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Sample records for hot wall epitaxial

  1. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy of AlN using a high temperature hot-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Troy; Mayo, Ashley; Veisi, Zeinab; Lu, Peng; Schmitt, Jason

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) was grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The experiments utilized a two zone inductively heated hot-wall reactor. The surface morphology, crystal quality, and growth rate were investigated as a function of growth temperature in the range of 1450-1575 °C. AlN templates grown to a thickness of 1 μm were optimized with double axis X-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve full width half maximums (FWHMs) of 135″ for the (002) and 513″ for the (102).

  2. Roughness of CdTe thin films grown on glass by hot wall epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, F. F.; Ferreira, S. O.; Menezes-Sobrinho, I. L.; Faria, T. E.

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium telluride films were grown on glass substrates using the hot wall epitaxy (HWE) technique. The samples were polycrystalline with a preferential (111) orientation. Scanning electron micrographs reveal a grain size between 0.1 and 0.5 µm. The surface morphology of the samples was studied by measuring the roughness profile using a stylus profiler. The roughness as a function of growth time and scale size were investigated to determine the growth and roughness exponents, β and α, respectively. From the results we can conclude that the growth surface has a self-affine character with a roughness exponent α equal to 0.69 ± 0.03 and almost independent of growth time. The growth exponent β was equal to 0.38 ± 0.06. These values agree with that determined previously for CdTe(111) films grown on GaAs(100).

  3. Characterization of epitaxial films of CdTe and CdS grown by hot-wall epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitter, H.; Humenberger, J.; Huber, W.; Lopez-Otero, A.

    1983-09-01

    Layers of n-type CdTe and CdS doped with indium are grown on single-crystal BaF2 and SrF2 substrates, respectively, using the method of hot-wall epitaxy. The electron concentrations are typically up to 2 x 10 to the 17th/cu cm in CdTe and 3 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm in CdS. Mobilities of 600 sq cm/Vs for CdTe and 230 sq cm/Vs for CdS are measured at room temperature. The mobility of some of the samples is found to increase exponentially with temperature in the range from 300 to 100 K. It is noted that this effect can be explained by means of a grain boundary model. In other samples, however, bulk scattering mechanisms figure prominently for tempperatures lower than 100 K. Attention is also given to mobility as a function of grain size. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are made in characterizing the carrier traps in the CdTe films. Six different defect levels are found in the upper half of the forbidden gap. It is determined that the concentration of the defects and their distribution with depth away from the interface in heterojunction diodes are a function of the growth conditions.

  4. High growth rate 4H-SiC epitaxial growth using dichlorosilane in a hot-wall CVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Iftekhar; Chandrasekhar, M. V. S.; Klein, Paul B.; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Sudarshan, Tangali

    2011-02-01

    Thick, high quality 4H-SiC epilayers have been grown in a vertical hot-wall chemical vapor deposition system at a high growth rate on (0 0 0 1) 8° off-axis substrates. We discuss the use of dichlorosilane as the Si-precursor for 4H-SiC epitaxial growth as it provides the most direct decomposition route into SiCl 2, which is the predominant growth species in chlorinated chemistries. A specular surface morphology was attained by limiting the hydrogen etch rate until the system was equilibrated at the desired growth temperature. The RMS roughness of the grown films ranged from 0.5-2.0 nm with very few morphological defects (carrots, triangular defects, etc.) being introduced, while enabling growth rates of 30-100 μm/h, 5-15 times higher than most conventional growths. Site-competition epitaxy was observed over a wide range of C/Si ratios, with doping concentrations <1×10 14 cm -3 being recorded. X-ray rocking curves indicated that the epilayers were of high crystallinity, with linewidths as narrow as 7.8 arcsec being observed, while microwave photoconductive decay (μPCD) measurements indicated that these films had high injection (ambipolar) carrier lifetimes in the range of 2 μs.

  5. Influence of substrate materials on the properties of CdTe thin films grown by hot-wall epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilevych, Ye.; Soshnikov, A.; Darchuk, L.; Apatskaya, M.; Tsybrii, Z.; Vuychik, M.; Boka, A.; Sizov, F.; Boelling, O.; Sulkio-Cleff, B.

    2005-02-01

    Growth of high-quality CdTe thin films by hot-wall epitaxy (HWE) under different temperature conditions and the control of their physical, electrical and structural properties have been examined by various ways. CdTe (1 1 0), Zn 0.04Cd 0.96Te (1 1 1), Hg 0.2Cd 0.8Te (1 1 1), Si (1 1 1) and BaF 2 (1 1 1) were used as substrates. The obtained films have the cut-off wavelength at 0.84-0.85 μm and the transmission of about 55-60% out of the fundamental absorption domain. The current-voltage investigations have shown that the contact properties strongly depend on the contact material and contact fabrication method and less depend on substrate materials. The film-specific resistances (4-7)×10 4 Ω cm were determined. The CdTe deposition (layer thickness about 1000 Å) on Cd xHg 1-xTe resulted in significant increase in photodiodes electrical parameters. All samples showed the crystalline structure according to the XRD data with strong influence on lattice mismatch between CdTe and substrate materials. Atomic force microscope (AFM) investigations have shown a smooth and defect-free surface with a roughness range of 15-100 nm for 50 μm of basic length.

  6. Invariance of multifractal spectrums of spatial forms on the surface of ZnxCd1-xTe - Si heterocompositions synthesized by electron beam epitaxy and hot wall epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, P. P.; Kryzhanivskyy, V. B.; Rashkovetskyi, L. V.; Rudnitskyi, V. A.; Morozov, A. V.; Lytvyn, P. M.

    2017-10-01

    Multifractal (MF) analysis is applied for the description of spatial nanoforms which form a relief on a surface of heterostructures of ZnxCd1-xTe solid solution - substrate Si (1 1 1) synthesized by the method of the electron beam with the evaporating anode. The input data for the MF analysis were the AFM (atomic force microscopy) images of the surface of layers. Comparison of parameters of MF spectrums for different geometries of the surface relief of the layers obtained at identical temperatures and approximately identical growth rates by the above mentioned method of growth and the method of hot wall epitaxy has been performed. It was shown that within the error limits, MF spectrums of spatial nanoforms for heterostructures ZnxCd1-xTe - Si remained very similar under identical conditions for synthesis of layers for compared techniques.

  7. Element substitution from substrates in Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 overlayers deposited by hot wall epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Y.; Jahn, U.; Jenichen, B.; Berlin, K.; Kong, X.; Biermann, K.

    2014-09-01

    In depositing Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 or Sb2Te3 layers on certain substrates by hot wall epitaxy, the Bi and Sb atoms in the layers are replaced by the atoms supplied from the substrates. We extend our exploration on this substitution phenomenon for a number of combinations of the layer and the substrate to infer the factors that determine the occurrence of the substitution. Using a series of Ga- and In-based III-V substrates, it is evidenced that the group III atoms substitute the group V overlayer atoms when the bonds in the substrates are weak. We demonstrate that Ag triggers the substitution more effectively than Cu as a catalyst. The competition between the catalyst-induced substitutions on ternary alloy substrates shows that the dependence on the bond strength is not as strong as to be exclusive. Additionally, defectiveness around the interface between a semicoherently grown α-In2Se3 layer produced by the substitution and the InAs substrate is demonstrated. The cathodeluminescence properties are also provided focusing on the dependence on the phase of In2Se3.

  8. Lateral Growth Expansion of 4H/6H-SiC m-plane Pseudo Fiber Crystals by Hot Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Woodworth, Andrew A.; Powell, J. A.; Spry, David J.; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Lateral expansion of small mixed polytype 4H/6H-SiC slivers were realized by hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Small slivers cut from m-oriented ..11..00.. SiC boule slices containing regions of 4H and 6H SiC were exposed to HWCVD conditions using standard silane/propane chemistry for a period of up to eight hours. The slivers exhibited approximately 1500 microns (1.5 mm) of total lateral expansion. Initial analysis by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) confirms, that the lateral growth was homoepitaxial, matching the polytype of the respective underlying region of the seed sliver.

  9. Hot-Dipped Metal Films as Epitaxial Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Multistep process forms semiconductor devices on macrocrystalline films of cadmium or zinc. Solar-cell fabrication processes use hot-dipped macrocrystalline films on low-cost sheet-metal base as substrates for epitaxy. Epitaxial layers formed by variety of methods of alternative sequence paths. Solar cells made economically by forming desired surface substance directly on metal film by chemical reactions.

  10. Study of defect structures in 6H-SiC a/m-plane pseudofiber crystals grown by hot-wall CVD epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Goue, Ouloide Y.; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Yang, Yu; Guo, Jianqiu; Dudley, Michael; Kisslinger, Kim; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Woodworth, Andrew A.

    2015-11-25

    Structural perfection of silicon carbide (SiC) single crystals is essential to achieve high-performance power devices. A new bulk growth process for SiC proposed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, called large tapered crystal (LTC) growth, based on axial fiber growth followed by lateral expansion, could produce SiC boules with potentially as few as one threading screw dislocation per wafer. In this study, the lateral expansion aspect of LTC growth is addressed through analysis of lateral growth of 6H-SiC a/m-plane seed crystals by hot-wall chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary synchrotron white-beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) indicates that the as-grown boules match the polytype structure of the underlying seed and have a faceted hexagonal morphology with a strain-free surface marked by steps. SWBXT Laue diffraction patterns of transverse and axial slices of the boules reveal streaks suggesting the existence of stacking faults/polytypes, and this is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Transmission x-ray topography of both transverse and axial slices reveals inhomogeneous strains at the seed–epilayer interface and linear features propagating from the seed along the growth direction. Micro-Raman mapping of an axial slice reveals that the seed contains high stacking disorder, while contrast extinction analysis (g·b and g·b×l) of the linear features reveals that these are mostly edge-type basal plane dislocations. Further high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of the seed–homoepilayer interface also reveals nanobands of different SiC polytypes. A model for their formation mechanism is proposed. Lastly, the implication of these results for improving the LTC growth process is addressed.

  11. Study of defect structures in 6H-SiC a/m-plane pseudofiber crystals grown by hot-wall CVD epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Goue, Ouloide Y.; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Yang, Yu; ...

    2015-11-25

    Structural perfection of silicon carbide (SiC) single crystals is essential to achieve high-performance power devices. A new bulk growth process for SiC proposed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, called large tapered crystal (LTC) growth, based on axial fiber growth followed by lateral expansion, could produce SiC boules with potentially as few as one threading screw dislocation per wafer. In this study, the lateral expansion aspect of LTC growth is addressed through analysis of lateral growth of 6H-SiC a/m-plane seed crystals by hot-wall chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary synchrotron white-beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) indicates that the as-grown boules match themore » polytype structure of the underlying seed and have a faceted hexagonal morphology with a strain-free surface marked by steps. SWBXT Laue diffraction patterns of transverse and axial slices of the boules reveal streaks suggesting the existence of stacking faults/polytypes, and this is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Transmission x-ray topography of both transverse and axial slices reveals inhomogeneous strains at the seed–epilayer interface and linear features propagating from the seed along the growth direction. Micro-Raman mapping of an axial slice reveals that the seed contains high stacking disorder, while contrast extinction analysis (g·b and g·b×l) of the linear features reveals that these are mostly edge-type basal plane dislocations. Further high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of the seed–homoepilayer interface also reveals nanobands of different SiC polytypes. A model for their formation mechanism is proposed. Lastly, the implication of these results for improving the LTC growth process is addressed.« less

  12. Structural Characterization of Lateral-grown 6H-SiC am-plane Seed Crystals by Hot Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Woodworth, Andrew A.; Spry, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) power devices is limited due to inherently high density of screw dislocations (SD), which are necessary for maintaining polytype during boule growth and commercially viable growth rates. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently proposed a new bulk growth process based on axial fiber growth (parallel to the c-axis) followed by lateral expansion (perpendicular to the c-axis) for producing multi-faceted m-plane SiC boules that can potentially produce wafers with as few as one SD per wafer. In order to implement this novel growth technique, the lateral homoepitaxial growth expansion of a SiC fiber without introducing a significant number of additional defects is critical. Lateral expansion is being investigated by hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) growth of 6H-SiC am-plane seed crystals (0.8mm x 0.5mm x 15mm) designed to replicate axially grown SiC single crystal fibers. The post-growth crystals exhibit hexagonal morphology with approximately 1500 m (1.5 mm) of total lateral expansion. Preliminary analysis by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) confirms that the growth was homoepitaxial, matching the polytype of the respective underlying region of the seed crystal. Axial and transverse sections from the as grown crystal samples were characterized in detail by a combination of SWBXT, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy to map defect types and distribution. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the seed crystal contained stacking disorders and this appears to have been reproduced in the lateral growth sections. Analysis of the relative intensity for folded transverse acoustic (FTA) and optical (FTO) modes on the Raman spectra indicate the existence of stacking faults. Further, the density of stacking faults is higher in the seed than in the grown crystal. Bundles of dislocations are observed propagating from the seed in m-axis lateral directions

  13. Hot Wall Thickness Variation Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Subtltia) HOT WALL THICKNESS VARIATION MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 7. AUTHORfa; 3. J. KRUPSKI 9 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS PRODUCT...THE FORGING 3. ULTRASONICS ON A HOT TUBE 4. SYSTEt-l DESCRIPTION 5. TESTING RESULTS 6. CONCLUSIONS 7. HffLEMENTATION PAGE i ii 1 2 4 6 9 ...printed out. The grip procedure was repeated toward the breech end of the forging with good results. The third and 9 breech end prints were at about

  14. 2. PLENUM WALL, SHOWING PNEUMATIC TUBES. Hot Springs National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PLENUM WALL, SHOWING PNEUMATIC TUBES. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  15. Hot electron attenuation of direct and scattered carriers across an epitaxial Schottky interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, S.; Klandermans, P. S.; Venkatesan, S.; Scheu, C.; Banerjee, T.

    2013-11-01

    Hot electron transport of direct and scattered carriers across an epitaxial NiSi2/n-Si(111) interface, for different NiSi2 thickness, is studied using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM). We find the BEEM transmission for the scattered hot electrons in NiSi2 to be significantly lower than that for the direct hot electrons, for all thicknesses. Interestingly, the attenuation length of the scattered hot electrons is found to be twice as large as that of the direct hot electrons. The lower BEEM transmission for the scattered hot electrons is due to inelastic scattering of the injected hot holes while the larger attenuation length of the scattered hot electrons is a consequence of the differences in the energy distribution of the injected and scattered hot electrons and the increasing attenuation length, at lower energies, of the direct hot electrons in NiSi2.

  16. Hot electron attenuation of direct and scattered carriers across an epitaxial Schottky interface.

    PubMed

    Parui, S; Klandermans, P S; Venkatesan, S; Scheu, C; Banerjee, T

    2013-11-06

    Hot electron transport of direct and scattered carriers across an epitaxial NiSi2/n-Si(111) interface, for different NiSi2 thickness, is studied using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM). We find the BEEM transmission for the scattered hot electrons in NiSi2 to be significantly lower than that for the direct hot electrons, for all thicknesses. Interestingly, the attenuation length of the scattered hot electrons is found to be twice as large as that of the direct hot electrons. The lower BEEM transmission for the scattered hot electrons is due to inelastic scattering of the injected hot holes while the larger attenuation length of the scattered hot electrons is a consequence of the differences in the energy distribution of the injected and scattered hot electrons and the increasing attenuation length, at lower energies, of the direct hot electrons in NiSi2.

  17. 47. ARAI. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. ARA-I. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell in ARA-626. Note stands for operators at viewing windows. Manipulators with hand grips extend cables and other controls into hot cell through ducts above windows. Ineel photo no. 81-27. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring radioactive materials containment box, facing east - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  19. Epitaxial Engineering of Domain Walls and Distortions in Ferrite Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Julia

    The defining feature of ferroics is the ability of an external stimulus--electric field, magnetic field, or stress--to move domain walls. These topological defects and their motion enables many useful attributes, e.g., memories that can be reversibly written between stable states as well as enhanced conductivity, permittivity, permeability, and piezoelectricity. Although methods are known to drastically increase their density, the placement of domain walls with atomic precision has until now evaded control. Here we engineer the location of domain walls with monolayer precision and exploit this ability to create a novel multiferroic in which ferroelectricity enhances magnetism at all relevant length scales. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3, a geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling, we introduce individual extra monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 within the LuFeO3 matrix, i.e., (LuFeO3)m /(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighboring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state and reduces the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature significantly--to 281 K for the (LuFeO3)9 /(LuFe2O4)1 superlattice. Moreover, LuFeO3 can form charged ferroelectric domain walls, which we align to the LuFe2O4 bilayers with monolayer precision. Charge transfers to these domain walls to alleviate the otherwise electrostatically unstable polarization arrangement, further boosting the magnetic moment. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining ferroics at the atomic-layer level with attention to domain walls, geometric frustration and polarization doping to create multiferroics by design.

  20. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhipoor, S.; Magén, C.; Venkatesan, S.; Íñiguez, J.; Daumont, C. J. M.; Rubi, D.; Snoeck, E.; Mostovoy, M.; de Graaf, C.; Müller, A.; Döblinger, M.; Scheu, C.; Noheda, B.

    2014-11-01

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new approaches to materials synthesis that make it possible to control material functionality down to the smallest scales. An objective of materials research is to achieve enhanced control over the physical properties of materials such as ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and superconductors. In this context, complex oxides and inorganic perovskites are attractive because slight adjustments of their atomic structures can produce large physical responses and result in multiple functionalities. In addition, these materials often contain ferroelastic domains. The intrinsic symmetry breaking that takes place at the domain walls can induce properties absent from the domains themselves, such as magnetic or ferroelectric order and other functionalities, as well as coupling between them. Moreover, large domain wall densities create intense strain gradients, which can also affect the material's properties. Here we show that, owing to large local stresses, domain walls can promote the formation of unusual phases. In this sense, the domain walls can function as nanoscale chemical reactors. We synthesize a two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase at the domain walls of the orthorhombic perovskite terbium manganite (TbMnO3), which was grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates. This phase is yet to be created by standard chemical routes. The density of the two-dimensional sheets can be tuned by changing the film thickness or the substrate lattice parameter (that is, the epitaxial strain), and the distance between sheets can be made as small as 5 nanometres in ultrathin films, such that the new phase at domain walls represents up to 25 per cent of the film volume. The general concept of using domain walls of epitaxial oxides to promote the formation of unusual phases may be applicable to other materials systems, thus giving access to new classes of nanoscale materials for applications in nanoelectronics and

  1. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide.

    PubMed

    Farokhipoor, S; Magén, C; Venkatesan, S; Íñiguez, J; Daumont, C J M; Rubi, D; Snoeck, E; Mostovoy, M; de Graaf, C; Müller, A; Döblinger, M; Scheu, C; Noheda, B

    2014-11-20

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new approaches to materials synthesis that make it possible to control material functionality down to the smallest scales. An objective of materials research is to achieve enhanced control over the physical properties of materials such as ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and superconductors. In this context, complex oxides and inorganic perovskites are attractive because slight adjustments of their atomic structures can produce large physical responses and result in multiple functionalities. In addition, these materials often contain ferroelastic domains. The intrinsic symmetry breaking that takes place at the domain walls can induce properties absent from the domains themselves, such as magnetic or ferroelectric order and other functionalities, as well as coupling between them. Moreover, large domain wall densities create intense strain gradients, which can also affect the material's properties. Here we show that, owing to large local stresses, domain walls can promote the formation of unusual phases. In this sense, the domain walls can function as nanoscale chemical reactors. We synthesize a two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase at the domain walls of the orthorhombic perovskite terbium manganite (TbMnO3), which was grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates. This phase is yet to be created by standard chemical routes. The density of the two-dimensional sheets can be tuned by changing the film thickness or the substrate lattice parameter (that is, the epitaxial strain), and the distance between sheets can be made as small as 5 nanometres in ultrathin films, such that the new phase at domain walls represents up to 25 per cent of the film volume. The general concept of using domain walls of epitaxial oxides to promote the formation of unusual phases may be applicable to other materials systems, thus giving access to new classes of nanoscale materials for applications in nanoelectronics and

  2. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan Rahman, Anwar Abdul Hamzah, Mohd Arif Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  3. Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and Scalable Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0319 Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and...controlled growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using vapor phase epitaxy: mechanistic understanding and scalable production FA9550-14-1-0115 Zhou...producing nanotubes of predefined chirality. By combining nanotube separation with synthesis, we have achieved controlled growth of nanotubes with

  4. New hot repair technique for coke oven wall

    SciTech Connect

    Mikoshi, Kazuhiro; Tsugita, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Akio; Okanishi, Kazuya

    1993-01-01

    The brick of coke-oven chamber walls is subjected to thermal and mechanical impact due to changes in temperature during coal carbonization and the lateral pressure applied at the time of coke pushing, and brick deterioration gradually progresses. Nippon Steel formerly repaired oven chamber wall brick by hot relaying at the Hirohata No. 2 Coke-Oven Battery and the Kamaishi No. 1 Coke-Oven Battery. In both cases the brick was relaid from the chamber end part (oven door). Therefore, if damage occurs in the middle part of the chamber, a large extent of brick relaying is necessary. The Hirohata No. 3 Coke-Oven Battery has recently been repaired by the boring method, in which only the brick of the middle part of coking chambers was hot-related. This report outlines the repair method newly adopted at that time.

  5. Hot-wall low pressure chemical vapor deposition growth and characterization of AlN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinselman, Karen N.; Brown, Richard J.; Shealy, James R.

    2017-10-01

    Hot-wall low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of highly crystalline epitaxial thin-film AlN grown on silicon (1 1 1) substrates is reported for the first time. Deposition was carried out in a modified commercial LPCVD at 1000 °C and 2 torr. Preflow time for the aluminum precursor, trimethylaluminum, was varied to nucleate Al, and the resulting variation in X-ray diffraction (XRD) crystalline AlN peaks is presented. With a 30 s dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) pretreatment at 700 °C and the optimal TMAl preflow time, the FWHM of the resulting film was 1116 arcsec for the AlN (0 0 2) 2 θ - ω peak, and the AlN (0 0 2) peak had an omega rocking curve FWHM of 1.6°. This AlN film was shown to be epitaxially aligned to the Si (1 1 1) substrate.

  6. Directional sensitivity of wall mounted hot-film gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvery, David G.; Bremhorst, Klaus

    1996-10-01

    The directional sensitivity of a constant temperature, thin, wall mounted hot-film gauge with respect to variations in yaw angle is investigated. Results obtained for the response of a hot-film gauge in a boundary layer flow fit the correlation between the effective cooling velocity for a hot-wire gauge and the yaw angle suggested by other workers. The yaw factor 0957-0233/7/10/011/img1 used in this correlation is typically less than 1.0. Results presented for the hot-film gauge in a boundary layer indicate that the yaw factor depends on both the distance into the boundary layer and the magnitude of the free stream velocity. At some velocity, close to zero, the results predict a yaw factor greater than unity. Computer simulations using the 0957-0233/7/10/011/img2 turbulence model are presented which verify this prediction. Yaw factors greater than one result because diffusion from the edges of the gauge becomes significant at low velocities with respect to the total heat transferred.

  7. Chirality-dependent vapor-phase epitaxial growth and termination of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Tu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Jialu; Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-09-11

    Structurally uniform and chirality-pure single-wall carbon nanotubes are highly desired for both fundamental study and many of their technological applications, such as electronics, optoelectronics, and biomedical imaging. Considerable efforts have been invested in the synthesis of nanotubes with defined chiralities by tuning the growth recipes but the approach has only limited success. Recently, we have shown that chirality-pure short nanotubes can be used as seeds for vapor-phase epitaxial cloning growth, opening up a new route toward chirality-controlled carbon nanotube synthesis. Nevertheless, the yield of vapor-phase epitaxial growth is rather limited at the present stage, due in large part to the lack of mechanistic understanding of the process. Here we report chirality-dependent growth kinetics and termination mechanism for the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of seven single-chirality nanotubes of (9, 1), (6, 5), (8, 3), (7, 6), (10, 2), (6, 6), and (7, 7), covering near zigzag, medium chiral angle, and near armchair semiconductors, as well as armchair metallic nanotubes. Our results reveal that the growth rates of nanotubes increase with their chiral angles while the active lifetimes of the growth hold opposite trend. Consequently, the chirality distribution of a nanotube ensemble is jointly determined by both growth rates and lifetimes. These results correlate nanotube structures and properties with their growth behaviors and deepen our understanding of chirality-controlled growth of nanotubes.

  8. Interactions between two bubbles on a hot or cold wall.

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Hiroki; Sides, Paul J; Anderson, John L

    2004-08-01

    A temperature gradient normal to a planar wall produces two-dimensional motion and aggregation or separation of bubbles on the hot or cold wall, respectively. The origin of the motion is fluid convection driven by the thermal Marangoni stress on the surface of the bubbles. Previous theories for the dynamics of two or more bubbles have been based on an analysis of flow about a single bubble and the resulting convection that entrains its neighbors. Here we extend the theory by solving the quasi-steady equations for the temperature and velocity fields for two bubbles. The result is a quantitative model for the relative velocity between two bubbles as a function of both the distance between them and the gap between each bubble and the surface. Interactions between the bubbles strongly increase the approach velocity, which is counter-intuitive because the hydrodynamic resistance increases as the bubbles approach each other. An asymptotic analysis indicates the thermocapillary force bringing them together or pushing them apart is singular in the separation when the bubbles are close to each other. The two-bubble theory agrees reasonably well with the experimentally measured velocities of pairs of bubbles on hot or cold surfaces, though it slightly overestimates the velocities.

  9. Characterization of hot wall grown silver phthalocyanine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Himani; Bedi, R. K.; Mahajan, Aman

    2007-10-01

    Silver phthalocyanine (AgPc) has attracted considerable interest because of its outstanding chemical stability, optical and electrical properties, and wide variety of potential applications in modern optical recording and optoelectronic devices. To improve the performance of devices based on AgPc, hot wall technique has been used to grow thin layers of AgPc onto the glass substrates kept at different temperatures in a vacuum of 10-5Torr. The films so obtained are annealed and studied for structural, electrical, and optical characterization. The x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy pattern of these films show a crystalline behavior of films. The films deposited at higher substrate temperature suggest the formation of more ordered and crystalline films. An analysis of optical absorption measurements on the films indicates that the interband transition energies lie in the range 4.1-4.13eV.

  10. Observing hot carrier distribution in an n-type epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Someya, T.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Iimori, T.; Yukawa, R.; Akikubo, K.; Yamamoto, Sh.; Yamamoto, S.; Kanai, T.; Itatani, J.; Komori, F.; Shin, S.; Matsuda, I.; Fukidome, H.; Funakubo, K.; Suemitsu, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2014-04-21

    Hot carrier dynamics in the Dirac band of n-type epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate were traced in real time using femtosecond-time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The spectral evolution directly reflects the energetically linear density of states superimposed with a Fermi–Dirac distribution. The relaxation time is governed by the internal energy dissipation of electron–electron scattering, and the observed electronic temperature indicates cascade carrier multiplication.

  11. Wall proximity corrections for hot-wire readings in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebbar, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    This note describes some details of recent (successful) attempts of wall proximity corrections for hot-wire measurements performed in a three-dimensional incompressible turbulent boundary layer. A simple and quite satisfactory method of estimating wall proximity effects on hot-wire readings is suggested.

  12. Rapid low-temperature epitaxial growth using a hot-element assisted chemical vapor deposition process

    DOEpatents

    Iwancizko, Eugene; Jones, Kim M.; Crandall, Richard S.; Nelson, Brent P.; Mahan, Archie Harvin

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides a process for depositing an epitaxial layer on a crystalline substrate, comprising the steps of providing a chamber having an element capable of heating, introducing the substrate into the chamber, heating the element at a temperature sufficient to decompose a source gas, passing the source gas in contact with the element; and forming an epitaxial layer on the substrate.

  13. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noheda, Beatriz

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new paradigms for materials synthesis that allow controlling their functionality down to the smallest scales. Here we report a novel two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase that is synthesized at the domain walls (DWs) of the antiferromagnetic insulator TbMnO3 when grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain. This Mn oxide phase presents an atomic arrangement that does not exist in bulk and cannot be synthesized by standard chemical routes. The number of 2D ferromagnetic sheets can be controlled by tuning the thickness of the thin films, giving rise to volume fractions that go up to 25% of the total film volume. Such novel phases are driven by a unique environment induced by the symmetry breaking and large stresses present at domain walls, which function as nanoreactors. This new class of nanoscale materials may find innovative applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics. The work is published as S. Farokhipoor, C. Magén, S. Venkatesan, J. Íñiguez, C. J. M. Daumont, D. Rubi, E. Snoeck, M. Mostovoy, C. de Graaf, A. Müller, M. Döblinger, C. Scheu, B. Noheda, Nature 515, 379 (2014)

  14. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  15. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. OPEN CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. OPEN CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH WALL OF BUILDING. CAMERA IS NEAR HOT CELL NO. 1, FACES WEST TOWARDS WALL OF TEST-TRAIN ASSEMBLY (TRA-632A). NOTE MOTORIZED RAIL CRANE ABOVE STAIRWAY. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS OF THE BUILDING, SHEET STEEL DEFINES THE HOT CELL "BOX" ITSELF. THREE OPERATING WINDOWS ON LEFT; ONE VIEWING WINDOW ON RIGHT. TUBES WILL CONTAIN SERVICE AND CONTROL LEADS. SPACE BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER BOX WALLS WILL BE FILLED WITH SHIELDED WINDOWS AND BARETES CONCRETE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7933. Unknown Photographer, ca. 5/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. A&M. TAN607. Shield wall sections and details around hot shop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Shield wall sections and details around hot shop and special equipment room, showing taper, crane rail elevations, and elevation for biparting door (door no. 301) in wall between hot shop and special equipment room. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-S 138. Date: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-62-963-106782 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  19. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  20. A Method to Estimate Local Towed Array Angles Using Flush Mounted Hot Film Wall Shear Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-05

    during turns. In the invention, a flush mounted hot film sensor and an anemometry system are used to measure the mean and fluctuating turbulent wall...decrease in towing speed necessitated by certain maneuvers can cause the towed array to fall or sink. Suitable flush mounted hot film sensors and anemometry ...the calculated shaped of the deployed towed array 100 and the physical restraints of incorporating the hot -film sensors 108 and associated wiring into

  1. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing south shielding wall of hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing south shielding wall of hot shop. Ports have been left for viewing windows. Space on east side of wall will be enclosed to provide operating gallery next to viewing windows and then the cold shop. Date: November 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 9233 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Response of hot element flush wall gauges in oscillating laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, T. A.; Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The time dependent response characteristics of flush-mounted hot element gauges used as instruments to measure wall shear stress in unsteady periodic air flows were investigated. The study was initiated because anomalous results were obtained from the gauges in oscillating turbulent flows for the phase relation of the wall shear stress variation, indicating possible gauge response problems. Flat plate laminar oscillating turbulent flows characterized by a mean free stream velocity with a superposed sinusoidal variation were performed. Laminar rather than turbulent flows were studied, because a numerical solution for the phase angle between the free stream velocity and the wall shear stress variation that is known to be correct can be obtained. The focus is on comparing the phase angle indicated by the hot element gauges with corresponding numerical prediction for the phase angle, since agreement would indicate that the hot element gauges faithfully follow the true wall shear stress variation.

  3. Chiral-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Lattice-Mismatched Epitaxial Cobalt Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Bilu; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Chernov, Alexander I.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob B.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Belkin, Alexey V.; Sairanen, Emma; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Lehtonen, Juha; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling chirality in growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important for exploiting their practical applications. For long it has been conceptually conceived that the structural control of SWNTs is potentially achievable by fabricating nanoparticle catalysts with proper structures on crystalline substrates via epitaxial growth techniques. Here, we have accomplished epitaxial formation of monometallic Co nanoparticles with well-defined crystal structure, and its use as a catalyst in the selective growth of SWNTs. Dynamics of Co nanoparticles formation and SWNT growth inside an atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope at a low CO pressure was recorded. We achieved highly preferential growth of semiconducting SWNTs (~90%) with an exceptionally large population of (6, 5) tubes (53%) in an ambient CO atmosphere. Particularly, we also demonstrated high enrichment in (7, 6) and (9, 4) at a low growth temperature. These findings open new perspectives both for structural control of SWNTs and for elucidating the growth mechanisms. PMID:23492872

  4. Tunable ferroelectric domain wall alignment in strained monoclinic KxNa1-xNbO3 epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, D.; Schmidbauer, M.; Hanke, M.; Kwasniewski, A.; Schwarzkopf, J.

    2017-06-01

    Epitaxial growth of ferroelectric KxNa1-xNbO3 thin films on (110) NdScO3 substrates results in the formation of domain walls which significantly differ in their arrangement from commonly observed 45° or 90° inclinations. The deviation is attributed to the monoclinic symmetry of the evolving a1a2/MC herringbone pattern and can be controlled by the epitaxial strain. In this work, tuning of the in-plane domain angle is systematically performed by the variation of the potassium content in KxNa1-xNbO3. The experimental data are in full agreement with a theoretical model. The observed behavior yields a promising pathway for domain engineering and patterning of periodic structures.

  5. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of high performance wall systems. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, cost information, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into the 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project utilized information collected in the California project.

  6. 113. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building wall sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building wall sections and details of radio chemistry lab. Shows high-bay roof over hot cells and isolation rooms below grade storage pit for fuel elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102724. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Preparation of Transparent Conducting ZnO:Al Coating Using Hot Wall Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, J. M.; Shirodkar, V. S.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide thin films were grown on glass substrates using hot wall deposition technique. The method involved evaporation of high purity ZnO and Al from respective sources surrounded by alumina cylinder held at high temperature. The additional thermal energy supplied by the hot wall to the particles colliding on it helps in its migration resulting in highly uniform films. XRD studies show the growth of c-axis oriented near single phase ZnO films having about 90% transmittance in the visible range and resistivity of the order of 10-4Θ cm.

  8. Evaluation of Tritium Behavior in the Epoxy Painted Concrete Wall of ITER Hot Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-07-15

    Tritium behavior released in the ITER hot cell has been investigated numerically using a combined analytical methods of a tritium transport analysis in the multi-layer wall (concrete and epoxy paint) with the one dimensional diffusion model and a tritium concentration analysis in the hot cell with the complete mixing model by the ventilation. As the results, it is revealed that tritium concentration decay and permeation issues are not serious problem in a viewpoint of safety, since it is expected that tritium concentration in the hot cell decrease rapidly within several days just after removing the tritium release source, and tritium permeation through the epoxy painted concrete wall will be negligible as long as the averaged realistic diffusion coefficient is ensured in the concrete wall. It is also revealed that the epoxy paint on the concrete wall prevents the tritium inventory increase in the concrete wall greatly (two orders of magnitudes), but still, the inventory in the wall is estimated to reach about 0.1 PBq for 20 years operation.

  9. Epitaxial Growth of GaN Films by Pulse-Mode Hot-Mesh Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komae, Yasuaki; Yasui, Kanji; Suemitsu, Maki; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ito, Takashi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Narita, Yuzuru; Takata, Masasuke; Akahane, Tadashi

    2009-07-01

    Intermittent gas supplies for hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride (GaN) films were investigated to improve film crystallinity and optical properties. The GaN films were deposited on SiC/Si(111) substrates using an alternating-source gas supply or an intermittent supply of source gases such as ammonia (NH3) and trimethylgallium (TMG) in hot-mesh CVD after deposition of an aluminum nitride (AlN) buffer layer. The AlN layer was deposited using NH3 and trimethylaluminum (TMA) on a SiC layer grown by carbonization of a Si substrate using propane (C3H8). GaN films were grown on the AlN layer by a reaction between NHx radicals generated on a ruthenium (Ru)-coated tungsten (W) mesh and TMG molecules. After testing various gas supply modes, GaN films with good crystallinity and surface morphology were obtained using an intermittent supply of TMG and a continuous supply of NH3 gas. An optimal interval for the TMG gas supply was also obtained for the apparatus employed.

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND FILTER LOFT PLATFORM AND LADDER ON EAST SIDE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-4, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-396-110563, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. ARCHITECTURAL WALL SECTIONS OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP640). INL DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARCHITECTURAL WALL SECTIONS OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CPP-640). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0640-00-279-111682. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 8952-CPP-640-A-5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  13. Amorphous/epitaxial superlattice for thermoelectric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Shibata, Mamoru; Nakashima, Seisuke; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    An amorphous/epitaxial superlattice system is proposed for application to thermoelectric devices, and the superlattice based on a PbGeTeS system was prepared by the alternate deposition of PbS and GeTe using a hot wall epitaxy technique. The structure was analyzed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray analysis, and it was found that the superlattice consists of an epitaxial PbTe-based layer and a GeS-based amorphous layer by the reconstruction of the constituents. A reduction in thermal conductivity due to the amorphous/epitaxial system was confirmed by a 2ω method. Electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured for the samples.

  14. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Mahan, Archie H.; Alleman, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  15. Hot-wall corrosion testing of simulated high level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Zapp, P.E.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    Three materials of construction for steam tubes used in the evaporation of high level radioactive waste were tested under heat flux conditions, referred to as hot-wall tests. The materials were type 304L stainless steel alloy C276, and alloy G3. Non-radioactive acidic and alkaline salt solutions containing halides and mercury simulated different high level waste solutions stored or processed at the United States Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site. Alloy C276 was also tested for corrosion susceptibility under steady-state conditions. The nickel-based alloys C276 and G3 exhibited excellent corrosion resistance under the conditions studied. Alloy C276 was not susceptible to localized corrosion and had a corrosion rate of 0.01 mpy (0.25 {mu}m/y) when exposed to acidic waste sludge and precipitate slurry at a hot-wall temperature of 150{degrees}C. Type 304L was susceptible to localized corrosion under the same conditions. Alloy G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 {mu}m/y) when exposed to caustic high level waste evaporator solution at a hot-wall temperature of 220{degrees}C compared to 1.1 mpy (28.0 {mu}/y) for type 304L. Under extreme caustic conditions (45 weight percent sodium hydroxide) G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 {mu}m/y) at a hot-wall temperature of 180{degrees}C while type 304L had a high corrosion rate of 69.4 mpy (1.8 mm/y).

  16. Convective response of a wall-mounted hot-film sensor in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Ortgies, Kelly R.; Gartenberg, Ehud; Carraway, Debra L.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed in order to determine the response of a single hot-film element of a sensor array to transiently induced flow behind weak normal shock waves. The experiments attempt to isolate the response due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface mounted on the wall of the shock tube. The experiments are described, the results being correlated with transient boundary layer theory and compared with an independent set of experimental results. One of the findings indicates that the change in the air properties (temperature and pressure) precedes the air mass transport, causing an ambiguity in the sensor response to the development of the velocity boundary layer. Also, a transient, local heat transfer coefficient is formulated to be used as a forcing function in an hot-film instrument model and simulation which remains under investigation.

  17. Convective response of a wall-mounted hot-film sensor in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.; Carraway, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed in order to determine the response of a single hot-film element of a sensor array to transiently induced flow behind weak normal shock waves. The experiments attempt to isolate the response due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface mounted on the wall of the shock tube. The experiments are described, the results being correlated with transient boundary layer theory and compared with an independent set of experimental results. One of the findings indicates that the change in the air properties (temperature and pressure) precedes the air mass transport, causing an ambiguity in the sensor response to the development of the velocity boundary layer. Also, a transient, local heat transfer coefficient is formulated to be used as a forcing function in a hot-film instrument model and simulation which remains under investigation.

  18. Hot film wall shear instrumentation for compressible boundary layer transition research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of hot film wall shear instrumentation were performed. A new hot film anemometer was developed and tested. The anemometer performance was not quite as good as that of commercial anemometers, but the cost was much less and testing flexibility was improved. The main focus of the project was a parametric study of the effect of sensor size and substrate material on the performance of hot film surface sensors. Both electronic and shock-induced flow experiments were performed to determine the sensitivity and frequency response of the sensors. The results are presented in Michael Moen's M.S. thesis, which is appended. A condensed form of the results was also submitted for publication.

  19. Convective response of a wall-mounted hot-film sensor in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.; Carraway, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed in order to determine the response of a single hot-film element of a sensor array to transiently induced flow behind weak normal shock waves. The experiments attempt to isolate the response due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface mounted on the wall of the shock tube. The experiments are described, the results being correlated with transient boundary layer theory and compared with an independent set of experimental results. One of the findings indicates that the change in the air properties (temperature and pressure) precedes the air mass transport, causing an ambiguity in the sensor response to the development of the velocity boundary layer. Also, a transient, local heat transfer coefficient is formulated to be used as a forcing function in a hot-film instrument model and simulation which remains under investigation.

  20. Chloride-based fast homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC films in a vertical hot-wall CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guoguo, Yan; Feng, Zhang; Yingxi, Niu; Fei, Yang; Xingfang, Liu; Lei, Wang; Wanshun, Zhao; Guosheng, Sun; Yiping, Zeng

    2016-06-01

    Chloride-based fast homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC epilayers was performed on 4° off-axis 4H-SiC substrates in a home-made vertical hot-wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system using H2-SiH4-C2H4-HCl. The effect of the SiH4/H2 ratio and reactor pressure on the growth rate of 4H-SiC epilayers has been studied successively. The growth rate increase in proportion to the SiH4/H2 ratio and the influence mechanism of chlorine has been investigated. With the reactor pressure increasing from 40 to 100 Torr, the growth rate increased to 52 μm/hand then decreased to 47 μm/h, which is due to the joint effect of H2 and HCl etching as well as the formation of Si clusters at higher reactor pressure. The surface root mean square (RMS) roughness keeps around 1 nm with the growth rate increasing to 49 μm/h. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrate that 96.7 μm thick 4H-SiC layers of good uniformity in thickness and doping with high crystal quality can be achieved. These results prove that chloride-based fast epitaxy is an advanced growth technique for 4H-SiC homoepitaxy. Project supported by the National High Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2014AA041402), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474113, 61274007, 61574140), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 4132076, 4132074), the Program of State Grid Smart Grid Research Institute (No. SGRI-WD-71-14-004), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS.

  1. Confinement of ferroelectric domain-wall motion at artificially formed conducting-nanofilaments in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Hee; Son, Jong Yeog; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2014-05-14

    We report confinement of ferroelectric domain-wall motion at conducting-nanofilament wall in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin film on Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate. The BiFeO3 film exhibited well-defined ferroelectric response and unipolar resistive switching behavior. We artificially formed conducting-nanofilaments in the BiFeO3 via conducting atomic force microscope techniques. The conducting-nanofilament wall, which does not possess any ferroelectric polarization, is then able to block domain propagation. Consequently, we demonstrate that the domain-wall motion is effectively confined within the conducting-nanofilament wall during polarization switching. This significant new insight potentially gives an opportunity for the artificial manipulation of nanoscale ferroelectric domain.

  2. Large structural, thin-wall castings made of metals subject to hot tearing, and their fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An article, such as a gas turbine engine mixer, is made by providing a mold structure defining a thin-walled, hollow article, and a base metal that is subject to hot tear cracking when cast in a generally equiaxed polycrystalline form, such as Rene' 108 and Mar-M247. The article is fabricated by introducing the molten base metal into the mold structure, and directionally solidifying the base metal in the mold structure to form a directionally oriented structure. The directionally oriented structure may be formed of a single grain or oriented multiple grains.

  3. Morphology Control of Hot-Wall MOCVD Selective Area Grown Hexagonal GaN Pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundskog, Anders; Forsberg, Urban; Holtz, Per Olof; Janzen, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Morphological variations of gallium polar (0001)-oriented hexagonal GaN pyramids grown by hot wall metal organic chemical vapor deposition under various growth conditions are investigated. The stability of the semipolar {1 (1) over bar 02} and nonpolar {1 (1) over bar 00} facets is particularly discussed. The presence of the {1 (1) over bar 02} facets near the apex of the pyramid was found to be controllable by tuning the absolute flow rate of ammonia during the growth Vertical nonpolar {1 (1) over bar 00} facets appeared in gallium rich conditions, which automatically were created when the growth time was prolonged beyond pyramid completion. The result was attributed to a gallium passivation of the {1 (1) over bar 00} surface.

  4. Crystalline phase in Alq3 films grown by the hot-wall method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Satoru; Yamada, Satoru; Kitazaki, Asami; Sebald, Kathrin; Rückmann, Ilja; Gutowski, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    We deposited tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) films on glass substrates by using the hot-wall method. The Alq3 films were deposited for changing substrate temperature from 50 to 125 °C. With increasing the substrate temperature, anomalous growth patterns with a butterfly-like shape appeared and spread on the surface of the deposited films. The intensity of emission from the anomalous region is stronger than that from the smooth region as found by fluorescence microscope observations and photoluminescence measurements. The observed anomalous growth in the films deposited at high substrate temperatures was identified to be due to α-phase crystallization of Alq3 from the emission spectrum and X-ray diffraction measurements and from comparing those results with α-Alq3 crystals grown by the vapour phase growth technique.

  5. Dislocation blocking by AlGaN hot electron injecting layer in the epitaxial growth of GaN terahertz Gunn diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Lin'an; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports an efficient method to improve the crystal quality of GaN Gunn diode with AlGaN hot electron injecting layer (HEI). An evident reduction of screw dislocation and edge dislocation densities is achieved by the strain management and the enhanced lateral growth in high temperature grown AlGaN HEI layer. Compared with the top hot electron injecting layer (THEI) structure, the bottom hot electron injecting layer (BHEI) structure enhances the crystal quality of transit region due to the growth sequence modulation of HEI layer. A high Hall mobility of 2934 cm2/Vs at 77 K, a nearly flat downtrend of Hall mobility at the temperature ranging from 300 to 573 K, a low intensity of ratio of yellow luminescence band to band edge emission, a narrow band edge emission line-width, and a smooth surface morphology are observed for the BHEI structural epitaxy of Gunn diode, which indicates that AlGaN BHEI structure is a promising candidate for fabrication of GaN Gunn diodes in terahertz regime.

  6. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  7. Fibers comprised of epitaxially grown single-wall carbon nanotubes, and a method for added catalyst and continuous growth at the tip

    DOEpatents

    Kittrell, W. Carter; Wang, Yuhuang; Kim, Myung Jong; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.; Marek leg, Irene Morin

    2010-06-01

    The present invention is directed to fibers of epitaxially grown single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and methods of making same. Such methods generally comprise the steps of: (a) providing a spun SWNT fiber; (b) cutting the fiber substantially perpendicular to the fiber axis to yield a cut fiber; (c) etching the cut fiber at its end with a plasma to yield an etched cut fiber; (d) depositing metal catalyst on the etched cut fiber end to form a continuous SWNT fiber precursor; and (e) introducing feedstock gases under SWNT growth conditions to grow the continuous SWNT fiber precursor into a continuous SWNT fiber.

  8. Experimental results for diffusion and infiltration of moisture in concrete masonry walls exposed to hot and humid climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosni, M.H.; Sipes, J.M.; Wallis, M.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents experimental test results for heat and moisture migration in walls exposed to hot and humid climates. The research was conducted to study the problem of mold and mildew caused by moisture transfer into walls of concrete masonry unit (CMU) type construction by diffusion and convective transport by air infiltration. This type of construction is common in commercial buildings in the southern US. The tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 evaluated heat and moisture transfer by diffusion. Phase 2 testing involved air infiltration through the test walls. Data were also collected to determine the rate at which the test walls would dry out without infiltration present. Test results indicate that an exterior vapor retarder will reduce the moisture migration into the wall and thereby lower the moisture accumulation due to infiltration when a vapor retarder (such as vinyl wallpaper) is used for the interior surface treatment. Testing also showed that while the exterior wall treatment does have an effect on reducing the total moisture accumulation in the test walls, the interior wall treatment has a much larger impact when infiltration is present. The data support a proposed criterion for the onset of mold and mildew, which requires a monthly average surface relative humidity of 80% with temperatures between 32 F and 105 F.

  9. Synthesis of ZnO nanorods by a hot-wall high-temperature laser deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Hwan; Hwang, In-Sung; Choi, Young-Jin; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2005-03-01

    ZnO nanorods with diameter 30-300 nm were synthesized by a pulsed laser deposition process in a hot-wall type chamber at the elevated temperatures above 800 °C. At temperatures 500-800 °C, ZnO thin films and wrinkles were synthesized. Above 800 °C, vertically aligned ZnO nanorods were grown on the Si and sapphire substrate without any catalysts. The range of diameter was 100-300 nm. When Au catalyst were deposited on the substrate prior to the deposition, the process range of ZnO nanorod become wider and the diameter of ZnO smaller. Especially, ZnO could be grown selectively along the pattern of Au catalyst with the aid of Au-Zn alloy. The feasibility of doping of P, as a p-type dopant, was identified with this hot-wall type and high-temperature compatible process.

  10. Observational Evidence for the "Hot Wall" Effect in Small Magnetic Flux Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikurda, K.; Beck, C.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: When lacking polarimetric observations, the Bright Points (BPs) visible in the G-band at 430 nm are commonly used as tracers for magnetic fields. Methods: Observations presented in this paper were taken on October 11, 2005 at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope and involved the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at 1.5 micron, the Telecentric Etalon Solar Spectrometer (TESOS) in the Fe I spectral line at 557.6 nm, and a speckle setup in G-band. The area scanned by TIP was 75''x33'' and covered a pore surrounded by network. The TIP spectra were inverted with the SIR (Stokes Inversion based on Response functions) code to retrieve the magnetic field vector. Results: We find that G-band BPs are not cospatial with the central part of the flux concentrations. Even at the small heliocentric angle of 12 degree, the BPs appear projected on the limb side walls of the granules (Fig. 1), whereas the fields are concentrated in the intergranular lanes. Discussion: Our findings indicate that the G-band Bright Points are a result of the "hot wall effect". The downward shift of the optical depth scale in the presence of magnetic fields allows to see deeper and hotter layers, where CH dissociates, in the granules next to the field concentrations. Thus, information drawn from the observations of BPs cannot be used to conclude on the actual variation of the magnetic field structure, as only the outer parts of the flux concentrations are seen in the BPs. Figure 1. Non-cospatiality of BPs and field concentrations. Top row, left to right: line-core intensity, LOS velocity (range =+/- 1 km/s), magnetic flux , polarity, LOS velocity from the inversion (range =+/- 1.5 km/s), field azimuth. Bottom row, left to right: polarization degree, G-band intensity, continuum intensity at 1.5 micron, BP mask, field strength, field inclination. The white arrow in the G-band image denotes the limb direction, the cross marks the center of the 6.7 x 6.7 Mm field-of-view shown.

  11. Changes in plant cell-wall structure of corn stover due to hot compressed water pretreatment and enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Yang, Maohua; Wang, Caixia; Liu, Jianfei; Xing, Jianmin

    2014-08-01

    Corn stover is a potential feedstock for biofuel production. This work investigated physical and chemical changes in plant cell-wall structure of corn stover due to hot compressed water (HCW) pretreatment at 170-190 °C in a tube reactor. Chemical composition analysis showed the soluble hemicellulose content increased with pretreatment temperature, whereas the hemicellulose content decreased from 29 to 7 % in pretreated solids. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the parenchyma-type second cell-wall structure of the plant was almost completely removed at 185 °C, and the sclerenchyma-type second cell wall was greatly damaged upon addition of 5 mmol/L ammonium sulfate during HCW pretreatment. These changes favored accessibility for enzymatic action. Enzyme saccharification of solids by optimized pretreatment with HCW at 185 °C resulted in an enzymatic hydrolysis yield of 87 %, an enhancement of 77 % compared to the yield from untreated corn stover.

  12. The growth of epitaxial single crystal PbS 1-xSe x films by hot wall evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuelmann, R.; Marino, A.; Reichelt, K.

    1983-12-01

    Heteroepitaxial films of semiconducting PbS 1- xSe x on rock salt and mica substrates have been prepared and studied. The films have good crystalline perfection but have low electron mobilities, probably due to deviations from stoichiometry.

  13. Effect of the spatial filtering and alignment error of hot-wire probes in a wall-bounded turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, A.; Cimarelli, A.; Rüedi, J.-D.; De Angelis, E.; Talamelli, A.

    2011-10-01

    The effort to describe velocity fluctuation distributions in wall-bounded turbulent flows has raised different questions concerning the accuracy of hot-wire measurement techniques close to the wall and more specifically the effect of spatial averaging resulting from the finite size of the wire. Here, an analytical model which describes the effect of the spatial filtering and misalignment of hot-wire probes on the main statistical moments in turbulent wall-bounded flows is presented. The model, which is based on the two-point velocity correlation function, shows that the filtering is directly related to the transverse Taylor micro-scale. By means of turbulent channel flow DNS data, the capacity of the model to accurately describe the probe response is established. At the same time, the filtering effect is appraised for different wire lengths and for a range of misalignment angles which can be expected from good experimental practice. Effects of the second-order terms in the model equations are also taken into account and discussed. In order to use the model in a practical situation, the Taylor micro-scale distribution at least should be provided. A simple scaling law based on classic turbulence theory is therefore introduced and finally employed to estimate the filtering effect for different wire lengths.

  14. A temperature correlation for the radiation resistance of a thick-walled circular duct exhausting a hot gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Cline, J. G.; Jones, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    It is often useful to know the radiation impedance of an unflanged but thick-walled circular duct exhausting a hot gas into relatively cold surroundings. The reactive component is shown to be insensitive to temperature, but the resistive component is shown to be temperature dependent. A temperature correlation is developed permitting prediction of the radiation resistance from a knowledge of the temperature difference between the ambient air and the gas flowing from the duct, and a physical basis for this correlation is presented.

  15. Technology Solutions Case Study: High-Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-01

    In this project,the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) team worked with builders in California to implement wall assemblies meeting a U-value lower than 0.050 Btu/h-ft2-°F. ARBI and its project team members helped builders identify preferred wall designs that met the requirements of their architects, structural engineers, and purchasing agents and that were acceptable to their subcontractors. Construction methods were observed and documented and construction costs obtained from builders were used to inform cost estimates for a range of advanced wall system types and insulation types. Wall framing types of 2 × 6 (16- and 24-in. on center [o.c.]) and double stud were modeled in Building Energy Optimization (BEopt™) software with cavity insulation levels ranging from R-19 to R-33 (double stud) and exterior rigid insulation of R-4, R-6, and R-8.

  16. Life prediction of thermally highly loaded components: modelling the damage process of a rocket combustion chamber hot wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, W.; Schwub, S.; Quering, K.; Wiedmann, D.; Höppel, H. W.; Göken, M.

    2011-09-01

    During their operational life-time, actively cooled liners of cryogenic combustion chambers are known to exhibit a characteristic so-called doghouse deformation, pursued by formation of axial cracks. The present work aims at developing a model that quantitatively accounts for this failure mechanism. High-temperature material behaviour is characterised in a test programme and it is shown that stress relaxation, strain rate dependence, isotropic and kinematic hardening as well as material ageing have to be taken into account in the model formulation. From fracture surface analyses of a thrust chamber it is concluded that the failure mode of the hot wall ligament at the tip of the doghouse is related to ductile rupture. A material model is proposed that captures all stated effects. Basing on the concept of continuum damage mechanics, the model is further extended to incorporate softening effects due to material degradation. The model is assessed on experimental data and quantitative agreement is established for all tests available. A 3D finite element thermo-mechanical analysis is performed on a representative thrust chamber applying the developed material-damage model. The simulation successfully captures the observed accrued thinning of the hot wall and quantitatively reproduces the doghouse deformation.

  17. Condensation Potential in High Thermal Performance Walls. Hot, Humid Summer Climate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    occur on the back of gypsum board or on the vapor retarder if one is installed. Indoor temperature and outdoor humidity . Studies were conducted to...toward the drier air-conditioned space and will condense if cold climate and in a hot, humid climate with a long the gypsum board or vapor retarder...type air conditioner mounted in the floor. Humidification is available For this study, all test panels have 1/2-inch gypsum board by a vaporizing-type

  18. Hybrid-PIC modeling of laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in gold hohlraum walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Rose, D. V.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-06-01

    The walls of the hohlraum used in experiments at the national ignition facility are heated by laser beams with intensities ˜ 10 15 W/cm2, a wavelength of ˜ 1 / 3 μm, and pulse lengths on the order of a ns, with collisional absorption believed to be the primary heating mechanism. X-rays generated by the hot ablated plasma at the gold walls are then used to implode a target in the hohlraum interior. In addition to the collisional absorption of laser energy at the walls, non-linear laser-plasma interactions (LPI), such as stimulated Raman scattering and two plasmon decay, are believed to generate a population of supra-thermal electrons which, if present in the hohlraum, can have a deleterious effect on target implosion. We describe results of hohlraum modeling using a hybrid particle-in-cell code. To enable this work, new particle-based algorithms for a multiple-ion magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) treatment, and a particle-based ray-tracing model were developed. The use of such hybrid methods relaxes the requirement to resolve the laser wavelength, and allows for relatively large-scale hohlraum simulations with a reasonable number of cells. But the non-linear effects which are believed to be the cause of hot electron generation can only be captured by fully kinetic simulations with good resolution of the laser wavelength. For this reason, we employ a two-tiered approach to hohlraum modeling. Large-scale simulations of the collisional absorption process can be conducted using the fast quasi-neutral MHD algorithm with fluid particle species. From these simulations, we can observe the time evolution of the hohlraum walls and characterize the density and temperature profiles. From these results, we can transition to smaller-scale highly resolved simulations using traditional kinetic particle-in-cell methods, from which we can fully model all of the non-linear laser-plasma interactions, as well as assess the details of the electron distribution function. We find that vacuum

  19. Highly Sensitive Hot-Wire Anemometry Based on Macro-Sized Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube Strands

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingqu; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Zhaoying; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Xing; Li, Weihua; Jiang, Yueyuan; Zhang, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a highly sensitive flow-rate sensor with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as sensing elements. The sensor uses micro-size centimeters long double-walled CNT (DWCNT) strands as hot-wires to sense fluid velocity. In the theoretical analysis, the sensitivity of the sensor is demonstrated to be positively related to the ratio of its surface. We assemble the flow sensor by suspending the DWCNT strand directly on two tungsten prongs and dripping a small amount of silver glue onto each contact between the DWCNT and the prongs. The DWCNT exhibits a positive TCR of 1980 ppm/K. The self-heating effect on the DWCNT was observed while constant current was applied between the two prongs. This sensor can evidently respond to flow rate, and requires only several milliwatts to operate. We have, thus far, demonstrated that the CNT-based flow sensor has better sensitivity than the Pt-coated DWCNT sensor. PMID:28762998

  20. Dynamic analysis of moisture transport through walls and associated cooling loads in the hot/humid climate of Florianopolis, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, N.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Lamberts, R.; Philippi, P.C.; Da Cunha Neto, J.A.B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors describe the use of a dynamic model of combined heat and mass transfer to analyze the effects on cooling loads of transient moisture storage and transport through walls with porous building materials, under varying boundary conditions. The materials studied were brick, lime mortar and autoclaved cellular concrete. The physical properties of these materials, such as mass transport coefficients, thermal conductivity and specific heat, were taken to be functions of moisture content. The simulation results were compared to those obtained by pure conduction heat transfer without moisture effects. Also analyzed were the influence on cooling loads of high moisture content due to rain soaking of materials, and the influence of solar radiation on sunny and cloudy days. The weather used was a hot/humid summer period in Florianopolis (South Brazil). It is shown that neglecting moisture migration or assuming that the physical properties of wall materials do not depend on moisture content can result in large errors in sensible and latent heat transfer.

  1. Correcting hot-wire spatial resolution effects in third- and fourth-order velocity moments in wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamelli, Alessandro; Segalini, Antonio; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2013-04-01

    Spatial averaging, resulting from the finite size of a hot-wire probe, significantly affects the accuracy of velocity measurements in turbulent flows close to walls. Here, we extend the theoretical model, introduced in Segalini et al. (Meas Sci Technol 22:104508, 2011) quantifying the effect of a linear spatial filter of hot-wire probes on the mean and the variance of the streamwise velocity in turbulent wall-bounded flows, to describe the effect of the spatial filtering on the third- and fourth-order moments of the same velocity component. The model, based on the three-(four) point velocity-correlation function for the third-(fourth-) order moment, shows that the filtering can be related to a characteristic length scale which is an equivalent of the Taylor transverse microscale for the second-order moment. The capacity of the model to accurately describe the attenuation is validated against direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer. The DNS data allow the filtering effect to be appraised for different wire lengths and for the different moments. The model shows good accuracy except for the third-order moment in the region where a zero-crossing of the third-order function is observed and where the equations become ill-conditioned. An "a posteriori" correction procedure, based on the developed model, to correct the measured third- and fourth-order velocity moments is also presented. This procedure, based on combining the measured data by two single hot-wire sensors with different wire lengths, is a natural extension of the one introduced by Segalini et al. (Exp Fluids 51:693-700, 2011) to evaluate both the turbulence intensity and the transverse Taylor microscale in turbulent flows. The technique is validated against spatially averaged simulation data showing a good capacity to correct the actual profiles over the entire height of the boundary layer except, as expected, for the third-order moment in the region where

  2. CFD coupled kinetic modeling and simulation of hot wall vertical tubular reactor for deposition of SiC crystal from MTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollick, P. K.; Venugopalan, R.; Srivastava, D.

    2017-10-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process is generally carried out in a hot wall reactor of vertical or horizontal type keeping the substrate inside the chamber on which deposition is targeted. Present study is focused to explain the role of hydrodynamics and temperature conditions on the overall coating rates inside a hot wall vertical tubular reactor. Deposition of β-Silicon Carbide crystals from Methytricholorosilane catalyzed by hydrogen is modeled here considering growth kinetics which can be successfully described - using only two steps. Finite Element Method based simulation is performed to obtain the flow and temperature profiles inside the hot wall reactor. Model equations for kinetics are derived in differential form based on mass balance considering transport of species. Kinetic parameters were approximated comparing the experimentally found coating rates as reported earlier. Present model is seen to fit reasonably well for the wide variation of gas flow rates as well as temperature. Apart from the flow rates of total fluid at inlet and initial wall temperature of reactor, sample position and the inlet diameter of the reactor are found to be key important parameters for the desired coating to take place. Model prediction thus can provide better knowledge in order to carefully choose process parameters in designing the reactor for achieving optimized deposition rates by CVD with desired properties.

  3. Chemical vapour deposition of silicon under reduced pressure in a hot-wall reactor: Equilibrium and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Francis; Hottier, François; Cadoret, Robert

    1982-02-01

    Silicon chemical vapour deposition (SiH 2Cl 2/H 2 system), under reduced pressure conditions, in a hot-wall reactor, is presented. The vapour phase composition is assessed by evaluating two distnct equilbria. The "homogeneous equilibrium", which assumes that the vapour phase is not in equilibrium with solid silicon, is thought to give an adequate description of the vapour phase in the case of low pressure, high gas velocities, good temperature homogeneity conditions. A comparison with "heterogeneous equilibrium" enables us to calculate the supersaturation so evidencing a highly irreversible growth system. The experimental determination of the growth rate reveals two distinct temperature ranges: below 1000°C, polycrystalline films are usually obtained with a thermally activated growth rate (+40 kcal mole -1) and a reaction order, with respect to the predominant species SiCl 2, close to one; above 1000°C, the films are always monocrystalline and their growth rate exhibits a much lower or even negative activation energy, the reaction order in SiCl 2 remaining about one.

  4. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Clive J; Arendse, Christopher J; Camagu, Sigqibo T; Swart, Hendrik

    2014-02-01

    Filament condition during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition conditions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is a major concern for a stable deposition process. We report on the novel application of electron backscatter diffraction to characterize the carburization of tungsten filaments. During the synthesis, the W-filaments transform to W2C and WC. W-carbide growth followed a parabolic behavior corresponding to the diffusion of C as the rate-determining step. The grain size of W, W2C, and WC increases with longer exposure time and increasing filament temperature. The grain size of the recrystallizing W-core and W2C phase grows from the perimeter inwardly and this phenomenon is enhanced at filament temperatures in excess of 1,400°C. Cracks appear at filament temperatures >1,600°C, accompanied by a reduction in the filament operational lifetime. The increase of the W2C and recrystallized W-core grain size from the perimeter inwardly is ascribed to a thermal gradient within the filament, which in turn influences the hardness measurements and crack formation.

  5. A novel TMV-induced hot pepper cell wall protein gene (CaTin2) is associated with virus-specific hypersensitive response pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2003-03-01

    Incompatible plant-pathogen interactions result in the rapid cell death response known as hypersensitive response (HR) and activation of host defense related genes. To understand the cellular mechanism controlling defense response better, a novel pathogenesis-related (PR) gene and putative cell wall protein gene, CaTin2, was isolated through differential screening of a hot pepper cDNA library and characterized. CaTin2 gene was locally and systemically induced in hot pepper plants upon TMV-P0 inoculation which induces HR. However, CaTin2 gene wasn't regulated by bacterial HR-specific signal pathway. The full-length cDNA for CaTin2, which is 864 nucleotides long, contained the open reading frame of 200 amino acids including cell wall targeting sequences of 26 amino acids. CaTin2 gene has no sequence similarity with other cell wall protein genes except the signal sequence and exists as only one copy in hot pepper genome. CaTin2 gene contains repeated helix-turn-helix motif consisting of 39 amino acids. CaTin2 mRNA accumulation was induced in response to various treatments such as ethylene, SA, MeJA, ABA, methyl viologen, NaCl and wounding at early time points. Subcelluar localization of CaTin2 was confirmed in the cell wall in hot pepper leaves by making CaTin2::smGFP fusion protein. The transgenic plants overexpressing CaTin2 cDNA were resistant to TMV and CMV inoculation. From these results, CaTin2 gene may encode a virus-related new cell wall protein member.

  6. A numerical simulation of non-uniform magnetic field effect on ferrofluid flow in a half-annulus enclosure with sinusoidal hot wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oǧlakkaya, F. S.; Bozkaya, C.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the problem of two-dimensional, laminar ferrofluid flow in a semi-annulus enclosure with sinusoidal hot wall is investigated numerically by using the dual reciprocity boundary element method. The flow is under the influence of a nodal magnetic source placed below the mid of the sinusoidal inner wall. The equations governing the present problem are obtained under the principles of ferrohydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics. The numerical computations are performed for various values of Rayleigh, Hartmann and magnetic numbers. The obtained results are depicted in terms of streamlines and isotherms which show that the effects of aforementioned physical parameters on the flow field and temperature distributions inside the enclosure.

  7. Aerosol mass spectrometer for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Kyum; Winterer, Markus

    2005-09-01

    We present a modified aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors and describe the transfer function of the velocity and kinetic-energy measurement. The AMS is a combination of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and a particle mass spectrometer (PMS) and enables the in situ analysis of aerosols with high number concentrations up to 1018m-3. Size distributions of ultrafine particles in the range of 104-107u (amu) can be measured in the PMS. Simultaneously, molecular species up to 300u can be detected in the QMS. In the setup described here a furnace was developed to enable measurement directly at the reactor exit. The formation of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) was investigated. TMS started to decompose at about 900K and carbosilanes with two [-Si-C-] units were identified as growth species in the synthesis of SiC from TMS. With increasing temperatures particles were formed and grew by coagulation. At higher temperatures sintering of the particles became an important process. Although the particle mass reduced slightly due to a smaller residence time at higher temperatures in the reactor, the particle velocity in the molecular beam of the AMS decreased significantly. A simple model is used to compare the particle velocity in a molecular beam as a function of particle mass. The significant difference in the particle velocity can be explained by a change in the particle shape factor (κp) due to sintering.

  8. Epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Wu, Xiaosong; First, Phillip N.; Conrad, Edward H.; Li, Xuebin; Li, Tianbo; Sprinkle, Michael; Hass, Joanna; Sadowski, Marcin L.; Potemski, Marek; Martinez, Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long coherence lengths; properties that may persist above cryogenic temperatures. Paradoxically, in contrast to exfoliated graphene, the quantum Hall effect is not observed in high-mobility epitaxial graphene. It appears that the effect is suppressed due to the absence of localized states in the bulk of the material. Epitaxial graphene can be patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array of techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low-dissipation high-speed nanoelectronics.

  9. Epitaxial growth and photoluminescence of hexagonal CdS 1- xSe x alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, M.; Gerlach, H.; Breitkopf, Th.; Hetterich, M.; Reznitsky, A.; Kalt, H.; Klingshirn, C.

    1995-01-01

    CdSSe ternary alloy films were grown on GaAs(111) by hot-wall beam epitaxy. The hexagonal crystal phase is obtained. The composition varies from 0 to 40% selenium. Luminescence spectroscopy at low temperatures shows a dominant effect by alloy disorder. Localization of carriers, for example, is still observed at a pulsed optical excitation density of 6 mJ/cm 2. The overall quality of the CdSSe films is sufficient to use them as buffer layers for the growth of hexagonal superlattices.

  10. Flush mounted hot film anemometer measurement of wall shear stress distal to a tri-leaflet valve for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood analog fluids.

    PubMed

    Nandy, S; Tarbell, J M

    1987-01-01

    Wall shear stress has been measured by flush-mounted hot film anemometry distal to an Ionescu-Shiley tri-leaflet valve under pulsatile flow conditions. Both Newtonian (aqueous glycerol) and non-Newtonian (aqueous polyacrylamide) blood analog fluids were investigated. Significant differences in the axial distribution of wall shear stress between the two fluids are apparent in flows having nearly identical Reynolds numbers. The Newtonian fluid exhibits a (peak) wall shear rate which is maximized near the valve seat (30 mm) and then decays to a fully developed flow value (by 106 mm). In contrast, the shear rate of the non-Newtonian fluid at 30 mm is less than half that of the Newtonian fluid and at 106 mm is more than twice that of the Newtonian fluid. It is suggested that non-Newtonian rheology influences valve flow patterns either through alterations in valve opening associated with low shear separation zones behind valve leaflets, or because of variations in the rate of jet spreading. More detailed studies are required to clarify the mechanisms. The Newtonian wall shear stresses for this valve are low. The highest value observed anywhere in the aortic chamber was 2.85 N/m2 at a peak Reynolds number of 3694.

  11. A Microstructure Evolution Model for the Processing of Single-Crystal Alloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Bansal, Rohan; Gambone, Justin J.; Das, Suman

    2014-12-01

    Part I [Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2014, DOI:10.1007/s11663-014-0117-9] presented a comprehensive thermal, fluid flow, and solidification model that can predict the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for the processing of CMSX-4 alloy powder through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE). SLE is an additive manufacturing technology aimed at the creation of equiaxed, directionally solidified and single-crystal (SX) deposits of nickel-based superalloys using a fast-scanning laser beam. Part II here further explores the Marangoni convection-based model to predict the solidification microstructure as a function of the conditions at the trailing edge of the melt pool formed during the SLE process. Empirical values for several microstructural characteristics such as the primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) criterion and the oriented-to-misoriented transition (OMT) criterion are obtained. Optical microscopy provides visual information on the various microstructural characteristics of the deposited material such as melt depth, CET location, OMT location, PDAS, etc. A quantitative and consistent investigation of this complex set of characteristics is both challenging and unprecedented. A customized image-analysis technique based on active contouring is developed to automatically extract these data from experimental micrographs. Quantitative metallography verifies that even for the raster scan pattern in SLE and the corresponding line heat source assumption, the PDAS follows the growth relation w ~ G -0.5 V -0.25 ( w = PDAS, G = temperature gradient and V = solidification velocity) developed for marginal stability under constrained growth. Models for the CET and OMT are experimentally validated, thereby providing powerful predictive capabilities for controlling the microstructure of SX alloys processed through SLE.

  12. Prototype solar heated hot water systems and double-walled heat exchangers: A collection of quarterly reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The plan schedule and status of multiple objectives to be achieved in the development, manufacture, installation, and maintenance of two solar heated hot water prototype systems and two heat exchangers are reported. A computer program developed to resolve problems and evaluate system performance is described.

  13. Thermal performance characterization of residential wall systems using a calibrated hot box with airflow induced by differential pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.C.; Ober, D.G.; Goodrow, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    ASTM E 283 ad ASTM E 1424 in conjunction with ASTM C 976 were used to study the effect of airflow on thermal performance of the wall. A typical residential 2 {times} 4 stud wall was constructed and placed on top of a subfloor, making a 2.44 {times} 2.74 m (8 by 9 ft) test specimen. This base wall assembly was then covered with two types of XPS sheathing, various housewraps, a 15{number_sign} felt, and a polyethylene vapor retarder film in 40 different configurations and tested individually per ASTM E 283 and per ASTM C 976. For 24 of the 40 C 976 tests, a differential pressure was induced across the test wall as per and ASTM E 1424. Airflows ranged from undetectable airflow at 0 {center_dot} Pa {Delta}P to 1.63 L/s {center_dot} m{sup 2} for the base wall assembly alone. Difference in airflow resistance performance between the ASTM E 283 and ASTM E 1424 test methods were noted. Thermal testing results incorporating both ASTM C 976 and ASTM E 1424 for tests 1--28 produced apparent thermal conductances (C-values) in the range of 0.40 W/m{sup 2} {center_dot} K for a nondetectable airflow level to 1.81 W/m{sup 2} {center_dot} K for an airflow of 1.53 L/s {center_dot} m{sup 2} for the base wall assembly alone with a 20-Pa {Delta}P. The calculated C-value for this base wall assembly was 0.40 W/m{sup 2} {center_dot} K. Test results reveal that airflow rates as low as 0.2 L/s {center_dot} m{sup 2} could produce a 46% increase in apparent C-value. Similar thermal performance differences were revealed when thicker shiplap XPS sheathing was used. Tests were also conducted using an Air-Tight Drywall configuration showing the effect of wind washing on thermal performance. By sealing the gypsum drywall on the base wall assembly tested, the apparent C-value, when exposed to a 12.5 Pa wind pressure, was found to be equivalent to a base wall assembly configuration which allows 0.15 L/s {center_dot} m{sup 2} airflow to penetrate completely through.

  14. Dow and Mary Davidson residence - A residence in a hot humid climate with major living spaces in rooms without walls

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, L.M. III; Holder, L.M. IV

    1997-12-31

    Dow Davidson works out of his home while his wife, Mary, home schools their three children. The entire family uses the house full time throughout the year. Dow and Mary Davidson stressed the importance of a home with minimal site disruption while providing for as many human needs as practical. Specific requirements were for harmony with the natural climate and adjacent bird sanctuary. The clients had a strong preference for a pole structural system reflecting buildings they were familiar with in Hawaii. The house was designed as a pole structure utilizing passive solar heating, natural ventilation, night flushing, daylighting, rainwater harvesting, and an outdoor and indoor living area without walled separation from the climate. This type of open indoor/outdoor living is an extension of the Hawaiian experience. Use of the pole structure system provided compatibility between the residence and the neighboring bird habitat. The completed house easily blended with the surrounding vegetation due to the extensive use of natural materials. Exterior walks and drives, made from caliche and mulch (harvested from cedar cut on-site), helped further balance the structure with the terrain and vegetation.

  15. Effect of the Film-Growth Defects on the Magnetic Microstructure of Epitaxial FePt Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Yoo, J H; Yang, J M; Park, J K

    2015-11-01

    Effect of the columnar grain boundaries on the perpendicular magnetic domain structure of epitaxial L10 FePt (001) thin film has been studied using electron holography. The analysis of stray fields shows that both the continuous and columnar epitaxial films of L10 FePt (001) consist of perpendicular magnetic domain walls. In the columnar epitaxial film, however, the perpendicular domain walls tend to be confined to columnar grain boundaries, because columnar boundaries act as pinning sites for the domain walls. The domain wall pinning by columnar grain boundaries leads to a significant hysteresis effect in the perpendicular magnetization of L10 FePt epitaxial films.

  16. Selective Area Epitaxial Growth of Silicon by the A.C. Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing Sheng

    Four major areas are covered in this dissertation: (1) Thermodynamic analyses for blanket and selective area deposition of silicon and TiN; (2) Kinetic and hydrodynamic considerations in CVD processes; (3) The hot wall low pressure epitaxial system design and description; and (4) Experimental results of selective area growth of epitaxial silicon. The thermodynamic analyses and calculations for the blanket and selective area deposition of silicon and TiN by the alternating cyclic, A.C., reduction technique were carried out using a computer free energy minimization program, SOLGASMIX, coupled with a first principles analysis as an integrity check. The A.C. technique was shown to be thermodynamically feasible for a global reaction chemistry in which an embedded disproportionation chemistry for removing spurious nuclei could be cyclically activated in a simple fashion. A generalized study of some kinetic and hydrodynamic concepts for chemical vapor transport system provided insights into the design of an A.C. chemical vapor deposition process, and provided sufficient information for designing and testing an experimental low pressure CVD system, and optimizing the experimental conditions. The experimental system design and installation were intended to provide a unique hot wall LPCVD epitaxial system, which is equipped with an internally designed vacuum load-lock, an automatic wafer loading mechanism, a water -cooling system, a complete gas panel, and a hydrogen pulsing mechanism for carrying out the A.C. process. Extensive experiments were conducted on selective area silicon epitaxial growth over a range of the available parameter space, using "standard" non-A.C. deposition process and comparing it with A.C. processes. It was found that substrate topology, substrate pre-treatment, including ion implantation, as well as various system and experimental conditions influenced, to varying degrees, the tendency for spurious nucleation to occur in masked areas where

  17. Substrate heater for the growth of epitaxial silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Matthew; Varhue, Walter; Adams, Edward; Lavoie, Mark

    1999-03-01

    The single wafer processing of epitaxial Si films requires that special attention be paid to the design of the substrate heater assembly. This document describes the evolution and testing of an in situ heater used to deposit epitaxial Si films at temperatures as high as 700 °C. One problem encountered was the production of excessive levels of ultraviolet radiation which contributed to the desorption of water vapor from the vacuum chamber walls during the in situ cleaning process. A second problem involved the formation of a molybdenum containing film that poisoned epitaxial growth. A final proven in situ heater design is presented which avoids these problems.

  18. Epitaxial Graphene Quantum Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-19

    ferromagnetism with spintronics potential. * We have achieved the highest operational frequency in graphene transistors. Epitaxial graphene; quantum transport...important discovery with implications for spintronics . * We have found that ballistic transport most likely involves non-conventional charge carriers

  19. Origin of the low-energy emission band in epitaxially grown para-sexiphenyl nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadashchuk, A.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.; Skryshevski, Yu.; Piryatinski, Yu.; Beinik, I.; Teichert, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, G.; Sitter, H.; Andreev, A.; Frank, P.; Winkler, A.

    2009-02-01

    A comparative study of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence of para-sexiphenyl (PSP) films grown by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE) and hot wall epitaxy (HWE) under comparable conditions is presented. Using different template substrates [mica(001) and KCl(001) surfaces] as well as different OMBE growth conditions has enabled us to vary greatly the morphology of the PSP crystallites while keeping their chemical structure virtually untouched. We prove that the broad redshifted emission band has a structure-related origin rather than being due to monomolecular oxidative defects. We conclude that the growth conditions and type of template substrate impacts substantially on the film morphology (measured by atomic force microscopy) and emission properties of the PSP films. The relative intensity of the defect emission band observed in the delayed spectra was found to correlate with the structural quality of PSP crystallites. In particular, the defect emission has been found to be drastically suppressed when (i) a KCl template substrate was used instead of mica in HWE-grown films, and (ii) in the OMBE-grown films dominated by growth mounds composed of upright standing molecules as opposed to the films consisting of crystallites formed by molecules lying parallel to the substrate.

  20. Origin of the low-energy emission band in epitaxially grown para-sexiphenyl nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Kadashchuk, A.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.; Skryshevski, Yu.; Piryatinski, Yu.; Beinik, I.; Teichert, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, G.; Sitter, H.; Andreev, A.; Frank, P.; Winkler, A.

    2009-02-28

    A comparative study of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence of para-sexiphenyl (PSP) films grown by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE) and hot wall epitaxy (HWE) under comparable conditions is presented. Using different template substrates [mica(001) and KCl(001) surfaces] as well as different OMBE growth conditions has enabled us to vary greatly the morphology of the PSP crystallites while keeping their chemical structure virtually untouched. We prove that the broad redshifted emission band has a structure-related origin rather than being due to monomolecular oxidative defects. We conclude that the growth conditions and type of template substrate impacts substantially on the film morphology (measured by atomic force microscopy) and emission properties of the PSP films. The relative intensity of the defect emission band observed in the delayed spectra was found to correlate with the structural quality of PSP crystallites. In particular, the defect emission has been found to be drastically suppressed when (i) a KCl template substrate was used instead of mica in HWE-grown films, and (ii) in the OMBE-grown films dominated by growth mounds composed of upright standing molecules as opposed to the films consisting of crystallites formed by molecules lying parallel to the substrate.

  1. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ferrites Lithium Ferrite Magnetostatic Wave Garnets Epitaxy Yttrium Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite Microwave Signal Processing...epitaxial ferrit ( materials for use in microwave and millirreter-wave signal processing devices. The major emphasis has been on multiple layer...overall objective of this research is to develop epitaxial single crystal ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at

  2. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Brian Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are initial investigations into an electrochemical method whereby thin films of compound semiconductors are produced by epitaxial growth of the constituent elements. This method is the electrochemical analogue of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) (a vacuum-based technique which relies on sequential formation of atomic layers of the constituent elements) and has been termed "Electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy" (ECALE). These preliminary studies are centered on the formation of CdTe, though in principle they could be extended to a number of other compound semiconductors. A background introduction on topics relevant to epitaxial growth in electrochemical systems will be presented. Predictions of underpotential behavior in the CdTe system will be made using potential -pH (Pourbaix) diagrams. Development of the method will proceed from our initial studies of Cd and Te underpotential deposition (UPD) on a number of metallic substrates, followed by results demonstrating the ECALE formation of two monolayers of CdTe on polycrystalline and single crystal gold substrates. The final chapter will present current attempts to design and construct an automated, computer-controlled thin-layer electrochemical flow cell, which is to be used for the deposition of thicker layers (up to 1 mu m) of compound semiconductors.

  3. Epitaxial thin films

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Andrew Tye; Deshpande, Girish; Lin, Wen-Yi; Jan, Tzyy-Jiuan

    2006-04-25

    Epitatial thin films for use as buffer layers for high temperature superconductors, electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), gas separation membranes or dielectric material in electronic devices, are disclosed. By using CCVD, CACVD or any other suitable deposition process, epitaxial films having pore-free, ideal grain boundaries, and dense structure can be formed. Several different types of materials are disclosed for use as buffer layers in high temperature superconductors. In addition, the use of epitaxial thin films for electrolytes and electrode formation in SOFCs results in densification for pore-free and ideal gain boundary/interface microstructure. Gas separation membranes for the production of oxygen and hydrogen are also disclosed. These semipermeable membranes are formed by high-quality, dense, gas-tight, pinhole free sub-micro scale layers of mixed-conducting oxides on porous ceramic substrates. Epitaxial thin films as dielectric material in capacitors are also taught herein. Capacitors are utilized according to their capacitance values which are dependent on their physical structure and dielectric permittivity. The epitaxial thin films of the current invention form low-loss dielectric layers with extremely high permittivity. This high permittivity allows for the formation of capacitors that can have their capacitance adjusted by applying a DC bias between their electrodes.

  4. A Coupled Thermal, Fluid Flow, and Solidification Model for the Processing of Single-Crystal Alloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Bansal, Rohan; Gambone, Justin J.; Das, Suman

    2014-12-01

    Scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) is a new laser-based additive manufacturing technology under development at the Georgia Institute of Technology. SLE is aimed at the creation of equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal deposits of nickel-based superalloys through the melting of alloy powders onto superalloy substrates using a fast scanning Nd:YAG laser beam. The fast galvanometer control movement of the laser (0.2 to 2 m/s) and high-resolution raster scanning (20 to 200 µm line spacing) enables superior thermal control over the solidification process and allows the production of porosity-free, crack-free deposits of more than 1000 µm thickness. Here, we present a combined thermal and fluid flow model of the SLE process applied to alloy CMSX-4 with temperature-dependent thermo-physical properties. With the scanning beam described as a moving line source, the instantaneous melt pool assumes a convex hull shape with distinct leading edge and trailing edge characteristics. Temperature gradients at the leading and trailing edges are of order 2 × 105 and 104 K/m, respectively. Detailed flow analysis provides insights on the flow characteristics of the powder incorporating into the melt pool, showing velocities of order 1 × 10-4 m/s. The Marangoni effect drives this velocity from 10 to 15 times higher depending on the operating parameters. Prediction of the solidification microstructure is based on conditions at the trailing edge of the melt pool. Time tracking of solidification history is incorporated into the model to couple the microstructure prediction model to the thermal-fluid flow model, and to predict the probability of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition. Qualitative agreement is obtained between simulation and experimental result.

  5. Changes in hot spring temperature and hydrogeology of the Alpine Fault hanging wall, New Zealand, induced by distal South Island earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S.; Menzies, C. D.; Sutherland, R.; Denys, P. H.; Chamberlain, C. J.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2014-12-01

    In response to large distant earthquakes Copland hot spring cooled c.1 °C and changed fluid chemistry. Thermal springs in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, originate through penetration of fluids into a thermal anomaly generated by rapid uplift and exhumation on the Alpine Fault. Copland hot spring (43.629S, 169.946E) is one of the most vigorously flowing, hottest of the springs, discharging strongly effervescent CO2-rich 56-58 °C water at 6 ± 1 Ls-1. Shaking from the Mw7.8 Dusky Sound (Fiordland) 2009 and Mw7.1 Darfield (Canterbury) 2010 earthquakes, 350 and 180 km from the spring respectively, resulted in a characteristic c. 1 °C delayed-cooling over five days. The cooling responses occurred at low shaking intensities (MM III-IV) and seismic energy densities (~10-1 Jm-3) from intermediate-field distances, independent of variations in spectral frequency, without the need for post-seismic recovery before the next cooling occurred. Such shaking can be expected approximately every 1-10 years in central Southern Alps. Observed temperature and fluid chemistry responses are inferred to reflect subtle changes in the fracture permeability of schist mountains adjacent to the spring. Relatively low intensity shaking induced small permanent 10-7-10-6 strains across the Southern Alps - opening fractures which enhance mixing of relatively cool near-surface groundwater with upwelling hot water. Hydrothermal systems situated in places of active deformation, tectonic and topographic stress may be particularly susceptible to earthquake-induced transience, that if monitored may provide important information on difficult to measure hydrogeological properties within active orogens.

  6. Hetero epitaxial graphene on various substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gary; Kaut, Gurpreet; Taylor, Crawford

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale production of graphene is pivotal for the development of graphene-based electronics. These results focus on the synthesis and characterization of graphene layers. Two methods were used to grow graphene films. First, graphene films were epitaxially grown on silicon carbide substrates by thermal decomposition of SiC at high temperature and low pressure. In-house built reactor consisting of induction furnace was used to form epitaxial films for electronic applications. Second, chemical vapor deposition method was used for direct graphene synthesis on 3C-SiC with the use of copper as a catalyst. In thermal CVD process, hydrogen and methane gases were used as precursors. Methane acts as a carbon source and annealing and cooling were done hydrogen environment. Different polytypes of silicon carbide (6H-SiC and 3C-SiC) and their crystal orientations were exploited as substrates to form epitaxial graphene. Hetero epitaxial 3C-SiC epilayer was first deposited on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition technique in cold wall, low pressure, and horizontal CVD reactor. The reactor temperature, argon pressure, flow rates and concentration of different gases (propane, silane, hydrogen and argon) was investigated to control the growth of 3C-SiC and silicon sublimation rate. The resulting graphene films were confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. Further, graphene films have been characterized with the tools of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mobility, electrical resistivity and carrier density measurements were taken using hall measurements. NSF_PRDM

  7. Germanium epitaxy on silicon

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Yu, Jinzhong

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of on-chip optical interconnects and optical computing in the past decade, silicon-based integrated devices for monolithic and hybrid optoelectronic integration have attracted wide attention. Due to its narrow pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si technology, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become a significant material for optoelectronic device applications. In this paper, we describe recent research progress on heteroepitaxy of Ge flat films and self-assembled Ge quantum dots on Si. For film growth, methods of strain modification and lattice mismatch relief are summarized, while for dot growth, key process parameters and their effects on the dot density, dot morphology and dot position are reviewed. The results indicate that epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials will play a bigger role in silicon photonics. PMID:27877657

  8. Vacancies in epitaxial graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2015-08-15

    The coherent-potential method is used to consider the problem of the influence of a finite concentration of randomly arranged vacancies on the density of states of epitaxial graphene. To describe the density of states of the substrate, simple models (the Anderson model, Haldane-Anderson model, and parabolic model) are used. The electronic spectrum of free single-sheet graphene is considered in the low-energy approximation. Charge transfer in the graphene-substrate system is discussed. It is shown that, in all cases, the density of states of epitaxial graphene decreases proportionally to the vacancy concentration. At the same time, the average charge transferred from graphene to the substrate increases.

  9. Germanium epitaxy on silicon.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Yu, Jinzhong

    2014-04-01

    With the rapid development of on-chip optical interconnects and optical computing in the past decade, silicon-based integrated devices for monolithic and hybrid optoelectronic integration have attracted wide attention. Due to its narrow pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si technology, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become a significant material for optoelectronic device applications. In this paper, we describe recent research progress on heteroepitaxy of Ge flat films and self-assembled Ge quantum dots on Si. For film growth, methods of strain modification and lattice mismatch relief are summarized, while for dot growth, key process parameters and their effects on the dot density, dot morphology and dot position are reviewed. The results indicate that epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials will play a bigger role in silicon photonics.

  10. Germanium epitaxy on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yu, Jinzhong

    2014-04-01

    With the rapid development of on-chip optical interconnects and optical computing in the past decade, silicon-based integrated devices for monolithic and hybrid optoelectronic integration have attracted wide attention. Due to its narrow pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si technology, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become a significant material for optoelectronic device applications. In this paper, we describe recent research progress on heteroepitaxy of Ge flat films and self-assembled Ge quantum dots on Si. For film growth, methods of strain modification and lattice mismatch relief are summarized, while for dot growth, key process parameters and their effects on the dot density, dot morphology and dot position are reviewed. The results indicate that epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials will play a bigger role in silicon photonics.

  11. Epitaxial thinning process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, C. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for thinning an epitaxial layer of a wafer that is to be used in producing diodes having a specified breakdown voltage and which also facilitates the thinning process. Current is passed through the epitaxial layer, by connecting a current source between the substrate of the wafer and an electrolyte in which the wafer is immersed. When the wafer is initially immersed, the voltage across the wafer initially drops and then rises at a steep rate. When light is applied to the wafer the voltage drops, and when the light is interrupted the voltage rises again. These changes in voltage, each indicate the breakdown voltage of a Schottky diode that could be prepared from the wafer at that time. The epitaxial layer is thinned by continuing to apply current through the wafer while it is immersed and light is applied, to form an oxide film and when the oxide film is thick the wafer can then be cleaned of oxide and the testing and thinning continued. Uninterrupted thinning can be achieved by first forming an oxide film, and then using an electrolyte that dissolves the oxide about as fast as it is being formed, to limit the thickness of the oxide layer.

  12. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    ... are due to menopause — the time when menstrual periods become irregular and eventually stop. In fact, hot flashes are the most common symptom of the menopausal transition. How often hot flashes occur varies among women ...

  13. Hot microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroy, Klaus; Chakraborty, Dipanjan; Cichos, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Hot microswimmers are self-propelled Brownian particles that exploit local heating for their directed self-thermophoretic motion. We provide a pedagogical overview of the key physical mechanisms underlying this promising new technology. It covers the hydrodynamics of swimming, thermophoresis and -osmosis, hot Brownian motion, force-free steering, and dedicated experimental and simulation tools to analyze hot Brownian swimmers.

  14. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Hot flashes By Mayo Clinic Staff Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the ... skin may redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause profuse sweating and may ...

  15. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mengdi Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  16. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  17. A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN633) interior under construction. Hot cells ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN-633) interior under construction. Hot cells and their doors are along concrete wall. Note side wall of pumice block. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: October 28, 1957. INEEL negative no. 57-5335 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Physical and chemical kinetic processes in the CVD of silicon from SiH 2Cl 2/H 2 gaseous mixtures in a vertical cylindrical hot-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, F.; Prebende, C.; Couderc, J. P.

    1991-09-01

    The kinetic process of the CVD of silicon is studied in the Si-H-Cl system on the basis of a large-scale experimental investigation of the growth rates. A cylindrical hot-wall LPCVD reactor was specifically built up and equipped with a sensitive microbalance. The physical transport phenomena are theoretically studied for a cylindrical geometry of both the hot reactional zone and the substrate itself: by solving the heat equation, a large isothermal area is found to extend around the substrate; the study of the momentum transfers reveals, by calculating gas velocities and streamlines, a very low disturbance of the gas flow by the occurrence of the substrate, due to a creeping laminar flow; at last, a coupled modelling of momentum and mass transfers shows, by computing gaseous species concentrations and deposition thicknesses profiles, that the growth rate is not influenced by total pressure, hardly by temperature, is increased by increasing the total flow rate and decreased by increasing the dilution ratio. Then, on the basis of thermodynamic approaches and considerations on adsorption phenomena, two theoretical mechanisms are proposed for the chemical process, depending on the experimental conditions. Taking into account theoretical and experimental kinetics, the temperature, the total flow rate and the total pressure are found to induce the transition between physical and chemical kinetic control. In both proposed chemical mechanisms, the limiting step is found to be the surface reaction between SiCl 2 adsorbed species and H 2 molecules. The predominant process is those with an activation energy of about 170 kJ mol -1 and a reaction order close to one with respect to H 2 species. The second mechanism, which involves an inhibition of the surface by atomic Cl species, occurs under more specifics conditions, i.e., high temperature, high dilution ratio and low total pressure.

  19. Misfit dislocations in epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, Jan H.

    2002-08-01

    This article on epitaxy highlights the following: the definition and some historical milestones; the introduction by Frenkel and Kontorowa (FK) of a truncated Fourier series to model the periodic interaction at crystalline interfaces; the invention by Frank and van der Merwe (FvdM)—using the FK model—of (interfacial) misfit dislocations as an important mechanism in accommodating misfit at epilayer-substrate interfaces; the generalization of the FvdM theory to multilayers; the application of the parabolic model by Jesser and van der Merwe to describe, for growing multilayers and superlattices, the impact of Fourier coefficients in the realization of epitaxial orientations and the stability of modes of misfit accommodation; the involvement of intralayer interaction in the latter—all features that impact on the attainment of perfection in crystallinity of thin films, a property that is so vital in the fabrication of useful uniformly thick epilayers (uniformity being another technological requirement), which also depends on misfit accommodation through the interfacial energy that function strongly in the criterion for growth modes, proposed by Bauer; and the ingenious application of the Volterra model by Matthews and others to describe misfit accommodation by dislocations in growing epilayers.

  20. Structural and photoelectrical characterization of hot wall deposited CuInSe{sub 2} thin films and the fabrication of CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Agilan, S.; Venkatachalam, S.; Mangalaraj, D. . E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com; Narayandass, Sa. K.; Velumani, S.; Mohan Rao, G.; Singh, Vijay P.

    2007-08-15

    Films of CuInSe{sub 2} were deposited onto glass substrates by a hot wall deposition method using bulk CuInSe{sub 2} as a source material. All the deposited CuInSe{sub 2} films were found to be polycrystalline in nature exhibiting the chalcopyrite structure with the crystallite orientation along (101),(112),(103),(211),(220),(312) and (400) directions. The photocurrent was found to increase with increase in film thickness and also with increase of light intensity. Photocurrent spectra show a peak related to the band-to-band transition. The spectral response of CuInSe{sub 2} thin films was studied by allowing the radiation to pass through a series of interference filters in the wavelength range 700-1200 nm. Films of higher thickness exhibited higher photosensitivity while low thickness films exhibited moderate photosensitivity. CuInSe{sub 2}-based Solar cells with different types of buffer layers such as CdS, CdSe, CuInSe{sub 2} and CdSe{sub 0.7}Te{sub 0.3} were fabricated. The current and voltage were measured using an optical power meter and an electrometer respectively. The fabricated solar cells were illuminated using 100 mW/cm2 white light under AM1 conditions.

  1. Dynamic nonlinearity in epitaxial BaTi O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyunina, M.; Savinov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic dielectric and piezoelectric constants of ferroelectrics increase proportionally to the amplitude of alternating electric field as a result of hysteretic Rayleigh-type motion of domain walls. Here a hysteresis-free quadratic field dependence of the dynamic dielectric response is experimentally demonstrated in the absence of domain walls in epitaxial BaTi O3 films. This extraordinary behavior is related to polar entities, whose presence is confirmed by the Vogel-Fulcher relaxation. The polar entities are ascribed to polarization fluctuations associated with lattice inhomogeneity.

  2. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived,…

  3. Epitaxial Silicon Doped With Antimony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.; Halleck, Bradley L.

    1996-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial silicon doped with antimony made by chemical vapor deposition, using antimony pentachloride (SbCI5) as source of dopant and SiH4, SiCI2H2, or another conventional source of silicon. High purity achieved in layers of arbitrary thickness. Epitaxial silicon doped with antimony needed to fabricate impurity-band-conduction photodetectors operating at wavelengths from 2.5 to 40 micrometers.

  4. Epitaxial Silicon Doped With Antimony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.; Halleck, Bradley L.

    1996-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial silicon doped with antimony made by chemical vapor deposition, using antimony pentachloride (SbCI5) as source of dopant and SiH4, SiCI2H2, or another conventional source of silicon. High purity achieved in layers of arbitrary thickness. Epitaxial silicon doped with antimony needed to fabricate impurity-band-conduction photodetectors operating at wavelengths from 2.5 to 40 micrometers.

  5. The epitaxial growth of (1 1 1) oriented monocrystalline Si film based on a 4:5 Si-to-SiC atomic lattice matching interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chen; Chen, Zhiming; Hu, Jichao; Ren, Zhanqiang; Lin, Shenghuang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► A monocrystalline Si film was demonstrated by XRD to epitaxially grow on the 6H-SiC substrate. ► A 4:5 Si-to-SiC lattice matching structure was observed at the Si/SiC interface. ► The calculated value of the actual lattice mismatch is only 0.26%. ► Defects can be effectively reduced at the 4:5 Si-to-SiC lattice matching Si/SiC interface. -- Abstract: Due to a huge lattice mismatch of about 20% theoretically existing between SiC and Si, it is difficult for growing monocrystalline Si/SiC heterojunction to realize the light control of SiC devices. However, based on a 4:5 Si-to-SiC atomic lattice matching interface structure, the monocrystalline Si films were epitaxially prepared on the 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrate by hot-wall chemical vapor deposition in our work. The film was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis with only (1 1 1) orientation occurring. The X-ray rocking curves illustrated good symmetry with a full width at half maximum of 0.4339° omega. A 4:5 Si-to-SiC atomic matching structure of the Si/6H-SiC interface clearly observed by the transmission electron microscope revealed the essence of growing the monocrystalline Si film on the SiC substrate.

  6. Hot gas filter and system assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin; Palmer, Kathryn Miles; Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Alvin, Mary Anne; Smeltzer, Eugene E.; Bachovchin, Dennis Michael

    1999-01-01

    A filter element for separating fine dirty particles from a hot gas. The filter element comprises a first porous wall and a second porous wall. Each porous wall has an outer surface and an inner surface. The first and second porous walls being coupled together thereby forming a substantially closed figure and open at one end. The open end is formed to be coupled to a hot gas clean up system support structure. The first and second porous walls define a channel beginning at the open end and terminate at the closed end through which a filtered clean gas can flow through and out into the clean gas side of a hot gas clean up system.

  7. Hot gas filter and system assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, T.E.; Palmer, K.M.; Bruck, G.J.; Alvin, M.A.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1999-08-31

    A filter element is described for separating fine dirty particles from a hot gas. The filter element comprises a first porous wall and a second porous wall. Each porous wall has an outer surface and an inner surface. The first and second porous walls being coupled together thereby forming a substantially closed figure and open at one end. The open end is formed to be coupled to a hot gas clean up system support structure. The first and second porous walls define a channel beginning at the open end and terminate at the closed end through which a filtered clean gas can flow through and out into the clean gas side of a hot gas clean up system. 8 figs.

  8. Interfacing epitaxial oxides to gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losego, Mark Daniel

    solutions. By controlling the composition of these alloys, the oxide's lattice parameter can be engineered to match GaN and reduce interfacial state density. Compositional control is a universal challenge to oxide MBE, and the MgO-CaO system (MCO) is further complicated by magnesium's high volatility and the lack of a thermodynamically stable phase. Through a detailed investigation of MgO's deposition rate and subsequent impact on MCO composition, the process space for achieving lattice-matched compositions to GaN are fully mapped. Lattice-matched compositions are demonstrated to have the narrowest off-axis rocking curve widths ever reported for an epitaxial oxide deposited directly on GaN (0.7° in φ-circle for 200 reflection). Epitaxial deposition of the ferroelectric (Ba,Sr)TiO3 by hot RF sputtering on GaN surfaces is also demonstrated. Simple MOS capacitors are fabricated from epitaxial rocksalt oxides and (Ba,Sr)TiO3 layers deposited on n-GaN substrates. Current-voltage measurements reveal that BST epilayers have 5 orders of magnitude higher current leakage than rocksalt epilayers. This higher leakage is attributed to the smaller band offset expected at this interface; modeling confirms that electronic transport occurs by Schottky emission. In contrast, current transport across the rocksalt oxide/GaN interface occurs by Frenkel-Poole emission and can be reduced with pre-deposition surface treatments. Finally, through this work, it is realized that the integration of oxides with III-nitrides requires an appreciation of many different fields of research including materials science, surface science, and electrical engineering. By recognizing the importance that each of these fields play in designing oxide/III-nitride interfaces, this thesis has the opportunity to explore other related phenomena including accessing metastable phases through MBE (ytterbium monoxide), spinodal decomposition in metastable alloys (MCO), how polar surfaces grown by MBE compensate their bound

  9. Submonolayer epitaxy with impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrla, Miroslav; Krug, Joachim; Smilauer, Pavel

    2000-03-01

    The effect of impurities on epitaxial growth in the submonolayer regime is studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a two-species solid-on-solid growth model. Both species are mobile, and attractive interactions among adatoms and between adatoms and impurities are incorporated. Impurities can be codeposited with the growing material or predeposited prior to growth. The activated exchange of impurities and adatoms is identified as the key kinetic process in the formation a growth morphology in which the impurities decorate the island edges. The dependence of the island density N on flux F and coverage θ is studied in detail. The impurities strongly increase the island density without appreciably changing the exponent \\chi in the power law relation N ~ F^\\chi, apart from a saturation of the flux dependence at large F and small θ. Within the present model, even completely decorated island edges do not provide efficient barriers to the attachment of adatoms, and therefore the mechanism for the increase of \\chi proposed by D. Kandel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 499 (1997)] is not operative. A simple analytic theory taking into account only the dependence of the adatom diffusion constant on impurity coverage is shown to provide semi-quantitative agreement with many features observed in the simulations.

  10. Hot microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Baranski, Andrzej S

    2002-03-15

    Heat generation at disk microelectrodes by a high-amplitude (few volt) and high-frequency (0.1-2 GHz) alternating voltage is described. This method allows changing electrode temperature very rapidly and maintaining it well above the boiling point of solution for a very long time without any indication of boiling. The size of the hot zone in solution is determined by the radius of the electrode. There is no obvious limit in regard to the electrode size, so theoretically, by this method, it should be possible to create hot spots that are much smaller than those created with laser beams. That could lead to potential applications in medicine and biology. The heat-generating waveform does not electrically interfere with normal electroanalytical measurements. The noise level at hot microelectrodes is only slightly higher, as compared to normal microelectodes, but diffusion-controlled currents at hot microelectrodes may be up to 7 times higher, and an enhancement of kinetically controlled currents may be even larger. Hot microelectrodes can be used for end-column detection in capillary electrophoresis and for in-line or in vivo analyses. Temperature gradients at hot microelectrodes may exceed 1.5 x 10(5) K/cm, which makes them useful in studies of Soret diffusion and thermoelectric phenomena.

  11. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  12. Method of epitaxially depositing cadmium sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, Frank Z. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A single crystal layer of either cadmium sulfide or an alloy of cadmium sulfide and indium phosphide is epitaxially deposited on a substrate of cadmium sulfide by liquid phase epitaxy using indium as the solvent.

  13. 1. PLENUM WALL, SHOWING BALL AND STRING DAMPER CONTROLS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PLENUM WALL, SHOWING BALL AND STRING DAMPER CONTROLS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  14. Epitaxial technology for low cost solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Raccah, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    Epitaxial solar cell structures on low cost silicon substrates are compared to direct diffusion substrates. Dislocation density in the epitaxial layers is found to be significantly lower than that of the substrate material. The saturation current density of diodes epitaxially formed on the substrate is commonly 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than for diodes formed by direct diffusion. Solar cells made epitaxially are substantially better than those made by direct diffusion into similar material.

  15. Layer Resolved Imaging of Magnetic Domain Motion in Epitaxial Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Sioan; Choi, Yongseong; Love, David; Mansell, Rhodri; Barnes, Crispin; Keavney, David; Rosenberg, Richard

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy (XELM) to image the elemental and layer resolved magnetic domain structure of an epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure in the presence of large magnetic fields. The observed magnetic domains exhibit several unique behaviors that depend on the Cr thickness (tCr) modulated interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) strength. For Cr thickness tCr??1.5?nm, strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal and weakly coupled layer independent reversal are observed, respectively. The transition between these two reversal mechanisms for 0.34?wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. We observe domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  16. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Laser-Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy ( LSCE ). The essential features of LSCE as applied to CdTe epitaxy involve: coadsorption of DMCd and DMTe on a GaAs...DIAGRAM OF THE LSCE PROCESS UHV environment 1M substra1e 9 /X Adsorbed thin film produced CH 3 -Cd-GH 3 CH 3 -Te-CH, by molecular beam source hv ’ CH...with Anneal W/// substraIe %/"/,’ Figure 1.1. Schematic of the LSCE process. (1-2) t I 2. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH 2.1 Experimental Apparatus The

  17. Electronic cooling via interlayer Coulomb coupling in multilayer epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Mihnev, Momchil T; Tolsma, John R; Divin, Charles J; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A; MacDonald, Allan H; Norris, Theodore B

    2015-09-24

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron-phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport, even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier dynamics as temperature and the number of layers is varied.

  18. Electronic cooling via interlayer Coulomb coupling in multilayer epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mihnev, Momchil T.; Tolsma, John R.; Divin, Charles J.; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-01-01

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron–phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport, even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier dynamics as temperature and the number of layers is varied. PMID:26399955

  19. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  20. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  1. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  2. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  3. Method for rapid, controllable growth and thickness, of epitaxial silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi [Littleton, CO; Stradins, Paul [Golden, CO; Teplin, Charles [Boulder, CO; Branz, Howard M [Boulder, CO

    2009-10-13

    A method of producing epitaxial silicon films on a c-Si wafer substrate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition by controlling the rate of silicon deposition in a temperature range that spans the transition from a monohydride to a hydrogen free silicon surface in a vacuum, to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness is disclosed. The method includes placing a c-Si substrate in a HWCVD reactor chamber. The method also includes supplying a gas containing silicon at a sufficient rate into the reaction chamber to interact with the substrate to deposit a layer containing silicon thereon at a predefined growth rate to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness.

  4. Solar Hot Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  5. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Kuan Hsiung

    Ga(,0.48)In(,0.52)As recently emerges as a promising material for high speed applications. It also has a direct bandgap with gap energy suitable for optical applications. It is the purpose of this thesis to grow high quality Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As, lattice-matched Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As and heterojunction structures by molecular beam epitaxy technique for applications in the areas of modulation-doped high mobility devices and internal photoemission Schottky diodes for infrared detection. Single crystal Al metal deposition on GaInAs by MBE is also studied for its electrical properties. Mobility enhancement has been demonstrated in modulation-doped structures at low temperatures. Very high mobilities were obtained: 10,900 cm('2)/Vs at room temperature, 55,500 cm('2)/Vs at 77K and 70,200 cm('2)/Vs at 10K with corresponding two-dimensional electron gas densities greater than 1 x 10('12) l/cm('2). The quality of Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As and the parallel conduction in this material are the limiting factors in its mobility. A new ohmic contact phenomenon has been observed in the MBE single crystal Al metal on Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)AS samples. Its contact resistivity is measured to be as small as 1 x 10('-6) (OMEGA)-cm('2). The Fermi-level pinning near the conduction band edge might be caused by the interface defects. A planar doping technique has been employed to enhance the built-in barrier height to a value of about 0.5 eV in the single crystal Al on n-p('+)-n-Ga(,0.47)In(,0.52)As structures. This novel quasi-Schottky diode also shows a forward ideal factor of 1.03. As for optical detectors, four kinds of diodes were made for internal photoemission studies: Au Schottky on Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As in the wavelength range of 1.9 (mu)m to 2.5 (mu)m, Au Schottky on Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As in 1.1 (mu)m to 2.0 (mu)m range, single crystal Al on (Al(,0.8)Ga(,0.2))(,0.48)In(,0.52)As with improved quantum yields and lastly a Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As/Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As heterojunction with a measured

  6. Wall turbulence without walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Jimenez, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are presented of isolated logarithmic layers without an underlying buffer zone. They are implemented by enforcing artificial boundary conditions within the logarithmic layer which are synthesized from values from the interior of the flow. As an example, simulations of a half-channel employing this technique are discussed. The results exhibit logarithmic mean velocity profiles, and velocity fluctuation intensities that are similar to those obtained by the full DNS of half or full channels. Those results strongly suggest that the formation of a logarithmic layer is not overly dependent on the presence of a near-wall region, and that such a flow can exist by itself. The technique enables us to perform conceptual experiments to clarify what is essential to the logarithmic layer. For example, preliminary results show that the logarithmic layer cannot be created only by a non-uniform shear, and requires a spatial gradient of the scales of the fluctuations. Somewhat surprisingly, some simulations result in Kármán constants fairly different from κ=0.4, providing clues to what determines κ in real wall turbulence.

  7. Layer resolved magnetic domain imaging of epitaxial heterostructures in large applied magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, S.; Choi, Y.; Love, D. M.; Mansell, R.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Keavney, DJ.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2015-02-16

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy to investigate the elemental and layer resolved magnetic reversal in an interlayer exchange coupled (IEC) epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure. The transition from strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal for Cr thickness t(Cr) < 0.34 nm to weakly coupled layer independent reversal for t(Cr) > 1.5 nm is punctuated at 0.34 < t(Cr) < 1.5 nm by a combination of IEC guided domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. Domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  8. Layer resolved magnetic domain imaging of epitaxial heterostructures in large applied magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, S.; Choi, Y.; Love, D. M.; Mansell, R.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Keavney, D. J.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy to investigate the elemental and layer resolved magnetic reversal in an interlayer exchange coupled (IEC) epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure. The transition from strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal for Cr thickness tCr < 0.34 nm to weakly coupled layer independent reversal for tCr > 1.5 nm is punctuated at 0.34 < tCr < 1.5 nm by a combination of IEC guided domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. Domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  9. Epitaxial silicon growth for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Richman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The epitaxial procedures, solar cell fabrication, and evaluation techniques are described. The development of baseline epitaxial solar cell structures grown on high quality conventional silicon substrates is discussed. Diagnostic layers and solar cells grown on four potentially low cost silicon substrates are considered. The crystallographic properties of such layers and the performance of epitaxially grown solar cells fabricated on these materials are described. An advanced epitaxial reactor, the rotary disc, is described along with the results of growing solar cell structures of the baseline type on low cost substrates. The add on cost for the epitaxial process is assessed and the economic advantages of the epitaxial process as they relate to silicon substrate selection are examined.

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy an Patternless and Patterned Substrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses chemical vapor deposition epitaxy on patternless and patterned substrates for an electronic materials processing course. Describes the processs types and features of epitaxy. Presents some potential problems of epitaxy. Lists 38 references. (YP)

  11. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-20

    Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite microwave Signal Processing Millimeter-Wave 20. ABSTRACT (Continue ani revee arde if necoeermy and...le.’uIfy by block rns.) e objective of this research is to develop new and improved epitauial ferrite materials for use in microwave and millimeter... ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at frequencies above 1 GHz. The specific tasks are: a. Analyze and develop

  12. Recent developments in droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Abbarchi, Marco; Noda, Takeshi; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2014-05-15

    The droplet epitaxy allows for self-assembly of lattice-matched GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with high quality and high uniformity. In this article, we show our efforts to realize the GaAs QDs with excellent optical properties. After the optimization of the several growth processes, we achieved current-injection lasing in the GaAs QDs. In addition, formation of further advanced nanostructure is presented.

  13. Epitaxial complex oxide tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junwoo; Moetakef, Pouya; Cagnon, Joël; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-03-01

    Tunnel junctions with complex oxide thin film barriers are of interest for studies of the critical thickness of ferroelectricity, of phonon modes in ultrathin films and of traps by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We show that high-quality epitaxial SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 tunnel barriers can be grown on Pt bottom electrodes. Coherent, epitaxial Pt films with roughness of less than a unit cell were grown on (001) SrTiO3 to serve as bottom electrodes for epitaxial SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 tunnel barriers. All interfaces were atomically abrupt as confirmed by atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging. The IV characteristics were non-linear, demonstrating good insulating properties. For the SrTiO3 barriers and voltage sweeps up to ± 0.5 V, the measured tunnel current was independent of the sweep direction. At low biases, dynamic conductance curves showed a symmetrical parabolic shape around the origin in both resistance states. At high bias, deviation from the ideal tunnel behavior was observed. A large increase of the tunnel conductance occurred above a minimum positive bias. A dramatic decrease of tunnel conductance occurred for a large negative bias, indicating bipolar switching. We show the contributions to the resistive switching. Phonon modes and traps are determined using inelastic tunneling spectroscopy with both paraelectric and ferroelectric tunnel barriers.

  14. Are 'hot spots' hot spots?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, Gillian R.

    2012-07-01

    The term 'hot spot' emerged in the 1960s from speculations that Hawaii might have its origins in an unusually hot source region in the mantle. It subsequently became widely used to refer to volcanic regions considered to be anomalous in the then-new plate tectonic paradigm. It carried with it the implication that volcanism (a) is emplaced by a single, spatially restricted, mongenetic melt-delivery system, assumed to be a mantle plume, and (b) that the source is unusually hot. This model has tended to be assumed a priori to be correct. Nevertheless, there are many geological ways of testing it, and a great deal of work has recently been done to do so. Two fundamental problems challenge this work. First is the difficulty of deciding a 'normal' mantle temperature against which to compare estimates. This is usually taken to be the source temperature of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). However, Earth's surface conduction layer is ˜200 km thick, and such a norm is not appropriate if the lavas under investigation formed deeper than the 40-50 km source depth of MORB. Second, methods for estimating temperature suffer from ambiguity of interpretation with composition and partial melt, controversy regarding how they should be applied, lack of repeatability between studies using the same data, and insufficient precision to detect the 200-300 °C temperature variations postulated. Available methods include multiple seismological and petrological approaches, modelling bathymetry and topography, and measuring heat flow. Investigations have been carried out in many areas postulated to represent either (hot) plume heads or (hotter) tails. These include sections of the mid-ocean spreading ridge postulated to include ridge-centred plumes, the North Atlantic Igneous Province, Iceland, Hawaii, oceanic plateaus, and high-standing continental areas such as the Hoggar swell. Most volcanic regions that may reasonably be considered anomalous in the simple plate-tectonic paradigm have been

  15. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  16. Seismic evaluation of a hot cell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The evaluation of the structural capacity of and the seismic demand on an existing hot cell structure in a nuclear facility is described. An ANSYS finite-element model of the cell was constructed, treating the walls as plates and the floor and ceiling as a system of discrete beams. A modal analysis showed that the fundamental frequencies of the cell walls lie far above the earthquake frequency range. An equivalent static analysis of the structure was performed. Based on the analysis it was demonstrated that the hot cell structure, would readily withstand the evaluation basis earthquake.

  17. Epitaxy of MgO magnetic tunnel barriers on epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Godel, Florian; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Majjad, Hicham; Metten, Dominik; Henry, Yves; Berciaud, Stéphane; Dayen, Jean-Francois; Halley, David

    2013-11-29

    Epitaxial growth of electrodes and tunnel barriers on graphene is one of the main technological bottlenecks for graphene spintronics. In this paper, we demonstrate that MgO(111) epitaxial tunnel barriers, one of the prime candidates for spintronic application, can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). Ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co, Fe20Ni80) were epitaxially grown on top of the MgO barrier, thus leading to monocrystalline electrodes on graphene. Structural and magnetic characterizations were performed on these ferromagnetic metals after annealing and dewetting: they form clusters with a 100 nm typical lateral width, which are mostly magnetic monodomains in the case of Fe. This epitaxial stack opens the way to graphene spintronic devices taking benefits from a coherent tunnelling current through the epitaxial MgO/graphene stack.

  18. Epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Gershon, Talia S.; Guha, Supratik; Shin, Byungha; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Techniques for epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) materials on Si are provided. In one aspect, a method of forming an epitaxial kesterite material is provided which includes the steps of: selecting a Si substrate based on a crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate; forming an epitaxial oxide interlayer on the Si substrate to enhance wettability of the epitaxial kesterite material on the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial oxide interlayer is formed from a material that is lattice-matched to Si; and forming the epitaxial kesterite material on a side of the epitaxial oxide interlayer opposite the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, and wherein a crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial kesterite material is based on the crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate. A method of forming an epitaxial kesterite-based photovoltaic device and an epitaxial kesterite-based device are also provided.

  19. Epitaxial growth of europium monoxide on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T.; Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A.; Fischer, M.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M.; Awschalom, D. D.; Holländer, B.; Schubert, J.; Schlom, D. G.

    2013-11-25

    We report the epitaxial integration of phase-pure EuO on both single-crystal diamond and on epitaxial diamond films grown on silicon utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. The epitaxial orientation relationship is (001) EuO ‖ (001) diamond and [110] EuO ‖[100] diamond. The EuO layer is nominally unstrained and ferromagnetic with a transition temperature of 68 ± 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 5.5 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the single-crystal diamond, and a transition temperature of 67 ± 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 2.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the epitaxial diamond film.

  20. Can epitaxial replacement induce low temperature recovery and recrystallization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joe; Wheeler, John; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2017-04-01

    Microstructural analysis of deformed rocks can help identify which deformation mechanism was dominant during viscous deformation of the mid-to-lower crust. Crystal plastic deformation can result in the development of subgrains and a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO); the presence of such microstructures are traditionally taken as evidence for dominance of dislocation creep. These microstructures are observed in plagioclase (pure albite end member) grains deformed at mid-crustal conditions (greenschist facies) in a km-wide Alpine extensional shear zone. However, crystal plastic behaviour is temperature dependent, and our current understanding of the behaviour of plagioclase suggests dislocation creep should not dominate deformation at these conditions (300-450°C, <9 kbar). We present the results of an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study that suggests epitaxial replacement was responsible for the development of the observed microstructures. The presence of inclusion trails that record fluid infiltration pathways, chessboard twinning, and high dislocation densities in product porphyroclasts are taken as indicators that fluid-mediated epitaxial replacement of Ca-bearing plagioclase to pure albite occurred to produce mm-scale product grains with an inherited CPO and a high dislocation density (ρ, due to lattice mismatch between parent and daughter grains). We speculate that subsequent deformation has driven recovery of dislocations into subgrain walls at relatively low T (0.3-0.4 Tm); high ρ and associated stored plastic strain energy providing the driving force for recovery. The observation that subgrains with a relatively low dislocation density mantle porphyroclasts with a relatively high dislocation density may indicate that higher local stresses at grain boundaries (with respect to the grain interior) during continued deformation have influenced recovery and the generation of subgrain walls. Subsequent subgrain rotation

  1. Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Patricia D.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) computer program developed to aid in design of single- and double-junction cascade cells made of silicon. Cascade cell has efficiency 1 or 2 percent higher than single cell, with twice the open-circuit voltage. Input parameters include doping density, diffusion lengths, thicknesses of regions, solar spectrum, absorption coefficients of silicon (data included for 101 wavelengths), and surface recombination velocities. Results include maximum power, short-circuit current, and open-circuit voltage. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  2. Effect of substrate temperature on the magnetic properties of epitaxial sputter-grown Co/Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, A. P.; Whiteside, A. L.; Canwell, E. J.; Marrows, C. H.; Moore, T. A.; Benitez, M. J.; McGrouther, D.; McVitie, S.; McFadzean, S.

    2013-12-23

    Epitaxial Co/Pt films have been deposited by dc-magnetron sputtering onto heated C-plane sapphire substrates. X-ray diffraction, the residual resistivity, and transmission electron microscopy indicate that the Co/Pt films are highly ordered on the atomic scale. The coercive field and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy increase as the substrate temperature is increased from 100–250 °C during deposition of the Co/Pt. Measurement of the domain wall creep velocity as a function of applied magnetic field yields the domain wall pinning energy, which scales with the coercive field. Evidence for an enhanced creep velocity in highly ordered epitaxial Co/Pt is found.

  3. Growing Epitaxial Graphene on an Insulator by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Chandra; Eckstein, James

    2009-03-01

    We have used electron beam evaporation of solid carbon (C) to deposit graphene on MgO <111> at 850C. The growth appears epitaxial as observed by in-situ RHEED which also reveals that the hot scattering surface transitions from an insulator to a conductor after deposition of 1 monolayer of C. Growth at higher temperatures gives better crystallinity. We further characterize the film by ex-situ Raman spectroscopy, AFM and transport. Raman reveals all the characteristic G, D and 2D peaks of graphene and the 2D peak can be fit to a single lorentzian typical for graphene. AFM pictures show that the surface consists of flat connected domains, which are uniform across the substrate. Electrical transport shows insulating behavior with resistance (R) varying as 1/T^2. This work was supported by the DOE BES at the F. Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Urbana.

  4. Materials aspects of ion beam synthesis of epitaxial suicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantl, S.

    1994-02-01

    Ion beam synthesis of epitaxial suicides involves high dose ion implantation and subsequent annealing. In this short review the formation of suicide precipitates during the hot implantation and the layer formation during the high temperature anneal are discussed. Diffusivity and solid solubility of the transition metals in Si are crucial material properties for the formation of a uniform buried layer. Recent X-ray reflectivity measurements on buried CoSi 2 layers provided different interface roughnesses depending on suicide orientation and annealing conditions. A new 2 × 1 ordered structure of the CoSi 2/Si(001) interface was found using Z-contrast imaging. In addition, the carrier mobilities of the semiconducting suicides β-FeSi 2 and CrSi 2 are discussed.

  5. Microstructural and Magnetic Properties of Polycrystalline and Epitaxial Permalloy (NICKEL(80) IRON(20) Multilayered Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Imran

    the soft magnetic properties of rm Ni _{80}Fe_{20}. To explain these experimentally observed magnetic properties, a micromagnetic model was developed taking into account domain wall interaction with misfit dislocations and film surface roughness especially during the initial stages of epitaxial growth. Finally, epitaxial growth of rm Ni_{80}Fe_{20} /Cu on Si suggests the possibility of growing grain -boundary free atomically sharp rm Ni_ {80}Fe_{20}/Cu multilayers which exhibit recently-discovered "giant" magnetoresistance.

  6. Transitional Boundary Layers Under the Influence of High Free Stream Turbulence, Intensive Wall Cooling and High Pressure Gradients in Hot Gas Circulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rued, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for fundamental experimental studies of the influence of free stream turbulence, pressure gradients and wall cooling are discussed. Under turbine-like free stream conditions, comprehensive tests of transitional boundary layers with laminar, reversing and turbulent flow increments were performed to decouple the effects of the parameters and to determine the effects during mutual interaction.

  7. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  8. Epitaxial Halide Perovskite Lateral Double Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Chen, Zhizhong; Deschler, Felix; Sun, Xin; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wertz, Esther A; Hu, Jia-Mian; Shi, Jian

    2017-03-28

    Epitaxial III-V semiconductor heterostructures are key components in modern microelectronics, electro-optics, and optoelectronics. With superior semiconducting properties, halide perovskite materials are rising as promising candidates for coherent heterostructure devices. In this report, spinodal decomposition is proposed and experimentally implemented to produce epitaxial double heterostructures in halide perovskite system. Pristine epitaxial mixed halide perovskites rods and films were synthesized via van der Waals epitaxy by chemical vapor deposition method. At room temperature, photon was applied as a knob to regulate the kinetics of spinodal decomposition and classic coarsening. By this approach, halide perovskite double heterostructures were created carrying epitaxial interfaces and outstanding optical properties. Reduced Fröhlich electron-phonon coupling was discovered in coherent halide double heterostructure, which is hypothetically attributed to the classic phonon confinement effect widely existing in III-V double heterostructures. As a proof-of-concept, our results suggest that halide perovskite-based epitaxial heterostructures may be promising for high-performance and low-cost optoelectronics, electro-optics, and microelectronics. Thus, ultimately, for practical device applications, it may be worthy to pursue these heterostructures via conventional vapor phase epitaxy approaches widely practised in III-V field.

  9. Origin and reduction of impurities at GaAs epitaxial layer-substrate interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanber, H.; Yang, H. T.; Zielinski, T.; Whelan, J. M.

    1988-09-01

    Surface cleaning techniques used for semi-insulating GaAs substrates prior to epitaxial growth can have an important and sometimes detrimental effect on the quality and characteristics of epitaxial layers that are grown on them. We observe that a HF rinse followed by a 5:1:1 H 2SO 4:H 2O 2:H 2O etch and H 2O rinse drastically reduced the maximum concentrations and total amount of both SIMS detected S and Si for MOCVD grown GaAs undoped epitaxial layers. Subsequent final HCl and H 2O reduced the S interfacial residues to the SIMS detection limit. Total amounts of residual Si are estimated to be equivalent to 10 -2 to 10 -3 monolayers. Residual S is less. Alternately the S residue can be comparable reduced by a HF rinse followed by a NH 4OH:H 2O 2:H 2O etch and H 2O rinse. Hot aqueous HCl removes S but not Si residues. The Si residue is not electrically active and most likely exists as islands of SiO 2. The relative significance of the impurity residues is most pronounced for halide VPE, smaller for MBE and least for MOCVD grown GaAs epitaxial layers.

  10. Characterization of Epitaxial Film Silicon Solar Cells Grown on Seeded Display Glass: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C.; Stradins, P.; LaSalvia, V.; Chuang, T. K.; Couillard, J. G.; Branz, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    We report characterizations of epitaxial film crystal silicon (c-Si) solar cells with open-circuit voltages (Voc) above 560 mV. The 2-um absorber cells are grown by low-temperature (<750 degrees C) hot-wire CVD (HWCVD) on Corning EAGLE XG display glass coated with a layer-transferred (LT) Si seed. The high Voc is a result of low-defect epitaxial Si (epi-Si) growth and effective hydrogen passivation of defects. The quality of HWCVD epitaxial growth on seeded glass substrates depends on the crystallographic quality of the seed and the morphology of the epitaxial growth surface. Heterojunction devices consist of glass/c-Si LT seed/ epi n+ Si:P/epi n- Si:P/intrinsic a-Si:H/p+ a-Si:H/ITO. Similar devices grown on electronically 'dead' n+ wafers have given Voc {approx}630 mV and {approx}8% efficiency with no light trapping features. Here we study the effects of the seed surface polish on epi-Si quality, how hydrogenation influences the device character, and the dominant junction transport physics.

  11. Epitaxial growth and stress relaxation of vapor-deposited Fe-Pd magnetic shape memory films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnemund, L.; Edler, T.; Kock, I.; Seibt, M.; Mayr, S. G.

    2009-11-01

    To achieve maximum performance in microscale magnetic shape memory actuation devices epitaxial films several hundred nanometers thick are needed. Epitaxial films were grown on hot MgO substrates (500 °C and above) by e-beam evaporation. Structural properties and stress relaxation mechanisms were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, in situ substrate curvature measurements and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The high misfit stress incorporated during Vollmer-Weber growth at the beginning was relaxed by partial or perfect dislocations depending on the substrate temperature. This relaxation allowed the avoidance of a stress-induced breakdown of epitaxy and no thickness limit for epitaxy was found. For substrate temperatures of 690 °C or above, the films grew in the fcc austenite phase. Below this temperature, iron precipitates were formed. MD simulations showed how these precipitates influence the movements of partial dislocations, and can thereby explain the higher stress level observed in the experiments in the initial stage of growth for these films.

  12. Micro-grooved heat transfer combustor wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A gas turbine engine hot section combustor liner is provided a non-film cooled portion of a heat transfer wall having a hot surface and a plurality of longitudinally extending micro-grooves disposed in the portion of the wall along the hot surface in a direction parallel to the direction of the hot gas flow. The depth of the micro-grooves is very small and on the order of magnitude of a predetermined laminar sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer. The micro-grooves are sized so as to inhibit heat transfer from the hot gas flow to the hot surface of the wall while reducing NOx emissions of the combustor relative to an otherwise similar combustor having a liner wall portion including film cooling apertures. In one embodiment the micro-grooves are about 0.001 inches deep and have a preferred depth range of from about 0.001 inches to 0.005 inches and which are square, rectangular, or triangular in cross-section and the micro-grooves are spaced about one width apart.

  13. Brush Seal Would Impede Flow Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Paul F.; Easter, Barry P.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed brush seal helps prevent recirculating flow of hot combustion gases from reaching bellows seal located deep in gap in wall of combustion chamber. More durable, more tolerant of irregularities, and easier to install. Seals also helpful in impeding deleterious flows of hot gases in other combustion chambers such as those of furnaces and turbomachines.

  14. Electroless epitaxial etching for semiconductor applications

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon on insulator substrates using electroless etching for achieving efficient etch stopping on epitaxial silicon substrates. Microelectric circuits and devices are prepared on epitaxial silicon wafers in a standard fabrication facility. The wafers are bonded to a holding substrate. The silicon bulk is removed using electroless etching leaving the circuit contained within the epitaxial layer remaining on the holding substrate. A photolithographic operation is then performed to define streets and wire bond pad areas for electrical access to the circuit.

  15. Epitaxial silicon devices for dosimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Casati, M.; Menichelli, D.; Talamonti, C.; Piemonte, C.; Svensson, B. G.

    2007-04-23

    A straightforward improvement of the efficiency and long term stability of silicon dosimeters has been obtained with a n{sup +}-p junction surrounded by a guard-ring structure implanted on an epitaxial p-type Si layer grown on a Czochralski substrate. The sensitivity of devices made on 50-{mu}m-thick epitaxial Si degrades by only 7% after an irradiation with 6 MeV electrons up to 1.5 kGy, and shows no significant further decay up to 10 kGy. These results prove the enhanced radiation tolerance and stability of epitaxial diodes as compared to present state-of-the-art Si devices.

  16. Ion implanted epitaxially grown ZnSe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of ZnSe on (100) Ge using the close-spaced transport process is described. Substrate temperature of 575 C and source temperatures of 675 C yield 10 micron, single crystal layers in 10 hours. The Ge substrates provides a nonreplenishable chemical transport agent and the epitaxial layer thickness is limited to approximately 10 microns. Grown epitaxial layers show excellent photoluminescence structure at 77 K. Grown layers exhibit high resistivity, and annealing in Zn vapor at 575 C reduces the resistivity to 10-100 ohms-cm. Zinc vapor annealing quenches the visible photoluminescence.

  17. High throughput vacuum chemical epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, L. M.; Malocsay, E.; Sundaram, V.; Baird, R. W.; Mao, B. Y.; Lee, G. Y.

    1990-10-01

    We have developed a vacuum chemical epitaxy (VCE) reactor which avoids the use of arsine and allows multiple wafers to be coated at one time. Our vacuum chemical epitaxy reactor closely resembles a molecular beam epitaxy system in that wafers are loaded into a stainless steel vacuum chamber through a load chamber. Also as in MBE, arsenic vapors are supplied as reactant by heating solid arsenic sources thereby avoiding the use of arsine. However, in our VCE reactor, a large number of wafers are coated at one time in a vacuum system by the substitution of Group III alkyl sources for the elemental metal sources traditionally used in MBE. Higher wafer throughput results because in VCE, the metal-alkyl sources for Ga, Al, and dopants can be mixed at room temperature and distributed uniformly though a large area injector to multiple substrates as a homogeneous array of mixed element molecular beams. The VCE reactor that we have built and that we shall describe here uniformly deposits films on 7 inch diameter substrate platters. Each platter contains seven two inch or three 3 inch diameter wafers. The load chamber contains up to nine platters. The vacuum chamber is equipped with two VCE growth zones and two arsenic ovens, one per growth zone. Finally, each oven has a 1 kg arsenic capacity. As of this writing, mirror smooth GaAs films have been grown at up to 4 μm/h growth rate on multiple wafers with good thickness uniformity. The background doping is p-type with a typical hole concentration and mobility of 1 × 10 16/cm 3 and 350 cm 2/V·s. This background doping level is low enough for the fabrication of MESFETs, solar cells, and photocathodes as well as other types of devices. We have fabricated MESFET devices using VCE-grown epi wafers with peak extrinsic transconductance as high as 210 mS/mm for a threshold voltage of - 3 V and a 0.6 μm gate length. We have also recently grown AlGaAs epi layers with up to 80% aluminum using TEAl as the aluminum alkyl source. The Al

  18. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF HOT CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF HOT CELL NO. 2 FROM STAIRWAY ALONG NORTH WALL. OBSERVATION WINDOW ALONG WEST SIDE BENEATH "CELL 2" SIGN. DOORWAY IN LEFT OF VIEW LEADS TO CELL 1 WORK AREA OR TO EXIT OUTDOORS TO NORTH. RADIATION DETECTION MONITOR TO RIGHT OF DOOR. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  20. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  1. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  2. Epitaxial CuInSe2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and migration enhanced epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrafi, K.; Ribeiro-Andrade, R.; Nicoara, N.; Cerqueira, M. F.; Gonzalez Debs, M.; Limborço, H.; Salomé, P. M. P.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Briones, F.; Garcia, J. M.; Sadewasser, S.

    2017-10-01

    While CuInSe2 chalcopyrite materials are mainly used in their polycrystalline form to prepare thin film solar cells, epitaxial layers have been used for the characterization of defects. Typically, epitaxial layers are grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Here we present epitaxial layers grown by migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and compare the materials quality to MBE grown layers. CuInSe2 layers were grown on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates by co-evaporation of Cu, In, and Se using substrate temperatures of 450 °C, 530 °C, and 620 °C. The layers were characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). HR-XRD and HR-TEM show a better crystalline quality of the MEE grown layers, and Raman scattering measurements confirm single phase CuInSe2. AFM shows the previously observed faceting of the (0 0 1) surface into {1 1 2} facets with trenches formed along the [1 1 0] direction. The surface of MEE-grown samples appears smoother compared to MBE-grown samples, a similar trend is observed with increasing growth temperature.

  3. Thermal breaking systems for metal stud walls -- Can metal stud walls perform as well as wood stud walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1997-12-31

    Metal stud wall systems for residential buildings are gaining in popularity. Strong thermal bridges caused by highly conductive metal studs degrade the thermal performance of such walls. Several wall configurations have been developed to improve their thermal performance. The authors tried to evaluate some of these wall systems. The thermal performance of metal stud walls is frequently compared with that of wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. In metal stud walls, thermal bridges generated by the metal components reduce their thermal performance by up to 55%. Today, metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar systems made of wood because steel has much higher thermal conductivity than wood. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is now widely recommended as the remedy for weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of promising metal stud wall configurations was analyzed. Some of these walls were designed and tested by the authors, some were tested in other laboratories, and some were developed and forgotten a long time ago. Several types of thermal breaking systems were used in these walls. Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer simulations were used to analyze 20 metal stud wall configurations. Also, a series of hot-box tests were conducted on several of these walls. Test results for 22 additional metal stud walls were analyzed. Most of these walls contained conventional metal studs. Commonly used fiberglass and EPS were used as insulation materials. The most promising metal stud wall configurations have reductions in the center-of-cavity R-values of less than 20%.

  4. Epitaxial growth of single crystal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment in gallium arsenide liquid phase epitaxy was performed successfully on the SPAR 6 flight October 17, 1979. The design, fabrication, and testing of the experimental apparatus, and the performance and results of the experiment are discussed.

  5. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    DOEpatents

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  6. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  7. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  8. Epitaxial Deposition Of Germanium Doped With Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium made by chemical vapor deposition. Method involves combination of techniques and materials used in chemical vapor deposition with GeH4 or GeCl4 as source of germanium and GaCl3 as source of gallium. Resulting epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium expected to be highly pure, with high crystalline quality. High-quality material useful in infrared sensors.

  9. Epitaxial Deposition Of Germanium Doped With Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium made by chemical vapor deposition. Method involves combination of techniques and materials used in chemical vapor deposition with GeH4 or GeCl4 as source of germanium and GaCl3 as source of gallium. Resulting epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium expected to be highly pure, with high crystalline quality. High-quality material useful in infrared sensors.

  10. Strong impact of slight trench direction misalignment from [11\\bar{2}0] on deep trench filling epitaxy for SiC super-junction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Ryoji; Ji, Shiyang; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Kouketsu, Hidenori; Kawada, Yasuyuki; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Kazutoshi; Yonezawa, Yoshiyuki; Okumura, Hajime

    2017-04-01

    A trench filling epitaxial growth technique using hot-wall chemical vapor deposition with HCl gas has been developed for SiC super-junction (SJ) device fabrication. 2–6 kV class SJ devices require p/n column structures with depths of over 10 µm. However, rapid trench closure before the trench backfilling process is complete makes these structures difficult to realize. Stripe trenches that were intentionally inclined within ±2° on a surface plane towards the [11\\bar{2}0] direction were formed on an off-angled wafer, and the effects of trench direction misalignment from the off-direction were investigated. Slight trench direction misalignment was found to affect the tilt angle of the mesa top epi-layer strongly. Tilted growth on the mesa top reduced the filling rate at the trench bottom and caused void formation. When a wafer with high orientation-flat accuracy relative to the [11\\bar{2}0] direction was used, 25-µm-deep trench backfilling was successfully demonstrated.

  11. Epitaxial growth and characterization of Si/NiSi 2/Si(111) heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Angela; Förster, A.; Lüth, H.; Slijkerman, W.

    1989-04-01

    Si/NiSi 2/Si(111) heterostructures are grown under UHV conditions. The well known "template" method is used to produce the epitaxial NiSi 2 interlayer. On top of the suicide, the silicon epitaxial growth is obtained by means of gas phase reaction of SiH 4 at a surface temperature of 500° C. The Si growth rate is strongly enhanced by predissociation of SiH 4 using a hot tungsten filament in the vicinity of the surface. The single steps of the growth are followed in-situ by means of AES, HREELS and LEED analysis. Ex-situ high resolution RBS analysis is also applied for characterization.

  12. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  13. Epitaxial graphene quantum dots for high-performance terahertz bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fatimy, Abdel; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Boyd, Anthony K.; Daniels, Kevin M.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Barbara, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Light absorption in graphene causes a large change in electron temperature due to the low electronic heat capacity and weak electron-phonon coupling. This property makes graphene a very attractive material for hot-electron bolometers in the terahertz frequency range. Unfortunately, the weak variation of electrical resistance with temperature results in limited responsivity for absorbed power. Here, we show that, due to quantum confinement, quantum dots of epitaxial graphene on SiC exhibit an extraordinarily high variation of resistance with temperature (higher than 430 MΩ K-1 below 6 K), leading to responsivities of 1 × 1010 V W-1, a figure that is five orders of magnitude higher than other types of graphene hot-electron bolometer. The high responsivity, combined with an extremely low electrical noise-equivalent power (˜2 × 10-16 W Hz-1/2 at 2.5 K), already places our bolometers well above commercial cooled bolometers. Additionally, we show that these quantum dot bolometers demonstrate good performance at temperature as high as 77 K.

  14. A compact VCE growth system for in situ studies of epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P.; Deppert, K.; Jeppesen, S.; Jönsson, J.; Paulsson, G.; Samuelson, L.

    1990-10-01

    A vacuum chemical epitaxy (VCE) equipment for growing epitaxial layers of GaAs from triethylgallium (TEG) and arsine (AsH 3) as precursors has been developed. A novel inlet system consisting of two separate concentric nozzle rings with sixfold symmetry has been designed. The directed molecular beams from the nozzles are redistributed by the wall of the growth chamber which is at a temperature of about 250°C, thus avoiding pre-reactions of metalorganic (MO) gases and the condensation of As-related species. In this manner a uniform molecule density, growth rate and a multiple impinging of volatile group-V species, typical for VCE, is realized. The changeable wall geometry also allows work under chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) like conditions. Grown layers of GaAs have been characterized using photoluminescence (PL), deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), carrier concentration profile measurements and morphology studies. In situ measurements were conducted with the aid of line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and reflectance difference (RD) measurements. RD made it possible to characterize the growth process, and to optimize growth parameters such as the V/III ratio, also the pressure is too high for reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). We have specifically studied AsH 3 and TEG stabilized surfaces, and the transitions between these two types of surfaces, in the temperature range between 400 and 550°C.

  15. Effects of contamination on selective epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Brian J.; Paton, Eric; Adem, Ercan; En, Bill

    2004-06-01

    As MOSFET dimensions scale down in size, it has become increasingly difficult to maintain high drive current while suppressing the off-state leakage current. One method of avoiding short-channel effects is to scale the source/drain (S/D) junction depths proportionally with the gate length. Unfortunately, this increases the S/D resistance, which slows the circuit. To keep the S/D junction shallow without affecting the S/D resistance, a raised S/D (RSD) structure is required. Integrating RSD can be difficult. Selective epitaxial growth (SEG) is the process used to incorporate RSD. This process requires a relatively clean surface to initiate the growth. Insertion of SEG earlier in the process flow facilitates selective epitaxial growth. Insertion of SEG later in the process flow results in higher levels of contamination at the interface of the Si substrate and the RSD structure. In this paper, we identify some mechanisms that determine the quality of the selective epitaxial film. Results indicate that Si defects are not a dominant mechanism in SEG film quality. Instead, results suggest that higher levels of contamination increased the surface roughness of the epitaxial film. PMOS regions were found to have higher levels of contamination and rougher epitaxial films than NMOS regions. Hydrogen bake as high as 900 °C was required to lower the surface contamination and provide excellent epitaxial morphology. Unfortunately, this high temperature causes enhanced dopant diffusion and deactivation of the device. Previous work [H. van Meer, K. De Meyer, Symposium on VLSI Technology Digest of Technical Papers, 2002, p. 170.] identified an alternative integration that provides excellent quality selective epitaxy, without dopant diffusion and deactivation.

  16. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  17. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  18. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Island morphologies in epitaxial growth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessinger, Uwe; Leskovar, M.; Rumaner, Lee; Ohuchi, Fumio; Olmstead, Marjorie A.; Ueno, Keiji; Koma, Atsushi

    1996-03-01

    Growth of epitaxial films commonly occurs through the coalescence of individual islands. The morphology of islands has therefore a key importance for the film qualities desired. A uniform layer-by-layer growth of the film is achieved when islands in the first layer coalesce to form a uniform layer before a second layer nucleates; a non-uniform multi-layer growth results from multiple layers successively nucleating on top of each other before the first layer coalesces. We developed a kinetic model based on an analytic solution of the diffusion equation between nucleation events to calculate the evolving island morphology during growth. The morphologies depend on deposition rate, substrate temperature, and activation energies for surface diffusion on the substrate and deposited material. By applying this theory to atomic force microscopy data of GaSe multi-layer islands, we extract a value for the activation energy for Ga diffusion across steps of GaSe. Supported by NSF Grant No. ECS-9209652, DOE Grant No. DE-FG06-94ER45516, and the Japanese New Energy Development Organization.

  20. Engineering epitaxial graphene with oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimouche, Amina; Martin, Sylvain; Winkelmann, Clemens; Fruchart, Olivier; Courtois, Hervé; Coraux, Johann; Hybrid system at low dimension Team

    2013-03-01

    Almost free-standing graphene can be obtained on metals by decoupling graphene from its substrate, for instance by intercalation of atoms beneath graphene, as it was shown with oxygen atoms. We show that the interaction of oxygen with epitaxial graphene on iridium leads to the formation of an ultrathin crystalline oxide extending between graphene and the metallic substrate via the graphene wrinkles. Graphene studied in this work was prepared under ultra-high vacuum by CVD. The samples were studied by combining scanning probe microscopy (STM, AFM) and spatially resolved spectroscopy (Raman, STS). The ultrathin oxide forms a decoupling barrier layer between graphene and Ir, yielding truly free-standing graphene whose hybridization and charge transfers with the substrate have been quenched. Our work presents novel types of graphene-based nanostructures, and opens the route to the transfer-free preparation of graphene directly onto an insulating support contacted to the metallic substrate which could serve as a gate electrode. Work supported by the EU-NMP GRENADA project

  1. Laser-synthesized epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwon; Toney, Michael F; Ko, Wonhee; Randel, Jason C; Jung, Hee Joon; Munakata, Ko; Lu, Jesse; Geballe, Theodore H; Beasley, Malcolm R; Sinclair, Robert; Manoharan, Hari C; Salleo, Alberto

    2010-12-28

    Owing to its unique electronic properties, graphene has recently attracted wide attention in both the condensed matter physics and microelectronic device communities. Despite intense interest in this material, an industrially scalable graphene synthesis process remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate a high-throughput, low-temperature, spatially controlled and scalable epitaxial graphene (EG) synthesis technique based on laser-induced surface decomposition of the Si-rich face of a SiC single-crystal. We confirm the formation of EG on SiC as a result of excimer laser irradiation by using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Laser fluence controls the thickness of the graphene film down to a single monolayer. Laser-synthesized graphene does not display some of the structural characteristics observed in EG grown by conventional thermal decomposition on SiC (0001), such as Bernal stacking and surface reconstruction of the underlying SiC surface.

  2. Hot tub folliculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001460.htm Hot tub folliculitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hot tub folliculitis is an infection of the skin around ...

  3. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  4. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  5. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  6. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  7. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  8. Flow Characteristics of Plane Wall Jet with Side Walls on Both Sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imao, Shigeki; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Kozato, Yasuaki; Hayashi, Takayasu

    Flow characteristics of a two-dimensional jet with side walls have been studied experimentally. Three kinds of cylindrical walls and a flat wall were provided as the side walls, and they were combined and attached to a nozzle. Nine types of side wall conditions were investigated. Velocity was measured by a hot-wire probe and the separation point was measured by a Pitot tube. Mean velocity profiles, the growth of the jet half-width, the decay of jet maximum velocity, and the attachment distance were clarified. When cylindrical walls with different radii are installed, the flow pattern changes markedly depending on the velocity of the jet. A striking increase in the jet half-width is related to the separation of flow from the smaller cylindrical wall just behind the nozzle.

  9. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni

  10. Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A.; Sergeev, A.

    2013-11-25

    Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La{sub 2−x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, δV∼γI{sup 3}, with a coefficient γ(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity dρ/dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area g{sub e−ph}≈1 W/K cm{sup 2} at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

  11. Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A.; Sergeev, A.

    2013-11-01

    Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La2-xSrxCuO4 layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, δV ˜γI3, with a coefficient γ(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity dρ /dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area ge -ph≈1 W/K cm2 at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

  12. 5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ABOVE THE BATHS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  13. Coke-oven wall repair - types and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, D.A.; Fischer, H.J.

    1984-05-01

    Coke-oven wall repairs can range in scope from spraying and patching, brickwork panel patches and end flue replacement to complete throughwall replacement. Oven conditions considered while a repair is made are hot idle, hot operating and cold. The unique technical problems associated with each type of repair are discussed and the methods employed to overcome these problems are reviewed.

  14. Tunable bands in biased multilayer epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Samarakoon, Duminda K; Hess, Dennis W; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2012-04-28

    We have studied the electronic characteristics of multilayer epitaxial graphene under a perpendicularly applied electric bias. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal that there is notable variation of the electronic density-of-states in valence bands near the Fermi level. Evolution of the electronic structure of graphite and rotational-stacked multilayer epitaxial graphene as a function of the applied electric bias is investigated using first-principles density-functional theory including interlayer van der Waals interactions. The experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that the tailoring of electronic band structure correlates with the interlayer coupling tuned by the applied bias. The implications of controllable electronic structure of rotationally fault-stacked epitaxial graphene grown on the C-face of SiC for future device applications are discussed.

  15. Performance of epitaxial back surface field cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Baraona, C. R.; Swartz, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Epitaxial back surface field structures were formed by depositing a 10 micron thick 10 ohm-cm epitaxial silicon layer onto substrates with resistivities of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 ohm-cm. A correlation between cell open-circuit voltage and substrate resistivity was observed and was compared to theory. The cells were also irradiated with 1-MeV electrons to a fluence of 5 times 10 to the 15th electrons per sq cm. The decrease of cell open-circuit voltage was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the measured short-circuit currents were within 2% of the prediction. Calculations are presented for optimum cell performance as functions of epitaxial layer thickness, radiation fluence, and substrate diffusion length.

  16. Performance of epitaxial back surface field cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Baraona, C. R.; Swartz, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    Epitaxial back surface field structures were formed by depositing a 10 micron thick 10 Omega-cm epitaxial silicon layer onto substrates with resistivities of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 Omega-cm. A correlation between cell open-circuit voltage and substrate resistivity was observed and was compared to theory. The cells were also irradiated with 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 5 X 10 to the 15th power e/cm2. The decrease of cell open-circuit voltage was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the measured short circuit currents were within 2% of the prediction. Calculations are presented of optimum cell performance as functions of epitaxial layer thickness, radiation fluence and substrate diffusion length.

  17. Prototype solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Construction of a double wall heat exchanger using soft copper tube coiled around a hot water storage tank was completed and preliminary tests were conducted. Solar transport water to tank potable water heat exchange tests were performed with a specially constructed test stand. Work was done to improve the component hardware and system design for the solar water heater. The installation of both a direct feed system and a double wall heat exchanger system provided experience and site data to enable informative decisions to be made as the solar market expands into areas where freeze protection is required.

  18. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  20. An affine transformation description of epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshinamurthy, S.; Rajan, K.

    1991-07-01

    The matching at the interface between the substrate and the film in an epitaxial deposit has been analyzed and explained very well in the literature for the various fcc-bcc metallic systems by the use of the energy minimization criteria such as invariant line criterion, the O-lattice approach etc. Though many orientation relationships have been reported for other crystal structures and non-metals, very little effort has been made to explain these relationships. Here, we attempt to rationalize the orientation relationships that we have obtained and which others have reported for epitaxial suicides using the above mentioned criteria.

  1. Crystal growth of calcium phosphates - epitaxial considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoukos, P. G.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1981-05-01

    The growth of one crystalline phase on the surface of another that offers a good crystal lattice match, may be important in environmental, physiological and pathological mineralization processes. The epitaxial relationships and kinetics of growth of hydroxyapatite on crystals of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, calcium fluoride and calcite have been studied at sustained low supersaturation with respect to hydroxyapatite. At the very low supersaturations, the crystallization of hydroxyapatite takes place without the formation of precursor phases. The experimental results are in agreement with theoretical predictions for epitaxial growth, while the kinetics of hydroxyapatite crystallization on the foreign substrates is the same as that for the growth of hydroxyapatite on synthetic hydroxyapatite crystals.

  2. Wall Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Doppler velocimeter, computer experiments, and pulsed-laser velocimetry. External influences to be studied are imposed flow oscillations , wavy walls...imposed flow oscillations Studies of the effect of imposed small amplitude flow oscillations have shown no effect on the time mean flow. Work was...undertaken to see if imposed large amplitude oscillations can affect drag. The system used was water flow through a two inch pipe. The flow oscillations

  3. Epitaxial Crystal Silicon Absorber Layers and Solar Cells Grown at 1.8 Microns per Minute

    SciTech Connect

    Bobela, D. C.; Teplin, C. W.; Young, D. L.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have grown device-quality epitaxial silicon thin films at growth rates up to 1.85 {micro}m/min, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition from silane, at substrate temperatures below 750 C. At these rates, which are more than 30 times faster than those used by the amorphous and nanocrystalline Si industry, capital costs for large-scale solar cell production would be dramatically reduced, even for cell absorber layers up to 10 {micro}m thick. We achieved high growth rates by optimizing the three key parameters: silane flow, depletion, and filament geometry, based on our model developed earlier. Hydrogen coverage of the filament surface likely limits silane decomposition and growth rate at high system pressures. No considerable deterioration in PV device performance is observed when grown at high rate, provided that the epitaxial growth is initiated at low rate. A simple mesa device structure (wafer/epi Si/a-Si(i)/a-Si:H(p)/ITO) with a 2.3 {micro}m thick epitaxial silicon absorber layer was grown at 0.7 {micro}m/min. The finished device had an open-circuit voltage of 0.424 V without hydrogenation treatment.

  4. Morphology and Electrical Characterization of Reduced Epitaxial Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yike; Wu, Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Michael; Madiomanana, Nerasoa; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter

    2009-03-01

    We present results for on-chip oxidation of epitaxial graphene and sequential reduction of the insulating graphene oxide layers. In our previous work , we have used the Hummer's method to oxidize epitaxial graphene and used electron beam exposure and heat treatment to reduce the epitaxial graphene oxide (EGO) band gap by changing the degree of oxidation. Here we further explore various oxidation and reduction methods on epitaxial graphene. EGO is characterized by atomic force microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, ellipsometry, and Raman Spectrometry. Mobility measurements of patterned structures are presented where epitaxial graphene layers pads are seamlessly connected to EGO ribbons.

  5. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of GaN Nanowires on Epitaxial Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Gao, Guanhui; Galves, Lauren A; Sharma, Bharat; Corfdir, Pierre; Calabrese, Gabriele; de Souza Schiaber, Ziani; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Lopes, João Marcelo J; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2017-09-13

    We demonstrate an all-epitaxial and scalable growth approach to fabricate single-crystalline GaN nanowires on graphene by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. As substrate, we explore several types of epitaxial graphene layer structures synthesized on SiC. The different structures differ mainly in their total number of graphene layers. Because graphene is found to be etched under active N exposure, the direct growth of GaN nanowires on graphene is only achieved on multilayer graphene structures. The analysis of the nanowire ensembles prepared on multilayer graphene by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of graphene underneath as well as in between nanowires, as desired for the use of this material as contact layer in nanowire-based devices. The nanowires nucleate preferentially at step edges, are vertical, well aligned, epitaxial, and of comparable structural quality as similar structures fabricated on conventional substrates.

  6. Encapsulated solid phase epitaxy of a Ge quantum well embedded in an epitaxial rare earth oxide.

    PubMed

    Laha, Apurba; Bugiel, E; Jestremski, M; Ranjith, R; Fissel, A; Osten, H J

    2009-11-25

    An efficient method based on molecular beam epitaxy has been developed to integrate an epitaxial Ge quantum well buried into a single crystalline rare earth oxide. The monolithic heterostructure comprised of Gd2O3-Ge-Gd2O3 grown on an Si substrate exhibits excellent crystalline quality with atomically sharp interfaces. This heterostructure with unique structural quality could be used for novel nanoelectronic applications in quantum-effect devices such as nanoscale transistors with a high mobility channel, resonant tunneling diode/transistors, etc. A phenomenological model has been proposed to explain the epitaxial growth process of the Ge layer under oxide encapsulation using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy technique.

  7. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  8. 14. View of interior, north and east walls featuring sink, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of interior, north and east walls featuring sink, facing east (Note: B/W scale on wall in foreground is in 1/2 ft increments) - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  9. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    DOEpatents

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  10. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Braun, Paul V.; Sardela, Mauro; Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}P (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  11. A New Eddy-Based Model for Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-11

    results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. 15...results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. The...Carry out hot - wire anemometry experiments covering a large Reynolds number range. This involves the use of the High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer

  12. Electrostatic transfer of epitaxial graphene to glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Taisuke; Pan, Wei; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2010-12-01

    We report on a scalable electrostatic process to transfer epitaxial graphene to arbitrary glass substrates, including Pyrex and Zerodur. This transfer process could enable wafer-level integration of graphene with structured and electronically-active substrates such as MEMS and CMOS. We will describe the electrostatic transfer method and will compare the properties of the transferred graphene with nominally-equivalent 'as-grown' epitaxial graphene on SiC. The electronic properties of the graphene will be measured using magnetoresistive, four-probe, and graphene field effect transistor geometries [1]. To begin, high-quality epitaxial graphene (mobility 14,000 cm2/Vs and domains >100 {micro}m2) is grown on SiC in an argon-mediated environment [2,3]. The electrostatic transfer then takes place through the application of a large electric field between the donor graphene sample (anode) and the heated acceptor glass substrate (cathode). Using this electrostatic technique, both patterned few-layer graphene from SiC(000-1) and chip-scale monolayer graphene from SiC(0001) are transferred to Pyrex and Zerodur substrates. Subsequent examination of the transferred graphene by Raman spectroscopy confirms that the graphene can be transferred without inducing defects. Furthermore, the strain inherent in epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) is found to be partially relaxed after the transfer to the glass substrates.

  13. Improved Boat For Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth boat redesigned. Still fabricated from ultra-high-purity graphite, but modified to permit easy disassembly and cleaning, along with improved wiping action for more complete removal of melt to reduce carry-over of gallium. Larger substrates and more uniform composition obtained.

  14. Epitaxial solar-cell fabrication, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) was used as the silicon source material in all of the epitaxial growths. Both n/p/p(+) and p/n/n(+) structures were studied. Correlations were made between the measured profiles and the solar cell parameters, especially cell open-circuit voltage. It was found that in order to obtain consistently high open-circuit voltage, the epitaxial techniques used to grow the surface layer must be altered to obtain very abrupt doping profiles in the vicinity of the junction. With these techniques, it was possible to grow reproducibly both p/n/n(+) and n/p/p(+) solar cell structures having open-circuit voltages in the 610- to 630-mV range, with fill-factors in excess of 0.80 and AM-1 efficiencies of about 13%. Combinations and comparisons of epitaxial and diffused surface layers were also made. Using such surface layers, we found that the blue response of epitaxial cells could be improved, resulting in AM-1 short-circuit current densities of about 30 mA/cm sq. The best cells fabricated in this manner had AM-1 efficiency of 14.1%.

  15. Epitaxial Graphene: A New Material for Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Heer, Walt A.

    2007-10-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long coherence lengths; properties that may persists above cryogenic temperatures. Paradoxically, in contrast to exfoliated graphene, the quantum Hall effect is not observed in high mobility epitaxial graphene. It appears that the effect is suppressed due to absence of localized states in the bulk of the material. Epitaxial graphene can be patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array of techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low dissipation high-speed nano-electronics.

  16. Improved Boat For Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth boat redesigned. Still fabricated from ultra-high-purity graphite, but modified to permit easy disassembly and cleaning, along with improved wiping action for more complete removal of melt to reduce carry-over of gallium. Larger substrates and more uniform composition obtained.

  17. New Sources for Chemical Beam Epitaxy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    TBP, BPE , TDMAP, and TBBDMAP. This work has resulted in: (1) further development of safe and improved sources specifically for chemical beam epitaxy... BPE , TDMAP, and TBBDMAP was performed. The first reported growth of GaInP without precracking the phosphorous source, TDMAP, and the first reported

  18. Reversible plasma switching in epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Vrejoiu, Ionela; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin

    2010-05-17

    Reversible plasma switching in epitaxial multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} thin films was directly observed and analyzed using piezoresponse force microscopy. The polarization could be reversibly switched using oxygen plasma and a subsequent thermal annealing treatment in vacuum, respectively. The domain wall velocity during plasma switching, estimated to about 10{sup -8} m/s, is much slower compared to the normal electrical switching, however a large area of square centimeter scale could be stably switched. The results demonstrate that reversible plasma switching can be achieved by oxygen plasma treatment and it can be a useful tool for an electrode-less control of ferroelectric switching on large area.

  19. Hot techniques for tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Scott, A

    2006-11-01

    (1) Some patients experience pain and bleeding after a standard or extracapsular tonsillectomy. (2) Evidence suggests that none of the hot tonsillectomy techniques offers concurrent reductions in intra- and post-operative bleeding and pain, compared with traditional cold-steel dissection with packs or ties. (3) Little information is available on the cost effectiveness of the hot techniques. (4) Diathermy is likely to remain the most commonly practised hot tonsillectomy technique.

  20. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  1. Fluid epitaxialization effect on velocity dependence of dynamic contact angle in molecular scale.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takahiro; Hirata, Yosuke; Kukita, Yutaka

    2010-02-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the effect of epitaxial ordering of the fluid molecules on the microscopic dynamic contact angle. The simulations were performed in a Couette-flow-like geometry where two immiscible fluids were confined between two parallel walls moving in opposite directions. The extent of ordering was varied by changing the number density of the wall particles. As the ordering becomes more evident, the change in the dynamic contact angle tends to be more sensitive to the increase in the relative velocity of the contact line to the wall. Stress components around the contact line is evaluated in order to examine the stress balance among the hydrodynamic stresses (viscous stress and pressure), the deviation of Young's stress from the static equilibrium condition, and the fluid-wall shear stress induced by the relative motion between them. It is shown that the magnitude of the shear stress on the fluid-wall surface is the primary contribution to the sensitivity of the dynamic contact angle and that the sensitivity is intensified by the fluid ordering near the wall surface.

  2. Epitaxially-Grown GaN Junction Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Denbaars, S.P.; Lester, L.F.; Mishra, U.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-05-19

    Junction field effect transistors (JFET) are fabricated on a GaN epitaxial structure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The DC and microwave characteristics of the device are presented. A junction breakdown voltage of 56 V is obtained corresponding to the theoretical limit of the breakdown field in GaN for the doping levels used. A maximum extrinsic transconductance (gm) of 48 mS/mm and a maximum source-drain current of 270 mA/mm are achieved on a 0.8 µ m gate JFET device at VGS= 1 V and VDS=15 V. The intrinsic transconductance, calculated from the measured gm and the source series resistance, is 81 mS/mm. The fT and fmax for these devices are 6 GHz and 12 GHz, respectively. These JFETs exhibit a significant current reduction after a high drain bias is applied, which is attributed to a partially depleted channel caused by trapped hot-electrons in the semi-insulating GaN buffer layer. A theoretical model describing the current collapse is described, and an estimate for the length of the trapped electron region is given.

  3. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-21

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.

  4. Heat transfer characteristics of a structural lightweight concrete wall. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Geem, M.G.; Fiorato, A.E.

    1983-06-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate thermal performance of three concrete walls. A normal-weight concrete wall, a structural lightweight concrete wall, and a low density concrete wall were tested in the calibrated hot box facility of Construction Technology Laboratories, a division of the Portland Cement Association. This report covers experimental results for the structural lightweight concrete wall. Test results for the normal-weight concrete wall and low density concrete wall are covered in separate reports. The wall was subjected to steady-state, transient, and periodically varying temperature conditions in a calibrated hot box. Steady-state tests were used to define heat transmission coefficients. Data obtained during transient and periodic temperature variations were used to define dynamic thermal response of the wall. Thus, effects of heat storage capacity could be evaluated. Conductivities derived from calibrated hot box tests were compared with results from hot wire tests. Hot wire tests were also used to evaluate the influence of moisture on thermal conductivity. Data obtained from dynamic tests were compared with steady-state calculations. Data obtained in this investigation are applicable to concrete wall assemblies commonly used in multi-family residential, commercial, and industrial structures. Results provide a data base for evaluation of building envelope performance in such structures, and are also applicable for defining thermal characteristics of concrete walls in passive solar systems. 21 refs., 33 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  6. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  7. Hot Spot at Yellowstone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dress, Abby

    2005-01-01

    Within this huge national park (over two million acres spread across Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho) are steaming geysers, hot springs, bubbling mudpots, and fumaroles, or steam vents. Drives on the main roads of Yellowstone take tourists through the major hot attractions, which also include Norris Geyser Basin, Upper and Lower Geyser Basin, West…

  8. Hot Spot at Yellowstone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dress, Abby

    2005-01-01

    Within this huge national park (over two million acres spread across Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho) are steaming geysers, hot springs, bubbling mudpots, and fumaroles, or steam vents. Drives on the main roads of Yellowstone take tourists through the major hot attractions, which also include Norris Geyser Basin, Upper and Lower Geyser Basin, West…

  9. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  10. Hot wire anemometry in compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry in compressible flow was studied. New techniques for the measurement of turbulence in compressible flows with thermal sensors are described. The greatest amount of information about fluctuating flow variables as achieved using the newly developed sensors and techniques in conjunction with the classical hot-wire mode diagram method. It was found that the hot wire has no fundamental handicap for accurate high speed turbulence measurements in non-separated boundary layers outside the immediate wall region. It was also known that extreme overheating of a supported sensors leads to advantages in simplicity and accuracy of measurements of turbulent fluctuations over the full Mach number range.

  11. 6. HOT AIR PORTION OF DAMPERS. Hot Springs National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HOT AIR PORTION OF DAMPERS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  12. Wafer bonded epitaxial templates for silicon heterostructures

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A.; Zahler, James M.; Morral, Anna Fontcubera I

    2008-03-11

    A heterostructure device layer is epitaxially grown on a virtual substrate, such as an InP/InGaAs/InP double heterostructure. A device substrate and a handle substrate form the virtual substrate. The device substrate is bonded to the handle substrate and is composed of a material suitable for fabrication of optoelectronic devices. The handle substrate is composed of a material suitable for providing mechanical support. The mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates is improved and the device substrate is thinned to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. An upper portion of the device film exfoliated from the device substrate is removed to provide a smoother and less defect prone surface for an optoelectronic device. A heterostructure is epitaxially grown on the smoothed surface in which an optoelectronic device may be fabricated.

  13. Wafer bonded epitaxial templates for silicon heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A., Jr. (Inventor); Zahler, James M. (Inventor); Morral, Anna Fontcubera I (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A heterostructure device layer is epitaxially grown on a virtual substrate, such as an InP/InGaAs/InP double heterostructure. A device substrate and a handle substrate form the virtual substrate. The device substrate is bonded to the handle substrate and is composed of a material suitable for fabrication of optoelectronic devices. The handle substrate is composed of a material suitable for providing mechanical support. The mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates is improved and the device substrate is thinned to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. An upper portion of the device film exfoliated from the device substrate is removed to provide a smoother and less defect prone surface for an optoelectronic device. A heterostructure is epitaxially grown on the smoothed surface in which an optoelectronic device may be fabricated.

  14. Ultrahigh efficiencies in vertical epitaxial heterostructure architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Fafard, S. E-mail: simon.fafard@azastra.com; Proulx, F.; York, M. C. A.; Arès, R.; Aimez, V.; Valdivia, C. E.; Wilkins, M. M.; Hinzer, K.; Masson, D. P.

    2016-02-15

    Optical to electrical power converting semiconductor devices were achieved with breakthrough performance by designing a Vertical Epitaxial Heterostructure Architecture. The devices are featuring modeled and measured conversion efficiencies greater than 65%. The ultrahigh conversion efficiencies were obtained by monolithically integrating several thin GaAs photovoltaic junctions tailored with submicron absorption thicknesses and grown in a single crystal by epitaxy. The heterostructures that were engineered with a number N of such ultrathin junctions yielded an optimal external quantum efficiencies approaching 100%/N. The heterostructures are capable of output voltages that are multiple times larger than the corresponding photovoltage of the input light. The individual nanoscale junctions are each generating up to ∼1.2 V of output voltage when illuminated in the infrared. We compare the optoelectronic properties of phototransducers prepared with designs having 5 to 12 junctions and that are exhibiting voltage outputs between >5 V and >14 V.

  15. Domain epitaxy for thin film growth

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish

    2005-10-18

    A method of forming an epitaxial film on a substrate includes growing an initial layer of a film on a substrate at a temperature T.sub.growth, said initial layer having a thickness h and annealing the initial layer of the film at a temperature T.sub.anneal, thereby relaxing the initial layer, wherein said thickness h of the initial layer of the film is greater than a critical thickness h.sub.c. The method further includes growing additional layers of the epitaxial film on the initial layer subsequent to annealing. In some embodiments, the method further includes growing a layer of the film that includes at least one amorphous island.

  16. Photoluminescence studies in epitaxial CZTSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendler, Jan; Thevenin, Maxime; Werner, Florian; Redinger, Alex; Li, Shuyi; Hägglund, Carl; Platzer-Björkman, Charlotte; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    Epitaxial Cu 2 ZnSnSe 4 (CZTSe) thin films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) using two different growth processes, one containing an in-situ annealing stage as used for solar cell absorbers and one for which this step was omitted. Photoluminescences (PL) measurements carried out on these samples show no dependence of the emission shape on the excitation intensity at different temperatures ranging from 4 K to 300 K . To describe the PL measurements, we employ a model with fluctuating band edges in which the density of states of the resulting tail states does not seem to depend on the excited charge carrier density. In this interpretation, the PL measurements show that the annealing stage removes a defect level, which is present in the samples without this annealing.

  17. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents versus Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Gabrys, Paul A.; Fleischman, Dagny; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Youngeun; Atwater, Harry A.; MacFarlane, Robert J.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-01-01

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of nanoparticle thin films. Under optimized equilibrium conditions, single crystal, multilayer thin films can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm2 areas on lithographically patterned templates. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in thin film atomic deposition, allowing for these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy, and potentially enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes.

  18. Ultrahigh efficiencies in vertical epitaxial heterostructure architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafard, S.; York, M. C. A.; Proulx, F.; Valdivia, C. E.; Wilkins, M. M.; Arès, R.; Aimez, V.; Hinzer, K.; Masson, D. P.

    2016-02-01

    Optical to electrical power converting semiconductor devices were achieved with breakthrough performance by designing a Vertical Epitaxial Heterostructure Architecture. The devices are featuring modeled and measured conversion efficiencies greater than 65%. The ultrahigh conversion efficiencies were obtained by monolithically integrating several thin GaAs photovoltaic junctions tailored with submicron absorption thicknesses and grown in a single crystal by epitaxy. The heterostructures that were engineered with a number N of such ultrathin junctions yielded an optimal external quantum efficiencies approaching 100%/N. The heterostructures are capable of output voltages that are multiple times larger than the corresponding photovoltage of the input light. The individual nanoscale junctions are each generating up to ˜1.2 V of output voltage when illuminated in the infrared. We compare the optoelectronic properties of phototransducers prepared with designs having 5 to 12 junctions and that are exhibiting voltage outputs between >5 V and >14 V.

  19. Transient-mode liquid phase epitaxial growth of GaAs on GaAs-coated Si substrates prepared by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Shuji; Sakai, Shiro; Chang, Shi S.; Ramaswamy, Ramu V.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Liu, John K.; Katz, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Planar oxide-maskless growth of GaAs was demonstrated by transient-mode liquid phase epitaxy (TMLPE) on GaAs-coated Si substrates that were prepared by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MEMBE). In TMLPE, the cool substrate was brought into contact with hot melts for a short time. A GaAs layer as thick as 30 microns was grown in 10 sec. The etch pits observed in TMLPE-grown layers became longer in one direction and decreased in density with increasing the TMLPE epilayer thickness. The density of etch pits in a 20 micron-thick layer was approximately 5 x 10 the 6th/sq cm. Strong bandgap emission elliptically polarized with a major axis perpendicular to the surface was observed at about 910 nm, while deep-level emission from the TMLPE/MEMBE GaAs interface was detected at 980 nm. The photoluminescence intensity divided by the carrier concentration of the TMLPE-grown layer was about 270 times larger than that of the MEMBE-grown layer used as a substrate.

  20. Chemical Beam Epitaxy of ZnSe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-17

    is curren:ly underway in Japan and Europe with major investment in funds and manpower. However, the problems which remain are largely still an issue...of availability of suitable materials, specifically availability of p-type ZnSe with sufficient useable hole carrier concentrations. The problem ...contract provided essential seed funding necessary to accumulate sufficient funds to build and equip a state-or-the-art chemical beam epitaxy facility at

  1. Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time.

  2. Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-01-10

    A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time. 9 figures.

  3. Optical Epitaxial Growth of Gold Nanoparticle Arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningfeng; Martínez, Luis Javier; Jaquay, Eric; Nakano, Aiichiro; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-09-09

    We use an optical analogue of epitaxial growth to assemble gold nanoparticles into 2D arrays. Particles are attracted to a growth template via optical forces and interact through optical binding. Competition between effects determines the final particle arrangements. We use a Monte Carlo model to design a template that favors growth of hexagonal particle arrays. We experimentally demonstrate growth of a highly stable array of 50 gold particles with 200 nm diameter, spaced by 1.1 μm.

  4. What Is Hot Yoga (Bikram)?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Consumer health What is hot yoga? Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. Hot yoga is ... 30, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/expert-answers/hot-yoga/faq-20058057 . ...

  5. Junction Transport in Epitaxial Film Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D. L.; Li, J. V.; Teplin, C. W.; Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.

    2011-07-01

    We report our progress toward low-temperature HWCVD epitaxial film silicon solar cells on inexpensive seed layers, with a focus on the junction transport physics exhibited by our devices. Heterojunctions of i/p hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si) on our n-type epitaxial crystal Si on n++ Si wafers show space-charge-region recombination, tunneling or diffusive transport depending on both epitaxial Si quality and the applied forward voltage.

  6. Search for quantum size effects in ultrathin epitaxial metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badoz, P. A.; D'Avitaya, F. Arnaud; Rosencher, E.

    In order to investigate quantum size effects in ultrathin metal films, tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been performed in the epitaxial CoSi2/Si system, with a metal thickness ranging from 1000 Å down to 35 A, i.e. a few de Broglie wavelengths of electrons in CoSi 2. The resulting spectra show extremely rich sets of features, the origin of which are investigated. The peaks observed at low energy (-100 meV, +100 meV) are thickness independent and attributed to phonon emission by hot electrons. The peaks observed at higher energy (up to 600 meV) are thickness dependent but their physical origin is not yet fully ascertained. The absence of unambiguous electron quantization effects in these epitaxial films is discussed and tentatively attributed to small thickness fluctuations (of the order of a few monolayers), which tend to blur the quantization of the electronic energies. Nous avons étudié les effets de quantification électronique dans les films métalliques minces par spectroscopie tunnel des jonctions CoSi2/Si épitaxiées, pour des épaisseurs de film métallique variant de 1000 ? 35 A, i.e. quelques longueurs d'ondes de de Broglie des électrons dans le CoSi 2. Les spectres obtenus montrent un ensemble de structures extrêmement riche dont nous discutons l'origine physique. Les pics observés à faible énergie (-100 meV, + 100 meV) sont indépendants de I'épaisseur du film de CoSi2, et attribués à l'émission de phonons par les électrons chauds dans le silicium. L'origine des pics observés à plus forte énergie (jusqu'à 600 meV) et dont la position dépend de l'épaisseur du film, est encore incomplètement comprise. Nous discutons l'absence d'effets clairement reliés à la quantification du gaz d'électrons bidimensionnel dans ces films épitaxiés: celle-ci pourrait provenir de faibles fluctuations d'épaisseur (quelques monocouches) qui tendent à brouiller la quantification des énergies électroniques.

  7. Epitaxial nucleation and growth of molecular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooks, Daniel Edwin

    2000-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increased emphasis on the design and use of molecular-based materials, commonly in thin film form, as components in electronic devices, sensors, displays, and logic elements. The growing interest in films based on molecular components, rather than their more traditional inorganic counterparts, stems largely from the premise that collective optical and electronic properties can be systematically manipulated through molecular design. Many of these properties depend strongly upon film structure and orientation with respect to the substrate upon which they are deposited. This relationship mandates careful attention to the interface between the primary molecular overlayer and the substrate. Further advances in molecular films and multilayer composites based on molecular films require improved understanding of the role of epitaxy in molecular organization as well as the nucleation events that precede film formation. Determination of critical nucleus dimensions and elucidation of the factors that govern critical size are particularly important for fabricating nanoscale molecular features and controlling domain defects in contiguous molecular films. This thesis describes an examination of the role of epitaxy in the growth of molecular films, including a hierarchical classification and grammar of molecular epitaxy, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation of the intercalation of molecular components into multilayer organic-inorganic composites, and an AFM investigation of the nucleation of molecular films.

  8. Epitaxial Crystal Growth: Methods and Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capper, Peter; Irvine, Stuart; Joyce, Tim

    The epitaxial growth of thin films of material for a wide range of applications in electronics and optoelectronics is a critical activity in many industries. The original growth technique used, in most instances, was liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE), as this was the simplest and often the cheapest route to producing device-quality layers. These days, while some production processes are still based on LPE, most research into and (increasingly) much of the production of electronic and optoelectronic devices now centers on metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). These techniques are more versatile than LPE (although the equipment is more expensive), and they can readily produce multilayer structures with atomic-layer control, which has become more and more important in the type of nanoscale engineering used to produce device structures in as-grown multilayers. This chapter covers these three basic techniques, including some of their more common variants, and outlines the relative advantages and disadvantages of each. Some examples of growth in various important systems are also outlined for each of the three techniques.

  9. Electron holography of devices with epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Gribelyuk, M. A. Ontalus, V.; Baumann, F. H.; Zhu, Z.; Holt, J. R.

    2014-11-07

    Applicability of electron holography to deep submicron Si devices with epitaxial layers is limited due to lack of the mean inner potential data and effects of the sample tilt. The mean inner potential V{sub 0} = 12.75 V of the intrinsic epitaxial SiGe was measured by electron holography in devices with Ge content C{sub Ge} = 18%. Nanobeam electron diffraction analysis performed on the same device structure showed that SiGe is strain-free in [220] direction. Our results showed good correlation with simulations of the mean inner potential of the strain-free SiGe using density function theory. A new method is proposed in this paper to correct electron holography data for the overlap of potentials of Si and the epitaxial layer, which is caused by the sample tilt. The method was applied to the analysis of the dopant diffusion in p-Field-effect Transistor devices with the identical gate length L = 30 nm, which had alternative SiGe geometry in the source and drain regions and was subjected to different thermal processing. Results have helped to understand electrical data acquired from the same devices in terms of dopant diffusion.

  10. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents Versus Atoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary X; Seo, Soyoung E; Gabrys, Paul A; Fleischman, Dagny; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Youngeun; Atwater, Harry A; Macfarlane, Robert J; Mirkin, Chad A

    2017-01-24

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle (NP) superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of NP thin films. Both surface morphology and internal thin film structure are examined to provide an understanding of particle attachment and reorganization during growth. Under equilibrium conditions, single crystalline, multilayer thin films can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm(2) areas on lithographically patterned templates, whereas deposition under kinetic conditions leads to the rapid growth of glassy films. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in atomic thin film deposition, allowing these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy and enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes. Through understanding the role of epitaxy as a driving force for NP assembly, we are able to realize 3D architectures of arbitrary domain geometry and size.

  11. Selective epitaxy using the gild process

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method of selective epitaxy on a semiconductor substrate. The present invention provides a method of selectively forming high quality, thin GeSi layers in a silicon circuit, and a method for fabricating smaller semiconductor chips with a greater yield (more error free chips) at a lower cost. The method comprises forming an upper layer over a substrate, and depositing a reflectivity mask which is then removed over selected sections. Using a laser to melt the unmasked sections of the upper layer, the semiconductor material in the upper layer is heated and diffused into the substrate semiconductor material. By varying the amount of laser radiation, the epitaxial layer is formed to a controlled depth which may be very thin. When cooled, a single crystal epitaxial layer is formed over the patterned substrate. The present invention provides the ability to selectively grow layers of mixed semiconductors over patterned substrates such as a layer of Ge.sub.x Si.sub.1-x grown over silicon. Such a process may be used to manufacture small transistors that have a narrow base, heavy doping, and high gain. The narrowness allows a faster transistor, and the heavy doping reduces the resistance of the narrow layer. The process does not require high temperature annealing; therefore materials such as aluminum can be used. Furthermore, the process may be used to fabricate diodes that have a high reverse breakdown voltage and a low reverse leakage current.

  12. Growth of pseudomorphic structures through organic epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaviyil, Sreejith Embekkat; Sassella, Adele; Borghesi, Alessandro; Campione, Marcello; Su Genbo; He Youping; Chen Chenjia

    2012-12-14

    The control of molecular orientation in thin solid film phases of organic semiconductors is a basic factor for the exploitation of their physical properties for optoelectronic devices. We compare structural and optical properties of thin films of the organic semiconductor {alpha}-quarterthiophene grown by molecular beam epitaxy on different organic substrates. We show how epitactic interactions, characteristic of the surface of organic crystals, can drive the orientation of the crystalline overlayer and the selection of specific polymorphs and new pseudomorphic phases. We identify a key role in this phenomenon played by the marked groove-like corrugations present in some organic crystal surfaces. Since different polymorphs possess rather different performance in terms of, e.g., charge carrier mobility, this strategy is demonstrated to allow for the growth of oriented phases with enhanced physical properties, while keeping the substrate at room temperature. These results provide useful guidelines for the design of technological substrates for organic epitaxy and they substantiate the adoption of an organic epitaxy approach for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices based on thin films of organic semiconductors.

  13. Ferroelastic twin structures in epitaxial WO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Shinhee; Woo, Chang-Su; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Sharma, Pankaj; Lee, Jin Hong; Chu, Kanghyun; Song, Jong Hyun; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Seidel, Jan; Choi, Si-Young; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten trioxide is a binary oxide that has potential applications in electrochromic windows, gas sensors, photo-catalysts, and superconductivity. Here, we analyze the crystal structure of atomically flat epitaxial layers on YAlO3 single crystal substrates and perform nanoscale investigations of the ferroelastic twins revealing a hierarchical structure at multiple length scales. We have found that the finest stripe ferroelastic twin walls along pseudocubic <100> axes are associated with cooperative mosaic rotations of the monoclinic films and the larger stripe domains along pseudocubic <110> axes are created to reduce the misfit strain through a commensurate matching of an effective in-plane lattice parameter between film and substrate. The typical widths of the two fine and larger stripe domains increase with film thickness following a power law with scaling exponents of ˜0.6 and ˜0.4, respectively. We have also found that the twin structure can be readily influenced by illumination with an electron beam or a tip-based mechanical compression.

  14. Low temperature laser molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of AlGaN epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prashant; Ch., Ramesh; Kushvaha, S. S.; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2017-05-01

    We have grown AlGaN (0001) epitaxial layers on sapphire (0001) by using laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) technique. The growth was carried out using laser ablation of AlxGa1-x liquid metal alloy under r.f. nitrogen plasma ambient. Before epilayer growth, the sapphire nitradation was performed at 700 °C using r.f nitrogen plasma followed by AlGaN layer growth. The in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was employed to monitor the substrate nitridation and AlGaN epitaxial growth. High resolution x-ray diffraction showed wurtzite hexagonal growth of AlGaN layer along c-axis. An absorption bandgap of 3.97 eV is obtained for the grown AlGaN layer indicating an Al composition of more than 20 %. Using ellipsometry, a refractive index (n) value of about 2.19 is obtained in the visible region.

  15. Turbulence measurements in curved wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, L. C.; Wood, N. J.; Roberts, L.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate turbulence measurements taken in wall jet flows are difficult to obtain, due to high intensity turbulence and problems in achieving two-dimensionality. The problem is compounded when streamwise curvature of the flow is introduced, since the jet entrainment and turbulence levels are greatly increased over the equivalent planar values. In this experiment, two-dimensional plane and curved wall jet flows are simulated by having a jet blow axially over a cylinder. In the plane case the cylinder has constant transverse radius, and in the curved cases the cylinder has a varying transverse radius. Although the wall jet in these cases is axisymmetric, adequate 'two-dimensional' flow can be obtained as long as the ratio of the jet width to the cylinder radius is small. The annular wall jet has several advantages over wall jets issuing from finite rectangular slots. Since the slot has no ends, three-dimensional effects caused by the finite length of the slot and side wall interference are eliminated. Also, the transverse curvature of the wall allows close optical access to the surface using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. Hot wire measurements and some LDV measurements are presented for plane and curved wall jet flows. An integral analysis is used to assess the effects of transverse curvature on the turbulent shear stress. The analysis and the data show that the effects of transverse curvature on both the mean flow and the shear stress are small enough for two-dimensional flow to be approximately satisfactorily.

  16. Silicon epitaxy process recipe and tool configuration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, W. H.; Cheong, K. Y.

    2017-07-01

    Silicon epitaxy is widely used in semiconductor fabrication due to its ability to produce high quality and low cost thin film. Epitaxy optimized process condition with respect to the process recipe and tool for the maximization of n-type epitaxial production has been investigated. For standard recipe of an epitaxy process, there are seven main steps, namely purge, ramp, bake, stab, deposition, post and cooling. This project focuses on the recipe optimization on ramp, bake and stab steps. For the tool configuration, cool-down step has been optimized. Impact on slip, haze, wafers warpage and crystal originated particles have been investigated.

  17. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE FIRST BUILT) IN LABORATORY 101. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS ARE ON LEFT (NORTH) SIDE. OBSERVATION WINDOW IS AT LEFT OF VIEW (ON WEST SIDE). PLASTIC COVERS SHROUD MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATORS AT WINDOWS IN LEFT OF VIEW. NOTE MINERAL OIL RESERVOIR ABOVE "CELL 1" SIGN, INDICATING LEVEL OF THE FLUID INSIDE THE THICK WINDOWS. HOT CELL HAS BEVELED CORNER BECAUSE A SQUARED CORNER WOULD HAVE SUPPLIED UNNECESSARY SHIELDING. NOTE PUMICE BLOCK WALL AT LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Suppression of creep-regime dynamics in epitaxial ferroelectric BiFeO3 films

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Y. J.; Jeon, B. C.; Yang, S. M.; Hwang, I.; Cho, M. R.; Sando, D.; Lee, S. R.; Yoon, J.-G.; Noh, T. W.

    2015-01-01

    Switching dynamics of ferroelectric materials are governed by the response of domain walls to applied electric field. In epitaxial ferroelectric films, thermally-activated ‘creep’ motion plays a significant role in domain wall dynamics, and accordingly, detailed understanding of the system’s switching properties requires that this creep motion be taken into account. Despite this importance, few studies have investigated creep motion in ferroelectric films under ac-driven force. Here, we explore ac hysteretic dynamics in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films, through ferroelectric hysteresis measurements, and stroboscopic piezoresponse force microscopy. We reveal that identically-fabricated BiFeO3 films on SrRuO3 or La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 bottom electrodes exhibit markedly different switching behaviour, with BiFeO3/SrRuO3 presenting essentially creep-free dynamics. This unprecedented result arises from the distinctive spatial inhomogeneities of the internal fields, these being influenced by the bottom electrode’s surface morphology. Our findings further highlight the importance of controlling interface and defect characteristics, to engineer ferroelectric devices with optimised performance. PMID:26014521

  19. Hot ice computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that supersaturated solution of sodium acetate, commonly called ‘hot ice’, is a massively-parallel unconventional computer. In the hot ice computer data are represented by a spatial configuration of crystallization induction sites and physical obstacles immersed in the experimental container. Computation is implemented by propagation and interaction of growing crystals initiated at the data-sites. We discuss experimental prototypes of hot ice processors which compute planar Voronoi diagram, shortest collision-free paths and implement AND and OR logical gates.

  20. Defect-free epitaxial lateral overgrowth of oxidized (111) Si by liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.; Bauser, E.; Werner, J. H.

    1990-07-01

    We report on epitaxial lateral overgrowth of Si on oxidized (111) Si wafers by liquid phase epitaxy. The growth starts in oxide-free seeding windows and proceeds laterally over the SiO2. Growth effectively ceases when (111) sidewalls form. This observation allows the development of a geometrical model that, for the first time, explains the observed dependence of the overgrowth width on the orientation of the seeding windows. We obtain a maximum overgrowth width of 120-130 μm and a maximum aspect ratio of 40:1. Transmission electron microscopy reveals no crystallographic defects in the overgrown lamellae.

  1. Modeling of Fuel Film Cooling on Chamber Hot Wall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    while numerically solving the conservation PDEs. In the current model, this is done by using equilibrium thermochemistry methods and knowledge of the...The next step toward more accurate thermochemistry will be to include moderately non-equilibrium pyrolysis chemistry via a flamelet model. This

  2. Modeling of Fuel Film Cooling on Chamber Hot Wall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    current model, this is done by using equilibrium thermochemistry methods and knowledge of the specific heat as a function of temperature. In obtaining...realistic estimates of mean absorptivity and emissivity of a soot-heavy dense fluid. The next step toward more accurate thermochemistry will be to

  3. Smokin Hot Galaxy animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-03-16

    This infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy is known as Messier 82 or the Cigar galaxy.

  4. Saturn's Hot Plasma Explosions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation based on data obtained by NASA's Cassini Spacecraft shows how the "explosions" of hot plasma on the night side (orange and white) periodically inflate Saturn's magnetic field (white ...

  5. Modelling hot air balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimicombe, N. W.

    1991-07-01

    Hot air balloons can be modelled in a number of different ways. The most satisfactory, but least useful model is at a microscopic level. Macroscopic models are easier to use but can be very misleading.

  6. Saturn Hot Plasma Explosions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-14

    This frame from an animation based on data obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft shows how the explosions of hot plasma on the night side orange and white periodically inflate Saturn magnetic field white lines.

  7. In hot water, again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Watkins, Sheila

    2009-10-01

    Regarding Norman Willcox's letter about the problems of using solar panels for domestic heating (August p21), I also have thermal solar panels installed. However, contrary to his disappointing experience, I have found that they provide my family with a useful amount of hot water. In our system, the solar energy is used to heat a store of water, which has no other source of heat. Mains-pressure cold water passes through this store via a heat exchanger, removing heat from it and warming up. If the water becomes warm enough, an unpowered thermostatic valve allows it to go straight to the hot taps (mixing it with cold if it is too hot). However, if it is not hot enough, then the water is directed first through our previously installed gaspowered combination boiler and then to the taps.

  8. A&M. Hot liquid waste treatment building (TAN616). Camera facing southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot liquid waste treatment building (TAN-616). Camera facing southwest. Oblique view of east and north walls. Note three corrugated pipes at lower left indicating location of underground hot waste storage tanks. Photographer: Ron Paarmann. Date: September 22, 1997. INEEL negative no. HD-20-1-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Flush-mounted hot film anemometer accuracy in pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Nandy, S; Tarbell, J M

    1986-08-01

    The accuracy of a flush-mounted hot film anemometer probe for wall shear stress measurements in physiological pulsatile flows was evaluated in fully developed pulsatile flow in a rigid straight tube. Measured wall shear stress waveform based on steady flow anemometer probe calibrations were compared to theoretical wall shear stress waveforms based on well-established theory and measured flow rate waveforms. The measured and theoretical waveforms were in close agreement during systole (average deviation of 14 percent at peak systole). As expected, agreement was poor during diastole because of flow reversal and diminished frequency response at low shear rate.

  10. Hot ammonia in Orion

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.; Palmer, P.; Zuckerman, B.

    1980-04-01

    Ten inversion lines from nonmetastable rotational levels of NH/sub 3/ have been detected in the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula in Orion. Six of these lines were previoulsy undetected. The emission arises from levels which have energies up to 1150 K above the ground state, indicating that the NH/sub 3/ is immersed in a hot, dense medium. Three well-defined kinematical components within KL are evident in emission from NH/sub 3/ and other molecules. The emission from hot NH/sub 3/ is dominated by the component having V/sub LSR/=5.2 km s/sup -1/ and ..delta..V =10--12 km s/sup -1/. A non-LTE analysis of NH/sub 3/ emission from this ''hot core'' component reveals that the minimum particle density in this source is approx.5 x 10 cm/sup -3/, and that the kinetic temperature is > or approx. =220 K. The diameter of the hot core source is probably within a factor of 2 to 6'' (5 x 10/sup 16/ cm). The hot core is undoubtedly associated with one of the compact infrared sources in KL, and we suggest on the basis of position and velocity coincidences that it is IRc2. The hot core appears to contain about one Jeans mass at the inferred temperature and density. We therefore suggest that this object is a very young protostar which is still in the throes of its initial collapse.

  11. Geothermal hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    Dittell, E.W.

    1983-05-10

    Geothermal hot water system including a hot water tank and a warm water tank which are heated independently of each other by a close loop freon system. The closed loop freon system includes a main condenser which heats water for the warm water tank and a super-heated condenser which heats water for the hot water tank, and where the freon passes through a water evaporator which is heated by water such as from a well or other suitable source. The water evaporator in the closed loop freon system passes the water through but no environmental change to the water. An electrical circuit including aquastats in the warm water tank connected therethrough controls operation of the closed loop freon system including respective pumps on the super-heated condenser and main condenser for pumping water. Pumps pump water through the main condenser for the warm tank and through the super-heated condenser for the hot tank. The system provides for energy conservation in that the head pressure of the compressor is kept in the lower operating ranges as determined by the discharge flow of the main condenser which varies by the head pressure and temperature flow control which varies by temperature. The geothermal hot water system uses a least amount of energy in heating the water in the hot tank as well as the warm tank.

  12. Axions as hot and cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Kwang Sik; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    The presence of a hot dark matter component has been hinted at 3σ by a combination of the results from different cosmological observations. We examine a possibility that pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons account for both hot and cold dark matter components. We show that the QCD axions can do the job for the axion decay constant f{sub a}∼wall annihilation. We also investigate the cases of thermal QCD axions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons coupled to the standard model sector through the Higgs portal, and axions produced by modulus decay.

  13. High quality thick epitaxial films for power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Rong; Temple, V. A. K.

    1986-01-01

    High quality epitaxial layers with low defect levels are the key to fabrication of high voltage power devices. Growth of 100 μm thick epitaxial layers has been performed using a thermally driven chemical vapor deposition process. Three important parameters that have significant influence on epitaxy quality have been identified: substrate surface condition, reactor system cleanliness, and deposition process. The prerequisite p- n- p structure of a 6 kV thyristor was fabricated using 100 μm thick epitaxial layers to form the p-base. Defect density (hillocks and dislocations) in epitaxial layers has been correlated with the breakdown voltage of the p- n- p structure. It was found that an order of magnitude improvement of the defect level was obtained using well polished substrates instead of poorly polished substrates. Further improvement was achieved with the use of an etched reactor system before epitaxial growth, resulting in the reduction of defect density by another order of magnitude. A new cycled process, consisting of successive H 2 purges and deposition steps, is proposed that effectively reduces the defect level by an additional factor of 4, as compared with the conventional continuous deposition process. Specular epitaxial layers without spikes were obtained. Experimental results showed that for thick epitaxial films (100 μm), a susceptor with round-bottomed depressions provides higher dislocation density than one with flat-bottomed depressions, leading to a lower breakdown voltage of test devices.

  14. STUDIES ON THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STREPTOCOCCAL CELL WALL

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Richard M.; McCarty, Maclyn

    1961-01-01

    Lysis of trypsinized Group A streptococcal cell walls with phage-associated lysin releases into solution dialyzable and non-dialyzable mucopeptide fractions composed of N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylmuramic acid and alanine, glutamic acid, lysine, and glycine in addition to the characteristic group-specific carbohydrate. The latter substance contains appreciable amounts of N-acetylmuramic acid and the amino acids as well as N-acetylglucosamine and rhamnose. Hot formamide extraction of the cell walls results in a soluble fraction of group-specific carbohydrate and an insoluble residue. The Group A carbohydrate in this instance is composed of rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine. The composition of the insoluble residue is similar to that of the mucopeptide fractions released from the cell wall by phage-associated lysin. This residue was shown by electron microscopy to be composed of discrete discs which appear similar in structure to the intact cell wall. The specific carbohydrate obtained by hot formamide extraction of Group A-variant cell walls was composed almost exclusively of rhamnose. The residue fraction was similar to that of Group A. The residue of cell walls extracted with hot formamide is extensively solubilized not only by phage-associated lysin and S. albus enzyme, but also by lysozyme, which has no measurable effect on the intact streptococcal cell wall. PMID:13754097

  15. Sequential imposed layer epitaxy of cuprate films

    SciTech Connect

    Laguees, M.; Tebbji, H.; Mairet, V.; Hatterer, C.; Beuran, C.F.; Hass, N.; Xu, X.Z. ); Cavellin, C.D. )

    1994-02-01

    Layer-by-layer epitaxy has been used to grow cuprate films since the discovery of high-Tc compounds. This deposition technique is in principle suitable for the growth of layered crystalline structures. However, the sequential deposition of atomic layer by atomic layer of cuprate compounds has presently not been optimized. Nevertheless, this deposition process is the only one which allows one to build artificial cell structures such as Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub (n[minus]1)]Cu[sub n]O[sub y] with n as large as 10. This process will also be the best one to grow films of the so-called infinite layer phase compounds belonging to the Sr[sub 1[minus]x]Ca[sub x]CuO[sub 2] family, in order to improve the transport properties and the morphological properties of the cuprate films. When performed at high substrate temperature (typically more than 600[degree]C), the layer-by-layer epitaxy of cuprates exhibits usually 3D aggregate nucleation. Then the growth of the film no longer obeys the layer-by-layer sequence imposed during the deposition. We present here two experimental situations of true 2D sequential imposed layer epitaxy; the growth at 500[degree]C under atomic oxygen pressure of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CuO[sub 6] and of Sr[sub 1[minus]x]Ca[sub y]CuO[sub 2] phases. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Reduction of epitaxial defects on 4°-off 4Hsbnd SiC homo-epitaxial growth by optimizing in-situ etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongqiang; Feng, Gan; Zhang, Jianhui; Qian, Weining; Kang, Junyong

    2016-11-01

    The investigations of in-situ etching of 4Hsbnd SiC epi-growth on 4° off-axis 100 mm diameter substrates under different conditions have been carried out in a commercial warm-wall multi-wafer planetary reactor. The surface morphologies of the as-etched substrates have been characterized by atomic force microscopy on 20 × 20 μm2. Based on the step height and roughness mean square, the best etching condition for 4Hsbnd SiC 4° off-axis substrates was determined to be H2 + HCl at 1500 °C for 10 min. With the optimized in-situ etching process, high quality 4Hsbnd SiC epitaxial layers with excellent surface morphology have been obtained, and the defect density is lowered to 0.45 cm-2 resulting in a projected 2 × 2 mm die yield of ∼98%.

  17. One-dimensional domain walls in thin ferromagnetic films with fourfold anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Ross G.; Muratov, Cyrill B.

    2016-06-01

    We study the properties of domain walls and domain patterns in ultrathin epitaxial magnetic films with two orthogonal in-plane easy axes, which we call fourfold materials. In these materials, the magnetization vector is constrained to lie entirely in the film plane and has four preferred directions dictated by the easy axes. We prove the existence of {{90}\\circ} and {{180}\\circ} domain walls in these materials as minimizers of a nonlocal one-dimensional energy functional. Further, we investigate numerically the role of the considered domain wall solutions for pattern formation in a rectangular sample.

  18. Epitaxial Growth of GeGaAs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    liquid solvent for epitaxial growth of Ge. Because of the finite solubility of GaAs in Pb (7 x 10-4 atomic fraction at 500°C) relatively fast initial...mixture of Pb and Sn was used as a melt. The solubility of Ge in a PbSn eutetic mixture is significantly higher than the solubility of Ge in pure Pb...shallow donor acceptor levels. Addition of a deep level to the crystal lat- tice at this point would further pin the fermi level near mid-gap

  19. Epitaxy of layered semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim Otsmane, L.; Emery, J. Y.; Jouanne, M.; Balkanski, M.

    1993-03-01

    Epilayers of InSe on InSe(00.1) and GaSe(00.1) have been grown by the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technique. Raman spectroscopy was used for a characterization of the structure and crystallinity in InSe/InSe(00.1) (homoepitaxy) and InSe/GaSe(00.1) (heteroepitaxy). The Raman spectra of the InSe thin films are identical to those of polytype γ-InSe. An activation of the E(LO) mode at 211 cm -1 is observed in these films here. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is also used to investigate surfaces of these films.

  20. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) is the “gold standard” synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  1. Epitaxial superlattices of ionic conductor oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, A.; Medaglia, P. G.; Sanna, S.; Traversa, E.; Licoccia, S.; Tebano, A.; Balestrino, G.

    2009-07-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition technique was used to engineer heterostructures of Yttrium-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Gadolinium-doped Ceria (GDC) on perovskite substrates like Neodymium Gallate (NGO) and Strontium Titanate (STO). Epitaxial superlattices of the same number of layers of both materials were deposited with each block thickness as thin as 2 unit cells up to 30 unit cells. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigation of the (002) symmetrical reflection allowed to evaluate the amount of material deposited in each layer constituting the superlattices. (113) asymmetrical reflections were analyzed to investigate strain effects on YSZ and GDC lattice parameters, evidencing the cube on cube growth of these films.

  2. Large area epitaxial germanane for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Walid; Odenthal, Patrick M.; Bushong, Elizabeth J.; O'Hara, Dante J.; Luo, Yunqiu Kelly; van Baren, Jeremiah; Pinchuk, Igor; Wu, Yi; Ahmed, Adam S.; Katoch, Jyoti; Bockrath, Marc W.; Tom, Harry W. K.; Goldberger, Joshua E.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2015-09-01

    We report the synthesis and transfer of epitaxial germanane (GeH) onto arbitrary substrates by electrochemical delamination and investigate its optoelectronic properties. GeH films with thickness ranging from 1 to 600 nm (2-1000 layers) and areas up to ˜1 cm2 have been reliably transferred and characterized by photoluminescence, x-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Wavelength dependent photoconductivity measurements on few-layer GeH exhibit an absorption edge and provide a sensitive characterization tool for ultrathin germanane materials. The transfer process also enables the possibility of integrating germanane into vertically stacked heterostructures.

  3. The hot list strategy.

    SciTech Connect

    Wos, L.; Pieper, G. W.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    1999-01-01

    Experimentation strongly suggests that, for attacking deep questions and hard problems with the assistance of an automated reasoning program, the more effective paradigms rely on the retention of deduced information. A significant obstacle ordinarily presented by such a paradigm is the deduction and retention of one or more needed conclusions whose complexity sharply delays their consideration. To mitigate the severity of the cited obstacle, I formulated and feature in this article the hot list strategy. The hot list strategy asks the researcher to choose, usually from among the input statements characterizing the problem under study, one or more statements that are conjectured to play a key role for assignment completion. The chosen statements--conjectured to merit revisiting, again and again--are placed in an input list of statements, called the hot list. When an automated reasoning program has decided to retain a new conclusion C--before any other statement is chosen to initiate conclusion drawing--the presence of a nonempty hot list (with an appropriate assignment of the input parameter known as heat) causes each inference rule in use to be applied to C together with the appropriate number of members of the hot list. Members of the hot list are used to complete applications of inference rules and not to initiate applications. The use of the hot list strategy thus enables an automated reasoning program to briefly consider a newly retained conclusion whose complexity would otherwise prevent its use for perhaps many CPU-hours. To give evidence of the value of the strategy, I focus on four contexts: (1) dramatically reducing the CPU time required to reach a desired goal, (2) finding a proof of a theorem that had previously resisted all but the more inventive automated attempts, (3) discovering a proof that is more elegant than previously known, and (4) answering a question that had steadfastly eluded researchers relying on an automated reasoning program. I also

  4. Enhanced heat transfer rocket combustor technology component hot-fire test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William S.

    1990-01-01

    The evaluation of a method for enhancing combustor hot-gas wall heat extraction by using hot-fire tests of a rocket engine combustor calorimeter with hot-gas wall ribs is presented. The capability for enhanced heat extraction is required to increase available turbine drive energy for high chamber pressure operation, and therefore higher overall expander cycle engine performance. Determination of the rib effectiveness for incorporation into the design of a high-performance combustor for an advanced expander cycle combustor intended for use in an orbital transfer vehicle or advanced space engine, was the objective of these tests.

  5. HotRegion: a database of predicted hot spot clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cukuroglu, Engin; Keskin, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Hot spots are energetically important residues at protein interfaces and they are not randomly distributed across the interface but rather clustered. These clustered hot spots form hot regions. Hot regions are important for the stability of protein complexes, as well as providing specificity to binding sites. We propose a database called HotRegion, which provides the hot region information of the interfaces by using predicted hot spot residues, and structural properties of these interface residues such as pair potentials of interface residues, accessible surface area (ASA) and relative ASA values of interface residues of both monomer and complex forms of proteins. Also, the 3D visualization of the interface and interactions among hot spot residues are provided. HotRegion is accessible at http://prism.ccbb.ku.edu.tr/hotregion. PMID:22080558

  6. High-Temperature Ionic Epitaxy of Halide Perovskite Thin Film and the Hidden Carrier Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Sun, Xin; Chen, Zhizhong; Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wertz, Esther; Shi, Jian

    2017-09-01

    High-temperature vapor phase epitaxy (VPE) has been proved ubiquitously powerful in enabling high-performance electro-optic devices in III-V semiconductor field. A typical example is the successful growth of p-type GaN by VPE for blue light-emitting diodes. VPE excels as it controls film defects such as point/interface defects and grain boundary, thanks to its high-temperature processing condition and controllable deposition rate. For the first time, single-crystalline high-temperature VPE halide perovskite thin film has been demonstrated-a unique platform on unveiling previously uncovered carrier dynamics in inorganic halide perovskites. Toward wafer-scale epitaxial and grain boundary-free film is grown with alkali halides as substrates. It is shown the metal alkali halides could be used as universal substrates for VPE growth of perovskite due to their similar material chemistry and lattice constant. With VPE, hot photoluminescence and nanosecond photo-Dember effect are revealed in inorganic halide perovskite. These two phenomena suggest that inorganic halide perovskite could be as compelling as its organic-inorganic counterpart regarding optoelectronic properties and help explain the long carrier lifetime in halide perovskite. The findings suggest a new avenue on developing high-quality large-scale single-crystalline halide perovskite films requiring precise control of defects and morphology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  8. Epitaxial Crystal Silicon Absorber Layers and Solar Cells Grown at 1.8 Microns per Minute: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bobela, D. C.; Teplin, C. W.; Young, D. L.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

    2011-07-01

    We have grown device-quality epitaxial silicon thin films at growth rates up to 1.8 μm/min, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition from silane at substrate temperatures below 750 degrees C. At these rates, which are more than 30 times faster than those used by the amorphous and nanocrystalline Si industry, capital costs for large-scale solar cell production would be dramatically reduced, even for cell absorber layers up to 10 ?m thick. We achieved high growth rates by optimizing the three key parameters: silane flow, depletion, and filament geometry, based on our model developed earlier. Hydrogen coverage of the filament surface likely limits silane decomposition and growth rate at high system pressures. No considerable deterioration in PV device performance is observed when grown at high rate, provided that the epitaxial growth is initiated at low rate. A simple mesa device structure (wafer/epi Si/a-Si(i)/a-Si:H(p)/ITO) with a 2.3 um epitaxial silicon absorber layer was grown at 700 nm/min. The finished device had an open-circuit voltage of 0.424 V without hydrogenation treatment.

  9. High quality epitaxial CoSi{sub 2} using plasma nitridation-mediated epitaxy: The effects of the capping layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Gu, Gil Ho; Son, J. Y.; Park, C. G.; Kim, Hyungjun

    2007-11-01

    The epitaxial growth of CoSi{sub 2} from Co with a Ti capping layer using plasma nitridation-mediated epitaxy (PNME) was demonstrated. By exposing the Si substrate to the NH{sub 3} plasma, an a-SiN{sub x} layer was formed with atomic scale thickness controllability. After Co and Ti deposition followed by annealing, high quality epitaxial CoSi{sub 2} was formed on Si(001) with a perfectly flat interface. However, the epitaxial growth was observed for Co with a Ti capping layer prepared only by ex situ deposition, not by in situ deposition. The epitaxial CoSi{sub 2} was analyzed by x-ray diffraction and a scanning transmission electron microscope. Based on these results, the mechanism of PNME and the effects of the Ti capping layer process on silicidation were discussed.

  10. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  11. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  12. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  13. Thermoelectric power of a single-walled carbon nanotubes rope.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Hu, Lijun; Zhou, Haiqing; Qiu, Caiyu; Yang, Huaichao; Chen, Minjiang; Lu, Jianglei; Sun, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a rope of single-walled carbon nanotubes is prepared by using a diamond wire drawing die. At atmospheric condition, the electrical conductance and the thermoelectric voltage of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope have been investigated with the hot-side temperature ranging from 292 to 380 K, and cold-side temperature at 292 K. For different temperatures in the range of 292 to 380 K at hot-side, the current-voltage curves are almost parallel to each other, indicating that the electrical conductance does not change. The dynamic characteristics of voltage at positive, zero and negative current bias demonstrate that a thermoelectric voltage is induced with a direction from hot- to cold-side. The induced thermoelectric voltage shows linear dependence on the temperature difference between hot- and cold-side. The thermoelectric power of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope is found to be positive and has a value about 17.8 +/- 1.0 microV/K. This result suggests the hole-like carriers in single-walled carbon nanotubes rope. This study will pave the way for single-walled carbon nanotubes based thermoelectric devices.

  14. Epitaxial thick film high-Tc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Mi, S. B.; Jia, C. L.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.; Fagaly, R. L.

    2008-02-01

    Low-noise operation of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in magnetic fields requires high critical current and strong pinning of vortices in the superconducting electrodes and in the flux transformer. Crack-free epitaxial high-Tc dc-SQUID structures with a total thickness ?5 μm and a surface roughness determined by 30 nm high growth spirals were prepared with YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) films on MgO substrates buffered by a SrTiO3/BaZrO3-bilayer. HRTEM demonstrated a high quality epitaxial growth of the films. The YBCO films and SQUID structures deposited on the buffered MgO substrates had a superconducting transition temperature Tc exceeding 91 K and critical current densities Jc > 3 MA/cm2 at 77 K up to a thickness ~5 μm. The application of thicker superconducting and insulator films helped us to increase the critical current and dynamic range of the multilayer high-Tc flux transformer and improve the insulation between the superconducting layers. An optimization of SQUID inductance allowed us to fabricate 8 mm SQUID magnetometers with SQUID voltage swings of ~60 μV and a field resolution of ~30 fT/√Hz at 77 K.

  15. Epitaxy of advanced nanowire quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazibegovic, Sasa; Car, Diana; Zhang, Hao; Balk, Stijn C.; Logan, John A.; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Schmits, Rudi; Xu, Di; Wang, Guanzhong; Krogstrup, Peter; Op Het Veld, Roy L. M.; Zuo, Kun; Vos, Yoram; Shen, Jie; Bouman, Daniël; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; Pennachio, Daniel; Lee, Joon Sue; van Veldhoven, Petrus J.; Koelling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Palmstrøm, Chris J.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are ideal for realizing various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasiparticles (such as anyons) can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought into contact with a superconductor. To exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons—which are key elements of topological quantum computing—fully, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks with a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire ‘hashtags’ reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase-coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap (with vanishing sub-gap conductance) is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens up new avenues for the realization of epitaxial three-dimensional quantum architectures which have the potential to become key components of various quantum devices.

  16. Graphene nanoribbons epitaxy on boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaobo; Yang, Wei; Wang, Shuopei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Meng, Jianling; Xie, Guibai; Wang, Duoming; Wang, Guole; Zhang, Ting Ting; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yang, Rong; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, we report a pilot study on epitaxy of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that GNRs grow preferentially from the atomic steps of h-BN, forming in-plane heterostructures. GNRs with well-defined widths ranging from ˜15 nm to ˜150 nm can be obtained reliably. As-grown GNRs on h-BN have high quality with a carrier mobility of ˜20 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 for ˜100-nm-wide GNRs at a temperature of 1.7 K. Besides, a moiré pattern induced quasi-one-dimensional superlattice with a periodicity of ˜15 nm for GNR/h-BN was also observed, indicating zero crystallographic twisting angle between GNRs and h-BN substrate. The superlattice induced band structure modification is confirmed by our transport results. These epitaxial GNRs/h-BN with clean surfaces/interfaces and tailored widths provide an ideal platform for high-performance GNR devices.

  17. Epitaxy of advanced nanowire quantum devices.

    PubMed

    Gazibegovic, Sasa; Car, Diana; Zhang, Hao; Balk, Stijn C; Logan, John A; de Moor, Michiel W A; Cassidy, Maja C; Schmits, Rudi; Xu, Di; Wang, Guanzhong; Krogstrup, Peter; Op Het Veld, Roy L M; Zuo, Kun; Vos, Yoram; Shen, Jie; Bouman, Daniël; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; Pennachio, Daniel; Lee, Joon Sue; van Veldhoven, Petrus J; Koelling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A; Kouwenhoven, Leo P; Palmstrøm, Chris J; Bakkers, Erik P A M

    2017-08-23

    Semiconductor nanowires are ideal for realizing various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasiparticles (such as anyons) can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought into contact with a superconductor. To exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons-which are key elements of topological quantum computing-fully, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks with a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire 'hashtags' reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase-coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap (with vanishing sub-gap conductance) is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens up new avenues for the realization of epitaxial three-dimensional quantum architectures which have the potential to become key components of various quantum devices.

  18. Exceptional ballistic transport in epitaxial graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Baringhaus, Jens; Ruan, Ming; Edler, Frederik; Tejeda, Antonio; Sicot, Muriel; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Li, An-Ping; Jiang, Zhigang; Conrad, Edward H; Berger, Claire; Tegenkamp, Christoph; de Heer, Walt A

    2014-02-20

    Graphene nanoribbons will be essential components in future graphene nanoelectronics. However, in typical nanoribbons produced from lithographically patterned exfoliated graphene, the charge carriers travel only about ten nanometres between scattering events, resulting in minimum sheet resistances of about one kilohm per square. Here we show that 40-nanometre-wide graphene nanoribbons epitaxially grown on silicon carbide are single-channel room-temperature ballistic conductors on a length scale greater than ten micrometres, which is similar to the performance of metallic carbon nanotubes. This is equivalent to sheet resistances below 1 ohm per square, surpassing theoretical predictions for perfect graphene by at least an order of magnitude. In neutral graphene ribbons, we show that transport is dominated by two modes. One is ballistic and temperature independent; the other is thermally activated. Transport is protected from back-scattering, possibly reflecting ground-state properties of neutral graphene. At room temperature, the resistance of both modes is found to increase abruptly at a particular length--the ballistic mode at 16 micrometres and the other at 160 nanometres. Our epitaxial graphene nanoribbons will be important not only in fundamental science, but also--because they can be readily produced in thousands--in advanced nanoelectronics, which can make use of their room-temperature ballistic transport properties.

  19. Graphene nanoribbons epitaxy on boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaobo; Wang, Shuopei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Meng, Jianling; Xie, Guibai; Wang, Duoming; Wang, Guole; Zhang, Ting Ting; Yang, Rong; Shi, Dongxia; Yang, Wei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zhang, Guangyu

    2016-03-14

    In this letter, we report a pilot study on epitaxy of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that GNRs grow preferentially from the atomic steps of h-BN, forming in-plane heterostructures. GNRs with well-defined widths ranging from ∼15 nm to ∼150 nm can be obtained reliably. As-grown GNRs on h-BN have high quality with a carrier mobility of ∼20 000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for ∼100-nm-wide GNRs at a temperature of 1.7 K. Besides, a moiré pattern induced quasi-one-dimensional superlattice with a periodicity of ∼15 nm for GNR/h-BN was also observed, indicating zero crystallographic twisting angle between GNRs and h-BN substrate. The superlattice induced band structure modification is confirmed by our transport results. These epitaxial GNRs/h-BN with clean surfaces/interfaces and tailored widths provide an ideal platform for high-performance GNR devices.

  20. Optical Properties of Epitaxially Grown Silver Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanwen; Zhang, Chendong; Zhang, Matt; Shih, Chih-Kang; Li, Xiaoqin

    2013-03-01

    One major obstacle in the advancing field of plasmonics is the loss in metals. A sizable contribution of this loss comes from grain boundaries and surface roughness introduced during thin film growth using conventional deposition methods. A novel epitaxial growth technique is used to produce silver (Ag) thin films free of such flaws. We investigate the optical properties-namely the dielectric optical constants-of these new epitaxial films in the bulk region and in the ultrathin film limit where quantum mechanical behaviors emerge due to energy quantization in the growth direction. The values for the dielectric optical constants are extracted from the spectral ellipsometry (SE) measurements over a wide range of optical frequencies. By using an adequate model of the sample structure and initial values of the fitting parameters (i.e. the real and imaginary parts of the optical constants), we can extract these measured values for the new Ag films. We have confirmed that in the bulk region, the optical constants converge with the well-known Johnson and Christy measurements. In the ultrathin film limit, however, we observed significant changes near the D-band transition likely due to a quantum well-like density of states. Equal contribution. Also affiliated with Department of Physics, The University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208

  1. Dispersants displace hot oiling

    SciTech Connect

    Wash, R.

    1984-02-01

    Laboratory experiments and field testing of dispersants in producing wells have resulted in development of 2 inexpensive paraffin dispersant packages with a broad application range, potential for significant savings over hot oiling, and that can be applied effectively by both continuous and batch treating techniques. The 2 dispersants are soluble in the carrier solvent (one soluble in oil, one in water); are able to readily disperse the wax during a hot flask test conducted in a laboratory; and leave the producing interval water wet. Field data on the 2 dispersants are tabulated, demonstrating their efficacy.

  2. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  3. Subcooled Boiling Near a Heated Wall

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Trabold; C.C. Maneri; P.F. Vassallo; D.M. Considine

    2000-10-27

    Experimental measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency, and velocity are obtained in subcooled R-134a flowing over a heated flat plate near an unheated wall and compared to analytical predictions. The measurements were obtained for a fixed system pressure and mass flow rate (P = 2.4 MPa and w = 106 kg/hr) at various inlet liquid temperatures. During the experiments, electrical power was applied at a constant rate to one side of the test section. The local void fraction data, acquired with a hot-film anemometer probe, showed the existence of a significant peak near the heated wall and a smaller secondary peak near the unheated wall for the larger inlet subcoolings. Local vapor velocity data, taken with the hot-film probe and a laser Doppler velocimeter, showed broad maxima near the centerline between the heated and unheated plates. Significant temperature gradients near the heated wall were observed for large inlet subcooling. Bubble size data, inferred from measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency and vapor velocity, when combined with the measured bubble chord length distributions illustrate the transition from pure three dimensional spherical to two-dimensional planar bubble flow, the latter being initiated when the bubbles fill the gap between the plates. These various two-phase flow measurements were used for development of a multidimensional, four-field calculational method; comparisons of the data to the calculations show reasonable agreement.

  4. 2D vibrational properties of epitaxial silicene on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, Dmytro; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Le Lay, Guy; Sahin, Hasan; Cahangirov, Seymur; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.; Vogt, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    The two-dimensional silicon allotrope, silicene, could spur the development of new and original concepts in Si-based nanotechnology. Up to now silicene can only be epitaxially synthesized on a supporting substrate such as Ag(111). Even though the structural and electronic properties of these epitaxial silicene layers have been intensively studied, very little is known about its vibrational characteristics. Here, we present a detailed study of epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) using in situ Raman spectroscopy, which is one of the most extensively employed experimental techniques to characterize 2D materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and black phosphorous. The vibrational fingerprint of epitaxial silicene, in contrast to all previous interpretations, is characterized by three distinct phonon modes with A and E symmetries. Both, energies and symmetries of theses modes are confirmed by ab initio theory calculations. The temperature dependent spectral evolution of these modes demonstrates unique thermal properties of epitaxial silicene and a significant electron-phonon coupling. These results unambiguously support the purely two-dimensional character of epitaxial silicene up to about 300 °C, whereupon a 2D-to-3D phase transition takes place. The detailed fingerprint of epitaxial silicene will allow us to identify it in different environments or to study its modifications.

  5. Comparison of Epitaxial Growth Techniques for III-V Layer Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    FOR Ill-V LAYER STRUCTURES DTIC byS ELECTE G. B. STRINGFELLOW MAY 2 819S2 A Prepared for Publication in the Proceedings of croissance de cristaux et de...epitaxial growth techniques have been used for semiconductors, including liquid phase epitaxy (LPE), chloride vapor phase epitaxy (CIVPE) using...MBE (GSMBE), organometallic MBE (OMMBE or MOMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). II. LIQUID PHASE EPITAXY The first technique listed, LPE, was one of

  6. Deposition of epitaxial Cu 2O films on (100) MgO by laser ablation and their processing using ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogale, S. B.; Bilurkar, P. G.; Mate, Nitant; Parikh, Nalin; Patnaik, B.

    1993-03-01

    Epitaxial thin films of Cu2O have been deposited on (100) MgO substrates by pulsed excimer laser ablation technique. Chemical polishing of the substrates by etching them in hot phosphoric acid prior to film deposition is found to be a critical step in realizing epitaxy. A KrF excimer laser operating at 248 nm wavelengths was used for ablation. The depositions were carried out at the laser energy density of 2 J/cm2 and the pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz. The substrate temperature was held at 700°C and the oxygen partial pressure during deposition and cooling was 10-3 Torr. The epitaxial nature of the deposited films was established via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford back-scattering (RBS) channelling measurements. The epitaxial films thus obtained were then subjected to ion bombardment for studies of damage formation. Implantations were carried out using 110 keV Ar+ ions over a dose range between 5 x 1014 and 1.5 x 1016 ions/cmz. The as-grown and implanted samples were subjected to resistivity versus temperature measurements in view of the importance of the Cu-O system in the context of the phenomenon of high temperature superconductivity.

  7. Relating Nanoscale Accessibility within Plant Cell Walls to Improved Enzyme Hydrolysis Yields in Corn Stover Subjected to Diverse Pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Jacob D; Zarger, Rachael A; Hodge, David B

    2017-10-04

    Simultaneous chemical modification and physical reorganization of plant cell walls via alkaline hydrogen peroxide or liquid hot water pretreatment can alter cell wall structural properties impacting nanoscale porosity. Nanoscale porosity was characterized using solute exclusion to assess accessible pore volumes, water retention value as a proxy for accessible water-cell walls surface area, and solute-induced cell wall swelling to measure cell wall rigidity. Key findings concluded that delignification by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment decreased cell wall rigidity and that the subsequent cell wall swelling resulted increased nanoscale porosity and improved enzyme binding and hydrolysis compared to limited swelling and increased accessible surface areas observed in liquid hot water pretreated biomass. The volume accessible to a 90 Å dextran probe within the cell wall was found to be correlated to both enzyme binding and glucose hydrolysis yields, indicating cell wall porosity is a key contributor to effective hydrolysis yields.

  8. What's Hot? What's Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buczynski, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    When Goldilocks finds three bowls of porridge at different temperatures in the three bears' house, she accurately assesses the situation and comes up with one of the most recognizable lines in children's literature," This porridge is too hot; this porridge is too cold; aahh, this porridge is just right!" Goldilocks' famous line is a perfect…

  9. Hot off the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2007-01-01

    In the past, the newspaper was one of the world's most used sources of information. Recently, however, its use has declined due to the popularity of cable television and the Internet. Yet the idea of reading the morning paper with a hot cup of coffee holds many warm memories for children who watched their parents in this daily ritual. In this…

  10. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  11. Geodynamics: Hot mantle rising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    The long-term cooling of Earth's mantle is recorded in the declining temperature and volume of its volcanic outpourings over time. However, analyses of 89-million-year-old lavas from Costa Rica suggest that extremely hot mantle still lurks below.

  12. Neptune Hot South Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-18

    These thermal images show a hot south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere. The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile Sept. 1 and 2, 2006.

  13. Hot off the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2007-01-01

    In the past, the newspaper was one of the world's most used sources of information. Recently, however, its use has declined due to the popularity of cable television and the Internet. Yet the idea of reading the morning paper with a hot cup of coffee holds many warm memories for children who watched their parents in this daily ritual. In this…

  14. What's Hot? What's Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buczynski, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    When Goldilocks finds three bowls of porridge at different temperatures in the three bears' house, she accurately assesses the situation and comes up with one of the most recognizable lines in children's literature," This porridge is too hot; this porridge is too cold; aahh, this porridge is just right!" Goldilocks' famous line is a perfect…

  15. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  16. Reclamation of a molecular beam epitaxy system and conversion for oxide epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, Alexander G.; Henderson, Walter; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2008-11-15

    An early 1980s vintage molecular beam epitaxy system, a Varian Gen II system, originally used for HgCdTe epitaxy, was converted into a system capable of growing thin-film complex metal oxides. The nature of some of the alternative oxides requires a thorough cleaning and, in some cases, complete replacement of system components. Details are provided regarding the chemistry of the etchants used, safety requirements for properly handling, and disposal of large quantities of etchants and etch by-products, and components that can be reused versus components that require replacement are given. Following the given procedures, an ultimate base pressure of 2x10{sup -10} Torr was obtained. Films grown in the system after reclamation contained no evidence of previously present materials down to the detection limit of secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  17. Turbulent flame-wall interaction: a DNS study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Hawkes, Evatt R; Sankaran, Ramanan; Gruber, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A turbulent flame-wall interaction (FWI) configuration is studied using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) and detailed chemical kinetics. The simulations are used to investigate the effects of the wall turbulent boundary layer (i) on the structure of a hydrogen-air premixed flame, (ii) on its near-wall propagation characteristics and (iii) on the spatial and temporal patterns of the convective wall heat flux. Results show that the local flame thickness and propagation speed vary between the core flow and the boundary layer, resulting in a regime change from flamelet near the channel centreline to a thickened flame at the wall. This finding has strong implications for the modelling of turbulent combustion using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes or large-eddy simulation techniques. Moreover, the DNS results suggest that the near-wall coherent turbulent structures play an important role on the convective wall heat transfer by pushing the hot reactive zone towards the cold solid surface. At the wall, exothermic radical recombination reactions become important, and are responsible for approximately 70% of the overall heat release rate at the wall. Spectral analysis of the convective wall heat flux provides an unambiguous picture of its spatial and temporal patterns, previously unobserved, that is directly related to the spatial and temporal characteristic scalings of the coherent near-wall turbulent structures.

  18. Experimental Evidence for Epitaxial Silicene on Diboride Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurence, Antoine; Friedlein, Rainer; Ozaki, Taisuke; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Wang, Ying; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko

    2012-06-01

    As the Si counterpart of graphene, silicene may be defined as an at least partially sp2-hybridized, atom-thick honeycomb layer of Si that possesses π-electronic bands. Here we show that two-dimensional, epitaxial silicene forms through surface segregation on zirconium diboride thin films grown on Si wafers. A particular buckling of silicene induced by the epitaxial relationship with the diboride surface leads to a direct π-electronic band gap at the Γ point. These results demonstrate that the buckling and thus the electronic properties of silicene are modified by epitaxial strain.

  19. Droplet Epitaxy Image Contrast in Mirror Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Jesson, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation methods are applied to interpret mirror electron microscopy (MEM) images obtained from a movie of GaAs droplet epitaxy. Cylindrical symmetry of structures grown by droplet epitaxy is assumed in the simulations which reproduce the main features of the experimental MEM image contrast, demonstrating that droplet epitaxy can be studied in real-time. It is therefore confirmed that an inner ring forms at the droplet contact line and an outer ring (or skirt) occurs outside the droplet periphery. We believe that MEM combined with image simulations will be increasingly used to study the formation and growth of quantum structures.

  20. Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Segercrantz, N. Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Song, Y.; Wang, S.

    2014-08-25

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

  1. Microstructural, Magnetic Anisotropy, and Magnetic Domain Structure Correlations in Epitaxial FePd Thin Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skuza, J. R.; Clavero, C.; Yang, K.; Wincheski, B.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    L1(sub 0)-ordered FePd epitaxial thin films were prepared using dc magnetron sputter deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The films were grown with varying thickness and degree of chemical order to investigate the interplay between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic domain structure. The experimentally measured domain size/period and magnetic anisotropy in this high perpendicular anisotropy system were found to be correlated following the analytical energy model proposed by Kooy and Enz that considers a delicate balance between the domain wall energy and the demagnetizing stray field energy.

  2. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Prater, John Thomas; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO3, SrTiO3 (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called "domain matching epitaxy," is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%-25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation "smart" devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin-film heterostructure systems that span a

  3. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Prater, John Thomas; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-15

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin

  4. Epitaxial integration of nanowires in microsystems by local micrometer-scale vapor-phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Mølhave, Kristian; Wacaser, Brent A; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wagner, Jakob B; Samuelson, Lars; Bøggild, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Free-standing epitaxially grown nanowires provide a controlled growth system and an optimal interface to the underlying substrate for advanced optical, electrical, and mechanical nanowire device connections. Nanowires can be grown by vapor-phase epitaxy (VPE) methods such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metal organic VPE (MOVPE). However, VPE of semiconducting nanowires is not compatible with several microfabrication processes due to the high synthesis temperatures and issues such as cross-contamination interfering with the intended microsystem or the VPE process. By selectively heating a small microfabricated heater, growth of nanowires can be achieved locally without heating the entire microsystem, thereby reducing the compatibility problems. The first demonstration of epitaxial growth of silicon nanowires by this method is presented and shows that the microsystem can be used for rapid optimization of VPE conditions. The important issue of the cross-contamination of other parts of the microsystem caused by the local growth of nanowires is also investigated by growth of GaN near previously grown silicon nanowires. The design of the cantilever heaters makes it possible to study the grown nanowires with a transmission electron microscope without sample preparation.

  5. Effects of sapphire nitridation and growth temperature on the epitaxial growth of hexagonal boron nitride on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kawser; Dahal, Rajendra; Weltz, Adam; J-Q Lu, James; Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the epitaxial growth of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) films on sapphire substrates in a cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system where different sapphire nitridation and hBN growth temperatures were employed. A thin and amorphous nitridated layer was formed at a low temperature (850 °C), which enabled subsequent epitaxial hBN growth at 1350 °C. The influences of the sapphire nitridation temperature and the growth temperature on the film quality were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Higher than optimum nitridation and growth temperatures improve the crystalline quality of the nitridated layer, but does not favor the epitaxial growth of hBN. hBN films grown at the optimum conditions exhibit the c-lattice constant of 6.66 Å from the XRD θ–2θ scan and the characteristic in plane stretching vibration at 1370.5 cm‑1 from Raman spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of stoichiometric hBN films with excellent uniformity.

  6. Growth and characterization of GaAs, AlGaAs and their heterostructures by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shealy, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) is a cold wall vapor desposition technique using organometallic and/or hydride sources for the fabrication of a variety of epitaxial compound semiconductor alloys on suitable substrates. The use of the OMVPE process to produce high quality GaAs, AlGaAs, and their heterostructures on GaAs substrates using trimethygalium (TMG), trimethylalumium (TMA), and arsine is described. For GaAs epitaxial films, the unintentional residual donor sand acceptors have been identified using far-infrared photo-ionization data, and low temperature photoluminescence, respectively, and their concentrations have been evaluated using Hall data. For the growth of AlGaAs films, it was observed that poor quality films were obtained due to oxygen contamination of the layer during growth. A series of graded bandgap heterostructures and abrupt quantum well heterostructures were grown over a variety of growth conditions. Composition gradings were controlled over a full range of alloy compositions on distances as small as 500 - 1000 A, and a 40 A quantum well heterostructure was obtained at low growth temperatures (550/sup 0/C). Finally, results are presented on a few devices which incorporate metallurgical junctions and heterojunctions with the GaAs/AlGaAs system. These devices include a microwave vertical FET structure, graded bandgap solar cells, and light emitting diodes.

  7. Multichannel temperature controller for hot air solar house

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an electronic controller that is optimized to operate a hot air solar system. Thermal information is obtained from copper constantan thermocouples and a wall-type thermostat. The signals from the thermocouples are processed through a single amplifier using a multiplexing scheme. The multiplexing reduces the component count and automatically calibrates the thermocouple amplifier. The processed signals connect to some simple logic that selects one of the four operating modes. This simple, inexpensive, and reliable scheme is well suited to control hot air solar systems.

  8. Metamorphic Epitaxy for Multijunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    France, Ryan M.; Dimroth, Frank; Grassman, Tyler J.; King, Richard R.

    2016-03-01

    Multijunction solar cells have proven to be capable of extremely high efficiencies by combining multiple semiconductor materials with bandgaps tuned to the solar spectrum. Reaching the optimum set of semiconductors often requires combining high-quality materials with different lattice constants into a single device, a challenge particularly suited for metamorphic epitaxy. In this article, we describe different approaches to metamorphic multijunction solar cells, including traditional upright metamorphic, state-of-the-art inverted metamorphic, and forward-looking multijunction designs on silicon. We also describe the underlying materials science of graded buffers that enables metamorphic subcells with low dislocation densities. Following nearly two decades of research, recent efforts have demonstrated high-quality lattice-mismatched multijunction solar cells with very little performance loss related to the mismatch, enabling solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies over 45%.

  9. Friction boosted by spontaneous epitaxial rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-03-01

    It is well known in surface science that incommensurate adsorbed monolayers undergo a spontaneous, energy-lowering epitaxial rotation from aligned to misaligned relative to a periodic substrate. We show first of all that a model 2D colloidal monolayer in an optical lattice, of recent importance as a frictional model, also develops in full equilibrium a small rotation angle, easy to detect in the Moiré pattern. The colloidal monolayer misalignment is then shown by extensive sliding simulations to increase the dynamic friction by a considerable factor over the aligned case. More generally, this example suggests that spontaneous rotations are rather ubiquitous and should not be ignored in all tribological phenomena between mismatched lattices. This work was mainly supported by the ERC Advanced Grant No. 320796-MODPHYSFRICT, and partly by SINERGIA contract CRSII2 136287, by PRIN/COFIN Contract 2010LLKJBX 004, by COST Action MP1303.

  10. Epitaxial oxide bilayer on Pt (001) nanofacets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Daniel; Komanicky, Vladimir; Iddir, Hakim; Pierce, Michael S.; Menzel, Andreas; Chang, Kee-Chul; Barbour, Andi; Zapol, Peter; You, Hoydoo

    2012-01-01

    We observed an epitaxial, air-stable, partially registered (2 × 1) oxide bilayer on Pt (001) nanofacets [V. Komanicky, A. Menzel, K.-C. Chang, and H. You, J. Phys. Chem. 109, 23543 (2005)]. The bilayer is made of two half Pt layers; the top layer has four oxygen bonds and the second layer two. The positions and oxidation states of the Pt atoms are determined by analyzing crystal truncation rods and resonance scattering data. The positions of oxygen atoms are determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Partial registry on the nanofacets and the absence of such registry on the extended Pt (001) surface prepared similarly are explained in DFT calculations by strain relief that can be accommodated only by nanoscale facets.

  11. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    SciTech Connect

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  12. Low energy dislocation structures in epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Merwe, Jan H.; Woltersdorf, J.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The principle of minimum energy was applied to epitaxial interfaces to show the interrelationship beteen misfit, overgrowth thickness and misfit dislocation spacing. The low energy dislocation configurations were presented for selected interfacial geometries. A review of the interfacial energy calculations was made and a critical assessment of the agreement between theory and experiment was presented. Modes of misfit accommodation were presented with emphasis on the distinction between kinetic effects and equilibrium conditions. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional overgrowths were treated together with interdiffusion-modified interfaces, and several models of interfacial structure were treated including the classical and the current models. The paper is concluded by indicating areas of needed investigation into interfacial structure.

  13. Infrared Rugates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rona, M.

    1993-01-01

    Rugates are optical structures that have a sinusoidal index of refraction (harmonic gradient-index field). As their discrete high/ low index filter counterparts, they can be used as narrow rejection band filters. However, since rugates do not have abrupt interfaces, they tend to have a smaller absorption, hence deliver a higher in band reflectivity. The absence of sharp interfaces makes rugates even more desirable for high-energy narrow band reflectors. In this application, the lack of a sharp interface at the maximum internal standing wave electric field results in higher breakdown strengths. Our method involves fabricating rugates, with molecular beam epitaxy, on GaAs wafers as an Al(x)Ga(1-x)As single-crystal film.

  14. Epitaxial oxide bilayer on Pt(001) nanofacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, D.; Komanicky, V.; Iddir, H.; Pierce, M. S.; Menzel, A.; Chang, K-C.; Barbour, A.; Zapol, P.; You, H.

    2012-01-01

    We observed an epitaxial, air-stable, partially registered (2 x 1) oxide bilayer on Pt (001) nanofacets [V. Komanicky, A. Menzel, K.-C. Chang, and H. You, J. Phys. Chem. 109, 23543 (2005)]. The bilayer is made of two half Pt layers; the top layer has four oxygen bonds and the second layer two. The positions and oxidation states of the Pt atoms are determined by analyzing crystal truncation rods and resonance scattering data. The positions of oxygen atoms are determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Partial registry on the nanofacets and the absence of such registry on the extended Pt (001) surface prepared similarly are explained in DFT calculations by strain relief that can be accommodated only by nanoscale facets.

  15. Transport properties of epitaxial lift off films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Young, P. G.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Transport properties of epitaxially lifted-off (ELO) films were characterized using conductivity, Hall, and Shubnikov-de Haas measurements. A 10-15 percent increase in the 2D electron gas concentration was observed in these films as compared with adjacent conventional samples. We believe this result to be caused by a backgating effect produced by a charge build up at the interface of the ELO film and the quartz substrate. This increase results in a substantial decrease in the quantum lifetime in the ELO samples, by 17-30 percent, but without a degradation in carrier mobility. Under persistent photoconductivity, only one subband was populated in the conventional structure, while in the ELO films the population of the second subband was clearly visible. However, the increase of the second subband concentration with increasing excitation is substantially smaller than anticipated due to screening of the backgating effect.

  16. Mechanistic study of organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, G.B.

    1990-12-31

    Only AsH{sub 3} and PH{sub 3} have been used as the group V source molecules for organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) of III/V semiconductors until recently, since they have been the only precursors yielding device quality materials. This paper reviews recent work on the pyrolysis of individual organometallic molecules, with emphasis on the group V sources, including: (1) the methylarsines, di- and tri-methylarsine, (2) the ethylarsines, mono-, di-, and tri-ethylarsine, and (3) the singly substituted tertiarybutyl arsine and phosphine molecules. The pyrolysis and growth reactions occurring when both group III and group V precursors are present simultaneously, i.e., the reactions occuring during OMVPE growth of several III/V semiconductors, are also briefly reviewed.

  17. Mechanistic study of organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    Only AsH{sub 3} and PH{sub 3} have been used as the group V source molecules for organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) of III/V semiconductors until recently, since they have been the only precursors yielding device quality materials. This paper reviews recent work on the pyrolysis of individual organometallic molecules, with emphasis on the group V sources, including: (1) the methylarsines, di- and tri-methylarsine, (2) the ethylarsines, mono-, di-, and tri-ethylarsine, and (3) the singly substituted tertiarybutyl arsine and phosphine molecules. The pyrolysis and growth reactions occurring when both group III and group V precursors are present simultaneously, i.e., the reactions occuring during OMVPE growth of several III/V semiconductors, are also briefly reviewed.

  18. Nanoscale selective area epitaxy for optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elarde, V. C.; Coleman, J. J.

    Self-assembled quantum dots have been heavily researched in recent years because of the potential applications to quantum electronic and optoelectronic devices they present. The non-uniformity and random ordering resulting from the self-assembly processes, however, are detrimental to potential applications, prohibiting the type of engineering control necessary for complex systems. The work presented in this document has sought to overcome the limitations of self-assembly by combining selective area epitaxy via MOCVD with high-resolution electron beam lithography to achieve lateral control over semiconductor structures at the nanometer scale. Two different structures are presented. The first is patterned quantum dots which improve on the uniformity and order of similar self-assembled quantum dots. The second is an entirely novel structure, the nanopore active layer, which demonstrates the potential for this process to extend beyond the constraints of self-assembly. Experimental and theoretical results for both structures are presented.

  19. Complex oxide ferroelectrics: Electrostatic doping by domain walls

    DOE PAGES

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2015-06-19

    Electrically conducting interfaces can form, rather unexpectedly, by breaking the translational symmetry of electrically insulating complex oxides. For example, a nanometre-thick heteroepitaxial interface between electronically insulating LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 supports a 2D electron gas1 with high mobility of >1,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 (ref. 2). Such interfaces can exhibit magnetism, superconductivity and phase transitions that may form the functional basis of future electronic devices2. A peculiar conducting interface can be created within a polar ferroelectric oxide by breaking the translational symmetry of the ferroelectric order parameter and creating a so-called ferroelectric domain wall (Fig. 1a,b). If the direction of atomic displacementsmore » changes at the wall in such a way as to create a discontinuity in the polarization component normal to the wall (Fig. 1a), the domain wall becomes electrostatically charged. It may then attract compensating mobile charges of opposite sign produced by dopant ionization, photoexcitation or other effects, thereby locally, electrostatically doping the host ferroelectric film. In contrast to conductive interfaces between epitaxially grown oxides, domain walls can be reversibly created, positioned and shaped by electric fields, enabling reconfigurable circuitry within the same volume of the material. Now, writing in Nature Nanotechnology, Arnaud Crassous and colleagues at EPFL and University of Geneva demonstrate control and stability of charged conducting domain walls in ferroelectric thin films of BiFeO3 down to the nanoscale.« less

  20. Epitaxy on Substrates with Hexagonal Lattice Symmetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Max Willi Hermann

    A general description of epitaxy between thin films and substrates of general symmetry was developed from a model with rigid substrate and overgrowth and extended to include strain of the overgrowth. The overgrowth-substrate interaction was described by Fourier series, usually truncated, defined on the reciprocal lattice of the interface surfaces of the crystals. Energy considerations lead directly to a criterion that epitaxial configurations occur when a pair of surface reciprocal lattice vectors of the substrate and overgrowth coincide, equivalent to atomic row matching. This is analogous to the von Laue criterion and Bragg equations of diffraction theory, with a geometrical realization related to the Ewald construction. When generalized, misfit strain, the spacing, line sense and Burgers vectors of misfit dislocations and misfit verniers are obtained from the reciprocal lattices of crystals with any symmetry and misfit. The most general structures can be described with convenient unit cells by using structure factors. Homogeneous misfit strain, the interfacial atom positions after local relaxation and misfit and elastic (harmonic approximation) strain energies were obtained by direct minimization of the total interfacial energy of a large (1105 atoms), but finite, system. The local relaxation was calculated with a Finite Element formulation. Systems with fcc {111 } or bcc{ 110} overgrowths on fcc {111} or hcp{0001} substrates were studied with respect to substrate symmetry, overgrowth size and anisotropy of the overgrowth elastic constants. Configurations such as Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS), Nishiyama-Wassermann (NW) and a pseudomorphic phase (2DC) were explained, while several other higher order configurations were predicted. The inherent difference in nature between the KS and NW and their relationship to the 2DC were emphasized. Deviations from the ideal orientation of KS linked to anisotropy for systems undergoing misfit strain were discovered. Deviations were also

  1. STM Properties and Manipulation of Epitaxial Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibado, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on SiC has been identified as one of the most likely avenues to graphene-based electronics. Understanding how morphology affects electronic properties is therefore important. In our work, epitaxial graphene was grown on the polar and non-polar a-, m-, and r-crystallographic oriented surfaces of SiC, and was investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Bunched nano-ridges ten times smaller than previously recorded were observed throughout the surface. A new STM technique called electrostatic-manipulation scanning tunneling microscopy (EM-STM) was performed to modify the morphology of the nano-ridges. By modeling the electrostatics involved in the EM-STM measurement, we estimate that a force of 5 nN and energy of 10 eV was required to alter the local interfacial bonding. At the atomic scale, STM images of Moire patterns reveal low-angle, twisted bi-layer graphene, grain boundaries, and an apparent lattice constant dilation. We will show that this dilation is due to the STM tip electrostatically dragging the graphene surface. Collaborators: P. Xu, D. Qi, M.L. Ackerman, S.D. Barber, J.K. Schoelz, and J. Thompson, Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA; V.D. Wheelr, R.L. Myers-Ward, C.R. Eddy, Jr., and D.K. Gaskill, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; and L.O. Nyakiti, Texas A&M University. Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA.

  2. Homing in on Hot Dogs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-29

    This image is a portion of the all-sky survey from NASA WISE. It highlights the first of about 1,000 hot DOGs found by the mission magenta circle. Hot DOGs are hot dust-obscured galaxies and are among the most powerful galaxies known.

  3. Epitaxial growth of Si deposited on (100) Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, L. S.; Lau, S. S.; von Allmen, M.; Mayer, J. W.; Ullrich, B. M.; Baker, J. E.; Williams, P.; Tseng, W. F.

    1980-11-01

    Epitaxial growth of deposited amorphous Si on chemically cleaned (100) Si has been found and layer-by-layer growth occurred at rates comparable to those in self-ion-implanted-amorphous Si. There is no evidence for appreciable oxygen penetration into the deposited layer during storage in air. The critical factors in achieving epitaxial growth are fast (˜50 Å/sec) deposition of Si onto a surface cleaned with a HF dip as a last rinse before loading into the vacuum system. Channeling and transmission electron microscopy measurements indicated that the epitaxial layers are essentially defect free. Secondary-ion mass spectroscopic analysis showed about 1014 oxygen/cm2 at the amorphous/crystal interface. With either higher interfacial oxygen coverage or slow (˜2 Å/sec) deposition, epitaxial growth rates are significantly slower.

  4. Growth of strontium ruthenate films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Patrick B.; Kim, Honggyu; Ahadi, Kaveh; Stemmer, Susanne

    2017-09-01

    We report on the growth of epitaxial Sr2RuO4 films using a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach in which a volatile precursor containing RuO4 is used to supply ruthenium and oxygen. The use of the precursor overcomes a number of issues encountered in traditional molecular beam epitaxy that uses elemental metal sources. Phase-pure, epitaxial thin films of Sr2RuO4 are obtained. At high substrate temperatures, growth proceeds in a layer-by-layer mode with intensity oscillations observed in reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Films are of high structural quality, as documented by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The method should be suitable for the growth of other complex oxides containing ruthenium, opening up opportunities to investigate thin films that host rich exotic ground states.

  5. Coincident-site lattice matching during van der Waals epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Boschker, Jos E.; Galves, Lauren A.; Flissikowski, Timur; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy is an attractive method for the fabrication of vdW heterostructures. Here Sb2Te3 films grown on three different kind of graphene substrates (monolayer epitaxial graphene, quasi freestanding bilayer graphene and the SiC (6√3 × 6√3)R30° buffer layer) are used to study the vdW epitaxy between two 2-dimensionally (2D) bonded materials. It is shown that the Sb2Te3 /graphene interface is stable and that coincidence lattices are formed between the epilayers and substrate that depend on the size of the surface unit cell. This demonstrates that there is a significant, although relatively weak, interfacial interaction between the two materials. Lattice matching is thus relevant for vdW epitaxy with two 2D bonded materials and a fundamental design parameter for vdW heterostructures. PMID:26658715

  6. Epitaxial CoSi2 on MOS devices

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Shin, Chan Soo; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2005-01-25

    An Si.sub.x N.sub.y or SiO.sub.x N.sub.y liner is formed on a MOS device. Cobalt is then deposited and reacts to form an epitaxial CoSi.sub.2 layer underneath the liner. The CoSi.sub.2 layer may be formed through a solid phase epitaxy or reactive deposition epitaxy salicide process. In addition to high quality epitaxial CoSi.sub.2 layers, the liner formed during the invention can protect device portions during etching processes used to form device contacts. The liner can act as an etch stop layer to prevent excessive removal of the shallow trench isolation, and protect against excessive loss of the CoSi.sub.2 layer.

  7. Improved process for epitaxial deposition of silicon on prediffused substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. G.; Halsor, J. L.; Word, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Process for fabricating integrated circuits uniformly deposits silicon epitaxially on prediffused substrates without affecting the sublayer diffusion pattern. Two silicon deposits from different sources, and deposited at different temperatures, protect the sublayer pattern from the silicon tetrachloride reaction.

  8. Formation Of Ohmic Gold Contacts On Epitaxial GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.; Bell, L. Doug; Kaiser, William J.

    1991-01-01

    New low-temperature procedure used to deposit ohmic gold contacts on gallium arsenide epitaxial films, forming ohmic electrical contacts. Keeping wafer in vacuum until metallization prevents formation of rectifying contacts.

  9. Evaporation of hot jupiters and hot neptunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenreich, D.

    2011-02-01

    Among the nearly five hundred extra-solar planets known, almost 30% orbit closer than 0.1 AU from their parent star. We will review the observations and the corresponding models of the evaporation of these `hot jupiters'. The observations started with the discovery made with HST that the planet orbiting HD 209458 has an extended atmosphere of escaping hydrogen. Subsequent observations obtained with HST/STIS and HST/ACS confirm the escape of the gas. Even more, oxygen and carbon have been shown to be present at very high altitude in the upper atmosphere. Observations of other targets like HD 189733 and WASP-12 show that evaporation is a general phenomenon which could contribute to the evolution of planets orbiting close to their parent stars. To interpret these observations, we developed models to quantify the escape rate from the measured occultation depths. Numerous models have also been published to investigate mechanisms which can lead to the estimated escape rate. In general, the high temperature of the upper atmosphere heated by the far and extreme UV combined with the tidal forces allow a very efficient evaporation of the upper atmosphere. We will review the different models and their implications.

  10. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  11. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  12. The hot chocolate effect

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1982-05-01

    The "hot chocolate effect" was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the ten percent accuracy of the experiments.

  13. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  14. The hot chocolate effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  15. Hot Billet Surface Qualifier

    SciTech Connect

    Tzyy-Shuh Chang

    2007-04-30

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT), developed a prototype of a Hot Billet Surface Qualifier (“Qualifier”) based on OGT’s patented HotEye™ technology and other proprietary imaging and computing technologies. The Qualifier demonstrated its ability of imaging the cast billets in line with high definition pictures, pictures capable of supporting the detection of surface anomalies on the billets. The detection will add the ability to simplify the subsequent process and to correct the surface quality issues in a much more timely and efficient manner. This is challenging due to the continuous casting environment, in which corrosive water, temperature, vibration, humidity, EMI and other unbearable factors exist. Each installation has the potential of 249,000 MMBTU in energy savings per year. This represents a cost reduction, reduced emissions, reduced water usage and reduced mill scale.

  16. Hot chocolate effect

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  17. 100-GHz Transistors from Wafer-Scale Epitaxial Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-M.; Dimitrakopoulos, C.; Jenkins, K. A.; Farmer, D. B.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Grill, A.; Avouris, Ph.

    2010-02-01

    The high carrier mobility of graphene has been exploited in field-effect transistors that operate at high frequencies. Transistors were fabricated on epitaxial graphene synthesized on the silicon face of a silicon carbide wafer, achieving a cutoff frequency of 100 gigahertz for a gate length of 240 nanometers. The high-frequency performance of these epitaxial graphene transistors exceeds that of state-of-the-art silicon transistors of the same gate length.

  18. Growth of epitaxial thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1992-10-01

    High-quality, high-temperature superconductor (HTSc) films can be grown by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process. This article provides a detailed introduction to the advantages and curent limitations of PLA for epitaxial film growth. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods and on exploitation of PLA to control epitaxial growth at either the unit cell or the atomic-layer level. Examples are taken from recent HTSc film growth. 33 figs, 127 refs. (DLC)

  19. Flux monitoring and control in epitaxy by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearsall, T. P.; Brown, N.; Ricker, N. L.; Johnson, M.

    1998-06-01

    Atomic fluorescence spectroscopy is a promising technique to detect individual chemical species at typical growth pressures in chemical beam and metal-organic epitaxy. We report results of initial experiments to measure triethyl gallium and dimethylethylamine-alane. We have successfully detected both species, but further development is needed to adapt this measurement to the needs of real-time sensing and control in chemical beam epitaxy.

  20. Epitaxial growth of diindenoperylene ultrathin films on Ag(111) investigated by LT-STM and LEED.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han; Sun, Jia-Tao; Feng, Yuan Ping; Chen, Wei; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2011-12-21

    The epitaxial growth of the 1st and 2nd monolayer (ML) diindenoperylene (DIP) on Ag(111) has been systematically investigated using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction and first-principles calculations. At one ML regime, DIP molecules commensurately arrange in either herringbone or brick-wall superstructures, depending on the deposition rate. Tip-induced structural transformation from herringbone to brick-wall is observed. Calculations based on density functional theory reveal that the top site of Ag(111) is energetically favorable for both superstructures. The 2nd ML DIP aggregate in either herringbone or brick-wall superstructures depending on the arrangements of the 1st ML DIP, indicating that the structural properties of DIP thin films on Ag(111) are sensitive to growth conditions. The observed variation in DIP ultrathin film structure may result in different electronic properties and have implications for DIP-based organic electronic devices, such as organic field-effect transistors or organic photovoltaic cells.

  1. The ''hot'' patella

    SciTech Connect

    Kipper, M.S.; Alazraki, N.P.; Feiglin, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Increased patellar uptake on bone scans is seen quite commonly but the possible or probable etiologies of this finding have not been previously well described. A review of 100 consecutive bone scans showed that the incidence of bilateral ''hot'' patellae is 15%. Identified etiologies include osteoarthritic degenerative disease (35%), fracture, possible metastatic disease, bursitis, Paget's disease, and osteomyelitis. The value of careful history, physical examination, and radiographs is stressed.

  2. HOT infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniuk, P.; Rogalski, A.

    2013-06-01

    At present, uncooled thermal detector focal plane arrays are successfully used in staring thermal imagers. However, the performance of thermal detectors is modest, they suffer from slow response and they are not very useful in applications requiring multispectral detection. Infrared (IR) photon detectors are typically operated at cryogenic temperatures to decrease the noise of the detector arising from various mechanisms associated with the narrow band gap. There are considerable efforts to decrease system cost, size, weight, and power consumption to increase the operating temperature in so-called high-operating-temperature (HOT) detectors. Initial efforts were concentrated on photoconductors and photoelectromagnetic detectors. Next, several ways to achieve HOT detector operation have been elaborated including non-equilibrium detector design with Auger suppression and optical immersion. Recently, a new strategies used to achieve HOT detectors include barrier structures such as nBn, material improvement to lower generation-recombination leakage mechanisms, alternate materials such as superlattices and cascade infrared devices. Another method to reduce detector's dark current is reducing volume of detector material via a concept of photon trapping detector. In this paper, a number of concepts to improve performance of photon detectors operating at near room temperature are presented. Mostly three types of detector materials are considered — HgCdTe and InAsSb ternary alloys, and type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice. Recently, advanced heterojunction photovoltaic detectors have been developed. Novel HOT detector designs, so called interband cascade infrared detectors, have emerged as competitors of HgCdTe photodetectors.

  3. The "hot" patella.

    PubMed

    Kipper, M S; Alazraki, N P; Feiglin, D H

    1982-01-01

    Increased patellar uptake on bone scans is seen quite commonly but the possible or probable etiologies of this finding have not been previously well described. A review of 100 consecutive bone scans showed that the incidence of bilateral "hot" patellae is 15%. Identified etiologies include osteoarthritic degenerative disease (35%), fracture, possible metastatic disease, bursitis, Paget's disease, and osteomyelitis. The value of careful history, physical examination, and radiographs is stressed.

  4. Silver plating technique seals leaks in thin wall tubing joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blenderman, W. H.

    1966-01-01

    Leaks in thin wall tubing joints are sealed by cleaning and silver plating the hot gas side of the joint in the leakage area. The pressure differential across the silver during hydrostatic test and subsequent use forces the ductile silver into the leak area and seals it.

  5. 13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing north (Note: B/W scale on fume hood is in 1/2 ft increments) - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  6. Extrusion of small-diameter, thin-wall tungsten tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Small-diameter, thin-wall seamless tubing of tungsten has been fabricated in lengths of up to 10 feet by hot extrusion over a floating mandrel. Extrusion of 0.50-inch-diameter tubing over 0.4-inch-diameter mandrels was accomplished at temperatures ranging from 3000 degrees to 4000 degrees F.

  7. Spectra of Hot Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; McKee, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    The turbulent core model for massive star formation (McKee & Tan 2002) generalizes the standard isothermal collapse model for low-mass stars to include turbulent pressure support. This model predicts reasonable massive star formation times of order 105 years, which is short enough to overcome the radiation pressure of the newly formed star. We calculate the millimeter and infrared spectrum predicted by the turbulent core model and compare with observations of several hot molecular cores. We consider spherically symmetric dust envelopes and use DUSTY, a 1-D radiative transfer code (Ivezic, Nenkova, Elitzur 1997), to numerically calculate the SEDs of these hot cores. We also analytically calculate the spectra in the asymptotic regions of low and high frequency and join these asymptotic forms smoothly by a fitting function that minimizes the relative error between the analytic and numerical spectra. Thus, we are able to express the functional dependence of the spectra of hot cores in terms of the dynamical variables of any given collapse model. This approach allows us to use observed SEDs as a diagnostic tool in inferring physical conditions in these cores.

  8. Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. Observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft and on telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i indicate that lava flows on Io are surprisingly hot, over 1200 oC and possibly as much as 1300 oC; a few areas might have lava flows as hot as 1500 oC. Such high temperatures imply that the lava flows are composed of rock that formed by a very large amount of melting of Io's mantle. This has led Laszlo Keszthelyi and Alfred S. McEwen of the University of Arizona and me to reawaken an old hypothesis that suggests that the interior of Io is a partially-molten mush of crystals and magma. The idea, which had fallen out of favor for a decade or two, explains high-temperature hot spots, mountains, calderas, and volcanic plains on Io. If correct, Io gives us an opportunity to study processes that operate in huge, global magma systems, which scientists believe were important during the early history of the Moon and Earth, and possibly other planetary bodies as well. Though far from proven, the idea that Io has a ocean of mushy magma beneath its crust can be tested with measurements by future spacecraft.

  9. Epitaxial patterning of thin-films: conventional lithographies and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-09-01

    Thin-film based novel magnetic and electronic devices have entered a new era in which the film crystallography, structural coherence, and epitaxy play important roles in determining their functional properties. The capabilities of controlling such structural and functional properties are being continuously developed by various physical deposition technologies. Epitaxial patterning strategies further allow the miniaturization of such novel devices, which incorporates thin-film components into nanoscale architectures while keeping their functional properties unmodified from their ideal single-crystal values. In the past decade, epitaxial patterning methods on the laboratory scale have been reported to meet distinct scientific inquires, in which the techniques and processes used differ from one to the other. In this review we summarize many of these pioneering endeavors in epitaxial patterning of thin-film devices that use both conventional and novel lithography techniques. These methods demonstrate epitaxial patterning for a broad range of materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors) and cover common device length scales from micrometer to sub-hundred nanometer. Whilst we have been motivated by magnetic materials and devices, we present our outlook on developing systematic-strategies for epitaxial patterning of functional materials which will pave the road for the design, discovery and industrialization of next-generation advanced magnetic and electronic nano-devices.

  10. Depomedroxyprogesterone acetate for hot flashes.

    PubMed

    Barton, Debra; Loprinzi, Charles; Quella, Susan; Sloan, Jeff; Pruthi, Sandya; Novotny, Paul

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a long-acting preparation of medroxyprogesterone acetate for hot flash management, 3 men receiving androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer and 15 women with a history of breast cancer were treated as part of clinical practice with three biweekly intramuscular injections of 500 mg depomedroxyprogesterone. A review of hot flash diaries and patient charts were completed to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of these injections for managing hot flashes. Treatment was associated with an approximate 90% decrease in hot flashes (95% CI 82-97%). Daily hot flash frequency decreased from a mean of 10.9 on the first day of treatment (95% CI 8.0-13.8 hot flashes per day) to a mean of 1.1 hot flashes 6 weeks later (95% CI 0.5-1.8 hot flashes) and to a mean of 0.7 hot flashes 12 weeks following therapy initiation (95% CI 0.1-1.2). Improvement in the hot flashes remained for months after discontinuing the injections in many patients. Reported side effects were minimal. This experience suggests that treatment with depomedroxyprogesterone may be an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of hot flashes.

  11. Advances in Hot-Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has actively participated in the development of hot structures technology for application to hypersonic flight systems. Hot structures have been developed for vehicles including the X-43A, X-37, and the Space Shuttle. These trans-atmospheric and atmospheric entry flight systems that incorporate hot-structures technology are lighter weight and require less maintenance than those that incorporate parasitic, thermal-protection materials that attach to warm or cool substructure. The development of hot structures requires a thorough understanding of material performance in an extreme environment, boundary conditions and load interactions, structural joint performance, and thermal and mechanical performance of integrated structural systems that operate at temperatures ranging from 1500 C to 3000 C, depending on the application. This paper will present recent advances in the development of hot structures, including development of environmentally durable, high temperature leading edges and control surfaces, integrated thermal protection systems, and repair technologies. The X-43A Mach-10 vehicle utilized carbon/carbon (C/C) leading edges on the nose, horizontal control surface, and vertical tail. The nose and vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased, high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three-layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the C/C, followed by a CVD layer of SiC, followed by a thin CVD layer of HfC. Work has also been performed on the development of an integrated structure and was focused on both hot and warm (insulated) structures and integrated fuselage/tank/TPS systems. The objective was to develop integrated multifunctional airframe structures that eliminate fragile external thermal-protection systems and incorporate the insulating function within the structure. The approach taken to achieve this goal was to develop candidate hypersonic

  12. Wall conditioning in JT-60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Akino, N.; Kodama, K.; Nakamura, H.; Niikura, S.; Takatsu, H.; Shimizu, M.; Ohkubo, M.; Ohta, M.; JT-60 Team

    1987-02-01

    The vacuum vessel of JT-60 has a volume of 160 m 3 and a vacuum side surface of 2750 m 2 containing the surfaces of the first wall and many types of ports. The first wall is made of 20 μm TiC coated molybdenum and Inconel 625, bolted to the inner surface of the vacuum vessel. The vacuum vessel is evacuated with four identical pumping systems with a total pumping speed of 29 m 3/s for hydrogen. The wall conditioning procedure consisted of two wipes with special cloths wetted by freon after hot water and freon jet cleaning, and three bakeouts were carried out before the first plasma production. An ultimate pressure of 7.4 × 10 -7 Pa and an outgassing rate of 6.8 × 10 -10 Pa m 3/s m 2 were obtained. Low current pulse discharge cleaning (TDC) was carried out for two weeks at a vacuum vessel temperature of 200°C. The TDC is performed typically with a plasma current of 30 kA, a pulse duration of 40 ms, a repetition period in the range from 0.3 s to 1.2 s, a hydrogen pressure of 5.0 × 10 -3 Pa, and a toroidal field of 0.45 T. The TDC conditioning for 50 h removed a quantity of water vapor corresponding to approximately 0.3 g. The main residual gases consisting of hydrocarbons, were monitored in addition to hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  13. Great wall...and lesser wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    What nature has covered up, humans have again exposed. Using images from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), researchers have found remnants of two generations of the Great Wall of China buried beneath desert sands, 700 km west of Beijing. Erosion and wind storms had shielded parts of both walls from view, but the foundation now has been laid bare by remote sensors.

  14. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  15. Wall contraction in Bloch wall films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of wall contraction characterized by a peak in the velocity-field relationship and a region of negative differential mobility is observed in uniaxial magnetic thin films of various magnetic properties by careful interrupted-pulse experiments. The observed results agree quite well with the theory for bulk samples when the extensive flux closure of thin film walls is accounted for by a suitable empirical scaling factor.

  16. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  17. Ultrafast electron dynamics in epitaxial graphene investigated with time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Johannsen, Jens Christian; Crepaldi, Alberto; Cilento, Federico; Zacchigna, Michele; Cacho, Cephise; Chapman, Richard T.; Springate, Emma; Fromm, Felix; Raidel, Christian; Seyller, Thomas; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Grioni, Marco; Hofmann, Philip

    2015-04-01

    In order to exploit the intriguing optical properties of graphene it is essential to gain a better understanding of the light-matter interaction in the material on ultrashort timescales. Exciting the Dirac fermions with intense ultrafast laser pulses triggers a series of processes involving interactions between electrons, phonons and impurities. Here we study these interactions in epitaxial graphene supported on silicon carbide (semiconducting) and iridium (metallic) substrates using ultrafast time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES) based on high harmonic generation. For the semiconducting substrate we reveal a complex hot carrier dynamics that manifests itself in an elevated electronic temperature and an increase in linewidth of the π band. By analyzing these effects we are able to disentangle electron relaxation channels in graphene. On the metal substrate this hot carrier dynamics is found to be severely perturbed by the presence of the metal, and we find that the electronic system is much harder to heat up than on the semiconductor due to screening of the laser field by the metal.

  18. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  19. Selective epitaxial growth techniques to integrate high-quality germanium on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Darin

    2011-12-01

    High-quality Ge-on-Si heterostructures have been actively pursued for many advanced applications, including near-infrared photodetectors, high-mobility field effect transistors, and virtual substrates for integrating III-V multijunction solar cells. However, growing epitaxial Ge on Si poses many engineering challenges, ranging from lattice mismatch, to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch, to non-planar morphological evolution. The lattice mismatch between Ge and Si often leads to a high density of threading dislocations. These dislocations, if not reduced, propagate through the subsequently grown GaAs layer, deteriorating its quality. To overcome these engineering challenges, we have developed three different approaches based on molecular beam epitaxy to significantly reduce, manage, or eliminate the defects in Ge films grown on Si. The first approach involves the nucleation of Ge islands within nanoscale windows in a thin layer of chemically grown SiO2 and successive island coalescence over the SiO2 to form a continuous film. Nanoscale contact areas between Ge and Si effectively relieve the lattice mismatch stress between Ge/Si so that dislocations do not nucleate. We observe that annealing the nucleated islands prior to full coalescence also leads to Ge films that are free of defects, along with significant improvement in GaAs integrated on Ge. The second approach involves trapping dislocations in Ge between high aspect ratio walls of SiO2. Defects form during coalescence of Ge from adjacent channels and at the corners of the SiO2 walls due to stress resulting from differences in thermal expansion coefficients of Ge, Si, and SiO2. The third approach involves filling etch pits, which reveal dislocations, with SiO2 and subsequent Ge growth over SiO2. The filling prevents dislocations in the lower Ge layer from propagating into the upper Ge layer. The third method reduces the defect density from 2.8 x 108 cm-2 to 9.1 x 10 6 cm-2, and is proven to be the most

  20. An experimental study of near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, Rakesh K.; Raj, Rishi S.

    1989-01-01

    The near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region is investigated. The blade end-wall corner region was simulated by mounting an airfoil section (NACA 65-015 base profile) symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semi-circular leading edge. The initial 7 cm from the leading edge of the flat plate was roughened by gluing No. 4 floor sanding paper to artificially increase the boundary layer thickness on the flat plate. The initial flow conditions of the boundary layer upstream of the corner region are expected to dictate the behavior of flow inside the corner region. Therefore, an experimental investigation was extended to study the combined effect of initial roughness and increased level of free stream turbulence on the development of a 2-D turbulent boundary layer in the absence of the blade. The measurement techniques employed in the present investigation included, the conventional pitot and pitot-static probes, wall taps, the Preston tube, piezoresistive transducer and the normal sensor hot-wire probe. The pitot and pitot-static probes were used to obtain mean velocity profile measurements within the boundary layer. The measurements of mean surface static pressure were obtained with the surface static tube and the conventional wall tap method. The wall shear vector measurements were made with a specially constructed Preston tube. The flush mounted piezoresistive type pressure transducer were employed to measure the wall pressure fluctuation field. The velocity fluctuation measurements, used in obtaining the wall pressure-velocity correlation data, were made with normal single sensor hot-wire probe. At different streamwise stations, in the blade end-wall corner region, the mean values of surface static pressure varied more on the end-wall surface in the corner region were mainly caused by the changes in the curvature of the streamlines. The magnitude of the wall shear stress in the blade end-wall corner region increased significantly

  1. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  2. The Controller Synthesis of Metastable Oxides Utilizing Epitaxy and Epitaxial Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, Darrell

    2003-12-02

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has achieved unparalleled control in the integration of semiconductors at the nanometer. These advances were made through the use of epitaxy, epitaxial stabilization, and a combination of composition-control techniques including adsorption-controlled growth and RHEED-based composition control that we have developed, understood, and utilized for the growth of oxides. Also key was extensive characterization (utilizing RHEED, four-circle x-ray diffraction, AFM, TEM, and electrical characterization techniques) in order to study growth modes, optimize growth conditions, and probe the structural, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of the materials grown. The materials that we have successfully engineered include titanates (PbTiO3, Bi4Ti3O12), tantalates (SrBi2Ta2O9), and niobates (SrBi2Nb2O9); layered combinations of these perovskite-related materials (Bi4Ti3O12-SrTiO3 and Bi4Ti3O12-PbTiO3 Aurivillius phases and metastable PbTiO3/SrTiO3 and BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices), and new metastable phases (Srn+1TinO3n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases). The films were grown by reactive MBE and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Many of these materials are either new or have been synthesized with the highest perfection ever reported. The controlled synthesis of such layered oxide heterostructures offers great potential for tailoring the superconducting, ferroelectric, and dielectric properties of these materials. These properties are important for energy technologies.

  3. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy of aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamber, Derrick Shane

    AlN is a promising substrate material for AlGaN-based UV optoelectronic devices and high-power, high-frequency electronic devices. Since large-area bulk AlN crystals are not readily available, one approach to prepare AlN substrates is to heteroepitaxially deposit thick (e.g., 10-300+ mum) AlN layers by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Initial efforts focused on growing AlN layers on sapphire substrates with growth rates up to 75 mum/hr. The resulting layers were colorless, smooth, and specular. Subsurface cracking, attributed to the plastic relief of tensile strain from island coalescence, was observed but did not adversely affect the surface morphology of the AlN layers. The surfaces possessed rms roughnesses as low as 0.316 nm over 5 x 5 mum2 sampling areas, but hexagonal hillock formation was observed for thick films grown at high growth rates. TEM revealed that the threading dislocation (TD) density of the films was 2 x 109 cm-2. The high TD densities for direct growth of AlN films on foreign substrates motivated the development of lateral epitaxial overgrowth approaches for defect reduction. Growth of AlN layers on patterned SiC substrates produced coalesced AlN films possessing TD densities below 8.3 x 106 cm -2 in the laterally grown wing regions, as compared to 1.8 x 109 cm-2 in the seed regions. These films, however, cracked on cooldown due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficients for AlN and SiC. To avoid this cracking, AlN layers were grown on patterned sapphire substrates. Although the films were able to be coalesced and contained few or no cracks, the TDs in these films were not confined to the seed regions. This produced a relatively uniform distribution of TDs over the surfaces of the films, with only a modest reduction in the TD density of 1 x 10 8 cm-2. Selective area growth of AlN was also pursued using Si3N4, SiO2, and Ti masks. Growth selectivity and film coalescence was observed for films grown on each masking material, but none of the

  4. Not so hot "hot spots" in the oceanic mantle.

    PubMed

    Bonath, E

    1990-10-05

    Excess volcanism and crustal swelling associated with hot spots are generally attributed to thermal plumes upwelling from the mantle. This concept has been tested in the portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 34 degrees and 45 degrees (Azores hot spot). Peridotite and basalt data indicate that the upper mantle in the hot spot has undergone a high degree of melting relative to the mantle elsewhere in the North Atlantic. However, application of various geothermometers suggests that the temperature of equilibration of peridotites in the mantle was lower, or at least not higher, in the hot spot than elsewhere. The presence of H(2)O-rich metasomatized mantle domains, inferred from peridotite and basalt data, would lower the melting temperature of the hot spot mantle and thereby reconcile its high degree ofmelting with the lack of a mantle temperature anomaly. Thus, some so-called hot spots might be melting anomalies unrelated to abnormally high mantle temperature or thermal plumes.

  5. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  6. Transient hot-film sensor response in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed to determine the response of a hot-film sensor, mounted flush on the side wall of a shock tube, to unsteady flow behind a normal shock wave. The present experiments attempt to isolate the response of the anemometer due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface. The experiments, performed at low supersonic shock speeds in air, are described along with the data acquisition procedure. The change in convective heat transfer is deduced from the data and the results are compared with those from transient boundary layer theory and another set of experimental results. Finally, a transient local heat transfer coefficient is formulated for use as the forcing function in a hot-film sensor instrument model simulation.

  7. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  8. Unveiling the carrier transport mechanism in epitaxial graphene for forming wafer-scale, single-domain graphene.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sang-Hoon; Zhou, Xiaodong; Kim, Seyoung; Lee, Yun Seog; Cruz, Samuel S; Kim, Yunjo; Hannon, James B; Yang, Yang; Sadana, Devendra K; Ross, Frances M; Park, Hongsik; Kim, Jeehwan

    2017-04-18

    Graphene epitaxy on the Si face of a SiC wafer offers monolayer graphene with unique crystal orientation at the wafer-scale. However, due to carrier scattering near vicinal steps and excess bilayer stripes, the size of electrically uniform domains is limited to the width of the terraces extending up to a few microns. Nevertheless, the origin of carrier scattering at the SiC vicinal steps has not been clarified so far. A layer-resolved graphene transfer (LRGT) technique enables exfoliation of the epitaxial graphene formed on SiC wafers and transfer to flat Si wafers, which prepares crystallographically single-crystalline monolayer graphene. Because the LRGT flattens the deformed graphene at the terrace edges and permits an access to the graphene formed at the side wall of vicinal steps, components that affect the mobility of graphene formed near the vicinal steps of SiC could be individually investigated. Here, we reveal that the graphene formed at the side walls of step edges is pristine, and scattering near the steps is mainly attributed by the deformation of graphene at step edges of vicinalized SiC while partially from stripes of bilayer graphene. This study suggests that the two-step LRGT can prepare electrically single-domain graphene at the wafer-scale by removing the major possible sources of electrical degradation.

  9. Hot oiling spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Mansure, A.J.

    1996-09-01

    One of the most common oil-field treatments is hot oiling to remove paraffin from wells. Even though the practice is common, the thermal effectiveness of the process is not commonly understood. In order for producers to easily understand the thermodynamics of hot oiling, a simple tool is needed for estimating downhole temperatures. Such a tool has been developed that was distributed as a compiled, public-domain-software spreadsheet. That spreadsheet has evolved into an interactive from on the World Wide Web and has been adapted into a Windows{trademark} program by Petrolite, St. Louis MO. The development of such a tools was facilitated by expressing downhole temperatures in terms of analytic formulas. Considerable algebraic work is required to develop such formulas. Also, the data describing hot oiling is customarily a mixture of practical units that must be converted to a consistent set of units. To facilitate the algebraic manipulations and to assure unit conversions are correct, during development parallel calculations were made using the spreadsheet and a symbolic mathematics program. Derivation of the formulas considered falling film flow in the annulus and started from the transient differential equations so that the effects of the heat capacity of the tubing and casing could be included. While this approach to developing a software product does not have the power and sophistication of a finite element or difference code, it produces a user friendly product that implements the equations solved with a minimum potential for bugs. This allows emphasis in development of the product to be placed on the physics.

  10. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  11. A Generalized Wall Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lumley, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions, described by Tennekes and Lumley (1972), for surface flows in a channel, pipe or boundary layer at large Reynolds numbers are revisited. These solutions can be extended to more complex flows such as the flows with various pressure gradients, zero wall stress and rough surfaces, etc. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), these solutions can be used as the boundary conditions to bridge the near-wall region of turbulent flows so that there is no need to have the fine grids near the wall unless the near-wall flow structures are required to resolve. These solutions are referred to as the wall functions. Furthermore, a generalized and unified law of the wall which is valid for whole surface layer (including viscous sublayer, buffer layer and inertial sublayer) is analytically constructed. The generalized law of the wall shows that the effect of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients on the surface flow is very significant. Such as unified wall function will be useful not only in deriving analytic expressions for surface flow properties but also bringing a great convenience for CFD methods to place accurate boundary conditions at any location away from the wall. The extended wall functions introduced in this paper can be used for complex flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation, recirculation and rough surfaces.

  12. MSFC hot air collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, K.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the hot air collector is given that includes a history of development, a history of the materials development, and a program summary. The major portion of the solar energy system cost is the collector. Since the collector is the heart of the system and the most costly subsystem, reducing the cost of producing collectors in large quantities is a major goal. This solar collector is designed to heat air and/or water cheaply and efficiently through the use of solar energy.

  13. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  14. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  15. Hot cell examination table

    DOEpatents

    Gaal, Peter S.; Ebejer, Lino P.; Kareis, James H.; Schlegel, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A table for use in a hot cell or similar controlled environment for use in examining specimens. The table has a movable table top that can be moved relative to a table frame. A shaft is fixedly mounted to the frame for axial rotation. A shaft traveler having a plurality of tilted rollers biased against the shaft is connected to the table top such that rotation of the shaft causes the shaft traveler to roll along the shaft. An electromagnetic drive is connected to the shaft and the frame for controllably rotating the shaft.

  16. Epitaxial oxidation of Ni-V biaxially textured tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrisor, T.; Boffa, V.; Celentano, G.; Ciontea, L.; Fabbri, F.; Galluzzi, V.; Gambardella, U.; Mancini, A.; Rufoloni, A.; Varesi, E.

    2002-08-01

    The epitaxial oxidation of the (0 0 1)[1 0 0] textured Ni 100- xV x tapes was studied because of the practical interest of NiO as a first buffer layer for the YBCO based coated conductors. The study revealed that the oxidation of the Ni-V alloy is rather complex, the less noble V being internally oxidized, while Ni undergoes an external oxidation. Moreover, the formation of the NiVO 3 and of Ni 7V 5O 17 compounds have negative effects on the epitaxial oxidation and on the surface morphology, as well. The role of vanadium on the epitaxial oxidation of Ni-V alloy has not been fully understood yet. The optimum conditions for the epitaxial oxidation have been found to be: 700epitaxial NiO films obtained under these conditions have a good out-of-plane and in-plane orientation, with a full-width-half-maximum of about 6.5° and 9.5°, respectively. The in-plane epitaxial relationship is [1 0 0]NiO∥[1 1 0]Ni-V. The as-obtained films have a compact and crack-free morphology, with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 300 nm. Nevertheless, the NiO films grown on (1 1 3) oriented grains or on twins are polycrystalline with a bright aspect, exhibiting a spongeous morphology. Epitaxial YBCO/CeO 2/NiO/Ni-V structures grown on the NiO template have a critical current density of about 0.6 MA/cm 2 at 77 K and zero magnetic field.

  17. Thermal performance of steel-framed walls. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, E.; Goodrow, J.; Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.

    1994-11-21

    In wall construction, highly conductive members spaced along the wall, which allow higher heat transfer than that through less conductive areas, are referred to as thermal bridges. Thermal bridges in walls tend to increase heat loss and, under certain adverse conditions, can cause dust streaking (``ghosting``) on interior walls over studs due to temperature differentials, as well as condensation in and on walls. Although such adverse conditions can be easily avoided by proper thermal design of wall systems, these effects have not been well understood and thermal data has been lacking. Therefore, the present study was initiated to provide (1) a better understanding of the thermal behavior of steel-framed walls, (2) a set of R-values for typical wall constructions, and (3) information that could be used to develop improved methods of predicting R-values. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them to choose the optimum choice for construction. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C9761) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Test results were compared to R-value estimates using the parallel path method, the isothermal planes method and the ASHRAE Zone method. The comparison showed that the known procedures do not fully account for the three-dimensional effects created by steel framing in a wall.

  18. Asymmetric shape transitions of epitaxial quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chaozhen; Spencer, Brian J.

    2016-06-01

    We construct a two-dimensional continuum model to describe the energetics of shape transitions in fully faceted epitaxial quantum dots (strained islands) via minimization of elastic energy and surface energy at fixed volume. The elastic energy of the island is based on a third-order approximation, enabling us to consider shape transitions between pyramids, domes, multifaceted domes and asymmetric intermediate states. The energetics of the shape transitions are determined by numerically calculating the facet lengths that minimize the energy of a given island type of prescribed island volume. By comparing the energy of different island types with the same volume and analysing the energy surface as a function of the island shape parameters, we determine the bifurcation diagram of equilibrium solutions and their stability, as well as the lowest barrier transition pathway for the island shape as a function of increasing volume. The main result is that the shape transition from pyramid to dome to multifaceted dome occurs through sequential nucleation of facets and involves asymmetric metastable transition shapes. We also explicitly determine the effect of corner energy (facet edge energy) on shape transitions and interpret the results in terms of the relative stability of asymmetric island shapes as observed in experiment.

  19. Epitaxial overgrowth of platinum on palladium nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Majiong; Lim, Byungkwon; Tao, Jing; Camargo, Pedro H. C.; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Yimei; Xia, Younan

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a systematic study on the epitaxial overgrowth of Pt on well-defined Pd nanocrystals with different shapes (and exposed facets), including regular octahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and cubes. Two different reducing agents, i.e., citric acid and L-ascorbic acid, were evaluated and compared for the reduction of K2PtCl4 in an aqueous solution in the presence of Pd nanocrystal seeds. When citric acid was used as a reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of octahedral Pt shells on regular and truncated octahedrons of Pd led to the formation of Pd-Pt core-shell octahedrons, while non-conformal overgrowth of Pt on cubic Pd seeds resulted in the formation of an incomplete octahedral Pt shell. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Pt branches was observed when L-ascorbic acid was used as a reducing agent regardless of the facets expressed on the surface of Pd nanocrystal seeds. This work shows that both the binding affinity of a reducing agent to the Pt surface and the reduction kinetics for a Pt precursor play important roles in determining the mode of Pt overgrowth on Pd nanocrystal surface.

  20. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinfeng

    Ultrathin semiconductors present various novel electronic properties. The first experimental realized two-dimensional (2D) material is graphene. Searching 2D materials with heavy elements bring the attention to Si, Ge and Sn. 2D buckled Si-based silicene was realized by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. Ge-based germanene was realized by mechanical exfoliation. Sn-based stanene has its unique properties. Stanene and its derivatives can be 2D topological insulators (TI) with a very large band gap as proposed by first-principles calculations, or can support enhanced thermoelectric performance, topological superconductivity and the near-room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. For the first time, in this work, we report a successful fabrication of 2D stanene by MBE. The atomic and electronic structures were determined by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in combination with first-principles calculations. This work will stimulate the experimental study and exploring the future application of stanene. In cooperation with Fengfeng Zhu, Wei-jiong Chen, Yong Xu, Chun-lei Gao, Dan-dan Guan, Canhua Liu, Dong Qian, Shou-Cheng Zhang.

  1. Configurable hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Masanari; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Aburada, Ryota; Furuta, Nozomu; Kotani, Toshiya

    2014-03-01

    Hot spot fixing (HSF) method has been used to fix many hot spots automatically. However, conventional HSF based on a biasing based modification is difficult to fix many hot spots under a low-k1 lithography condition. In this paper we proposed a new HSF, called configurable hotspot fixing system. The HSF has two major concepts. One is a new function to utilize vacant space around a hot spot by adding new patterns or extending line end edges around the hot spot. The other is to evaluate many candidates at a time generated by the new functions. We confirmed the proposed HSF improves 73% on the number of fixing hot spots and reduces total fixing time by 50% on a device layout equivalent to 28nm-node. The result shows the proposed HSF is effective for layouts under the low-k1 lithography condition.

  2. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  3. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  4. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system.

    The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles.

    Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone.

    This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged

  5. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system.

    The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles.

    Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone.

    This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged

  6. Growth of very large InN microcrystals by molecular beam epitaxy using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, J.; Kishino, K.; Kikuchi, A.

    2015-02-28

    Very thick InN (∼40 μm) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique. In some regions, the ELO of InN was observed as expected, indicating an important step toward fabricating quasi-bulk InN substrates. Interestingly, most parts of the sample consist of large flat-topped microcrystals and well-faceted microstructures. This is likely due to local growth condition variations during ELO, which is supported by an experiment where ELO of InN was performed on a substrate with various stripe mask patterns. TEM characterization of a flat top InN microcrystal revealed few stacking faults and only related threading dislocations. Defect-free small faceted microcrystals were also observed. The thick InN crystals show a narrow photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 0.679 eV and linewidth of 16.8 meV at 4 K.

  7. Layer-by-Layer Epitaxial Growth of Scalable WSe2 on Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masaki; Wang, Yue; Kashiwabara, Yuta; Matsuoka, Hideki; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2017-09-13

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides a simple but powerful way to synthesize large-area high-quality thin films and heterostructures of a wide variety of materials including accomplished group III-V and II-VI semiconductors as well as newly developing oxides and chalcogenides, leading to major discoveries in condensed-matter physics. For two-dimensional (2D) materials, however, main fabrication routes have been mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition by making good use of weak van der Waals bonding nature between neighboring layers, and MBE growth of 2D materials, in particular on insulating substrates for transport measurements, has been limited despite its fundamental importance for future advanced research. Here, we report layer-by-layer epitaxial growth of scalable transition-metal dichalocogenide (TMDC) thin films on insulating substrates by MBE and demonstrate ambipolar transistor operation. The proposed growth protocol is broadly applicable to other TMDCs, providing a key milestone toward fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures with various 2D materials for novel properties and functionalities.

  8. Phantom domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Ferreira, V. M. C.; Menezes, J.; Sousa, L.

    2017-08-01

    We consider a model with two real scalar fields which admits phantom domain wall solutions. We investigate the structure and evolution of these phantom domain walls in an expanding homogeneous and isotropic universe. In particular, we show that the increase of the tension of the domain walls with cosmic time, associated to the evolution of the phantom scalar field, is responsible for an additional damping term in their equations of motion. We describe the macroscopic dynamics of phantom domain walls, showing that extended phantom defects whose tension varies on a cosmological time scale cannot be the dark energy.

  9. Atomic layer epitaxy group IV materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Bedair, Salah; El-Masry, Nadia; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    1993-06-01

    The maximum temperature at which self-terminating monolayers of Si can be formed on Si(100) from Si2H6 has been determined to be 570 deg C. As such, the chemical reactivity of C2H4 has been determined to be insufficient at this temperature, and acetylene has been selected as the successor C precursor due to its superior reactivity and chemisorption properties. A cryogenic purifier for removing acetone has been commissioned. Trenched Si(100) wafers are also being made to assess the ALE process for sidewall deposition uniformity and future bipolar devices. Nonstoichiometric, Si-rich SiC has been produced with an associated decrease in the band gap. An AES/XPS UHV analytical system and associated ALE deposition system has been commissioned and integrated into a much larger surface science system. These dual systems will allow a thorough study and characterization of both the initial nucleation of SiC and the overall ALE growth process of SiC. Tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane have been deposited onto Si substrates in a hot filament CVD chamber to investigate their ability to promote ALE of diamond under DC biasing and a variety of system parameters. An electron gun and heating stage has been added to the growth chamber to enable AES and substrate heating. Good quality diamond films have been nucleated on deposited interlayers of both precursor compounds. The films have been examined by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Good quality epitaxial films of CeO2 have been grown on Si(111) using laser ablation. Atomically clean substrates and slow growth rates were determined necessary for epitaxy.

  10. A&M. TAN607 third floor plan for hot shop. Crane control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607 third floor plan for hot shop. Crane control rooms and their shielding windows. Plenum. Wall rack for manipulators in hot shop. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-A 103. Date: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-00-693-106755 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  12. Near Wall Turbulence: an experimental view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislas, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this presentation is to summarize the understanding of the near wall turbulence phenomena obtained at Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille using both hot wire anemometry and PIV. A wind tunnel was built in 1993 specifically designed for these two measurement techniques and aimed at large Reynolds numbers. Several experiments were performed since then in the frame of different PhDs and European projects, all aimed at evidencing turbulence organization in this region. These have fully benefited of the extraordinary development of PIV in that time frame, which has allowed entering visually and quantitatively inside the complex spatial and temporal structure of near wall turbulence. The presentation will try to emphasize the benefit of this approach in terms of understanding and modelling, illustrated by some representative results obtained. M. Stanislas particularly acknowledges the financial support of Region Nord Pas de Calais, unmissing during 25 years.

  13. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  14. Development of a testing procedure for a guarded hot box facility

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, R.D.; Howanski, J.W.; Derderian, G.D.; Shu, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    ASTM Test for Thermal Conductance and Transmittance of Built-Up Sections by Means of the Guarded Hot Box (C 236) states that the net heat flow through the metering box walls should be minimized. In order to satisfy this requirement, a testing procedure was developed to experimentally define the required thermopile emf set point across the metering box walls of the W.R. Grace and Company guarded hot box (GHB). This method of calibration can be applied to any GHB. Thermal conductances of three specimens were measured using the results of the calibration procedure and were found to be within 3% of the values obtained by other independent test methods.

  15. Comparison of PIV and Hot-Wire statistics of turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dróżdż, A.; Uruba, V.

    2014-08-01

    The paper shows a cross checking of turbulent boundary layer measurements using large field of view PIV and hot-wire anemometry techniques. The time-resolved PIV method was used for the experiments. The measuring plane was oriented perpendicularly to the wall and parallel to the mean flow. Hot wire measurement has been performed using the special probe with perpendicular hot wire. The HW point measurements were performed in the same place as PIV experiments. The hot-wire probe has the wire length of l+ < 20 in considered range of Reynolds numbers. Various evaluation methods were applied on PIV data. The profiles of statistical characteristics of streamwise velocity components were evaluated from the data. Mean values, standard deviations as well as skewness and kurtosis coefficients were compared for a few values of Reθ. Reynolds number ranges from 1000 to 5500. The result shows that with the increasing Reynolds number the attenuation of fluctuations maximum in PIV measurements occurs with respect to Hot-Wire measurements, however representation of velocity fluctuations using the PIV method is satisfactory. The influence of wall-normal fluctuation component on Hot-Wire near wall peak was also investigated.

  16. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  17. The Deep Hot Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Harmon

    The first inhabitants of planet Earth were single-celled microorganisms and they are still with us today. Their name is truly legion, for they live everywhere, from boiling hot springs at the Earth's surface and on the seafloor to the coldest waters of the oceans and the Antarctic lakes. They are the masters of evolutionary adaptation, who have colonized the entire range of conditions under which water can exist as a liquid. At some ancient mythic time billions of years ago in a witches' brew of precursory molecules, somewhere, somehow, on a sunny Precambrian day bright with promise some of these molecules came together in the first coupling, learned to replicate, create enzymes, metabolize, and seal themselves into protective membranes inside of which they began the process of living. How they did this is our greatest mystery, for they are our primordial ancestors and we do not understand ourselves until we understand them.

  18. Continuum model of surface roughening and epitaxial breakdown during low-temperature Ge(001) molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bratland, K. A.; Spila, T.; Cahill, D. G.; Greene, J. E.; Desjardins, P.

    2011-03-15

    Numerical simulations based on a discrete model describing step edge motion are used to compute the surface morphological evolution of Ge(001) layers deposited by low-temperature (T{sub s} = 45-230 deg. C) molecular beam epitaxy and to probe the relationship between surface roughening and the onset of epitaxial breakdown - the abrupt growth mode transition from epitaxial to amorphous - at temperature-dependent critical film thicknesses h{sub 1}(T{sub s}). Computed surface widths w and in-plane coherence lengths d as a function of layer thickness h exhibit good agreement with experimental values. Inspired by experimental results indicating that epitaxial breakdown is initiated at facetted interisland trenches as the surface roughness reaches a T{sub s}-independent overall aspect ratio, we show that simulated data for w/d = 0.03 correspond to thicknesses h{sub 1{proportional_to}} exp (-E{sub 1}/kT{sub s}) with E{sub 1} = 0.63 eV, a value equal to the Ge adatom diffusion activation energy on Ge(001). Simulated h{sub 1} values agree well with experimental data. Above a critical growth temperature of 170 deg. C, computed w/d values saturate at large film thicknesses, never reaching the critical aspect ratio w/d = 0.03. Thus, the model also predicts that epitaxial breakdown does not occur for T{sub s} > 170 deg. C as observed experimentally.

  19. The hot big bang and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1995-08-01

    The hot big-bang cosmology provides a reliable accounting of the Universe from about 10{sup {minus}2} sec after the bang until the present, as well as a robust framework for speculating back to times as early as 10{sup {minus}43} sec. Cosmology faces a number of important challenges; foremost among them are determining the quantity and composition of matter in the Universe and developing a detailed and coherent picture of how structure (galaxies, clusters of galaxies, superclusters, voids, great walls, and so on) developed. At present there is a working hypothesis{emdash}cold dark matter{emdash}which is based upon inflation and which, if correct, would extend the big bang model back to 10{sup {minus}32} sec and cast important light on the unification of the forces. Many experiments and observations, from CBR anisotropy experiments to Hubble Space Telescope observations to experiments at Fermilab and CERN, are now putting the cold dark matter theory to the test. At present it appears that the theory is viable only if the Hubble constant is smaller than current measurements indicate (around 30 km s{sup {minus}1} Mpc{sup {minus}1}), or if the theory is modified slightly, e.g., by the addition of a cosmological constant, a small admixture of hot dark matter (5 eV {open_quote}{open_quote}worth of neutrinos{close_quote}{close_quote}), more relativistic particle or a tilted spectrum of density perturbations.

  20. Manipulation of Dirac cones in intercalated epitaxial graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Minsung; Tringides, Michael C.; Hershberger, Matthew T.; ...

    2017-07-12

    Graphene is an intriguing material in view of its unique Dirac quasi-particles, and the manipulation of its electronic structure is important in material design and applications. Here, we theoretically investigate the electronic band structure of epitaxial graphene on SiC with intercalation of rare earth metal ions (e.g., Yb and Dy) using first-principles calculations. We can use the intercalation to control the coupling of the constituent components (buffer layer, graphene, and substrate), resulting in strong modification of the graphene band structure. We also demonstrate that the metal-intercalated epitaxial graphene has tunable band structures by controlling the energies of Dirac cones asmore » well as the linear and quadratic band dispersion depending on the intercalation layer and density. Thus, the metal intercalation is a viable method to manipulate the electronic band structure of the epitaxial graphene, which can enhance the functional utility and controllability of the material.« less

  1. Electric circuit model for strained-layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, John E.

    2016-11-01

    For the design and analysis of a strained-layer semiconductor device structure, the equilibrium strain profile may be determined numerically by energy minimization but this method is computationally intense and non-intuitive. Here we present an electric circuit model approach for the equilibrium analysis of an epitaxial stack, in which each sublayer may be represented by an analogous configuration involving a current source, a resistor, a voltage source, and an ideal diode. The resulting node voltages in the analogous electric circuit correspond to the equilibrium strains in the original epitaxial structure. This new approach enables analysis using widely accessible circuit simulators, and an intuitive understanding of electric circuits may be translated to the relaxation of strained-layer structures. In this paper, we describe the mathematical foundation of the electrical circuit model and demonstrate its application to epitaxial layers of Si1-x Ge x grown on a Si (001) substrate.

  2. Thermodynamic considerations for epitaxial growth of III/V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringfellow, G. B.

    2017-06-01

    III/V semiconductor alloys have been extensively studied because of their usefulness for electronic and photonic devices. Nevertheless, the search for new alloys for specific applications continues. Often, thermodynamic factors restrict the compositional range accessible by epitaxial growth processes, particularly when the size difference between atoms mixing on a particular sublattice is large. This causes solid phase immiscibility, leading to important effects on the epitaxial growth, the resultant alloy properties, and, consequently, device performance. Stringent thermodynamic limits exist for a number of alloys being considered for advanced LED, laser, and solar cell applications where the atomic sizes are very dissimilar, such as GaInN, GaAsN and GaAsBi. This paper will review the basic thermodynamics of the epitaxial growth processes and mixing in semiconductor alloys, as well as the causes and consequences of the resultant complex microstructures.

  3. Localized States Influence Spin Transport in Epitaxial Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, T.; van den Berg, J. J.; Huisman, E. H.; Dijkstra, H.; Fromm, F.; Seyller, T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a spin transport model for a diffusive channel with coupled localized states that result in an effective increase of spin precession frequencies and a reduction of spin relaxation times in the system. We apply this model to Hanle spin precession measurements obtained on monolayer epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). Combined with newly performed measurements on quasi-free-standing monolayer epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) our analysis shows that the different values for the diffusion coefficient measured in charge and spin transport measurements on monolayer epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) and the high values for the spin relaxation time can be explained by the influence of localized states arising from the buffer layer at the interface between the graphene and the SiC surface.

  4. Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of (001) anatase titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barlaz, David Eitan; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2016-03-15

    The growing interest in metal oxide based semiconductor technologies has driven the need to produce high quality epitaxial films of one metal oxide upon another. Largely unrecognized in synthetic efforts is that some metal oxides offer strongly polar surfaces and interfaces that require electrostatic stabilization to avoid a physically implausible divergence in the potential. The present work examines these issues for epitaxial growth of anatase TiO{sub 2} on strontium titanate (001). Solid phase epitaxial regrowth yields only the (001) facet, while direct crystalline growth by atomic layer deposition yields both the (112) and (001). The presence of amorphous TiO{sub 2} during regrowth may provide preferential stabilization for formation of the (001) facet.

  5. Epitaxial Atomic Layer Deposition of Sn-Doped Indium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Jonathan D.; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Guo, Peijun; Chang, Robert P. H.; Martinson, Alex B. F.

    2016-02-03

    Coherently strained, epitaxial Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) thin films were fabricated at temperatures as low as 250 degrees C using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on (001)-, (011)-, and (111)-oriented single-crystal Y-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) substrates. Resultant films possess cube-on-cube epitaxial relationships with the underlying YSZ substrates and are smooth, highly conductive, and optically transparent. This epitaxial ALD approach is favorable compared to many conventional growth techniques as it is a large-scale synthesis method that does not necessitate the use of high temperatures or ultrahigh vacuum. These films may prove valuable as a conductive growth template in areas where high-quality crystalline thin film substrates are important, such as solar energy materials, light-emitting diodes, or wide bandgap semiconductors. Furthermore, we discuss the applicability of this ALD system as an excellent model system for the study of ALD surface chemistry, nucleation, and film growth.

  6. Fluoride waveguide lasers grown by liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starecki, Florent; Bolaños, Western; Brasse, Gurvan; Benayad, Abdelmjid; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Braud, Alain; Moncorgé, Richard; Camy, Patrice

    2013-03-01

    High optical quality rare-earth-doped LiYF4 (YLF) epitaxial layers were grown on pure YLF substrates by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Thulium, praseodymium and ytterbium YLF crystalline waveguides co-doped with gadolinium and/or lutetium were obtained. Spectroscopic and optical characterization of these rare-earth doped waveguides are reported. Internal propagation losses as low as 0.11 dB/cm were measured on the Tm:YLF waveguide and the overall spectroscopic characteristics of the epitaxial layers were found to be comparable to bulk crystals. Laser operation was achieved at 1.87 μm in the Tm3+ doped YLF planar waveguide with a very good efficiency of 76% with respect to the pump power. Lasing was also demonstrated in a Pr3+ doped YLF waveguide in the red and orange regions and in a Yb3+:YLF planar waveguide at 1020 nm and 994 nm.

  7. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  8. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  9. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  10. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  11. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  12. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  13. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  14. Micromagnetics and microstructure of epitaxially grown Co and Co-Cr films for perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, K. M.; Takeuchi, T.; Hirayama, Y.; Donnet, D. M.; Honda, Y.; Futamoto, M.

    1994-07-01

    Highly c-axis oriented, single crystal films of Co(1-x)Cr(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than 0.3) have been grown epitaxially on mica substrates by e-beam evaporation. Films grown on Ru underlayers have an average grain size of 50-80 nm, negligibe fcc content, and very narrow c-axis dispersions. For Co films (x = 0), the as-grown magnetization structure are mainly 180 degree domain walls with a uniform distribution of cross-ties for thinner samples (less than or equal to 300 Angstrom), while thicker (greater than 400 Angstrom) ones show stripe domains. These images were analyzed in detail to measure the wall widths and associated energy densities for as-grown, remanent, and ac-magnetized samples. As expected, the magnetic properties of these films are composition dependent. However, for any Cr concentration, these films exhibit the largest saturation magnetization when compared with either sputtered or evaporated samples. This enhancement can be attributed to a nanometer-scale segregation of Cr, which in these samples could be particularly aided by the diffusion on the close-packed planes of the films with very narrow c-axis dispersions. Preliminary x-ray microanalysis and NMR data support this interpretation.

  15. Nanoscale Origins of Ferroelastic Domain Wall Mobility in Ferroelectric Multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Hsin-Hui; Hong, Zijian; Xin, Huolin L.; ...

    2016-10-31

    Here we investigate the nanoscale origins of ferroelastic domain wall motion in ferroelectric multilayer thin films that lead to giant electromechanical responses. We present direct evidence for complex underpinning factors that result in ferroelastic domain wall mobility using a combination of atomic-level aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase-field simulations in model epitaxial (001) tetragonal (T) PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT)/rhombohedral (R) PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) bilayer heterostructures. The local electric dipole distribution is imaged on an atomic scale for a ferroelastic domain wall that nucleates in the R-layer and cuts through the composition breaking the T/R interface. Our studies reveal a highly complexmore » polarization rotation domain structure that is nearly on the knife-edge at the vicinity of this wall. Induced phases, namely tetragonal-like and rhombohedral-like monoclinic were observed close to the interface, and exotic domain arrangements, such as a half-four-fold closure structure, are observed. Phase field simulations show this is due to the minimization of the excessive elastic and electrostatic energies driven by the enormous strain gradient present at the location of the ferroelastic domain walls. Thus, in response to an applied stimulus, such as an electric field, any polarization reorientation must minimize the elastic and electrostatic discontinuities due to this strain gradient, which would induce a dramatic rearrangement of the domain structure. This insight into the origins of ferroelastic domain wall motion will allow researchers to better “craft” such multilayered ferroelectric systems with precisely tailored domain wall functionality and enhanced sensitivity, which can be exploited for the next generation of integrated piezoelectric technologies.« less

  16. Nanoscale Origins of Ferroelastic Domain Wall Mobility in Ferroelectric Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hsin-Hui; Hong, Zijian; Xin, Huolin L.; Su, Dong; Chen, Long-Qing; Huang, Guanzhong; Munroe, Paul R.; Valanoor, Nagarajan

    2016-10-31

    Here we investigate the nanoscale origins of ferroelastic domain wall motion in ferroelectric multilayer thin films that lead to giant electromechanical responses. We present direct evidence for complex underpinning factors that result in ferroelastic domain wall mobility using a combination of atomic-level aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase-field simulations in model epitaxial (001) tetragonal (T) PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT)/rhombohedral (R) PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) bilayer heterostructures. The local electric dipole distribution is imaged on an atomic scale for a ferroelastic domain wall that nucleates in the R-layer and cuts through the composition breaking the T/R interface. Our studies reveal a highly complex polarization rotation domain structure that is nearly on the knife-edge at the vicinity of this wall. Induced phases, namely tetragonal-like and rhombohedral-like monoclinic were observed close to the interface, and exotic domain arrangements, such as a half-four-fold closure structure, are observed. Phase field simulations show this is due to the minimization of the excessive elastic and electrostatic energies driven by the enormous strain gradient present at the location of the ferroelastic domain walls. Thus, in response to an applied stimulus, such as an electric field, any polarization reorientation must minimize the elastic and electrostatic discontinuities due to this strain gradient, which would induce a dramatic rearrangement of the domain structure. This insight into the origins of ferroelastic domain wall motion will allow researchers to better “craft” such multilayered ferroelectric systems with precisely tailored domain wall functionality and enhanced sensitivity, which can be exploited for the next generation of integrated piezoelectric technologies.

  17. On the polarity of GaN micro- and nanowires epitaxially grown on sapphire (0001) and Si(111) substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and ammonia-molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloing, B.; Vézian, S.; Tottereau, O.; Vennéguès, P.; Beraudo, E.; Zuniga-Pérez, J.

    2011-01-01

    The polarity of GaN micro- and nanowires grown epitaxially by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on sapphire substrates and by molecular-beam epitaxy, using ammonia as a nitrogen source, on sapphire and silicon substrates has been investigated. On Al2O3(0001), whatever the growth technique employed, the GaN wires show a mixture of Ga and N polarities. On Si(111), the wires grown by ammonia-molecular beam epitaxy are almost entirely Ga-polar (around 90%) and do not show inversion domains. These results can be understood in terms of the growth conditions employed during the nucleation stage.

  18. On the polarity of GaN micro- and nanowires epitaxially grown on sapphire (0001) and Si(111) substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and ammonia-molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Alloing, B.; Vezian, S.; Tottereau, O.; Vennegues, P.; Beraudo, E.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2011-01-03

    The polarity of GaN micro- and nanowires grown epitaxially by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on sapphire substrates and by molecular-beam epitaxy, using ammonia as a nitrogen source, on sapphire and silicon substrates has been investigated. On Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), whatever the growth technique employed, the GaN wires show a mixture of Ga and N polarities. On Si(111), the wires grown by ammonia-molecular beam epitaxy are almost entirely Ga-polar (around 90%) and do not show inversion domains. These results can be understood in terms of the growth conditions employed during the nucleation stage.

  19. Actual application of hot repairing technology to operating coke oven

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Susumu; Ito, Hidekuni; Numazawa, Makoto; Yamazaki, Takao; Narita, Yuji; Kondo, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    In Wakayama Steel Works, the coke ovens have been operating for 23 [approximately] 25 years, and many over-aged parts can be seen. However the investment for the construction of a new coke oven is so huge that the maximum prolongation of the existing coke ovens life becomes very important. In the Wakayama Steel Works, it is thought that the coking chamber repairing technology can be the key to that prolongation. While, repairing the coking chamber, the area near the wall head can be observed by the naked eye and repaired using conventional methods, such a welding repairment by metal oxidation heat, partial chamber wall brick re-laying in the hot stage. However, these repairing methods are limited to the area near the wall head, and successful repair methods for the central portion of chamber wall have not, heretofore, been found. In the Wakayama Steel Works, the development of a new welding repairing machine for the central portion of the chamber wall was started and the actual repairing machine has been completed with practical use tests on operating coke ovens. This repairing machine has the following characteristic; (1) Repair of the central portion of ovens under high temperature (over 1,000 C); (2) Capability to seal narrow cracks or open brick joints and to smooth out brick roughness into a flat surface; (3) High working efficiency (max. welding capacity [equals] 30K g/h); (4) Compact and fully automatic operation with a high level of man/machine control interface; and (5) No disturbance of coke oven operation and no cooling of the chamber wall. In this paper, the outline of the actual hot repairing machine and its application results in the Wakayama operating coke ovens are reported.

  20. Infrared hot carrier diode mixer.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, L W; Erler, J W

    1977-11-01

    Detection of a 54.3-GHz beatnote at 10.6 microm has been observed with a hot carrier diode mixer. The diode consists of a "cat whisker" antenna, which forms an ohmic point contact to n-InAs. The mechanism of this room-temperature detector is described as the "thermoelectric effect" of hot carriers.

  1. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  2. A&M. Hot liquid waste treatment building (TAN616). Contextual view, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot liquid waste treatment building (TAN-616). Contextual view, facing south. Wall of hot shop (TAN-607) with high bay at left of view. Lower-roofed building at left edge of view is TAN- 633, hot cell annex. Complex at center of view is TAN-616. Tall metal building with gable roof is TAN-615. Photographer: Ron Paarmann. Date: September 22, 1997. INEEL negative no. HD-20-2-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Process for growing epitaxial gallium nitride and composite wafers

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Eicke R.; Subramanya, Sudhir G.; Kim, Yihwan; Kruger, Joachim

    2003-05-13

    A novel growth procedure to grow epitaxial Group III metal nitride thin films on lattice-mismatched substrates is proposed. Demonstrated are the quality improvement of epitaxial GaN layers using a pure metallic Ga buffer layer on c-plane sapphire substrate. X-ray rocking curve results indicate that the layers had excellent structural properties. The electron Hall mobility increases to an outstandingly high value of .mu.>400 cm.sup.2 /Vs for an electron background concentration of 4.times.10.sup.17 cm.sup.-3.

  4. Optical Probing of metamagnetic phases in epitaxial EuSe

    SciTech Connect

    Galgano, G. D.; Henriques, A. B.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G.

    2011-12-23

    EuSe is a wide gap magnetic semiconductors with a potential for applications in proof-of-concept spintronic devices. When the temperature is lowered, EuSe goes through sharp transitions between a variety of magnetic phases and is thus described as metamagnetic. The purpose of the present investigation is to correlate the magnetic order to the sharp dichroic doublet, discovered recently in high quality thin epitaxial layers of EuSe, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We report detailed measurements of the doublet positions and intensities as a function of magnetic field in low temperatures, covering several magnetic phases.

  5. Fundamental Study of Antimonide Nanostructures by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-04

    to conduct experimental work in molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaSb/GaAs and InSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are conducted and compared with...September 2014 to July 2015 being conducted at Chulalongkorn University in Thailand. Following the research work on InAs quantum dots (QDs) and quantum ... dot molecules (QDMs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), the research target is extended to GaSb QDs and InSb QDs which are type II quantum

  6. Seed layer technique for high quality epitaxial manganite films.

    PubMed

    Graziosi, P; Gambardella, A; Calbucci, M; O'Shea, K; MacLaren, D A; Riminucci, A; Bergenti, I; Fugattini, S; Prezioso, M; Homonnay, N; Schmidt, G; Pullini, D; Busquets-Mataix, D; Dediu, V

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an innovative approach to the simultaneous control of growth mode and magnetotransport properties of manganite thin films, based on an easy-to-implement film/substrate interface engineering. The deposition of a manganite seed layer and the optimization of the substrate temperature allows a persistent bi-dimensional epitaxy and robust ferromagnetic properties at the same time. Structural measurements confirm that in such interface-engineered films, the optimal properties are related to improved epitaxy. A new growth scenario is envisaged, compatible with a shift from heteroepitaxy towards pseudo-homoepitaxy. Relevant growth parameters such as formation energy, roughening temperature, strain profile and chemical states are derived.

  7. Seed layer technique for high quality epitaxial manganite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziosi, P.; Gambardella, A.; Calbucci, M.; O'Shea, K.; MacLaren, D. A.; Riminucci, A.; Bergenti, I.; Fugattini, S.; Prezioso, M.; Homonnay, N.; Schmidt, G.; Pullini, D.; Busquets-Mataix, D.; Dediu, V.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an innovative approach to the simultaneous control of growth mode and magnetotransport properties of manganite thin films, based on an easy-to-implement film/substrate interface engineering. The deposition of a manganite seed layer and the optimization of the substrate temperature allows a persistent bi-dimensional epitaxy and robust ferromagnetic properties at the same time. Structural measurements confirm that in such interface-engineered films, the optimal properties are related to improved epitaxy. A new growth scenario is envisaged, compatible with a shift from heteroepitaxy towards pseudo-homoepitaxy. Relevant growth parameters such as formation energy, roughening temperature, strain profile and chemical states are derived.

  8. Concept of epitaxial silicon structures for edge illuminated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnecki, J.; Gawlik, G.; Teodorczyk, M.; Jeremiasz, O.; Kozłowski, R.; Lipiński, D.; Krzyżak, K.; Brzozowski, A.

    2011-12-01

    A new concept of edge illuminated solar cells (EISC) based on silicon epitaxial technique has been proposed. In this kind of photovoltaic (PV) devices, sun-light illuminates directly a p-n junction through the edge of the structure which is perpendicular to junction surface. The main motivation of the presented work is preparation of a working model of an edge-illuminated silicon epitaxial solar cell sufficient to cooperation with a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) consisted of a polymer foil doped with a luminescent material. The technological processes affecting the cell I-V characteristic and PV parameters are considered.

  9. Tunable interfacial properties of epitaxial graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Chendong; Hu, Hao; Yang, Rong; Lu, Hongliang; Cai, Jinming; Du, Shixuan; Liu, Feng; Gao, H.-J.

    2010-02-01

    We report on tuning interfacial properties of epitaxially-grown graphenes with different kinds of metal substrates based on scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and density functional theory calculations. Three kinds of metal substrates, Ni(111), Pt(111), and Ru(0001), show different interactions with the epitaxially grown graphene at the interfaces. The different interfacial interaction making graphene n-type and p-type doped, leads to the polarity change of the thermoelectric property of the graphene/metal systems. These findings may give further insights to the interfacial interactions in the graphene/metal systems and promote the use of graphene-based heterostructures in devices.

  10. Seed layer technique for high quality epitaxial manganite films

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, P.; Gambardella, A.; Calbucci, M.; O’Shea, K.; MacLaren, D. A.; Bergenti, I.; Homonnay, N.; Schmidt, G.; Pullini, D.; Busquets-Mataix, D.; Dediu, V.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an innovative approach to the simultaneous control of growth mode and magnetotransport properties of manganite thin films, based on an easy-to-implement film/substrate interface engineering. The deposition of a manganite seed layer and the optimization of the substrate temperature allows a persistent bi-dimensional epitaxy and robust ferromagnetic properties at the same time. Structural measurements confirm that in such interface-engineered films, the optimal properties are related to improved epitaxy. A new growth scenario is envisaged, compatible with a shift from heteroepitaxy towards pseudo-homoepitaxy. Relevant growth parameters such as formation energy, roughening temperature, strain profile and chemical states are derived. PMID:27648371

  11. Nanocluster dynamics in fast rate epitaxy under mesoplasma condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. W.; Shibuta, Y.; Kambara, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of Si nano-clusters during epitaxial growth has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulation using the Tersoff potential. Several nm sized Si cluster formed during rapid cooling was found to deform instantaneously upon impingement on a Si(1 0 0) substrate at the same time with the spontaneous ordering of the atomic structure to that of the substrate. Due to the increased fraction of high-energy atoms at the surface, smaller clusters (˜1 nm) are favorable for such a deformation even at lower temperatures. This is the advantage of loosely-bound cluster as growth precursor to attain epitaxy with reduced impact energies.

  12. Magnetic Nanostructures by Adaptive Twinning in Strained Epitaxial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann-Weiss, Sandra; Gruner, Markus E.; Backen, Anja; Schultz, Ludwig; Entel, Peter; Fähler, Sebastian

    2011-11-01

    We exploit the intrinsic structural instability of the Fe70Pd30 magnetic shape memory alloy to obtain functional epitaxial films exhibiting a self-organized nanostructure. We demonstrate that coherent epitaxial straining by 54% is possible. The combination of thin film experiments and large-scale first-principles calculations enables us to establish a lattice relaxation mechanism, which is not expected for stable materials. We identify a low twin boundary energy compared to a high elastic energy as key prerequisite for the adaptive nanotwinning. Our approach is versatile as it allows to control both, nanostructure and intrinsic properties for ferromagnetic, ferroelastic, and ferroelectric materials.

  13. Magnetic domain walls in nanostrips of single-crystalline Fe4N(001) thin films with fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Keita; Rougemaille, Nicolas; Pizzini, Stefania; Honda, Syuta; Ota, Norio; Suemasu, Takashi; Fruchart, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    We investigated head-to-head domain walls in nanostrips of epitaxial Fe4N(001) thin films, displaying a fourfold magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations show that the domain walls have specific properties, compared to soft magnetic materials. In particular, strips aligned along a hard axis of magnetization are wrapped by partial flux-closure concertina domains below a critical width, while progressively transforming to zigzag walls for wider strips. Transverse walls are favored upon the initial application of a magnetic field transverse to the strip, while transformation to vortex walls is favored upon motion under a longitudinal magnetic field. In all cases, the magnetization texture of such fourfold anisotropy domain walls exhibits narrow micro-domain walls, which may give rise to peculiar spin-transfer features.

  14. Supercooling and the Mpemba effect: When hot water freezes quicker than cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David

    1995-10-01

    Temperature measurements taken near vessel walls show that initially hot water may well begin to freeze quicker than cold. This is not, as previously surmised, due to the cooling history of the water (e.g., air expulsion during heating). Rather, supercooling virtually always takes place. On those occasions where the cold water supercools sufficiently more than the hot the Mpemba scenario is the following: The hot water supercools, but only slightly, before spontaneously freezing. Superficially it looks completely frozen. The cold water (in larger volume than that of the hot sample) supercools to a lower local temperature than the hot before it spontaneously freezes. This scenario can occur more often for ambient cooling temperatures between -6 °C and -12 °C.

  15. Experimental Study of Ignition by Hot Spot in Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serruys, Max

    1938-01-01

    In order to carry out the contemplated study, it was first necessary to provide hot spots in the combustion chamber, which could be measured and whose temperature could be changed. It seemed difficult to realize both conditions working solely on the temperature of the cooling water in a way so as to produce hot spots on the cylinder wall capable of provoking autoignition. Moreover, in the majority of practical cases, autoignition is produced by the spark plug, one of the least cooled parts in the engine. The first procedure therefore did not resemble that which most generally occurs in actual engine operation. All of these considerations caused us to reproduce similar hot spots at the spark plugs. The hot spots produced were of two kinds and designated with the name of thermo-electric spark plug and of metallic hot spot.

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT DOOR WAS DARKROOM, AND THIRD DOOR LED TO ANOTHER OFFICE. ALL ARE ALONG NORTH WALL OF BUILDING (ETR EXTENSION OF 1958). CAMERA FACES NORTHEAST. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CP640) LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF HOT PILOT PLANT (CP-640) LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING FORMING AND PLACEMENT OF REINFORCING STEEL FOR SOUTH WALLS OF CELLS 1, 3, 4 AND 5 AND WEST WALL FOR CELLS 1 AND 2; CONSTRUCTION 13 PERCENT COMPLETE. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS 59-6436. J. Anderson, Photographer, 12/18/1959 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Fully planar method for creating adjacent ``self-isolating'' silicon-on-insulator and epitaxial layers by epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, J. L., Jr.; Neudeck, G. W.; Subramanian, C. K.; Denton, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    A novel and simple process is demonstrated for creating isolated silicon-on-insulator (SOI) tubs adjacent to selective epitaxial substrate layers. The process results in a fully planar wafer surface which is uniquely suited for mixed bipolar/complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication. Low-temperature epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) using SiH2Cl2/HCl/H2 is carried out in a reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor to create SOI islands in thermally grown SiO2 valleys. SOI islands and epitaxial seed regions are ``self-isolated'' by chemical-mechanical planarization. The as-grown ELO is single-crystal material with well-defined facets. Planarized SOI and epilayer regions have planar, featureless surfaces. Defect etching for the nonoptimized SOI layers indicates about 5×104 stacking faults/cm2.

  19. Three measuring techniques for assessing the mean wall skin friction in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoun, E.-S.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper aims at evaluating the mean wall skin friction data in laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows obtained from two optical and one thermal measuring techniques, namely, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), oil-film interferometry (OFI), and surface hot-film anemometry (SHFA), respectively. A comparison among the three techniques is presented, indicating close agreement in the mean wall skin friction data obtained, directly, from both the OFI and the LDA near-wall mean velocity profiles. On the other hand, the SHFA, markedly, over estimates the mean wall skin friction by 3.5-11.7% when compared with both the LDA and the OFI data, depending on the thermal conductivity of the substrate and glue material, probe calibration, probe contamination, temperature drift and Reynolds number. Satisfactory agreement, however, is observed among all three measuring techniques at higher Reynolds numbers, Re x >106, and within ±5% with empirical relations extracted from the literature. In addition, accurate velocity data within the inertial sublayer obtained using the LDA supports the applicability of the Clauser method to evaluate the wall skin friction when appropriate values for the constants of the logarithmic line are utilized.

  20. FDNS code to predict wall heat fluxes or wall temperatures in rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings on the NASA contract NAG8-212, Task No. 3. The overall project consists of three tasks, all of which have been successfully completed. In addition, some supporting supplemental work, not required by the contract, has been performed and is documented herein. Task 1 involved the modification of the wall functions in the code FDNS to use a Reynolds Analogy-based method. Task 2 involved the verification of the code against experimentally available data. The data chosen for comparison was from an experiment involving the injection of helium from a wall jet. Results obtained in completing this task also show the sensitivity of the FDNS code to unknown conditions at the injection slot. Task 3 required computation of the flow of hot exhaust gases through the P&W 40K subscale nozzle. Computations were performed both with and without film coolant injection. The FDNS program tends to overpredict heat fluxes, but, with suitable modeling of backside cooling, may give reasonable wall temperature predictions. For film cooling in the P&W 40K calorimeter subscale nozzle, the average wall temperature is reduced from 1750 R to about 1050 R by the film cooling. The average wall heat flux is reduced by a factor of three.

  1. Practical hot oiling and hot watering for paraffin control

    SciTech Connect

    Mansure, A.J.; Barker, K.M.

    1994-03-01

    One of the common oil-field wellbore problems is paraffin deposition. Even though hot oiling or hot watering is usually the first method tried for removing paraffin, few operators appreciate the limitations of ``hot oiling`` and the potential for the fluid to aggravate well problems and cause formation damage. Field tests have shown that the chemical and thermal processes that occur during ``hot oiling`` are very complex and that there are significant variations in practices among operators. Key issues include: (1) During a typical hot oiling job, a significant amount of the fluid injected into the well goes into the formation, and hence, particulates and chemicals in the fluid have the potential to damage the formation. (2) Hot oiling can vaporize oil in the tubing faster than the pump lifts oil. This interrupts paraffin removal from the well, and thus the wax is refined into harder deposits, goes deeper into the well, and can stick rods. These insights have been used to determine good ``hot oiling`` practices designed to maximize wax removal and minimize formation damage.

  2. A study on the epitaxial Bi2Se3 thin film grown by vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Sung; Lee, Chao-Chun; Wu, Jen-Kai; Lee, Hsin-Yen; Liang, Chi-Te; Chang, Yuan Huei

    2016-06-01

    We report the growth of high quality Bi2Se3 thin films on Al2O3 substrates by using chemical vapor deposition. From the atomic force microscope, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope measurements we found that the films are of good crystalline quality, have two distinct domains and can be grown epitaxially on the Al2O3 substrate. Carrier concentration in the sample is found to be 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 between T = 2 K to T = 300 K, and electron mobility can reach 954 cm2/V s at T = 2 K. Weak anti-localization effect is observed in the low temperature magneto-transport measurement for the sample which indicates that the thin film has topological surface state.

  3. 22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM THE SAME POINT AS VIEW NO. 21. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  5. Epitaxial growth of AlN films via plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nepal, N.; Qadri, S. B.; Hite, J. K.; Mahadik, N. A.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R. Jr.

    2013-08-19

    Thin AlN layers were grown at 200–650 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) simultaneously on Si(111), sapphire (1120), and GaN/sapphire substrates. The AlN growth on Si(111) is self-limited for trimethyaluminum (TMA) pulse of length > 0.04 s, using a 10 s purge. However, the AlN nucleation on GaN/sapphire is non-uniform and has a bimodal island size distribution for TMA pulse of ≤0.03 s. The growth rate (GR) remains almost constant for T{sub g} between 300 and 400 °C indicating ALE mode at those temperatures. The GR is increased by 20% at T{sub g} = 500 °C. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurement shows that the ALE AlN layers grown at T{sub g} ≤ 400 °C have no clear band edge related features, however, the theoretically estimated band gap of 6.2 eV was measured for AlN grown at T{sub g} ≥ 500 °C. X-ray diffraction measurements on 37 nm thick AlN films grown at optimized growth conditions (T{sub g} = 500 °C, 10 s purge, 0.06 s TMA pulse) reveal that the ALE AlN on GaN/sapphire is (0002) oriented with rocking curve full width at the half maximum (FWHM) of 670 arc sec. Epitaxial growth of crystalline AlN layers by PA-ALE at low temperatures broadens application of the material in the technologies that require large area conformal growth at low temperatures with thickness control at the atomic scale.

  6. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  7. Self-assembled magnetic nanostructures: Epitaxial nickel on titanium nitride (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Honghui

    2005-11-01

    Systems that contain single domain magnetic particles have been receiving intensive attentions over recent years since they are possible candidates for applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and magnetoelectronic devices. The focus of this research is self-assembly growth of magnetic nickel nanostructures by domain matching epitaxy under Volmer-Weber (V-W) mode. The growth was conducted by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using epitaxial titanium nitride film as the template, which was in turn grown on silicon (100) substrate. The structural characterization includes X-ray diffraction and both cross-sectional and plan-view transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the nickel islands formed exhibit a self-assembled nature, i.e., a certain degree of uniformity in orientation, shape, and size. The orientation relationship observed is Ni {100} // TiN {100} // Si {100}, the so-called "cube-on-cube" relationship. The islands are faceted, forming truncated pyramids with walls of (111) planes and a flat top of (100) plane. The base of islands is rectangular with the two principal edges parallel to two orthogonal <011> directions. The size distribution is relatively narrow, comparable to that obtained from self-assembled islands grown under Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) mode. A certain degree of self-organization was also found in the island lateral distribution: island chains were observed along the directions close to <011>, which are also the edge directions. The island faceting could be explained by surface energy minimization. The interaction of the island edge induced strain field between neighboring islands is believed to be responsible for the size uniformity and the lateral ordering. Magnetic measurements were also conducted on these crystallographically aligned nickel islands using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, and the results were compared with that obtained from the ensemble of randomly oriented

  8. Classification of epitaxy in reciprocal and real space: rigid versus flexible lattices.

    PubMed

    Forker, Roman; Meissner, Matthias; Fritz, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    Early investigations of epitaxy focused on inorganic adsorbates consisting of atoms or few-atom molecules, where commensurate registries are predominantly encountered. Expanding such studies to larger (organic) molecules has revealed hitherto unknown types of epitaxy with coherence between adlayer and substrate lattices in just one direction. Here we review recent contributions to the fundamental understanding and modeling of epitaxy. By sorting the ideas brought forward in the literature and amending some basic algebraic considerations a universal scheme for the classification of lattice epitaxy is presented. Ultimately, the occurrence of the different types of epitaxy is made plausible by easy-to-grasp energetic arguments.

  9. MIR wall surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    1998-08-01

    This report addresses the problem of determining the layer thickness of a wall probed with a monostatic, hand-held implementation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR). Our goal is to locate the layers of the wall, and measure its overall thickness. The physical constraints require the device to be held fixed or swept rapidly over the wall. Thus an insufficient amount of backscattered data are collected to use diffraction tomographic [3] techniques to form images. The problem is therefore one of determining the wall layers from a set of time series reflection data. We develop two channel signal processing algorithms to determine the location of the layers of a wall, using as inputs the time series returned from the wall and the incident pulse. We study the problem using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) computer code to simulate the electromagnetic propagation within and scattering from a wall probed with five pulses. We use the results to develop and test signal processing procedures for locating the individual layers. We study two classes of algorithms: a deconvolution approach to determine a layered impulse response, and a correlation approach. After testing the algorithms on the FDTD results, we down-select to a suitable method.

  10. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111)B substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-02-01

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {111}B substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {113}B faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  11. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-10-07

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°.

  12. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°. PMID:26442629

  13. Studies on the chemistry and immunochemistry of cell walls of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    MORSE, S I

    1962-08-01

    The cell walls of an 80/81 strain of Staphylococcus aureus (NYH-6) contain alanine, glycine, glutamic acid, lysine, muramic acid, glucosamine, and ribitol phosphate. 94 per cent of the phosphorus and 41 per cent of the glucosamine are removed by extraction of the cell walls with hot 5 per cent TCA, but significant amounts of the other constituents are not extracted by this procedure. The residue after hot TCA extraction (mucopeptide) is susceptible to lysozyme whereas the intact cell walls are resistant. Staphylococcus aureus cell walls are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Agglutination of the cell walls of one S. aureus strain is inhibited by absorption of antisera with cell walls of other S. aureus strains but not by absorption with S. albus cell walls. The ribitol teichoic acid can be isolated from cold TCA extracts of the cell walls. This compound consists almost entirely of ribitol phosphate and glucosamine. The isolated teichoic acid of strain NYH-6 is readily fixed to tanned sheep erythrocytes and these sensitized cells are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Cold TCA extracts of cell walls of other strains of S. aureus inhibit hemagglutination whereas extracts of S. albus walls do not. Studies on the inhibition of both hemagglutination and precipitation indicate that the antigenic determinant of S. aureus NYH-6 teichoic acid is beta-N-acetylglucosamine.

  14. STUDIES ON THE CHEMISTRY AND IMMUNOCHEMISTRY OF CELL WALLS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen I.

    1962-01-01

    The cell walls of an 80/81 strain of Staphylococcus aureus (NYH-6) contain alanine, glycine, glutamic acid, lysine, muramic acid, glucosamine, and ribitol phosphate. 94 per cent of the phosphorus and 41 per cent of the glucosamine are removed by extraction of the cell walls with hot 5 per cent TCA, but significant amounts of the other constituents are not extracted by this procedure. The residue after hot TCA extraction (mucopeptide) is susceptible to lysozyme whereas the intact cell walls are resistant. Staphylococcus aureus cell walls are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Agglutination of the cell walls of one S. aureus strain is inhibited by absorption of antisera with cell walls of other S. aureus strains but not by absorption with S. albus cell walls. The ribitol teichoic acid can be isolated from cold TCA extracts of the cell walls. This compound consists almost entirely of ribitol phosphate and glucosamine. The isolated teichoic acid of strain NYH-6 is readily fixed to tanned sheep erythrocytes and these sensitized cells are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Cold TCA extracts of cell walls of other strains of S. aureus inhibit hemagglutination whereas extracts of S. albus walls do not. Studies on the inhibition of both hemagglutination and precipitation indicate that the antigenic determinant of S. aureus NYH-6 teichoic acid is β-N-acetylglucosamine. PMID:14476345

  15. Wall conditioning on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Pitts, Richard A.

    2011-08-01

    Like all tokamaks, ITER will require wall conditioning systems and strategies for successful operation from the point of view of plasma-facing surface preparation. Unlike today's devices however, ITER will have to manage large quantities of tritium fuel, imposing on wall conditioning a major responsibility for tritium inventory control. It will also feature the largest plasma-facing beryllium surface ever used in a tokamak and its high duty cycle and long pulse are expected to lead to the rapid formation of deposited layers in which tritium can accumulate. This paper summarises the currently planned ITER wall conditioning systems and describes the strategy for their use throughout exploitation of the device.

  16. Techniques for hot structures testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deangelis, V. Michael; Fields, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    Hot structures testing have been going on since the early 1960's beginning with the Mach 6, X-15 airplane. Early hot structures test programs at NASA-Ames-Dryden focused on operational testing required to support the X-15 flight test program, and early hot structures research projects focused on developing lab test techniques to simulate flight thermal profiles. More recent efforts involved numerous large and small hot structures test programs that served to develop test methods and measurement techniques to provide data that promoted the correlation of test data with results from analytical codes. In Nov. 1988 a workshop was sponsored that focused on the correlation of hot structures test data with analysis. Limited material is drawn from the workshop and a more formal documentation is provided of topics that focus on hot structures test techniques used at NASA-Ames-Dryden. Topics covered include the data acquisition and control of testing, the quartz lamp heater systems, current strain and temperature sensors, and hot structures test techniques used to simulate the flight thermal environment in the lab.

  17. Current at domain walls, roughly speaking: nanoscales studies of disorder roughening and conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruch, Patrycja

    2013-03-01

    Domain walls in (multi)ferroic materials are the thin elastic interfaces separating regions with different orientations of magnetisation, electric polarisation, or spontaneous strain. Understanding their behaviour, and controlling domain size and stability, is key for their integration into applications, while fundamentally, domain walls provide an excellent model system in which the rich physics of disordered elastic interfaces can be accesses. In addition, domain walls can present novel properties, quite different from those of their parent materials, making them potentially useful as active components in future nano-devices. Here, we present our atomic force microscopy studies of ferroelectric domain walls in epitaxial Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 and BiFeO3 thin films, in which we use piezorespose force microscopy to show unusual domain wall roughening behaviour, with very localised disorder regions in the sample leading to a complex, multi-affine scaling of the domain wall shape. We also show the effects of temperature, environmental conditions, and defects on switching dynamics and domain wall roughness. We combine these observations with parallel conductive-tip atomic force microscopy current measurements, which also show highly localised variations in conduction, and highlight the key role played by oxygen vacancies in the observed domain wall conduction.

  18. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  19. Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These thermal images show a 'hot' south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere.

    The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO).

    Scientists say Neptune's south pole is 'hotter' than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit). The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius (minus 392 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The upper left image samples temperatures near the top of Neptune's troposphere (near 100 millibar pressure, which is one-tenth the Earth atmospheric pressure at sea level). The hottest temperatures are indicated at the lower part of the image, at Neptune's south pole (see the graphic at the upper right). The lower two images, taken 6.3 hours apart, sample temperatures at higher altitudes in Neptune's stratosphere. They do show generally warmer temperatures near, but not at, the south pole. They also show a distinct warm area which can be seen in the lower left image and rotated completely around the back of the planet and returned to the earth-facing hemisphere in the lower right image.

  20. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W. David; Carmack, Jon; Werner, James E.; Pink, Robert J.; Haggard, DeLon C.; Johnson, Ryan

    2007-01-30

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISP. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 deg. C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test low activity uranium containing materials but is also suited for testing cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.