center. We find that the cluster contains a variety of massive stars, including more unambiguously identified Wolf-Rayet stars than any cluster in the Galaxy, and over a dozen stars in earlier stages of evolution, i.e., luminous blue variables (LBVs), Ofpe/WN9, and OB supergiants. One newly identified star is the second luminous blue variable in the cluster, after the ``Pistol star.'' Although we are unable to provide certain spectral classifications for the five enigmatic Quintuplet-proper members, we tentatively propose that they are extremely dusty versions of the WC stars found elsewhere in the cluster and similar to the dozen or so known examples in the Galaxy. Although the cluster parameters are uncertain because of photometric errors and uncertainties in stellar models, i.e., extrapolating initial masses and estimating ionizing fluxes, we have the following conclusions. Given the evolutionary stages of the identified stars, the cluster appears to be about 4+/-1 Myr old, assuming coeval formation. The total mass in observed stars is ~103 Msolar, and the implied mass is ~104 Msolar, assuming a lower mass cutoff of 1 Msolar and a Salpeter initial mass function. The implied mass density in stars is greater than or similar to a few thousand Msolar pc-3. The newly identified stars increase the estimated ionizing flux from this cluster by about an order of magnitude with respect to earlier estimates, to 1050.9 photons s-1, or roughly what is required to ionize the nearby ``Sickle'' H II region (G0.18-0.04). The total luminosity from the massive cluster stars is ~107.5 Lsolar, enough to account for the heating of the nearby molecular cloud, M0.20-0.033. We propose a picture that integrates most of the major features in this part of the sky, excepting the nonthermal filaments. We

  18. The Brief Lives of Massive Stars as Witnessed by Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C.

    2014-09-01

    Massive stars present the newest and perhaps most challenging opportunity for long baseline interferometry to excel. Large distances require high angular resolution both to study the means of accreting enough mass in a short time and to split new-born multiples into their components for the determination of their fundamental parameters. Dust obscuration of young stellar objects requires interferometry in the mid-infrared, while post-main-sequence stellar phases require high-precision measurements to challenge stellar evolution models. I will summarize my recent work on modeling mid-IR observations of a massive YSO in NGC 3603, and on the derivation of masses and luminosities of a massive hot supergiant star in another star-forming region in Orion. Challenges presented themselves when constraining the geometry of a hypothetical accretion disk as well as obtaining spectroscopy matching the interferometric precision when working with only a few photospheric lines. As a rapidly evolving application of interferometry, massive stars have a bright future.

  19. The initial conditions of massive star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Massive stars are some of the most energetic building blocks of galaxies. They are the progenitors of supernovae and of neutrons stars and black holes, the coallescence of which is one of the most likely detectable sources of gravitational waves. Yet their formation remains poorly understood. As a consequence, the mechanisms that set initial parameters such as rotation rates, multiplicity and orbital distributions are also ill constrained. These quantities are however critical as they affect the internal mixing, the rate and nature of the interactions, the stars final fates and their end-of-life products. In this presentation, I will review existing and new observations that allow us to better constraints these parameters, hence the initial conditions for massive star evolution.

  20. Comments on the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, M. F.; The, L.-S.; Meyer, B. S.

    We describe in a brief form present results we have obtained from a careful and up to date study of the evolution of massive stars including their advanced evolutionary phases beyond the oxygen burning phase. We describe the effects of mass loss, treatment of convection in inhomogeneous stellar layers and the rate of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction on the properties of stellar models in the interesting case of a 25 M⊙ star of solar-like initial metallicity.

  1. The Pistol Star and Unstable Massive Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.

    2005-09-01

    We present recent results on quantitative spectroscopic studies of the Pistol Star and other massive stars in the Quintuplet and Arches clusters. Thanks to the impressive evolution of IR detectors and the new generation of line blanketed models for the extended atmospheres of hot stars we are able to accurately derive the physical properties of the massive stars in these clusters. Our analysis of the LBVs in the Quintuplet cluster provides, for the first time, a direct estimate of α-elements and Fe chemical abundances in these objects. Preliminary results point to a slightly enhanced enrichment of α-elements compared to Fe and suggest an initial mass function dominated by massive stars, as found for the Arches cluster. On the other hand, from our analysis of the Arches cluster, we introduce a new method to estimate metallicity in very young clusters based on the N abundance of WNL stars and the theory of evolution of massive stars. Results indicating solar metallicity are presented.

  2. Hot subdwarf stars and their connection to thermonuclear supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Ziegerer, E.; Heber, U.; Németh, P.; Irrgang, A.; pre=", team

    2016-07-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by crossmatching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. The Gaia mission will provide accurate astrometry and light curves of all the stars in our hot subdwarf sample and will allow us to compile a much larger all-sky catalogue of those stars. In this way we expect to find hundreds of progenitor binaries and ejected companions.

  3. Massive stars. A chemical signature of first-generation very massive stars.

    PubMed

    Aoki, W; Tominaga, N; Beers, T C; Honda, S; Lee, Y S

    2014-08-22

    Numerical simulations of structure formation in the early universe predict the formation of some fraction of stars with several hundred solar masses. No clear evidence of supernovae from such very massive stars has, however, yet been found in the chemical compositions of Milky Way stars. We report on an analysis of a very metal-poor star SDSS J001820.5-093939.2, which possesses elemental-abundance ratios that differ significantly from any previously known star. This star exhibits low [α-element Fe] ratios and large contrasts between the abundances of odd and even element pairs, such as scandium/titanium and cobalt/nickel. Such features have been predicted by nucleosynthesis models for supernovae of stars more than 140 times as massive as the Sun, suggesting that the mass distribution of first-generation stars might extend to 100 solar masses or larger. PMID:25146286

  4. Massive stars. A chemical signature of first-generation very massive stars.

    PubMed

    Aoki, W; Tominaga, N; Beers, T C; Honda, S; Lee, Y S

    2014-08-22

    Numerical simulations of structure formation in the early universe predict the formation of some fraction of stars with several hundred solar masses. No clear evidence of supernovae from such very massive stars has, however, yet been found in the chemical compositions of Milky Way stars. We report on an analysis of a very metal-poor star SDSS J001820.5-093939.2, which possesses elemental-abundance ratios that differ significantly from any previously known star. This star exhibits low [α-element Fe] ratios and large contrasts between the abundances of odd and even element pairs, such as scandium/titanium and cobalt/nickel. Such features have been predicted by nucleosynthesis models for supernovae of stars more than 140 times as massive as the Sun, suggesting that the mass distribution of first-generation stars might extend to 100 solar masses or larger.

  5. Massive stars: flare activity due to infalls of comet-like bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon; Ibodov, Firuz S.

    2015-01-01

    Passages of comet-like bodies through the atmosphere/chromosphere of massive stars at velocities more than 600 km/s will be accompanied, due to aerodynamic effects as crushing and flattening, by impulse generation of hot plasma within a relatively very thin layer near the stellar surface/photosphere as well as ``blast'' shock wave, i.e., impact-generated photospheric stellar/solar flares. Observational manifestations of such high-temperature phenomena will be eruption of the explosive layer's hot plasma, on materials of the star and ``exploding'' comet nuclei, into the circumstellar environment and variable anomalies in chemical abundances of metal atoms/ions like Fe, Si etc. Interferometric and spectroscopic observations/monitoring of young massive stars with dense protoplanetary discs are of interest for massive stars physics/evolution, including identification of mechanisms for massive stars variability.

  6. Massive stars in the galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The star-forming galaxies of the Local Group act as our laboratories for testing massive star evolutionary models. In this review, I briefly summarize what we believe we know about massive star evolution, and the connection between OB stars, Luminous Blue Variables, yellow supergiants, red supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars. The difficulties and recent successes in identifying these various types of massive stars in the neighboring galaxies of the Local Group will be discussed.

  7. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  8. Some correlations for massive MS stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, T.

    1994-11-01

    Criteria are derived for estimating the values of photospheric density, of the core mass and of the energy-generation rate for massive main-sequence stars. Based on the observational material concerning M, L and Te the demarcation lines are determined for the domain of values expected for these quantities in cor relation with measured Mb.

  9. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  10. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  11. The brief lives of massive stars as witnessed by interferometry}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Massive stars present the newest and perhaps most challenging opportunity for long baseline interferometry to excel. Large distances require high angular resolution both to study the means of accreting enough mass in a short time and to split new-born multiples into their components for the determination of their fundamental parameters. Dust obscuration of young stellar objects require interferometry in the infrared, while post-mainsequence stellar phases require high-precision measurements to challenge stellar evolution models. I will summarize our work on a massive YSO in NGC 3603 including modeling mid-IR interferometric observations, as well as recent sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy with APEX. We find some evidence for a disk in the MIR, resolve multiple cores in the sub-mm with emission line spectra untypical for hot cores. I also report on the derivation of masses and luminosities of a massive O-type supergiant (ζ Orionis) in another star forming region in Orion. The small radial velocity semi-amplitudes coupled with few usable (i.e. wind-free) lines have made this work very challenging and forced us to base the mass determination on a photometric distance estimate. As a rapidly evolving application of interferometry, massive stars have a bright future.

  12. Evolution and Nucleosynthesis of Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschi, Raphael

    In this chapter, after a brief introduction and overview of stellar evolution, we discuss the evolution and nucleosynthesis of very massive stars (VMS: M > 100 M_{odot } ) in the context of recent stellar evolution model calculations. This chapter covers the following aspects: general properties, evolution of surface properties, late central evolution, and nucleosynthesis including their dependence on metallicity, mass loss and rotation. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All VMS at metallicities close to solar end their life as WC(-WO) type Wolf-Rayet stars. Due to very important mass loss through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 M_{odot } . A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of neon and magnesium at the surface of WC stars. At solar metallicity, mass loss is so strong that even if a star is born with several hundred solar masses, it will end its life with less than 50 M_{odot } (using current mass loss prescriptions). At the metallicity of the LMC and lower, on the other hand, mass loss is weaker and might enable stars to undergo pair-instability supernovae.

  13. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN NGC 2074

    SciTech Connect

    Fleener, Christine E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Payne, James T.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-15

    Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 10{sup 5} yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.

  14. The Evolution and Stability of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiode, Joshua Hajime

    Massive stars are the ultimate source for nearly all the elements necessary for life. The first stars forge these elements from the sparse set of ingredients supplied by the Big Bang, and distribute enriched ashes throughout their galactic homes via their winds and explosive deaths. Subsequent generations follow suit, assembling from the enriched ashes of their predecessors. Over the last several decades, the astrophysics community has developed a sophisticated theoretical picture of the evolution of these stars, but it remains an incomplete accounting of the rich set of observations. Using state of the art models of massive stars, I have investigated the internal processes taking place throughout the life-cycles of stars spanning those from the first generation ("Population III") to the present-day ("Population I"). I will argue that early-generation stars were not highly unstable to perturbations, contrary to a host of past investigations, if a correct accounting is made for the viscous effect of convection. For later generations, those with near solar metallicity, I find that this very same convection may excite gravity-mode oscillations that produce observable brightness variations at the stellar surface when the stars are near the main sequence. If confirmed with modern high-precision monitoring experiments, like Kepler and CoRoT, the properties of observed gravity modes in massive stars could provide a direct probe of the poorly constrained physics of gravity mode excitation by convection. Finally, jumping forward in stellar evolutionary time, I propose and explore an entirely new mechanism to explain the giant eruptions observed and inferred to occur during the final phases of massive stellar evolution. This mechanism taps into the vast nuclear fusion luminosity, and accompanying convective luminosity, in the stellar core to excite waves capable of carrying a super-Eddington luminosity out to the stellar envelope. This energy transfer from the core to the

  15. Instability considerations for massive star eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to explain the observed properties of the giant eruptions of 'supernova imposters' such as {eta} Car and P Cyg. This mechanism must be episodic, generate a large amount of energy, and be very deep-seated, in order to lift about 10 solar masses out of the deep gravitational potential well of these massive evolved stars. We suggest that nonradial gravity mode oscillations capable of existing in the core grow slowly to sufficient amplitude to cause an episode of mixing. This mixing generates a burst of nuclear energy deep in the star that is responsible for the observed large mass ejection and bolometric magnitude increase.

  16. Very Massive Stars in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jorick S.; Heger, Alexander; Krumholz, Mark R.; Puls, Joachim; Banerjee, S.; Castro, N.; Chen, K.-J.; Chenè, A.-N.; Crowther, P. A.; Daminelli, A.; Gräfener, G.; Groh, J. H.; Hamann, W.-R.; Heap, S.; Herrero, A.; Kaper, L.; Najarro, F.; Oskinova, L. M.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Rosen, A.; Sander, A.; Shirazi, M.; Sugawara, Y.; Tramper, F.; Vanbeveren, D.; Voss, R.; Wofford, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have claimed the existence of very massive stars (VMS) up to 300 M ⊙ in the local Universe. As this finding may represent a paradigm shift for the canonical stellar upper-mass limit of 150 M ⊙, it is timely to discuss the status of the data, as well as the far-reaching implications of such objects. We held a Joint Discussion at the General Assembly in Beijing to discuss (i) the determination of the current masses of the most massive stars, (ii) the formation of VMS, (iii) their mass loss, and (iv) their evolution and final fate. The prime aim was to reach broad consensus between observers and theorists on how to identify and quantify the dominant physical processes.

  17. Wolf-Rayet stars from Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Norhasliza

    2015-01-01

    Many studies focused on very massive stars (VMS) within the framework of Pop. III stars, because this is where they were thought to be abundant. In this work, we focus on the evolution of VMS in the local universe following the discovery of VMS in the R136 cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We computed grids of VMS evolutionary tracks in the range 120-500 M ⊙ with solar, LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud metallicities. All models end their lives as Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars of the WC (or WO) type. We discuss the evolution and fate of VMS around solar metallicity with particular focus on the WR phase. For example, we show that a distinctive feature that may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of Ne and Mg at the surface of WC stars.

  18. Proper Motions of Massive Stars in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We propose an ambitious proper motion survey of massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud using the unique capabilities of HST. We will derive the directions of motion of massive runaway stars, searching in particular for massive stars which have been ejected from the central very massive cluster R136. These data will be combined with radial velocities from the VLT-FLAMES Survey of the Tarantula Nebula and with atmospheric analyses and stellar evolution models to constrain their origins. We will also search for very young isolated massive stars to test models of single-star formation. This work is highly relevant to star formation, cluster dynamics, the origin of field WR stars and GRBs, the creation of very massive stars by runaway mergers, and the possible formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  19. The hot γ Doradus and Maia stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.; Engelbrecht, C. A.; Joshi, Y. C.; Joshi, S.; Sharma, K.; Semenko, E.; Pandey, G.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Mkrtichian, David; Hema, B. P.; Nemec, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    The hot γ Doradus stars have multiple low frequencies characteristic of γ Dor or SPB variables, but are located between the red edge of the SPB and the blue edge of the γ Dor instability strips where all low-frequency modes are stable in current models of these stars. Though δ Sct stars also have low frequencies, there is no sign of high frequencies in hot γ Dor stars. We obtained spectra to refine the locations of some of these stars in the H-R diagram and conclude that these are, indeed, anomalous pulsating stars. The Maia variables have multiple high frequencies characteristic of β Cep and δ Sct stars, but lie between the red edge of the β Cep and the blue edge of the δ Sct instability strips. We compile a list of all Maia candidates and obtain spectra of two of these stars. Again, it seems likely that these are anomalous pulsating stars which are currently not understood.

  20. Hot Stars: Old-Fashioned or Trendy? (With 24 Figures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    Spectroscopic analyses with the intention of the interpretation of the UV-spectra of the brightest stars as individuals - supernovae - or as components of star-forming regions - massive O stars - provide a powerful tool with great astrophysical potential for the determination of extragalactic distances and of the chemical composition of star-forming galaxies even at high redshifts. The perspectives of already initiated work with the new generation of tools for quantitative UV-spectroscopy of Hot Stars that have been developed during the last two decades are presented and the status of the continuing effort to construct corresponding models for Hot Star atmospheres is reviewed. Because the physics of the atmospheres of Hot Stars are strongly affected by velocity expansion dominating the spectra at all wavelength ranges, hydrodynamic model atmospheres for O-type stars and explosion models for Supernovae of Type Ia are necessary as basis for the synthesis and analysis of the spectra. It is shown that stellar parameters, abundances and stellar wind properties can be determined by the methods of spectral diagnostics already developed. Additionally, it will be demonstrated that models and synthetic spectra of Type Ia Supernovae of required quality are already available that make it possible to tackle the question of whether Supernovae Ia are standard candles in a cosmological sense and the SN-luminosity distances thus indicate accelerated expansion of the universe.

  1. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  2. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  3. Massive main-sequence stars evolving at the Eddington limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, D.; Grassitelli, L.; Langer, N.; Bestenlehner, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Massive stars play a vital role in the Universe, however, their evolution even on the main-sequence is not yet well understood. Aims: Because of the steep mass-luminosity relation, massive main-sequence stars become extremely luminous. This brings their envelopes very close to the Eddington limit. We analyse stellar evolutionary models in which the Eddington limit is reached and exceeded, explore the rich diversity of physical phenomena that take place in their envelopes, and investigate their observational consequences. Methods: We use published grids of detailed stellar models, computed with a state-of-the-art, one-dimensional hydrodynamic stellar evolution code using LMC composition, to investigate the envelope properties of core hydrogen burning massive stars. Results: We find that the Eddington limit is almost never reached at the stellar surface, even for stars up to 500 M⊙. When we define an appropriate Eddington limit locally in the stellar envelope, we can show that most stars more massive than ~40 M⊙ actually exceed this limit, in particular, in the partial ionisation zones of iron, helium, or hydrogen. While most models adjust their structure such that the local Eddington limit is exceeded at most by a few per cent, our most extreme models do so by a factor of more than seven. We find that the local violation of the Eddington limit has severe consequences for the envelope structure, as it leads to envelope inflation, convection, density inversions, and, possibly to, pulsations. We find that all models with luminosities higher than 4 × 105L⊙, i.e. stars above ~40 M⊙ show inflation, with a radius increase of up to a factor of about 40. We find that the hot edge of the S Dor variability region coincides with a line beyond which our models are inflated by more than a factor of two, indicating a possible connection between S Dor variability and inflation. Furthermore, our coolest models show highly inflated envelopes with masses of up to

  4. The Chandra Carina Complex Project: Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Marc; Townsley, L.; Corcoran, M.; Cohen, D.; Dickerson, K.; Oskinova, L.; Naze, Y.; Broos, P.; Chandra Carina Complex Project

    2010-03-01

    The Great Nebula in Carina is a superb site to study the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have combined 20 deep, new Chandra ACIS-I pointings with two existing ACIS-I fields to map over one square degree of the Carina complex. A state-of-the-art source detection algorithm has been used to create a catalog of 14,368 x-ray sources, the great majority with counterparts at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. Carina contains the largest catalogued population of OB stars within 3 kpc, including many known binaries. In this paper, we report on the 130 x-ray detected OB and Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Carina complex. We use their x-ray spectra and light curves to categorize their x-ray emission. Not surprisingly, we find that the known OB and WolfRayet binaries have hard x-ray spectra and high Lx/Lbol strongly suggesting colling wind shocks. Most of the single OB stars have generally lower shock temperatures and lower Lx/Lbol, suggesting wind shocks embedded in the wind. About a dozen of the apparently single OB stars have harder x-ray spectra, and some time variability, possibly suggesting magnetically confined wind shocks, or flaring T Tauri companions.

  5. NEARBY MASSIVE STAR CLUSTER YIELDS INSIGHTS INTO EARLY UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of young, ultra-bright stars nested in their embryonic cloud of glowing gases. The celestial maternity ward, called N81, is located 200,000 light-years away in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a small irregular satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. Hubble's exquisite resolution allows astronomers to pinpoint 50 separate stars tightly packed in the nebula's core within a 10 light-year diameter - slightly more than twice the distance between earth and the nearest star to our sun. The closest pair of stars is only 1/3 of a light-year apart (0.3 arcseconds in the sky). This furious rate of mass loss from these super-hot stars is evident in the Hubble picture that reveals dramatic shapes sculpted in the nebula's wall of glowing gases by violent stellar winds and shock waves. A pair of bright stars in the center of the nebula is pouring out most of the ultraviolet radiation to make the nebula glow. Just above them, a small dark knot is all that's left of the cold cloud of molecular hydrogen and dust the stars were born from. Dark absorption lanes of residual dust trisect the nebula. The nebula offers a unique opportunity for a close-up glimpse at the 'firestorm' accompanying the birth of extremely massive stars, each blazing with the brilliance of 300,000 of our suns. Such galactic fireworks were much more common billions of years ago in the early universe, when most star formation took place. The 'natural-color' view was assembled from separate images taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, in ultraviolet light and two narrow emission lines of ionized Hydrogen (H-alpha, H-beta). The picture was taken on September 4, 1997. Credit: Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory, France), NASA/ESA

  6. Evolution and fate of very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Norhasliza; Hirschi, Raphael; Meynet, Georges; Crowther, Paul A.; Ekström, Sylvia; Frischknecht, Urs; Georgy, Cyril; Abu Kassim, Hasan; Schnurr, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    There is observational evidence that supports the existence of very massive stars (VMS) in the local universe. First, VMS (Mini ≲ 320 M⊙) have been observed in the Large Magellanic Clouds (LMC). Secondly, there are observed supernovae (SNe) that bear the characteristics of pair creation supernovae (PCSNe, also referred to as pair instability SN) which have VMS as progenitors. The most promising candidate to date is SN 2007bi. In order to investigate the evolution and fate of nearby VMS, we calculated a new grid of models for such objects, for solar, LMC and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC) metallicities, which covers the initial mass range from 120 to 500 M⊙. Both rotating and non-rotating models were calculated using the GENEVA stellar evolution code and evolved until at least the end of helium burning and for most models until oxygen burning. Since VMS have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All the VMS, at all the metallicities studied here, end their life as WC(WO)-type Wolf-Rayet stars. Because of very important mass losses through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 M⊙. A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses would be the enhanced abundances of Ne and Mg at the surface of WC stars. This feature is however not always apparent depending on the history of mass loss. At solar metallicity, none of our models is expected to explode as a PCSN. At the metallicity of the LMC, only stars more massive than 300 M⊙ are expected to explode as PCSNe. At the SMC metallicity, the mass range for the PCSN progenitors is much larger and

  7. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  8. H II Regions: Witnesses to Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-01

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  9. Formation of massive stars by growing accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Andre

    There are at present three scenarios for the formation of massive star. 1) The classical scenario of constant mass pre-Main Sequence (MS) evolution on the Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale. 2) The coalescence scenario, with merging of intermediate mass protostars. 3) The accretion scenario. The various arguments for and against these scenarios are briefly reviewed. We examine the pre-MS evolution of accreting stars for constant accretion rates and for accretion rates which are growing with the stellar masses. The location of the birthlines in the HRD and the lifetimes support accretion rates growing fastly with the stellar masses. Remarkably the dependence found is similar to that of the mass outflows from UC HII regions observed by Churchwell (1999) and Henning et al. (2000). The accretion scenario also leads to a new concept for the maximum stellar mass.

  10. Energetic Supernovae of Very Massive Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan

    2015-08-01

    Current models of the formation of the first stars in the universe suggest that these stars were very massive, having a typical mass scale of hundreds of solar masses. Some of them would die as pair instability supernovae (PSNe) which might be the biggest explosions of the universe. We present the results from multidimensional numerical studies of PSNe with a new radiation-hydrodynamics code, CASTRO and with realistic nuclear reaction networks. We simulate the fluid instabilities that occur in multiple spatial dimensions and discuss how the resulting mixing affects the explosion, mixing, and nucleosynthesis of these supernovae. Our simulations provide useful predictions for the observational signatures of PSNe, which might soon be examined by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    PubMed

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae. PMID:22837522

  12. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    PubMed

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae.

  13. Massive stars in their death throes.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, John J

    2008-12-13

    The study of the stars that explode as supernovae used to be a forensic study, working backwards from the remnants of the star. This changed in 1987 when the first progenitor star was identified in pre-explosion images. Currently, there are eight detected progenitors with another 21 non-detections, for which only a limit on the pre-explosion luminosity can be placed. This new avenue of supernova research has led to many interesting conclusions, most importantly that the progenitors of the most common supernovae, type IIP, are red supergiants, as theory has long predicted. However, no progenitors have been detected thus far for the hydrogen-free type Ib/c supernovae, which, given the expected progenitors, is an unlikely result. Also, observations have begun to show evidence that luminous blue variables, which are among the most massive stars, may directly explode as supernovae. These results contradict the current stellar evolution theory. This suggests that we may need to update our understanding.

  14. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  15. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  16. Complete Stellar Models: Spectral and Interior Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerer, Daniel

    1995-08-01

    This thesis work presents the first "complete stellar models" for massive stars, which consistently treat the stellar interior, the atmosphere, and the stellar winds. This approach allows to simultaneously predict basic stellar parameters (luminosity, radii, temperatures), nucleosynthesis (abundances), as well as the detailed emergent spectrum through the relevant evolutionary phases (corresponding to OB, LBV and Wolf--Rayet stars). On the other hand, our modelling including the stellar winds also allows to study the influence of the outer layers on the stellar structure and evolution. Conceptually the thesis is divided in two main parts. In the first part we construct the first non-LTE line blanketed hydrodynamic models of spherically expanding atmospheres of hot stars. The entire domain from the optically thick photosphere out to the terminal velocity of the wind is treated. We discuss in detail the effects of line blanketing on the atmospheric structure and on the predicted spectrum. We study the influence of the hydrodynamic structure on the profiles of both photospheric and wind lines. Our results also show that for precise determinations of stellar parameters and abundances of hot luminous stars, the use of plane parallel models may lead to systematic errors. In the second part we develop the "complete stellar models" (CoStar). As a first application we study the main sequence (MS) interior and spectral evolution of massive stars at solar metallicity. The evolutionary tracks and the interior evolution are found to be basically unchanged by the realistic treatment of the outer layers. The main CoStar predictions presented and discussed for the MS are the following: 1. Ejected mass of the most important elements. Deposition of wind momentum and mechanical energy 2. Estimates of mass loss rates due to radiation pressure including multiple scattering and line overlap 3. Continuous spectral energy distribution (EUV to IR) and ionising fluxes 4. UBVRIJHKLMN

  17. Evolutionary Connections Between RSGs and Other Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Red supergiants are an important mass-loss phase near the end of a massive star's life, but there are many other evolved mass-losing stars that populate the HR Diagram, and not all massive stars will pass through a red supergiant phase. This talk will provide an overview of other types of massive stars and how they relate to red supergiants. Mass loss by red supergiant winds will be weighed against the mass loss of other massive stars in terms of their contribution to pre-supernova evolution, focussing on trends with initial mass and metallicity. Moreover, some other evolved massive stars have already been RSG or will be in the future, and circumstellar material is an important clue in this regard. Last, the diversity of different supernova explosions, their circumstellar material, and statistics of SN types provide important constraints on the role of RSGs in the latest phases of evolution and mass loss.

  18. Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M {sub ☉} die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ∼20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  19. Pair Instability Supernovae of Very Massive Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Woosley, Stan; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M ⊙ die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ~20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  20. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope photometry of massive stars - The OB association NGC 206 in M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jesse K.; Pfarr, Barbara B.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Isensee, Joan E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Neff, Susan G.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) obtained UV images of the giant M31 OB association NGC 206. Magnitudes in bands at 1520 and 2490 A were obtained for 30 massive stars, which demonstrate the effectiveness of UIT for photometry of moderately crowded hot stars to V about 21. The UV colors and magnitudes observed for stars in NGC 206 place them in the region of the color magnitude diagram occupied by evolutionary models for 30-60 solar mass stars, after correcting for extinction. The brighter stars are systematically redder than the fainter stars, indicating that they are supergiants of age about 4 Myr, while the fainter, bluer stars are nearer age zero. The relative numbers of probable supergiants measured by us and the number of probable main-sequence O stars measured from optical images are in agreement with the relative lifetimes. Calculated UIT colors are presented for a library of standard star spectra constructed from IUE and ground-based observations.

  1. Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bowshock Nebulae: Identifying Twelve New Early-Type Stars using SMOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chick, William T.; Andrews, Julian E.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Povich, Matthew S.; Dale, Daniel A.; Munari, Stephan; Olivier, Grace M.; Schurhammer, Danielle; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Wernke, Heather N.

    2016-01-01

    Massive O and B type stars are crucial to the evolution of the interstellar medium, dominating the production of ionizing radiation, mechanical energy, and heavy elements. However, due to their short lives and relative scarcity, these stars are some of the least well understood and are difficult to locate outside of large star forming regions. A small but significant fraction of these massive stars have been observed to be high-velocity runaway stars moving rapidly away from their origin. When these stars encounter nebular gas they create characteristic arc-shaped bowshocks of heated compressed dust and gas. Using the distinct infrared emission morphology of the hot dust, these bowshock nebulae are predicted to give the location of the massive early type stars.Visual inspection of 24-micron band images from the Spitzer Mapping of the Outer Galaxy (SMOG) revealed 12 new bowshock nebula candidates. Follow up optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory confirmed that all 12 of the associated stellar sources are early-type stars. Combined with related results from visual searches for bowshock nebulae using WISE and Spitzer surveys in the inner Galaxy, we have identified over 85 new early type bowshock supporting stellar sources, a 95% success rate. We conclude that morphological selection of arc-shared infrared nebulae with a symmetrically placed star is an efficient way to discover early type stars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  2. The Hot Horizontal-Branch Stars in omega Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moehler, S.; Dreizler, S.; Lanz, T.; Bono, G.; Sweigart, A. V.; Calamida, A.; Nonino, M.

    2010-01-01

    Context. UV observations of some massive globular clusters have revealed a significant population of stars hotter and fainter than the hot end of the horizontal branch (HB), the so-called blue hook stars. This feature might be explained either by the late hot flasher scenario where stars experience the helium flash while on the white dwarf cooling curve or by the progeny of the helium-enriched sub-population recently postulated to exist in some clusters. Previous spectroscopic analyses of blue hook stars in co Cen and NGC 2808 support the late hot flasher scenario, but the stars contain much less helium than expected and the predicted C, N enrichment could not be verified. Aims. We compare observed effective temperatures, surface gravities, helium abundances, and carbon line strengths (where detectable) of our targets stars to the predictions of the two scenarios. Methods. Moderately high resolution spectra of hot HB stars in the globular cluster omega-Cen were analysed for radial velocity variations, atmospheric parameters and abundances using LTE and non-LTE model atmospheres. Results. We find no evidence for close binaries among our target stars. All stars below 30 000 K are helium-poor and very similar to HB stars observed in that temperature range in other globular clusters. In the temperature range 30000 K to 50000 K we find that 28% of our stars are helium-poor (log ((sup n)He/(sup n )H)< - 1.6), while 72% have roughly solar or super-solar helium abundance (log ((sup n)He/(sup n )H) >/= -1.5). We also find carbon enrichment strongly correlated with helium enrichment, with a maximum carbon enrichment of 3% by mass. Conclusions. The strong carbon enrichment in tandem with helium enrichment is predicted by the late hot flasher scenario, but not by the helium-enrichment scenario. We conclude that the helium-rich HB stars in omega-Cen cannot be explained solely by the helium-enrichment scenario invoked to explain the blue main sequence.

  3. Instability Considerations for Massive Star Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    We propose a mechanism to explain the observed properties of the giant eruptions of `supernova imposters' such as η Car and P Cyg. This mechanism must be episodic, generate a large amount of energy, and be deep seated, in order to lift about 10 solar masses out of the deep gravitational potential well of these massive evolved stars. We suggest that nonradial gravity mode oscillations capable of existing in the core near the hydrogen-burning shell grow slowly to an amplitude sufficient to cause an episode of mixing of hydrogen-rich material downward into hotter denser layers. This mixing generates a burst of nuclear energy production that is responsible for the observed mass ejection and bolometric magnitude increase.

  4. Hot Stars With Cool Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Young intermediate-mass stars have become high-priority targets for direct-imaging planet searches following the recent discoveries of planets orbiting e.g. HR 8799 and Beta Pictoris Close stellar companions to these stars can affect the formation and orbital evolution of any planets, and so a census of the multiplicity properties of nearby intermediate mass stars is needed. Additionally, the multiplicity can help constrain the important binary star formation physics. We report initial results from a spectroscopic survey of 400 nearby A- and B-type stars. We search for companions by cross-correlating high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio echelle spectra of the targets stars against model spectra for F- to M-type stars. We have so far found 18 new candidate companions, and have detected the spectral lines of the secondary in 4 known spectroscopic binary systems. We present the distribution of mass-ratios for close companions, and find that it differs from the distribution for wide (a ≳ 100 AU) intermediate-mass binaries, which may indicate a different formation mechanism for the two populations.

  5. YOUNG STELLAR GROUPS AND THEIR MOST MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, Philip C.

    2011-02-01

    We analyze the masses and spatial distributions of 14 young stellar groups in Taurus, Lupus3, ChaI, and IC348. These nearby groups, which typically contain 20-40 members, have membership catalogs complete to {approx}0.02 M{sub sun}, and are sufficiently young that their locations should be similar to where they formed. These groups show five properties seen in clusters having many more stars and much greater surface density of stars: (1) a broad range of masses, (2) a concentration of the most massive star toward the center of the group, (3) an association of the most massive star with a high surface density of lower mass stars, (4) a correlation of the mass of the most massive star with the total mass of the group, and (5) the distribution of a large fraction of the mass in a small fraction of the stars.

  6. Hot Subdwarf Star Membership in Visual Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, R. A.; Stark, M. A.

    2001-05-01

    We have inspected more than 1300 regions (6 x 6 arcmin) of the first Digitized Sky Survey, each centered on the position of a hot subdwarf star (sdB or sdO star). Several per cent of these subdwarfs are found, on a statistical basis, to be reasonably convincing candidate members of wide binaries (common--proper--motion pairs of stars), and another several per cent are identified as possible c.p.m. candidates (wider separations, more crowded fields, etc.). In very crowded fields, no identification of pairs was attempted. Confirmation of these candidate binary systems awaits radial velocity and proper motion studies. In most cases, the red magnitude of the hot subdwarf and its proposed fellow traveler are similar, although this is partly a selection effect. We will present what is currently known about these pairs of stars: photographic magnitude differences and colors, distribution of angular separation vs magnitude, 2MASS colors, etc. We will also present validating studies of control fields, to assess whether the fraction of hot subdwarfs that are visual binary candidates is higher than field stars of similar magnitude. This sample of stars cannot be regarded as complete in any rigorous way and is certainly biased by the selection process. We can nevertheless hope to exploit the (to--be--purified) sample to learn much about the luminosities, ages, and original metallicities of the hot subdwarf stars, and possibly their companions can be used as a kinematically unbiased sample of old disk stars. Supported in part by NASA. This work made use of the Digitized Sky Surveys produced at the Space Telescope Science Institute, the 2MASS Second Incremental Data Release, and the U.S. Naval Observatory USNO-A2 catalogue.

  7. WHAT SETS THE INITIAL ROTATION RATES OF MASSIVE STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Anna L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    The physical mechanisms that set the initial rotation rates in massive stars are a crucial unknown in current star formation theory. Observations of young, massive stars provide evidence that they form in a similar fashion to their low-mass counterparts. The magnetic coupling between a star and its accretion disk may be sufficient to spin down low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to well below breakup at the end stage of their formation when the accretion rate is low. However, we show that these magnetic torques are insufficient to spin down massive PMS stars due to their short formation times and high accretion rates. We develop a model for the angular momentum evolution of stars over a wide range in mass, considering both magnetic and gravitational torques. We find that magnetic torques are unable to spin down either low-mass or high-mass stars during the main accretion phase, and that massive stars cannot be spun down significantly by magnetic torques during the end stage of their formation either. Spin-down occurs only if massive stars' disk lifetimes are substantially longer or their magnetic fields are much stronger than current observations suggest.

  8. Hot-Jupiter Breakfasts Realign Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Two researchers at the University of Chicago have recently developed a new theory to explain an apparent dichotomy in the orbits of planets around cool vs. hot stars. Their model proposes that the spins of cool stars are affected when they ingest hot Jupiters (HJs) early in their stellar lifetimes. A Puzzling Dichotomy: In exoplanet studies, there is a puzzling difference observed between planet orbits around cool and hot (those with Teff ≥ 6250 K) stars: the orbital planes of planets around cool stars are primarily aligned with the host star's spin, whereas the orbital planes of planets around hot stars seem to be randomly distributed. Previous attempts to explain this dichotomy have focused on tidal interactions between the host star and the planets observed in the system. Now Titos Matsakos and Arieh Königl have taken these models a step further — by including in their calculations not only the effects of observed planets, but also those of HJs that may have been swallowed by the star long before we observed the systems. Modeling Meals: Plots of the distribution of the obliquity λ for hot Jupiters around cool hosts (upper plot) and hot hosts (lower plot). The dashed line shows the initial distribution, the bins show the model prediction for the final distribution after the systems evolve, and the black dots show the current observational data. [Matsakos & Königl, 2015]" class="size-thumbnail wp-image-223" height="386" src="http://aasnova.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/fig22-260x386.png" width="260" /> Plots of the distribution of the obliquity λ for hot Jupiters around cool hosts (upper plot) and hot hosts (lower plot). The dashed line shows the initial distribution, the bins show the model prediction for the final distribution after the systems evolve, and the black dots show the current observational data. [Matsakos & Königl, 2015] The authors' model assumes that as HJs are formed and migrate inward through the protoplanetary disk, they stall out near

  9. The Unevolved Massive Star Content of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2012-10-01

    The Magellanic Clouds offer a unique astrophysical laboratory where we can actually obtain an unbiased estimate of the number of unevolved massive stars above a certain mass. Comparing this number with the {known} number of evolved massive stars, such as Wolf-Rayets, yellow supergiants, and red supergiants, provides a hiterto unavailable test of massive star evolutionary theory. We are engaged in a long-term {5 year} effort to characterize the massive star content of select OB associations of the SMC and LMC using spectroscopy with the Magellan 6.5-m telescopes. Here we are asking for a short { 1 sec} SNAPshot of each of 23 OB associations in the F225W filter. These HST data will provide a crucial complement to our ground based data, allowing us to concentrate on the early and mid O-type stars with our spectroscopy, and to recognize close doubles that would otherwise be unrecognized from the ground.

  10. Mass fluxes for hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucy, L. B.

    2010-03-01

    In an attempt to understand the extraordinarily small mass-loss rates of late-type O dwarfs, mass fluxes in the relevant part of (Teff, g)-space are derived from first principles using a previously-described code for constructing moving reversing layers. From these mass fluxes, a weak-wind domain is identified within which a star's rate of mass loss by a radiatively-driven wind is less than that due to nuclear burning. The five weak-wind stars recently analysed by Marcolino et al. (2009, A&A, 498, 837) fall within or at the edge of this domain. But although the theoretical mass fluxes for these stars are ≈1.4 dex lower than those derived with the formula of Vink et al. (2000), the observed rates are still not matched, a failure that may reflect our poor understanding of low-density supersonic outflows. Mass fluxes are also computed for two strong-wind O4 stars analysed by Bouret et al. (2005, A&A, 438, 301). The predictions agree with the sharply reduced mass loss rates found when Bouret et al. take wind clumping into account.

  11. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J.; Livio, Mario; Siess, Lionel

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  12. Stellar winds of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stee, Ph.; Chesneau, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we summarize the basic properties of radiative stellar winds from the theoretical and observational point of views. We illustrate two examples of a radiative code applied to stellar physics: the SIMECA code successfully used to constrain the physics of the circumstellar environment of the Be star α Arae constrained by VLTI-AMBER spectrally resolved measurements and the CMFGEN code applied to the BA supergiants Deneb and Rigel constrained by CHARA-VEGA measurements.

  13. On stars, galaxies and black holes in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Enander, Jonas; Mörtsell, Edvard E-mail: edvard@fysik.su.se

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the phenomenology of stars and galaxies in massive bigravity. We give parameter conditions for the existence of viable star solutions when the radius of the star is much smaller than the Compton wavelength of the graviton. If these parameter conditions are not met, we constrain the ratio between the coupling constants of the two metrics, in order to give viable conditions for e.g. neutron stars. For galaxies, we put constraints on both the Compton wavelength of the graviton and the conformal factor and coupling constants of the two metrics. The relationship between black holes and stars, and whether the former can be formed from the latter, is discussed. We argue that the different asymptotic structure of stars and black holes makes it unlikely that black holes form from the gravitational collapse of stars in massive bigravity.

  14. The Hot Stars in Symbiotic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muerset, Urs

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries, consisting of a late giant and a very hot companion, whose radiation ionizes the wind from the cool star. They strike the observers by their complex spectra and variability. A small subgroup, the symbiotic novae, undergo outbursts with an amplitude of several magnitudes and a duration of several decades. The ionizing binary component is usually too hot to be observed in the optical light. It emits mainly EUV photons, and in spectral regions better accessible to observers, nebula and cool star are much brighter than the hot star. Direct observations of hot components have therefore been restricted to special cases. Consequently, our knowledge about the hot components was poor. This thesis presents indirect methods allowing to extract crucial information on the ionizing star from the spectrum of the ionized nebula. Fundamental characteristics such as temperature, radius, and outburst energy are determined. They characterize the nature of the hot star, its outbursts, and the evolutionary status of the system. The IUE archive proved best suited as observational base. It contains thousands of far UV spectra of symbiotic stars. The UV continuum and the He II lambda-1640 recombination line turned out to be particularly sensitive to the hot star's parameters. For one object ROSAT observations of photospheric X-ray emission exist. They confirm the results obtained from IUE spectra. Unfortunately, only a subset of the symbiotics are bright enough to be observable in the UV, and moreover, the outburst of most symbiotic novae started long before the advent of space observatories. Possibilities to use optical spectroscopy are explored for these cases. T* can be derived from the observed ionization stages, and L* can be estimated from UBV magnitudes. The main result is displayed in Figure 1. Typically, the hot component of a symbiotic system has a radius ~0.1~R\\odot, a surface temperature ~100,000~K, and a luminosity ~1000~L\\odot. They

  15. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf-Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ˜50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  16. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf–Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ˜50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  17. MASSIVE STARS IN THE Cl 1813-178 CLUSTER: AN EPISODE OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE W33 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Messineo, Maria; Davies, Ben; Figer, Donald F.; Trombley, Christine; Kudritzki, R. P.; Valenti, Elena; Najarro, F.; Michael Rich, R.

    2011-05-20

    Young massive (M > 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}) stellar clusters are a good laboratory to study the evolution of massive stars. Only a dozen of such clusters are known in the Galaxy. Here, we report about a new young massive stellar cluster in the Milky Way. Near-infrared medium-resolution spectroscopy with UIST on the UKIRT telescope and NIRSPEC on the Keck telescope, and X-ray observations with the Chandra and XMM satellites, of the Cl 1813-178 cluster confirm a large number of massive stars. We detected 1 red supergiant, 2 Wolf-Rayet stars, 1 candidate luminous blue variable, 2 OIf, and 19 OB stars. Among the latter, twelve are likely supergiants, four giants, and the faintest three dwarf stars. We detected post-main-sequence stars with masses between 25 and 100 M{sub sun}. A population with age of 4-4.5 Myr and a mass of {approx}10, 000 M{sub sun} can reproduce such a mixture of massive evolved stars. This massive stellar cluster is the first detection of a cluster in the W33 complex. Six supernova remnants and several other candidate clusters are found in the direction of the same complex.

  18. EVIDENCE FOR THE TIDAL DESTRUCTION OF HOT JUPITERS BY SUBGIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Winn, Joshua N. E-mail: jwinn@mit.edu

    2013-08-01

    Tidal transfer of angular momentum is expected to cause hot Jupiters to spiral into their host stars. Although the timescale for orbital decay is very uncertain, it should be faster for systems with larger and more evolved stars. Indeed, it is well established that hot Jupiters are found less frequently around subgiant stars than around main-sequence stars. However, the interpretation of this finding has been ambiguous, because the subgiants are also thought to be more massive than the F- and G-type stars that dominate the main-sequence sample. Consequently, it has been unclear whether the absence of hot Jupiters is due to tidal destruction or inhibited formation of those planets around massive stars. Here we show that the Galactic space motions of the planet-hosting subgiant stars demand that on average they be similar in mass to the planet-hosting main-sequence F- and G-type stars. Therefore the two samples are likely to differ only in age, and provide a glimpse of the same exoplanet population both before and after tidal evolution. As a result, the lack of hot Jupiters orbiting subgiants is clear evidence for their tidal destruction. Questions remain, though, about the interpretation of other reported differences between the planet populations around subgiants and main-sequence stars, such as their period and eccentricity distributions and overall occurrence rates.

  19. WO-Type Wolf-Rayet Stars: the Last Hurrah of the Most Massive Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2014-10-01

    WO-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are considered the final evolutionary stage of the highest mass stars, immediate precursors to Type Ic (He-poor) core-collapse supernovae. These WO stars are rare, and until recently only 6 were known. Our knowledge about their physical properties is mostly based on a single object, Sand 2 in the LMC. It was the only non-binary WO star both bright and unreddened enough that its FUV and NUV spectra could be obtained by FUSE and HST/FOS. A non-LTE analysis showed that Sand 2 is very hot and its (C+O)/He abundance ratio is higher than that found in WC-type WRs, suggesting it is indeed highly evolved. However, the O VI resonance doublet in the FUV required a considerably cooler temperature (120,000 K) model than did the optical O VI lines (170,000 K). Further, the enhanced chemical abundances did not match the predictions of stellar evolutionary models. Another non-LTE study found a 3x higher (C+O)/He abundance ratio and a cooler temperature. We have recently discovered two other bright, single, and lightly reddened WOs in the LMC, allowing us to take a fresh look at these important objects. Our newly found WOs span a range in excitation type, from WO1 (the highest) to WO4 (the lowest). Sand 2 is intermediate (WO3). We propose to use COS to obtain FUV and NUV data of all three stars for as comprehensive a study as is currently possible. These UV data will be combined with our optical Magellan spectra for a detailed analysis with CMFGEN with the latest atomic data. Knowing the degree of chemical evolution of these WO stars is crucial to determining their evolutionary status, and thus in understanding the final stages of the most massive stars.

  20. X-ray diagnostics of massive star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lidia M.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all types of massive stars with radiatively driven stellar winds are X-ray sources that can be observed by the presently operating powerful X-ray telescopes. In this review I briefly address recent advances in our understanding of stellar winds obtained from X-ray observations. X-rays may strongly influence the dynamics of weak winds of main sequence B-type stars. X-ray pulsations were detected in a β Cep type variable giving evidence of tight photosphere-wind connections. The winds of OB dwarfs with subtypes later than O9V may be predominantly in a hot phase, and X-ray observations offer the best window for their studies. The X-ray properties of OB supergiants are largely determined by the effects of radiative transfer in their clumped stellar winds. The recently suggested method to directly measure mass-loss rates of O stars by fitting the shapes of X-ray emission lines is considered but its validity cannot be confirmed. To obtain robust quantitative information on stellar wind parameters from X-ray spectroscopy, a multiwavelength analysis by means of stellar atmosphere models is required. Independent groups are now performing such analyses with encouraging results. Joint analyses of optical, UV, and X-ray spectra of OB supergiants yield consistent mass-loss rates. Depending on the adopted clumping parameters, the empirically derived mass-loss rates are a factor of a few smaller or comparable to those predicted by standard recipes (Vink et al., 2001). All sufficiently studied O stars display variable X-ray emission that might be related to corotating interaction regions in their winds. In the latest stages of stellar evolution, single red supergiants (RSG) and luminous blue variable (LBV) stars do not emit observable amounts of X-rays. On the other hand, nearly all types of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are X-ray sources. X-ray spectroscopy allows a sensitive probe of WR wind abundances and opacities.

  1. The massive star population of Cygnus OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Nicholas J.; Drew, Janet E.; Mohr-Smith, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We have compiled a significantly updated and comprehensive census of massive stars in the nearby Cygnus OB2 association by gathering and homogenizing data from across the literature. The census contains 169 primary OB stars, including 52 O-type stars and 3 Wolf-Rayet stars. Spectral types and photometry are used to place the stars in a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, which is compared to both non-rotating and rotating stellar evolution models, from which stellar masses and ages are calculated. The star formation history and mass function of the association are assessed, and both are found to be heavily influenced by the evolution of the most massive stars to their end states. We find that the mass function of the most massive stars is consistent with a `universal' power-law slope of Γ = 1.3. The age distribution inferred from stellar evolutionary models with rotation and the mass function suggest the majority of star formation occurred more or less continuously between 1 and 7 Myr ago, in agreement with studies of low- and intermediate-mass stars in the association. We identify a nearby young pulsar and runaway O-type star that may have originated in Cyg OB2 and suggest that the association has already seen its first supernova. Finally we use the census and mass function to calculate the total mass of the association of 16 500^{+3800}_{-2800} M⊙, at the low end, but consistent with, previous estimates of the total mass of Cyg OB2. Despite this Cyg OB2 is still one of the most massive groups of young stars known in our Galaxy making it a prime target for studies of star formation on the largest scales.

  2. Unravelling the Mystery of Massive Star Birth - All Stars are Born the Same Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    of a screw on the International Space Station, or more than ten times the resolution possible with current visible-light telescopes in space. With this unique capability, complemented by observations done with another of ESO's telescopes, the 3.58-metre New Technology Telescope at La Silla, Kraus and colleagues were able to detect a disc around IRAS 13481-6124. "This is the first time we could image the inner regions of the disc around a massive young star", says Kraus. "Our observations show that formation works the same for all stars, regardless of mass." The astronomers conclude that the system is about 60 000 years old, and that the star has reached its final mass. Because of the intense light of the star - 30 000 times more luminous than our Sun - the disc will soon start to evaporate. The flared disc extends to about 130 times the Earth-Sun distance - or 130 astronomical units (AU) - and has a mass similar to that of the star, roughly twenty times the Sun. In addition, the inner parts of the disc are shown to be devoid of dust. "Further observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), currently being constructed in Chile, could provide much information on these inner parts, and allow us to better understand how baby massive stars became heavy," concludes Kraus. More information This research was presented in a paper to appear in this week issue of Nature ("A hot compact dust disk around a massive young stellar object", by S. Kraus et al.). The team is composed of Stefan Kraus (University of Michigan, USA), Karl-Heinz Hofmann, Karl M. Menten, Dieter Schertl, Gerd Weigelt, Friedrich Wyrowski, and Anthony Meilland (Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany),Karine Perraut (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, France), Romain Petrov and Sylvie Robbe-Dubois (Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis/CNRS/Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France), Peter Schilke (Universität zu Köln, Germany), and Leonardo Testi (ESO).

  3. The Final Stages of Massive Star Evolution and Their Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Alexander

    In this chapter I discuss the final stages in the evolution of massive stars - stars that are massive enough to burn nuclear fuel all the way to iron group elements in their core. The core eventually collapses to form a neutron star or a black hole when electron captures and photo-disintegration reduce the pressure support to an extent that it no longer can hold up against gravity. The late burning stages of massive stars are a rich subject by themselves, and in them many of the heavy elements in the universe are first generated. The late evolution of massive stars strongly depends on their mass, and hence can be significantly effected by mass loss due to stellar winds and episodic mass loss events - a critical ingredient that we do not know as well as we would like. If the star loses all the hydrogen envelope, a Type I supernova results, if it does not, a Type II supernova is observed. Whether the star makes neutron star or a black hole, or a neutron star at first and a black hole later, and how fast they spin largely affects the energetics and asymmetry of the observed supernova explosion. Beyond photon-based astronomy, other than the sun, a supernova (SN 1987) has been the only object in the sky we ever observed in neutrinos, and supernovae may also be the first thing we will ever see in gravitational wave detectors like LIGO. I conclude this chapter reviewing the deaths of the most massive stars and of Population III stars.

  4. Infrared galaxies - Evolutionary stages of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.; Pacini, F.

    1975-01-01

    We cite evidence which indicates that infrared galaxies may represent evolutionary stages during which a large number of massive stars are being formed. The lifetimes of these stars would be rather short (1-10 million years), and the resulting supernova explosions could account for the level of nonthermal activity which often accompanies the thermal infrared emission.

  5. Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; de Mink, S. E.; Pols, O. R.; Langer, N.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    ~Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with the second generation forming from a mixture of pristine gas and ejecta from the first generation. We show that massive binary stars may be a source of much of the material that makes this second generation of stars. Mass transfer in binaries is often non-conservative and the ejected matter moves slowly enough that it can remain inside a globular cluster and remain available for subsequent star formation. Recent studies show that there are more short-period massive binaries than previously thought, hence also more stars that interact and eject nuclear-processed material.

  6. Dynamical ejections of massive stars from young star clusters under diverse initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungkyung; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects that initial conditions of star clusters and their massive star population have on dynamical ejections of massive stars from star clusters up to an age of 3 Myr. We use a large set of direct N-body calculations for moderately massive star clusters (Mecl ≈ 103.5 M⊙). We vary the initial conditions of the calculations, such as the initial half-mass radius of the clusters, initial binary populations for massive stars and initial mass segregation. We find that the initial density is the most influential parameter for the ejection fraction of the massive systems. The clusters with an initial half-mass radius rh(0) of 0.1 (0.3) pc can eject up to 50% (30)% of their O-star systems on average, while initially larger (rh(0) = 0.8 pc) clusters, that is, lower density clusters, eject hardly any OB stars (at most ≈ 4.5%). When the binaries are composed of two stars of similar mass, the ejections are most effective. Most of the models show that the average ejection fraction decreases with decreasing stellar mass. For clusters that are efficient at ejecting O stars, the mass function of the ejected stars is top-heavy compared to the given initial mass function (IMF), while the mass function of stars that remain in the cluster becomes slightly steeper (top-light) than the IMF. The top-light mass functions of stars in 3 Myr old clusters in our N-body models agree well with the mean mass function of young intermediate-mass clusters in M 31, as reported previously. This implies that the IMF of the observed young clusters is the canonical IMF. We show that the multiplicity fraction of the ejected massive stars can be as high as ≈ 60%, that massive high-order multiple systems can be dynamically ejected, and that high-order multiples become common especially in the cluster. We also discuss binary populations of the ejected massive systems. Clusters that are initially not mass-segregated begin ejecting massive stars after a time delay that is caused by mass

  7. Formation and Evolution of Massive Stars: Current Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koter, A.

    2016-10-01

    The advent of multi-object spectrographs on 8-10 m class telescopes has provided the opportunity to perform detailed atmospheric analysis of samples of several hundreds of massive stars, prior studies being limited to several tens of objects at most. These analyses have highlighted some serious problems regarding our understanding of massive-star evolution. A central theme in the findings is the prominent role of multiplicity, with the majority of high-mass stars being in close binary systems of which the components will interact at some point in their lives.

  8. VLT-Flames Tarantula Survey and Multiplicity of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, H.

    2013-06-01

    The VLT-Flames Tarantula Survey (VFTS) has obtained optical spectroscopy of over 800 OB and Wolf-Rayet stars in the 30 Doradus region with the aim to investigate a number of questions regarding the formation, evolution and final fate of the most massive stars and the dynamics of the region. In this presentation, I will review some of the most important results obtained by the VFTS so far. The multi-epoch strategy was designed to identify spectroscopic binaries, and I will describe the binary properties in the 30 Dor region in the broader context of our knowledge of the multiplicity of massive stars.

  9. Eccentricity boost of stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Mao; Seto, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Based on a simple geometrical approach, we analyze the evolution of the Kozai-Lidov mechanism for stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries on circular orbits. We find that, due to a peculiar bifurcation pattern induced by the Newtonian potential of stellar clusters, the orbit of stars could become highly eccentric. This transition occurs abruptly for stars with small initial eccentricities. The approach presented in this paper may be useful for studying the Kozai-Lidov mechanism in various astrophysical contexts.

  10. The evolutionary tracks of young massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalzner, S.; Steinhausen, M.; Vincke, K.; Menten, K.; Parmentier, G.

    2014-10-20

    Stars mostly form in groups consisting of a few dozen to several ten thousand members. For 30 years, theoretical models have provided a basic concept of how such star clusters form and develop: they originate from the gas and dust of collapsing molecular clouds. The conversion from gas to stars being incomplete, the leftover gas is expelled, leading to cluster expansion and stars becoming unbound. Observationally, a direct confirmation of this process has proved elusive, which is attributed to the diversity of the properties of forming clusters. Here we take into account that the true cluster masses and sizes are masked, initially by the surface density of the background and later by the still present unbound stars. Based on the recent observational finding that in a given star-forming region the star formation efficiency depends on the local density of the gas, we use an analytical approach combined with N-body simulations to reveal evolutionary tracks for young massive clusters covering the first 10 Myr. Just like the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is a measure for the evolution of stars, these tracks provide equivalent information for clusters. Like stars, massive clusters form and develop faster than their lower-mass counterparts, explaining why so few massive cluster progenitors are found.

  11. The Deaths of Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, Stan. E.; Heger, Alexander

    The theory underlying the evolution and death of stars heavier than 10 M⊙ on the main sequence is reviewed with an emphasis upon stars much heavier than 30 M⊙. These are stars that, in the absence of substantial mass loss, are expected to either produce black holes when they die, or, for helium cores heavier than about 35 M⊙, encounter the pair instability. A wide variety of outcomes is possible depending upon the initial composition of the star, its rotation rate, and the physics used to model its evolution. These stars can produce some of the brightest supernovae in the universe, but also some of the faintest. They can make gamma-ray bursts or collapse without a whimper. Their nucleosynthesis can range from just CNO to a broad range of elements up to the iron group. Though rare nowadays, they probably played a disproportionate role in shaping the evolution of the universe following the formation of its first stars.

  12. Discovery of X-ray pulsations from a massive star.

    PubMed

    Oskinova, Lidia M; Nazé, Yael; Todt, Helge; Huenemoerder, David P; Ignace, Richard; Hubrig, Swetlana; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from stars much more massive than the Sun was discovered only 35 years ago. Such stars drive fast stellar winds where shocks can develop, and it is commonly assumed that the X-rays emerge from the shock-heated plasma. Many massive stars additionally pulsate. However, hitherto it was neither theoretically predicted nor observed that these pulsations would affect their X-ray emission. All X-ray pulsars known so far are associated with degenerate objects, either neutron stars or white dwarfs. Here we report the discovery of pulsating X-rays from a non-degenerate object, the massive B-type star ξ(1) CMa. This star is a variable of β Cep-type and has a strong magnetic field. Our observations with the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM-Newton) telescope reveal X-ray pulsations with the same period as the fundamental stellar oscillations. This discovery challenges our understanding of stellar winds from massive stars, their X-ray emission and their magnetism. PMID:24892504

  13. Searching for Massive Star Clusters around Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensland, Jared; Edwards, M. L.; Mikles, V. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to search for the massive birth clusters of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). Using theoretical absolute magnitudes of early-type stars, we calculated expected color and magnitude limits for candidate massive stars at the distance and reddening of the Pistol Star and FMM 362 in the Quintuplet. We then applied these cuts to stars found in the 2MASS catalog surrounding the LBVs. By using a well-characterized cluster, we were able to confirm the method's effectiveness and determine the color and magnitude criteria that eliminated the highest number of false candidates while recovering the largest number of known massive cluster members. We then calculated and applied similar cuts to stars within a 1pc radius of WRA 751 to confirm its cluster, Teutsch 143a, discovered by Pasquali et al (2006) and later investigated by Froebrich et al (2008). We used our method to select 22 strong candidate massive cluster stars, 18 medium confidence candidates and 39 weak candidates, categorized based on their colors and magnitudes. These stars are prime candidates for follow-up spectroscopy to determine their spectral types and confirm cluster membership. We plan to apply a similar method to other LBVs without known birth clusters.

  14. Discovery of X-ray pulsations from a massive star.

    PubMed

    Oskinova, Lidia M; Nazé, Yael; Todt, Helge; Huenemoerder, David P; Ignace, Richard; Hubrig, Swetlana; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer

    2014-06-03

    X-ray emission from stars much more massive than the Sun was discovered only 35 years ago. Such stars drive fast stellar winds where shocks can develop, and it is commonly assumed that the X-rays emerge from the shock-heated plasma. Many massive stars additionally pulsate. However, hitherto it was neither theoretically predicted nor observed that these pulsations would affect their X-ray emission. All X-ray pulsars known so far are associated with degenerate objects, either neutron stars or white dwarfs. Here we report the discovery of pulsating X-rays from a non-degenerate object, the massive B-type star ξ(1) CMa. This star is a variable of β Cep-type and has a strong magnetic field. Our observations with the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM-Newton) telescope reveal X-ray pulsations with the same period as the fundamental stellar oscillations. This discovery challenges our understanding of stellar winds from massive stars, their X-ray emission and their magnetism.

  15. Massive star evolution: luminous blue variables as unexpected supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.; Meynet, G.; Ekström, S.

    2013-02-01

    Stars more massive than about 8 M⊙ end their lives as a supernova (SN), an event of fundamental importance Universe-wide. Theoretically, these stars have been expected to be either at the red supergiant, blue supergiant, or Wolf-Rayet stage before the explosion. We performed coupled stellar evolution and atmospheric modeling of stars with initial masses between 20 M⊙ and 120 M⊙. We found that the 20 M⊙ and 25 M⊙ rotating models, before exploding as SN, have spectra that do not resemble any of the aforementioned classes of massive stars. Rather, they have remarkable similarities with rare, unstable massive stars known as luminous blue variables (LBV). While observations show that some SNe seem to have had LBVs as progenitors, no theoretical model had yet predicted that a star could explode at this stage. Our models provide theoretical support for relatively low-luminosity LBVs exploding as SN in the framework of single stellar evolution. This is a significant shift in paradigm, meaning that a fraction of LBVs could be the end stage of massive star evolution, rather than a transitory evolutionary phase. We suggest that type IIb SN could have LBV as progenitors, and a prime example could be SN 2008ax.

  16. Models of the circumstellar medium of evolving, massive runaway stars moving through the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Mignone, A.; Izzard, R. G.; Kaper, L.

    2014-11-01

    At least 5 per cent of the massive stars are moving supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM) and are expected to produce a stellar wind bow shock. We explore how the mass-loss and space velocity of massive runaway stars affect the morphology of their bow shocks. We run two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations following the evolution of the circumstellar medium of these stars in the Galactic plane from the main sequence to the red supergiant phase. We find that thermal conduction is an important process governing the shape, size and structure of the bow shocks around hot stars, and that they have an optical luminosity mainly produced by forbidden lines, e.g. [O III]. The Hα emission of the bow shocks around hot stars originates from near their contact discontinuity. The Hα emission of bow shocks around cool stars originates from their forward shock, and is too faint to be observed for the bow shocks that we simulate. The emission of optically thin radiation mainly comes from the shocked ISM material. All bow shock models are brighter in the infrared, i.e. the infrared is the most appropriate waveband to search for bow shocks. Our study suggests that the infrared emission comes from near the contact discontinuity for bow shocks of hot stars and from the inner region of shocked wind for bow shocks around cool stars. We predict that, in the Galactic plane, the brightest, i.e. the most easily detectable bow shocks are produced by high-mass stars moving with small space velocities.

  17. The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Smartt, Stephen J; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Gilmore, Gerard F

    2004-01-01

    The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II supernova to one of a helium-rich (hydrogen-deficient) type Ib. The spectral and photometric peculiarities were best explained by models in which the 13-20 solar mass supergiant had lost almost its entire hydrogen envelope to a close binary companion, producing a 'type IIb' supernova, but the hypothetical massive companion stars for this class of supernovae have so far eluded discovery. Here we report photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN1993J ten years after the explosion. At the position of the fading supernova we detect the unambiguous signature of a massive star: the binary companion to the progenitor. PMID:14712269

  18. The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Smartt, Stephen J; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Gilmore, Gerard F

    2004-01-01

    The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II supernova to one of a helium-rich (hydrogen-deficient) type Ib. The spectral and photometric peculiarities were best explained by models in which the 13-20 solar mass supergiant had lost almost its entire hydrogen envelope to a close binary companion, producing a 'type IIb' supernova, but the hypothetical massive companion stars for this class of supernovae have so far eluded discovery. Here we report photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN1993J ten years after the explosion. At the position of the fading supernova we detect the unambiguous signature of a massive star: the binary companion to the progenitor.

  19. Photon Bubbles in Young Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Yorke, H. W.; Socrates, A.; Blaes, O. M.

    2004-12-01

    Spectroscopic studies indicate that gas in the photospheres of young O stars moves at speeds up to the sound speed. We show, using two-dimensional radiation MHD calculations and results from a local linear analysis, that the motions may be due to photon bubble instability if young O stars have magnetic fields.

  20. Magnetic Fields in Massive Stars, Their Winds, and Their Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Rolf; Folini, Doris; Meynet, Georges

    2012-05-01

    Massive stars are crucial building blocks of galaxies and the universe, as production sites of heavy elements and as stirring agents and energy providers through stellar winds and supernovae. The field of magnetic massive stars has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Different perspectives—ranging from direct field measurements over dynamo theory and stellar evolution to colliding winds and the stellar environment—fruitfully combine into a most interesting and still evolving overall picture, which we attempt to review here. Zeeman signatures leave no doubt that at least some O- and early B-type stars have a surface magnetic field. Indirect evidence, especially non-thermal radio emission from colliding winds, suggests many more. The emerging picture for massive stars shows similarities with results from intermediate mass stars, for which much more data are available. Observations are often compatible with a dipole or low order multi-pole field of about 1 kG (O-stars) or 300 G to 30 kG (Ap/Bp stars). Weak and unordered fields have been detected in the O-star ζ Ori A and in Vega, the first normal A-type star with a magnetic field. Theory offers essentially two explanations for the origin of the observed surface fields: fossil fields, particularly for strong and ordered fields, or different dynamo mechanisms, preferentially for less ordered fields. Numerical simulations yield the first concrete stable (fossil) field configuration, but give contradictory results as to whether dynamo action in the radiative envelope of massive main sequence stars is possible. Internal magnetic fields, which may not even show up at the stellar surface, affect stellar evolution as they lead to a more uniform rotation, with more slowly rotating cores and faster surface rotation. Surface metallicities may become enhanced, thus affecting the mass-loss rates.

  1. Massive Stars and Their Possible Impacts in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decressin, Thibaut

    2012-05-01

    Globular clusters exhibit peculiar chemical patterns where Fe and heavy elements abundances stay constant inside a given cluster while light elements (Li to Al) show strong star-to-star variations. This peculiar chemical pattern can be explained by self-pollution of the intracluster gas occurring in the early evolution of clusters. Here I present the possible strong impact of fast rotating massive stars on clusters evolution. First providing they rotate initially fast enough, these stars can reach the break-up velocity during the main sequence and matter will be ejected from the equator at low velocity. Rotation-induced mixing will also bring matter from the convective core to the surface. From this ejected matter loaded in H-burning material a second generation of stars will born. The chemical pattern of these second generation stars are similar to the one observed for stars in globular cluster with abundance anomalies in light elements. Then during the explosion as supernovae the massive stars will also clear the cluster of the remaining gas. One important feature of globular clusters observed today is that 50 to 80% of the low mass stars still evolving in the cluster are second generation starts whereas, with a standard IMF, these stars should be at most 10% of the cluster stars. This strong discrepancy can be solved if the proto-globular clusters were more massive (up to a factor 20-30) and mass-segregated during their formation. In this case a strong loss of first generation stars occupying the outer part of the cluster is possible through the dynamical history of the cluster.

  2. On the onset of secondary stellar generations in giant star-forming regions and massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-10

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ∼ 10{sup 4} K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ∼ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  3. On the Onset of Secondary Stellar Generations in Giant Star-forming Regions and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-01

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ~ 104 K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ~ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  4. Astronomers Gain Important Insight on How Massive Stars Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered key evidence that may help them figure out how very massive stars can form. Young Star Graphic Artist's Conception of Young Star Showing Motions Detected in G24 A1: (1) Infall toward torus, (2) Rotation and (3) outflow. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for larger graphic file (JPEG, 129K) "We think we know how stars like the Sun are formed, but there are major problems in determining how a star 10 times more massive than the Sun can accumulate that much mass. The new observations with the VLA have provided important clues to resolving that mystery," said Maria Teresa Beltran, of the University of Barcelona in Spain. Beltran and other astronomers from Italy and Hawaii studied a young, massive star called G24 A1 about 25,000 light-years from Earth. This object is about 20 times more massive than the Sun. The scientists reported their findings in the September 28 issue of the journal Nature. Stars form when giant interstellar clouds of gas and dust collapse gravitationally, compacting the material into what becomes the star. While astronomers believe they understand this process reasonably well for smaller stars, the theoretical framework ran into a hitch with larger stars. "When a star gets up to about eight times the mass of the Sun, it pours out enough light and other radiation to stop the further infall of material," Beltran explained. "We know there are many stars bigger than that, so the question is, how do they get that much mass?" One idea is that infalling matter forms a disk whirling around the star. With most of the radiation escaping without hitting the disk, material can continue to fall into the star from the disk. According to this model, some material will be flung outward along the rotation axis of the disk into powerful outflows. "If this model is correct, there should be material falling inward, rushing outward and rotating

  5. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  6. The Formation Of Massive Stars And The Effects Of Rotation On Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, A.

    2011-11-01

    We first review the current debates about massive star formation over the last decade. Then we concentrate on the accretion scenario, emphasizing the evidences in favor of it. We study the basic properties of the accretion scenario in the spherical case. In the case of massive stars, the free-fall time is longer than the Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale, so that the massive stars in formation reach thermal equilibrium before the accretion is completed. This is why the history of the accretion rates for massive stars is so critical. We derive analytically the typical accretion rates, their upper and lower limits, showing the importance of dust properties. We examine the basic properties of the disk, their luminosity and temperature in the stationary approximation, as well as their various components. The results of some recent numerical models are discussed with a particular attention to the effects that favor accretion on the central body relatively to the case of spherical accretion. These effects strongly influence the final stellar mass resulting from a collapsing clump in a cloud. We also show some properties of the pre-main sequence tracks of massive stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. During the first part of their evolution up to a mass of about 3M⊙ the forming stars are overluminous, then they are strongly underluminous (with respect to the zero age main sequence) up to a mass of about 10M⊙ until they adjust after a slight overluminosity to the main sequence values. We consider some rotational properties related to star formation. The angular momentum has to be reduced by a factor of about 106 during star formation. Some effects contributing to this reduction have been studied particularly in the case of low- and intermediate-mass stars: disk locking and magnetic braking. We also discuss the case of massive stars and emphasize the effects of the gravity darkening of rotating stars that may favor the accretion from the disk of massive stars in formation.

  7. Massive-Star Magnetospheres: Now in 3-D!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Richard

    Magnetic fields are unexpected in massive stars, due to the absence of a dynamo convection zone beneath their surface layers. Nevertheless, kilogauss-strength, ordered fields were detected in a small subset of these stars over three decades ago, and the intervening years have witnessed the steady expansion of this subset. A distinctive feature of magnetic massive stars is that they harbor magnetospheres --- circumstellar environments where the magnetic field interacts strongly with the star's radiation-driven wind, confining it and channelling it into energetic shocks. A wide range of observational signatures are associated with these magnetospheres, in diagnostics ranging from X-rays all the way through to radio emission. Moreover, these magnetospheres can play an important role in massive-star evolution, by amplifying angular momentum loss in the wind. Recent progress in understanding massive-star magnetospheres has largely been driven by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations. However, these have been restricted to two- dimensional axisymmetric configurations, with three-dimensional configurations possible only in certain special cases. These restrictions are limiting further progress; we therefore propose to develop completely general three-dimensional models for the magnetospheres of massive stars, on the one hand to understand their observational properties and exploit them as plasma-physics laboratories, and on the other to gain a comprehensive understanding of how they influence the evolution of their host star. For weak- and intermediate-field stars, the models will be based on 3-D MHD simulations using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP code. For strong-field stars, we will extend our existing Rigid Field Hydrodynamics (RFHD) code to handle completely arbitrary field topologies. To explore a putative 'photoionization-moderated mass loss' mechanism for massive-star magnetospheres, we will also further develop a photoionization code we have recently

  8. Advanced Spectral Library II: Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Stars are the bright matter of the Universe. Without them, it would be a dull and dreary place indeed: no light, no heavy elements, no planets, no life. It also is safe to say that stellar spectroscopy is a cornerstone of astrophysics, providing much of what we know concerning temperatures and masses of stars, their compositions, planets, and the dynamics and evolution of the galaxies they inhabit. This is especially true for the satellite ultraviolet, owing to the rich collection of atomic and ionic transitions found there. Unfortunately, the archive of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph rarely achieves the high S/N of the best ground-based spectra, and relatively few objects have the full wavelength coverage for which the powerful, highly multiplexed, second generation Hubble instrument was designed. Our aim is to collect STIS UV echelle spectra - comparable in S/N and resolution to the best ground-based material - for a diverse sample of representative stars, to build an Advanced Spectral Library; a foundation for astrophysical exploration: stellar, interstellar, and beyond. Our first effort, in Cycle 18, involved cool stars. Now we turn attention to the hot side of the H-R diagram.Our Treasury program will provide detailed stellar "atlases," based on advanced processing of the STIS echellegrams. Members of our broad collaboration will analyze these data for specific purposes, such as dynamics of O-star mass-loss; detection of rare species in sharp-lined B stars; and properties and kinematics of local interstellar clouds; but public release {based on the "ASTRAL-I" model} will enable many other investigations by a much wider community, for decades to come.

  9. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, C.; Rogers, T. M.

    2015-06-20

    We demonstrate observational evidence for the occurrence of convectively driven internal gravity waves (IGWs) in young massive O-type stars observed with high-precision CoRoT space photometry. This evidence results from a comparison between velocity spectra based on two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of IGWs in a differentially rotating massive star and the observed spectra. We also show that the velocity spectra caused by IGWs may lead to detectable line-profile variability and explain the occurrence of macroturbulence in the observed line profiles of OB stars. Our findings provide predictions that can readily be tested by including a sample of bright, slowly and rapidly rotating OB-type stars in the scientific program of the K2 mission accompanied by high-precision spectroscopy and their confrontation with multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of IGWs for various masses and ages.

  10. Peering to the Heart of Massive Star Birth - V. Highest Priority Massive Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    As part of an on-going, multi-year program to build up a sample of massive and intermediate-mass protostars that are observed across MIR and FIR bands to test theoretical models of massive star formation, we propose to observe about 15 highest priority massive protostar targets with SOFIA-FORCAST with this Regular Program proposal. Especially the unique 37 micron imaging can help reveal thermal emission from outflow cavities and the relative fluxes from the near and far-facing sides probes the amount of dense gas in the immediate vicinity of the protostar. Core Accretion models generally involve larger quantities of such gas than Competitive Accretion models. We will compare observational results against specific predictions of a grid of radiative transfer simulations developed for the Turbulent Core Model of massive star formation.

  11. Chandra Observatory Uncovers Hot Stars In The Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    Cambridge, Mass.--In resolving the hot core of one of the Earth's closest and most massive star-forming regions, the Chandra X-ray Observatory showed that almost all the young stars' temperatures are more extreme than expected. Orion Trapezium JPEG, TIFF, PS The Orion Trapezium as observed on October 31st UT 05:47:21 1999. The colors represent energy, where blue and white indicate very high energies and therefore exterme temperatures. The size of the X-ray source in the image also reflects its brightness, i.e. more bright sources appear larger in size. The is an artifact caused by the limiting blur of the telescope optics. The projected diameter of the field of view is about 80 light days. Credit: NASA/MIT Orion Trapezium JPEG, TIFF, PS The Orion Trapezium as observed on November 24th UT 05:37:54 1999. The colors represent energy, where blue and white indicate very high energies and therefore exterme temperatures. The size of the X-ray source in the image also reflects its brightness, i.e. more bright sources appear larger in size. The is an artifact caused by the limiting blur of the telescope optics. The projected diameter of the field of view is about 80 light days. Credit: NASA/MIT The Orion Trapezium Cluster, only a few hundred thousand years old, offers a prime view into a stellar nursery. Its X-ray sources detected by Chandra include several externally illuminated protoplanetary disks ("proplyds") and several very massive stars, which burn so fast that they will die before the low mass stars even fully mature. One of the major highlights of the Chandra observations are identification of proplyds as X-ray point source in the near vicinity of the most massive star in the Trapezium. Previous observations did not have the ability to separate the contributions of the different objects. "We've seen high temperatures in stars before, but what clearly surprised us was that nearly all the stars we see appear at rather extreme temperatures in X-rays, independent of

  12. Herbig Ae/Be stars - Intermediate-mass stars surrounded by massive circumstellar accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Strom, Stephen E.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Keene, Jocelyn

    1992-01-01

    The proposition that Herbig Ae/Be stars are young intermediate mass stars surrounded by optically thick accretion disks is explored. From a study of 47 such objects, a subset of 30 stars is identified whose spectral energy distributions can be interpreted convincingly in terms of pre-main sequence stars surrounded by massive optically thick circumstellar accretion disks. Constraints on the physical properties of the disks, such as size, mass, accretion rate, lifetime, and radial structure are derived from the photometric data.

  13. Massive Star Formation: Characterising Infall and Outflow in dense cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shaila; Cunningham, Maria; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jones, Paul Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew John

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars are some of the most important objects in the Universe, shaping the evolution of galaxies, creating chemical elements, and hence shaping the evolution of the Universe. However, the processes by which they form, and how they shape their environment during their birth processes, are not well understood. We are using NH3 data from the "The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey" (HOPS) to define the positions of dense cores/clumps of gas in the southern Galactic plane that are likely to form stars. Due to its effective critical density, NH3 can detect massive star forming regions effectively compared to other tracers. We did a comparative study with different methods for finding clumps and found Fellwalker as the best. We found ~ 10% of the star forming clumps with multiple components and ~ 90% clumps with single component along the line of sight. Then, using data from the "The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz" (MALT90) survey, we search for the presence of infall and outflow associated with these cores. We will subsequently use the "3D Molecular Line Radiative Transfer Code" (MOLLIE) to constrain properties of the infall and outflow, such as velocity and mass flow. The aim of the project is to determine how common infall and outflow are in star forming cores, hence providing valuable constraints on the timescales and physical process involved in massive star formation.

  14. Stellar wind models of subluminous hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, J.; Krtičková, I.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Mass-loss rate is one of the most important stellar parameters. Mass loss via stellar winds may influence stellar evolution and modifies stellar spectrum. Stellar winds of subluminous hot stars, especially subdwarfs, have not been studied thoroughly. Aims: We aim to provide mass-loss rates as a function of subdwarf parameters and to apply the formula for individual subdwarfs, to predict the wind terminal velocities, to estimate the influence of the magnetic field and X-ray ionization on the stellar wind, and to study the interaction of subdwarf wind with mass loss from Be and cool companions. Methods: We used our kinetic equilibrium (NLTE) wind models with the radiative force determined from the radiative transfer equation in the comoving frame (CMF) to predict the wind structure of subluminous hot stars. Our models solve stationary hydrodynamical equations, that is the equation of continuity, equation of motion, and energy equation and predict basic wind parameters. Results: We predicted the wind mass-loss rate as a function of stellar parameters, namely the stellar luminosity, effective temperature, and metallicity. The derived wind parameters (mass-loss rates and terminal velocities) agree with the values derived from the observations. The radiative force is not able to accelerate the homogeneous wind for stars with low effective temperatures and high surface gravities. We discussed the properties of winds of individual subdwarfs. The X-ray irradiation may inhibit the flow in binaries with compact components. In binaries with Be components, the winds interact with the disk of the Be star. Conclusions: Stellar winds exist in subluminous stars with low gravities or high effective temperatures. Despite their low mass-loss rates, they are detectable in the ultraviolet spectrum and cause X-ray emission. Subdwarf stars may lose a significant part of their mass during the evolution. The angular momentum loss in magnetic subdwarfs with wind may explain their

  15. Dynamical Models for High-Energy Emission from Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley %FAA(University of Delaware)

    Massive stars are prominent sources of X-rays and gamma-rays detected by both targeted and survey observations from orbiting telescopes like Chandra, XMM/Newton, RXTE, and Fermi. Such high-energy emissions represent key probes of the dynamics of massive-star mass loss, and their penetration through many magnitudes of visible interstellar extinction makes them effective beacons of massive stars in distant reaches of the Galaxy, and in young, active star-forming regions. The project proposed here will develop a comprehensive theoretical framework for interpreting both surveys and targeted observations of high-energy emission from massive stars. It will build on our team's extensive experience in both theoretical models and observational analyses for three key types of emission mechanisms in the stellar wind outflows of these stars, namely: 1) Embedded Wind Shocks (EWS) arising from internal instabilities in the wind driving; 2) shocks in Colliding Wind Binary (CWB) systems; and 3) High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXB) systems with interaction between massive-star wind with a compact companion (neutron star or black hole). Taking advantage of commonalities in the treatment of radiative driving, hydrodynamics, shock heating and cooling, and radiation transport, we will develop radiation hydrodynamical models for the key observational signatures like energy distribution, emission line spectrum, and variability, with an emphasis on how these can be used in affiliated analyses of both surveys like the recent Chandra mapping of the Carina association, and targeted observations of galactic X-ray and gamma-ray sources associated with each of the above specific model types. The promises of new clumping-insensitive diagnostics of mass loss rates, and the connection to mass transfer and binarity, all have broad relevance for understanding the origin, evolution, and fate of massive stars, in concert with elements of NASA's Strategic Subgoal 3D. Building on our team's expertise, the

  16. Hot subdwarf stars in the Galactic halo Tracers of prominent events in late stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Stephan; Kupfer, Thomas; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are the stripped cores of red giants located at the bluest extension of the horizontal branch. They constitute the dominant population of UV-bright stars in old stellar environments and are most likely formed by binary interactions. We perform the first systematic, spectroscopic analysis of a sample of those stars in the Galactic halo based on data from SDSS. In the course of this project we discovered 177 close binary candidates. A significant fraction of the sdB binaries turned out to have close substellar companions, which shows that brown dwarfs and planets can significantly influence late stellar evolution. Close hot subdwarf binaries with massive white dwarf companions on the other hand are good candidates for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae. We discovered a hypervelocity star, which not only turned out to be the fastest unbound star known in our Galaxy, but also the surviving companion of such a supernova explosion.

  17. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES MODULATE THE APPARENT MISALIGNMENT OF EXOPLANETS AROUND HOT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org

    2012-10-10

    We propose that the observed misalignment between extrasolar planets and their hot host stars can be explained by angular momentum transport within the host star. Observations have shown that this misalignment is preferentially around hot stars, which have convective cores and extended radiative envelopes. This situation is amenable to substantial angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves (IGW) generated at the convective-radiative interface. Here, we present numerical simulations of this process and show that IGW can modulate the surface rotation of the star. With these two-dimensional simulations, we show that IGW could explain the retrograde orbits observed in systems such as HAT-P-6 and HAT-P-7. However, extension to high-obliquity objects will await future three-dimensional simulations. We note that these results also imply that individual massive stars should show temporal variations in their v sin i measurements.

  18. An Unstable Truth: How Massive Stars get their Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-08-01

    The pressure exerted by massive stars' radiation fields is an important mechanism regulating their formation. Detailed simulation of massive star formation therefore requires an accurate treatment of radiation. However, all published simulations have either used a diffusion approximation of limited validity; have only been able to simulate a single star fixed in space, thereby suppressing potentially-important instabilities; or did not provide adequate resolution at locations where instabilities may develop. To remedy this we have developed a new, highly accurate radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities, in agreement with previous results using stars capable of moving, but in disagreement with methods where the star is held fixed or with simulations that do not adequately resolve the development of RT instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. Instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. Our results suggest that RT features should be present around accreting massive stars throughout their formation.

  19. On the evolution and explosion of massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, Alessandro

    2008-05-21

    We review our recent progresses on the presupernova evolution of massive stars in the range 11-120 M{sub {center_dot}} of solar metallicity. Special attention will be devoted to the effect of the mass loss rate during the Wolf-Rayet stages in determining the structure and the physical properties of the star prior the supernova explosion. We also discuss the explosive yields and the initial mass-remnant mass relation in the framework of the kinetic bomb induced explosion and hence the contribution of these stars to the global chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  20. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Soeren

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies are often characterized by very high globular cluster specific frequencies, in some cases exceeding that of the Milky Way by a factor of 100 or more. Moreover, the GCs are typically much more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars, so that a substantial fraction (up to 20-25% or more) of all metal-poor stars in some dwarf galaxies are associated with GCs. The metal-poor components of these galaxies thus represent an extreme case of the "specific frequency problem". In this talk I will review the current status of our understanding of GC systems in dwarf galaxies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the implications of the high GC specific frequencies for the amount of mass loss the clusters could have experienced and the constraints this provides on theories for the origin of multiple populations in globular clusters.

  1. The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of Galactic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, N.; Fossati, L.; Langer, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Izzard, R. G.

    2014-10-01

    The distribution of stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram narrates their evolutionary history and directly assesses their properties. Placing stars in this diagram however requires the knowledge of their distances and interstellar extinctions, which are often poorly known for Galactic stars. The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (sHRD) tells similar evolutionary tales, but is independent of distance and extinction measurements. Based on spectroscopically derived effective temperatures and gravities of almost 600 stars, we derive for the first time the observational distribution of Galactic massive stars in the sHRD. While biases and statistical limitations in the data prevent detailed quantitative conclusions at this time, we see several clear qualitative trends. By comparing the observational sHRD with different state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary predictions, we conclude that convective core overshooting may be mass-dependent and, at high mass (≳15 M⊙), stronger than previously thought. Furthermore, we find evidence for an empirical upper limit in the sHRD for stars with Teff between 10 000 and 32 000 K and, a strikingly large number of objects below this line. This over-density may be due to inflation expanding envelopes in massive main-sequence stars near the Eddington limit. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  3. Eta Carinae in the Context of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Damineli, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Eta Car, with its historical outbursts, visible ejecta and massive, variable winds, continues to challenge both observers and modelers. In just the past five years over 100 papers have been published on this fascinating object. We now know it to be a massive binary system with a 5.54-year period. In January 2009, Car underwent one of its periodic low-states, associated with periastron passage of the two massive stars. This event was monitored by an intensive multi-wavelength campaign ranging from -rays to radio. A large amount of data was collected to test a number of evolving models including 3-D models of the massive interacting winds. August 2009 was an excellent time for observers and theorists to come together and review the accumulated studies, as have occurred in four meetings since 1998 devoted to Eta Car. Indeed, Car behaved both predictably and unpredictably during this most recent periastron, spurring timely discussions. Coincidently, WR140 also passed through periastron in early 2009. It, too, is a intensively studied massive interacting binary. Comparison of its properties, as well as the properties of other massive stars, with those of Eta Car is very instructive. These well-known examples of evolved massive binary systems provide many clues as to the fate of the most massive stars. What are the effects of the interacting winds, of individual stellar rotation, and of the circumstellar material on what we see as hypernovae/supernovae? We hope to learn. Topics discussed in this 1.5 day Joint Discussion were: Car: the 2009.0 event: Monitoring campaigns in X-rays, optical, radio, interferometry WR140 and HD5980: similarities and differences to Car LBVs and Eta Carinae: What is the relationship? Massive binary systems, wind interactions and 3-D modeling Shapes of the Homunculus & Little Homunculus: what do we learn about mass ejection? Massive stars: the connection to supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursters Where do we go from here? (future

  4. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram (HRD); extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a low-metallicity galaxy (Z=0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE+STIS+optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C=0.085 solar C and N=0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe. This study was supported in part by grants from NASA's ADP, HST GO-7437, and FUSE B134.

  5. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass-loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the HRD; extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the SMC, a low-metallicity galaxy (Z= 0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE + STIS + optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C = 0.085 solar C and N = 0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe.

  6. Late stages of massive star evolution and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars in the mass range of 8 to 25 M solar mass is reviewed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the gravothermal nature of stars is discussed. Depending on the stellar mass, the stars form three types of cores, namely, non-degenerate, semi-degenerate, and strongly degenerate cores. The evolution for these cases is quite distinct from each other and leads to the three different types of final fate. It is suggested that our helium star model, which is equivalent to a 25 M solar mass star, will form a relatively small mass iron core despite the faster /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O reaction. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  7. Curtain-Lifting Winds Allow Rare Glimpse into Massive Star Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Formation of Exceedingly Luminous and Hot Stars in Young Stellar Cluster Observed Directly Summary Based on a vast observational effort with different telescopes and instruments, ESO-astronomer Dieter Nürnberger has obtained a first glimpse of the very first stages in the formation of heavy stars. These critical phases of stellar evolution are normally hidden from the view, because massive protostars are deeply embedded in their native clouds of dust and gas, impenetrable barriers to observations at all but the longest wavelengths. In particular, no visual or infrared observations have yet "caught" nascent heavy stars in the act and little is therefore known so far about the related processes. Profiting from the cloud-ripping effect of strong stellar winds from adjacent, hot stars in a young stellar cluster at the center of the NGC 3603 complex, several objects located near a giant molecular cloud were found to be bona-fide massive protostars, only about 100,000 years old and still growing. Three of these objects, designated IRS 9A-C, could be studied in more detail. They are very luminous (IRS 9A is about 100,000 times intrinsically brighter than the Sun), massive (more than 10 times the mass of the Sun) and hot (about 20,000 degrees). They are surrounded by relative cold dust (about 0°C), probably partly arranged in disks around these very young objects. Two possible scenarios for the formation of massive stars are currently proposed, by accretion of large amounts of circumstellar material or by collision (coalescence) of protostars of intermediate masses. The new observations favour accretion, i.e. the same process that is active during the formation of stars of smaller masses. PR Photo 16a/03: Stellar cluster and star-forming region NGC 3603. PR Photo 16b/03: Region near very young, massive stars IRS 9A-C in NGC 3603 (8 bands from J to Q). How do massive stars form? This question is easy to pose, but so far very difficult to answer. In fact, the processes

  8. Interferometric Radio Observations of the Interactive Winds of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Diane Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Massive stars have very strong stellar winds which interact with their environment. This work has involved the study of these interactive winds at radio and other wavelengths. Radio observations have been made of the massive runaway star BD+43 3654 and its bow shock which is interacting with the inter-stellar medium. These observations, together with archive data at other wavelengths, have revealed stratified dust and turbulent gas in this interaction zone. Further radio studies have been undertaken of the interaction zones of the colliding winds of massive binary systems. Observations of the colliding wind binary WR 147 at 5GHz have revealed a curved collision zone, suggestive of simple interactive models. Measurements of the flux from the Wolf-Rayet component of this massive binary system has allowed a mass-loss rate to be derived and though the companion O-star is not detected, an upper flux limit has allowed upper limits on the mass-loss rate and limits on the terminal velocity to be inferred. Also revealed is a curious ’bridge’ feature previously observed in WR 147 which occurs between the two binary components. One mechanism is suggested to explain this anomalous feature, the ionising flux of one binary component, the O-star, may be ionising the wind of the other, the WR component. Modelling of the ionisation structure of the stellar winds has been undertaken to verify that this may be occurring. Radio observations of massive stars made at low-frequency have produced detections of WR 147 and the brighter colliding wind binary, WR 146. These detections have allowed modelling of the non-thermal emission in order to deduce where the non-thermal absorption turn-over occurs in these systems. The resultant modelling has illustrated that these colliding wind regions are complex, with multiple absorption regions best describing their nature.

  9. UH cosmic rays: Possible origin in massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.; Schramm, D. N.; Blake, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The origin of the Z greater than 28, ultraheavy, cosmic rays in supernova explosions of massive stars is considered. For Z greater than 70, the UH data is dominated by an r-process source distribution, but for the elements just beyond iron, 29 or = Z less than 36, the data cannot be explained by any single process of nucleosynthesis. This problem is solved naturally in a massive star model by secondary neutron capture reactions occuring during core helium burning and during explosive carbon burning. Interstellar propagation calculations were performed with these episodes of synthesis as source distributions, and the results offer an explanation for the current UH cosmic-ray data. The heavy element synthesis during explosive carbon burning is reexamined using more realistic initial conditions given by the post-helium-burning configuration of the star. Effects of preferential acceleration are considered, and experimental tests are discussed.

  10. Rb and Zr abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report new abundances of Rb and Zr in a sample of massive Galactic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that were previously studied with hydrostatic models by using more realistic dynamical model atmospheres. We use a modified version of the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum, and consider the presence of a circumstellar envelope and a radial wind in the modelling of these Galactic AGB stars. The Rb and Zr are determined from the 7800 Å Rb I resonant line and the 6474 Å ZrO bandhead, respectively, and they are compared with the AGB nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions. The derived Rb abundances are much lower (∼⃒1-2 dex) with the new dynamical models, while the Zr abundances, however, are closer to the hydrostatic values. The new model atmospheres can help to resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions of massive AGB stars.

  11. EQUATION OF STATE FOR MASSIVE NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuya; Saito, Koichi; Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi

    2012-12-15

    Using the relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation, we investigate the properties of neutron-star matter in detail. In the present calculation, we consider not only the tensor coupling of vector mesons to octet baryons and the form factors at interaction vertices but also the change in the internal (quark) structure of baryons in dense matter. The relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations are performed in two ways: one with coupling constants determined by SU(6) (quark model) symmetry and the other with coupling constants based on SU(3) (flavor) symmetry. For the latter case, we use the latest Nijmegen (ESC08) model. Then, it is very remarkable that the particle composition of the core matter in SU(3) symmetry is completely different from that in SU(6) symmetry. In SU(6) symmetry, all octet baryons appear in the density region below {approx}1.2 fm{sup -3}, while in the ESC08 model only the {Xi}{sup -} hyperon is produced. Furthermore, the medium modification of the internal baryon structure hardens the equation of state for the core matter. Taking all these effects into account, we can obtain the maximum neutron-star mass which is consistent with the recently observed mass, 1.97 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun} (PSR J1614-2230). We therefore conclude that the extension from SU(6) symmetry to SU(3) symmetry in meson-baryon couplings and the internal baryon structure variation in matter considerably enhance the mass of neutron stars. Furthermore, the effects of the form factor at the vertex and the Fock contribution, including the tensor coupling due to vector mesons, are indispensable for describing the core matter.

  12. Evolution of massive single stars with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges

    2015-08-01

    After a brief recall of the physics of rotation, we shall discuss how this physics can be implemented in stellar evolution codes and what are the main calibration processes allowing to constrain some poorly known parameters associated with the description of the turbulence. Models with and without magnetic fields will be discussed. Stellar models predictions will be confronted with observed features. Consequences for the origin of various stellar populations, as red and blue supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars, of various types of core collapse supernovae will be presented.

  13. One of the most massive stars in the Galaxy may have formed in isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Steinke, M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sander, A.; Todt, H.; Liermann, A.

    2013-12-01

    Very massive stars, 100 times heavier than the sun, are rare. It is not yet known whether such stars can form in isolation or only in star clusters. The answer to this question is of fundamental importance. The central region of our Galaxy is ideal for investigating very massive stars and clusters located in the same environment. We used archival infrared images to investigate the surroundings of apparently isolated massive stars presently known in the Galactic Centre (GC). We find that two such isolated massive stars display bow shocks and hence may be `runaways' from their birthplace. Thus, some isolated massive stars in the GC region might have been born in star clusters known in this region. However, no bow shock is detected around the isolated star WR 102ka (Peony nebula star), which is one of the most massive and luminous stars in the Galaxy. This star is located at the centre of an associated circumstellar nebula. To study whether a star cluster may be `hidden' in the surroundings of WR 102ka, to obtain new and better spectra of this star, and to measure its radial velocity, we obtained observations with the integral-field spectrograph SINFONI at the ESO's Very Large Telescope. Our observations confirm that WR 102ka is one of the most massive stars in the Galaxy and reveal that this star is not associated with a star cluster. We suggest that WR 102ka has been born in relative isolation, outside of any massive star cluster.

  14. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald; Najarro, Paco; Stolovy, Susan

    2004-09-01

    The most massive star that can form is presently defined by observations of a class of very rare stars having inferred initial masses of ~200 solar masses. There are only a few such stars in the Galaxy, including the Pistol Star, FMM362, and LBV 1806-20, the first two being located near the Galactic center, and third located in the disk near W31. Each has only recently been identified as so massive within the past 10 years through the analysis of infrared observations, but they are otherwise too faint, due to extinction, to observe at shorter wavelengths. These stars appear to be very luminous (L>10^6.3 solar luminosities), "blue" (T>10000 K), and variable (delta K~1 mag.), and the Pistol Star has ejected 10 solar masses of material in the past 10000 years. In addition, these stars have near-infrared spectra similar to those of prototypical Luminous Blue Variables, i.e. Eta Car and AG Car. Given their apparent violation of the Humphries-Davidson limit, they are presumably in a short-lived phase of stellar evolution that is often associated with rapid mass-loss through episodic eruptions of their outer atmospheres. We propose to determine the physical properties of these stars and the velocity and ionization structure in their winds by using spectra obtained with the high resolution modes of the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 10 to 40 micron wavelength region is ideally suited for accessing a variety of lines from transitions of hydrogen, helium, iron, silicon, sulfur, among others; indeed, through our models, we predict that sufficiently sensitive spectra will yield over 300 spectral lines. In addition, we predict that the mid-infrared continuum will be dominated by free-free emission generated in the thick winds associated with these stars, an effect that should be clearly detectable in the spectra.

  15. Dense molecular cocoons in the massive protocluster W3 IRS5: a test case for models of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-S.; Bourke, T. L.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Benz, A. O.; Megeath, S. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Two competing models describe the formation of massive stars in objects like the Orion Trapezium. In the turbulent core accretion model, the resulting stellar masses are directly related to the mass distribution of the cloud condensations. In the competitive accretion model, the gravitational potential of the protocluster captures gas from the surrounding cloud for which the individual cluster members compete. Aims: With high resolution submillimeter observations of the structure, kinematics, and chemistry of the proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5, we aim to determine which mode of star formation dominates. Methods: We present 354 GHz Submillimeter Array observations at resolutions of 1″-3″ (1800-5400 AU) of W3 IRS5. The dust continuum traces the compact source structure and masses of the individual cores, while molecular lines of CS, SO, SO2, HCN, H2CS, HNCO, and CH3OH (and isotopologues) reveal the gas kinematics, density, and temperature. Results: The observations show five emission peaks (SMM1-5). SMM1 and SMM2 contain massive embedded stars (~20 M⊙); SMM3-5 are starless or contain low-mass stars (<8 M⊙). The inferred densities are high, ≥107 cm-3, but the core masses are small, 0.2-0.6 M⊙. The detected molecular emission reveals four different chemical zones. Abundant (X ~ few 10-7 to 10-6) SO and SO2 are associated with SMM1 and SMM2, indicating active sulfur chemistry. A low abundance (5 × 10-8) of CH3OH concentrated on SMM3/4 suggest the presence of a hot core that is only just turning on, possibly by external feedback from SMM1/2. The gas kinematics are complex with contributions from a near pole-on outflow traced by CS, SO, and HCN; rotation in SO2, and a jet in vibrationally excited HCN. Conclusions: The proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5 is an ideal test case to discriminate between models of massive star formation. Either the massive stars accrete locally from their local cores; in this case the small core masses imply that W3 IRS5 is

  16. Circumstellar medium around rotating massive stars at solar metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Walder, Rolf; Folini, Doris; Bykov, Andrei; Marcowith, Alexandre; Favre, Jean M.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: Observations show nebulae around some massive stars but not around others. If observed, their chemical composition is far from homogeneous. Our goal is to put these observational features into the context of the evolution of massive stars and their circumstellar medium (CSM) and, more generally, to quantify the role of massive stars for the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM. Methods: Using the A-MAZE code, we perform 2d-axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of the evolution of the CSM, shaped by stellar winds, for a whole grid of massive stellar models from 15 to 120 M⊙ and following the stellar evolution from the zero-age main-sequence to the time of supernova explosion. In addition to the usual quantities, we also follow five chemical species: H, He, C, N, and O. Results: We show how various quantities evolve as a function of time: size of the bubble, position of the wind termination shock, chemical composition of the bubble, etc. The chemical composition of the bubble changes considerably compared to the initial composition, particularly during the red-supergiant (RSG) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) phases. In some extreme cases, the inner region of the bubble can be completely depleted in hydrogen and nitrogen, and is mainly composed of carbon, helium, and oxygen. We argue why the bubble typically expands at a lower rate than predicted by self-similarity theory. In particular, the size of the bubble is very sensitive to the density of the ISM, decreasing by a factor of ~2.5 for each additional dex in ISM density. The bubble size also decreases with the metallicity of the central star, because low-metallicity stars have weaker winds. Our models qualitatively fit the observations of WR ejecta nebulae.

  17. Tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novikov, I. D.; Pethick, C. J.; Polnarev, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    The processes leading to tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole and the consequences of these processes in a dense stellar cluster are discussed in detail. When the amplitude of a tide and the subsequent oscillations are sufficiently large, the energy deposited in a star after periastron passage and formation of a bound orbit cannot be estimated directly using the linear theory of oscillations of a spherical star, but rather numerical estimates must be used. The evolution of a star after tidal capture is discussed. The maximum ratio R of the cross-section for tidal capture to that for tidal disruption is about 3 for real systems. For the case of a stellar system with an empty capture loss cone, even in the case when the impact parameter for tidal capture only slightly exceeds the impact parameter for direct tidal disruption, tidal capture would be much more important than tidal disruption.

  18. The Origin of Nonradiative Heating/momentum in Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B. (Editor); Michalitsianos, A. G. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The origin of nonradiative heating and momentum in the atmospheres of stars is studied. The similarities and differences between what occurs in the hot stars and what occurs in cool stars are emphasized. Key points in the theory are reviewed. Areas requiring new study are indicated.

  19. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - II. Disruption of bound clusters by photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the dynamical effect of photoionization from O-type stars on star-forming clouds of a range of masses and sizes during the time window before supernovae explode. Our model clouds all have the same degree of turbulent support initially, the ratio of turbulent kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy being set to Ekin/|Epot|= 0.7. We allow the clouds to form stars and study the dynamical effects of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars or clusters born within them. We find that dense filamentary structures and accretion flows limit the quantities of gas that can be ionized, particularly in the higher density clusters. More importantly, the higher escape velocities in our more massive (106 M⊙) clouds prevent the H II regions from sweeping up and expelling significant quantities of gas, so that the most massive clouds are largely dynamically unaffected by ionizing feedback. However, feedback has a profound effect on the lower density 104 and 105 M⊙ clouds in our study, creating vast evacuated bubbles and expelling tens of per cent of the neutral gas in the 3-Myr time-scale before the first supernovae are expected to detonate, resulting in clouds highly porous to both photons and supernova ejecta.

  20. Role of Rotation in Massive Stars in the SMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    We report on an analysis of FUSE+STIS+optical spectra of 17 O-type stars in the SMC. We found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C=0.08 C(sub circle dot) and N=0.03 N(sub circle dot). However, more than half shows NO, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such a high level of N enrichment cannot be reproduced by current evolutionary models accounting for rotationally induced mixing. It suggests that the sum of CNO nuclei may not be conserved, i.e. massive stars might be producing primary nitrogen. It raises questions concerning the sources of nitrogen in the early universe, presently thought to be almost exclusively intermediate-mass stars. It also raises basic questions about the evolution of massive stars in low-metallicity environments, including the precursors to supernovae.

  1. Simulating the Birth of Massive Star Clusters: Is Destruction Inevitable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Very early in its operation, the Hubble Space Telescope {HST} opened an entirely new frontier: study of the demographics and properties of star clusters far beyond the Milky Way. However, interpretation of HST's observations has proven difficult, and has led to the development of two conflicting models. One view is that most massive star clusters are disrupted during their infancy by feedback from newly formed stars {i.e., "infant mortality"}, independent of cluster mass or environment. The other model is that most star clusters survive their infancy and are disrupted later by mass-dependent dynamical processes. Since observations at present have failed to discriminate between these views, we propose a theoretical investigation to provide new insight. We will perform radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive star clusters, including for the first time a realistic treatment of the most important stellar feedback processes. These simulations will elucidate the physics of stellar feedback, and allow us to determine whether cluster disruption is mass-dependent or -independent. We will also use our simulations to search for observational diagnostics that can distinguish bound from unbound clusters, and to predict how cluster disruption affects the cluster luminosity function in a variety of galactic environments.

  2. Astronomers Discover Most Massive Neutron Star Yet Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered the most massive neutron star yet found, a discovery with strong and wide-ranging impacts across several fields of physics and astrophysics. "This neutron star is twice as massive as our Sun. This is surprising, and that much mass means that several theoretical models for the internal composition of neutron stars now are ruled out," said Paul Demorest, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This mass measurement also has implications for our understanding of all matter at extremely high densities and many details of nuclear physics," he added. Neutron stars are the superdense "corpses" of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. With all their mass packed into a sphere the size of a small city, their protons and electrons are crushed together into neutrons. A neutron star can be several times more dense than an atomic nucleus, and a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh more than 500 million tons. This tremendous density makes neutron stars an ideal natural "laboratory" for studying the most dense and exotic states of matter known to physics. The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star. The neutron star is a pulsar, emitting lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as it rotates. This pulsar, called PSR J1614-2230, spins 317 times per second, and the companion completes an orbit in just under nine days. The pair, some 3,000 light-years distant, are in an orbit seen almost exactly edge-on from Earth. That orientation was the key to making the mass measurement. As the orbit carries the white dwarf directly in front of the pulsar, the radio waves from the pulsar that reach Earth must travel very close to the white dwarf. This close passage causes them to be delayed in their arrival by the distortion of

  3. Interaction of massive stars with the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Geus, E. J.

    This paper reviews observations and theory regarding the interaction between massive stars in open clusters and OB associations and the interstellar medium. The results of a systematic study of the gas and dust surrounding a large sample of open clusters are described. Different models for the bubbles blown by stellar winds of O-type stars are discussed, and the effects of subsequent supernova are investigated. The effects of correlated supernovae on the morphology of the interstellar gas and on the communication of the disk with the halo of a galaxy are presented.

  4. Massive star-formation in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Perez-Martinez, S.; Cesarsky, D.

    1999-03-01

    The Trifid nebula is a young galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected using ISO and ground-based telescopes. The sources are massive (17 to 60 0.20em Modot) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense apparently still inactive cores to somewhat more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source which powers an optical jet. these observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation.

  5. HOT GAS LINES IN T TAURI STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Gregory, Scott G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Ingleby, Laura; Bergin, Edwin; Bethell, Thomas; Calvet, Nuria; France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander; Edwards, Suzan; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Yang, Hao; Valenti, Jeff A.; Abgrall, Herve; Alexander, Richard D.; Brown, Joanna M.; Espaillat, Catherine; Hussain, Gaitee; and others

    2013-07-01

    For Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), the resonance doublets of N V, Si IV, and C IV, as well as the He II 1640 A line, trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the accretion process. In this paper we assemble a large high-resolution, high-sensitivity data set of these lines in CTTSs and Weak T Tauri Stars (WTTSs). The sample comprises 35 stars: 1 Herbig Ae star, 28 CTTSs, and 6 WTTSs. We find that the C IV, Si IV, and N V lines in CTTSs all have similar shapes. We decompose the C IV and He II lines into broad and narrow Gaussian components (BC and NC). The most common (50%) C IV line morphology in CTTSs is that of a low-velocity NC together with a redshifted BC. For CTTSs, a strong BC is the result of the accretion process. The contribution fraction of the NC to the C IV line flux in CTTSs increases with accretion rate, from {approx}20% to up to {approx}80%. The velocity centroids of the BCs and NCs are such that V{sub BC} {approx}> 4 V{sub NC}, consistent with the predictions of the accretion shock model, in at most 12 out of 22 CTTSs. We do not find evidence of the post-shock becoming buried in the stellar photosphere due to the pressure of the accretion flow. The He II CTTSs lines are generally symmetric and narrow, with FWHM and redshifts comparable to those of WTTSs. They are less redshifted than the CTTSs C IV lines, by {approx}10 km s{sup -1}. The amount of flux in the BC of the He II line is small compared to that of the C IV line, and we show that this is consistent with models of the pre-shock column emission. Overall, the observations are consistent with the presence of multiple accretion columns with different densities or with accretion models that predict a slow-moving, low-density region in the periphery of the accretion column. For HN Tau A and RW Aur A, most of the C IV line is blueshifted suggesting that the C IV emission is produced by shocks within outflow jets. In our sample, the Herbig Ae star DX Cha is the only object for which we find a

  6. Relativistic stars in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragawa, Taishi; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    We study relativistic stars in the simplest model of the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity which describes the massive graviton without a ghost propagating mode. We consider the hydrostatic equilibrium and obtain the modified Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation and the constraint equation coming from the potential terms in the gravitational action. We give analytical and numerical results for quark and neutron stars and discuss the deviations compared with general relativity and F (R ) gravity. It is shown that the theory under investigation leads to a small deviation from general relativity in terms of density profiles and mass-radius relation. Nevertheless, such a deviation may be observable in future astrophysical probes.

  7. Effects of axions on nucleosynthesis in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Shohei; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effect of axion cooling on nucleosynthesis in a massive star with 16 M⊙ by a standard stellar evolution calculation. We find that axion cooling suppresses nuclear reactions in carbon, oxygen, and silicon burning phases because of the extraction of the energy. As a result, larger amounts of the already synthesized neon and magnesium remain without being consumed to produce further, heavier elements. Even in the case with axion-photon coupling constant ga γ=10-11 GeV-1 , which is six times smaller than the current upper limit, the amount of neon and magnesium that remain just before the core-collapse supernova explosion is considerably larger than the standard value. This implies that we could give a more stringent constraint on ga γ from the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in massive stars.

  8. Hot subdwarfs: Small stars marking important events in stellar evolution. Ludwig Biermann Award Lecture 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.

    2015-06-01

    Hot subdwarfs are considered to be the compact helium cores of red giants which lost almost their entire hydrogen envelope. What causes this enormous mass loss is still unclear. Binary interactions are invoked, and a significant fraction of the hot subdwarf population is indeed found in close binaries. In a large project we search for close binary sdBs with the most and the least massive companions. Significantly enhancing the known sample of close binary sdBs we performed the first comprehensive study of this population. Triggered by the discovery of two sdB binaries with close brown dwarf companions in the course of this project, we were able to show that the interaction of stars with substellar companions is an important channel to form sdB stars. Finally, we discovered a unique and very compact binary system consisting of an sdB and a massive white dwarf which qualifies as a progenitor candidate for a supernova of type Ia. In addition to that, we could connect those explosions to the class of hypervelocity hot subdwarf stars which we consider as the surviving companions of such events. Being the stripped cores of red giants, hot subdwarfs turned out to be important markers of peculiar events in stellar evolution ranging all the way from star-planet interactions to the progenitors of stellar explosions used to measure the expansion of our Universe.

  9. HST/STIS ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COMPONENTS OF THE MASSIVE TRIPLE STAR δ ORI A

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Noel D.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Lindler, Don J.; Gies, Douglas R.; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2015-07-20

    The multiple star system of δ Orionis is one of the closest examples of a system containing a luminous O-type, bright giant star (component Aa1). It is often used as a spectral-type standard and has the highest observed X-ray flux of any hot-star binary. The main component Aa1 is orbited by two lower mass stars, faint Aa2 in a 5.7 day eclipsing binary, and Ab, an astrometric companion with an estimated period of 346 years. Generally the flux from all three stars is recorded in ground-based spectroscopy, and the spectral decomposition of the components has proved difficult. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy of δ Ori A that provides us with spatially separated spectra of Aa and Ab for the first time. We measured radial velocities for Aa1 and Ab in two observations made near the velocity extrema of Aa1. We show tentative evidence for the detection of the Aa2 component in cross-correlation functions of the observed and model spectra. We discuss the appearance of the UV spectra of Aa1 and Ab with reference to model spectra. Both stars have similar effective temperatures, but Ab is fainter and is a rapid rotator. The results will help in the interpretation of ground-based spectroscopy and in understanding the physical and evolutionary parameters of these massive stars.

  10. THE ROLE OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Kagan, Daniel; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil

    2015-01-20

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key to physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Tayler (ST) mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magnetorotational effects can move models of given zero-age main sequence mass across ''boundaries'' from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the rotation of the inner core in general agreement with the observed ''initial'' rotation rates of pulsars. The MRI analysis suggests that localized fields ∼10{sup 12} G may exist at the boundary of the iron core. With both the ST and MRI mechanisms active in the 20 M {sub ☉} model, we find that the helium shell mixes entirely out into the envelope. Enhanced mixing could yield a population of yellow or even blue supergiant supernova progenitors that would not be standard SN IIP.

  11. A BUTTERFLY-SHAPED 'PAPILLON' NEBULA YIELDS SECRETS OF MASSIVE STAR BIRTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope view of a turbulent cauldron of starbirth, called N159, taking place 170,000 light-years away in our satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Torrential stellar winds from hot newborn massive stars within the nebula sculpt ridges, arcs, and filaments in the vast cloud, which is over 150 light-years across. A rare type of compact ionized 'blob' is resolved for the first time to be a butterfly-shaped or 'Papillon' (French for 'butterfly') nebula, buried in the center of the maelstrom of glowing gases and dark dust. The unprecedented details of the structure of the Papillon, itself less than 2 light-years in size (about 2 arcseconds in the sky), are seen in the inset. A possible explanation of this bipolar shape is the outflow of gas from massive stars (over 10 times the mass of our sun) hidden in the central absorption zone. Such stars are so hot that their radiation pressure halts the infall of gas and directs it away from the stars in two opposite directions. Presumably, a dense equatorial disk formed by matter still trying to fall in onto the stars focuses the outstreaming matter into the bipolar directions. This observation is part of a search for young massive stars in the LMC. Rare are the cases where we can see massive stars so early after their birth. The red in this true-color image is from the emission of hydrogen and the yellow from high excitation ionized oxygen. The picture was taken on September 5, 1998 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The Hubble observations of the Papillon nebula were conducted by the European astronomers Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory, France) and co-investigators Michael Rosa (Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility, European Southern Observatory, Germany), Vassilis Charmandaris (Paris Observatory), Lise Deharveng (Marseille Observatory, France), and Hans Zinnecker (Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam, Germany). Their work is submitted for publication in the European

  12. Preface: X-ray emission from hot stars and their winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of highly sensitive X-ray observatories, X-ray astrophysics has become a versatile tool to study highly energetic processes in a wide variety of astrophysical contexts. Hot stars are no exception to this rule. Indeed, X-rays provide an important observational window for studies of such stars. Observations obtained with modern X-ray telescopes over the last decade and a half have revolutionized our understanding of hot stars and their winds. X-ray spectroscopy, time monitoring, and imaging allow us to probe stellar atmospheres, magnetospheres, stellar winds and give us new insight into their impact on the interstellar medium and the galactic ecology. While some questions about X-ray emission from massive stars have been answered, many unexpected findings point out that our picture of stellar winds is not yet complete. The new theories and models of X-ray emission from hot stars were developed in parallel or, sometimes, ahead of the arrival of the new data. This special issue is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge of X-ray emission from hot stars as well as at opening new avenues for investigation in anticipation of the next generation of X-ray telescopes.

  13. The role of massive stars in young starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Richard Paul Furber

    Starburst galaxies are defined as those galaxies undergoing violent star formation over relatively short periods of time (10 to 100 Myr). These objects may form stellar populations of > 106 Msun, containing massive stars with masses > 100 Msun. Although most starburst galaxies are observed at relatively low redshift, recent evidence suggests that these types of galaxies were far more important in the high redshift past. It is believed that the chemical evolution of the Universe has been strongly influenced by this mode of star formation through the dense winds from massive stars and supernovae ejecta. Our understanding of starbursts is still relatively poor, since most are too distant to be resolved. We can gain some understanding of starbursts indirectly through the modelling of associated nebulae via the calculation of theoretical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and photoionization modelling. This technique heavily relies upon the accuracy of the predicted far UV continuum of the massive star population. This thesis presents a new grid of SEDs for O stars, early B supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars which have been incorporated into the evolutionary synthesis code Starburst99 (Leitherer et al. 1999). A total of 285 expanding, non-LTE, line-blanketed model atmospheres have been calculated to replace old, inaccurate LTE models for O stars, and pure helium, unblanketed models for W-R stars. These new grids cover five metallicities and the wind parameters are scaled with metallicity. We find that the new models yield significantly less ionizing flux below the He 0 ionizing edge at early phases and as a consequence, nebular He II lambda4686 will not be observable in young starbursts. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to test the accuracy of the predicted ionizing fluxes from our new models. We find that they are in much better agreement with observed optical and IR nebular line diagnostics than any previous models. The new W-R atmospheres are used in

  14. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nazé, Yaël; Petit, Véronique; Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan; Cohen, David; Ud-Doula, Asif; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  15. Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Clouds in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Kris; Doty, S.; Krumholz, M.

    2011-01-01

    The process of massive star formation is not well understood. Recent work in large scale radiation hydrodynamical simulations have strongly suggested that radiation pressure can play an important role in opening cavities through which energy can be released, thus avoiding the problems of high radiation pressure supressing massive star formation. As a result, this pressure valve allows for the direct accretion of matter, and formation of massive stars. While these models include significant microphysics, it is important that predictions be made that allow the models to be compared with observations. Toward that end, we have undertaken a study of the chemistry in one of these collapsing cloud models. The chemical model involves the application of a large gas-phase and grain surface chemistry to the dynamical structure, including the effects of density, temperature, and radiation field. We present maps of H2, CO, and other molecular abundances as functions of space and time, as well as consider the resulting observational consequences of these results.

  16. Kinematics of a Massive Star Cluster in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    We propose to measure the proper motion stellar kinematics of a massive (~10^4Msun), forming proto-star-cluster to test basic theoretical models of formation. This will be the first time such a measurement has been performed. It requires HST-WFC3/IR and is beyond the practical capabilities of ground-based adaptive optics (AO) observations. In contrast to previously-studied massive, young (<10 Myr-old), already-formed clusters, such as NGC3603, Westerlund 1 or the Arches, our target protocluster, G286.21+0.17 (hereafter G286), is still gas-dominated and undergoing active star formation. It has been carefully selected from a complete survey of ~300 dense molecular gas clumps in a 120 sq. deg. region of the Galactic plane. The cluster is also relatively nearby (~2.5 kpc), but not too close that it would span a prohibitively large angular area or suffer from significant saturation problems. Such massive systems are rare and indeed we are unaware of any equivalent, early-stage (i.e., gas dominated) cluster that is closer. Given the depth of its gravitational potential based on its mass and size, the expected proper motions of many independent sub-clusters of stars are detectable at the ~5 sigma level over a 2-year baseline and global contraction of the cluster can be seen if it is happening even at just ~10% of the free-fall rate.

  17. Young and intermediate-age massive star clusters.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren S

    2010-02-28

    An overview of our current understanding of the formation and evolution of star clusters is given, with the main emphasis on high-mass clusters. Clusters form deeply embedded within dense clouds of molecular gas. Left-over gas is cleared within a few million years and, depending on the efficiency of star formation, the clusters may disperse almost immediately or remain gravitationally bound. Current evidence suggests that a small percentage of star formation occurs in clusters that remain bound, although it is not yet clear whether this fraction is truly universal. Internal two-body relaxation and external shocks will lead to further, gradual dissolution on time scales of up to a few hundred million years for low-mass open clusters in the Milky Way, while the most massive clusters (>10(5) M(o)) have lifetimes comparable to or exceeding the age of the Universe. The low-mass end of the initial cluster mass function is well approximated by a power-law distribution, dN/dM proportional to M(-2), but there is mounting evidence that quiescent spiral discs form relatively few clusters with masses M > 2 x 10(5) M(o). In starburst galaxies and old globular cluster systems, this limit appears to be higher, at least several x10(6) M(o). The difference is likely related to the higher gas densities and pressures in starburst galaxies, which allow denser, more massive giant molecular clouds to form. Low-mass clusters may thus trace star formation quite universally, while the more long-lived, massive clusters appear to form preferentially in the context of violent star formation.

  18. Young and intermediate-age massive star clusters.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren S

    2010-02-28

    An overview of our current understanding of the formation and evolution of star clusters is given, with the main emphasis on high-mass clusters. Clusters form deeply embedded within dense clouds of molecular gas. Left-over gas is cleared within a few million years and, depending on the efficiency of star formation, the clusters may disperse almost immediately or remain gravitationally bound. Current evidence suggests that a small percentage of star formation occurs in clusters that remain bound, although it is not yet clear whether this fraction is truly universal. Internal two-body relaxation and external shocks will lead to further, gradual dissolution on time scales of up to a few hundred million years for low-mass open clusters in the Milky Way, while the most massive clusters (>10(5) M(o)) have lifetimes comparable to or exceeding the age of the Universe. The low-mass end of the initial cluster mass function is well approximated by a power-law distribution, dN/dM proportional to M(-2), but there is mounting evidence that quiescent spiral discs form relatively few clusters with masses M > 2 x 10(5) M(o). In starburst galaxies and old globular cluster systems, this limit appears to be higher, at least several x10(6) M(o). The difference is likely related to the higher gas densities and pressures in starburst galaxies, which allow denser, more massive giant molecular clouds to form. Low-mass clusters may thus trace star formation quite universally, while the more long-lived, massive clusters appear to form preferentially in the context of violent star formation. PMID:20083510

  19. THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS OMNIBUS X-RAY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Povich, Matthew S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the Massive Star-forming Regions (MSFRs) Omnibus X-ray Catalog (MOXC), a compendium of X-ray point sources from Chandra/ACIS observations of a selection of MSFRs across the Galaxy, plus 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. MOXC consists of 20,623 X-ray point sources from 12 MSFRs with distances ranging from 1.7 kpc to 50 kpc. Additionally, we show the morphology of the unresolved X-ray emission that remains after the cataloged X-ray point sources are excised from the ACIS data, in the context of Spitzer and WISE observations that trace the bubbles, ionization fronts, and photon-dominated regions that characterize MSFRs. In previous work, we have found that this unresolved X-ray emission is dominated by hot plasma from massive star wind shocks. This diffuse X-ray emission is found in every MOXC MSFR, clearly demonstrating that massive star feedback (and the several-million-degree plasmas that it generates) is an integral component of MSFR physics.

  20. Colliding Winds in Massive Binaries Involving Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Bartzakos, Peter

    1996-12-01

    Wolf-Rayet stars are notorious for their very strong, hot winds. Their presence in binary systems can therefore lead to strong wind collisions, that manifest themselves as well-defined, phase-dependent distortions of the spectral lines. Turning this around, profile variations can be used to determine properties of the wind collision, as well as the winds and even the orbit itself. We review the present situation regarding colliding winds for WR stars in WR + O, WR + WR, and WR + c systems.

  1. Fallback and Black Hole Production in Massive Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; Woosley, S.E.; Heger, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz /Los Alamos

    2007-01-08

    The compact remnants of core collapse supernovae--neutron stars and black holes--have properties that reflect both the structure of their stellar progenitors and the physics of the explosion. In particular, the masses of these remnants are sensitive to the density structure of the presupernova star and to the explosion energy. To a considerable extent, the final mass is determined by the ''fallback'', during the explosion, of matter that initially moves outwards, yet ultimately fails to escape. We consider here the simulated explosion of a large number of massive stars (10 to 100 M{sub {circle_dot}}) of Population I (solar metallicity) and III (zero metallicity), and find systematic differences in the remnant mass distributions. As pointed out by Chevalier (1989), supernovae in more compact progenitor stars have stronger reverse shocks and experience more fallback. For Population III stars above about 25 M{sub {circle_dot}} and explosion energies less than 1.5 x 10{sup 51} erg, black holes are a common outcome, with masses that increase monotonically with increasing main sequence mass up to a maximum hole mass of about 35 M{sub {circle_dot}}. If such stars produce primary nitrogen, however, their black holes are systematically smaller. For modern supernovae with nearly solar metallicity, black hole production is much less frequent and the typical masses, which depend sensitively on explosion energy, are smaller. We explore the neutron star initial mass function for both populations and, for reasonable assumptions about the initial mass cut of the explosion, find good agreement with the average of observed masses of neutron stars in binaries. We also find evidence for a bimodal distribution of neutron star masses with a spike around 1.2 M{sub {circle_dot}} (gravitational mass) and a broader distribution peaked around 1.4 M{sub {circle_dot}}.

  2. Nucleosynthesis of Short-lived Radioactivities in Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.

    2004-01-01

    A leading model for the source of many of the short-lived radioactivities in the early solar nebula is direct incorporation from a massive star [1]. A recent and promising incarnation of this model includes an injection mass cut, which is a boundary between the stellar ejecta that become incorporated into the solar cloud and those ejecta that do not [2-4]. This model also includes a delay time between ejection from the star and incorporation into early solar system solid bodies. While largely successful, this model requires further validation and comparison against data. Such evaluation becomes easier if we have a better sense of the nature of the synthesis of the various radioactivities in the star. That is the goal of this brief abstract.

  3. Massive stars and expanding shells within the violent interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David Allan

    Massive stars have a tremendous impact on their surroundings, largely due to a prodigious production rate of Lyman continuum photons and their inevitable termination in a supernova explosion. A single OB star may ionize a sufficiently luminous HII region to remain detectable out to distances of many Mpc. By concentrating the mechanical power of many high mass stars in a limited volume over a short time period, OB associations are known to produce large expanding bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM). Aperture synthesis observations of HI in nearby galaxies clearly reveal the bubbly character of the diffuse ISM and highlight the connection with massive stars. In this dissertation I close the loop between theory and observations regarding massive stars, their incipient HII regions, and related expanding shells, all in the hope of learning more about the diffuse ISM. The research described herein has three main components: (1)object recognition in the context of HI datacubes and hydrodynamic shell models, (2)automated photometry of HII regions in crowded narrowband images, and (3)population synthesis modeling of stellar clusters and expanding shells in disk galaxies. I have created efficient procedures for conducting a census of HI superbubbles and young massive star clusters in nearby galaxies, plus a modeling framework allowing one to check these databases for relative agreement. My population synthesis algorithm predicts ensemble characteristics: of a disk-galaxy shell population, given details of the stellar cluster formation process and global properties of the galaxy in question. My automated HI object recognition method has made possible the Las Cruces/Dwingeloo Supershell Survey (LCDSS) of 21 nearby disk galaxies. In this dissertation I present early LCDSS results for NGC 300, NGC 2403, M81, and M101. Furthermore, I demonstrate the technique for photometry of HII regions by analyzing a small sample of 11 prominent spirals. The photometric measurements are

  4. Massive star formation by accretion. I. Disc accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Massive stars likely form by accretion and the evolutionary track of an accreting forming star corresponds to what is called the birthline in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The shape of this birthline is quite sensitive to the evolution of the entropy in the accreting star. Aims: We first study the reasons why some birthlines published in past years present different behaviours for a given accretion rate. We then revisit the question of the accretion rate, which allows us to understand the distribution of the observed pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) stars in the HR diagram. Finally, we identify the conditions needed to obtain a large inflation of the star along its pre-MS evolution that may push the birthline towards the Hayashi line in the upper part of the HR diagram. Methods: We present new pre-MS models including accretion at various rates and for different initial structures of the accreting core. We compare them with previously published equivalent models. From the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram, we deduce the accretion law that best matches the accretion history of most of the intermediate-mass stars. Results: In the numerical computation of the time derivative of the entropy, some treatment leads to an artificial loss of entropy and thus reduces the inflation that the accreting star undergoes along the birthline. In the case of cold disc accretion, the existence of a significant swelling during the accretion phase, which leads to radii ≳ 100 R⊙ and brings the star back to the red part of the HR diagram, depends sensitively on the initial conditions. For an accretion rate of 10-3M⊙ yr-1, only models starting from a core with a significant radiative region evolve back to the red part of the HR diagram. We also obtain that, in order to reproduce the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram with an accretion law deduced from the observed mass outflows in ultra-compact HII regions, the fraction of the

  5. Mass loss from evolved massive stars: self-consistent modeling of the wind and photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.

    2007-03-01

    This work analyzes the mass loss phenomenon in evolved massive stars through self-consistent modeling of the wind and photosphere of such stars, using the radiative transfer code CMFGEN. In the first part, fundamental physical parameters of Wolf-Rayet stars of spectral types WN3-w (WR 46 e WR 152) and WN6-s (WR 136) were obtained. The results clearly indicate that hydrogen is present on the surface of those stars in a considerable fraction, defying current evolutionary models. For both WN subtypes, significant difference between the physical parameters obtained here and in previous works were noticed. The 20-year evolution of the luminous blue variable (LBV) AG Carinae was analyzed in detail in the second part of this work. The results indicate unexpected changes in the current paradigm of massive star evolution during the S Dor cycle. In this work, the high rotational velocity obtained during the hot phases, and the transition between the bistability regimes of line-driven winds were detected for the first time in LBVs. Those results need to be considered in future analysis of such massive stars. This Thesis also presents a pioneering study about the impact of the time variability effects on the analysis of the winds of LBVs. The results achieved here are valid for the whole LBV class, and show that the mass-loss rates derived from Hα and radio free-free emission are affected by time-dependent effects. The mass-loss rate evolution during the S Dor cycle, derived using time-dependent models, implies that LBV eruptions begin well before the maximum in the visual lightcurve during this phase. The analysis of the full S Dor cycle of AG Car rule out that the S Dor variability is caused exclusively by an expanding pseudo-photosphere. The AG Car hydrostatic radius was found to vary by a factor of six between cool and hot phases, while the bolometric luminosity is 50% higher during the hot phase. Both results provide observational contraints for the physical mechanism

  6. Influence of X-ray radiation on the hot star wind ionization state and on the radiative force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří; Kubát, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Hot stars emit large amounts of X-rays, which are assumed to originate in the supersonic stellar wind. Part of the emitted X-rays is subsequently absorbed in the wind and influences its ionization state. Because hot star winds are driven radiatively, the modified ionization equilibrium affects the radiative force. We review the recent progress in modeling the influence of X-rays on the radiative equilibrium and on the radiative force. We focus particularly on single stars with X-rays produced in wind shocks and on binaries with massive components, which belong to the most luminous objects in X-rays.

  7. Rayleigh scattering in the atmospheres of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišák, J.; Krtička, J.; Munzar, D.; Kubát, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Rayleigh scattering is a result of an interaction of photons with bound electrons. Rayleigh scattering is mostly neglected in calculations of hot star model atmospheres because most of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and the heavier elements have a lower abundance than hydrogen. In atmospheres of some chemically peculiar stars, helium overabundant regions containing singly ionized helium are present and Rayleigh scattering can be a significant opacity source. Aims: We evaluate the contribution of Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen and singly ionized helium in the atmospheres of hot stars with solar composition and in the atmospheres of helium overabundant stars. Methods: We computed several series of model atmospheres using the TLUSTY code and emergent fluxes using the SYNSPEC code. These models describe atmospheres of main sequence B-type stars with different helium abundance. We used an existing grid of models for atmospheres with solar chemical composition and we calculated an additional grid for helium-rich stars with N(He)/N(H) = 10. Results: Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen can be neglected in atmospheres of hot stars, while Rayleigh scattering by singly ionized helium can be a non-negligible opacity source in some hot stars, especially in helium-rich stars.

  8. Are many hot subdwarf stars hidden in binaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Richard

    The Palomar-Green (PG) survey of UV-excess objects yielded an abundant harvest of hot subdwarf (sdO/sdB) stars. Based on visual and near IR (2MASS) colors, about one-third of these are binary (composite colors). Many additional candidate PG stars that might also be hot subdwarfs in binaries were rejected from the final PG catalog, because the Ca II K line appears in their spectra; this line was interpreted to mean that the candidates are cool metal-poor stars (sdF) with low UV line-blocking, so they were U-B color-selected for the wrong reason. An alternate explanation is that these objects are additional composite-spectrum binaries consisting of a hot subdwarf and a main sequence (A or F) star. Optical data alone cannot easily distinguish between these possibilities. A recent theory of binary sdB formation channels predicts that many sdB+A/F systems exist undiscovered, and the rejected PG stars are pointed to as a specific example of where they might be found. With a targeted archival study using GALEX imaging data to search for radiation from a hot star, we can learn whether or not these rejected objects from the PG survey are in fact mostly sdB binaries, with consequences for the origin and numbers of hot evolved stars.

  9. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2016-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary hot Jupiters remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for the production of hot Jupiters is planet-planet interactions, which produce them from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event, occurring in ˜1% of star cluster planetary systems. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters’ orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32b, HAT-P-2b, HD 80606b, and GJ 876d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters, then our simulations predict that these very hot inner planets are often accompanied by much more distant gas giants in highly eccentric orbits.

  10. Scanner observations of hot helium-carbon stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, T.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Photoelectric spectral scans at 20 A resolution of four hot helium-carbon-rich stars have been reduced to fluxes and are presented in graphical form. Similar flux curves for several normal (hydrogen-rich) stars in the same temperature range are presented for comparison.

  11. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  12. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - III. Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We extend our previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range 104-106 M⊙ with initial virial ratios Ekin/Epot = 2.3, allow them to form stars and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3 Myr time-scale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fraction of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while low-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this time-scale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.

  13. Lithium and zirconium abundances in massive Galactic O-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; D'Antona, F.; Lub, J.; Habing, H.

    2007-02-01

    Lithium and zirconium abundances (the latter taken as representative of s-process enrichment) are determined for a large sample of massive Galactic O-rich AGB stars, for which high-resolution optical spectroscopy has been obtained (R˜ 40 000{-}50 000). This was done by computing synthetic spectra based on classical hydrostatic model atmospheres for cool stars and using extensive line lists. The results are discussed in the framework of "hot bottom burning" (HBB) and nucleosynthesis models. The complete sample is studied for various observational properties such as the position of the stars in the IRAS two-colour diagram ([ 12] - [25] vs. [ 25] - [60] ), Galactic distribution, expansion velocity (derived from the OH maser emission), and period of variability (when available). We conclude that a considerable fraction of these sources are actually massive AGB stars (M>3{-}4 M⊙) experiencing HBB, as deduced from the strong Li overabundances we found. A comparison of our results with similar studies carried out in the past for the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) reveals that, in contrast to MC AGB stars, our Galactic sample does not show any indication of s-process element enrichment. The differences observed are explained as a consequence of metallicity effects. Finally, we discuss the results obtained in the framework of stellar evolution by comparing our results with the data available in the literature for Galactic post-AGB stars and PNe. Based on observations at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Also based on observations with the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile). Tables [see full text]-[see full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Submillimeter Array Observations Toward the Massive Star-forming Core MM1 of W75N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Su, Y.-N.; Chen, H.-R.; Liu, S.-Y.; Yan, C.-H.; Kim, S.-J.

    2010-11-01

    The massive star-forming core MM1 of W75N was observed using the Submillimeter Array with ~1'' and 2'' spatial resolutions at 217 and 347 GHz, respectively. From the 217 GHz continuum we found that the MM1 core consists of two sources, separated by about 1'': MM1a (~0.6 M sun) and MM1b (~1.4 M sun), located near the radio continuum sources VLA 2/VLA 3 and VLA 1, respectively. Within MM1b, two gas clumps were found to be expanding away from VLA 1 at about ±3 km s-1, as a result of the most recent star formation activity in the region. Observed molecular lines show emission peaks at two positions, MM1a and MM1b: sulfur-bearing species have emission peaks toward MM1a, but methanol and saturated species at MM1b. We identified high-temperature (~200 K) gas toward MM1a and the hot core in MM1b. This segregation may result from the evolution of the massive star-forming core. In the very early phase of star formation, the hot core is seen through the evaporation of dust ice-mantle species. As the mantle species are consumed via evaporation the high-temperature gas species (such as the sulfur-bearing molecules) become bright. The SiO molecule is unique in having an emission peak exactly at the VLA 2 position, probably tracing a shock powered by VLA 2. The observed sulfur-bearing species show similar abundances both in MM1a and MM1b, whereas the methanol and saturated species show significant abundance enhancement toward MM1b, by about an order of magnitude, compared to MM1a.

  15. Induced massive star formation in the trifid nebula?

    PubMed

    Cernicharo; Lefloch; Cox; Cesarsky; Esteban; Yusef-Zadeh; Mendez; Acosta-Pulido; Garcia Lopez RJ; Heras

    1998-10-16

    The Trifid nebula is a young (10(5) years) galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected with the infrared space observatory. The sources are massive (17 to 60 solar masses) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense, apparently still inactive cores to more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source that powers an optical jet. These observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation in the Trifid nebula. PMID:9774270

  16. The evolution of rotating very massive stars with LMC composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, K.; Langer, N.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S. E.; Crowther, P. A.; Evans, C. J.; Gräfener, G.; Sana, H.; Sanyal, D.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Context. With growing evidence for the existence of very massive stars at subsolar metallicity, there is an increased need for corresponding stellar evolution models. Aims: We present a dense model grid with a tailored input chemical composition appropriate for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Methods: We use a one-dimensional hydrodynamic stellar evolution code, which accounts for rotation, transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields, and stellar wind mass loss to compute our detailed models. We calculate stellar evolution models with initial masses from 70 to 500 M⊙ and with initial surface rotational velocities from 0 to 550 km s-1, covering the core-hydrogen burning phase of evolution. Results: We find our rapid rotators to be strongly influenced by rotationally induced mixing of helium, with quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution occurring for the fastest rotating models. Above 160 M⊙, homogeneous evolution is also established through mass loss, producing pure helium stars at core hydrogen exhaustion independent of the initial rotation rate. Surface nitrogen enrichment is also found for slower rotators, even for stars that lose only a small fraction of their initial mass. For models above ~150 M⊙ at zero age, and for models in the whole considered mass range later on, we find a considerable envelope inflation due to the proximity of these models to their Eddington limit. This leads to a maximum ZAMS surface temperature of ~56 000 K, at ~180 M⊙, and to an evolution of stars in the mass range 50 M⊙...100 M⊙ to the regime of luminous blue variables in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with high internal Eddington factors. Inflation also leads to decreasing surface temperatures during the chemically homogeneous evolution of stars above ~180 M⊙. Conclusions: The cool surface temperatures due to the envelope inflation in our models lead to an enhanced mass loss, which prevents stars at LMC metallicity from evolving into pair-instability supernovae

  17. How Very Massive Metal Free Stars Start Cosmological Reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2007-11-07

    The initial conditions and relevant physics for the formation of the earliest galaxies are well specified in the concordance cosmology. Using ab initio cosmological Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement radiation hydrodynamical calculations, we discuss how very massive stars start the process of cosmological reionization. The models include non-equilibrium primordial gas chemistry and cooling processes and accurate radiation transport in the Case B approximation using adaptively ray traced photon packages, retaining the time derivative in the transport equation. Supernova feedback is modeled by thermal explosions triggered at parsec scales. All calculations resolve the local Jeans length by at least 16 grid cells at all times and as such cover a spatial dynamic range of {approx}10{sup 6}. These first sources of reionization are highly intermittent and anisotropic and first photoionize the small scales voids surrounding the halos they form in, rather than the dense filaments they are! embedded in. As the merging objects form larger, dwarf sized galaxies, the escape fraction of UV radiation decreases and the H II regions only break out on some sides of the galaxies making them even more anisotropic. In three cases, SN blast waves induce star formation in overdense regions that were formed earlier from ionization front instabilities. These stars form tens of parsecs away from the center of their parent DM halo. Approximately 5 ionizing photons are needed per sustained ionization when star formation in 10{sup 6} M{sub {circle_dot}} halos are dominant in the calculation. As the halos become larger than {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub {circle_dot}}, the ionizing photon escape fraction decreases, which in turn increases the number of photons per ionization to 15--50, in calculations with stellar feedback only. Supernova feedback in these more massive halos creates a more diffuse medium, allowing the stellar radiation to escape more easily and maintaining the ratio of 5 ionizing

  18. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2015-02-20

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass.

  19. Massive stars on the verge of exploding: the properties of oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramper, F.; Straal, S. M.; Sanyal, D.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.; Gräfener, G.; Langer, N.; Vink, J. S.; de Mink, S. E.; Kaper, L.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet (WO) stars are a very rare stage in the evolution of massive stars. Their spectra show strong emission lines of helium-burning products, in particular highly ionized carbon and oxygen. The properties of WO stars can be used to provide unique constraints on the (post-)helium burning evolution of massive stars, and their remaining lifetimes and the expected properties of their supernovae. Aims: We aim to homogeneously analyze the currently known presumed-single WO stars to obtain the key stellar and outflow properties and to constrain their evolutionary state. Methods: We use the line-blanketed non-local thermal equilibrium atmosphere code cmfgen to model the X-Shooter spectra of the WO stars and to deduce the atmospheric parameters. We calculate dedicated evolutionary models to determine the evolutionary state of the stars. Results: The WO stars have extremely high temperatures that range from 150 kK to 210 kK, and very low surface helium mass fractions that range from 44% down to 14%. Their properties can be reproduced by evolutionary models with helium zero-age main sequence masses of MHe,ini = 15-25 M⊙ that exhibit a fairly strong (a few times 10-5M⊙ yr-1), homogeneous (fc> 0.3) stellar wind. Conclusions: WO stars represent the final evolutionary stage of stars with estimated initial masses of Mini = 40-60 M⊙. They are post core-helium burning and predicted to explode as type Ic supernovae within a few thousand years. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory under program IDs 091.C-0934 and 093.D-0591.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Properties of massive stars in four clusters of the VVV survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.; Martins, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Bouret, J.-C.; Borissova, J.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Lácteá (VVV)" discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars. We present an analysis of massive stars in four of these new clusters. Our aim is to provide constraints on stellar evolution and to better understand the relation between different types of massive stars. We use the radiative transfer code CMFGEN to analyse K-band spectra of twelve stars with spectral types ranging from O and B to WN and WC. We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the Wolf-Rayet stars are more luminous or hotter than the O stars. From the log(C/N)-log(C/He) diagram, we show quantitatively that WN stars are more chemically evolved than O stars, WC stars being more evolved than WN stars. Mass loss rates among Wolf-Rayet stars are a factor of 10 larger than for O stars, in agreement with previous findings.

  1. The Hottest Horizontal-Branch Stars in Omega Centauri: Late Hot Flasher vs. Helium Enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moehler, S.; Dreizler, S.; Lanz, T.; Bono, G.; Sweigart, A V.; Calamida, A.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.

    2007-01-01

    UV observations of some massive globular clusters uncovered a significant population of very hot stars below the hot end of the horizontal branch (HB), the so-called blue hook stars. This feature might be explained either by the late hot flasher scenario here stars experience the helium flash while on the white dwarf cooling curve or by the helium-rich sub-population recently postulated to exist in some clusters. Spectroscopic analyses of blue hook stars in omega Cen and NGC 2808 support the late hot flasher scenario, but the stars contain much less helium than expected and the predicted C, N enrichment could not be verified from existing data. We want to determine effective temperatures, surface gravities and abundances of He, C, N in blue hook and canonical extreme horizontal branch (EHB) star candidates. Moderately high resolution spectra of stars at the hot end of the blue horizontal branch in the globular cluster omega Cen were analysed for atmospheric parameters (T(sub eff), log g) and abundances using LTE and Non-LTE model atmospheres. In the temperature range 30,000 K to 50,000 K we find that 37% of our stars are helium-poor (log nHe/nH less than -2), 49% have solar helium abundance within a factor of 3 (-1.5 less than or equal to log nHe/nH less than or equal to -0.5) and 14% are helium rich (log nHe/nH greater than -0.4). We also find carbon enrichment in step with helium enrichment, with a maximum carbon enrichment of 3% by mass. At least 30% of the hottest HB stars in omega Centauri show helium abundances well above the predictions from the helium enrichment scenario (Y = 0.42 corresponding to log nHe/nH approximately equal to -0.74). In addition the most helium-rich stars show strong carbon enrichment as predicted by the late hot flasher scenario. We conclude that the helium-rich HB stars in omega Cen cannot be explained solely by the helium-enrichment scenario invoked to explain the blue main sequence.

  2. Observations of hot stars and eclipsing binaries with FRESIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gies, Douglas R.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP project offers an unprecedented opportunity to study pulsations in hot stars (which vary on time scales of a day) over a several year period. The photometric data will determine what frequencies are present, how or if the amplitudes change with time, and whether there is a connection between pulsation and mass loss episodes. It would initiate a new field of asteroseismology studies of hot star interiors. A search should be made for selected hot stars for inclusion in the list of project targets. Many of the primary solar mass targets will be eclipsing binaries, and I present estimates of their frequency and typical light curves. The photometric data combined with follow up spectroscopy and interferometric observations will provide fundamental data on these stars. The data will provide definitive information on the mass ratio distribution of solar-mass binaries (including the incidence of brown dwarf companions) and on the incidence of planets in binary systems.

  3. A minimum column density of 1 g cm(-2) for massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Mark R; McKee, Christopher F

    2008-02-28

    Massive stars are very rare, but their extreme luminosities make them both the only type of young star we can observe in distant galaxies and the dominant energy sources in the Universe today. They form rarely because efficient radiative cooling keeps most star--forming gas clouds close to isothermal as they collapse, and this favours fragmentation into stars of one solar mass or lower. Heating of a cloud by accreting low-mass stars within it can prevent fragmentation and allow formation of massive stars, but the necessary properties for a cloud to form massive stars-and therefore where massive stars form in a galaxy--have not yet been determined. Here we show that only clouds with column densities of at least 1 g cm(-2) can avoid fragmentation and form massive stars. This threshold, and the environmental variation of the stellar initial mass function that it implies, naturally explain the characteristic column densities associated with massive star clusters and the difference between the radial profiles of Halpha and ultraviolet emission in galactic disks. The existence of a threshold also implies that the initial mass function should show detectable variation with environment within the Galaxy, that the characteristic column densities of clusters containing massive stars should vary between galaxies, and that star formation rates in some galactic environments may have been systematically underestimated.

  4. Massive Star Formation in a Gravitationally-Lensed H II Galaxy at z = 3.357

    SciTech Connect

    Villar-Martin, M; Stern, D; Hook, R N; Rosati, P; Lombardi, M; Humphrey, A; Fosbury, R; Stanford, S A; Holden, B P

    2004-03-02

    The Lynx arc, with a redshift of 3.357, was discovered during spectroscopic follow-up of the z = 0.570 cluster RX J0848+4456 from the ROSAT Deep Cluster Survey. The arc is characterized by a very red R - K color and strong, narrow emission lines. Analysis of HST WFPC 2 imaging and Keck optical and infrared spectroscopy shows that the arc is an H II galaxy magnified by a factor of {approx} 10 by a complex cluster environment. The high intrinsic luminosity, the emission line spectrum, the absorption components seen in Ly{alpha} and C IV, and the restframe ultraviolet continuum are all consistent with a simple H II region model containing {approx} 10{sup 6} hot O stars. The best fit parameters for this model imply a very hot ionizing continuum (T{sub BB} {approx} 80, 000 K), high ionization parameter (log U {approx} -1), and low nebular metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} 0.05). The narrowness of the emission lines requires a low mass-to-light ratio for the ionizing stars, suggestive of an extremely low metallicity stellar cluster. The apparent overabundance of silicon in the nebula could indicate enrichment by past pair instability supernovae, requiring stars more massive than {approx}140M{sub {circle_dot}}.

  5. Combining magnetic and seismic studies to constrain processes in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, Coralie; Degroote, Pieter; Coste, Blanche; Briquet, Maryline; Mathis, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    The presence of pulsations influences the local parameters at the surface of massive stars and thus it modifies the Zeeman magnetic signatures. Therefore it makes the characterisation of a magnetic field in pulsating stars more difficult and the characterisation of pulsations is thus required for the study of magnetic massive stars. Conversely, the presence of a magnetic field can inhibit differential rotation and mixing in massive stars and thus provides important constraints for seismic modelling based on pulsation studies. As a consequence, it is necessary to combine spectropolarimetric and seismic studies for all massive classical pulsators. Below we show examples of such combined studies and the interplay between physical processes.

  6. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  7. The role of low-mass star clusters in forming the massive stars in DR 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the young low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar population associated with the massive star-forming region DR 21 by using archival X-ray Chandra observations and by complementing them with existing optical and infrared (IR) surveys. The Chandra observations have revealed for the first time a new highly extincted population of PMS low-mass stars previously missed in observations at other wavelengths. The X-ray population exhibits three main stellar density peaks, coincident with the massive star-forming regions, being the DR 21 core the main peak. The cross-correlated X-ray/IR sample exhibits a radial `Spokes-like' stellar filamentary structure that extends from the DR 21 core towards the northeast. The near-IR data reveal a centrally peaked structure for the extinction, which exhibits its maximum in the DR 21 core and gradually decreases with the distance to the N-S cloud axis and to the cluster centre. We find evidence of a global mass segregation in the full low-mass stellar cluster, and of a stellar age segregation, with the youngest stars still embedded in the N-S cloud, and more evolved stars more spatially distributed. The results are consistent with the scenario where an elongated overall potential well created by the full low-mass stellar cluster funnels gas through filaments feeding stellar formation. Besides the full gravitational well, smaller scale local potential wells created by dense stellar sub-clusters of low-mass stars are privileged in the competition for the gas of the common reservoir, allowing the formation of massive stars. We also discuss the possibility that a stellar collision in the very dense stellar cluster revealed by Chandra in the DR 21 core is the origin of the large-scale and highly energetic outflow arising from this region.

  8. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2005-07-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources ``Hot excess'' YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early protostars are

  9. Mass Loss and Pre-SN Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N.

    2010-06-01

    I review the role that mass loss plays in the pre-SN evolution of massive stars in a variety of different scenarios, and what observable effect it may have on the resulting SN. The amount of mass lost, its speed, and how soon before core collapse the material is removed can have a dramatic effect on the resulting SN light curve and spectrum. Massive stars trek across the HR diagram as they evolve, and the SN can look very different depending on where along this path core collapse occurs; it may not depend solely on initial mass. The most extreme pre-SN mass ejections in massive luminous blue variables (LBVs) have recently (and surprisingly) been linked to the very luminous Type IIn supernovae with circumstellar interaction that dominates the spectrum and enhances the visual luminosity. In some cases these objects require strong LBV-like shell ejections in the decades immediately before a SN. Strong winds or episodic mass loss of luminous red supergiants (RSGs) and yellow hypergiants may also lead to less extreme Type IIn events. Post-RSG blue supergiants like SN 1987A's progenitor and lower-luminosity LBVs like HD 168625 are also candidates for Type II SNe with visible circumstellar material. Finally, progenitors that successfully shed their H envelopes (either through LBV eruptions, strong winds, or binary mass transfer) die as Type Ib or Ic supernovae, and some of these also show evidence for immediate pre-SN shell ejections. Many of the potential progenitors of Types Ib, Ic, IIn, IIb, and II-L overlap in their range of probable initial mass, and I will point to some open questions about how they fit together in the context of stellar evolution, and the roles of mass loss and initial mass in determining their relative rates.

  10. How Very Massive Metal-Free Stars Start Cosmological Reionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The initial conditions and relevant physics for the formation of the earliest galaxies are well specified in the concordance cosmology. Using ab initio cosmological Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement radiation hydrodynamical calculations, we discuss how very massive stars start the process of cosmological reionization. The models include nonequilibrium primordial gas chemistry and cooling processes and accurate radiation transport in the case B approximation using adaptively ray-traced photon packages, retaining the time derivative in the transport equation. Supernova feedback is modeled by thermal explosions triggered at parsec scales. All calculations resolve the local Jeans length by at least 16 grid cells at all times and as such cover a spatial dynamic range of approx.10(exp 6). These first sources of reionization are highly intermittent and anisotropic and first photoionize the small-scale voids surrounding the halos they form in, rather than the dense filaments they are embedded in. As the merging objects form larger, dwarf-sized galaxies, the escape fraction of UV radiation decreases and the H II regions only break out on some sides of the galaxies, making them even more anisotropic. In three cases, SN blast waves induce star formation in overdense regions that were formed earlier from ionization front instabilities. These stars form tens of parsecs away from the center of their parent DM halo. Approximately five ionizing photons are needed per sustained ionization when star formation in 10(exp 6) stellar Mass halos is dominant in the calculation. As the halos become larger than approx.10(exp 7) Stellar Mass, the ionizing photon escape fraction decreases, which in turn increases the number of photons per ionization to 15-50, in calculations with stellar feedback only. Radiative feedback decreases clumping factors by 25% when compared to simulations without star formation and increases the average temperature of ionized gas to values between 3000 and 10,000 K.

  11. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  12. The chemical composition of Galactic ring nebulae around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Morisset, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep spectra of ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-type stars: NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58, S 308, NGC 7635 and RCW 52. The data have been taken with the 10m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6.5m Clay Telescope. We extract spectra of several apertures in some of the objects. We derive C2+ and O2+ abundances from faint recombination lines in NGC 6888 and NGC 7635, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios and estimate the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) of O2+. The ADFs are larger than the typical ones of normal H II regions but similar to those found in the ionized gas of star-forming dwarf galaxies. We find that chemical abundances are rather homogeneous in the nebulae where we have spectra of several apertures: NGC 6888, NGC 7635 and G2.4+1.4. We obtain very high values of electron temperature in a peripheral zone of NGC 6888, finding that shock excitation can reproduce its spectral properties. We find that all the objects associated with WR stars show N enrichment. Some of them also show He enrichment and O deficiency as well as a lower Ne/O than expected, this may indicate the strong action of the ON and NeNa cycles. We have compared the chemical composition of NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58 and S 308 with the nucleosynthesis predicted by stellar evolution models of massive stars. We find that non-rotational models of stars of initial masses between 25 and 40 M⊙ seem to reproduce the observed abundance ratios of most of the nebulae.

  13. Massive Young Star Clusters in M33: Stochastic Star Formation Ruled Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2014-09-01

    It is widely accepted that the distribution function of the masses of young star clusters is universal and can be purely interpreted as a probability density distribution function with a constant upper mass limit. As a result of this picture, the masses of the most massive objects would be exclusively determined by the size of the sample. Conversely we show, with very high confidence, that the masses of the most massive young (< 10 Myr) star clusters in the flocculent galaxy M33 decrease with increasing galactocentric radius, in contradiction with a constant shape and upper mass limit of the cluster mass function. Moreover, by comparing the radial distributions of gas surface densities and highest cluster masses, we find that M_{max} ∝ Σ_{gas, total}^{3.8 ± 0.3}, M_{max} ∝ Σ_{H_2}^{1.2± 0.1} and M_{max} ∝ Σ_{SFR}^{0.9 ± 0.1}. Hence, in M33 we can rule out stochastic star formation. The change of the maximum cluster mass there must be due to physical causes, i.e., very massive star clusters may require special physical conditions, like high gas surface densities, in order to form.

  14. Massive star formation within the Leo 'primordial' ring.

    PubMed

    Thilker, David A; Donovan, Jennifer; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Boissier, Samuel; de Paz, Armando Gil; Madore, Barry F; Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark

    2009-02-19

    Few intergalactic, plausibly primordial clouds of neutral atomic hydrogen (H(i)) have been found in the local Universe, suggesting that such structures have either dispersed, become ionized or produced a stellar population on gigayear timescales. The Leo ring, a massive (M(H(i)) approximately 1.8 x 10(9)M[symbol: see text], M[symbol: see text] denoting the solar mass), 200-kpc-wide structure orbiting the galaxies M105 and NGC 3384 with a 4-Gyr period, is a candidate primordial cloud. Despite repeated atttempts, it has previously been seen only from H i emission, suggesting the absence of a stellar population. Here we report the detection of ultraviolet light from gaseous substructures of the Leo ring, which we attribute to recent massive star formation. The ultraviolet colour of the detected complexes is blue, implying the onset of a burst of star formation or continuous star formation of moderate (approximately 10(8)-yr) duration. Measured ultraviolet-visible photometry favours models with low metallicity (Z approximately Z[symbol: see text]/50-Z[symbol: see text]/5, Z[symbol: see text] denoting the solar metallicity), that is, a low proportion of elements heavier than helium, although spectroscopic confirmation is needed. We speculate that the complexes are dwarf galaxies observed during their formation, but distinguished by their lack of a dark matter component. In this regard, they resemble tidal dwarf galaxies, although without the enrichment preceding tidal stripping. If structures like the Leo ring were common in the early Universe, they may have produced a large, yet undetected, population of faint, metal-poor, halo-lacking dwarf galaxies.

  15. Feedback from quasars in star-forming galaxies and the triggering of massive galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Pierluigi; Fontanot, Fabio

    2005-05-01

    The shining of quasars is a likely trigger of massive galactic winds, able to remove most interstellar medium (ISM) from a star-forming spheroid. However, the mechanism responsible for the deposition of energy into the ISM is still unclear. Starting from a model for feedback in galaxy formation with a two-phase medium (Monaco), we propose that the perturbation induced by radiative heating from a quasar on the ISM triggers a critical change of feedback regime. In the feedback model, supernova remnants (SNRs) expanding in the hot and pressurized phase of a star-forming spheroid typically become pressure confined before the hot interior gas is able to cool. In the presence of runaway radiative heating by a quasar, a mass flow from the cold to the hot phase develops; whenever this evaporation flow is significant with respect to the star formation rate, owing to the increased density of the hot phase the SNRs reach the point where their interior gas cools before being confined, forming a thick cold shell. We show that in this case the consequent drop in pressure leads quickly to the percolation of all the shells and to the formation of a super shell of cold gas that sweeps the whole galaxy. Radiation pressure is then very effective in removing such a shell from the galaxy. This self-limiting mechanism leads to a correlation between black hole and bulge masses for more massive bulges than 1010 Msolar. The insertion of a motivated wind trigger criterion in a hierarchical galaxy formation model shows, however, that winds are not necessary to obtain a good black hole-bulge correlation. In the absence of winds, good results are obtained if the mechanism responsible for the creation of a reservoir of low-angular momentum gas (able to accrete on to the black hole) deposits mass at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. Using a novel galaxy formation model, we show under which conditions black hole masses are self-limited by the wind mechanism described above, and

  16. The Very Massive Star Content of the Nuclear Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Calzetti, D.; Sidoli, F.

    2016-05-01

    The blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a very young starburst containing twin nuclear star clusters, separated by a projected distance of 5 pc. One cluster (#5) coincides with the peak of the Hα emission and the other (#11) with a massive ultracompact H ii region. A recent analysis of these clusters shows that they have a photometric age of 1 ± 1 Myr, in apparent contradiction with the age of 3-5 Myr inferred from the presence of Wolf-Rayet features in the cluster #5 spectrum. We examine Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of #5 and show that the stellar features arise from very massive stars (VMSs), with masses greater than 100 M ⊙, at an age of 1-2 Myr. We further show that the very high ionizing flux from the nuclear clusters can only be explained if VMSs are present. We investigate the origin of the observed nitrogen enrichment in the circumcluster ionized gas and find that the excess N can be produced by massive rotating stars within the first 1 Myr. We find similarities between the NGC 5253 cluster spectrum and those of metal-poor, high-redshift galaxies. We discuss the presence of VMSs in young, star-forming galaxies at high redshift; these should be detected in rest-frame UV spectra to be obtained with the James Webb Space Telescope. We emphasize that population synthesis models with upper mass cutoffs greater than 100 M ⊙ are crucial for future studies of young massive star clusters at all redshifts.

  17. The Very Massive Star Content of the Nuclear Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Calzetti, D.; Sidoli, F.

    2016-05-01

    The blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a very young starburst containing twin nuclear star clusters, separated by a projected distance of 5 pc. One cluster (#5) coincides with the peak of the Hα emission and the other (#11) with a massive ultracompact H ii region. A recent analysis of these clusters shows that they have a photometric age of 1 ± 1 Myr, in apparent contradiction with the age of 3–5 Myr inferred from the presence of Wolf-Rayet features in the cluster #5 spectrum. We examine Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of #5 and show that the stellar features arise from very massive stars (VMSs), with masses greater than 100 M ⊙, at an age of 1–2 Myr. We further show that the very high ionizing flux from the nuclear clusters can only be explained if VMSs are present. We investigate the origin of the observed nitrogen enrichment in the circumcluster ionized gas and find that the excess N can be produced by massive rotating stars within the first 1 Myr. We find similarities between the NGC 5253 cluster spectrum and those of metal-poor, high-redshift galaxies. We discuss the presence of VMSs in young, star-forming galaxies at high redshift; these should be detected in rest-frame UV spectra to be obtained with the James Webb Space Telescope. We emphasize that population synthesis models with upper mass cutoffs greater than 100 M ⊙ are crucial for future studies of young massive star clusters at all redshifts.

  18. Imprints of recoiling massive black holes on the hot gas of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devecchi, B.; Rasia, E.; Dotti, M.; Volonteri, M.; Colpi, M.

    2009-04-01

    Anisotropic gravitational radiation from a coalescing black hole (BH) binary is known to impart recoil velocities of up to ~1000kms-1 to the remnant BH. In this context, we study the motion of a recoiling BH inside a galaxy modelled as a Hernquist sphere, and the signature that the hole imprints on the hot gas, using N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Ejection of the BH results in a sudden expansion of the gas ending with the formation of a gaseous core, similarly to what is seen for the stars. A cometary tail of particles bound to the BH is initially released along its trail. As the BH moves on a return orbit, a nearly spherical swarm of hot gaseous particles forms at every apocentre: this feature can live up to ~108 years. If the recoil velocity exceeds the sound speed initially, the BH shocks the gas in the form of a Mach cone in density near each supersonic pericentric passage. We find that the X-ray fingerprint of a recoiling BH can be detected in Chandra X-ray maps out to a distance of Virgo. For exceptionally massive BHs, the Mach cone and the wakes can be observed out to a few hundred of milliparsec. The detection of the Mach cone is of twofold importance as it can be a probe of high-velocity recoils, and an assessment of the scatter of the MBH - Mbulge relation at large BH masses.

  19. A Hidden Population of Hot Subdwarf Stars in Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Richard A.; Clausen, Drew R.; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Stark, M. A.; Walentosky, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Observations to date preferentially find Galactic hot subdwarf (sdB/sdO) stars in binaries when the subdwarfs are more luminous than their relatively faint companions (G/K/M dwarfs, white dwarfs). As suggested by Han et al. [1], this selection bias may distort our perspective of the evolutionary channels that form hot subdwarfs in the galactic disk. A predicted and possibly more numerous population of binaries features a lower-mass, lower-luminosity, longer-lived hot subdwarf hiding in the glare from its companion: the subdwarf+A/early F binaries. Such systems may arise when mass transfer is initiated in the Hertzsprung gap; the A/F companion in some cases was ``created'' from a lower-mass star (i.e., it would be a blue straggler if seen in a cluster). A survey is underway at Penn State to identify hot subdwarfs paired with F stars, determine their properties, and establish their space density. The project makes use of ground and space archival data to identify these systems (from their UV excesses) and new spectroscopic observations to determine their orbital periods and other properties. Successful characterization of this group of close binaries should help to challenge, calibrate, or refine models of binary star evolution that are used in population synthesis studies, including the relative importance of the RLOF and common-envelope channels for the formation of hot subdwarfs. The motivation, methodology, and status of this search for hidden hot subdwarfs are presented in this contribution.

  20. Resolved photometry of extragalactic young massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, S. S.; de Mink, S. E.; Eldridge, J. J.; Langer, N.; Bastian, N.; Seth, A.; Smith, L. J.; Brodie, J.; Efremov, Yu. N.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: We present colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young massive star clusters in several galaxies located well beyond the Local Group. The richness of these clusters allows us to obtain large samples of post-main sequence stars and test how well the observed CMDs are reproduced by canonical stellar isochrones. Methods: We use imaging of seven clusters in the galaxies NGC 1313, NGC 1569, NGC 1705, NGC 5236 and NGC 7793 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and carry out PSF-fitting photometry of individual stars in the clusters. The clusters have ages in the range ~(5-50) × 106 years and masses of ~105 M⊙-106 M⊙. Although crowding prevents us from obtaining photometry in the inner regions of the clusters, we are still able to measure up to 30-100 supergiant stars in each of the richest clusters. The resulting CMDs and luminosity functions are compared with photometry of artificially generated clusters, designed to reproduce the photometric errors and completeness as realistically as possible. Results: In agreement with previous studies, our CMDs show no clear gap between the H-burning main sequence and the He-burning supergiant stars, contrary to predictions by common stellar isochrones. In general, the isochrones also fail to match the observed number ratios of red-to-blue supergiant stars, although the difficulty of separating blue supergiants from the main sequence complicates this comparison. In several cases we observe a large spread (1-2 mag) in the luminosities of the supergiant stars that cannot be accounted for by observational errors. We find that this spread can be reproduced by including an age spread of ~(10-30) × 106 years in the models. However, age spreads cannot fully account for the observed morphology of the CMDs and other processes, such as the evolution of interacting binary stars, may also play a role. Conclusions: Colour-magnitude diagrams can be successfully obtained for massive star

  1. Instabilities in the Envelopes and Winds of Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.

    The high luminosity of Very Massive Stars (VMS) means that radiative forces play an important, dynamical role both in the structure and stability of their stellar envelope, and in driving strong stellar-wind mass loss. Focusing on the interplay of radiative flux and opacity, with emphasis on key distinctions between continuum vs. line opacity, this chapter reviews instabilities in the envelopes and winds of VMS. Specifically, we discuss how: (1) the iron opacity bump can induce an extensive inflation of the stellar envelope; (2) the density dependence of mean opacity leads to strange mode instabilities in the outer envelope; (3) desaturation of line-opacity by acceleration of near-surface layers initiates and sustains a line-driven stellar wind outflow; (4) an associated line-deshadowing instability leads to extensive small-scale structure in the outer regions of such line-driven winds; (5) a star with super-Eddington luminosity can develop extensive atmospheric structure from photon bubble instabilities, or from stagnation of flow that exceeds the "photon tiring" limit; (6) the associated porosity leads to a reduction in opacity that can regulate the extreme mass loss of such continuum-driven winds. Two overall themes are the potential links of such instabilities to Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars, and the potential role of radiation forces in establishing the upper mass limit of VMS.

  2. HST/STIS Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Components of the Massive Triple Star δ Ori A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Lindler, Don J.; Gies, Douglas R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Chené, André-Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    The multiple star system of δ Orionis is one of the closest examples of a system containing a luminous O-type, bright giant star (component Aa1). It is often used as a spectral-type standard and has the highest observed X-ray flux of any hot-star binary. The main component Aa1 is orbited by two lower mass stars, faint Aa2 in a 5.7 day eclipsing binary, and Ab, an astrometric companion with an estimated period of 346 years. Generally the flux from all three stars is recorded in ground-based spectroscopy, and the spectral decomposition of the components has proved difficult. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy of δ Ori A that provides us with spatially separated spectra of Aa and Ab for the first time. We measured radial velocities for Aa1 and Ab in two observations made near the velocity extrema of Aa1. We show tentative evidence for the detection of the Aa2 component in cross-correlation functions of the observed and model spectra. We discuss the appearance of the UV spectra of Aa1 and Ab with reference to model spectra. Both stars have similar effective temperatures, but Ab is fainter and is a rapid rotator. The results will help in the interpretation of ground-based spectroscopy and in understanding the physical and evolutionary parameters of these massive stars. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13450.

  3. Spectacular Spitzer Images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a Young, Massive-Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, William T.; Lefloch, Bertrand; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2006-06-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, highlighting the nebula's special evolutionary stage. The images feature recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stellar objects, and a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed, and unveil large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. Multiple protostars are detected in the infrared, within the cold dust cores of TC3 and TC4, which were previously defined as Class 0. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~160 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify them into different evolutionary stages. The diagram also revealed a unique group of YSOs that are bright at 24 μm but have the spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8 μm. Despite expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars. The mid-infrared emission of the protostars can be fit by two temperatures of 150 and 400 K; the hot core region is probably optically thin in the mid-infrared regime, and the size of hot core is much smaller than that of the cold envelope. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive star in the TC3 cluster is located at the center of the cluster and at the bottom of the gravitational potential well.

  4. The Blob, the Very Rare Massive Star and the Two Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    The nebula N214 [1] is a large region of gas and dust located in a remote part of our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. N214 is a quite remarkable site where massive stars are forming. In particular, its main component, N214C (also named NGC 2103 or DEM 293), is of special interest since it hosts a very rare massive star, known as Sk-71 51 [2] and belonging to a peculiar class with only a dozen known members in the whole sky. N214C thus provides an excellent opportunity for studying the formation site of such stars. Using ESO's 3.5-m New Technology telescope (NTT) located at La Silla (Chile) and the SuSI2 and EMMI instruments, astronomers from France and the USA [3] studied in great depth this unusual region by taking the highest resolution images so far as well as a series of spectra of the most prominent objects present. N214C is a complex of ionised hot gas, a so-called H II region [4], spreading over 170 by 125 light-years (see ESO PR Photo 12b/05). At the centre of the nebula lies Sk-71 51, the region's brightest and hottest star. At a distance of ~12 light-years north of Sk-71 51 runs a long arc of highly compressed gas created by the strong stellar wind of the star. There are a dozen less bright stars scattered across the nebula and mainly around Sk-71 51. Moreover, several fine, filamentary structures and fine pillars are visible. The green colour in the composite image, which covers the bulk of the N214C region, comes from doubly ionised oxygen atoms [5] and indicates that the nebula must be extremely hot over a very large extent. The Star Sk-71 51 decomposed ESO PR Photo 12c/05 ESO PR Photo 12c/05 The Cluster Around Sk-71 51 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 620 pix - 189k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1239 pix - 528k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 12c/05 shows a small field around the hot star Sk-71 51 as seen through the V filter. The left image shows a single frame after subtraction of the nebular background. The image quality - or seeing - is roughly 8.5 pixels

  5. COLLAPSE OF MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH RADIATION TRANSFER: FORMATION OF MASSIVE STARS BY ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Daza-Montero, Judith; De Felice, Fernando

    2009-12-20

    Most early radiative transfer calculations of protostellar collapse have suggested an upper limit of approx40 M{sub sun} for the final stellar mass before radiation pressure can exceed the star's gravitational pull and halt the accretion. Here we perform further collapse calculations, using frequency-dependent radiation transfer coupled to a frequency-dependent dust model that includes amorphous carbon particles, silicates, and ice-coated silicates. The models start from pressure-bounded, logatropic spheres of mass between 5 M{sub sun} and 150 M{sub sun} with an initial nonsingular density profile. We find that in a logatrope the infall is never reversed by the radiative forces on the dust and that stars with masses approx>100 M{sub sun} may form by continued accretion. Compared to previous models that start the collapse with a rho propor to r{sup -2} density configuration, our calculations result in higher accretion times and lower average accretion rates with peak values of approx5.8 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The radii and bolometric luminosities of the produced massive stars (approx>90 M{sub sun}) are in good agreement with the figures reported for detected stars with initial masses in excess of 100 M{sub sun}. The spectral energy distribution from the stellar photosphere reproduces the observed fluxes for hot molecular cores with peaks of emission from mid- to near-infrared.

  6. The growth of massive stars via stellar collisions in ensemble star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2013-04-01

    Recent simulations and observations suggest that star clusters form via the assembling of smaller subclusters. Because of their short relaxation time, subclusters experience core collapse much earlier than virialized solo clusters, which have similar properties of the merger remnant of the assembling clusters. As a consequence, it seems that the assembling clusters result in efficient multiple collisions of stars in the cluster core. We performed a series of N-body simulations of ensemble and solitary clusters including stellar collisions and found that the efficiency of multiple collisions between stars is suppressed if subclusters assemble after they experience core collapse individually. In this case, subclusters form their own multiple collision stars which experienced a few collisions, but they fail to collide with each other after their host subclusters assemble. The multiple collision stars scatter each other and escape, and furthermore the central density of the remnant clusters had already been depleted for the stars to experience more collisions. On the other hand, if subclusters assemble before they experience core collapse, the multiple collisions of stars proceed efficiently in the remnant cluster, and the collision products are more massive than virialized solo clusters and comparable in mass to cold solo clusters.

  7. Massive stars and miniature robots: today's research and tomorrow's technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, William David

    2013-03-01

    This thesis documents the reduction of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) data set, whilst also describing the analysis for one of the serendipitous discoveries: the massive binary R139. This high-mass binary will provide an excellent future calibration point for stellar models, in part as it seems to defy certain expectations about its evolution. Out with the VFTS, a search for binary companions around a trio of B-type supergiants is presented. These stars are surrounded by nebulae that closely resemble the triple-ring structure associated with the poorly-understood SN1987A. Do these stars share a similar evolutionary fate? While strong evidence is found for periodic pulsations in one of the stars, there appears to be no indication of a short-period binary companion suggested in the literature. Gathering observations from a wide range of environments builds a fuller picture of massive stars, but the samples remain somewhat limited. The coming generation of extremely large telescopes will open new regions for studies like the VFTS. Fully utilising these remarkable telescopes will require many new technologies, and this thesis presents one such development project. For adaptive-optics corrected, multi-object instruments it will be necessary to position small pick-off mirrors in the telescope¿s focal plane to select the sub-fields on the sky. This could be most efficiently achieved if the mirrors were self-propelled, which has led to a miniature robot project called MAPS - the Micro Autonomous Positioning System. A number of robots have been built with a footprint of only 30 x 30mm. These wirelessly-controlled robots draw their power from the floor on which they operate and have shown the potential to be positioned to an accuracy of tens of microns. This thesis details much of the early design work and testing of the robots, and also the development of the camera imaging system used to determine the position of the robots. The MAPS project is ongoing and a

  8. Modeling and analysing massive star spectra: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Todt, Helge; Sander, Andreas; Hainich, Rainer; Shenar, Tomer; Oskinova, Lidia

    2013-06-01

    Depending on their mass-loss rate, the spectra of massive stars are more or less formed in the expanding parts of their atmosphere, i.e. in the stellar wind. Over decades we have developed a sophisticated non-LTE code for modeling such spectra adequately. Originally, the "Potsdam WR PoWR" code aimed at Wolf-Rayet stars with their emission-line dominated spectra. Meanwhile we have added a more detailed treatment of the lower, nearly static parts of the atmosphere, including pressure broadening of lines. This extends the applicability of the models to spectra showing both, photospheric absorption lines and stellar wind features, e.g. from O and B-type stars. The ionizing effect of X-rays, which are intrinsically produced in stellar winds, can be taken into account. Instead of a one-temperature plasma, a power-law distribution of the X-ray emission measure can be chosen and gives the best fit of the EUV spectral energy distribution. The effect of rotation on the emergent spectrum can be simulated under suitable assumptions on the angular motions in the wind. When clumping is accounted for in the approximation of optically thin structures, this leads to a reduction of empirical mass-loss rates when determined from recombination lines. A more general, but not fully consistent formalism has been incorporated to account for the effect of "macroclumping" on resonance lines. PoWR calculations were also combined with a 3-D Monte Carlo code for resonance line scattering in a structured stellar wind. A formalism has been developed to establish the hydrodynamically consistent solution for radiation-driven winds, including all multiple-scattering effects that are essential e.g. for WR stars, but this branch of the code is not ready yet for routinely use. PoWR models have been used extensively for analyzing WR stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, and for a couple of OB-type stars and LBVs. An increasing number of models is made available via internet.

  9. Rotational Signatures of Disks in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallscheer, Cassandra L.; Beuther, H.; Zhang, Q.; Sridharan, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    We have obtained multiple data sets from the SMA, PdBI, and IRAM 30m telescope of the massive Infrared Dark Cloud IRDC18223-3 and High-Mass Protostellar Object IRAS18151-1208 in order to look for clues regarding the role of rotation and disks in high mass star formation. Because IRAS 18151-1208 is at a later evolutionary stage than IRDC 18223-3, these two objects allow us to compare the central-most regions surrounding the embedded continuum source at two different periods in the formation process. Toward both regions we see rotational structures perpendicular to molecular outflows. Similarities and differences will be discussed in the context of core and disk evolution.

  10. Dynamic star formation in the massive DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. In addition, magnetic fields may play a decisive role in the star-formation process since they influence the efficiency of gas infall onto the protostar. Aims: By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. Methods: We use molecular line data from our 13CO 1 to 0, CS 2 to 1, and N2H+ 1 to 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO+, N2H+, and H2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, to investigate the distribution of the different phases of molecular gas. Gravitational infall is identified by the presence of inverse P Cygni profiles that are detected in optically thick lines, while the optically thinner isotopomers are found to reach a peak in the self-absorption gap. Results: We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of 0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 105 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter

  11. Gamma rays from colliding winds of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; Pohl, Martin

    2007-06-01

    Colliding winds of massive binaries have long been considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated by the detection of non-thermal spectra in the radio band, as well as by correlation studies of yet unidentified EGRET γ-ray sources with source populations appearing in star formation regions. This work re-considers the basic radiative processes and its properties that lead to high energy photon production in long-period massive star systems. We show that Klein Nishina effects as well as the anisotropic nature of the inverse Compton scattering, the dominating leptonic emission process, likely yield spectral and variability signatures in the γ-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma ray instruments like GLAST-LAT. In addition to all relevant radiative losses, we include propagation (such as convection in the stellar wind) as well as photon absorption effects, which a priori can not be neglected. The calculations are applied to WR 140 and WR 147, and predictions for their detectability in the γ-ray regime are provided. Physically similar specimen of their kind like WR 146, WR 137, WR 138, WR 112 and WR 125 may be regarded as candidate sources at GeV energies for near-future γ-ray experiments. Finally, we discuss several aspects relevant for eventually identifying this source class as a γ-ray emitting population. Thereby we utilize our findings on the expected radiative behavior of typical colliding wind binaries in the γ-ray regime as well as its expected spatial distribution on the γ-ray sky.

  12. SULFUR-BEARING MOLECULES IN MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS: OBSERVATIONS OF OCS, CS, H{sub 2}S, AND SO

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Juan; Wang, Junzhi; Zhu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Jiangshui; Li, Di

    2015-03-20

    We studied the sulfur chemistry of massive star-forming regions through single-dish submillimeter spectroscopy. OCS, O{sup 13}CS, {sup 13}CS, H{sub 2}S, and SO transitions were observed toward a sample of massive star-forming regions with embedded UCH ii or CH ii regions. These sources could be divided into H ii-hot core and H ii-only sources based on their CH{sub 3}CN emission. Our results show that the OCS line of thirteen sources is optically thick, with optical depth ranging from 5 to 16. Column densities of these molecules were computed under LTE conditions. CS column densities were also derived using its optically thin isotopologue {sup 13}CS. H{sub 2}S is likely to be the most abundant gas-phase sulfuretted molecule in hot massive cores. Both the column density and abundance of sulfur-bearing molecules decrease significantly from H ii-hot core to H ii-only sources. Ages derived from hot core models appear to be consistent with star formation theories, suggesting that abundance ratios of [CS]/[SO], [SO]/[OCS], and [OCS]/[CS] could be used as chemical clocks in massive star-forming regions.

  13. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  14. Bipolar Ejection of Matter from Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pismis, P.

    1985-01-01

    A general program on the internal velocities in H II regions was carried out within the past decade by the use of photographic Fabry-Perot interferometry, in the H (alpha) line and lately also in the N IIlambda 6584 line. Among the score of objects studied three H II regions and one planetary nebula possess pronounced symmetry around their ionizing stars. Velocity data combined with morphological properties suggest strongly that the nebulae were formed essentially by matter ejected from the central star and that ejection occurred preferentially from diametrially opposite regions on the star, that is, in a bi-polar fashion. The nebulae are discussed individually and a model for the ejection mechanism is presented.

  15. Current hot questions on the s process in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; Campbell, S. W.; D'Orazi, V.; Karakas, A. I.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Tagliente, G.; Iliadis, C.; Rauscher, T.

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are a main site of production of nuclei heavier than iron via the s process. In massive (>4 M⊙) AGB stars the operation of the 22Ne neutron source appears to be confirmed by observations of high Rb enhancements, while the lack of Tc in these stars rules out 13C as a main source of neutrons. The problem is that the Rb enhancements are not accompanied by Zr enhancements, as expected by s-process models. This discrepancy may be solved via a better understanding of the complex atmospheres of AGB stars. Second- generation stars in globular clusters (GCs), on the other hand, do not show enhancements in any s-process elements, not even Rb. If massive AGB stars are responsible for the composition of these GC stars, they may have evolved differently in GCs than in the field. In AGB stars of lower masses, 13C is the main source of neutrons and we can potentially constrain the effects of rotation and proton-ingestion episodes using the observed composition of post-AGB stars and of stardust SiC grains. Furthermore, independent asteroseismology observations of the rotational velocities of the cores of red giants and of white dwarves will play a fundamental role in helping us to better constrain the effect of rotation. Observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in both Ba and Eu may require a neutron flux in-between the s and the r process, while the puzzling increase of Ba as function of the age in open clusters, not accompanied by increase in any other element heavier than iron, require further observational efforts. Finally, stardust SiC provides us high-precision constraints to test nuclear inputs such as neutron-capture cross sections of stable and unstable isotopes and the impact of excited nuclear states in stellar environments.

  16. Stability of metal-rich very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J.; White, Christopher J.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit the stability of very massive non-rotating main-sequence stars at solar metallicity, with the goal of understanding whether radial pulsations set a physical upper limit to stellar mass. Models of up to 938 solar masses are constructed with the MESA code, and their linear stability in the fundamental mode, assumed to be the most dangerous, is analysed with a fully non-adiabatic method. Models above 100 M⊙ have extended tenuous atmospheres (`shelves') that affect the stability of the fundamental. Even when positive, this growth rate is small, in agreement with previous results. We argue that small growth rates lead to saturation at small amplitudes that are not dangerous to the star. A mechanism for saturation is demonstrated involving non-linear parametric coupling to short-wavelength g-modes and the damping of the latter by radiative diffusion. The shelves are subject to much more rapidly growing strange modes. This also agrees with previous results but is extended here to higher masses. The strange modes probably saturate via shocks rather than mode coupling but have very small amplitudes in the core, where almost all of the stellar mass resides. Although our stellar models are hydrostatic, the structure of their outer parts suggests that optically thick winds, driven by some combination of radiation pressure, transonic convection, and strange modes, are more likely than pulsation in the fundamental mode to limit the main-sequence lifetime.

  17. Modeling Broadband X-Ray Absorption of Massive Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen,David H.; Zsargo, Janos; Martell, Erin M.; MacArthur, James P.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Gagne, Marc; Hillier, D. John

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for computing the net transition of X-rays emitted by shock-heated plasma distributed throughout a partially optically thick stellar wind from a massive star. We find the transmission by an exact integration of the formal solution, assuming the emitting plasma and absorbing plasma are mixed at a constant mass ratio above some minimum radius, below which there is assumed to be no emission. This model is more realistic than either the slab absorption associated with a corona at the base of the wind or the exospheric approximation that assumes all observed X-rays are emitted without attenuation from above the radius of optical depth unity. Our model is implemented in XSPEC as a pre-calculated table that can be coupled to a user-defined table of the wavelength dependent wind opacity. We provide a default wind opacity model that is more representative of real wind opacities than the commonly used neutral ISM tabulation. Preliminary modeling of Chandra grating data indicates that the X-ray hardness trend of OB stars with spectral subtype cars largely be understood as a wind absorption effect.

  18. Studying the nature of runaway stars using Andromeda's massive stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulkley, Jordan; Seth, Anil; Johnson, Cliff; Dalcanton, Julianne; Guhathakurta, Raja; Dorman, Claire; Hamren, Katie; Caldwell, Nelson; Williams, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Theory of the formation of massive stars remains incomplete, the question of the environments required have yet to be answered. An agreement on whether all massive stars must form in cluster type environments, or if isolated formation is viable has yet to be reached. This is further complicated by the presence of runaway stars, stellar objects which have been ejected from their host cluster. Studying the nature of these isolated runaway stars becomes paramount in the larger goal of developing a more comprehensive massive star formation theory. Creating a survey of runaway star candidates is possible thanks to Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury's UV and optical photometry, and the identified clusters from the Andromeda Project. A first glimpse into the data suggests large body of massive stars are 50 parsecs or more from the closest cluster and roughly half of the entire massive stellar population is found outside of defined cluster boundaries. Additional analysts shows a stark difference between the velocity dispersion of massive stars and appropriately young clusters, the stars exhibiting a inflated dispersion. Using this result in conjunction with artificial clusters and star populations, constrains on the percentage of expected runaway objects can be made.

  19. Stellar neutron sources and s-process in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Rashi

    The s-process or the slow neutron capture process is a nucleosynthesis process taking place at relatively low neutron densities in stars. It runs along the valley of beta stability since the neutron capture rate is much slower compared to the beta decay rate. The s-process occurs mainly during core helium burning and shell carbon burning phase in massive stars and during thermally pulsing helium burning phase in asymptotic giant-branch stars. The potential stellar neutron source for the s-process is associated with alpha-capture reactions on light nuclei. The capture-reaction rates provide the reaction flow for the build-up of22Ne neutron source during the heliumburning phase in these stars. The low energy 26Mg resonances at stellar energies below 800 keV are predicted to have a critical influence on the alpha-capture rates on 22Ne. Some of these resonances may also correspond to pronounced alpha cluster structure near the alpha-threshold. However, these resonances have remained elusive during direct alpha capture measurements owing to the high Coulomb barrier and background from cosmic rays and beam induced reactions. Hence, in the present work, alpha-inelastic scattering and alpha- transfer measurements have been performed to probe the level structure of 26Mg nucleus in order to determine the 22Ne+alpha-capture rates. Both experiments have been performed using the high-resolution Grand Raiden Spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka, Japan. For the alpha-inelastic scattering measurement, a self-supporting solid 26Mg target was used and for the alpha-transfer study via the (6Li,d) reaction, 22Ne gas enclosed in a gas cell with Aramid windows was used. The reaction products were momentum analysed by the spectrometer and detected at the focal plane equipped with two multi-wire drift chambers and two plastic-scintillation detectors. The focal plane detection system provided information on the position, the angle, the time of flight and

  20. Near Infrared Characterization of Hot Exo-Zodiacal Disks around Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand

    Debris disks found around main sequence stars are the remnants of planetary formation. The outer colder parts of these disks, analogous to our solar system Kuiper belt, were first detected via their mid/far infrared excess emission, and then abundantly imaged at visible to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Structures and asymmetries in spatially resolved debris disks have been used to infer the presence of yet unseen planets. The power of this technique was recently demonstrated with the direct imaging of massive planets at the inner edge of warped extended dust disks previously detected around Fomalhaut and beta Pic. Conversely, very little is known about the warmer dust component of debris disks, similar to the zodiacal dust of the inner solar system. A few hot disks have been found by Spitzer around mature stars via excess emission at 24 microns. But surprisingly, the majority of hot debris disk detections has come from the ground, where near infrared interferometric observations have recently revealed small (~1%) resolved excesses around a dozen nearby main sequence stars. The dust grains forming in these bright "exozodi disks" or dust belts are located within a few AU of their parent star. They are thought to be produced by the evaporation of comets or by collisions between larger rocky bodies, as in the solar zodiacal disk. Many of the detected disks are however much hotter (1000-1500K) and more massive than the zodiacal cloud. Their grain populations should be rapidly expelled from the inner planetary system by radiation pressure, which indicates inordinate replenishment rates. In practice, the steady state collisional grinding of a massive asteroid belt cannot be at the origin of these dust populations. They are most likely produced by isolated catastrophic events (e.g., major asteroid collision, break-up of a massive comet), or by major dynamical perturbations such as the Falling Evaporating Bodies (FEB) phenomenon in the beta Pic inner disk or the Late Heavy

  1. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20; see Figure 1) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources "Hot excess" YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be "starless" cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early

  2. Recent results on the connection between massive stars and supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    With the dramatic increase in observational data on supernovae (SNe), SN studies are undergoing a renaissance. It is known that Type II SN IIP arise from the explosion of a red supergiant (RSG). In several cases the RSG is seen in pre-explosion images, but it is absent in post-SN images — unambiguous proof that the RSG has exploded. Surprisingly, all RSG progenitors identified have a mass less than approximately 20 M⊙. To date, there has been no direct detection of the progenitor of a Type Ib or Ic SN. Because their ejecta masses are generally low (3 to 5 M⊙), these SNe are believed to arise from a relatively low mass star in a binary system. Such systems dominate the statistics due to the initial mass function. The broad-lined Ic SNe tend to have higher mass, and some of these may be associated with classic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Type IIn SNe are a heterogeneous class of SN — they arise when the SN ejecta interacts with preexisting circumstellar material. Their spectra often exhibit narrow emission lines, and they can be particularly luminous due to the efficient conversion of kinetic energy into radiation. The origin of Type IIn SN and their connection to stellar evolution is the subject of fierce debate and controversy. The final class to be discussed are the pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) which arise from a nuclear detonation. PISNe have a distinct chemical signature, and the observational evidence for the existence of this class of SN is ambiguous and controversial. While much progress has been made, it is still difficult to get models of core-collapse SNe to explode from first principles. The problem is inherently 3D and numerous questions remain unanswered. How much material falls back onto the core? What is the nature and extent of mixing in the ejecta? What are the chemical yields? Do all massive stars end their life as a luminous SN?

  3. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  4. The pre-supernova evolution of massive stars and concomitant nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Meynet, Georges

    1998-02-15

    After a recall of the main features of massive star evolution, we briefly describe the different nuclear burning phases through which these stars evolve. We discuss determinations of stellar surface abundances which provide some clues to the nuclear processes occuring in massive stars. Finally, we emphasize the role played by mass loss in the process of enrichment of the interstellar medium in newly synthesized elements.

  5. The Evolution of Massive Stars: a Selection of Facts and Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    In the present paper we discuss a selection of facts and questions related to observations and evolutionary calculations of massive single stars and massive stars in interacting binaries. We focus on the surface chemical abundances, the role of stellar winds, the early Be-stars, the high mass X-ray binaries and the effects of rotation on stellar evolution. Finally, we present an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) of WR binaries in dense stellar environments.

  6. RUNAWAY MASSIVE STARS FROM R136: VFTS 682 IS VERY LIKELY A 'SLOW RUNAWAY'

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel; Oh, Seungkyung E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2012-02-10

    We conduct a theoretical study on the ejection of runaway massive stars from R136-the central massive, starburst cluster in the 30 Doradus complex of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Specifically, we investigate the possibility of the very massive star (VMS) VFTS 682 being a runaway member of R136. Recent observations of the above VMS, by virtue of its isolated location and its moderate peculiar motion, have raised the fundamental question of whether isolated massive star formation is indeed possible. We perform the first realistic N-body computations of fully mass-segregated R136-type star clusters in which all the massive stars are in primordial binary systems. These calculations confirm that the dynamical ejection of a VMS from an R136-like cluster, with kinematic properties similar to those of VFTS 682, is common. Hence, the conjecture of isolated massive star formation is unnecessary to account for this VMS. Our results are also quite consistent with the ejection of 30 Dor 016, another suspected runaway VMS from R136. We further note that during the clusters' evolution, mergers of massive binaries produce a few single stars per cluster with masses significantly exceeding the canonical upper limit of 150 M{sub Sun }. The observations of such single super-canonical stars in R136, therefore, do not imply an initial mass function with an upper limit greatly exceeding the accepted canonical 150 M{sub Sun} limit, as has been suggested recently, and they are consistent with the canonical upper limit.

  7. The Blob, the Very Rare Massive Star and the Two Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    The nebula N214 [1] is a large region of gas and dust located in a remote part of our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. N214 is a quite remarkable site where massive stars are forming. In particular, its main component, N214C (also named NGC 2103 or DEM 293), is of special interest since it hosts a very rare massive star, known as Sk-71 51 [2] and belonging to a peculiar class with only a dozen known members in the whole sky. N214C thus provides an excellent opportunity for studying the formation site of such stars. Using ESO's 3.5-m New Technology telescope (NTT) located at La Silla (Chile) and the SuSI2 and EMMI instruments, astronomers from France and the USA [3] studied in great depth this unusual region by taking the highest resolution images so far as well as a series of spectra of the most prominent objects present. N214C is a complex of ionised hot gas, a so-called H II region [4], spreading over 170 by 125 light-years (see ESO PR Photo 12b/05). At the centre of the nebula lies Sk-71 51, the region's brightest and hottest star. At a distance of ~12 light-years north of Sk-71 51 runs a long arc of highly compressed gas created by the strong stellar wind of the star. There are a dozen less bright stars scattered across the nebula and mainly around Sk-71 51. Moreover, several fine, filamentary structures and fine pillars are visible. The green colour in the composite image, which covers the bulk of the N214C region, comes from doubly ionised oxygen atoms [5] and indicates that the nebula must be extremely hot over a very large extent. The Star Sk-71 51 decomposed ESO PR Photo 12c/05 ESO PR Photo 12c/05 The Cluster Around Sk-71 51 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 620 pix - 189k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1239 pix - 528k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 12c/05 shows a small field around the hot star Sk-71 51 as seen through the V filter. The left image shows a single frame after subtraction of the nebular background. The image quality - or seeing - is roughly 8.5 pixels

  8. The x-ray and spectropolarimetric view of mass loss and transfer in massive binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.

    2013-03-01

    The majority of massive stars are members of binary systems. In order to have a better understanding of their evolutionary pathways, the mass and angular momentum loss from massive binaries needs to be well understood. Self consistent explanations for their behavior need to be valid across many wavelength regimes in order to illuminate key phases of mass loss to completely determine how it affects their evolution. In this dissertation I present the results of X-ray and specropolarimetric studies on one Roche-lobe overflow binary (beta Lyr) and two colliding wind binaries (V444 Cyg and WR 140). In beta Lyr a repeatable discrepancy between the secondary eclipse in total and polarized light indicates that an accretion hot spot has formed on the edge of the disk in the system. This hot spot may also be the source of the bipolar outflows within the system. The existence of a hot spot and its relationship to bipolar outflows is important in understanding the mass transfer dynamics of Roche-lobe overflow binaries. The absorption of the 2.0 keV spectral fit component in V444 Cyg suggests that the shock has a large opening angle while analysis of the X-ray light curves places the stagnation point farther away from the O star than theoretically expected. Combining this with evidence of polarimetric variability in V444 Cyg's optical emission lines shows that the effects of radiative inhibition or braking are significant for this close binary and may be important in other colliding wind systems. Long term X-ray monitoring of the shock formed by the winds in WR 140 shows conflicting evidence for unexpected intrinsic hard X-ray emission. Spectral analysis shows that the low energy thermal tail is causing the observed higher energy emission. On the other hand, light curve analysis of the absorption feature near periastron passage suggests that there may be intrinsic hard X-ray emission from the system. WR 140's polarimetric behavior is consistent with the formation of dust near

  9. Effects of massive star radiation on circumstellar disks evolution in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Mario

    2007-09-01

    We will determine the frequency of disk and disk-less stars in the outer regions (relatively poor of massive stars) of the young cluster NGC 6611, with the aim to study the effects of UV flux due to massive stars on the evolution of circumstellar disks around low mass stars. Our previous results for the central region of the cluster show that this effect may be present, but we need to observe stars at larger distance from massive stars. This cluster is particularly well suited for our study, thanks to the irregular spatial distribution of its OB stars. CHANDRA observations are crucial for identifying the disk-less population undetectable with other method.

  10. Chemical Pollution and Evolution of Massive Starbursts: Cleaning up the Environment in Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, C.

    1996-12-01

    I present the results of a research program seeking to characterize the impact of massive star-clusters on the chemical and dynamical evolution of metal-poor, irregular and blue compact galaxies. The evolution of high mass stars is thought to contribute the bulk of heavy element enrichment in the interstellar medium, especially alpha -process elements like O, Si, etc. Yet, in actively star-forming galaxies, localized chemical inhomogeneities are seldom observed. Spatially-resolved optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories is used to search for chemical enrichment in the vicinity of young star clusters in nearby galaxies. VLA aperture synthesis maps are used to examine the neutral hydrogen content, dynamics, and local environment of the sample galaxies. Despite the spread in evolutionary state of the starbursts determined by the EW of Balmer emission lines and the radio continuum spectral index, few instances of localized enrichment are found. In light of these data, the ``instantaneous enrichment'' scenario for extragalactic HII regions appears less probable than one which operates on long timescales and global spatial scales. The results are consistent with the idea that starburst driven winds expel freshly synthesized metals in a hot 10(6) K phase into the halos of galaxies where they cool, condense into globules, and mix homogeneously with the rest of the galaxy on long (dynamical) timescales. The C/O and N/O ratios of the galaxies are used as new tools for measuring the recent star formation history. Implications for chemical evolution of galaxies both locally and cosmologically are developed.

  11. Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions: What are the Most Massive Stars Formed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, Chip; Vargas, Carlos; Kerton, Charles; Arvidsson, Kim

    2010-08-01

    High-mass star formation cannot be viewed as simply a scaled-up version of the paradigm for low-mass star formation. The high-mass regime (M> 10 Msun) appears to require significant differences in cloud fragmentation, accretion, radiation, turbulence, and overall molecular density compared to the low-mass regime. We have identified a sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs) hosting embedded clusters that straddle the boundary of these two regimes and can be used to understand the factors that govern the transition between these extremes. Most notable among these factors is the possibility of a critical cloud mass column density that appears to divide high-mass SFRs from IM SFRs. Yet, the very nature of IM SFRs and their stellar content are almost completely unknown, primarily because of the previous difficulty in identifying such objects. We propose HK band spectroscopy of the brightest stellar sources near nine IM SFRs to identify probable members, confirm the IM nature of the most massive stars, and characterize their evolutionary state. Three nights with FLAMINGOS on the 4 m (or equivalent IR spectrograph) will suffice to obtain classification spectra and several spectral diagnostics sensitive to accretion for at least 8-10 stars per object.

  12. An Extraordinary Cluster of Massive Young Stars in the Milky Way's Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.; Shupe, D.; Figer, D. F.

    1998-01-01

    The mass distribution of newborn stars is key to the evolution of galaxies, as it determines whether a galaxy's interstellar medium is funneled predominantly into dim, long-lived, low-mass stars, as is the case in normal galactic disks, or into bright, short-lived, massive stars, as is perhaps the case in starburst nuclei.

  13. The Wind and Mass-loss Properties of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestenlehner, Joachim; Vink, Jorick; Gräfener, Götz; Najarro, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    Mass-loss rates play an important role in the evolution of massive stars. The initial, present day and the mass at their end of their lifetime is considerable different as a result of mass loss. Different stages of evolution have different mass-loss rates. The understanding of massive star evolution is tightly connected to the understanding of their mass loss properties. In the context of the VLT-Flames Tarantula Survey I will present the results from our spectral analysis of stars in the transition region from O-stars to very massive WN(h)-stars. WN(h)-stars are very young and massive stars which develop already in the earliest stages of their evolution WR-star like winds. For the analysis we used the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN to investigate the wind and mass-loss properties of these very massive stars. This analysis also tests theoretical predictions which suggest a notable change of the mass-loss behaviour at a certain Eddington factor in the transition region from O to WN(h)-stars (Bestenlehner et al. 2011, Bestenlehner et al. in prep.)

  14. Chemical differentiation in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, S. D.; Charnley, S. B.

    2001-01-01

    We have reexamined the origin of the apparent differentiation between nitrogen-bearing molecules and complex oxygen-bearing molecules that is observed in hot molecular cores associated with massive protostars. Observations show that methanol is an ubiquitous and abundant component of protostellar ices. Recent observations suggest that ammonia may constitute an appreciable fraction of the ices toward some sources. In contrast to previous theories that suggested that N/O differentiation was caused by an anticorrelation between methanol and ammonia in the precursor grain mantles, we show that the presence of ammonia in mantles and the core temperature are key quantities in determining N/O differentiation. Calculations are presented which show that when large amounts of ammonia are evaporated alkyl cation transfer reactions are suppressed and the abundances of complex O-bearing organic molecules greatly reduced. Cooler cores (100 K) eventually evolve to an oxygen-rich chemical state similar to that attained when no ammonia was injected, but on a timescale that is an order of magnitude longer (10(5) yr). Hotter cores (300 K) never evolve an O-rich chemistry unless ammonia is almost absent from the mantles. In this latter case, a complex O-rich chemistry develops on a timescale of 10(4) yr, as in previous models, but disappears in about 2 x 10(5) yr, after which time the core is rich in NH3, HCN, and other N-bearing molecules. There are thus two ways in which N-rich cores can occur. We briefly discuss the implications for the determination of hot-core ages and for explaining N/O differentiation in several well-studied sources.

  15. HATS-15b and HATS-16b: Two Massive Planets Transiting Old G Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Bakos, G.; Penev, K.; Brahm, R.; Zhou, G.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Suc, V.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Tan, T. G.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved (∼10 Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9 V star (V=14.8 mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of 2.17\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.105\\quad +/- \\quad 0.040 {R}{{J}}, and it completes its orbit in about 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of 3.27\\quad +/- \\quad 0.19 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.30\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {R}{{J}}; it orbits around its G3 V parent star (V=13.8 mag) in ∼2.7 days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days, which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations performed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile, with the Coralie and FEROS spectrographs mounted on the Euler-Swiss and MPG 2.2 m telescopes, respectively. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Keck Telescope. Observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope are used in this paper.

  16. Recovery from Giant Eruptions in Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Amit; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    We use a hydro-and-radiative-transfer code to explore the behavior of a very massive star (VMS) after a giant eruption—i.e., following a supernova impostor event. Beginning with reasonable models for evolved VMSs with masses of 80 M⊙ and 120 M⊙, we simulate the change of state caused by a giant eruption via two methods that explicitly conserve total energy. (1) Synthetically removing outer layers of mass of a few M⊙ while reducing the energy of the inner layers. (2) Synthetically transferring energy from the core to the outer layers, an operation that automatically causes mass ejection. Our focus is on the aftermath, not the poorly understood eruption itself. Then, using a radiation-hydrodynamic code in 1D with realistic opacities and convection, the interior disequilibrium state is followed for about 200 years. Typically the star develops a ˜400 km s-1 wind with a mass loss rate that begins around 0.1 M⊙ yr-1 and gradually decreases. This outflow is driven by κ-mechanism radial pulsations. The 1D models have regular pulsations but 3D models will probably be more chaotic. In some cases a plateau in the mass-loss rate may persist about 200 years, while other cases are more like η Car which lost >10 M⊙ and then had an abnormal mass loss rate for more than a century after its eruption. In our model, the post-eruption outflow carried more mass than the initial eruption. These simulations constitute a useful preliminary reconnaissance for 3D models which will be far more difficult.

  17. Characteristics of the hot components of symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Mari

    2010-08-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries whose components are a red giant and a small hot star, usually a white dwarf. The intensive stellar wind from the giant is captured by the companion, giving rise to strong emission lines in the spectra and a range of phenomena, which may include the formation of an accretion disk and the ejection of collimated jets. In this thesis, four symbiotic stars, as different as possible, were chosen for a spectral investigation of the symbiotic phenomenon. Of those, Z Andromedae is a so-called classical symbiotic star with a hot companion that shows a characteristic pattern of brightenings (outbursts). AG Draconis is a bright system like Z Andromedae and shows similar activity, but has an unusually hot yellow donor star. CH Cygni and EG Andromedae have, on the contrary, relatively dim white dwarfs. The former shows irregular outbursts, the origin of which is not easy to explain, the latter is one of the quiet symbiotic stars with no outburst yet recorded. Each of those four stars was observed for at least ten years with the 1.5-m telescope at Tartu Observatory. Several outbursts of Z Andromedae and AG Draconis were witnessed, as well as substantial changes in the CH Cygni spectra. The perhaps most surprising result was the discovery of collimated jets in Z Andromedae spectra on two instances, an event never observed in this star before. In CH Cygni, evidence for the existence of an accretion disk in 1998 was discovered. EG Andromedae stayed quiet and the only changes in its spectra could be ascribed to orbital motion. We found that not all the outbursts of Z Andromedae and AG Draconis are accompanied by similar changes in the spectra: during some brightenings the stars become hotter, during some, cooler. The existence of the disk in CH Cygni in 1998 affirms that the formation of such a structure is possible in symbiotic stars. Moreover, as the ejection of jets is associated to an accretion disk, the jets in Z Andromedae can also be

  18. FROM THE CONVERGENCE OF FILAMENTS TO DISK-OUTFLOW ACCRETION: MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN W33A

    SciTech Connect

    Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Zhang Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Zapata, Luis A.; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2010-12-10

    Interferometric observations of the W33A massive star formation region, performed with the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array at resolutions from 5'' (0.1 pc) to 0.''5 (0.01 pc), are presented. Our three main findings are: (1) parsec-scale, filamentary structures of cold molecular gas are detected. Two filaments at different velocities intersect in the zone where the star formation is occurring. This is consistent with triggering of the star formation activity by the convergence of such filaments, as predicted by numerical simulations of star formation initiated by converging flows. (2) The two dusty cores (MM1 and MM2) at the intersection of the filaments are found to be at different evolutionary stages, and each of them is resolved into multiple condensations. MM1 and MM2 have markedly different temperatures, continuum spectral indices, molecular-line spectra, and masses of both stars and gas. (3) The dynamics of the 'hot-core' MM1 indicates the presence of a rotating disk in its center (MM1-Main) around a faint free-free source. The stellar mass is estimated to be {approx}10 M{sub sun}. A massive molecular outflow is observed along the rotation axis of the disk.

  19. UV-selected Young Massive Star Cluster Populations in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Linda J.

    2015-08-01

    The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is an HST Treasury program aimed at the investigation of star-formation and its relationship to environment in nearby galaxies. The results of a UV-selected study of young massive star clusters in a sample of nearby galaxies (< 10 Mpc) using detections based on the WFC3/UVIS F275W filter will be presented. Previous studies have used V or I-band detections and tend to ignore clusters younger than 10 Myr old. This very young population, which represents the most recent cluster-forming event in the LEGUS galaxies will be discussed.This poster is presented on behalf of the LEGUS team (PI Daniela Calzetti).

  20. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  1. SUPERSONIC LINE BROADENING WITHIN YOUNG AND MASSIVE SUPER STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Wuensch, Richard; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Palous, Jan E-mail: richard@wunsch.c E-mail: cmt@ll.iac.e

    2010-01-10

    The origin of supersonic infrared and radio recombination nebular lines often detected in young and massive superstar clusters is discussed. We suggest that these arise from a collection of repressurizing shocks (RSs), acting effectively to re-establish pressure balance within the cluster volume and from the cluster wind which leads to an even broader although much weaker component. The supersonic lines here are shown to occur in clusters that undergo a bimodal hydrodynamic solution, that is within clusters that are above the threshold line in the mechanical luminosity or cluster mass versus the size of the cluster plane. A plethora of RSs is due to frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that take place within the matter reinserted by stellar winds and supernovae. We show that the maximum speed of the RSs and of the cluster wind are both functions of the temperature reached at the stagnation radius. This temperature depends only on the cluster heating efficiency (eta). Based on our two-dimensional simulations we calculate the line profiles that result from several models and confirm our analytical predictions. From a comparison between the predicted and observed values of the half-width zero intensity of the two line components, we conclude that the thermalization efficiency in young super star clusters above the threshold line must be lower than 20%.

  2. Atomic physics of shocked plasma in winds of massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-05-25

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure.

  3. Self-gravitating disc candidates around massive young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, D. H.; Ilee, J. D.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    There have been several recent detections of candidate Keplerian discs around massive young protostars. Given the relatively large disc-to-star mass ratios in these systems, and their young ages, it is worth investigating their propensity to becoming self-gravitating. To this end, we compute self-consistent, semi-analytic models of putative self-gravitating discs for five candidate disc systems. Our aim is not to fit exactly the observations, but to demonstrate that the expected dust continuum emission from marginally unstable self-gravitating discs can be quite weak, due to high optical depth at the mid-plane even at millimetre wavelengths. In the best cases, the models produce `observable' disc masses within a factor of <1.5 of those observed, with mid-plane dust temperatures comparable to measured temperatures from molecular line emission. We find in two cases that a self-gravitating disc model compares well with observations. If these discs are self-gravitating, they satisfy the conditions for disc fragmentation in their outer regions. These systems may hence have as-yet-unresolved low-mass stellar companions, and are thus promising targets for future high angular resolution observations.

  4. The KELT-North Transit Survey: Hot Planets around Hot, Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Beatty, Thomas G.; Eastman, Jason D.; Lund, Michael; Penny, Matthew; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert; Stassun, Keivan; Stevens, Daniel J.; KELT-North Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The KELT-North is a small-aperture, wide-angle automated telescope located in southern Arizona that has been surveying roughly 40% of the northern sky for transiting planets since 2006. By virtue of its small aperture and large field-of-view, KELT is most sensitive to hot Jupiters transiting relatively bright (V~8-10), and thus relatively hot stars. Roughly half of the over 200,000 dwarf stars targeted by KELT are hotter than 6250K; such stars pose novel challenges, but also provide unique opportunities. I will present the first transiting substellar companions discovered by KELT, focusing in detail on a few particularly interesting systems. I will discuss our plans for determining the frequency and demographics of short-period companions to hot stars from KELT; comparison with similar results for cooler stars may provide important constraints on theories of the emplacement and tidal evolution of low-mass stellar companions. Finally, I will speculate on how the lessons learned from KELT may inform the target selection and survey strategies for the TESS mission.This work was supported by NSF CAREER grant AST-1056524.

  5. Overview of the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-Ray (MYStIX) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Busk, Heather A.; Getman, Konstantin V.; King, Robert R.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Naylor, Tim; Povich, Matthew S.; Baddeley, Adrian; Bate, Matthew R.; Indebetouw, Remy; Luhman, Kevin L.; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Pittard, Julian M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Sills, Alison; Song, Yong; Wadsley, James

    2013-12-01

    The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) seeks to characterize 20 OB-dominated young clusters and their environs at distances d <= 4 kpc using imaging detectors on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope. The observational goals are to construct catalogs of star-forming complex stellar members with well-defined criteria and maps of nebular gas (particularly of hot X-ray-emitting plasma) and dust. A catalog of MYStIX Probable Complex Members with several hundred OB stars and 31,784 low-mass pre-main sequence stars is assembled. This sample and related data products will be used to seek new empirical constraints on theoretical models of cluster formation and dynamics, mass segregation, OB star formation, star formation triggering on the periphery of H II regions, and the survivability of protoplanetary disks in H II regions. This paper gives an introduction and overview of the project, covering the data analysis methodology and application to two star-forming regions: NGC 2264 and the Trifid Nebula.

  6. Imprints of fast-rotating massive stars in the Galactic Bulge.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Cristina; Frischknecht, Urs; Meynet, Georges; Hirschi, Raphael; Barbuy, Beatriz; Pignatari, Marco; Decressin, Thibaut; Maeder, André

    2011-04-28

    The first stars that formed after the Big Bang were probably massive, and they provided the Universe with the first elements heavier than helium ('metals'), which were incorporated into low-mass stars that have survived to the present. Eight stars in the oldest globular cluster in the Galaxy, NGC 6522, were found to have surface abundances consistent with the gas from which they formed being enriched by massive stars (that is, with higher α-element/Fe and Eu/Fe ratios than those of the Sun). However, the same stars have anomalously high abundances of Ba and La with respect to Fe, which usually arises through nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars (via the slow-neutron-capture process, or s-process). Recent theory suggests that metal-poor fast-rotating massive stars are able to boost the s-process yields by up to four orders of magnitude, which might provide a solution to this contradiction. Here we report a reanalysis of the earlier spectra, which reveals that Y and Sr are also overabundant with respect to Fe, showing a large scatter similar to that observed in extremely metal-poor stars, whereas C abundances are not enhanced. This pattern is best explained as originating in metal-poor fast-rotating massive stars, which might point to a common property of the first stellar generations and even of the 'first stars'. PMID:21525928

  7. Imprints of fast-rotating massive stars in the Galactic Bulge.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Cristina; Frischknecht, Urs; Meynet, Georges; Hirschi, Raphael; Barbuy, Beatriz; Pignatari, Marco; Decressin, Thibaut; Maeder, André

    2011-04-28

    The first stars that formed after the Big Bang were probably massive, and they provided the Universe with the first elements heavier than helium ('metals'), which were incorporated into low-mass stars that have survived to the present. Eight stars in the oldest globular cluster in the Galaxy, NGC 6522, were found to have surface abundances consistent with the gas from which they formed being enriched by massive stars (that is, with higher α-element/Fe and Eu/Fe ratios than those of the Sun). However, the same stars have anomalously high abundances of Ba and La with respect to Fe, which usually arises through nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars (via the slow-neutron-capture process, or s-process). Recent theory suggests that metal-poor fast-rotating massive stars are able to boost the s-process yields by up to four orders of magnitude, which might provide a solution to this contradiction. Here we report a reanalysis of the earlier spectra, which reveals that Y and Sr are also overabundant with respect to Fe, showing a large scatter similar to that observed in extremely metal-poor stars, whereas C abundances are not enhanced. This pattern is best explained as originating in metal-poor fast-rotating massive stars, which might point to a common property of the first stellar generations and even of the 'first stars'.

  8. KEPLER-6b: A TRANSITING HOT JUPITER ORBITING A METAL-RICH STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Edward W.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B.; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2010-04-20

    We announce the discovery of Kepler-6b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting a star with unusually high metallicity, [Fe/H]= +0.34{+-}0.04. The planet's mass is about 2/3 that of Jupiter, M {sub P} = 0.67 M {sub J}, and the radius is 30% larger than that of Jupiter, R {sub P} = 1.32 R {sub J}, resulting in a density of {rho}{sub P} = 0.35 g cm{sup -3}, a fairly typical value for such a planet. The orbital period is P = 3.235 days. The host star is both more massive than the Sun, M {sub *} = 1.21 M {sub sun}, and larger than the Sun, R {sub *} = 1.39 R {sub sun}.

  9. Hot subluminous stars: On the Search for Chemical Signatures of their Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Heiko Andreas

    2009-10-01

    , however, is still under debate. While the cooler sdBs can be analyzed with relatively simple LTE model atmospheres, the hot sdOs require much more sophisticated NLTE calculations. The large effort required for sdO analyses resulted in a relatively low number of paper on the subject, when compared with the numerous publications on sdB stars. Besides a few detailed studies of individuell objects, the ≈ 50 stars analyzed by Ströer et al. (2007) is the only extensive work on sdOs. They explained the helium poor sdOs as progeny of the sdB stars. But for the helium enriched sdOs, no definite statement about their evolutionary status could be found. In order to get a large sample of sdOs, this work made use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), one of the most extensive photometric and spectroscopic surveys in astronomy. About 14000 spectra were classified by visual inspection by means of easily recognizable spectral features. We now have a large database with classificatons of hot stars. The majority of the spectra were classified as white dwarfs, among them a number of previously unknown magnetic white dwarfs. 1500 objects were identified as hot subluminous stars, about 200 of them are sdOs. We determined effective temperatures, surface gravities and atmospheric helium abundances for these objects. Two evolutionary scenarios remain valid options for the sdOs' origin: The merging of two helium white dwarfs and the delayed helium flash of a red giant star ("late hot flasher"). In the first scenario, two low mass white dwarfs in short period orbits lose orbital energy by radiation of gravitational waves. As their orbit shrinks, the less massive one will fill its Roche lobe and get disrupted and accreted on the companion. Unfortunately no detailed calculations of the explosive nucleosynthesis exist for this scenario. The late hot flashers are stars that do not experience the helium core flash until they leave their red giant phase and already evolve towards the white dwarfs

  10. Effects of a new 3-alpha reaction on the s-process in massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuch, Yukihiro; Ono, Masaomi; Matsuo, Yasuhide; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro

    2012-11-12

    Effect of a new 3-alpha reaction rate on the s-process during the evolution of a massive star of 25 solar mass is investigated for the first time, because the s-process in massive stars have been believed to be established with only minor change. We find that the s-process with use of the new rate during the core helium burning is very inefficient compared to the case with the previous 3-alpha rate. However, the difference of the overproduction is found to be largely compensated by the subsequent carbon burning. Since the s-process in massive stars has been attributed so far to the neutron irradiation during core helium burning, our finding reveals for the first time the importance of the carbon burning for the s-process during the evolution of massive stars.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive LMC stars AAOmega spectroscopy (Evans+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; van Loon, J. T.; Hainich, R.; Bailey, M.

    2015-08-01

    This catalogue comprises ascii versions of the optical spectra of 263 massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, obtained with the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo Australian Telescope. Spectra from the first night (2006 Feb 22) were obtained with a 1700B grating at two wavelength settings. The spectra published here were obtained by median combining the two exposures at both settings, and then median combining them in the overlap region (spanning ~4375-4400Å). Spectra from the second night (2006 Feb 23) were obtained with a 1500V grating at one central wavelength setting (4375Å). The spectra The published spectra have been normalised/rectified using an automated script, which uses pre-defined regions (selected to avoid known absorption lines in early-type stars) to create a polynomial fit to the notional continuum in each spectrum. The published spectra have been divided by those fits to rectify them to unity. As such, we caution the user that quantitative analysis of these data would benefit from tailored rectification of the spectra. In particular, at the ends of the spectral range, and across broad emission features (such as that around HeII 4686 in luminous O-type supergiants). Also note that there were a number of 'hot' columns in the AAOmega CCDs, leading to small breaks (at multiple wavelengths) in the large majority of the spectra. (5 data files).

  12. RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF THE EVOLVING CIRCUMSTELLAR MEDIUM AROUND MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Toala, J. A.; Arthur, S. J.

    2011-08-20

    We study the evolution of the interstellar and circumstellar media around massive stars (M {>=} 40 M{sub sun}) from the main sequence (MS) through to the Wolf-Rayet (WR) stage by means of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We use publicly available stellar evolution models to investigate the different possible structures that can form in the stellar wind bubbles around WR stars. We find significant differences between models with and without stellar rotation, and between models from different authors. More specifically, we find that the main ingredients in the formation of structures in the WR wind bubbles are the duration of the red supergiant (or luminous blue variable) phase, the amount of mass lost, and the wind velocity during this phase, in agreement with previous authors. Thermal conduction is also included in our models. We find that MS bubbles with thermal conduction are slightly smaller, due to extra cooling which reduces the pressure in the hot, shocked bubble, but that thermal conduction does not appear to significantly influence the formation of structures in post-MS bubbles. Finally, we study the predicted X-ray emission from the models and compare our results with observations of the WR bubbles S 308, NGC 6888, and RCW 58. We find that bubbles composed primarily of clumps have reduced X-ray luminosity and very soft spectra, while bubbles with shells correspond more closely to observations.

  13. Evidence of magnetic field decay in massive main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Müller, A.; de Koter, A.; Morel, T.; Petit, V.; Sana, H.; Wade, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    A significant fraction of massive main-sequence stars show strong, large-scale magnetic fields. The origin of these fields, their lifetimes, and their role in shaping the characteristics and evolution of massive stars are currently not well understood. We compile a catalogue of 389 massive main-sequence stars, 61 of which are magnetic, and derive their fundamental parameters and ages. The two samples contain stars brighter than magnitude 9 in the V-band and range in mass between 5 and 100 M⊙. We find that the fractional main-sequence age distribution of all considered stars follows what is expected for a magnitude limited sample, while that of magnetic stars shows a clear decrease towards the end of the main sequence. This dearth of old magnetic stars is independent of the choice of adopted stellar evolution tracks, and appears to become more prominent when considering only the most massive stars. We show that the decreasing trend in the distribution is significantly stronger than expected from magnetic flux conservation. We also find that binary rejuvenation and magnetic suppression of core convection are unlikely to be responsible for the observed lack of older magnetic massive stars, and conclude that its most probable cause is the decay of the magnetic field, over a time span longer than the stellar lifetime for the lowest considered masses, and shorter for the highest masses. We then investigate the spin-down ages of the slowly rotating magnetic massive stars and find them to exceed the stellar ages by far in many cases. The high fraction of very slowly rotating magnetic stars thus provides an independent argument for a decay of the magnetic fields.

  14. X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILES FROM WIND CLUMP BOW SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Burke, A. E. E-mail: wwaldron@satx.rr.com E-mail: burke.alexander@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two-component flow structure of wind and clumps using two 'beta' velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double-horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the wind can be derived. The emission measure tends to be power law, and the temperature distribution is broad in terms of wind velocity. Although restricted to the case of adiabatic cooling, our models highlight the influence of bow shock effects for hot plasma temperature and emission measure distributions in stellar winds and their impact on X-ray line profile shapes. Previous models have focused on geometrical considerations of the clumps and their distribution in the wind. Our results represent the first time that the temperature distribution of wind clump structures are explicitly and self-consistently accounted for in modeling X-ray line profile shapes for massive stars.

  15. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  16. Self-similar hot accretion flow onto a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2001-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical solutions which describe a hot, viscous, two-temperature accretion flow onto a neutron star or any other compact star with a surface. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, and free-free cooling from the electrons. Outside a thin boundary layer, where the accretion flow meets the star, we show that there is an extended settling region which is well-described by two self-similar solutions: (1) a two-temperature solution which is valid in an inner zone r<=102.5 (r is in Schwarzchild units), and (2) a one-temperature solution at larger radii. In both zones, ρ~r-2, Ω~r-3/2, v~r0, Tp~r-1 in the two-temperature zone, Te~r-1/2. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy of the star as the star is braked by viscosity; hence the luminosity is independent of Ṁ. The settling solution is convectively and viscously stable and is unlikely to have strong winds or outflows. The flow is thermally unstable, but the instability may be stabilized by thermal conduction. The settling solution described here is not advection-dominated, and is thus different from the self-similar ADAF found around black holes. When the spin of the star is small enough, however, the present solution transforms smoothly to a (settling) ADAF. .

  17. The incidence of stellar mergers and mass gainers among massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    De Mink, S. E.; Sana, H.; Langer, N.; Izzard, R. G.; Schneider, F. R. N.

    2014-02-10

    Because the majority of massive stars are born as members of close binary systems, populations of massive main-sequence stars contain stellar mergers and products of binary mass transfer. We simulate populations of massive stars accounting for all major binary evolution effects based on the most recent binary parameter statistics and extensively evaluate the effect of model uncertainties. Assuming constant star formation, we find that 8{sub −4}{sup +9}% of a sample of early-type stars are the products of a merger resulting from a close binary system. In total we find that 30{sub −15}{sup +10}% of massive main-sequence stars are the products of binary interaction. We show that the commonly adopted approach to minimize the effects of binaries on an observed sample by excluding systems detected as binaries through radial velocity campaigns can be counterproductive. Systems with significant radial velocity variations are mostly pre-interaction systems. Excluding them substantially enhances the relative incidence of mergers and binary products in the non-radial velocity variable sample. This poses a challenge for testing single stellar evolutionary models. It also raises the question of whether certain peculiar classes of stars, such as magnetic O stars, are the result of binary interaction and it emphasizes the need to further study the effect of binarity on the diagnostics that are used to derive the fundamental properties (star-formation history, initial mass function, mass-to-light ratio) of stellar populations nearby and at high redshift.

  18. Wolf-Rayet, Yellow and Red Supergiant in the single massive stars perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Hirschi, R.; Ekstrom, S.; Meynet, G.

    2013-06-01

    Rotation and mass loss are the key ingredients determining the fate of single massive stars. In recent years, a large effort has been made to compute whole grids of stellar models at different metallicities, including or not the effects of rotation, with the Geneva evolution code. In this talk, I will focus on the evolved stages of massive star evolution (red and yellow supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars), in the framework of these new grids of models. I will highlight the effects of rotation and mass loss on the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars at solar and lower metallicity. In particular, I will discuss their impact on the maximum mass for a star to end its life as a RSG (leading to a type IIP supernova), on the possibility for a star to finish as a YSG, and on the initial mass ranges leading to various WR star subtypes. I will then compare the results predicted by our code with observed populations of evolved massive stars, bringing constraints on our computations, as well as some indications on the binary star fraction needed to reproduce them.

  19. g-Mode Oscillations in Hot B Subdwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpinet, S.; Van Grootel, V.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Green, E. M.; Randall, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from space with CoRoT (Convection Rotation and Planetary Transits) and Kepler have revealed the rich pulsation spectra that characterize the long-period hot B subdwarf (sdB) pulsators of the V1093 Her type. These evolved and compact helium core burning stars can develop low amplitude oscillations with periods in the range ˜1 - 4 hours that correspond to low degree, mid- to high-order g-modes. These modes penetrate deep inside the star, down to the boundary of the central convective core. They are consequently particularly interesting as asteroseismic probes. Here we briefly review how the g-modes behave in sdB stars, focusing in particular on the seismic signatures coming from the core itself. We also briefly summarize the first seismic results obtained from space data in pioneering efforts to exploit the potential of long-period sdB pulsators as deep probes of the core structure.

  20. An infrared diagnostic for magnetism in hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksala, M. E.; Grunhut, J. H.; Kraus, M.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Neiner, C.; Condori, C. A. H.; Campagnolo, J. C. N.; Souza, T. B.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetospheric observational proxies are used for indirect detection of magnetic fields in hot stars in the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio wavelength ranges. To determine the viability of infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines as a magnetic diagnostic for these stars, we have obtained low-resolution (R~ 1200), near-IR spectra of the known magnetic B2V stars HR 5907 and HR 7355, taken with the Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrometer (OSIRIS) attached to the 4.1 m Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope. Both stars show definite variable emission features in IR hydrogen lines of the Brackett series, with similar properties as those found in optical spectra, including the derived location of the detected magnetospheric plasma. These features also have the added advantage of a lowered contribution of stellar flux at these wavelengths, making circumstellar material more easily detectable. IR diagnostics will be useful for the future study of magnetic hot stars, to detect and analyze lower-density environments, and to detect magnetic candidates in areas obscured from UV and optical observations, increasing the number of known magnetic stars to determine basic formation properties and investigate the origin of their magnetic fields. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  1. Low Mach Number Simulation of Core Convection in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilet, Candace Elise

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 solar mass star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. We examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a reduced domain size and using a monatomic, or single species, approximation. We compare a multi-species simulation on a full sphere (360 degree) domain with a multi-species simulation on an octant domain and also with a single species simulation on a full sphere domain. To perform the long-time calculations, we use the new low Mach number code MAESTRO. The first part of this work deals with numerical aspects of using MAESTRO for the core convection system, a new application for MAESTRO. We extend MAESTRO to include two new models, a single species model and a simplified two-dimensional planar model, to aid in the exploration of using MAESTRO for core convection in massive stars. We discuss using MAESTRO with a novel spherical geometry domain configuration, namely, with the outer boundary located in the interior of the star, and show how this can create spurious velocities that must be numerically damped using a sponging layer. We describe the preparation of the initial model for the simulation. We find that assuring neutral stratification in the convective core and reasonable resolution of the gravity waves in the stable layer are key factors in generating suitable initial conditions for the simulation. Further, we examine a numerical aspect of the velocity constraint that is part of the low Mach number formulation of the Euler equations. In particular, we investigate the numerical procedure for computing beta0, the density-like variable that captures background stratification in the velocity constraint, and find that the original method of computation remains a good choice. The three-dimensional simulation results show that using a single species model actually increases the computational cost of the simulation because the single

  2. A RAPIDLY EVOLVING REGION IN THE GALACTIC CENTER: WHY S-STARS THERMALIZE AND MORE MASSIVE STARS ARE MISSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: Pau.Amaro-Seoane@aei.mpg.de

    2014-05-10

    The existence of ''S-stars'' within a distance of 1'' from Sgr A* contradicts our understanding of star formation, due to Sgr A* 's forbiddingly violent environment. A suggested possibility is that they form far away and were brought in by some fast dynamical process, since they are young. Nonetheless, all conjectured mechanisms either fail to reproduce their eccentricities—without violating their young age—or cannot explain the problem of {sup i}nverse mass segregation{sup :} the fact that lighter stars (the S-stars) are closer to Sgr A* and more massive ones, Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-stars, are farther out. In this Letter we propose that the mechanism responsible for both the distribution of the eccentricities and the paucity of massive stars is the Kozai-Lidov-like resonance induced by a sub-parsec disk recently discovered in the Galactic center. Considering that the disk probably extended to a smaller radius in the past, we show that in as short as (a few) 10{sup 6} yr, the stars populating the innermost 1'' region would redistribute in angular-momentum space and recover the observed ''super-thermal'' distribution. Meanwhile, WR and O-stars in the same region intermittently attain ample eccentricities that will lead to their tidal disruptions by the central massive black hole. Our results provide new evidences that Sgr A* was powered several millions years ago by an accretion disk as well as by tidal stellar disruptions.

  3. Chandra and NTT Observations of Massive Young Stars in the Heavily Reddened Galactic Cluster Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, S. L.; Damineli, A.; Palla, F.; Zhekov, S. A.; Simmons, A. E.; Teodoro, M.

    2005-12-01

    The southern galactic starburst cluster Westerlund 1 (Wd1) contains a rich population of massive young stars that is spectacularly revealed in infrared images. Recent studies give a mean extinction in the range Av = 9.5 - 13.6 mag and age estimates of ˜3 - 5 Myr (Brandner et al. 2005, Clark et al. 2005). The cluster contains numerous supergiants, hypergiants, a LBV candidate, and at least 19 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. We present new results from Chandra X-ray and NTT near-IR observations of Wd1. Our immediate objectives are to obtain an X-ray census, identify optical or near-IR counterparts to the X-ray sources, and quantify the X-ray properties of the cluster members. Chandra detections include a newly-discovered 10.61 sec pulsar, the unusual B[e] supergiant W9, and half of the currently known WR stars in the cluster. The Chandra ACIS-S CCD spectrum of the Wd1 pulsar (CXO J164710.2-455217) can be acceptably reproduced by an absorbed soft blackbody emission model, but the model is not uniquely constrained by the existing data. A high-temperature component is clearly present in the X-ray spectrum of W9, suggesting that it is a close binary or unresolved multiple. Most of the Chandra WR detections are nitrogen-rich WN stars, but a few carbon-rich WC stars are surprisingly detected. At an assumed distance of 4 kpc, the X-ray luminosity of W87-239 (WC9) is two orders of magnitude greater than upper limits previously obtained for closer less-obscured single WC stars such as WR 135 (WC8, log Lx < 29.82 ergs/s; Skinner et al. 2005). The luminous X-ray emission and hot plasma in W87-239 point toward binarity. This study was supported by NASA/SAO grants GO5-6009X (PI: S.S.) and GO4-5003X (PI: S.Z.).

  4. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  5. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  6. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  7. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XI. A census of the hot luminous stars and their feedback in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, E. I.; Crowther, P. A.; de Koter, A.; Evans, C. J.; McEvoy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bastian, N.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Gräfener, G.; Herrero, A.; Köhler, K.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Najarro, F.; Puls, J.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Taylor, W. D.; van Loon, J. Th.; Vink, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey has an extensive view of the copious number of massive stars in the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) star forming region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. These stars play a crucial role in our understanding of the stellar feedback in more distant, unresolved star forming regions. Aims: The first comprehensive census of hot luminous stars in 30 Dor is compiled within a 10 arcmin (150 pc) radius of its central cluster, R136. We investigate the stellar content and spectroscopic completeness of the early type stars. Estimates were made for both the integrated ionising luminosity and stellar wind luminosity. These values were used to re-assess the star formation rate (SFR) of the region and determine the ionising photon escape fraction. Methods: Stars were selected photometrically and combined with the latest spectral classifications. Spectral types were estimated for stars lacking spectroscopy and corrections were made for binary systems, where possible. Stellar calibrations were applied to obtain their physical parameters and wind properties. Their integrated properties were then compared to global observations from ultraviolet (UV) to far-infrared (FIR) imaging as well as the population synthesis code, Starburst99. Results: Our census identified 1145 candidate hot luminous stars within 150 pc of R136 of which >700 were considered to be genuine early type stars and contribute to feedback. We assess the survey to be spectroscopically complete to 85% in the outer regions (>5 pc) but only 35% complete in the region of the R136 cluster, giving a total of 500 hot luminous stars in the census which had spectroscopy. Only 31 were found to be Wolf-Rayet (W-R) or Of/WN stars, but their contribution to the integrated ionising luminosity and wind luminosity was ~40% and ~50%, respectively. Similarly, stars with Minit > 100 M⊙ (mostly H-rich WN stars) also showed high contributions to the global feedback, ~25% in both cases. Such massive stars are not

  8. Influence of Entropy on Composition and Structure of Massive Protoneutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bin; Jia, Huan-Yu; Mu, Xue-Ling; Zhou, Xia

    2016-08-01

    Adjusting the suitable coupling constants in relativistic mean Geld (RMF) theory and focusing on thermal effect of an entropy per baryon (S) from 0 to 3, we investigate the composition and structure of massive protoneutron stars corresponding PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432. It is found that massive protoneutron stars (PNSs) have more hyperons than cold neutron stars. The entropy per baryon will stiffen the equation of state, and the influence on the pressure is more obvious at low density than high density, while the influence on the energy density is more obvious at high density than low density. It is found that higher entropy will give higher maximum mass, higher central temperature and lower central density. The entropy per baryon changes from 0 to 3, the radius of a PNS corresponding PSR J0348+0432 will increase from 12.86 km to 19.31 km and PSR J1612-2230 will increase from 13.03 km to 19.93 km. The entropy per baryon will raise the central temperature of massive PNSs in higher entropy per baryon, but the central temperature of massive PNSs maybe keep unchanged in lower entropy per baryon. The entropy per baryon will increase the moment of inertia of a massive protoneutron star, while decrease gravitational redshift of a massive neutron star. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11175147

  9. THE MILKY WAY PROJECT: A STATISTICAL STUDY OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH INFRARED BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Robitaille, T. P.; Simpson, R.; Lintott, C. J.; Bressert, E.; Povich, M. S.; Sherman, R.; Schawinski, K.; Wolf-Chase, G.

    2012-08-10

    The Milky Way Project citizen science initiative recently increased the number of known infrared bubbles in the inner Galactic plane by an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. We present a detailed statistical analysis of this data set with the Red MSX Source (RMS) catalog of massive young stellar sources to investigate the association of these bubbles with massive star formation. We particularly address the question of massive triggered star formation near infrared bubbles. We find a strong positional correlation of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and H II regions with Milky Way Project bubbles at separations of <2 bubble radii. As bubble sizes increase, a statistically significant overdensity of massive young sources emerges in the region of the bubble rims, possibly indicating the occurrence of triggered star formation. Based on numbers of bubble-associated RMS sources, we find that 67% {+-} 3% of MYSOs and (ultra-)compact H II regions appear to be associated with a bubble. We estimate that approximately 22% {+-} 2% of massive young stars may have formed as a result of feedback from expanding H II regions. Using MYSO-bubble correlations, we serendipitously recovered the location of the recently discovered massive cluster Mercer 81, suggesting the potential of such analyses for discovery of heavily extincted distant clusters.

  10. Angular Momentum Fluctuations in the Convective Helium Shell of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkis, Avishai; Soker, Noam

    2016-08-01

    We find significant fluctuations of angular momentum within the convective helium shell of a pre-collapse massive star—a core-collapse supernova progenitor—that may facilitate the formation of accretion disks and jets that can explode the star. The convective flow in our model of an evolved {M}{ZAMS}=15{M}⊙ star, computed using the subsonic hydrodynamic solver MAESTRO, contains entire shells with net angular momentum in different directions. This phenomenon may have important implications for the late evolutionary stages of massive stars and for the dynamics of core collapse.

  11. Angular Momentum Fluctuations in the Convective Helium Shell of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkis, Avishai; Soker, Noam

    2016-08-01

    We find significant fluctuations of angular momentum within the convective helium shell of a pre-collapse massive star—a core-collapse supernova progenitor—that may facilitate the formation of accretion disks and jets that can explode the star. The convective flow in our model of an evolved {M}{ZAMS}=15{M}ȯ star, computed using the subsonic hydrodynamic solver MAESTRO, contains entire shells with net angular momentum in different directions. This phenomenon may have important implications for the late evolutionary stages of massive stars and for the dynamics of core collapse.

  12. Sudden Radiative Braking in Colliding Hot-Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, K. G.; Owocki, S. P.; Cranmer, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    When two hot-star winds collide, their interaction centers at the point where the momentum fluxes balance. However, in WR+O systems, the imbalance in the corporeal momentum fluxes may be extreme enough to preclude a standard head-on wind/wind collision. On the other hand, an important component of the total momentum flux in radiatively driven winds is carried by photons. Thus, if the wind interaction region has sufficient scattering opacity, it can reflect stellar photons and cause important radiative terms to enter the momentum balance. This radiative input would result in additional braking of the wind. We use a radiative-hydrodynamics calculation to show that such radiative braking can be an important effect in many types of colliding hot-star winds. Characterized by sudden deceleration of the stronger wind in the vicinity of the weak-wind star, it can allow a wind ram balance that would otherwise be impossible in many WR+O systems with separations less than a few hundred solar radii. It also greatly weakens the shock strength and the encumbent X ray production. We demonstrate the significant features of this effect using V444 Cygni as a characteristic example. We also derive a general analytic theory that applies to a wide class of binaries, yielding simple predictions for when radiative braking should play an important role.

  13. An `analytic dynamical magnetosphere' formalism for X-ray and optical emission from slowly rotating magnetic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; ud-Doula, Asif; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Petit, Veronique; Cohen, David H.; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2016-11-01

    Slowly rotating magnetic massive stars develop `dynamical magnetospheres' (DMs), characterized by trapping of stellar wind outflow in closed magnetic loops, shock heating from collision of the upflow from opposite loop footpoints, and subsequent gravitational infall of radiatively cooled material. In 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the interplay among these three components is spatially complex and temporally variable, making it difficult to derive observational signatures and discern their overall scaling trends. Within a simplified, steady-state analysis based on overall conservation principles, we present here an `analytic dynamical magnetosphere' (ADM) model that provides explicit formulae for density, temperature, and flow speed in each of these three components - wind outflow, hot post-shock gas, and cooled inflow - as a function of colatitude and radius within the closed (presumed dipole) field lines of the magnetosphere. We compare these scalings with time-averaged results from MHD simulations, and provide initial examples of application of this ADM model for deriving two key observational diagnostics, namely hydrogen H α emission line profiles from the cooled infall, and X-ray emission from the hot post-shock gas. We conclude with a discussion of key issues and advantages in applying this ADM formalism towards derivation of a broader set of observational diagnostics and scaling trends for massive stars with such dynamical magnetospheres.

  14. Radiative Amplification of Acoustic Waves in Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, B. E.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of broad P Cygni profiles in early type stars and the detection of X-rays emitted from the envelopes of these stars made it clear, that a considerable amount of mechanical energy has to be present in massive stars. An attack on the problem, which has proven successful when applied to late type stars is proposed. It is possible that acoustic waves form out of random fluctuations, amplify by absorbing momentum from stellar radiation field, steepen into shock waves and dissipate. A stellar atmosphere was constructed, and sinusoidal small amplitude perturbations of specified Mach number and period at the inner boundary was introduced. The partial differential equations of hydrodynamics and the equations of radiation transfer for grey matter were solved numerically. The equation of motion was augmented by a term which describes the absorption of momentum from the radiation field in the continuum and in lines, including the Doppler effect and allows for the treatment of a large number of lines in the radiative acceleration term.

  15. THE DECREASE OF SPECIFIC ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND THE HOT TOROID FORMATION: THE MASSIVE CLUMP G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Wu Jingwen; Li Huabai E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t E-mail: li@mpia.d

    2010-10-10

    This is the first paper of our series of high-resolution (1'') studies of the massive star-forming region G10.6-0.4. We present the emission line observations of the hot core type tracers (O{sup 13}CS, OCS, SO{sub 2}) with {approx}0.''5 resolution. By comparing the results to the high-resolution NH{sub 3} absorption line observation, we confirm for the first time the rotationally flattened hot toroid in the central <0.1 pc region, which has a rotational axis perpendicular to its geometrical major axis. In addition, we present the observations of NH{sub 3}, {sup 13}CS, and CH{sub 3}CN with {approx}1'' resolution, and follow the dynamics of the molecular accretion flow from the 0.3 pc radius to the inner 0.03 pc radius. With reference to the rotational axis of the hot toroid, we measure the rotational velocity from the molecular emission in the region. The results are consistent with an envelope with a rapid decrease of the specific angular momentum from the outer to the inner region. These new results improve the current understanding of the molecular accretion flow in an ultracompact H II region created by the embedded O-type cluster.

  16. High molecular gas fractions in normal massive star-forming galaxies in the young Universe.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, L J; Genzel, R; Neri, R; Cox, P; Cooper, M C; Shapiro, K; Bolatto, A; Bouché, N; Bournaud, F; Burkert, A; Combes, F; Comerford, J; Davis, M; Schreiber, N M Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S; Gracia-Carpio, J; Lutz, D; Naab, T; Omont, A; Shapley, A; Sternberg, A; Weiner, B

    2010-02-11

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas. As this is relatively rare in the local Universe, galaxies like the Milky Way form only a few new stars per year. Typical massive galaxies in the distant Universe formed stars an order of magnitude more rapidly. Unless star formation was significantly more efficient, this difference suggests that young galaxies were much more molecular-gas rich. Molecular gas observations in the distant Universe have so far largely been restricted to very luminous, rare objects, including mergers and quasars, and accordingly we do not yet have a clear idea about the gas content of more normal (albeit massive) galaxies. Here we report the results of a survey of molecular gas in samples of typical massive-star-forming galaxies at mean redshifts of about 1.2 and 2.3, when the Universe was respectively 40% and 24% of its current age. Our measurements reveal that distant star forming galaxies were indeed gas rich, and that the star formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch. The average fraction of cold gas relative to total galaxy baryonic mass at z = 2.3 and z = 1.2 is respectively about 44% and 34%, three to ten times higher than in today's massive spiral galaxies. The slow decrease between z approximately 2 and z approximately 1 probably requires a mechanism of semi-continuous replenishment of fresh gas to the young galaxies.

  17. Connecting the Dots: MUSE Unveils the Destructive Effect of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. F.; Ginsburg, A.; Klaassen, P.; Mottram, J.; Ramsay, S.; Testi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Throughout their entire lives, massive stars have a substantial impact on their surroundings, such as via protostellar outflows, stellar winds, ionising radiation and supernovae. Conceptually this is well understood, but the exact role of feedback mechanisms on the global star formation process and the stellar environment, as well as their dependence on the properties of the star-forming regions, are yet to be understood in detail. Observational quantification of the various feedback mechanisms is needed to precisely understand how high mass stars interact with and shape their environment, and which feedback mechanisms dominate under given conditions. We analysed the photo-evaporative effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their surrounding molecular clouds using MUSE integral field data. This allowed us to determine the mass-loss rate of pillar-like structures (due to photo-evaporation) in different environments, and relate it to the ionising power of nearby massive stars. The resulting correlation is the first observational quantification of the destructive effect of ionising radiation from massive stars.

  18. Kinematics of the inner thousand AU region around the young massive star AFGL 2591-VLA3: a massive disk candidate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-S.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Recent detections of disks around young high-mass stars support the idea of massive star formation through accretion rather than coalescence, but the detailed kinematics in the equatorial region of the disk candidates is not well known, which limits our understanding of the accretion process. Aims: This paper explores the kinematics of the gas around a young massive star with millimeter-wave interferometry to improve our understanding of the formation of massive stars though accretion. Methods: We use Plateau de Bure interferometric images to probe the environment of the nearby (~1 kpc) and luminous (~20 000 L⊙) high-mass (10-16 M⊙) young star AFGL 2591-VLA3 in continuum and in lines of HDO, H_218O and SO2 in the 115 and 230 GHz bands. Radiative transfer calculations are employed to investigate the kinematics of the source. Results: At ~0.5″ (500 AU) resolution, the line images clearly resolve the velocity field of the central compact source (diameter of ~800 AU) and show linear velocity gradients in the northeast-southwest direction. Judging from the disk-outflow geometry, the observed velocity gradient results from rotation and radial expansion in the equatorial region of VLA3. Radiative transfer calculations suggest that the velocity field is consistent with sub-Keplerian rotation plus Hubble-law like expansion. The line profiles of the observed molecules suggest a layered structure, with HDO emission arising from the disk mid-plane, H_218O from the warm mid-layer, and SO2 from the upper disk. Conclusions: We propose AFGL 2591-VLA3 as a new massive disk candidate, with peculiar kinematics. The rotation of this disk is sub-Keplerian, probably due to magnetic braking, while the stellar wind may be responsible for the expansion of the disk. The expansion motion may also be an indirect evidence of disk accretion in the very inner region because of the conservation of angular momentum. The sub-Keplerian rotation discovered in our work suggests that

  19. A TIDALLY DESTRUCTED MASSIVE PLANET AS THE PROGENITOR OF THE TWO LIGHT PLANETS AROUND THE sdB STAR KIC 05807616

    SciTech Connect

    Bear, Ealeal; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il

    2012-04-10

    We propose that the two newly detected Earth-size planets around the hot B subdwarf star KIC 05807616 are remnant of the tidally destructed metallic core of a massive planet. A single massive gas-giant planet was spiralling-in inside the envelope of the red giant branch star progenitor of the extreme horizontal branch (EHB) star KIC 05807616. The released gravitational energy unbound most of the stellar envelope, turning it into an EHB star. The massive planet reached the tidal-destruction radius of {approx}1 R{sub Sun} from the core, where the planet's gaseous envelope was tidally removed. In our scenario, the metallic core of the massive planet was tidally destructed into several Earth-like bodies immediately after the gaseous envelope of the planet was removed. Two, and possibly more, Earth-size fragments survived at orbital separations of {approx}> 1 R{sub Sun} within the gaseous disk. The bodies interact with the disk and among themselves, and migrated to reach orbits close to a 3:2 resonance. These observed planets can have a planetary magnetic field about 10 times as strong as that of Earth. This strong magnetic field can substantially reduce the evaporation rate from the planets and explain their survivability against the strong UV radiation of the EHB star.

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometry and effective temperatures of hot stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Mount, G. H.; Feldman, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    Absolutely calibrated ultraviolet stellar spectra from 3100 A to the hydrogen absorption edge at 912 A were obtained on 1977 February 17 by rocket observations above Woomera, Australia. Spectra taken at 15 A resolution have been compared with the observed fluxes from OAO 2 and with recent model-atmosphere fluxes of Kurucz for five hot stars: Gamma (2) Vel, Zeta Pup, Alpha Eri, Beta Cen, and Alpha Vir. The present data give fluxes which are generally lower than those obtained from OAO 2, with the largest deviations of about 20% between 1400 and 1700 A. Agreement with the models is good, although the model fluxes are substantially larger than the observed values below 1200 A. This discrepancy is greater for the higher-temperature stars. Effective temperatures are also determined and are in good agreement with previous results.

  1. Warm Dust around Hot Stars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cesarsky, D.; Demyk, K.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on mid-infrared observations of the central region in the Trifid nebula, carried out with ISOCAM in several broad-band filters and in the low-resolution spectroscopic mode provided by the Circular Variable Filter. Analysis of the emission indicates the presence of a hot dust component (500-1000 K) and a warm dust component at lower temperatures (150-200 K) around several members of the cluster exciting the HII region and other stars undetected at optical wavelengths. Complementary VLA observations suggest that the mid-IR emission could arise from the a dust cocoon or a circumstellar disk, evaporated under the ionization of the central source and the exciting star of the nebula. In several sources the 9.7 micron silicate band is seen in emission. Around one young stellar source we found the presence of crystalline silicates in the circumstellar dust.

  2. Disks around hot stars in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cesarsky, D.; Demyk, K.; Rodriguez, L. F.

    2001-03-01

    We report on mid-IR observations of the central region in the Trifid nebula, carried out with ISOCAM in several broad-band infrared filters and in the low resolution spectroscopic mode provided by the circular variable filter. Analysis of the emission indicates the presence of a hot dust component (500 to 1000 K) and a warm dust component at lower temperatures (~ 150-200 K) around several members of the cluster exciting the H II region, and other stars undetected at optical wavelengths. Complementary VLA observations suggest that the mid-IR emission could arise from a dust cocoon or a circumstellar disk, evaporated under the ionization of the central source and the exciting star of the nebula. In several sources the 9.7 kern 0.20em mu m silicate band is seen in emission. One young stellar source shows indications of crystalline silicates in the circumstellar dust.

  3. The comparison of physical properties derived from gas and dust in a massive star-forming region

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Ginsburg, Adam; Darling, Jeremy; Dunham, Miranda; Longmore, Steve

    2014-05-10

    We explore the relationship between gas and dust in a massive star-forming region by comparing the physical properties derived from each. We compare the temperatures and column densities in a massive star-forming Infrared Dark Cloud (G32.02+0.05), which shows a range of evolutionary states, from quiescent to active. The gas properties were derived using radiative transfer modeling of the (1,1), (2,2), and (4,4) transitions of NH{sub 3} on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, while the dust temperatures and column densities were calculated using cirrus-subtracted, modified blackbody fits to Herschel data. We compare the derived column densities to calculate an NH{sub 3} abundance, χ{sub NH{sub 3}} = 4.6 × 10{sup –8}. In the coldest star-forming region, we find that the measured dust temperatures are lower than the measured gas temperatures (mean and standard deviations T {sub dust,} {sub avg} ∼ 11.6 ± 0.2 K versus T {sub gas,} {sub avg} ∼ 15.2 ± 1.5 K), which may indicate that the gas and dust are not well-coupled in the youngest regions (∼0.5 Myr) or that these observations probe a regime where the dust and/or gas temperature measurements are unreliable. Finally, we calculate millimeter fluxes based on the temperatures and column densities derived from NH{sub 3}, which suggest that millimeter dust continuum observations of massive star-forming regions, such as the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey or ATLASGAL, can probe hot cores, cold cores, and the dense gas lanes from which they form, and are generally not dominated by the hottest core.

  4. Massive runaway stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we identified for the first time a dozen runaway OB stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) through the detection of their bow shocks. The geometry of detected bow shocks allows us to infer the direction of motion of the associated stars and to determine their possible parent clusters and associations. One of the identified runaway stars, AzV 471, was already known as a high-velocity star on the basis of its high peculiar radial velocity, which is offset by ≃ 40 km s-1 from the local systemic velocity. We discuss implications of our findings for the problem of the origin of field OB stars. Several of the bow shock-producing stars are found in the confines of associations, suggesting that these may be “alien” stars contributing to the age spread observed for some young stellar systems. We also report the discovery of a kidney-shaped nebula attached to the early WN-type star SMC-WR3 (AzV 60a). We interpreted this nebula as an interstellar structure created owing to the interaction between the stellar wind and the ambient interstellar medium.

  5. Slowly rotating neutron stars in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Popchev, Dimitar

    2016-04-01

    In the scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field, the coupling constants, and the coupling functions in general, which are observationally allowed, can differ significantly from those in the massless case. This fact naturally implies that the scalar-tensor neutron stars with a massive scalar field can have rather different structure and properties in comparison with their counterparts in the massless case and in general relativity. In the present paper, we study slowly rotating neutron stars in scalar-tensor theories with a massive gravitational scalar. Two examples of scalar-tensor theories are examined—the first example is the massive Brans-Dicke theory and the second one is a massive scalar-tensor theory indistinguishable from general relativity in the weak-field limit. In the latter case, we study the effect of the scalar field mass on the spontaneous scalarization of neutron stars. Our numerical results show that the inclusion of a mass term for the scalar field indeed changes the picture drastically compared to the massless case. It turns out that mass, radius, and moment of inertia for neutron stars in massive scalar-tensor theories can differ drastically from the pure general relativistic solutions if sufficiently large masses of the scalar field are considered.

  6. VLTI and KI Interferometric Observations of Massive Evolved Stars and Their Dusty Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Debra J.; Danchi, W. C.; Rajagopal, J.; Chesneau, O.; Lopez, B.; Menut, J.; Monnier, J.; Tuthill, P.; Ireland, M.; Barry, R.; Richardson, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    Recent aperture-masking and interferometric observations of late-type WC Wolf-Rayet stars strongly support the theory that dust formation in these objects is a result of colliding winds in binary systems. To explore and quantify this possible explanation, we have conducted a high-resolution interferometric survey of late-type massive stars utilizing the VLTI, KI, IOTA, and FGS1r interferometers. We present here the motivation for this study. We also present the first results from the MIDI instrument on the VLTI, and the KI and IOTA observations. Our VLTI study is aimed primarily at resolving and characterizing the dust around the WC9 star WR 85a and the LBV WR 122, both dust-producing but at different phases of massive star evolution. Our IOTA and KI interferometric observations resolve the WR star WR 137 into a dust-producing binary system.

  7. s-Process Nucleosynthesis in Advanced Burning Phases of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, Lih-Sin; El Eid, Mounib F.; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2007-02-01

    We present a detailed study of s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars of solar-like initial composition and masses 15, 20, 25, and 30 Msolar. We update our previous results of s-process nucleosynthesis during the core He burning of these stars and then focus on an analysis of the s-process under the physical conditions encountered during the shell carbon burning. We show that the recent compilation of the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg rate leads to a remarkable reduction of the efficiency of the s-process during core He burning. In particular, this rate leads to the lowest overproduction factor of 80Kr found to date during core He burning in massive stars. The s-process yields resulting from shell carbon burning turn out to be very sensitive to the structural evolution of the carbon shell. This structure is influenced by the mass fraction of 12C attained at the end of core helium burning, which in turn is mainly determined by the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction. The still-present uncertainty in the rate for this reaction implies that the s-process in massive stars is also subject to this uncertainty. We identify some isotopes like 70Zn and 87Rb as the signatures of the s-process during shell carbon burning in massive stars. In determining the relative contribution of our s-only stellar yields to the solar abundances, we find it is important to take into account the neutron exposure of shell carbon burning. When we analyze our yields with a Salpeter initial mass function, we find that massive stars contribute at least 40% to s-only nuclei with mass A<=87. For s-only nuclei with mass A>90, massive stars contribute on average ~7%, except for 152Gd, 187Os, and 198Hg, which contribute ~14%, ~13%, and ~11%, respectively.

  8. A search for new hot subdwarf stars by means of virtual observatory tools II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Fernández, E.; Ulla, A.; Solano, E.; Oreiro, R.; Rodrigo, C.

    2016-04-01

    Recent massive sky surveys in different bandwidths are providing new opportunities to modern astronomy. The Virtual Observatory (VO) represents the adequate framework to handle the huge amount of information available and filter out data according to specific requirements. In this work, we applied a selection strategy to find new, uncatalogued hot subdwarfs making use of VO tools. We used large area catalogues like GALEX, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), SuperCosmos and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) to retrieve photometric and astrometric information of stellar objects. To these objects, we applied colour and proper motion filters, together with an effective temperature cutoff, aimed at separating hot subdwarfs from other blue objects such as white dwarfs, cataclysmic variables or main-sequence OB stars. As a result, we obtained 437 new, uncatalogued hot subdwarf candidates. Based on previous results, we expect our procedure to have an overall efficiency of at least 80 per cent. Visual inspection of the 68 candidates with SDSS spectrum showed that 65 can be classified as hot subdwarfs: 5 sdOs, 25 sdOBs and 35 sdBs. This success rate above 95 per cent proves the robustness and efficiency of our methodology. The spectral energy distribution of 45 per cent of the subdwarf candidates showed infrared excesses, a signature of their probable binary nature. The stellar companions of the binary systems so detected are expected to be late-type main-sequence stars. A detailed determination of temperatures and spectral classification of the cool companions will be presented in a forthcoming work.

  9. Massive Stars and their Siblings: the Extreme End of the Companion Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, Selma

    2013-10-01

    The gold-rush for detecting exoplanets has lead to an exponential improvement of optimization algorithms for high-contrast imaging optimized for HST. We propose to exploit these to probe the virtually unexplored population of low mass stars in the very close vicinity of young massive stars in order to I. progress our understanding of how low-mass stars form and survive under the influence of the ionizing radiation of their massive host and II. provide urgently needed constraints on competing theories of massive star formation by measuring their multiplicity. The high spatial and temporal stability of HST's point spread function is essential for the detection of very faint companions down to sub-arcsecond separations even in crowded regions at contrast up to delta-mag ~ 10, i.e. flux ratios up to 10,000. Furthermore the characterization of the low mass companions calls for wavelength bands largely affected by absorption by H2O in the earth's atmosphere. To achieve this goal we propose to use WFC3/IR to observe two adjacent fields in the center of the very young, nearby star cluster Trumpler 14, which harbors a rich population of massive stars.

  10. Massive Stars and their Siblings: the Extreme End of the Companion Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, Selma

    2014-10-01

    The gold-rush for detecting exoplanets has lead to an exponential improvement of optimization algorithms for high-contrast imaging optimized for HST. We propose to exploit these to probe the virtually unexplored population of low mass stars in the very close vicinity of young massive stars in order to I. progress our understanding of how low-mass stars form and survive under the influence of the ionizing radiation of their massive host and II. provide urgently needed constraints on competing theories of massive star formation by measuring their multiplicity. The high spatial and temporal stability of HST's point spread function is essential for the detection of very faint companions down to sub-arcsecond separations even in crowded regions at contrast up to delta-mag ~ 10, i.e. flux ratios up to 10,000. Furthermore the characterization of the low mass companions calls for wavelength bands largely affected by absorption by H2O in the earth's atmosphere. To achieve this goal we propose to use WFC3/IR to observe two adjacent fields in the center of the very young, nearby star cluster Trumpler 14, which harbors a rich population of massive stars.

  11. Study of variable extinction of hot stars with circumstellar dust shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Various projects on the topic of hot stars with circumstellar dust are reported. The surface temperature, wind speed, and interstellar reddening were determined for the variable WC7 star HD 193793. Circumstellar carbon monoxide molecules were detected around a hot star. The dust envelope of the star W90 in the young cluster NGC2264 is discussed, and the spectra of low-redshift and X-ray emitting quasars are mentioned.

  12. Theoretical Near-IR Spectra for Surface Abundance Studies of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Bouret, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present initial results of a study of abundance and mass loss properties of O-type stars based on theoretical near-IR spectra computed with state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere models. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a powerful tool to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio near-IR (1-5 micron) spectra of massive stars in different environments of local galaxies. Our goal is to analyze model near-IR spectra corresponding to those expected from NIRspec on JWST in order to map the wind properties and surface composition across the parameter range of 0 stars and to determine projected rotational velocities. As a massive star evolves, internal coupling, related mixing, and mass loss impact its intrinsic rotation rate. These three parameters form an intricate loop, where enhanced rotation leads to more mixing which in turn changes the mass loss rate, the latter thus affecting the rotation rate. Since the effects of rotation are expected to be much more pronounced at low metallicity, we pay special attention to models for massive stars in the the Small Magellanic Cloud. This galaxy provides a unique opportunity to probe stellar evolution, and the feedback of massive stars on galactic evol.ution in conditions similar to the epoch of maximal star formation. Plain-Language Abstract: We present initial results of a study of abundance and mass loss properties of massive stars based on theoretical near-infrared (1-5 micron) spectra computed with state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere models. This study is to prepare for observations by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Evolved massive stars in W33 and in GMC 23.3-0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Clark, J. Simon; Figer, Donald F.; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Najarro, Francisco; Rich, Michael; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Valenti, Elena; Trombley, Christine; Chen, Rosie; Davies, Ben; MacKenty, John W.

    2015-08-01

    We have conducted an infrared spectroscopic survey for massive evolved stars and/or clusters in the Galactic giant molecular clouds G23.3-0.3 and W33. A large number of extraordinary sub-clumps/clusters of massive stars were detected. The spatial and temporal distribution of these massive stars yields information on the star formation history of the clouds.In G23.3-0.3, we discovered a dozen massive O-type stars, one candidate luminous blue variable, and several red supergiants. The O-type stars have masses from 25 to 50 Msun and ages of 5-8 Myr, while the RSGs belong to a burst that occurred 20-30 Myr ago. Therefore, GMC G23.3-0.3 has had one of the longest known histories of star formation (20-30 Myr). GMC G23.3-0.3 is rich in HII regions and supernova remnants; we detected massive stars in the cores of SNR W41 and of SNR G22.7-0.2.In W33, we detected a few evolved O-type stars and one Wolf-Rayet star, but none of the late-type objects has the luminosity of a red supergiant. W33 is characterized by discrete sources and has had at least 3-5 Myr of star formation history, which is now propagating from west to east. While our detections of massive evolved stars in W33 are made on the west side of the cloud, several dense molecular cores that may harbor proto clusters have recently been detected on the east side of the cloud by Immer et al. (2014).Messineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Ivanov, Valentin D.Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John W.; Trombley, Christine 2014A&A...569A..20MMessineo, Maria; Clark, J. Simon; Figer, Donald F.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Francisco, Najarro; Rich, R. Michael; Menten, Karl M.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Valenti, Elena; Trombley, Christine; Chen, C.H. Rosie; Davies, Ben; submitted to ApJ.

  14. NLTE in a Hot Hydrogen Star: Auer & Mihalas Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, J.; Rutten, R. J.; Lanz, T.

    2003-01-01

    We pay tribute to two landmark papers published by Auer & Mihalas in 1969. They modeled hot-star NLTE-RE hydrogen-only atmospheres, using two simplified hydrogen atoms: ApJ 156, 157: H I levels 1, 2 and c, Lyman α the only line ApJ 156, 681: H I levels 1, 2, 3 and c, Balmer α the only line and computed LTE and NLTE models with the single line turned on and off. The results were extensively analyzed in the two papers. Any student of stellar line formation should take these beautiful papers to heart. The final exercise in Rutten's lecture notes ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' asks the student to work through five pages of questions concerning diagrams from the first paper alone! That exercise led to the present work in which we recompute the Auer-Mihalas hot-hydrogen-star models with TLUSTY, adding results from a complete hydrogen atom for comparison. Our motivation for this Auer-Mihalas re-visitation is twofold: 1. to add diagnostic diagrams to the ones published by Auer & Mihalas, in particular Bν, Jν, Sν graphs to illustrate the role of the radiation field, and radiative heating & cooling graphs to illustrate the radiative energy budget, 2. to see the effect of adding the rest of the hydrogen atom.

  15. Self-similar Hot Accretion Flow onto a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-06-01

    We consider hot, two-temperature, viscous accretion onto a rotating, unmagnetized neutron star. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, as well as free-free cooling from the electrons. We show that the accretion flow has an extended settling region that can be described by means of two analytical self-similar solutions: a two-temperature solution that is valid in an inner zone, r<~102.5, where r is the radius in Schwarzschild units; and a one-temperature solution that is valid in an outer zone, r>~102.5. In both zones the density varies as ρ~r-2 and the angular velocity as Ω~r-3/2. We solve the flow equations numerically and confirm that the analytical solutions are accurate. Except for the radial velocity, all gas properties in the self-similar settling zone, such as density, angular velocity, temperature, luminosity, and angular momentum flux, are independent of the mass accretion rate; these quantities do depend sensitively on the spin of the neutron star. The angular momentum flux is outward under most conditions; therefore, the central star is nearly always spun down. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy that is released as the star is braked by viscosity, and the contribution from gravity is small; hence, the radiative efficiency, η=Lacc/Mc2, is arbitrarily large at low M. For reasonable values of the gas adiabatic index γ, the Bernoulli parameter is negative; therefore, in the absence of dynamically important magnetic fields, a strong outflow or wind is not expected. The flow is also convectively stable but may be thermally unstable. The described solution is not advection dominated; however, when the spin of the star is small enough, the flow transforms smoothly to an advection-dominated branch of solution.

  16. SOAR Optical and Near-infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Newly Discovered Massive Stars in the Periphery of Galactic Massive Star Clusters I-NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Franco, G. A. P.; Sanmartim, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic study of very massive stars (VMSs) found outside the center of the massive stellar cluster NGC 3603. From the analysis of the associated Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope spectroscopic data and related optical-near-IR (NIR) photometry, we confirm the existence of several VMSs in the periphery of NGC 3603. The first group of objects (MTT58, WR42e, and RF7) is composed of three new Galactic exemplars of the OIf*/WN type, all of them with probable initial masses well above 100 {M}⊙ and estimated ages of about 1 Myr. Based on our Goodman blue-optical spectrum of another source in our sample (MTT68), we can confirm the previous finding in the NIR of the only other Galactic exemplar (besides HD 93129A) of the O2If* type known to date. Based on its position relative to a set of theoretical isochrones in a Hertzprung-Russel (H-R) diagram, we concluded that the new O2If* star could be one of the most massive (150 {M}⊙ ) and luminous (M V = -7.3) O-stars in the Galaxy. Also, another remarkable result is the discovery of a new O2v star (MTT31), which is the first exemplar of that class so far identified in the Milk Way. From its position in the H-R diagram it is found that this new star probably had an initial mass of 80 {M}⊙ , as well as an absolute magnitude of M V = -6.0, corresponding to a luminosity similar to other known O2v stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Finally, we also communicate the discovery of a new Galactic O3.5If* star (RFS8) that is quite an intriguing case. Indeed, it is located far to the south of the NGC 3603 center, in apparent isolation at a large radial projected linear distance of ˜62 pc. Its derived luminosity is similar to that of the other O3.5If* (Sh18) found in NGC 3603's innermost region, and the fact that a such high mass star is observed so isolated in the field led us to speculate that perhaps it could have been expelled from the innermost parts of the complex

  17. SOAR Optical and Near-infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Newly Discovered Massive Stars in the Periphery of Galactic Massive Star Clusters I-NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Franco, G. A. P.; Sanmartim, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic study of very massive stars (VMSs) found outside the center of the massive stellar cluster NGC 3603. From the analysis of the associated Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope spectroscopic data and related optical–near-IR (NIR) photometry, we confirm the existence of several VMSs in the periphery of NGC 3603. The first group of objects (MTT58, WR42e, and RF7) is composed of three new Galactic exemplars of the OIf*/WN type, all of them with probable initial masses well above 100 {M}ȯ and estimated ages of about 1 Myr. Based on our Goodman blue-optical spectrum of another source in our sample (MTT68), we can confirm the previous finding in the NIR of the only other Galactic exemplar (besides HD 93129A) of the O2If* type known to date. Based on its position relative to a set of theoretical isochrones in a Hertzprung–Russel (H–R) diagram, we concluded that the new O2If* star could be one of the most massive (150 {M}ȯ ) and luminous (M V = ‑7.3) O-stars in the Galaxy. Also, another remarkable result is the discovery of a new O2v star (MTT31), which is the first exemplar of that class so far identified in the Milk Way. From its position in the H–R diagram it is found that this new star probably had an initial mass of 80 {M}ȯ , as well as an absolute magnitude of M V = ‑6.0, corresponding to a luminosity similar to other known O2v stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Finally, we also communicate the discovery of a new Galactic O3.5If* star (RFS8) that is quite an intriguing case. Indeed, it is located far to the south of the NGC 3603 center, in apparent isolation at a large radial projected linear distance of ˜62 pc. Its derived luminosity is similar to that of the other O3.5If* (Sh18) found in NGC 3603's innermost region, and the fact that a such high mass star is observed so isolated in the field led us to speculate that perhaps it could have been expelled from the innermost parts of the

  18. ON THE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION OF MASSIVE MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.

    2015-12-20

    To date, asteroseismology has provided core-to-surface differential rotation measurements in eight main-sequence stars. These stars, ranging in mass from ∼1.5–9 M{sub ⊙}, show rotation profiles ranging from uniform to counter-rotation. Although they have a variety of masses, these stars all have convective cores and overlying radiative regions, conducive to angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves (IGWs). Using two-dimensional numerical simulations, we show that angular momentum transport by IGWs can explain all of these rotation profiles. We further predict that, should high mass, faster rotating stars be observed, the core-to-envelope differential rotation will be positive, but less than one.

  19. A young massive planet in a star-disk system.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, J; Henning, Th; Launhardt, R; Müller, A; Weise, P; Kürster, M

    2008-01-01

    There is a general consensus that planets form within disks of dust and gas around newly born stars. Details of their formation process, however, are still a matter of ongoing debate. The timescale of planet formation remains unclear, so the detection of planets around young stars with protoplanetary disks is potentially of great interest. Hitherto, no such planet has been found. Here we report the detection of a planet of mass (9.8+/-3.3)M(Jupiter) around TW Hydrae (TW Hya), a nearby young star with an age of only 8-10 Myr that is surrounded by a well-studied circumstellar disk. It orbits the star with a period of 3.56 days at 0.04 au, inside the inner rim of the disk. This demonstrates that planets can form within 10 Myr, before the disk has been dissipated by stellar winds and radiation.

  20. Statistics of magnetic fields and fluxes of massive OB stars and the origin of neutron star magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshev, A. P.; Kholtygin, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    Based on the newest measurements, statistical properties of rms mean magnetic fields of OB and neutron stars (NSs) were investigated. The magnetic field distribution function f(B) for OB stars was determined and a sharp decrease of f(B) for weak magnetic fields was found. The mean magnetic fluxes F for all massive stars and NSs with measured magnetic fields was estimated, and it was found that log F = 27.7 for OB stars and log F = 24.5 for NSs. To explain the large differences of the fluxes from normal and neutron stars we studied the birth and evolution of isolated neutron stars in the whole volume of our Galaxy with our new code of population synthesis. We started modeling %with our code from the birth of massive OB stars and followed their motion within the spiral arms to the point of supernova explosion. Next we considered the evolution of NS up to the death line with considering the magnetic field decay. We found that a significant magnetic field decay occurs during the first million years of a NS's life. We have estimated the mean time of the Ohmic decay for NS. We modeled the distributions of pulsar periods P, of period derivatives \\dot P, and of pulsar magnetic fields B, and found that they are in a good agreement with those taken from \\cite{ATNF}.

  1. Sulfur-bearing molecules observed in the massive star-forming regions, DR21(OH) and G33.92+0.11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Y. C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent high sensitive and high angular resolution observations are providing unprecedented amount of chemical data, especially, on the massive star-forming regions. It will greatly extend our understandings on the complicated star formation process, if we can digest those huge amount of information. We discuss here on the properties of the sulfurbearing species observed with high angular resolutions toward two massive star-forming regions, DR21(OH) and G33.92+0.11. H2S may not exist as a solid form in the grain mantles, but OCS is believed to be one of major solid sulfur species, as suggested before. In addition, the bipolar-like outflow of the H2CS emission observed in DR21(OH) may suggest that H2CS is also one of solid sulfur species on the grain mantles. Depending on the chemical environment, the competition between hydrogenation and oxidization on the grain surface may lead to formation of specific solid forms to dominate, which could be either H2CS or OCS. SO and SO2 are often observed to be associated with ionized gas, such as the UC HII regions. These species seem to be formed in the high temperature turbulent gas in a later stage of star formation after the hot core phase. Fractional abundances of these sulfur-bearing species appear to be consistent to a certain extent in several star-forming regions. The physical and chemical evolution of massive star formation seems to pass through very similar stages in most star-forming regions. Consequently, it may indicate that there exists a consistent and coherent pattern of processes experienced by the massive star formation, in spite of the large variations in small scale locational differences.

  2. The multiplicity of massive stars: A high angular resolution survey with the HST fine guidance sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aldoretta, E. J.; Gies, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.-C.; Norris, R. P. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an all-sky survey made with the Fine Guidance Sensor on the Hubble Space Telescope to search for angularly resolved binary systems among massive stars. The sample of 224 stars is comprised mainly of Galactic O- and B-type stars and luminous blue variables, plus a few luminous stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The FGS TRANS mode observations are sensitive to the detection of companions with an angular separation between 0.″01 and 1.″0 and brighter than △m=5. The FGS observations resolved 52 binary and 6 triple star systems and detected partially resolved binaries in 7 additional targets (43 of these are new detections). These numbers yield a companion detection frequency of 29% for the FGS survey. We also gathered literature results on the numbers of close spectroscopic binaries and wider astrometric binaries among the sample, and we present estimates of the frequency of multiple systems and the companion frequency for subsets of stars residing in clusters and associations, field stars, and runaway stars. These results confirm the high multiplicity fraction, especially among massive stars in clusters and associations. We show that the period distribution is approximately flat in increments of logP. We identify a number of systems of potential interest for long-term orbital determinations, and we note the importance of some of these companions for the interpretation of the radial velocities and light curves of close binaries that have third companions.

  3. Massive star formation in 100,000 years from turbulent and pressurized molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    McKee, Christopher F; Tan, Jonathan C

    2002-03-01

    Massive stars (with mass m* > 8 solar masses Mmiddle dot in circle) are fundamental to the evolution of galaxies, because they produce heavy elements, inject energy into the interstellar medium, and possibly regulate the star formation rate. The individual star formation time, t*f, determines the accretion rate of the star; the value of the former quantity is currently uncertain by many orders of magnitude, leading to other astrophysical questions. For example, the variation of t*f with stellar mass dictates whether massive stars can form simultaneously with low-mass stars in clusters. Here we show that t*f is determined by the conditions in the star's natal cloud, and is typically about 105yr. The corresponding mass accretion rate depends on the pressure within the cloud--which we relate to the gas surface density--and on both the instantaneous and final stellar masses. Characteristic accretion rates are sufficient to overcome radiation pressure from about 100M middle dot in circle protostars, while simultaneously driving intense bipolar gas outflows. The weak dependence of t*f on the final mass of the star allows high- and low-mass star formation to occur nearly simultaneously in clusters.

  4. VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Tannus, Maria Claudia; Kaper, Lex

    2015-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Formation timescales are short, the corresponding accretion rates very high, and the forming stars are hidden from view due to vast amounts of interstellar extinction. On top of that, massive stars are rare, are located at relatively large distances, and play a major role in shaping the interstellar medium due to their strong UV radiation fields and stellar winds. Although massive stars show most spectral features in the UV and optical range, so far only for a handful of massive Young Stellar Objects (mYSOs) optical and near-infrared spectra have been obtained. For some of these their pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature has now been firmly established (e.g. Ochsendorf et al. 2011, Ellerbroek et al. 2013). The objective of our project is to determine the physical properties of mYSOs, to search for signatures remnant of their formation process and to better understand the feedback on their environment.To this aim the optical to near-infrared (300-2500 nm) spectra of six candidate mYSOs (Hanson et al. 1997), deeply embedded in the massive star forming region M17, have been obtained with X-Shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. These mYSO candidates have been identified based on their infrared excess and spectral features (double-peaked emission lines, CO band-head emission) indicating the presence of a disk. In most cases, we detect a photospheric spectrum allowing us to measure the physical properties of the mYSO and to confirm its PMS nature. We also uncover many emission features, including forbidden lines, providing information on the (active) formation process of these young (massive) stars.

  5. The global structure of hot star winds: Constraints from spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversberg, Thomas

    2000-11-01

    Chapter 1. We present time-series of ultra-high S/N, high resolution spectra of the He II λ 4686 Å emission line in the O4I(n)f supergiant ζ Puppis, the brightest early-type O-star in the sky. These reveal stochastic, variable substructures in the line, which tend to move away from the line-center with time. Similar scaled-up features are well established in the strong winds of Wolf-Rayet stars (the presumed descendants of O stars), where they are explained by outward moving inhomogeneities (e.g., blobs, clumps, shocks) in the winds. If all hot-star winds are clumped like that of ζ Pup, as is plausible, then mass-low rates based on recombination-line intensities will have to be revised downwards. Using a standard `β' velocity law we deduce a value of β = 1.0-1.2 to account for the kinematics of these structures in the wind of ζ Pup. In addition to the small-scale stochastic variations we also find a slow systematic variation of the mean central absorption reversal. Chapter 2. We introduce a new polarimeter unit which, mounted at the Cassegrain focus of any telescope and fiber-connected to a fixed CCD spectrograph, is able to measure all Stokes parameters I, Q, U and V across spectral lines of bright stellar targets and other point sources in a quasi-simultaneous manner. Applying standard reduction techniques for linearly and circularly polarized light we are able to obtain photon-noise limited line polarization. We briefly outline the technical design of the polarimeter unit and the linear algebraic Mueller calculus for obtaining polarization parameters of any point source. In addition, practical limitations of the optical elements are outlined. We present first results obtained with our spectropolarimeter for four bright, hot-star targets: We confirm previous results for Hα in the bright Be star γ Cas and find linear depolarization features across the emission line complex C III/C IV (λ 5696/λ 5808 Å) of the WR+O binary γ2 Vel. We also find circular

  6. THE INTEGRATED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION OF THE CARINA NEBULA COMPARED TO OTHER MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Oey, M. S.; Pittard, Julian M.

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) has shown that the Carina Nebula displays bright, spatially-complex soft diffuse X-ray emission. Here, we 'sum up' the CCCP diffuse emission work by comparing the global morphology and spectrum of Carina's diffuse X-ray emission to other famous sites of massive star formation with pronounced diffuse X-ray emission: M17, NGC 3576, NGC 3603, and 30 Doradus. All spectral models require at least two diffuse thermal plasma components to achieve adequate spectral fits, a softer component with kT = 0.2-0.6 keV and a harder component with kT = 0.5-0.9 keV. In several cases these hot plasmas appear to be in a state of non-equilibrium ionization that may indicate recent and current strong shocks. A cavity north of the embedded giant H II region NGC 3576 is the only region studied here that exhibits hard diffuse X-ray emission; this emission appears to be nonthermal and is likely due to a recent cavity supernova, as evidenced by a previously-known pulsar and a newly-discovered pulsar wind nebula also seen in this cavity. All of these targets exhibit X-ray emission lines that are not well modeled by variable-abundance thermal plasmas and that might be attributed to charge exchange at the shock between the hot, tenuous, X-ray-emitting plasma and cold, dense molecular material; this is likely evidence for dust destruction at the many hot/cold interfaces that characterize massive star-forming regions.

  7. A Hot Water Bottle for Aging Neutron Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Krishna

    We understand many of the properties of the densest phase of quark matter rigorously from first principles QCD. However, the nature of the second-most-dense phase of quark matter remains unclear. A recently proposed candidate for this phase features both neutrino emissivity and specific heat that are parametrically enhanced relative to those of all other proposed phases of dense matter -- quark or nuclear. If present within a layer of a neutron star, it would control the cooling of the star. The neutrino-dominated cooling would look like standard Direct-URCA as the two enhancements cancel, but old stars, say tens of millions of years and older, would stay orders of magnitude warmer than in any other scenario. Most of my talk will consist of explaining this abstract. At the end, I will explain why it currently remains unclear whether this hot water bottle phase really is the second-densest form of quark matter, and will discuss an alternative possibility.

  8. HUBBLE PICTURES SHOW HOT GAS BUBBLE EJECTED BY YOUNG STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 reveal the evolution of bubbles of glowing gas being blown out from the young binary star system XZ Tauri. Gas from an unseen disk around one or both of the stars is channeled through magnetic fields surrounding the binary system and then is forced out into space at nearly 300,000 miles per hour (540,000 kilometers per hour). This outflow, which is only about 30 years old, extends nearly 60 billion miles (96 billion kilometers). Hubble first discovered this unique bubble in 1995, and additional observations were made between 1998 and 2000. These images show that there was a dramatic change in its appearance between 1995 and 1998. In 1995, the bubble's edge was the same brightness as its interior. However, when Hubble took another look at XZ Tauri in 1998, the edge was suddenly brighter. This brightening is probably caused by the hot gas cooling off, which allows electrons in the gas to recombine with atoms, a process that gives off light. This is the first time that astronomers have seen such a cooling zone 'turn on.' These images provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the development of a very recent outflow from young (about 1 million years old) stars. Credits: NASA, John Krist (Space Telescope Science Institute), Karl Stapelfeldt (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jeff Hester (Arizona State University), Chris Burrows (European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute)

  9. The Formation of Massive Stars by Collisional Mergers: Theoretical Constraints and Observational Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, Hans; Bally, John

    2004-08-01

    While accretional growth can lead to the formation of massive stars in isolation or in loose OB associations, collisional growth and mergers can only occur in high-density cluster environments. We will discuss the conditions in a very dense young star cluster under which the merger scenario of massive star formation may work, and whether these conditions are likely to occur somewhere in the our Galaxy (Orion BN/KL, NGC 3603, W3-IRS5), the Local Group (30 Dor, NGC 604), or other galaxies (NGC 5253, Henize 2-10, The Antennae clusters). We explore the observational consequences of the merger scenario. Protostellar mergers may produce high luminosity infrared flares. Mergers may be surrounded by thick tori of expanding debris, impulsive wide-angle outflows, shock-induced maser and radio continuum emission. The collision products are expected to have fast stellar rotation and a large multiplicity fraction. Massive stars growing by a series of mergers may produce eruptive bursts of wide-angle outflow activity with random orientations; the walls of the resulting outflow cavities may be observable as filaments of dense gas and dust pointing away from the massive star. The extremely rare merger of two stars close to the upper mass limit of the IMF may be a possible pathway to hypernova-generated gamma-ray bursters. We also speculate that the outflow "fingers" from the OMC1 core in the Orion molecular cloud were produced by a merger less than a thousand years ago (Bally and Zinnecker 2004, AJ submitted). Mergers may not occur in every dense young cluster, but certainly in some of them, especially those where dynamical mass segregation of massive stars has taken place (Freitag and Benz 2004, astro-ph 0403621).

  10. All In The Family: Chandra Finds Evidence That Massive Stars Are More Like The Sun Than Previously Believed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found evidence that massive stars may be much more like the Sun than previously thought. Astronomers determined that magnetic loop structures, similar to those on the Sun, may exist on the surface of so-called O-type stars, some of the most luminous stars in the universe. "This result is quite surprising," says Wayne Waldron of Emergent Information Technologies, Inc., and co-author of a paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters. "This bucks conventional wisdom to find that these stars may really resemble our Sun." Zeta Orionis Press Image and Caption Using Chandra's High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) in conjunction with a CCD X-ray camera, astronomers observed the star Zeta Orionis (one of the three belt stars in the constellation of Orion) and found strong X-ray line emission from ions of iron, oxygen, and other elements. The high-resolution X-ray spectrum enabled astronomers to determine that the X-ray emitting gas has a density 1000 times larger than predicted by current models, an amount comparable to the atmospheric density just above the surface of the star. For many years, solar astronomers have derived densities of X-ray producing plasmas on the Sun using emission lines of ions like helium, those with just two bound electrons remaining. Chandra allows this approach to be used for other stars and it has detected X-rays from silicon ions that have been stripped of 12 of their usual complement of 14 electrons. This ion is an especially useful diagnostic of plasma densities in the extremely ultraviolet-bright environment surrounding O-stars. Following the discovery of X-ray emission from O-class stars some 20 years ago, astronomers assumed that the X-rays were created in a hot corona near the star, similar to the Sun's corona. Those models were then abandoned in favor of the currently preferred explanation: the X-ray radiation is created by energetic shocks in the stellar winds (steady streams

  11. On the possibility that the most massive stars result from binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koter, A.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; de Mink, S. E.; Evans, C. J.; Gräfener, G.; Izzard, R. G.; Langer, N.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Vink, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey is an ESO Large Program from which we have obtained multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. This unprecedented dataset is being used to address outstanding questions in how massive stars evolve from the early main sequence to their deaths as core collapse supernovae. Here we focus on the rotation properties of the population of presumably single O stars and use binary population synthesis predictions to show that the rapid rotators among this population likely are post-interaction binaries. The same type of population synthesis can be used to study the mass function of massive young clusters. We argue - on the basis of predictions for the Arches and Quintuplet clusters - that a sizable fraction of the very massive WNh stars in 30 Doradus may also have such a binary interaction history. We single out the WNh star discovered in the VFTS, VFTS 682, and discuss its properties.

  12. Molecular Clouds and Massive Star Formation in the Norma Spiral Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, P.; Bronfman, L.; May, J.

    2006-06-01

    The Norma spiral arm in the Southern Galaxy contains the most massive molecular clouds as well as the most FIR luminous regions of massive star formation in the Galactic disk. The tangent region of this arm, at a well defined distance of ≈ 4.5 kpc from the Sun, is ideal to study in detail the process of massive star formation in GMCs (Bronfman et al. 1988, ApJ, 324, 248). We present maps of the major GMCs in ^{12}CO and C^{18}O obtained with the Nanten 4-m telescope, at a resolution of 2.5 arcmin. We have obtained also CS (2-1) and CS(5-4) maps of several OB star formation regions embedded in these GMCs (Bronfman et al. 1996, A&AS, 115, 81). What is the contribution from embedded OB stars to the total FIR emission from these GMCs? What is the fraction of cloud molecular gas involved in massive star formation?

  13. The s-PROCESS Nucleosynthesis in Massive Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    We present the s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars with a wide range of metallicity, using the recent sets of reaction rates and stellar input physics. The decreasing metallicity makes poisoning effects of primary 16O larger at the late phase of core He burning, at which the s-process occurs actively in solar metallicity stars, and prevents the synthesis of heavy elements from being efficient. However, we find that the s-process proceeds very efficiently via neutron source reaction of 13C(α,n)16O at the end of core H burning phase when the metallicity decreases below Z ~ 10-8. These massive, extremely low metallicity stars may have an important contribution of light s-elements to observed extremely metal-poor stars.

  14. Constraining the axion-photon coupling with massive stars.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Alexander; Giannotti, Maurizio; Wise, Michael

    2013-02-01

    We point out that stars in the mass window ~8-12M([circumpunct]) can serve as sensitive probes of the axion-photon interaction, g(Aγγ). Specifically, for these stars axion energy losses from the helium-burning core would shorten and eventually eliminate the blue loop phase of the evolution. This would contradict observational data, since the blue loops are required, e.g., to account for the existence of Cepheid stars. Using the MESA stellar evolution code, modified to include the extra cooling, we conservatively find g(Aγγ)

  15. Stellar feedback from a massive Super Star Cluster in the Antennae merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Cinthya N.; Boulanger, Francois

    2015-08-01

    Super star clusters (SSCs), likely the progenitors of globular clusters, are one of the most extreme forms of star formation. Stellar feedback from such massive clusters is vital to galaxy evolution and star formation history in the Universe, as the intense radiation and stellar winds produced by massive stars are important in unbinding and dispersing large molecular clouds and affecting star formation efficiency and sequential star formation. Nearby galaxy mergers are ideal sites to investigate massive star feedback, and to form local analogous in high-redshift galaxies. Based on ALMA and VLT observations, we study this process in a SSC in the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/39, 22 Mpc), a spectacular example of a burst of star formation triggered by the encounter of two galaxies. We analyze a massive (~107 M⊙) and young (3.4 Myr) SSC, B1, which is associated with compact molecular and ionized emission, suggesting that it is still embedded in its parent molecular cloud. However, we found that the observed CO linewidth yields a conservative velocity expansion, the radiation pressure does not accelerate today the gas and the matter surrounding the cluster is clumpy, indicating that SSC B1 is not embedded in its parent cloud after all. We propose that radiation pressure was highly enhanced at the early stages of the SSC formation, early disrupting the parent cloud (< 3 Myr). The gas observed today surrounding the cluster did not participate on the cluster formation but are nearby clouds and/or gas accreted from the SGMC. We present evidences that outflowing gas from the parent cloud may be still observed in the broader, high velocity component of the CO gas, which has a bubble-like shape structure distributed around SSC B1. Higher angular resolution observations are needed to validate this interpretation and to understand the origin and fate of the component seen to be associated with SSC B1.

  16. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. PMID:26819043

  17. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

  18. Linking 1D evolutionary to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The ‘stiffness’ of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ({{Ri}}{{B}}), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A ‘stiff’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ {10}4) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a ‘soft’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ 10) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are ‘stiffer’ than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett (2007 Astrophys. J. 667 448-75). This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in super-asymptotic giant branch stars and also the onset of novae.

  19. The Galactic Distribution of Massive Star Formation from the Red MSX Source Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figura, Charles C.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Massive stars inject enormous amounts of energy into their environments in the form of UV radiation and molecular outflows, creating HII regions and enriching local chemistry. These effects provide feedback mechanisms that aid in regulating star formation in the region, and may trigger the formation of subsequent generations of stars. Understanding the mechanics of massive star formation presents an important key to understanding this process and its role in shaping the dynamics of galactic structure. The Red MSX Source (RMS) survey is a multi-wavelength investigation of ~1200 massive young stellar objects (MYSO) and ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions identified from a sample of colour-selected sources from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) point source catalog and Two Micron All Sky Survey. We present a study of over 900 MYSO and UCHII regions investigated by the RMS survey. We review the methods used to determine distances, and investigate the radial galactocentric distribution of these sources in context with the observed structure of the galaxy. The distribution of MYSO and UCHII regions is found to be spatially correlated with the spiral arms and galactic bar. We examine the radial distribution of MYSOs and UCHII regions and find variations in the star formation rate between the inner and outer Galaxy and discuss the implications for star formation throughout the galactic disc.

  20. Feedback by massive stars and the emergence of superbubbles. I. Energy efficiency and Vishniac instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, M.; Fierlinger, K.; Diehl, R.; Burkert, A.; Voss, R.; Ziegler, U.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Massive stars influence their environment through stellar winds, ionising radiation, and supernova explosions. This is signified by observed interstellar bubbles. Such feedback is an important factor for galaxy evolution theory and galactic wind models. The efficiency of the energy injection into the interstellar medium (ISM) via bubbles and superbubbles is uncertain, and is usually treated as a free parameter for galaxy scale effects. In particular, since many stars are born in groups, it is interesting to study the dependence of the effective energy injection on the concentration of the stars. Aims: We aim to reproduce observations of superbubbles, their relation to the energy injection of the parent stars, and to understand their effective energy input into the ISM, as a function of the spatial configuration of the group of parent stars. Methods: We study the evolution of isolated and merging interstellar bubbles of three stars (25, 32, and 60 M⊙) in a homogeneous background medium with a density of 10mp cm-3 via 3D-hydrodynamic simulations with standard ISM thermodynamics (optically thin radiative cooling and photo-electric heating) and time-dependent energy and mass input according to stellar evolutionary tracks. We vary the position of the three stars relative to each other to compare the energy response for cases of isolated, merging and initially cospatial bubbles. Results: Mainly due to the Vishniac instability, our simulated bubbles develop thick shells and filamentary internal structures in column density. The shell widths reach tens of per cent of the outer bubble radius, which compares favourably to observations. More energy is retained in the ISM for more closely packed groups, by up to a factor of three and typically a factor of two for intermediate times after the first supernova. Once the superbubble is established, different positions of the contained stars make only a minor difference to the energy tracks. For our case of three massive

  1. Very massive neutron stars in Ni's theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in Ni's theory of gravity, which is identical to general relativity in the post-Newtonian limit, neutron stars of arbitrarily large mass are possible. This result is independent, within reasonable bounds, of the equation of state of matter at supernuclear densities.

  2. The delay time distribution of massive double compact star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennekens, N.; Vanbeveren, D.

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the temporal evolution of binary populations, in general, and double compact-star binaries and mergers, in particular, within a galactic evolution context, a very straightforward method is obviously to implement a detailed binary evolutionary model in a galactic chemical evolution code. To our knowledge, the Brussels galactic chemical evolution code is the only one that fully and consistently accounts for the important effects of interacting binaries on the predictions of chemical evolution. With a galactic code that does not explicitly include binaries, the temporal evolution of the population of double compact star binaries and mergers can be estimated with reasonable accuracy if the delay time distribution (DTD) for these mergers is available. The DTD for supernovae type Ia has been studied extensively in the past decade. In the present paper we present the DTD for merging double neutron-star binaries and mixed systems consisting of a neutron star and a black hole. The latter mergers are very promising sites for producing r-process elements, and the DTDs can be used to study the galactic evolution of these elements with a code that does not explicitly account for binaries.

  3. Infrared Spectro-Interferometry of Massive Stars: Disks, Winds, Outflows, and Stellar Multiplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    for the dynamical orbit and the dynamical mass. Taking the measured flux ratio and the derived location in the HR-diagram into account, we estimated the spectral types and masses of Theta 1 Ori C1 and C2 to be O5.5 (M=34.0 M_sun) and O9.5 (M=15.5 M_sun), respectively. Thus, the companion C2 appears to be much more massive than previously thought, suggesting strong wind-wind interaction during the periastron passage, which we predict for epoch 2007.5 with a small physical separation of only approx. 1.5 AU. From the IOTA data on Theta 1 Ori C, we reconstructed the first optical aperture synthesis image of a young star. We also obtained IOTA data for Theta 1 Ori D, which appears resolved, perhaps indicating the presence of a close, faint companion. Eta Carinae: Using VLTI/AMBER, we performed the first NIR spectro-interferometry of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) Eta Car, simultaneously obtaining high spatial and spectral resolutions (R=1,500 and 12,000). The measured wavelength-dependent visibilities, differential phases, and closure phases were used to constrain the geometry of the continuum-emitting region, as well as the Br Gamma 2.166 micron and He I 2.059 micron line-emitting region. We compared the measured visibilities with predictions of the radiative transfer model of Hillier et al. (2001), finding good agreement. For the interpretation of the non-zero differential and closure phases measured within the Br Gamma line, we present a simple geometric model of an inclined, latitude-dependent wind zone. Thus, our observations support theoretical models of anisotropic winds from fast-rotating, luminous hot stars with enhanced high-velocity mass loss near the polar regions. In the He I line, we measured non-zero phases as well, indicating asymmetries in the brightness distribution, which we discuss in the context of wind-wind interaction between Eta Car and its hypothetical hot binary companion. Using simulations, we examined the possibility to directly detect this

  4. Southern Massive Stars at High Angular Resolution: Observational Campaign and Companion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, H.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Duvert, G.; Gauchet, L.; Norris, B.; Olofsson, J.; Pickel, D.; Zins, G.; Absil, O.; de Koter, A.; Kratter, K.; Schnurr, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2014-11-01

    Multiplicity is one of the most fundamental observable properties of massive O-type stars and offers a promising way to discriminate between massive star formation theories. Nevertheless, companions at separations between 1 and 100 milliarcsec (mas) remain mostly unknown due to intrinsic observational limitations. At a typical distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to projected physical separations of 2-200 AU. The Southern MAssive Stars at High angular resolution survey (SMaSH+) was designed to fill this gap by providing the first systematic interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars. We observed 117 O-type stars with VLTI/PIONIER and 162 O-type stars with NACO/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM), probing the separation ranges 1-45 and 30-250 mas and brightness contrasts of ΔH < 4 and ΔH < 5, respectively. Taking advantage of NACO's field of view, we further uniformly searched for visual companions in an 8'' radius down to ΔH = 8. This paper describes observations and data analysis, reports the discovery of almost 200 new companions in the separation range from 1 mas to 8'' and presents a catalog of detections, including the first resolved measurements of over a dozen known long-period spectroscopic binaries. Excluding known runaway stars for which no companions are detected, 96 objects in our main sample (δ < 0° H < 7.5) were observed both with PIONIER and NACO/SAM. The fraction of these stars with at least one resolved companion within 200 mas is 0.53. Accounting for known but unresolved spectroscopic or eclipsing companions, the multiplicity fraction at separation ρ < 8'' increases to f m = 0.91 ± 0.03. The fraction of luminosity class V stars that have a bound companion reaches 100% at 30 mas while their average number of physically connected companions within 8'' is f c = 2.2 ± 0.3. This demonstrates that massive stars form nearly exclusively in multiple systems. The nine non-thermal radio emitters observed by SMaSH+ are all resolved, including the newly

  5. SOUTHERN MASSIVE STARS AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION: OBSERVATIONAL CAMPAIGN AND COMPANION DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sana, H.; Lacour, S.; Gauchet, L.; Pickel, D.; Berger, J.-P.; Norris, B.; Olofsson, J.; Absil, O.; De Koter, A.; Kratter, K.; Schnurr, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2014-11-01

    Multiplicity is one of the most fundamental observable properties of massive O-type stars and offers a promising way to discriminate between massive star formation theories. Nevertheless, companions at separations between 1 and 100 milliarcsec (mas) remain mostly unknown due to intrinsic observational limitations. At a typical distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to projected physical separations of 2-200 AU. The Southern MAssive Stars at High angular resolution survey (SMaSH+) was designed to fill this gap by providing the first systematic interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars. We observed 117 O-type stars with VLTI/PIONIER and 162 O-type stars with NACO/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM), probing the separation ranges 1-45 and 30-250 mas and brightness contrasts of ΔH < 4 and ΔH < 5, respectively. Taking advantage of NACO's field of view, we further uniformly searched for visual companions in an 8'' radius down to ΔH = 8. This paper describes observations and data analysis, reports the discovery of almost 200 new companions in the separation range from 1 mas to 8'' and presents a catalog of detections, including the first resolved measurements of over a dozen known long-period spectroscopic binaries. Excluding known runaway stars for which no companions are detected, 96 objects in our main sample (δ < 0°; H < 7.5) were observed both with PIONIER and NACO/SAM. The fraction of these stars with at least one resolved companion within 200 mas is 0.53. Accounting for known but unresolved spectroscopic or eclipsing companions, the multiplicity fraction at separation ρ < 8'' increases to f {sub m} = 0.91 ± 0.03. The fraction of luminosity class V stars that have a bound companion reaches 100% at 30 mas while their average number of physically connected companions within 8'' is f {sub c} = 2.2 ± 0.3. This demonstrates that massive stars form nearly exclusively in multiple systems. The nine non-thermal radio emitters observed by SMaSH+ are all resolved

  6. Magnetic Grain Trapping and the Hot Excesses around Early-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Gáspár, András; Ballering, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    A significant fraction of main sequence stars observed interferometrically in the near-infrared have slightly extended components that have been attributed to very hot dust. To match the spectrum appears to require the presence of large numbers of very small (<200 nm in radius) dust grains. However, particularly for the hotter stars, it has been unclear how such grains can be retained close to the star against radiation pressure force. We find that the expected weak stellar magnetic fields are sufficient to trap nm-sized dust grains in epicyclic orbits for a few weeks or longer, sufficient to account for the hot excess emission. Our models provide a natural explanation for the requirement that the hot excess dust grains be smaller than 200 nm. They also suggest that magnetic trapping is more effective for rapidly rotating stars, consistent with the average vsini measurements of stars with hot excesses being larger (at ∼2σ) than those for stars without such excesses.

  7. PRESUPERNOVA EVOLUTION AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS OF ZERO METAL MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A. E-mail: alessandro.chieffi@inaf.it

    2012-04-01

    We present a new set of zero metallicity models in the range 13-80 M{sub Sun} together to the associated explosive nucleosynthesis. These models are fully homogeneous with the solar metallicity set we published in Limongi and Chieffi and will be freely available at the Online Repository for the FRANEC Evolutionary Output Web site. A comparison between these yields and an average star that represents the average behavior of most of the very metal-poor stars in the range -5.0 < [Fe/H] < -2.5 confirms previous findings that only a fraction of the elemental [X/Fe] may be fitted by the ejecta of standard core collapse supernovae.

  8. The Evolution of Massive Stars and the Concomitant Non-explosive and Explosive Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, Marcel

    These lectures are concerned with some aspects of the evolution of massive stars and of the concomitant nucleosynthesis. They complement other lectures in this volume. Special emphasis is put on the production of the nuclides heavier than iron by the r- and p-processes.

  9. Super and massive AGB stars - II. Nucleosynthesis and yields - Z = 0.02, 0.008 and 0.004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Carolyn L.; Gil-Pons, Pilar; Lau, Herbert H. B.; Lattanzio, John C.; Siess, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    We have computed detailed evolution and nucleosynthesis models for super and massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars over the mass range 6.5-9.0 M⊙ in divisions of 0.5 M⊙ with metallicities Z = 0.02, 0.008 and 0.004. These calculations, in which we find third dredge-up and hot bottom burning, fill the gap between existing low- and intermediate-mass AGB star models and high-mass star models that become supernovae. For the considered metallicities, the composition of the yields is largely dominated by the thermodynamic conditions at the base of the convective envelope rather than by the pollution arising from third dredge-up. We investigate the effects of various uncertainties, related to the mass-loss rate, mixing length parameter, and the treatment of evolution after the envelope instability that develops near the end of the (super)AGB phase. Varying these parameters alters the yields mainly because of their impact on the amount of third dredge-up enrichment, and to a lesser extent on the hot bottom burning conditions. Our models produce significant amounts of 4He, 7Li (depending on the mass-loss formulation) 13C, 14N, 17O, 23Na, 25Mg, as well the radioactive isotope 26Al in agreement with previous investigation. In addition, our results show enrichment of 22Ne, 26Mg and 60Fe, as well as a substantial increase in our proxy neutron capture species representing all species heavier than iron. These stars may provide important contributions to the Galaxy's inventory of the heavier Mg isotopes, 14N, 7Li and 27Al.

  10. Narrow He II emission in star-forming galaxies at low metallicity. Stellar wind emission from a population of very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfener, G.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-06-01

    Context. In a recent study, star-forming galaxies with He ii λ1640 emission at moderate redshifts between 2 and 4.6 have been found to occur in two modes that are distinguished by the width of their He ii emission lines. Broad He ii emission has been attributed to stellar emission from a population of evolved Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. The origin of narrow He ii emission is less clear but has been attributed to nebular emission excited by a population of very hot Pop III stars formed in pockets of pristine gas at moderate redshifts. Aims: We propose an alternative scenario for the origin of the narrow He ii emission, namely very massive stars (VMS) at low metallicity (Z), which form strong but slow WR-type stellar winds due to their proximity to the Eddington limit. Methods: We estimated the expected He ii line fluxes and equivalent widths based on wind models for VMS and Starburst99 population synthesis models and compared the results with recent observations of star-forming galaxies at moderate redshifts. Results: The observed He ii line strengths and equivalent widths are in line with what is expected for a population of VMS in one or more young super-clusters located within these galaxies. Conclusions: In our scenario the two observed modes of He ii emission originate from massive stellar populations in distinct evolutionary stages at low Z (~0.01 Z⊙). If this interpretation is correct, there is no need to postulate the existence of Pop III stars at moderate redshifts to explain the observed narrow He ii emission. An interesting possibility is the existence of self-enriched VMS with similar WR-type spectra at extremely low Z. Stellar He ii emission from such very early generations of VMS may be detectable in future studies of star-forming galaxies at high redshifts with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The fact that the He ii emission of VMS is largely neglected in current population synthesis models will generally affect the interpretation of the

  11. Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Santos, J. S.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.; Bouy, H.; Haines, C. P.; Okabe, N.

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of star-forming (SF) galaxies in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Field recent cluster merger A2744 (z = 0.308). Wide-field, ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) imaging enables a direct constraint of the total star formation rate (SFR) for 53 cluster galaxies, with SFRUV+IR = 343 ± 10 M⊙ yr-1. Within the central 4 arcmin (1.1 Mpc) radius, the integrated SFR is complete, yielding a total SFRUV+IR = 201 ± 9 M⊙ yr-1. Focusing on obscured star formation, this core region exhibits a total SFRIR = 138 ± 8 M⊙ yr-1, a mass-normalized SFRIR of ΣSFR = 11.2 ± 0.7 M⊙ yr-1 per 1014 M⊙ and a fraction of IR-detected SF galaxies f_SF = 0.080^{+0.010}_{-0.037}. Overall, the cluster population at z ˜ 0.3 exhibits significant intrinsic scatter in IR properties (total SFRIR, Tdust distribution) apparently unrelated to the dynamical state: A2744 is noticeably different to the merging Bullet cluster, but similar to several relaxed clusters. However, in A2744 we identify a trail of SF sources including jellyfish galaxies with substantial unobscured SF due to extreme stripping (SFRUV/SFRIR up to 3.3). The orientation of the trail, and of material stripped from constituent galaxies, indicates that the passing shock front of the cluster merger was the trigger. Constraints on star formation from both IR and UV are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution within the densest environments.

  12. Chemical abundances of massive stars in Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Kaufer, Andreas; Tolstoy, Eline; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Przybilla, Norbert; Smartt, Stephen J.; Lennon, Daniel J.

    The relative abundances of elements in galaxies can provide valuable information on the stellar and chemical evolution of a galaxy. While nebulae can provide abundances for a variety of light elements, stars are the only way to directly determine the abundances of iron-group and s-process and r-process elements in a galaxy. The new 8m and 10m class telescopes and high-efficiency spectrographs now make high-quality spectral observations of bright supergiants possible in dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have been concentrating on elemental abundances in the metal-poor dwarf irregular galaxies, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextants A, and GR 8. Comparing abundance ratios to those predicted from their star formation histories, determined from color-magnitude diagrams, and comparing those ratios between these galaxies can give us new insights into the evolution of these dwarf irregular galaxies. Iron-group abundances also allow us to examine the metallicities of the stars in these galaxies directly, which affects their inferred mass loss rates and predicted stellar evolution properties.

  13. The mass-radius relationship of massive compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Partha Roy

    2015-02-24

    The properties of pure hadronic and hybrid compact stars are reviewed using nuclear equation of state (EoS) for β-equilibrated neutron star (NS) matter obtained using a density-dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. Depending on the model, the energy density of quark matter can be lower than that of this nuclear EoS at higher densities, implying the possibility of transition to quark matter inside the core and the transition density depends on the particular quark matter model used. The recent observations of the binary millisecond pulsar J1614–2230 by P.B. Demorest et al. [1] and PSR J0348+0432 by J. Antoniadis et al. [2] suggest that the masses lie within 1.97 ± 0.04 M{sub ⊙} and 2.01 ± 0.04 M{sub ⊙}, respectively, where M{sub ⊙} is the solar mass. In conformity with recent observations, a pure nucleonic EoS determines that the maximum mass of NS rotating with frequency ν∼ 667 Hz below r-mode instability is ∼ 1.95 M{sub ⊙} with radius ∼ 10 km. Compact stars with quark cores rotating with same frequency have the maximum mass of ∼ 1.72 M{sub ⊙} turns out to be lower than the observed masses.

  14. Diquark condensation effects on hot quark star configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztas, A.; Blaschke, D.; Fredriksson, S.; Grigorian, H.

    The equation of state for quark matter is derived for a nonlocal, chiral quark model within the mean field approximation. We investigate the effects of a variation of the form-factors of the interaction on the phase diagram of quark matter. Special emphasis is on the occurrence of a diquark condensate which signals a phase transition to color superconductivity and its effects on the equation of state under the condition of β- equilibrium and charge neutrality. We calculate the quark star configurations by solving the Tolman- Oppenheimer- Volkoff equations and obtain for the transition from a hot, normal quark matter core of a protoneutron star to a cool diquark condensed one a release of binding energy of the order of ΔMc2 ~ 1053 erg. We find that this energy could not serve as an engine for explosive phenomena since the phase transition is not first order. Contrary to naive expectations the mass defect increases when for a given temperature we neglect the possibility of diquark condensation.

  15. Diquark condensation effects on hot quark star configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Fredriksson, S.; Grigorian, H.; Öztasş, A. M.

    2004-05-01

    The equation of state for quark matter is derived for a nonlocal, chiral quark model within the mean field approximation. We investigate the effects of a variation of the formfactors of the interaction on the phase diagram of quark matter. Special emphasis is on the occurrence of a diquark condensate which signals a phase transition to color superconductivity and its effects on the equation of state under the condition of β-equilibrium and charge neutrality. We calculate the quark star configurations by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations and obtain for the transition from a hot, normal quark matter core of a protoneutron star to a cool diquark condensed one a release of binding energy of the order of ΔMc2~1053 erg. We find that this energy could not serve as an engine for explosive phenomena since the phase transition is not first order. Contrary to naive expectations the mass defect increases when for a given temperature we neglect the possibility of diquark condensation.

  16. Voyager absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Forrester, W. T.; Shemansky, D. E.; Barry, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager observations in the 912-1200 A spectral region are used to indirectly intercompare absolute stellar spectrophotometry from previous experiments. Measurements of hot stars obtained by the Voyager 1 and 2 ultraviolet spectrometers show considerably higher 912-1200 A continuum fluxes than the recent observations of Brune et al. (1979) and Carruthers et al. (1981). The intercomparisons show all observations in basic agreement near 1200 A. The Carruthers et al. flux measurements are preferred down to 1050 A at which point the Voyager and Brune et al. values are respectively 60% higher and 60% lower. Below 1050 A the diasgreement among the observations becomes very large and the fluxes predicted by model atmospheres have been adopted. The pure hydrogen line-blanketed model atmosphere calculations of Wesemael et al. 1980) in comparison with Voyager observations of HZ 43 are used to adjust the Voyager calibration below 1050 A. This adjusted Voyager calibration, which is in good agreement with current model atmosphere fluxes for both early-type stars and DA white dwarfs, will be used for Voyager astronomical observations.

  17. A giant outburst two years before the core-collapse of a massive star.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, A; Smartt, S J; Mattila, S; Eldridge, J J; Young, D; Itagaki, K; Yamaoka, H; Navasardyan, H; Valenti, S; Patat, F; Agnoletto, I; Augusteijn, T; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Boles, T; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Botticella, M T; Bufano, F; Cao, C; Deng, J; Dennefeld, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Harutyunyan, A; Keenan, F P; Iijima, T; Lorenzi, V; Mazzali, P A; Meng, X; Nakano, S; Nielsen, T B; Smoker, J V; Stanishev, V; Turatto, M; Xu, D; Zampieri, L

    2007-06-14

    The death of massive stars produces a variety of supernovae, which are linked to the structure of the exploding stars. The detection of several precursor stars of type II supernovae has been reported (see, for example, ref. 3), but we do not yet have direct information on the progenitors of the hydrogen-deficient type Ib and Ic supernovae. Here we report that the peculiar type Ib supernova SN 2006jc is spatially coincident with a bright optical transient that occurred in 2004. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the supernova leads us to suggest that the progenitor was a carbon-oxygen Wolf-Rayet star embedded within a helium-rich circumstellar medium. There are different possible explanations for this pre-explosion transient. It appears similar to the giant outbursts of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) of 60-100 solar masses, but the progenitor of SN 2006jc was helium- and hydrogen-deficient (unlike LBVs). An LBV-like outburst of a Wolf-Rayet star could be invoked, but this would be the first observational evidence of such a phenomenon. Alternatively, a massive binary system composed of an LBV that erupted in 2004, and a Wolf-Rayet star exploding as SN 2006jc, could explain the observations. PMID:17568740

  18. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2013-12-10

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M {sub ☉} known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  19. A giant outburst two years before the core-collapse of a massive star.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, A; Smartt, S J; Mattila, S; Eldridge, J J; Young, D; Itagaki, K; Yamaoka, H; Navasardyan, H; Valenti, S; Patat, F; Agnoletto, I; Augusteijn, T; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Boles, T; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Botticella, M T; Bufano, F; Cao, C; Deng, J; Dennefeld, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Harutyunyan, A; Keenan, F P; Iijima, T; Lorenzi, V; Mazzali, P A; Meng, X; Nakano, S; Nielsen, T B; Smoker, J V; Stanishev, V; Turatto, M; Xu, D; Zampieri, L

    2007-06-14

    The death of massive stars produces a variety of supernovae, which are linked to the structure of the exploding stars. The detection of several precursor stars of type II supernovae has been reported (see, for example, ref. 3), but we do not yet have direct information on the progenitors of the hydrogen-deficient type Ib and Ic supernovae. Here we report that the peculiar type Ib supernova SN 2006jc is spatially coincident with a bright optical transient that occurred in 2004. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the supernova leads us to suggest that the progenitor was a carbon-oxygen Wolf-Rayet star embedded within a helium-rich circumstellar medium. There are different possible explanations for this pre-explosion transient. It appears similar to the giant outbursts of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) of 60-100 solar masses, but the progenitor of SN 2006jc was helium- and hydrogen-deficient (unlike LBVs). An LBV-like outburst of a Wolf-Rayet star could be invoked, but this would be the first observational evidence of such a phenomenon. Alternatively, a massive binary system composed of an LBV that erupted in 2004, and a Wolf-Rayet star exploding as SN 2006jc, could explain the observations.

  20. SPITZER SAGE-SMC INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF MASSIVE STARS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, A. Z.; Lennon, D. J.; Massa, D. L. E-mail: lennon@stsci.ed

    2010-08-15

    We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3to24 {mu}m in the UBVIJHK{sub s} +IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 {mu}m in the SMC are a few very luminous hypergiants, four B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all three known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in our SMC catalog, respectively, when compared to the LMC catalog, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A and F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.

  1. Are Young Massive Star Clusters in the Local Universe Analogous to Globular Clusters Progenitors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, Corinne

    2015-08-01

    Several models do compete to reproduce the present-day characteristics of globular clusters (GC) and to explain the origin of the multiple stellar populations these systems are hosting.In parallel, independent clues on GC early evolution may be derived from observations of young massive clusters (YMC) in the Local Group.But are these two populations of clusters related? In this talk, we discuss how and if GC and YMC data can be reconciled.We revisit in particular the impact of massive stars on the early evolution of massive star clusters, as well as the question of early gas expulsion.We propose several tests to probe whether the YMC we are observing today can be considered as the analogues of GC progenitors.

  2. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Cyganowski, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ∼10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ∼10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  3. Can Very Massive Population III Stars Produce a Super-Collapsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Chul; Kang, Jisu; Kozyreva, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    A fraction of the first generation of stars in the early universe may be very massive (≳ 300 {{M}⊙ }) as they form in metal-free environments. Formation of black holes from these stars can be accompanied by supermassive collapsars to produce long gamma-ray bursts of a unique type having a very high total energy (˜ {{10}54} erg) as recently suggested by several authors. We present new stellar evolution models of very massive Population III stars including the effect of rotation to provide theoretical constraints on super-collapsar progenitors. We find that the angular momentum condition for a super-collapsar can be fulfilled if magnetic torques are ignored, in which case Eddington-Sweet circulations play the dominant role for the transport of angular momentum. We further find that the initial mass range for super-collapsar progenitors would be limited to 300 {{M}⊙ }≲ M≲ 700 {{M}⊙ }. However, all of our very massive star models of this mass range end their lives as red supergiants rather than blue supergiants, in good agreement with most of the previous studies. The predicted final fate of these stars is either a jet-powered type IIP supernova or an ultra-long, relatively faint gamma-ray transient, depending on the initial amount of angular momentum.

  4. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  5. Gravitational waves from the collision of tidally disrupted stars with massive black holes

    SciTech Connect

    East, William E.

    2014-11-10

    We use simulations of hydrodynamics coupled with full general relativity to investigate the gravitational waves produced by a star colliding with a massive black hole when the star's tidal disruption radius lies far outside of the black hole horizon. We consider both main-sequence and white-dwarf compaction stars, and nonspinning black holes, as well as those with near-extremal spin. We study the regime in between where the star can be accurately modeled by a point particle, and where tidal effects completely suppress the gravitational wave signal. We find that nonnegligible gravitational waves can be produced even when the star is strongly affected by tidal forces, as well as when it collides with large angular momentum. We discuss the implications that these results have for the potential observation of gravitational waves from these sources with future detectors.

  6. A THIRD MASSIVE STAR COMPONENT IN THE {sigma} ORIONIS AB SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Lorenzo, J.

    2011-11-20

    We report on the detection of a third massive star component in the {sigma} Orionis AB system, traditionally considered as a binary system. The system has been monitored by the IACOB Spectroscopic Survey of Northern Massive Stars program, obtaining 23 high-resolution FIES-NOT spectra with a time span of {approx}2.5 years. The analysis of the radial velocity curves of the two spectroscopic components observed in the spectra has allowed us to obtain the orbital parameters of the system, resulting in a high eccentric orbit (e {approx} 0.78) with an orbital period of 143.5 {+-} 0.5 days. This result implies the actual presence of three stars in the {sigma} Orionis AB system when combined with previous results obtained from the study of the astrometric orbit (with an estimated period of {approx}157 years).

  7. Rejuvenation of stellar mergers and the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F. R. N.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Langer, N.; Castro, N.; Fossati, L.

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 10 per cent of massive OBA main-sequence (MS) and pre-MS stars harbour strong, large-scale magnetic fields. At the same time, there is a dearth of magnetic stars in close binaries. A process generating strong magnetic fields only in some stars must be responsible with the merging of pre-MS and MS stars being suggested as one such channel. Stars emerging from the coalescence of two MS stars are rejuvenated, appearing younger than they are. They can therefore be identified by comparison with reference clocks. Here, we predict the rejuvenation of MS merger products over a wide range of masses and binary configurations calibrated to smoothed-particle-hydrodynamical merger models. We find that the rejuvenation is of the order of the nuclear time-scale and is strongest in the lowest mass mergers and the most evolved binary progenitors with the largest mass ratios. These predictions allow us to put constraints on the binary progenitors of merger products. We show that the magnetic stars HR 2949 and τ Sco are younger than the potential binary companion HR 2948 and the Upper-Sco association, respectively, making them promising merger candidates. We find that the age discrepancies and the potential binary progenitors of both are consistent with them being rejuvenated merger products, implying that their magnetic fields may originate from this channel. Searching for age discrepancies in magnetic stars is therefore a powerful way to explore which fraction of magnetic stars may have obtained their strong magnetic field in MS mergers and to improve our understanding of magnetism in massive stars and their remnants.

  8. Surveying Massive Star Formation in the Inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, R.; Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.; Marco, A.

    2016-10-01

    The base of the Scutum arm is a Galactic region with a high density of red supergiant (RSG) stars, grouped in a few clusters which have similar ages, positions and radial velocities. We have performed an extensive survey using the multi-object spectrograph AAOmega, looking for new RSGs along the galactic plane from l˜24° to 30°. We have observed >1600 candidates, and identified them through an extensive study of the statistical behavior of RSG spectra, finding ˜200 new RSGs.

  9. Hot subdwarf stars in close-up view. III. Metal abundances of subdwarf B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are considered to be core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes situated on or near the extreme horizontal branch. The formation of sdBs is still unclear as well as the chemical composition of their atmospheres. The observed helium depletion is attributed to atmospheric diffusion. Metal abundances have been determined for about a dozen sdBs only resulting in puzzling patterns with enrichment of heavy metals and depletion of lighter ones. Aims: We present a detailed metal abundance analysis of 106 sdBs. Methods: From high resolution spectra we measured elemental abundances of up to 24 different ions per star. A semi-automatic analysis pipeline was developed to calculate and fit LTE models to a standard set of spectral lines. Results: A general trend of enrichment was found with increasing temperature for most of the heavier elements. The lighter elements like carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are depleted and less affected by temperature. Although there is considerable scatter from star to star, the general abundance patterns in most sdBs are similar. State-of-the-art diffusion models predict such patterns and are in qualitative agreement with our results. However, the highest enrichments measured cannot be explained with these models. Peculiar line shapes of the strongest metal lines in some stars indicate vertical stratification to be present in the atmospheres. Such effects are not accounted for in current diffusion models and may be responsible for some of the yet unexplained abundance anomalies. Tables A.1-A.3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A110

  10. Iron-group opacities in the envelopes of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine

    2014-02-01

    β Cephei and SPB stars are pulsating stars for which the excitation of modes by the κ mechanism, due to the iron-group opacity peak, seems puzzling. We have first investigated the origins of the differences noticed between OP and OPAL iron and nickel opacity calculations (up to a factor 2), a fact which complicates the interpretation. To accomplish this task, new well-qualified calculations (SCO-RCG, HULLAC and ATOMIC) have been performed and compared to values of these tables, and most of the differences are now well understood. Next, we have exploited a dedicated experiment on chromium, iron and nickel, conducted at the LULI 2000 facilities. We found that, in the case of iron, detailed calculations (OP, ATOMIC and HULLAC) show good agreement, contrary to all of the non-detailed calculations. However, in the case of nickel, OP calculations show large discrepancies with the experiments but also with other codes. Thus, the opacity tables need to be revised in the thermodynamical conditions corresponding to the peak of the iron group. Consequently we study the evolution of this iron peak with changes in stellar mass, age, and metallicity to determine the relevant region where these tables should be revised.

  11. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  12. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  13. First detections of FS Canis Majoris stars in clusters. Evolutionary state as constrained by coeval massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Trombley, C.; Davies, B.; Figer, D. F.

    2015-03-01

    Context. FS CMa stars are low-luminosity objects showing the B[e] phenomenon whose evolutionary state remains a puzzle. These stars are surrounded by compact disks of warm dust of unknown origin. Hitherto, membership of FS CMa stars to coeval populations has never been confirmed. Aims: The discovery of low-luminosity line emitters in the young massive clusters Mercer 20 and Mercer 70 prompts us to investigate the nature of such objects. We intend to confirm membership to coeval populations in order to characterize these emission-line stars through the cluster properties. Methods: Based on ISAAC/VLT medium-resolution spectroscopy and NICMOS/HST photometry of massive cluster members, new characterizations of Mercer 20 and Mercer 70 are performed. Coevality of each cluster and membership of the newly-discovered B[e] objects are investigated using our observations as well as literature data of the surroundings. Infrared excess and narrow-band photometric properties of the B[e] stars are also studied. Results: We confirm and classify 22 new cluster members, including Wolf-Rayet stars and blue hypergiants. Spectral types (O9-B1.5 V) and radial velocities of B[e] objects are compatible with the remaining cluster members, while emission features of Mg ii, Fe ii], and [Fe ii] are identified in their spectra. The ages of these stars are 4.5 and 6 Myr, and they show mild infrared excesses. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of FS CMa stars in the coeval populations of Mercer 20 and Mercer 70. We discuss the nature and evolutionary state of FS CMa stars, discarding a post-AGB nature and introducing a new hypothesis about mergers. A new search method for FS CMa candidates in young massive clusters based on narrow-band Paschen-α photometry is proposed and tested in photometric data of other clusters, yielding three new candidates. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under program IDs 083.D

  14. A magnetic confinement versus rotation classification of massive-star magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, V.; Owocki, S. P.; Wade, G. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Gagné, M.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Oksala, M. E.; Bohlender, D. A.; Rivinius, T.; Henrichs, H. F.; Alecian, E.; Townsend, R. H. D.; ud-Doula, A.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    Building on results from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, this paper shows how a two-parameter classification of massive-star magnetospheres in terms of the magnetic wind confinement (which sets the Alfvén radius RA) and stellar rotation (which sets the Kepler co-rotation radius RK) provides a useful organization of both observational signatures and theoretical predictions. We compile the first comprehensive study of inferred and observed values for relevant stellar and magnetic parameters of 64 confirmed magnetic OB stars with Teff ≳ 16 kK. Using these parameters, we locate the stars in the magnetic confinement-rotation diagram, a log-log plot of RK versus RA. This diagram can be subdivided into regimes of centrifugal magnetospheres (CM), with RA > RK, versus dynamical magnetospheres (DM), with RK > RA. We show how key observational diagnostics, like the presence and characteristics of Hα emission, depend on a star's position within the diagram, as well as other parameters, especially the expected wind mass-loss rates. In particular, we identify two distinct populations of magnetic stars with Hα emission: namely, slowly rotating O-type stars with narrow emission consistent with a DM, and more rapidly rotating B-type stars with broader emission associated with a CM. For O-type stars, the high mass-loss rates are sufficient to accumulate enough material for line emission even within the relatively short free-fall time-scale associated with a DM: this high mass-loss rate also leads to a rapid magnetic spindown of the stellar rotation. For the B-type stars, the longer confinement of a CM is required to accumulate sufficient emitting material from their relatively weak winds, which also lead to much longer spindown time-scales. Finally, we discuss how other observational diagnostics, e.g. variability of UV wind lines or X-ray emission, relate to the inferred magnetic properties of these stars, and summarize prospects for future developments in our

  15. THE COSMIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA RATE DOES NOT MATCH THE MASSIVE-STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Thompson, Todd A.; Prieto, Jose L.

    2011-09-10

    We identify a 'supernova rate problem': the measured cosmic core-collapse supernova rate is a factor of {approx}2 smaller (with significance {approx}2{sigma}) than that predicted from the measured cosmic massive-star formation rate. The comparison is critical for topics from galaxy evolution and enrichment to the abundance of neutron stars and black holes. We systematically explore possible resolutions. The accuracy and precision of the star formation rate data and conversion to the supernova rate are well supported, and proposed changes would have far-reaching consequences. The dominant effect is likely that many supernovae are missed because they are either optically dim (low-luminosity) or dark, whether intrinsically or due to obscuration. We investigate supernovae too dim to have been discovered in cosmic surveys by a detailed study of all supernova discoveries in the local volume. If possible supernova impostors are included, then dim supernovae are common enough by fraction to solve the supernova rate problem. If they are not included, then the rate of dark core collapses is likely substantial. Other alternatives are that there are surprising changes in our understanding of star formation or supernova rates, including that supernovae form differently in small galaxies than in normal galaxies. These possibilities can be distinguished by upcoming supernova surveys, star formation measurements, searches for disappearing massive stars, and measurements of supernova neutrinos.

  16. Super massive black hole in galactic nuclei with tidal disruption of stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    Tidal disruption of stars by super massive central black holes from dense star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. The time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate, the effect of tidal disruption on the stellar density profile, and, for the first time, the detailed origin of tidally disrupted stars are carefully examined and compared with classic papers in the field. Up to 128k particles are used in simulation to model the star cluster around a super massive black hole, and we use the particle number and the tidal radius of the black hole as free parameters for a scaling analysis. The transition from full to empty loss-cone is analyzed in our data, and the tidal disruption rate scales with the particle number, N, in the expected way for both cases. For the first time in numerical simulations (under certain conditions) we can support the concept of a critical radius of Frank and Rees, which claims that most stars are tidally accreted on highly eccentric orbits originating from regions far outside the tidal radius. Due to the consumption of stars moving on radial orbits, a velocity anisotropy is found inside the cluster. Finally we estimate the real galactic center based on our simulation results and the scaling analysis.

  17. A massive hypergiant star as the progenitor of the supernova SN 2005gl.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, A; Leonard, D C

    2009-04-16

    Our understanding of the evolution of massive stars before their final explosions as supernovae is incomplete, from both an observational and a theoretical standpoint. A key missing piece in the supernova puzzle is the difficulty of identifying and studying progenitor stars. In only a single case-that of supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud-has a star been detected at the supernova location before the explosion, and been subsequently shown to have vanished after the supernova event. The progenitor of SN 1987A was a blue supergiant, which required a rethink of stellar evolution models. The progenitor of supernova SN 2005gl was proposed to be an extremely luminous object, but the association was not robustly established (it was not even clear that the putative progenitor was a single luminous star). Here we report that the previously proposed object was indeed the progenitor star of SN 2005gl. This very massive star was likely a luminous blue variable that standard stellar evolution predicts should not have exploded in that state. PMID:19305392

  18. A Spectroscopic Survey of Massive Stars in M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F.; Smart, Brianna M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe our spectroscopic follow-up to the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS) photometry of M31 and M33. We have obtained new spectroscopy of 1895 stars, allowing us to classify 1496 of them for the first time. Our study has identified many foreground stars, and established membership for hundreds of early- and mid-type supergiants. We have also found nine new candidate luminous blue variables and a previously unrecognized Wolf-Rayet star. We republish the LGGS M31 and M33 catalogs with improved coordinates, and including spectroscopy from the literature and our new results. The spectroscopy in this paper is responsible for the vast majority of the stellar classifications in these two nearby spiral neighbors. The most luminous (and hence massive) of the stars in our sample are early-type B supergiants, as expected; the more massive O stars are more rare and fainter visually, and thus mostly remain unobserved so far. The majority of the unevolved stars in our sample are in the 20-40 M ⊙ range. The spectroscopic observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. MMT telescope time was granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by the National Science Foundation. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  19. A Spectroscopic Survey of Massive Stars in M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F.; Smart, Brianna M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe our spectroscopic follow-up to the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS) photometry of M31 and M33. We have obtained new spectroscopy of 1895 stars, allowing us to classify 1496 of them for the first time. Our study has identified many foreground stars, and established membership for hundreds of early- and mid-type supergiants. We have also found nine new candidate luminous blue variables and a previously unrecognized Wolf–Rayet star. We republish the LGGS M31 and M33 catalogs with improved coordinates, and including spectroscopy from the literature and our new results. The spectroscopy in this paper is responsible for the vast majority of the stellar classifications in these two nearby spiral neighbors. The most luminous (and hence massive) of the stars in our sample are early-type B supergiants, as expected; the more massive O stars are more rare and fainter visually, and thus mostly remain unobserved so far. The majority of the unevolved stars in our sample are in the 20–40 M ⊙ range. The spectroscopic observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. MMT telescope time was granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by the National Science Foundation. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  20. Super Massive Black Hole in Galactic Nuclei with Tidal Disruption of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Tidal disruption of stars by super massive central black holes from dense star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. The time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate, the effect of tidal disruption on the stellar density profile, and, for the first time, the detailed origin of tidally disrupted stars are carefully examined and compared with classic papers in the field. Up to 128k particles are used in simulation to model the star cluster around a super massive black hole, and we use the particle number and the tidal radius of the black hole as free parameters for a scaling analysis. The transition from full to empty loss-cone is analyzed in our data, and the tidal disruption rate scales with the particle number, N, in the expected way for both cases. For the first time in numerical simulations (under certain conditions) we can support the concept of a critical radius of Frank & Rees, which claims that most stars are tidally accreted on highly eccentric orbits originating from regions far outside the tidal radius. Due to the consumption of stars moving on radial orbits, a velocity anisotropy is found inside the cluster. Finally we estimate the real galactic center based on our simulation results and the scaling analysis.

  1. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION W49

    SciTech Connect

    Saral, G.; Hora, J. L.; Willis, S. E.; Koenig, X. P.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Saygac, A. T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective of locating a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the young stellar objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color–color and color–magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49, we analyzed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with ≥7 members is found to be 52% for a cutoff distance of 96″, and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star-forming regions and concluded that W49 has the richest population, with seven subclusters of YSOs.

  2. A massive hypergiant star as the progenitor of the supernova SN 2005gl.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, A; Leonard, D C

    2009-04-16

    Our understanding of the evolution of massive stars before their final explosions as supernovae is incomplete, from both an observational and a theoretical standpoint. A key missing piece in the supernova puzzle is the difficulty of identifying and studying progenitor stars. In only a single case-that of supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud-has a star been detected at the supernova location before the explosion, and been subsequently shown to have vanished after the supernova event. The progenitor of SN 1987A was a blue supergiant, which required a rethink of stellar evolution models. The progenitor of supernova SN 2005gl was proposed to be an extremely luminous object, but the association was not robustly established (it was not even clear that the putative progenitor was a single luminous star). Here we report that the previously proposed object was indeed the progenitor star of SN 2005gl. This very massive star was likely a luminous blue variable that standard stellar evolution predicts should not have exploded in that state.

  3. Origin and evolution of ices around massive young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2002-10-01

    The thesis Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the chromosphere is filled with acoustic and internal gravity waves that travel upward until they collide with a canopy of expanding magnetic field. The photosphere is the layer of which we see the light with the naked eye. Through this layer poke large and small magnetic tubes. Above the photosphere and the chromosphere sits the hot solar corona of a few million degrees. With observations of among others the space satellite TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer) J.M. Krijger shows that the photosphere is dominated by flows of the ambient gas that dictate the magnetic field where to go. The possible heating of the chromosphere is an important unsolved problem in solar physics. The chromosphere forms the transition region between the very hot corona, dominated by magnetic fields, and the photosphere where gasflows drag the magnetic field along. In this transition region the magnetic field, which in the photosphere is still trapped in individual tubes, expands to a canopy above which the magnetic field fills the entire space. In this thesis it is shown that the chromosphere is dominated by upward propagating acoustic waves and a magnetic canopy that changes the dynamics of the oscillations. Finally J.M. Krijger shows that the network of magnetic field in the chromosphere is formed by magnetic tubes that are swepped together by flows in the photosphere.

  4. KELT-17b: A Hot-Jupiter Transiting an A-star in a Misaligned Orbit Detected with Doppler Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, George; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Collins, Karen A.; Beatty, Thomas; Oberst, Thomas; Heintz, Tyler M.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Latham, David W.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Bieryla, Allyson; Lund, Michael B.; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Siverd, Robert J.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Buchhave, Lars A.; Eastman, Jason; Colón, Knicole; Cargile, Phillip; James, David; Gregorio, Joao; Reed, Phillip A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Cohen, David H.; McLeod, Kim K.; Tan, T. G.; Zambelli, Roberto; Bayliss, Daniel; Bento, Joao; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Blancato, Kirsten; Manner, Mark; Samulski, Camile; Stockdale, Christopher; Nelson, Peter; Stephens, Denise; Curtis, Ivan; Kielkopf, John; Fulton, Benjamin J.; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Pogge, Richard; Gould, Andy; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Pat

    2016-11-01

    We present the discovery of a hot Jupiter transiting the V = 9.23 mag main-sequence A-star KELT-17 (BD+14 1881). KELT-17b is a {1.31}-0.29+0.28 {M}{{J}}, {1.525}-0.060+0.065 {R}{{J}} hot-Jupiter in a 3.08-day period orbit misaligned at ‑115.°9 ± 4.°1 to the rotation axis of the star. The planet is confirmed via both the detection of the radial velocity orbit, and the Doppler tomographic detection of the shadow of the planet during two transits. The nature of the spin–orbit misaligned transit geometry allows us to place a constraint on the level of differential rotation in the host star; we find that KELT-17 is consistent with both rigid-body rotation and solar differential rotation rates (α \\lt 0.30 at 2σ significance). KELT-17 is only the fourth A-star with a confirmed transiting planet, and with a mass of {1.635}-0.061+0.066 {M}ȯ , an effective temperature of 7454 ± 49 K, and a projected rotational velocity of v\\sin {I}* ={44.2}-1.3+1.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1; it is among the most massive, hottest, and most rapidly rotating of known planet hosts.

  5. Infrared Spectroscopy of a Massive Obscured Star Cluster in the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/9) with NIRSPEC.

    PubMed

    Gilbert; Graham; McLean; Becklin; Figer; Larkin; Levenson; Teplitz; Wilcox

    2000-04-10

    We present infrared spectroscopy of the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/9) with the near-infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC) at the W. M. Keck Observatory. We imaged the star clusters in the vicinity of the southern nucleus (NGC 4039) with 0&farcs;39 seeing in the K band using NIRSPEC's slit-viewing camera. The brightest star cluster revealed in the near-IR [MK&parl0;0&parr0; approximately -17.9] is insignificant optically but is coincident with the highest surface brightness peak in the mid-IR (12-18 µm) Infrared Space Observatory image presented by Mirabel et al. We obtained high signal-to-noise ratio 2.03-2.45 µm spectra of the nucleus and the obscured star cluster at R approximately 1900. The cluster is very young ( approximately 4 Myr), massive (M approximately 16x106 M middle dot in circle), and compact (with a density of approximately 115 M middle dot in circle pc-3 within a 32 pc half-light radius), assuming a Salpeter initial mass function (0.1-100 M middle dot in circle). Its hot stars have a radiation field characterized by Teff approximately 39,000 K, and they ionize a compact H ii region with ne approximately 104 cm-3. The stars are deeply embedded in gas and dust (AV approximately 9-10 mag), and their strong far-ultraviolet field powers a clumpy photodissociation region with densities nH greater, similar105 cm-3 on scales of approximately 200 pc, radiating LH21-0S&parl0;1&parr0;=9600 L middle dot in circle.

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy of a Massive Obscured Star Cluster in the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/9) with NIRSPEC.

    PubMed

    Gilbert; Graham; McLean; Becklin; Figer; Larkin; Levenson; Teplitz; Wilcox

    2000-04-10

    We present infrared spectroscopy of the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/9) with the near-infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC) at the W. M. Keck Observatory. We imaged the star clusters in the vicinity of the southern nucleus (NGC 4039) with 0&farcs;39 seeing in the K band using NIRSPEC's slit-viewing camera. The brightest star cluster revealed in the near-IR [MK&parl0;0&parr0; approximately -17.9] is insignificant optically but is coincident with the highest surface brightness peak in the mid-IR (12-18 µm) Infrared Space Observatory image presented by Mirabel et al. We obtained high signal-to-noise ratio 2.03-2.45 µm spectra of the nucleus and the obscured star cluster at R approximately 1900. The cluster is very young ( approximately 4 Myr), massive (M approximately 16x106 M middle dot in circle), and compact (with a density of approximately 115 M middle dot in circle pc-3 within a 32 pc half-light radius), assuming a Salpeter initial mass function (0.1-100 M middle dot in circle). Its hot stars have a radiation field characterized by Teff approximately 39,000 K, and they ionize a compact H ii region with ne approximately 104 cm-3. The stars are deeply embedded in gas and dust (AV approximately 9-10 mag), and their strong far-ultraviolet field powers a clumpy photodissociation region with densities nH greater, similar105 cm-3 on scales of approximately 200 pc, radiating LH21-0S&parl0;1&parr0;=9600 L middle dot in circle. PMID:10727391

  7. Massive stars dying alone: Extremely remote environments of SN2009ip and SN2010jp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2014-10-01

    We propose an imaging study of the astonishingly remote environments of two recent supernovae (SNe): SN2009ip and SN2010jp. Both were unusual Type IIn explosions that crashed into dense circumstellar material (CSM) ejected by the star shortly before explosion. The favored progenitors of these SNe are very massive luminous blue variable (LBV) stars. In fact, SN2009ip presents an extraordinay case where the LBV-like progenitor was actually detected directly in archival HST data, and where we obtained spectra and photometry for numerous pre-SN eruptions. No other SN has this treasure trove of detailed information about the progenitor (not even SN1987A). SN2010jp represents a possible collapsar-powered event, since it showed evidence of a fast bipolar jet in spectra and a low 56Ni mass; this would be an analog of the black-hole forming explosions that cause gamma ray bursts, but where the relativistic jet is damped by a residual H envelope on the star. In both cases, the only viable models for these SNe involve extremely massive (initial masses of 40-100 Msun) progenitor stars. This seems at odds with their extremely remote environments in the far outskirts of their host galaxies, with no detected evidence for an underlying massive star population in ground-based data (nor in the single shallow WFPC2/F606W image of SN2009ip). Here we propose deep UV HST images to search for any mid/late O-type stars nearby, deep red images to detect any red supergiants, and an H-alpha image to search for any evidence of ongoing star formation in the vicinity. These observations will place important and demanding constraints on the initial masses and ages of these progenitors.

  8. A detailed study of feedback from a massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geen, Sam; Rosdahl, Joakim; Blaizot, Jeremy; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2015-04-01

    We present numerical simulations of a 15 M⊙ star in a suite of idealized environments in order to quantify the amount of energy transmitted to the interstellar medium (ISM). We include models of stellar winds, UV photoionization and the subsequent supernova based on theoretical models and observations of stellar evolution. The system is simulated in 3D using RAMSES-RT, an Adaptive Mesh Refinement Radiation Hydrodynamics code. We find that stellar winds have a negligible impact on the system owing to their relatively low luminosity compared to the other processes. The main impact of photoionization is to reduce the density of the medium into which the supernova explodes, reducing the rate of radiative cooling of the subsequent supernova. Finally, we present a grid of models quantifying the energy and momentum of the system that can be used to motivate simulations of feedback in the ISM unable to fully resolve the processes discussed in this work.

  9. Main sequence models for massive zero-metal stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, N.

    1974-01-01

    Zero-age main-sequence models for stars of 20, 10, 5, and 2 solar masses with no heavy elements are constructed for three different possible primordial helium abundances: Y=0.00, Y=0.23, and Y=0.30. The latter two values of Y bracket the range of primordial helium abundances cited by Wagoner. With the exceptions of the two 20 solar mass models that contain helium, these models are found to be self-consistent in the sense that the formation of carbon through the triple-alpha process during premain sequence contraction is not sufficient to bring the CN cycle into competition with the proton-proton chain on the ZAMS. The zero-metal models of the present study have higher surface and central temperatures, higher central densities, smaller radii, and smaller convective cores than do the population I models with the same masses.

  10. The metal and dust yields of the first massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marassi, Stefania; Schneider, Raffaella; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, Alessandro; Bocchio, Marco; Bianchi, Simone

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the role of Population (Pop) III core-collapse supernovae (SNe) as the first cosmic dust polluters. Starting from a homogeneous set of stellar progenitors with masses in the range [13-80] M⊙, we find that the mass and composition of newly formed dust depend on the mixing efficiency of the ejecta and the degree of fallback experienced during the explosion. For standard Pop III SNe, whose explosions are calibrated to reproduce the average elemental abundances of Galactic halo stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5, between 0.18 and 3.1 M⊙ (0.39-1.76 M⊙) of dust can form in uniformly mixed (unmixed) ejecta, and the dominant grain species are silicates. We also investigate dust formation in the ejecta of faint Pop III SN, where the ejecta experience a strong fallback. By examining a set of models, tailored to minimize the scatter with the abundances of carbon-enhanced Galactic halo stars with [Fe/H] < -4, we find that amorphous carbon is the only grain species that forms, with masses in the range 2.7 × 10^{-3}-0.27 M_{⊙} (7.5 × 10^{-4} -0.11 M_{⊙}) for uniformly mixed (unmixed) ejecta models. Finally, for all the models we estimate the amount and composition of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock, and find that, depending on circumstellar medium densities, between 3 and 50 per cent (10-80 per cent) of dust produced by standard (faint) Pop III SNe can contribute to early dust enrichment.

  11. Probing dust-obscured star formation in the most massive gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Jochen; Michałowski, Michał J.; Klose, Sylvio; Hunt, Leslie K.; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kamphuis, Peter; Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Wieringa, Mark; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Elliott, Jonathan; Graham, John F.; Ibar, Eduardo; Knust, Fabian; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, Ana; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    Context. As a result of their relation to massive stars, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the pinpointing of star formation in galaxies independent of redshift, dust obscuration, or galaxy mass/size, thus providing a unique tool to investigate star formation history over cosmic time. Aims: About half of the optical afterglows of long-duration GRBs are missed owing to dust extinction and are primarily located in the most massive GRB hosts. It is important to investigate the amount of obscured star formation in these GRB host galaxies to understand this bias. Methods: Radio emission of galaxies correlates with star formation, but does not suffer extinction as do the optical star formation estimators. We selected 11 GRB host galaxies with either large stellar mass or large UV-based and optical-based star formation rates (SFRs) and obtained radio observations of these with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array. Results: Despite intentionally selecting GRB hosts with expected high SFRs, we do not find any radio emission related to star formation in any of our targets. Our upper limit for GRB 100621A implies that the earlier reported radio detection was due to afterglow emission. We detect radio emission from the position of GRB 020819B, but argue that it is in large part, if not completely, due to afterglow contamination. Conclusions: Half of our sample has radio-derived SFR limits, which are only a factor 2-3 above the optically measured SFRs. This supports other recent studies that the majority of star formation in GRB hosts is not obscured by dust. Based on observations collected with ATCA under ID C2718, and at VLA under ID 13B-017.

  12. The life of massive stars seen through optical/infrared interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Alberdi, A.; Schödel, R.

    2015-05-01

    During the last decade, optical/infrared interferometry has become an essential tool to contribute to the understanding of stellar astrophysics. We present our results in the study of different aspects in the life of massive stars using optical interferometry. Particularly, we focused the discussion in our findings about multiplicity, interactions of the massive stars with the interstellar medium, and the early stages of high-mass stars. Our near-infrared observations comprise both: (i) long-baseline interferometry making use of AMBER/VLTI, and (ii) sparse aperture masking with VLT/NACO/SAM. These data have been obtained by our research group in the previous years, and the results have been published in several peer-reviewed papers. The principles of the optical/near-infrared interferometry are briefly presented. Particularly, we describe how to get the calibrated Interferometric observables. Henceforth, we present our results of two massive systems (HD150136 and Herschel 36) for which we discovered their triple nature using AMBER/VLTI. Finally, we will present the recently found evidence of a disk and a binary system in a very massive young stellar object known as IRS 9A in the NGC 3603 region.

  13. Massive envelopes and filaments in the NGC 3603 star forming region⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C. A.; Stanke, T.; Galván-Madrid, R.; Koribalski, B. S.

    2015-10-01

    The formation of massive stars and their arrival on the zero-age main-sequence occurs hidden behind dense clouds of gas and dust. In the giant H ii region NGC 3603, the radiation of a young cluster of OB stars has dispersed dust and gas in its vicinity. At a projected distance of 2.5 pc from the cluster, a bright mid-infrared (MIR) source (IRS 9A) was identified as a massive young stellar object (MYSO), located on the side of a molecular clump (MM2) of gas facing the cluster. We investigated the physical conditions in MM2, based on APEX sub-mm observations using the SABOCA and SHFI instruments, and archival ATCA 3 mm continuum and CS spectral line data. We resolved MM2 into several compact cores, one of them closely associated with IRS 9A. These are likely to be infrared dark clouds because they do not show the typical hot-core emission lines and are mostly opaque against the MIR background. The compact cores have masses of up to several hundred times the solar mass and gas temperatures of about 50 K, without evidence of internal ionizing sources. We speculate that IRS 9A is younger than the cluster stars, but is in an evolutionary state after the compact cores. Based in part on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Prop. No. 088.C-0093 and 090.C-0644).Observations were obtained with the Australia Telescope which is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operations as a National Facility managed by CSIRO.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe final reduced FITS (cubes) of the data presented in the paper are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A66

  14. Massive stars at low metallicity. Evolution and surface abundances of O dwarfs in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouret, J.-C.; Lanz, T.; Martins, F.; Marcolino, W. L. F.; Hillier, D. J.; Depagne, E.; Hubeny, I.

    2013-07-01

    Aims: We aim to study the properties of massive stars at low metallicity, with an emphasis on their evolution, rotation, and surface abundances. We focus on O-type dwarfs in the Small Magellanic Cloud. These stars are expected to have weak winds that do not remove significant amounts of their initial angular momentum. Methods: We analyzed the UV and optical spectra of twenty-three objects using the NLTE stellar atmosphere code cmfgen and derived photospheric and wind properties. Results: The observed binary fraction of the sample is ≈26%, which is consistent with more systematic studies if one considers that the actual binary fraction is potentially larger owing to low-luminosity companions and that the sample was biased because it excluded obvious spectroscopic binaries. The location of the fastest rotators in the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram built with fast-rotating evolutionary models and isochrones indicates that these could be several Myr old. The offset in the position of these fast rotators compared with the other stars confirms the predictions of evolutionary models that fast-rotating stars tend to evolve more vertically in the H-R diagram. Only one star of luminosity class Vz, expected to best characterize extreme youth, is located on the zero-age main sequence, the other two stars are more evolved. We found that the distribution of O and B stars in the ɛ(N) - vsin i diagram is the same, which suggests that the mechanisms responsible for the chemical enrichment of slowly rotating massive stars depend only weakly on the star's mass. We furthermore confirm that the group of slowly rotating N-rich stars is not reproduced by the evolutionary tracks. Even for more massive stars and faster rotators, our results call for stronger mixing in the models to explain the range of observed N abundances. All stars have an N/C ratio as a function of stellar luminosity that match the predictions of the stellar evolution models well. More massive stars have a higher

  15. Fundamental properties of core-collapse supernova and GRB progenitors: predicting the look of massive stars before death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose H.; Meynet, Georges; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the fundamental properties of core-collapse supernova (SN) progenitors from single stars at solar metallicity. For this purpose, we combine Geneva stellar evolutionary models with initial masses of Mini = 20-120 M⊙ with atmospheric and wind models using the radiative transfer code CMFGEN. We provide synthetic photometry and high-resolution spectra of hot stars at the pre-SN stage. For models with Mini = 9-20 M⊙, we supplement our analysis using publicly available MARCS model atmospheres of RSGs to estimate their synthetic photometry. We employ well-established observational criteria of spectroscopic classification and find that, depending on their initial mass and rotation, massive stars end their lives as red supergiants (RSG), yellow hypergiants (YHG), luminous blue variables (LBV), and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars of the WN and WO spectral types. For rotating models, we obtained the following types of SN progenitors: WO1-3 (Mini ≥ 32 M⊙), WN10-11 (25 < Mini < 32 M⊙), LBV (20 ≤ Mini ≤ 25 M⊙), G1 Ia+ (18 < Mini < 20 M⊙), and RSGs (9 ≤ Mini ≤ 18 M⊙). For non-rotating models, we found spectral types WO1-3 (Mini > 40 M⊙), WN7-8 (25 < Mini ≤ 40 M⊙), WN11h/LBV (20 < Mini ≤ 25 M⊙), and RSGs (9 ≤ Mini ≤ 20 M⊙). Our rotating models indicate that SN IIP progenitors are all RSG, SN IIL/b progenitors are 56% LBVs and 44% YHGs, SN Ib progenitors are 96% WN10-11 and 4% WOs, and SN Ic progenitors are all WO stars. We find that the most massive and luminous SN progenitors are not necessarily the brightest ones in a given filter, since this depends on their luminosity, temperature, wind density, and the way the spectral energy distribution compares to a filter bandpass. We find that SN IIP progenitors (RSGs) are bright in the RIJHKS filters and faint in the UB filters. SN IIL/b progenitors (LBVs and YHGs), and SN Ib progenitors (WNs) are relatively bright in optical/infrared filters, while SN Ic progenitors (WOs) are faint in all

  16. Stars and (furry) black holes in Lorentz breaking massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L.

    2011-04-01

    We study the exact spherically symmetric solutions in a class of Lorentz-breaking massive gravity theories, using the effective-theory approach where the graviton mass is generated by the interaction with a suitable set of Stückelberg fields. We find explicitly the exact black-hole solutions which generalizes the familiar Schwarzschild one, which shows a nonanalytic hair in the form of a powerlike term rγ. For realistic self-gravitating bodies, we find interesting features, linked to the effective violation of the Gauss law: (i) the total gravitational mass appearing in the standard 1/r term gets a multiplicative renormalization proportional to the area of the body itself; (ii) the magnitude of the powerlike hairy correction is also linked to size of the body. The novel features can be ascribed to the presence of the Goldstones fluid turned on by matter inside the body; its equation of state approaching that of dark energy near the center. The Goldstones fluid also changes the matter equilibrium pressure, leading to an upper limit for the graviton mass, m≲10-28÷29eV, derived from the largest stable gravitational bound states in the Universe.

  17. Super- and massive AGB stars - IV. Final fates - initial-to-final mass relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Carolyn L.; Gil-Pons, Pilar; Siess, Lionel; Lattanzio, John C.; Lau, Herbert H. B.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the final fates of massive intermediate-mass stars by computing detailed stellar models from the zero-age main sequence until near the end of the thermally pulsing phase. These super-asymptotic giant branch (super-AGB) and massive AGB star models are in the mass range between 5.0 and 10.0 M⊙ for metallicities spanning the range Z = 0.02-0.0001. We probe the mass limits Mup, Mn and Mmass, the minimum masses for the onset of carbon burning, the formation of a neutron star and the iron core-collapse supernovae, respectively, to constrain the white dwarf/electron-capture supernova (EC-SN) boundary. We provide a theoretical initial-to-final mass relation for the massive and ultra-massive white dwarfs and specify the mass range for the occurrence of hybrid CO(Ne) white dwarfs. We predict EC-SN rates for lower metallicities which are significantly lower than existing values from parametric studies in the literature. We conclude that the EC-SN channel (for single stars and with the critical assumption being the choice of mass-loss rate) is very narrow in initial mass, at most ≈0.2 M⊙. This implies that between ˜2 and 5 per cent of all gravitational collapse supernova are EC-SNe in the metallicity range Z = 0.02-0.0001. With our choice for mass-loss prescription and computed core growth rates, we find, within our metallicity range, that CO cores cannot grow sufficiently massive to undergo a Type 1.5 SN explosion.

  18. The Inflow Signature toward Different Evolutionary Phases of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kee-Tae; Evans, Neal J., II

    2016-08-01

    We analyze both HCN J = 1-0 and HNC J = 1-0 line profiles to study the inflow motions in different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: 54 infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), 69 high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and 54 ultra-compact H ii regions (UCHIIs). Inflow asymmetry in the HCN spectra seems to be prevalent throughout all the three evolutionary phases, with IRDCs showing the largest excess in the blue profile. In the case of the HNC spectra, the prevalence of blue sources does not appear, apart from for IRDCs. We suggest that this line is not appropriate to trace the inflow motion in the evolved stages of massive star formation, because the abundance of HNC decreases at high temperatures. This result highlights the importance of considering chemistry in dynamics studies of massive star-forming regions. The fact that the IRDCs show the highest blue excess in both transitions indicates that the most active inflow occurs in the early phase of star formation, i.e., in the IRDC phase rather than in the later phases. However, mass is still inflowing onto some UCHIIs. We also find that the absorption dips of the HNC spectra in six out of seven blue sources are redshifted relative to their systemic velocities. These redshifted absorption dips may indicate global collapse candidates, although mapping observations with better resolution are needed to examine this feature in more detail.

  19. The Inflow Signature toward Different Evolutionary Phases of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kee-Tae; Evans, Neal J., II

    2016-08-01

    We analyze both HCN J = 1–0 and HNC J = 1–0 line profiles to study the inflow motions in different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: 54 infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), 69 high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and 54 ultra-compact H ii regions (UCHIIs). Inflow asymmetry in the HCN spectra seems to be prevalent throughout all the three evolutionary phases, with IRDCs showing the largest excess in the blue profile. In the case of the HNC spectra, the prevalence of blue sources does not appear, apart from for IRDCs. We suggest that this line is not appropriate to trace the inflow motion in the evolved stages of massive star formation, because the abundance of HNC decreases at high temperatures. This result highlights the importance of considering chemistry in dynamics studies of massive star-forming regions. The fact that the IRDCs show the highest blue excess in both transitions indicates that the most active inflow occurs in the early phase of star formation, i.e., in the IRDC phase rather than in the later phases. However, mass is still inflowing onto some UCHIIs. We also find that the absorption dips of the HNC spectra in six out of seven blue sources are redshifted relative to their systemic velocities. These redshifted absorption dips may indicate global collapse candidates, although mapping observations with better resolution are needed to examine this feature in more detail.

  20. Narrow-band Imaging of Massive Star-Forming Regions: Tracing Outflows and the Rate of Star-Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kendall; Willis, Sarah; Hora, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband images targeting ionized hydrogen (Brackett gamma, 2.17 microns) and molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) were obtained for six massive star-forming regions within the Milky Way, NGC 6334, G305, G3333, G3264, G3266, and G351. These regions are within 1-4 kpc from our solar system. The narrowband flux in Brackett gamma was used as a star-formation tracer to calculate a star-formation rate for each region. This is compared with other star-formation rates found using other methods such as the count of young stars and YSOs, and rates calculated from using other tracers (e.g. 70 micron monochromatic luminosity). The molecular hydrogen narrowband images were manually searched to locate outflows from young stars. Once these outflows are identified, it may help to get a better survey of the young stellar population. A better understanding of the stellar population distribution can lead to more accurate star-formation rates to compare to those calculated from star-formation tracers. We found the regions NGC 6334 and G3266 to have the highest levels of ongoing star formation activity as indicated by the number of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs) detected. There are a total of 279 cataloged MHOs in 181 categorized systems for the six regions. There are a total of 150 identified potential driving sources.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  1. A Link Between Massive Binary Stars and Non-thermal Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Debra

    1999-07-01

    Non-thermal radio emission in Wolf-Rayet {WR} stars is explained in terms of synchrotron emission from shocks in the wind. For single star models, the shocks arise from instabilities in the wind itself, whereas in binary models, the shocks form at the wind-wind interaction zone. In Niemela et al. 1998 {from WFPC2 data}, we support the binary theory, for two WR stars, linking the non-thermal emission with the colliding wind region. Before we can conclusively link non- thermal emission to binarity, we must demonstrate that all non-thermal emitters are binary, and that all thermal emitters are either single stars or binary systems with separations that are either too wide or too close to result in a wind-wind interaction that produces shocks. We cannot yet conclusively state this because WFPC2 does not resolve binaries with separations less than about 0.100''. We propose to use the FGS to observe 9 non-thermal and 9 thermal WR stars to search for binary companions. The FGS ca n resolve angular separations as s mall as .007''. If the non-thermal stars are resolved as binaries and the thermal emitters are determined to be single, the single star theory of non-thermal emission can be disavowed. Co-latterally, we will have demonstrated a new method of detecting massive binaries, and, for all WR stars, we will establish a more accurate binary incidence rate.

  2. Massive Stars and the Energy Balance of the Interstellar Medium. 1; The Impact of an Isolated 60 M. Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freyer, Tim; Hensler, Gerhard; Yorke, Harold W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of numerical simulations carried out with a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code in order to study the impact of massive stars on their surrounding interstellar medium. This first paper deals with the evolution of the circumstellar gas around an isolated 60 M. star. The interaction of the photo- ionized H II region with the stellar wind bubble forms a variety of interesting structures like shells, clouds, fingers, and spokes. These results demonstrate that complex structures found in H II regions are not necessarily relics from the time before the gas became ionized but may result from dynamical processes during the course of the H II region evolution. We have also analyzed the transfer and deposit of the stellar wind and radiation energy into the circumstellar medium until the star explodes as a supernova. Although the total mechanical wind energy supplied by the star is negligible compared to the accumulated energy of the Lyman continuum photons, the kinetic energy imparted to the circumstellar gas over the star s lifetime is 4 times higher than for a comparable windless simulation. Furthermore, the thermal energy of warm photoionized gas is lower by some 55%). Our results document the necessity to consider both ionizing radiation and stellar winds for an appropriate description of the interaction of OB stars with their circumstellar environment.

  3. Small-scale hero: Massive-star enrichment in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Matteucci, Francesca; Feltzing, Sofia

    2012-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are often conjectured to be the sites of the first stars. The best current contenders for finding the chemical imprints from the enrichment by those massive objects are the ``ultrafaint dwarfs'' (UFDs). Here we present evidence for remarkably low heavy element abundances in the metal poor Hercules UFD. Combined with other peculiar abundance patterns this indicates that Hercules was likely only influenced by very few, massive explosive events - thus bearing the traces of an early, localized chemical enrichment with only very little other contributions from other sources at later times.

  4. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we aim to characterize high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al., we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II or photodissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 41.2 per cent, 36.6 per cent, 30.6 per cent and 12.7 per cent, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H2 column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 2.6 × 10-3, 7.0 × 10-3, 6.5 × 10-3 and 5.5 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. These values indicate that infall candidates at later evolutionary stages are still accumulating material efficiently. It is interesting to find that both infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected show a clear trend of increasing mass from the pre-stellar to proto-stellar, and to the H II stages. The power indices of the clump mass function are 2.04 ± 0.16 and 2.17 ± 0.31 for the infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected, respectively, which agree well with the power index of the stellar initial mass function (2.35) and the cold Planck cores (2.0).

  5. DETECTION OF A LUMINOUS HOT X-RAY CORONA AROUND THE MASSIVE SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 266

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine

    2013-08-01

    The presence of luminous hot X-ray coronae in the dark matter halos of massive spiral galaxies is a basic prediction of galaxy formation models. However, observational evidence for such coronae is very scarce, with the first few examples having only been detected recently. In this paper, we study the large-scale diffuse X-ray emission associated with the massive spiral galaxy NGC 266. Using ROSAT and Chandra X-ray observations we argue that the diffuse emission extends at least {approx}70 kpc, whereas the bulk of the stellar light is confined to within {approx}25 kpc. Based on X-ray hardness ratios, we find that most of the diffuse emission is released at energies {approx}< 1.2 keV, which indicates that this emission originates from hot X-ray gas. Adopting a realistic gas temperature and metallicity, we derive that in the (0.05-0.15)r{sub 200} region (where r{sub 200} is the virial radius) the bolometric X-ray luminosity of the hot gas is (4.3 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} and the gas mass is (9.1 {+-} 0.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. These values are comparable to those observed for the two other well-studied X-ray coronae in spiral galaxies, suggesting that the physical properties of such coronae are similar. This detection offers an excellent opportunity for comparison of observations with detailed galaxy formation simulations.

  6. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  7. Low Mach Number Modeling of Core Convection in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-01

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M ⊙ star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  8. HADRON-QUARK CROSSOVER AND MASSIVE HYBRID STARS WITH STRANGENESS

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2013-02-10

    Using the idea of smooth crossover from hadronic matter with hyperons to quark matter with strangeness, we show that the maximum mass (M {sub max}) of neutron stars with quark matter cores can be larger than those without quark matter cores. This is in contrast to the conventional softening of the equation of state due to exotic components at high density. The essential conditions for reaching our conclusion are that (1) the crossover takes place at relatively low densities, around three times the normal nuclear density and (2) the quark matter is strongly interacting in the crossover region. From these, the pressure of the system can be greater than that of purely hadronic matter at a given baryon density in the crossover density region and leads to M {sub max} greater than 2 solar mass. This conclusion is insensitive to the different choice of the hadronic equation of state with hyperons. We remark upon several implications of this result to the nuclear incompressibility, the hyperon mixing, and the neutrino cooling.

  9. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF CORE CONVECTION IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-20

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M{sub Sun} star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  10. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}ȯ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}ȯ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}ȯ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}ȯ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}ȯ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  11. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}⊙ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}⊙ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}⊙ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}⊙ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  12. IR grisms: cross check sensitivity function of hot and cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana

    2013-10-01

    Goals: To provide a cross check on the sensitivity functions of the -1st and +1st grism spectral orders.Scanned observations of a G type star, P330E, in the -1st and +1st grism orders show 5%-10% discrepancy in the sensitivity function derived from this star when compared to that of the sensitivity function determined from the WD standards, GD71 & GD153. We propose to obtain scanned spectra of at hot WD at the same locations on the IR array as for P330E {and Vega} to investigate the source of this discrepancy: scan vs. stare mode, hot star vs. cool star.

  13. PARSEC evolutionary tracks of massive stars up to 350 M⊙ at metallicities 0.0001 ≤ Z ≤ 0.04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Bressan, Alessandro; Girardi, Léo; Marigo, Paola; Kong, Xu; Lanza, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    We complement the PARSEC data base of stellar evolutionary tracks with new models of massive stars, from the pre-main-sequence phase to the central carbon ignition. We consider a broad range of metallicities, 0.0001 ≤ Z ≤ 0.04 and initial masses up to Mini = 350 M⊙. The main difference with respect to our previous models of massive stars is the adoption of a recent formalizm accounting for the mass-loss enhancement when the ratio of the stellar to the Eddington luminosity, Γe, approaches unity. With this new formalizm, the models are able to reproduce the Humphreys-Davidson limit observed in the Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud colour-magnitude diagrams, without an ad hoc mass-loss enhancement. We also follow the predictions of recent wind models indicating that the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates becomes shallower when Γe approaches unity. We thus find that the more massive stars may suffer from substantial mass-loss even at low metallicity. We also predict that the Humphreys-Davidson limit should become brighter at decreasing metallicity. We supplement the evolutionary tracks with new tables of theoretical bolometric corrections, useful to compare tracks and isochrones with the observations. For this purpose, we homogenize existing stellar atmosphere libraries of hot and cool stars (Potsdam Wolf-Rayet, ATLAS9 and PHOENIX) and we add, where needed, new atmosphere models computed with WM-BASIC. The mass, age and metallicity grids are fully adequate to perform detailed investigations of the properties of very young stellar systems, both in local and distant galaxies. The new tracks supersede the previous old PADOVA models of massive stars.

  14. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  15. The MiMeS survey of magnetism in massive stars: introduction and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J. H.; Petit, V.; Batz, B. de; Bohlender, D. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Henrichs, H. F.; Kochukhov, O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Manset, N.; Martins, F.; Mathis, S.; Oksala, M. E.; Owocki, S. P.; Rivinius, Th.; Shultz, M. E.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Townsend, R. H. D.; ud-Doula, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Braithwaite, J.; Briquet, M.; Carciofi, A. C.; David-Uraz, A.; Folsom, C. P.; Fullerton, A. W.; Leroy, B.; Marcolino, W. L. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Nazé, Y.; Louis, N. St; Aurière, M.; Bagnulo, S.; Bailey, J. D.; Barbá, R. H.; Blazère, A.; Böhm, T.; Catala, C.; Donati, J.-F.; Ferrario, L.; Harrington, D.; Howarth, I. D.; Ignace, R.; Kaper, L.; Lüftinger, T.; Prinja, R.; Vink, J. S.; Weiss, W. W.; Yakunin, I.

    2016-02-01

    The MiMeS (Magnetism in Massive Stars) project is a large-scale, high-resolution, sensitive spectropolarimetric investigation of the magnetic properties of O- and early B-type stars. Initiated in 2008 and completed in 2013, the project was supported by three Large Program allocations, as well as various programmes initiated by independent principal investigators, and archival resources. Ultimately, over 4800 circularly polarized spectra of 560 O and B stars were collected with the instruments ESPaDOnS (Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, Narval at the Télescope Bernard Lyot and HARPSpol at the European Southern Observatory La Silla 3.6 m telescope, making MiMeS by far the largest systematic investigation of massive star magnetism ever undertaken. In this paper, the first in a series reporting the general results of the survey, we introduce the scientific motivation and goals, describe the sample of targets, review the instrumentation and observational techniques used, explain the exposure time calculation designed to provide sensitivity to surface dipole fields above approximately 100 G, discuss the polarimetric performance, stability and uncertainty of the instrumentation, and summarize the previous and forthcoming publications.

  16. Modeling X-ray emission line profiles from massive star winds - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes have led to numerous advances in the study and understanding of astrophysical X-ray sources. Particularly important has been the much increased spectral resolution of modern X-ray instrumentation. Wind-broadened emission lines have been spectroscopically resolved for many massive stars. This contribution reviews approaches to the modeling of X-ray emission line profile shapes from single stars, including smooth winds, winds with clumping, optically thin versus thick lines, and the effect of a radius-dependent photoabsorption coefficient.

  17. New PARSEC evolutionary tracks of massive stars at low metallicity: testing canonical stellar evolution in nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Bressan, Alessandro; Rosenfield, Philip; Slemer, Alessandra; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Bianchi, Luciana

    2014-12-01

    We extend the PARSEC library of stellar evolutionary tracks by computing new models of massive stars, from 14 to 350 M⊙. The input physics is the same used in the PARSEC V1.1 version, but for the mass-loss rate from considering the most recent updates in the literature. We focus on low metallicity, Z = 0.001 and Z = 0.004, for which the metal-poor dwarf irregular star-forming galaxies, Sextans A, the Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte galaxy and NGC 6822, provide simple but powerful workbenches. The models reproduce fairly well the observed colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) but the stellar colour distributions indicate that the predicted blue loop is not hot enough in models with a canonical extent of overshooting. In the framework of a mild extended mixing during central hydrogen burning, the only way to reconcile the discrepancy is to enhance the overshooting at the base of the convective envelope (EO) during the first dredge-up. The mixing scales required to reproduce the observed loops, EO = 2HP or EO = 4HP, are definitely larger than those derived from, e.g. the observed location of the red-giant-branch bump in low mass stars. This effect, if confirmed, would imply a strong dependence of the mixing scale below the formal Schwarzschild border, on the stellar mass or luminosity. Reproducing the features of the observed CMDs with standard values of envelope overshooting would require a metallicity significantly lower than the values measured in these galaxies. Other quantities, such as the star formation rate and the initial mass function, are only slightly sensitive to this effect. Future investigations will consider other metallicities and different mixing schemes.

  18. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. deg of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: We present the fourth article in a series of papers focussed on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the cluster VVV CL041, which contains a new very massive star candidate, WR 62-2. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters (distance, reddening, mass, age) of VVV CL041. Results: We confirm that the cluster VVV CL041 is a young (less than 4 Myr) and massive (3 ± 2 × 103 M⊙) cluster, and not a simple asterism. It is located at a distance of 4.2 ± 0.9 kpc, and its reddening is AV = 8.0 ± 0.2 mag, which is slightly lower than the average for the young clusters towards the centre of the Galaxy. Spectral analysis shows that the most luminous star of the cluster, of the WN8h spectral type, is a candidate to have an initial mass larger than 100 M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002, and on observations with VLT/ISAAC at ESO (programme 087.D.0341A) and Flamingos-2 at Gemini (programme GS-2014A-Q-72).The photometric catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A31

  19. NGC346: Looking in the Cradle of a Massive Star Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Hony, Sacha; Dib, Sami; Galliano, Frederic; Cormier, Diane; Ralf, Klessen

    2015-08-01

    How a star cluster of more than few 10,000 solar masses forms? We present the case of the cluster NGC 346 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, still embedded in its natal star-forming region N66, and we propose a scenario for its formation, based on the rich resolved stellar populations found in the region. Young massive clusters (YMCs) host a significant amount of early-type stars, indicating an extremely high star formation efficiency. The Milky Way galaxy hosts several YMCs that fill the gap between young low-mass open clusters and old massive globular clusters. Only a handful, though, is relatively close to their formation, and the investigation of their gaseous natal environments suffers from contamination by the Galactic disk. YMCs are very abundant in distant starburst and interacting galaxies, but the distance of their hosting galaxies do not also allow a detailed analysis of their formation. The Magellanic Clouds, on the other hand, host YMCs in a wide range of ages with the youngest being still embedded in their giant HII regions. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of such star-forming complexes provide a complete stellar sampling with a high dynamic range in stellar masses, allowing the detailed study of star formation at scales typical for molecular clouds. The distribution of newly-born stars in N66 shows that star formation in the region proceeds in a clumpy hierarchical fashion, leading to the formation of both a dominant YMC, hosting about half of the observed pre--main-sequence (PMS) stars, and a self-similar dispersed distribution of the remaining PMS population. We investigate the correlation between stellar surface density (and star formation rate derived from star-counts) and molecular gas surface density (derived from dust column density) in an attempt to disentangle the physical conditions that gave birth to NGC 346. We discuss our findings in terms of stellar clustering, its relation to the turbulent interstellar medium, and the observed

  20. Explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars - Comparison with the Cassiopeia A fast-moving knots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Yahil, A.

    1984-01-01

    If the ejecta of a Type II supernova do not undergo extensive mixing, then, based on the explosion of current presupernova models, only a small fraction approximately equal to or less than 0.1 solar mass of the mantle of a massive star can yield abundances similar to those observed in the fast-moving knots of Cas A. This is shown to be independent of the detailed structure of the mantle and the supernova energy. Lack of mixing in Cas A is indicated by strong upper limits on the abundance ratios Ne/O, and Fe/O. If this is confirmed by further observations, then either Cas A is not the result of a standard progenitor of approximately equal to or less than 25 solar masses disrupted by a Type II supernova, or the picture of the last stages of stellar evolution in massive stars needs to be modified substantially.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectra of W49 massives young stars (Wu+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.-W.; Bik, A.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Henning, T.; Pasquali, A.; Brandner, W.; Stolte, A.

    2016-02-01

    Near-infrared observations have been carried out with LUCI mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), Mount Graham, Arizona. LUCI is a near-infrared multi-mode instrument capable of Multi-Object Spectroscopy (MOS), long-slit spectroscopy and imaging. The spectra of the massive stars in W49 have been taken in MOS mode based on K-band pre-image also obtained with LUCI. Additional archival data were used to complement the LUCI data. Medium-resolution (R=10,000) K-band spectra of five massive stars in W49 obtained with ISAAC mounted on Antu (UT1) of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), Paranal, Chile, and J- and H -band images obtained with SOFI at the New Technology Telescope (NTT), La Silla, Chile, were downloaded from the ESO archive. (2 data files).

  2. Massive Stars: Some Open Questions and the Role of Multi-Object Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, A.

    2016-10-01

    Massive stars are key ingredients in the evolution of the Universe. Yet, important uncertainties and limits persist in our understanding of these objects, even in their early phases, limiting their application as tools to interpret the Universe. Here we review some of these open questions and argue that large samples are needed to answer them, both in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. Multi-object spectroscopy plays a crucial role in this process.

  3. SPITZER SAGE INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF MASSIVE STARS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, A. Z.; Massa, D. L.; Sewilo, M. E-mail: massa@stsci.edu

    2009-10-15

    We present a catalog of 1750 massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 1268 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer SAGE survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3 to 24 {mu}m in the UBVIJHK{sub s} +IRAC+MIPS24 bands. The resulting infrared color-magnitude diagrams illustrate that the supergiant B[e], red supergiant, and luminous blue variable (LBV) stars are among the brightest infrared point sources in the LMC, due to their intrinsic brightness, and at longer wavelengths, due to dust. We detect infrared excesses due to free-free emission among {approx}900 OB stars, which correlate with luminosity class. We confirm the presence of dust around 10 supergiant B[e] stars, finding the shape of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to be very similar, in contrast to the variety of SED shapes among the spectrally variable LBVs. The similar luminosities of B[e] supergiants (log L/L {sub sun} {>=} 4) and the rare, dusty progenitors of the new class of optical transients (e.g., SN 2008S and NGC 300 OT), plus the fact that dust is present in both types of objects, suggests a common origin for them. We find the infrared colors for Wolf-Rayet stars to be independent of spectral type and their SEDs to be flatter than what models predict. The results of this study provide the first comprehensive roadmap for interpreting luminous, massive, resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies at infrared wavelengths.

  4. Radio Emission Toward Regions of Massive Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    Four regions of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) were observed for water and methanol maser emission and radio continuum emission. A total of 42 radio detections were made including 27 new radio sources, four water masers, and eight compact H II regions. The lobes of a radio galaxy were resolved for the first time, and the host galaxy identified. Seven sources were associated with known massive young stellar objects (YSOs). A multi-wavelength analysis using both the infrared and radio spectrum was used to characterize the sources. Mid-infrared color-magnitude selection criteria for ultracompact H II (UCHII) regions in the LMC are presented, yielding 136 UCHII region candidates throughout that galaxy. New maser detections identified two previously unknown massive YSOs. No methanol masers were detected, consistent with previous studies and supporting the hypothesis that the LMC may be deficient in these molecules. These discoveries contribute to the history of star formation in the LMC, which will lead to a better understanding of star formation in the Milky Way and throughout the universe.

  5. CIRCUMVENTING THE RADIATION PRESSURE BARRIER IN THE FORMATION OF MASSIVE STARS VIA DISK ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, Rolf; Klahr, Hubert; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas

    2010-10-20

    We present radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores. We treat frequency-dependent radiative feedback from stellar evolution and accretion luminosity at a numerical resolution down to 1.27 AU. In the 2D approximation of axially symmetric simulations, for the first time it is possible to simulate the whole accretion phase (up to the end of the accretion disk epoch) for a forming massive star and to perform a broad scan of the parameter space. Our simulation series evidently shows the necessity to incorporate the dust sublimation front to preserve the high shielding property of massive accretion disks. While confirming the upper mass limit of spherically symmetric accretion, our disk accretion models show a persistent high anisotropy of the corresponding thermal radiation field. This yields the growth of the highest-mass stars ever formed in multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, far beyond the upper mass limit of spherical accretion. Non-axially symmetric effects are not necessary to sustain accretion. The radiation pressure launches a stable bipolar outflow, which grows in angle with time, as presumed from observations. For an initial mass of the pre-stellar host core of 60, 120, 240, and 480 M{sub sun} the masses of the final stars formed in our simulations add up to 28.2, 56.5, 92.6, and at least 137.2 M{sub sun}, respectively.

  6. Distribution of HNCO 505-404 in massive star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J. Z.; Gu, Q. S.; Zheng, X. W.

    2013-07-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is to study the spatial distribution of HNCO in massive star-forming region and to investigate both its spatial association with infrared sources and physical conditions in region of HNCO emission. Methods: We mapped nine massive star-forming regions in HNCO 505-404 with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. The C18O maps of these sources were obtained simultaneously. Results: The HNCO emission shows compact distribution, with the emission peak centered on water masers. Nearly all the HNCO clumps show signs of embedded mid-infrared or far-infrared sources. The FWHM sizes of HNCO clumps are significantly smaller than C18O clumps but rather similar to HC3N clumps. We find a good correlation between the integrated intensities, linewidths, and LSR velocities of HNCO and HC3N emission, implying similar excitation mechanisms for these two species. As such, collisional excitation is likely to be the dominant excitation mechanism for HNCO 505 - 404 emission in galactic massive star-forming regions.

  7. A distance-limited sample of massive star-forming cores from the RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Moore, T. J. T.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cicchini, A.

    2015-09-01

    We analyse C18O (J = 3-2) data from a sample of 99 infrared (IR)-bright massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions that were identified as potential molecular-outflow sources in the Red MSX Source survey. We extract a distance-limited (D < 6 kpc) sample shown to be representative of star formation covering the transition between the source types. At the spatial resolution probed, Larson-like relationships are found for these cores, though the alternative explanation, that Larson's relations arise where surface-density-limited samples are considered, is also consistent with our data. There are no significant differences found between source properties for the MYSOs and H II regions, suggesting that the core properties are established prior to the formation of massive stars, which subsequently have little impact at the later evolutionary stages investigated. There is a strong correlation between dust-continuum and C18O-gas masses, supporting the interpretation that both trace the same material in these IR-bright sources. A clear linear relationship is seen between the independently established core masses and luminosities. The position of MYSOs and compact H II regions in the mass-luminosity plane is consistent with the luminosity expected from the most massive protostar in the cluster when using an ˜40 per cent star formation efficiency and indicates that they are at a similar evolutionary stage, near the end of the accretion phase.

  8. HOT X-RAY CORONAE AROUND MASSIVE SPIRAL GALAXIES: A UNIQUE PROBE OF STRUCTURE FORMATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Sijacki, Debora; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; David, Laurence P.; Bourdin, Herve; Gilfanov, Marat; Churazov, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    Luminous X-ray gas coronae in the dark matter halos of massive spiral galaxies are a fundamental prediction of structure formation models, yet only a few such coronae have been detected so far. In this paper, we study the hot X-ray coronae beyond the optical disks of two 'normal' massive spirals, NGC 1961 and NGC 6753. Based on XMM-Newton X-ray observations, hot gaseous emission is detected to {approx}60 kpc-well beyond their optical radii. The hot gas has a best-fit temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV and an abundance of {approx}0.1 Solar, and exhibits a fairly uniform distribution, suggesting that the quasi-static gas resides in hydrostatic equilibrium in the potential well of the galaxies. The bolometric luminosity of the gas in the (0.05-0.15)r{sub 200} region (r{sub 200} is the virial radius) is {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for both galaxies. The baryon mass fractions of NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 are f{sub b,NGC1961} {approx} 0.11 and f{sub b,NGC6753} {approx} 0.09, which values fall short of the cosmic baryon fraction. The hot coronae around NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 offer an excellent basis to probe structure formation simulations. To this end, the observations are confronted with the moving mesh code AREPO and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET. Although neither model gives a perfect description, the observed luminosities, gas masses, and abundances favor the AREPO code. Moreover, the shape and the normalization of the observed density profiles are better reproduced by AREPO within {approx}0.5r{sub 200}. However, neither model incorporates efficient feedback from supermassive black holes or supernovae, which could alter the simulated properties of the X-ray coronae. With the further advance of numerical models, the present observations will be essential in constraining the feedback effects in structure formation simulations.

  9. Double core evolution. 7: The infall of a neutron star through the envelope of its massive star companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, James L.; Taam, Ronald E.; Hernquist, Lars

    1995-01-01

    Binary systems with properties similar to those of high-mass X-ray binaries are evolved through the common envelope phase. Three-dimensional simulations show that the timescale of the infall phase of the neutron star depends upon the evolutionary state of its massive companion. We find that tidal torques more effectively accelerate common envelope evolution for companions in their late core helium-burning stage and that the infall phase is rapid (approximately several initial orbital periods). For less evolved companions the decay of the orbit is longer; however, once the neutron star is deeply embedded within the companion's envelope the timescale for orbital decay decreases rapidly. As the neutron star encounters the high-density region surrounding the helium core of its massive companion, the rate of energy loss from the orbit increases dramatically leading to either partial or nearly total envelope ejection. The outcome of the common envelope phase depends upon the structure of the evolved companion. In particular, it is found that the entire common envelope can be ejected by the interaction of the neutron star with a red supergiant companion in binaries with orbital periods similar to those of long-period Be X-ray binaries. For orbital periods greater than or approximately equal to 0.8-2 yr (for companions of mass 12-24 solar mass) it is likely that a binary will survive the common envelope phase. For these systems, the structure of the progenitor star is characterized by a steep density gradient above the helium core, and the common envelope phase ends with a spin up of the envelope to within 50%-60% of corotation and with a slow mass outflow. The efficiency of mass ejection is found to be approximately 30%-40%. For less evolved companions, there is insufficient energy in the orbit to unbind the common envelope and only a fraction of it is ejected. Since the timescale for orbital decay is always shorter than the mass-loss timescale from the common envelope

  10. Type Ic core-collapse supernova explosions evolved from very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Okita, Shinpei; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of a superluminous Type Ic core-collapse supernovae (SNe) producing a large amount of 56Ni. Very massive stars with a main-sequence mass larger than 100 M⊙ and a metallicity 0.001 < Z ≲ 0.004 are expected to explode as superluminous Type Ic SNe. Stars with ˜110-150 M⊙ and Z ≲ 0.001 would explode as Type Ic pulsational pair-instability SNe if the whole H and He layer has been lost by the mass-loss during pulsational pair instability. We evaluate the total ejecta mass and the yields of 56Ni, O and Si in core-collapse SNe evolved from very massive stars. We adopt 43.1 and 61.1 M⊙ WO stars with Z = 0.004 as SN progenitors expected to explode as Type Ic core-collapse SNe. These progenitors have masses of 110 and 250 M⊙ at the zero-age main sequence. Spherical explosions with an explosion energy larger than 2 × 1052 erg produce more than 3.5 M⊙56Ni, enough to reproduce the light curve of SN 2007bi. Asphericity of the explosion affects the total ejecta mass as well as the yields of 56Ni, O and Si. Aspherical explosions of the 110 and 250 M⊙ models reproduce the 56Ni yield of SN 2007bi. These explosions will also show large velocity dispersion. An aspherical core-collapse SN evolved from a very massive star is a possibility of the explosion of SN 2007bi.

  11. Resurrecting hot dark matter - Large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    These are the results of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos (hot dark matter). This model has several desirable features. The final matter distribution contains isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, producing a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. Because baryons can accrete onto the cosmic strings before the neutrinos, the galaxies will have baryon cores and dark neutrino halos. Galaxy formation in this model begins much earlier than in random-phase models. On large scales the distribution of clustered matter visually resembles the CfA survey, with large voids and filaments.

  12. THE ROTATION RATES OF MASSIVE STARS: THE ROLE OF BINARY INTERACTION THROUGH TIDES, MASS TRANSFER, AND MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    De Mink, S. E.; Langer, N.; Izzard, R. G.; Sana, H.; De Koter, A.

    2013-02-20

    Rotation is thought to be a major factor in the evolution of massive stars-especially at low metallicity-with consequences for their chemical yields, ionizing flux, and final fate. Deriving the birth spin distribution is of high priority given its importance as a constraint on theories of massive star formation and as input for models of stellar populations in the local universe and at high redshift. Recently, it has become clear that the majority of massive stars interact with a binary companion before they die. We investigate how this affects the distribution of rotation rates, through stellar winds, expansion, tides, mass transfer, and mergers. For this purpose, we simulate a massive binary-star population typical for our Galaxy assuming continuous star formation. We find that, because of binary interaction, 20{sup +5} {sub -10}% of all massive main-sequence stars have projected rotational velocities in excess of 200 km s{sup -1}. We evaluate the effect of uncertain input distributions and physical processes and conclude that the main uncertainties are the mass transfer efficiency and the possible effect of magnetic braking, especially if magnetic fields are generated or amplified during mass accretion and stellar mergers. The fraction of rapid rotators we derive is similar to that observed. If indeed mass transfer and mergers are the main cause for rapid rotation in massive stars, little room remains for rapidly rotating stars that are born single. This implies that spin-down during star formation is even more efficient than previously thought. In addition, this raises questions about the interpretation of the surface abundances of rapidly rotating stars as evidence for rotational mixing. Furthermore, our results allow for the possibility that all early-type Be stars result from binary interactions and suggest that evidence for rotation in explosions, such as long gamma-ray bursts, points to a binary origin.

  13. Mass ejection by pulsational pair instability in very massive stars and implications for luminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Maeda, Keiichi; Ishii, Tatsuo

    2016-03-01

    Massive stars having a CO core of ˜40-60 M⊙ experience pulsational pair-instability (PPI) after carbon-burning. This instability induces strong pulsations of the whole star and a part of outer envelope is ejected. We investigate the evolution and mass ejection of metal-poor very massive stars which experience PPI. We use stellar models with initial masses of 140, 200, and 250 M⊙ and the metallicity Z = 0.004. Their masses decrease to 54.09, 58.65, and 61.03 M⊙ before the neon-burning owing to mass-loss and He mass fraction at the surface becomes about 20 per cent. During the PPI period of ˜1-2000 yr, they experience six, four, and three pulsations, respectively. The larger CO-core model has the longer PPI period and ejects the larger amount of mass. Since almost all surface He has been lost by the pulsations, these stars become Type Ic supernovae if they explode. Light curves during the PPI stage and supernovae are investigated and are implicated in luminous supernovae. The luminosity created by the interaction of different PPI ejecta becomes Mbol ˜ -16 to -20. The interaction between the circumstellar shell ejected by PPI and the supernova ejecta can be more luminous. These luminous transients could be an origin of Type I superluminous supernovae and supernovae with precursor.

  14. The Fragmentation of Magnetized, Massive Star-forming Cores with Radiative Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Andrew T.; McKee, Christopher F.; Cunningham, Andrew J.; Klein, Richard I.; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-04-01

    We present a set of three-dimensional, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic calculations of the gravitational collapse of massive (300 M ⊙), star-forming molecular cloud cores. We show that the combined effects of magnetic fields and radiative feedback strongly suppress core fragmentation, leading to the production of single-star systems rather than small clusters. We find that the two processes are efficient at suppressing fragmentation in different regimes, with the feedback most effective in the dense, central region and the magnetic field most effective in more diffuse, outer regions. Thus, the combination of the two is much more effective at suppressing fragmentation than either one considered in isolation. Our work suggests that typical massive cores, which have mass-to-flux ratios of about 2 relative to critical, likely form a single-star system, but that cores with weaker fields may form a small star cluster. This result helps us understand why the observed relationship between the core mass function and the stellar initial mass function holds even for ~100 M ⊙ cores with many thermal Jeans masses of material. We also demonstrate that a ~40 AU Keplerian disk is able to form in our simulations, despite the braking effect caused by the strong magnetic field.

  15. Signatures of multiple stellar populations in unresolved extragalactic globular/young massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Finzell, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    We present an investigation of potential signatures of the formation of multiple stellar populations in recently formed extragalactic star clusters. All of the Galactic globular clusters for which good samples of individual stellar abundances are available show evidence for multiple populations. This appears to require that multiple episodes of star formation and light element enrichment are the norm in the history of a globular cluster. We show that there are detectable observational signatures of multiple formation events in the unresolved spectra of massive, young extragalactic star clusters. We present the results of a pilot program to search for one of the cleanest signatures that we identify—the combined presence of emission lines from a very recently formed population and absorption lines from a somewhat older population. A possible example of such a system is identified in the Antennae galaxies. This source's spectrum shows evidence of two stellar populations with ages of 8 Myr and 80 Myr. Further investigation shows that these populations are in fact physically separated, but only by a projected distance of 59 pc. We show that the clusters are consistent with being bound and discuss the possibility that their coalescence could result in a single globular cluster hosting multiple stellar populations. While not the prototypical system proposed by most theories of the formation of multiple populations in clusters, the detection of this system in a small sample is both encouraging and interesting. Our investigation suggests that expanded surveys of massive young star clusters should detect more clusters with such signatures.

  16. A Rare Encounter with Very Massive Stars in NGC~3125-A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, A.; Leitherer, C.; Chandar, R.; Bouret, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    Super star cluster A1 in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC~3125 shows broad He II λ1640 emission (FWHM ~ 1200 km/s) of unprecedented strength (equivalent width, EW = 7.1+/-0.4 angstroms). Previous attempts to characterize A1's massive star content were hampered by the low resolution of the UV spectrum and the lack of co-spatial panchromatic data. We obtained far-UV to near-IR spectroscopy of the two principal emitting regions in the galaxy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We use these data to derive the ages, reddenings, masses, and Wolf-Rayet (WR) to O star ratios of three compact clusters in the galaxy. We rule out that the extraordinary HeII lambda 1640 emission and OV lambda 1371 absorption in A1 are due to an extremely flat upper Initial Mass Function (IMF), and suggest that they originate in the winds of Very Massive Stars ( > 120 Msun, VMS). In order to reproduce the properties of peculiar clusters such as A1, the stellar evolution tracks implemented in Starburst99 need to be extended to masses >120 Msun.

  17. The Discovery of Hot Stars near the Galactic Center Thermal Radio Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotera, Angela S.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Allen, David A.; Burton, Michael G.

    1996-04-01

    We report the discovery of a highly unusual cluster of stars at GO.121+0.017 near the Arched (thermal) Filaments, ˜10' northeast of the Galactic center. H (1.65 μm) and K' (2.1 μm) images are used to estimate a distance to the cluster consistent with a Galactic center location. K'-band spectroscopy reveals that the cluster contains 13 stars with Brγ (2.166 μm) emission: 12 of these stars also have He I (2.112/3 μm) emission, and two show fainter He 11(2.189 μm) emission. Based on a spectral comparison with optically classified stars, we suggest the new emission stars are late WN stars. if the classification is correct, the cluster contains ˜14% of all known Galactic WN stars. Observations of emission-line stars near GO. 15-0.05, the "Pistol," are also presented. There are four stars near the Pistol which contain emission lines. Three of these stars differ spectroscopically from the stars in the new cluster; one has a spectrum that is similar to the new cluster stars. Together with the cluster stars, these newly discovered hot young stars provide evidence for recent star formation and the stellar ionization of the thermal radio emission regions in the vicinity of the Galactic center.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts from massive Population-III stars: clues from the radio band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, D.; Murphy, T.; Ghirlanda, G.; Hancock, P. J.; Parry, R.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-07-01

    Current models suggest gamma-ray bursts could be used as a way of probing Population-III stars - the first stars in the early Universe. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that late-time radio observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows could provide a means of identifying bursts that originate from Population-III stars, if these were highly massive, independently from their redshift. We then present the results from a pilot study using the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 17 GHz, designed to test the hypothesis that there may be Population-III gamma-ray bursts amongst the current sample of known events. We observed three candidates plus a control gamma-ray burst, and make no detections with upper limits of 20-40 μJy at 500-1300 d post-explosion.

  19. [A new automated method to identify emission line star from massive spectra].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhang, Cai-Ming; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2012-06-01

    Stellar spectra are characterized by obvious absorption lines or absorption bands, while those with emission lines are usually special stars such as cataclysmic variable stars (CVs), HerbigAe/Be etc. The further study of this kind of spectra is meaningful. The present paper proposed a new method to identify emission line stars (ELS) spectra automatically. After the continuum normalization is done for the original spectral flux, line detection is made by comparing the normalized flux with the mean and standard deviation of the flux in its neighbor region The results of the experiment on massive spectra from SDSS DR8 indicate that the method can identify ELS spectra completely and accurately. Since no complex transformation and computation are involved in this method, the identifying process is fast and it is ideal for the ELS detection in large sky survey projects like LAMOST and SDSS. PMID:22870668

  20. [A new automated method to identify emission line star from massive spectra].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhang, Cai-Ming; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2012-06-01

    Stellar spectra are characterized by obvious absorption lines or absorption bands, while those with emission lines are usually special stars such as cataclysmic variable stars (CVs), HerbigAe/Be etc. The further study of this kind of spectra is meaningful. The present paper proposed a new method to identify emission line stars (ELS) spectra automatically. After the continuum normalization is done for the original spectral flux, line detection is made by comparing the normalized flux with the mean and standard deviation of the flux in its neighbor region The results of the experiment on massive spectra from SDSS DR8 indicate that the method can identify ELS spectra completely and accurately. Since no complex transformation and computation are involved in this method, the identifying process is fast and it is ideal for the ELS detection in large sky survey projects like LAMOST and SDSS.

  1. Sizes and Shapes of Young, Massive Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryon, Jenna E.; Bastian, Nate; Adamo, Angela; Silva-Villa, Esteban; Gallagher, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Using HST imaging, the surface brightness profiles of individual star clusters in nearby galaxies can be resolved, in that clusters are clearly more extended than the stellar PSF. Previous studies of the sizes and shapes of star clusters find little variation with cluster age, mass, or galaxy environment. We use observations from seven pointings on M83 from HST/WFC3 programs GO/DD-11360 (PI O'Connell) and GO-12513 (PI Blair) to obtain a large sample of young, massive star clusters. We measure the half-light radii and power-law indices of the EFF light profile (Elson, Fall, & Freeman 1987) of these clusters using the galfit software package (Peng et al. 2002). We present our results on the relationships between cluster size, shape, age, mass, and environment in the disk of M83.

  2. Toward Detecting Fast Moving Massive Stars around the 30 Doradus Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platais, Imants; Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Lennon, D. J.; van der Marel, R. P.; Bellini, A. J.; de Mink, S. E.; Sohn, S. T.; Bedin, L. R.

    2012-05-01

    We have started an HST proper motion survey in the 30 Dor region of the Large Magellanic Cloud with the goal to find directions of tangential velocities of massive runaway stars and, hence, test the suggested production mechanisms (point of origin) of such stars. While the thrust of this survey is based on yet-to-be-completed two-epoch observations with the HST wide field cameras, there appears to be a considerable potential in achieving complementary aims by combining archival data from the HST WFPC2 with the latest extant observations. We report the first results of this approach and explore the level of proper-motion precision achievable with these data sets in the regime of sub-optimal images for the brighter main target stars. SdM acknowledges the NASA Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF-51270.01-A awarded by STScI, operated by AURA for NASA, contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. THE HOT R CORONAE BOREALIS STAR DY CENTAURI IS A BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Kameswara Rao, N.; Lambert, David L.; McArthur, Barbara; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Woolf, Vincent M. E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-11-20

    The remarkable hot R Coronae Borealis (RCB) star DY Cen is revealed to be the first and only binary system to be found among the RCB stars and their likely relatives, including the extreme helium stars and the hydrogen-deficient carbon stars. Radial velocity determinations from 1982 to 2010 have shown that DY Cen is a single-lined spectroscopic binary in an eccentric orbit with a period of 39.67 days. It is also one of the hottest and most H-rich member of the class of RCB stars. The system may have evolved from a common envelope to its current form.

  4. Detailed abundance analysis of the brightest star in Segue 2, the least massive galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Kirby, Evan N.

    2014-05-01

    We present the first high-resolution spectroscopic observations of one red giant star in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Segue 2, which has the lowest total mass (including dark matter) estimated for any known galaxy. These observations were made using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph on the Magellan II Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We perform a standard abundance analysis of this star, SDSS J021933.13+200830.2, and present abundances of 21 species of 18 elements as well as upper limits for 25 additional species. We derive [Fe/H] = -2.9, in excellent agreement with previous estimates from medium-resolution spectroscopy. Our main result is that this star bears the chemical signatures commonly found in field stars of similar metallicity. The heavy elements produced by neutron-capture reactions are present, but they are deficient at levels characteristic of stars in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies and a few luminous dwarf galaxies. The otherwise normal abundance patterns suggest that the gas from which this star formed was enriched by metals from multiple Type II supernovae reflecting a relatively well-sampled IMF. This adds to the growing body of evidence indicating that Segue 2 may have been substantially more massive in the past.

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