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Sample records for hotel dearborn mi

  1. Dearborn: Modern Standard Arabic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a roundup of the Arabic language instruction offered in the Dearborn, Michigan, school district. Only one of the district's 22 elementary schools--Becker--offers Arabic. Pupils receive at least two 40 minute periods of Arabic a week. The school gave up a two-way immersion program, in which students were taught half their…

  2. 77 FR 37326 - Safety Zone; Grand Hotel 125th Anniversary Fireworks Celebration, Mackinaw Island, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grand Hotel 125th Anniversary Fireworks... launched from a point on Lake Huron to commemorate the Grand Hotel's 125th anniversary. The Captain of the Port, Sector Sault Sainte Marie, has determined that the Grand Hotel Celebration Fireworks Display will...

  3. Dearborn 1981-82 Achievement Test Scores (Fifth Annual Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearborn Public Schools, MI.

    The purpose of the fifth annual Dearborn Achievement Test Score report is to summarize and to help interpret the test results so that Dearborn citizens and educators will have a better understanding of the educational achievements of Dearborn students. The District-wide Testing Program assesses reading readiness, scholastic aptitude, academic…

  4. Chicago's Dearborn Observatory: a study in survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartky, Ian R.

    2000-12-01

    The Dearborn Observatory, located on the Old University of Chicago campus from 1863 until 1888, was America's most promising astronomical facility when it was founded. Established by the Chicago Astronomical Society and directed by one of the country's most gifted astronomers, it boasted the largest telescope in the world and virtually unlimited operating funds. The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 destroyed its funding and demolished its research programme. Only via the sale of time signals and the heroic efforts of two amateur astronomers did the Dearborn Observatory survive.

  5. Source Apportionment of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter in Dearborn, Michigan, using Hourly Resolved PM Chemical Composition Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    High time-resolution aerosol sampling was conducted for one month during July–August 2007 in Dearborn, MI, a non-attainment area for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Measurements of more than 30 PM2.5 species were made using a suite o...

  6. Source Apportionment of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter in Dearborn, Michigan, using Hourly Resolved PM Chemical Composition Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    High time-resolution aerosol sampling was conducted for one month during July–August 2007 in Dearborn, MI, a non-attainment area for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Measurements of more than 30 PM2.5 species were made using a suite o...

  7. Dearborn Forms Elementary Arabic Language Program Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabrizi, Shereen

    2009-01-01

    The Dearborn Public Schools, with 18,300 students, is located in the Detroit urban area with the largest concentration of Arabic-speaking people in the United States. In order to prepare the students for the 21st century skills and global awareness and in response to parents' requests, the author in collaboration with the school principal and…

  8. Dearborn Forms Elementary Arabic Language Program Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabrizi, Shereen

    2009-01-01

    The Dearborn Public Schools, with 18,300 students, is located in the Detroit urban area with the largest concentration of Arabic-speaking people in the United States. In order to prepare the students for the 21st century skills and global awareness and in response to parents' requests, the author in collaboration with the school principal and…

  9. 75 FR 3252 - Ford Motor Company, Dearborn Truck Plant, Dearborn, MI; Notice of Negative Determination on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... like or directly competitive products with Ford F Series pickups and Lincoln Mark LR sports-utility... sports-utility pickups to/from a foreign country. The petitioners alleged that production at the subject..., although not substantial identical, are substantially equivalent for commercial purposes (i.e., adapted...

  10. Sources of fine urban particulate matter in Detroit, MI.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, Amy E; Hopke, Philip K; Kim, Eugene

    2007-10-01

    Data from the speciation trends network (STN) was used to evaluate the amount and temporal patterns of particulate matter originating from local industrial sources and long-range transport at two sites in Detroit, MI: Allen Park, MI, southwest of both Detroit and the areas of heavy industrial activity; Dearborn, MI, located on the south side of Detroit near the most heavily industrialized region. Using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and comparing source contributions at Allen Park to those in Dearborn, contributions made by local industrial sources (power plants, coke refineries, iron smelting, waste incineration), local area sources (automobile and diesel truck) and long range sources of PM(2.5) can be distinguished in greater Detroit. Overall, the mean mass concentration measured at Dearborn was 19% higher than that measured at Allen Park. The mass at Allen Park was apportioned as: secondary sulfate 31%, secondary nitrate 28%, soil 8%, mixed aged sea and road salts 4%, gasoline 15%, diesel 4%, and biomass burning 3%. At Dearborn the mass was apportioned as: secondary sulfate 25%, secondary nitrate 20%, soil 12%, mixed aged sea and road salts 4%, gasoline 20%, diesel 8%, iron and steel, 5%, and mixed industrial 7%. The impact of the iron and steel, soil, and mixed aged sea and road salt was much higher at the Dearborn site than at the Allen Park site, suggesting that close proximity to a local industrial complex has a direct negative impact on local air quality.

  11. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: GRACE DEARBORN INC.'S DARAMEND BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil's ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to microorganisms and...

  12. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: GRACE DEARBORN INC.'S DARAMEND BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil's ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to microorganisms and...

  13. Evaluation of Electronic Data Processing Curricula in the Dearborn Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Clovis B.; Ronan, Franklin D.

    In 1971 a survey was conducted by the Dearborn Schools to determine the curricular changes necessary to improve the electronic data processing (EDP) courses in the high schools and community colleges. Input was obtained from a 9 point questionnaire sent to 275 local data processing facilities and a 12 point questionnaire sent to 394 former EDP…

  14. Standards for Reference Service at the University of Michigan--Dearborn Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galligan, Sara

    Few standards for reference services have appeared in the past, therefore guidelines for reference librarians at the University of Michigan--Dearborn library are offered. The guidelines presented are based upon reference standards prepared by the Reference and Adult Services Division (RASD) Standards Committee for the ALA Centennial Conference in…

  15. 54. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  16. 57. VIEW LOOKING NORTH OF DENNIS HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. VIEW LOOKING NORTH OF DENNIS HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL IS PARTLY VISABLE TO THE RIGHT; SHELBOURNE HOTEL IS PARTLY VISABLE TO THE LEFT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  17. 66. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL IS PARTIALLY VIASBLE TO THE LEFT. CLARIDGE HOTEL IS VISABLE TO THE RIGHT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  18. Source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter in Dearborn, Michigan, using hourly resolved PM chemical composition data.

    PubMed

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Landis, Matthew S; Norris, Gary A; Vedantham, Ram; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2013-03-15

    High time-resolution aerosol sampling was conducted for one month during July-August 2007 in Dearborn, MI, a non-attainment area for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Measurements of more than 30 PM2.5 species were made using a suite of semi-continuous sampling and monitoring instruments. Dynamic variations in the sub-hourly concentrations of source 'marker' elements were observed when discrete plumes from local sources impacted the sampling site. Hourly averaged PM2.5 composition data for 639 samples were used to identify and apportion PM2.5 emission sources using the multivariate receptor modeling techniques EPA Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) v4.2 and EPA Unmix v6.0. Source contribution estimates from PMF and Unmix were then evaluated using the Sustained Wind Instance Method (SWIM), which identified plausible source origins. Ten sources were identified by both PMF and Unmix: (1) secondary sulfate, (2) secondary nitrate characterized by a significant diurnal trend, (3) iron and steel production, (4) a potassium-rich factor attributable to iron/steel slag waste processing, (5) a cadmium-rich factor attributable to incineration, (6) an oil refinery characterized by La/Ce>1 specific to south wind, (7) oil combustion, (8) coal combustion, (9) motor vehicles, and (10) road dust enriched with organic carbon. While both models apportioned secondary sulfate, oil refinery, and oil combustion PM2.5 masses closely, the mobile and industrial source apportionments differed. Analyses were also carried out to help infer time-of-day variations in the contributions of local sources.

  19. The UM-Dearborn Observatory: Variable-object Research from an Urban Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, Elisabeth; Clarkson, William I.; Rasmussen, Eric J; Bord, Donald J.; Dage, Kristen; Matzke, David; Swift, Carrie

    2014-06-01

    Since its construction in 2007, the UM-Dearborn Observatory has provided a valuable educational tool both for students at UM-Dearborn and our neighbor-institution the Henry Ford Community College, and for the public at-large. We have recently (Jan 2014) added a systematic long-term research program with our 0.4m main telescope, to photometrically monitor a number of bright variable objects, including X-ray binaries and chemically-peculiar metal-poor stars over long timescales. We ultimately envision assembling a photometric database of (at least) four-color photometry over years-decades (i.e., many hundreds of orbital timescales for close binaries), with the preponderance of datapoints taken by undergraduates. To conduct this program, we have had to overcome a number of site challenges, the solutions of which will be useful to many programs using small telescopes at urban sites. The 0.4m telescope lies on a shared building within UM-Dearborn's main Fairlane campus - i.e., is about 20 meters above sea level, near several sources of water vapor (including an active steam vent less than 15 meters away), experiences significant mechanical vibrations from other building functions, and lies about 6 miles from central Detroit, well within the Detroit-Ann Arbor conurbation. Observing conditions are thus highly variable, with 5 arcsecond seeing typical and significant transparency variations observed even during a clear night. Nevertheless, we are now able to make scientifically useful observations in a semi-automatic way, to which our chosen scientific niche is well-suited. We present here our solutions to these challenges, along with initial results from our ongoing monitoring program.

  20. 41. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT). CLARIDGE HOTEL IS PARTLY VISABLE TO THE RIGHT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  1. The Infinite Hotel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a historical context for the debate between Georg Cantor and Leopold Kronecker regarding the cardinality of different infinities and incorporates the short story "Welcome to the Hotel Infinity," which uses the analogy of a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to help explain this concept. Wanko makes use of this history and…

  2. The Infinite Hotel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a historical context for the debate between Georg Cantor and Leopold Kronecker regarding the cardinality of different infinities and incorporates the short story "Welcome to the Hotel Infinity," which uses the analogy of a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to help explain this concept. Wanko makes use of this history and…

  3. Crime wave in hotels.

    PubMed

    1998-04-03

    A National Development and Research Institutes study of New York's residential hotels, housing 400 AIDS patients, found rampant criminal activity. The 113-page report, commissioned by Mayor Guiliani, found prostitution, loan sharking, extortion, and theft to be commonplace, some of it perpetrated by hotel managers and employees. The unsafe conditions force some residents to miss medical treatments or drug rehabilitation because they are afraid to leave their rooms.

  4. 1. EAST FACADE OF THE MARCUS DALY HOTEL. THE HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAST FACADE OF THE MARCUS DALY HOTEL. THE HOTEL WAS CONSTRUCTED IN A U SHAPE, WITH THE ENTRANCE ARCADE FORMING THE FORTH SIDE OF THE RECTANGLE - Anaconda Historic District, Marcus Daly Hotel, 200-208 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  5. 52. VIEW LOOKING EAST WITH THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW LOOKING EAST WITH THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND THE DENNIS HI=OTEL (TOP TO BOTTOM) IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  6. Quantum Hilbert Hotel.

    PubMed

    Potoček, Václav; Miatto, Filippo M; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; Liapis, Andreas C; Oi, Daniel K L; Boyd, Robert W; Jeffers, John

    2015-10-16

    In 1924 David Hilbert conceived a paradoxical tale involving a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to illustrate some aspects of the mathematical notion of "infinity." In continuous-variable quantum mechanics we routinely make use of infinite state spaces: here we show that such a theoretical apparatus can accommodate an analog of Hilbert's hotel paradox. We devise a protocol that, mimicking what happens to the guests of the hotel, maps the amplitudes of an infinite eigenbasis to twice their original quantum number in a coherent and deterministic manner, producing infinitely many unoccupied levels in the process. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by experimentally realizing it on the orbital angular momentum of a paraxial field. This new non-Gaussian operation may be exploited, for example, for enhancing the sensitivity of NOON states, for increasing the capacity of a channel, or for multiplexing multiple channels into a single one.

  7. Quantum Hilbert Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoček, Václav; Miatto, Filippo M.; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Oi, Daniel K. L.; Boyd, Robert W.; Jeffers, John

    2015-10-01

    In 1924 David Hilbert conceived a paradoxical tale involving a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to illustrate some aspects of the mathematical notion of "infinity." In continuous-variable quantum mechanics we routinely make use of infinite state spaces: here we show that such a theoretical apparatus can accommodate an analog of Hilbert's hotel paradox. We devise a protocol that, mimicking what happens to the guests of the hotel, maps the amplitudes of an infinite eigenbasis to twice their original quantum number in a coherent and deterministic manner, producing infinitely many unoccupied levels in the process. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by experimentally realizing it on the orbital angular momentum of a paraxial field. This new non-Gaussian operation may be exploited, for example, for enhancing the sensitivity of NOON states, for increasing the capacity of a channel, or for multiplexing multiple channels into a single one.

  8. An Imaginary Community--Hotel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Jan

    1969-01-01

    An English class at Newtyle Secondary School, Scotland, spent four periods a week for 6 weeks on an anthological project entitled "hotel". Students assumed roles in an imaginary hotel community, wrote advertisements, brochures, and business letters, and participated in interviews, discussions, and dramatizations of specific hotel problems. Besides…

  9. [Deaths in hotels].

    PubMed

    Risse, Manfred; Weilbächer, Nadine; Birngruber, Christoph; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2010-01-01

    There are no verified statistics about deaths occurring in hotels, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. A recent case induced us to conduct a systematic search for deaths in hotels in the autopsy reports of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen for the period from 1968 to 2009. This search yielded 22 evaluable cases in which persons had been found dead or had died in hotels. Data evaluated in the study were sex and age of the deceased, reason for the stay in the hotel and cause of death. Among the deaths, 18 were males and 4 females and the average age was 41 and 40 years respectively. 6 of the male guests had died from a natural and 10 from a non-natural cause. In the remaining two cases, the cause of death could not be determined, but as there was no evidence that another party had been involved, the cases were not further investigated. Of the 4 female guests, 3 had died of a natural cause; in one case, the cause of death remained unclear even after morphological and toxicological investigations. Surprisingly, a third of the men were found to be temporarily living in hotels due to social circumstances. This was not true for any of the women. Our retrospective analysis is based on a comparatively small number of deaths in what were mostly hotels in small to medium-sized towns. Interestingly, the gender ratio of 18:4 for deceased men and women was significantly higher than the usual gender ratio of 2:1 found for forensic autopsies. To be able to draw further conclusions, a greater number of cases would have to be analysed, for example by recruiting additional case files from other institutes of legal medicine. This would also open up the option of investigating possible regional variations.

  10. Proceedings of the 1999 Vehicle Technologies Alternative Propulsion Symposium. Held in Dearborn, MI on May 3-5, 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-05

    overcharge 2. Efficiency -100% coulombic efficiency high efficiencies to >60C HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMONSTRATIONS OF OVON1C NICKEL-METAL HYDRIDE...Hybrid • vehicles Fuel cells, fuel reformers Turbines. CIDI engines Efficient electronics and electrical devices • Advanced batteries 2000 2004...gO(oQO NATIONAL DEFENSE INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATION STRENGTH THROUGH INDUSTRY & TECHNOLOGY 1999 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES ALTERNATIVE PROPULSION

  11. Integrating Title I and Title VII: The Evolving Model of Dearborn Public Schools, Michigan. NCBE Program Information Guide Series No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arraf, Shereen; And Others

    This report offers insights on the experiences and techniques used in the Dearborn Public Schools effort to integrate Title VII and Chapter 1 programs prior to their reauthorization. The school system is located near metropolitan Detroit, Michigan, and has over 14,500 students representing 24 languages, many from the Middle East, Romania, and…

  12. Spatial Analysis and Land Use Regression of VOCs and NO2 from School-Based Urban Air Monitoring in Detroit-Dearborn, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive ambient air sampling for nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and volatioe organic compounds (VOCs) was conducted at 25 schools and two compliance sites in Detroit and Dearborne, Michigan. Geographic Information System (GIS) data were calculated at each of 116 schools. The ...

  13. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different areas...

  14. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different areas...

  15. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different areas...

  16. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different areas...

  17. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different areas...

  18. Agency-Hired Hotel Housekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Sanon, Marie-Anne V.

    2014-01-01

    Hotel housekeepers experience unique workplace hazards and characteristics that increase their risks for poor health outcomes. Today’s agency-hiring practices may further marginalize hotel housekeepers and negatively impact their health. Yet the impact of such hiring practices on the health of this vulnerable worker group remains unexplored. This article presents the debate regarding agency-hiring practices and how these practices may influence the health and well-being of hotel housekeepers. Implications for occupational health nurses are also discussed. PMID:24512722

  19. Towards Universal Design Hotels in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Based on the research project 'Accessible Hotel Rooms' that studies the balance between the experience of supply and demand regarding accessibility features in Danish hotel rooms, this paper demonstrates factors having an influence on Universal Design hotels in Denmark. The research project was financed by the Danish Transport and Construction Agency. Different notions in the hotel sector of the current supply and demand for Universal Design hotel rooms are identified, as well as future demand. Despite supplying accessible rooms, some hotels do not advertise their accessibility features on their website. There exists an attitude in the hotel sector that functions as a barrier for Universal Design: if there are enough guests, for example business travellers, then why market the hotel on Universal Design? The paper points out the coherence between the understanding of the users and the view of demand. Another important factor is Corporate Social Responsibility, which can be regarded as a strategy or platform towards Universal Design hotels.

  20. 27. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT ROOFS OF DENNIS HOTEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT ROOFS OF DENNIS HOTEL AND BLENHEIM HOTEL. MARLBOROUGH HOTEL IS PARTLY VISIBLE TO THE RIGHT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  1. 6. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TO NORTHEAST OF DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TO NORTHEAST OF DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  2. A hotel fire.

    PubMed

    Petersen, K B

    1975-09-01

    A hotel fire in Copenhagen claimed 35 victims of eight different nationalities. An account is given of some major aspects of the dental identification work, including a few case reports. This disaster became professionally important because the dental expert team was allowed a completely free hand. Eight dental experts cooperated closely in recording, photographing and radiographing dental conditions in the victims and thereby became able to establish that, with adequate facilities at hand, complete dental registration of a single victim required an average of three man-hours. Three of the experts subsequently cooperated in establishing comparable antemortem data on the known missing persons, in comparing the ante- and postmortem data sets, and in completing the necessary paper work. Here, it could be shown that a further two man-hours were required per victim. In a final report to the police it was proposed that---in any future case---such number of dentists should be assigned which, allowing three man-hours per victim, would enable the dental team to finish the oral autopsy of the given number of victims within five full working days, i.e. a minimum of two dentists per 30 victims. Two dentists will accomplish complete recording in less than half the time it will take any dentist working single-handed to finish it, so that the question of cost can hardly become an obstacle. It remains for the profession to make sure that an adequate number of knowledgeable dental experts are always available.

  3. Hotels Make Room for Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Hotels, in hopes of gaining a competitive edge, are offering workout rooms, exercise equipment, fitness trails, and jogging tracks, but no standards have been set for safety of the facilities or staff preparedness in exercise screening, equipment use, injury prevention, or first aid. (MT)

  4. Expedition 33 Crew Hotel Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-23

    Expedition 33/34 Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin performs the traditional door signing before he and fellow cremates, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy, and Flight Engineer Kevin Ford depart the Cosmonaut Hotel for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station, on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket will send Ford, Novitskiy and Tarelkin on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 33 Crew Hotel Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-23

    Expedition 33/34 Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy performs the traditional door signing before he and fellow cremates, Flight Engineer Kevin Ford, and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin depart the Cosmonaut Hotel for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station, on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket will send Ford, Novitskiy and Tarelkin on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 33 Crew Hotel Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-23

    Expedition 33/34 Flight Engineer Kevin Ford performs the traditional door signing before he and fellow cremates, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy, and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin depart the Cosmonaut Hotel for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station, on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket will send Ford, Novitskiy and Tarelkin on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. 3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  8. 33. VIEW LOOKING NORTHNORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL (PARTIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW LOOKING NORTH-NORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL (PARTIAL VIEW OF THE BLENHEIM HOTEL) - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  9. 4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  10. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM HOTEL; HAMILTON BUNGALOW IN FOREGROUND; BUNGALOW NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM HOTEL; HAMILTON BUNGALOW IN FOREGROUND; BUNGALOW NO. 3 DIRECTLY BEHIND; HINDS & CONNER AND "A" BUNGALOWS IN REAR. VISTA DEL ARROYO HOTEL ON RIGHT - Vista del Arroyo Hotel, 125 South Grand Avenue, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 1. General view of the Moody Hotel, Tremont Square. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of the Moody Hotel, Tremont Square. The hotel was built by William Emerson in 1890-92. - Claremont Village Industrial District, Moody Hotel, Tremont Square, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  12. 39. VIEW LOOKING NORTHNORTHEAST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. VIEW LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE BLENHEIM HOTEL IN THE BACKGROUND - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  13. 88. VIEW LOOKING FROM THE BRIDGE FROM THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. VIEW LOOKING FROM THE BRIDGE FROM THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL TOWARD THE READING LOUNGE OUTSIDE OF THE MAIN DINING ROOM OF THE BLENHEIM HOTEL - Blenheim Hotel, Ohio Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  14. 43. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE BLENHEIM, DENNIS,AND SHELBOURNE HOTELS BEYOUND - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  15. Quantifying Behavior Driven Energy Savings for Hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Bing; Wang, Na; Hooks, Edward; Zhao, Jie

    2016-08-12

    Hotel facilities present abundant opportunities for energy savings. In the United States, there are around 25,000 hotels that spend on an average of $2,196 on energy costs per room each year. This amounts to about 6% of the total annual hotel operating cost. However, unlike offices, there are limited studies on establishing appropriate baselines and quantifying hotel energy savings given the variety of services and amenities, unpredictable customer behaviors, and the around-the-clock operation hours. In this study, we investigate behavior driven energy savings for three medium-size (around 90,000 sf2) hotels that offer similar services in different climate zones. We first used Department of Energy Asset Scoring Tool to establish baseline models. We then conducted energy saving analysis in EnergyPlus based on a behavior model that defines the upper bound and lower bound of customer and hotel staff behavior. Lastly, we presented a probabilistic energy savings outlook for each hotel. The analysis shows behavior driven energy savings up to 25%. We believe this is the first study to incorporate behavioral factors into energy analysis for hotels. It also demonstrates a procedure to quickly create tailored baselines and identify improvement opportunities for hotels.

  16. Proceedings of the Eastern Michigan University Conference on Languages for Business and the Professions (4th, Dearborn, MI, May 2-4, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Comp.

    The proceedings of this conference include 56 papers on program design, classroom techniques, and ideas for second language instruction for business and the professions. The papers are presented in eight groups: (1) "International Business: The Language and Culture Connection," which includes papers on multinational business, marketing,…

  17. Proceedings of the Eastern Michigan University Conference on Languages for Business and the Professions (4th, Dearborn, MI, May 2-4, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Comp.

    The proceedings of this conference include 56 papers on program design, classroom techniques, and ideas for second language instruction for business and the professions. The papers are presented in eight groups: (1) "International Business: The Language and Culture Connection," which includes papers on multinational business, marketing,…

  18. Fireguard Training for Hotel Employees: Sprinkler Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, James

    This thesis examines the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of an instructional development project addressing hotel fireguards. Systematic techniques were applied to produce a session to train the appropriate hotel employees to qualify as fireguards. The portion of training represented in this report is the sprinkler…

  19. Fireguard Training for Hotel Employees: Sprinkler Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, James

    This thesis examines the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of an instructional development project addressing hotel fireguards. Systematic techniques were applied to produce a session to train the appropriate hotel employees to qualify as fireguards. The portion of training represented in this report is the sprinkler…

  20. Promotion of responsible drinking in hotels.

    PubMed

    McLean, S; Wood, L J; Montgomery, I M; Davidson, J; Jones, M E

    1994-01-01

    This study reports on an intervention programme to promote responsible drinking in hotels. The licensees of eight hotels agreed to participate in a trial of measures designed to assist patrons to avoid drink-driving, and seven other hotels were used as controls. The interventions acceptable to licensees comprised commercial-quality promotional material with the theme "0.05 Know Your Limits", and a breath analysis machine and poster on its use. Patrons leaving the hotels on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights were interviewed and breath-tested. Although the intervention material had been seen by one-third of patrons in the intervention hotels, there was no significant difference between them and control hotel patrons in either median BAC or the proportion who were going to drive with BAC over the legal limit. There was poor compliance by hotels with the intervention procedures, indicating that a major impediment to the implementation and evaluation of programmes to promote responsible drinking is a lack of motivation by many licensees, despite support by some licensees and the Australian Hotels Association.

  1. Housekeeping ESL. Workplace Literacy Curriculum for Hotels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Carol; And Others

    This curriculum for hotel employees is based on the analyses of worksite tasks and interactions. Hotel housekeepers were observed on the job, supervisors were consulted, and existing resources were reviewed to determine the language and basic skills needed to effectively and efficiently perform job duties. Twelve curriculum units were developed,…

  2. Expedition 33 Crew Hotel Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-23

    Expedition 33/34 crew members, Flight Engineer Kevin Ford of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy of ROSCOSMOS, and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin of ROSCOSMOS, right, receive the traditional blessing from a Russian Orthodox priest at the Cosmonaut Hotel on the morning of their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of a Soyuz rocket later in the afternoon will send Ford, Novitskiy and Tarelkin on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Expedition 33 Crew Hotel Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-23

    Expedition 33/34 crew members, Flight Engineer Kevin Ford of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy of ROSCOSMOS, and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin of ROSCOSMOS, right, wave farewell to family and friends as they depart the Cosmonaut Hotel to suit-up for their soyuz launch to the International Space Station, on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket will send Ford, Novitskiy and Tarelkin on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Expedition 33 Crew Hotel Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-23

    Expedition 33/34 crew members, Flight Engineer Kevin Ford of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy, and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin of ROSCOSMOS, right, depart the Cosmonaut Hotel to head to another building across the Baikonur Cosmodrome where they will suit-up for their soyuz launch, on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket will send Ford, Novitskiy and Tarelkin on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Hotel Housekeeping Work Influences on Hypertension Management

    PubMed Central

    Sanon, Marie-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Characteristics of hotel housekeeping work increase the risk for hypertension development. Little is known about the influences of such work on hypertension management. Methods For this qualitative study, 27 Haitian immigrant hotel housekeepers from Miami-Dade County, FL were interviewed. Interview transcripts were analyzed with the assistance of the Atlas. ti software for code and theme identification. Results Influences of hotel housekeeping work on hypertension management arose both at the individual and system levels. Factors at the individual level included co-worker dynamics and maintenance of transmigrant life. Factors at the system level included supervisory support, workload, work pace, and work hiring practices. No positive influences were reported for workload and hiring practices. Conclusions Workplace interventions may be beneficial for effective hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. These work influences must be considered when determining effective methods for hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. PMID:23775918

  6. Hotel housekeeping work influences on hypertension management.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Marie-Anne

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of hotel housekeeping work increase the risk for hypertension development. Little is known about the influences of such work on hypertension management. For this qualitative study, 27 Haitian immigrant hotel housekeepers from Miami-Dade County, FL were interviewed. Interview transcripts were analyzed with the assistance of the Atlas.ti software for code and theme identification. Influences of hotel housekeeping work on hypertension management arose both at the individual and system levels. Factors at the individual level included co-worker dynamics and maintenance of transmigrant life. Factors at the system level included supervisory support, workload, work pace, and work hiring practices. No positive influences were reported for workload and hiring practices. Workplace interventions may be beneficial for effective hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. These work influences must be considered when determining effective methods for hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 30. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT DENNIS HOTEL SOUTH ELEVATION. BLENHEIM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT DENNIS HOTEL SOUTH ELEVATION. BLENHEIM HOTEL SOUTH ELEVATION IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE TO THE RIGHT. SHELBOURNE HOTEL IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE TO THE LEFT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  8. Geography Matters in Online Hotel Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingshu; Zhou, Xiaolu

    2016-06-01

    In resonance with the popularity of user-generated contents (UGC) and the volunteered geographic information (VGI), this study crowdsourced 77,098 hotel reviews of 220 hotels provided by U.S. reviewers in the city of San Francisco, 2002 to 2015. In this exploratory analysis, we have revealed that there is spatial dependence of customer satisfaction at different locations (of hotels), which violates the assumption that ordinary least-square (OLS) is the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE); therefore, spatial model might be required for analysing any antecedents and consequences of such phenomena. These results have implications in marketing and management strategies.

  9. Rosebud Casino and Hotel NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit SD-0034584, Rosebud Casino and Hotel, South Dakota, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Todd County, South Dakota to an unnamed drainageway(s) tributary to Rock Creek.

  10. Wages and Tips in Hotels and Motels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Harry B.

    1975-01-01

    In 23 of the 24 metropolitan areas surveyed in June 1973, table waiters and waitresses in hotels and motels generally received lower wages than their assistants, though tips caused their total hourly earnings to be considerably higher. (Author/MW)

  11. Rosebud Casino and Hotel NPDES Proposed Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Indian Country, Minor Permit, proposed permit SD-0034584, Rosebud Casino and Hotel, South Dakota, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Todd County, South Dakota to an unnamed drainageway(s) tributary to Rock Creek.

  12. The homeless: help from hotels and restaurants.

    PubMed

    Hales, A; Eyster, J J; Ford, J L

    1993-07-01

    Specific examples and information are given to service providers to address the needs of homeless people. Together nurses and restaurant and hotel managers combined their expertise to assist local agencies in their community kitchens and shelters.

  13. Spinning reserve from hotel load response

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brendan; Kueck, John; Laughner, Theo; Morris, Keith

    2008-12-15

    Even though preliminary tests were not conducted during times of highest system or hotel loading during the summer, they showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22 to 37 percent depending on the outdoor temperature and time of day. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator's command to shed load was issued and the load drop was very rapid. (author)

  14. Musculoskeletal disorders in hotel restaurant workers.

    PubMed

    Chyuan, Jong-Yu Adol; Du, Chung-Li; Yeh, Wen-Yu; Li, Chung-Yi

    2004-01-01

    A variety of occupational groups have been shown to experience elevated risks of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD). Little information on WMSD is available in hotel restaurant workers. To document the profile of WMSD in a sample of hotel restaurant workers in Taiwan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information regarding body site specific WMSD, pain intensity and strategies for pain relief amongst a sample of hotel restaurant workers. Among 905 restaurant workers, 785 (84%) reported experience of WMSD in the previous month, with the highest prevalence rate found for the shoulder (58%). The highest mean score for perceived pain intensity was found for the lower back/waist (2.50 points). Despite a high prevalence rate, only a small portion of those reporting WMSD (12%) considered their work capacity or activities of daily living to be affected by WMSD, and only <5% of workers with WMSD sought medical treatment. WMSD related pain is common among hotel restaurant workers in Taiwan, but it does not appear to interfere with job performance or daily living. Self-treatment and alternative therapies that have not been evaluated for effectiveness are commonly employed by hotel restaurant workers.

  15. Traveler's encounter with nymphs in a hotel bed.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, Johanna; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    This case illustrates skin lesions in a traveler staying in a hotel bed infested with tics. Although infestation of hotels with bedbugs belonging to the Cimex genus is a growing problem worldwide, tick infestation has never been reported before.

  16. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  17. Could You Spot Bed Bugs in A Hotel Room?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_166585.html Could You Spot Bed Bugs in a Hotel Room? Survey finds they're ... HealthDay News) -- While many travelers think that finding bed bugs in their hotel room would be the stuff ...

  18. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, MARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, MARCH 1, 1907 From the Collection of the Dorothea B. Hoover Historical Museum, Joplin, Missouri, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  19. 21. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, JULY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, JULY 1, 1907 From the Collection of the Dorothea B. Hoover Historical Museum, Joplin, Missouri, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  20. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, OCTOBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, OCTOBER 1, 1906 From the Collection of the Dorothea B. Hoover Historical Museum, Joplin, Missouri, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  1. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, APRIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, APRIL 1, 1907 From the Collection of the Dorothea B. Hoover Historical Museum, Joplin, Missouri, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  2. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, FEBRUARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey BUILDING OF THE HOTEL, FEBRUARY 1, 1907 From the Collection of the Dorothea B. Hoover Historical Museum, Joplin, Missouri, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  3. Divisive normalization in channelized Hotelling observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Mou, Xuanqin

    2010-02-01

    Channelized Hotelling observers have been evaluated in signal detection in medical images. However, these model observers fall short of overestimate of detection performance compared with human observers. Here, we present a modified channelized Hotelling observer with divisive normalization mechanism. In this model, images first traverse a series of Gabor filters of different orientations, phases and spatial frequencies. Then, the channels outputs pass through a nonlinear process and pool in several channels. Finally, these channels responses are normalized through a divisive operation. Human performances of nodule detection in chest radiography are evaluated by 2AFC experiments. The same detection tasks are performed by the model observers. The results show that the modified channelized Hotelling observer can well predict the human performances.

  4. Hotel Employees' Japanese Language Experiences: Implications and Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makita-Discekici, Yasuko

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the Japanese language learning experiences of 13 hotel employees in Guam. Results of the study present implications and suggestions for a Japanese language program for the hotel industry. The project began as a result of hotel employees frustrations when they were unable to communicate effectively with their Japanese guests. (Auth/JL)

  5. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of fire...

  6. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of fire...

  7. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of fire...

  8. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of fire...

  9. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of fire...

  10. Hotel Employees' Japanese Language Experiences: Implications and Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makita-Discekici, Yasuko

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the Japanese language learning experiences of 13 hotel employees in Guam. Results of the study present implications and suggestions for a Japanese language program for the hotel industry. The project began as a result of hotel employees frustrations when they were unable to communicate effectively with their Japanese guests. (Auth/JL)

  11. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part VI: French for Business and the Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part VI of the proceedings includes 12 presentations. They are: "Teaching Students How to Read Economics and Commercial Texts in a Commercial French Course: Focus on Meaning" (Robert A. Kreiter); "The Teaching of French for Computers and Information Science" (John B. Romeiser); "A Program in French for Hotel and Restaurant Management Majors: The…

  12. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part II: Program Overviews and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part II of the proceedings includes nine presentations. They are: "Business and Foreign Language Tie the Knot at Nazareth College: A Four Year Program Model" (Octave G. Naulleau); "For an Actual Education in International Management" (Alain Eclache and Georges Labet); "A Foreign Language Program for Majors in Hotel and Restaurant Management:…

  13. The Application of Intelligent Building Technologies to Space Hotels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawkes, S.

    This paper reports that over the last few years Intelligent Building technologies have matured and standardised. It compares the functions of command and control systems in future large space facilities such as space hotels to those commonly found in Intelligent Buildings and looks at how Intelligent Building technologies may be applied to space hotels. Many of the functions required in space hotels are the same as those needed in terrestrial buildings. The adaptation of standardised, low cost, Intelligent Building technologies would reduce capital costs and ease development of future space hotels. Other aspects of Intelligent Buildings may also provide useful models for the development and operation of space hotels.

  14. Women in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study of the employment of women in the hotel and catering industry indicated that the industry employs nearly 17 percent of the entire paid female work force in the United Kingdom. Women constitute 75 percent of the industry's work force, and 47 percent of its managers are women. Women's position in the industry is characterized by their…

  15. Women in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study of the employment of women in the hotel and catering industry indicated that the industry employs nearly 17 percent of the entire paid female work force in the United Kingdom. Women constitute 75 percent of the industry's work force, and 47 percent of its managers are women. Women's position in the industry is characterized by their…

  16. How to Evaluate Hotel and Seminar Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadwell, Martin M.

    1970-01-01

    There are four essential elements to check when arranging for the use of hotel or motel facilities for seminars and training programs: cost, location, physical facilities and equipment, and attitude of the management. Careful checking in advance can help avoid inconvenience and frustration during a program. (MF)

  17. Smoking in hotels: prevalence, and opinions about restrictions.

    PubMed

    Semmonds, A; Bailey, K; Bentley, S; Chase, V; Fernando, S; Guruge, A; King, M; Tan, O M; Walsh, R

    1995-02-01

    Exposure to high levels of environmental tobacco smoke can occur in hotels. Controversy exists about smoking regulation on licensed premises. This survey of 138 people attending one of three Newcastle hotels during 1993 found that 57 per cent of respondents were nonsmokers. Fifty-eight per cent (95 per cent confidence interval (CI) 50 to 66 per cent) of respondents in these hotels believed their health was being adversely affected by other people's smoke in the hotel. Seventy per cent (CI 62 to 78 per cent), including half the smokers, were in favour of restriction of smoking in the hotels. Most preferred the establishment of smoke-free areas to the introduction of total smoking bans in hotels. The failure of hotels to regulate smoking suggests that a legislative approach is required. The case for legislation would be strengthened by a larger study elsewhere in Australia.

  18. Spatial analysis and land use regression of VOCs and NO(2) from school-based urban air monitoring in Detroit/Dearborn, USA.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, Shaibal; Smith, Luther A; Johnson, Mary M; Neas, Lucas M; Stallings, Casson A

    2009-08-01

    Passive ambient air sampling for nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was conducted at 25 school and two compliance sites in Detroit and Dearborn, Michigan, USA during the summer of 2005. Geographic Information System (GIS) data were calculated at each of 116 schools. The 25 selected schools were monitored to assess and model intra-urban gradients of air pollutants to evaluate impact of traffic and urban emissions on pollutant levels. Schools were chosen to be statistically representative of urban land use variables such as distance to major roadways, traffic intensity around the schools, distance to nearest point sources, population density, and distance to nearest border crossing. Two approaches were used to investigate spatial variability. First, Kruskal-Wallis analyses and pairwise comparisons on data from the schools examined coarse spatial differences based on city section and distance from heavily trafficked roads. Secondly, spatial variation on a finer scale and as a response to multiple factors was evaluated through land use regression (LUR) models via multiple linear regression. For weeklong exposures, VOCs did not exhibit spatial variability by city section or distance from major roads; NO(2) was significantly elevated in a section dominated by traffic and industrial influence versus a residential section. Somewhat in contrast to coarse spatial analyses, LUR results revealed spatial gradients in NO(2) and selected VOCs across the area. The process used to select spatially representative sites for air sampling and the results of coarse and fine spatial variability of air pollutants provide insights that may guide future air quality studies in assessing intra-urban gradients.

  19. Legionellosis Outbreak Associated With a Hotel Fountain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shamika S.; Ritger, Kathy; Samala, Usha; Black, Stephanie R.; Okodua, Margaret; Miller, Loretta; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Hicks, Lauri A.; Steinheimer, Craig; Ewaidah, Saadeh; Presser, Lance; Siston, Alicia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In August 2012, the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) was notified of acute respiratory illness, including 1 fatality, among a group of meeting attendees who stayed at a Chicago hotel during July 30–August 3, 2012. Suspecting Legionnaires' disease (LD), CDPH advised the hotel to close their swimming pool, spa, and decorative lobby fountain and began an investigation. Methods. Case finding included notification of individuals potentially exposed during July 16–August 15, 2012. Individuals were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. An environmental assessment was performed. Results. One hundred fourteen cases were identified: 11 confirmed LD, 29 suspect LD, and 74 Pontiac fever cases. Illness onsets occurred July 21–August 22, 2012. Median age was 48 years (range, 22–82 years), 64% were male, 59% sought medical care (15 hospitalizations), and 3 died. Relative risks for hotel exposures revealed that persons who spent time near the decorative fountain or bar, both located in the lobby were respectively 2.13 (95%, 1.64–2.77) and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.09–1.44) times more likely to become ill than those who did not. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from samples collected from the fountain, spa, and women's locker room fixtures. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 environmental isolates and a clinical isolate had matching sequence-based types. Hotel maintenance records lacked a record of regular cleaning and disinfection of the fountain. Conclusions. Environmental testing identified Legionella in the hotel's potable water system. Epidemiologic and laboratory data indicated the decorative fountain as the source. Poor fountain maintenance likely created favorable conditions for Legionella overgrowth. PMID:26716104

  20. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    PubMed Central

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  1. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers.

    PubMed

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as 'outcome' variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 - 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 - 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks.

  2. Legionellosis Outbreak Associated With a Hotel Fountain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shamika S; Ritger, Kathy; Samala, Usha; Black, Stephanie R; Okodua, Margaret; Miller, Loretta; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Hicks, Lauri A; Steinheimer, Craig; Ewaidah, Saadeh; Presser, Lance; Siston, Alicia M

    2015-12-01

    Background.  In August 2012, the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) was notified of acute respiratory illness, including 1 fatality, among a group of meeting attendees who stayed at a Chicago hotel during July 30-August 3, 2012. Suspecting Legionnaires' disease (LD), CDPH advised the hotel to close their swimming pool, spa, and decorative lobby fountain and began an investigation. Methods.  Case finding included notification of individuals potentially exposed during July 16-August 15, 2012. Individuals were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. An environmental assessment was performed. Results.  One hundred fourteen cases were identified: 11 confirmed LD, 29 suspect LD, and 74 Pontiac fever cases. Illness onsets occurred July 21-August 22, 2012. Median age was 48 years (range, 22-82 years), 64% were male, 59% sought medical care (15 hospitalizations), and 3 died. Relative risks for hotel exposures revealed that persons who spent time near the decorative fountain or bar, both located in the lobby were respectively 2.13 (95%, 1.64-2.77) and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.09-1.44) times more likely to become ill than those who did not. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from samples collected from the fountain, spa, and women's locker room fixtures. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 environmental isolates and a clinical isolate had matching sequence-based types. Hotel maintenance records lacked a record of regular cleaning and disinfection of the fountain. Conclusions.  Environmental testing identified Legionella in the hotel's potable water system. Epidemiologic and laboratory data indicated the decorative fountain as the source. Poor fountain maintenance likely created favorable conditions for Legionella overgrowth.

  3. Design challenges and coordination issues in hotel projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Melvin L., IV; Marsh, David

    2002-11-01

    The design of a Five Star hotel facility encompasses a myriad of design dilemmas. On the same note, the design of a One Star or Two Star hotel has many dilemmas of its own. The ability of an acoustical consultant, as an integral part of the design team, to recognize the differences between these types of projects can be the difference between a successful hotel project and miserable failure. Different quality hotels require different levels of design criteria. Proper coordination and timing between trades and installations, such as loudspeakers, ceiling coffers, chandeliers, sprinkler heads, and ductwork, is also very important for the success of the overall project. This paper will discuss techniques and methods to produce successful hotel projects, as well as various noise sources throughout these spaces. It will also highlight a number of tips learned through many hotel design experiences.

  4. Evaluation of lumbar overload in hotel maids.

    PubMed

    Silva, J S; Correa, L R C; Morrone, L C

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are responsible for important amount of declining productivity among workers. Its economic impact is considered important because, in some aspects, such as sickness absence, it can cause increase in costs for employers. This paper aimed at identifying whether the activities that the hotel maids perform during working hours may lead to the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Cross-sectional study conducted in a hotel in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Performed an ergonomic analysis of the job application with a checklist consisting of risk assessment of low back pain. The maids are responsible for the cleaning of hotel rooms, including to lean in order to clean the bathroom. The activity is associated with ergonomic risk for poor posture, manual transport of loads and use of physical force in the upper limbs. This job presents a moderate risk of low back pain according to checklist for assessing the ergonomic situation. Negative ergonomic aspects are associated with the development or aggravation of musculoskeletal disorders in these workers. We suggest modification in work organisation. Another possibility is decreased the weight of the carts, keeping areas of replacement material on each floor.

  5. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  6. Occupational exposures and health outcomes among Latina hotel cleaners.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin Jerrie; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hatzudis, Kiki; Sönmez, Sevil

    2014-01-01

    The poor working conditions of Latina hotel cleaners render them particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards that lead to adverse health outcomes. This article presents a comprehensive review of occupational risks (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial risk factors) and health outcomes (including musculoskeletal disorders, respiratory diseases, dermatological diseases and allergies, and psychological disorders) for Latina hotel cleaners, within their unique sociocultural contexts. Preventive interventions for improving Latina hotel cleaners' work and health conditions are recommended.

  7. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hotels of Greece.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S D; Antoniadis, A; Papapaganagiotou, J; Stefanou, T

    1989-03-01

    Twenty water samples collected from 6 hotels situated in various areas of Greece were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms. Five of the six hotels included in this investigation were associated with cases of legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 8 were isolated from four of six hotels, mainly from the hot water supply system. This is the first isolation and identification of L. pneumophila in Greece.

  8. Renovation And Modernization Of Hotel Buildings - Case Studies In Silesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Uherek-Bradecka, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The cultural heritage of Silesia has different backgrounds and is often characterized by difficult to assess values. There is doubt as to whether some of the existing buildings should be modernized. Since 2000, an increase in the amount of investments in hotel buildings and conference venues in Poland has been observed. The functions and roles of hotels within a city have also changed. The paper presents examples of original projects and realizations of hotel buildings in Silesia. A discussion was also held regarding the issue of adapting and modernizing hotel buildings.

  9. Measurement of the direct <mi>CP> -violating parameter <mi>Ami><mi>CP> in the decay <mi>D>+<mi>Kmi>-<mimi>+<mi>π>+

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct mi>Cmi>mi>P>-violating parameter mi>Ami>mi>Cmi>mi>Pmi> for the decay of the charged charm meson, mi>Dmi>+mi>Kmi>-mi>πmi>+mi>πmi>+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 mi>fbmi>-1 sample of mi>p>mi>p>¯ collisions at mi>smi>=1.96 mi>TeVmi> collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from mi>B>mi>D

  10. New Employment Forecasts. Hotel and Catering Industry 1988-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measurement for Management Decision, Ltd., London (England).

    Econometric forecasting models were used to forecast employment levels in the hotel and catering industry in Great Britain through 1993 under several different forecasting scenarios. The growth in employment in the hotel and catering industry over the next 5 years is likely to be broadly based, both across income levels of domestic consumers,…

  11. Management Trainees in the Hotel Industry: What Do Managers Expect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of a survey of 118 United Kingdom hotel managers (53 percent response) with a similar study of 75 U.S. managers found key differences reflecting the impact of cultures on management expectations. Significant similarities support development of an internationally transferable core curriculum for hotel management. (SK)

  12. Management Trainees in the Hotel Industry: What Do Managers Expect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of a survey of 118 United Kingdom hotel managers (53 percent response) with a similar study of 75 U.S. managers found key differences reflecting the impact of cultures on management expectations. Significant similarities support development of an internationally transferable core curriculum for hotel management. (SK)

  13. HOTEL AND MOTEL HOUSEKEEPING AIDE, A SUGGESTED TRAINING PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    A LOCAL TRAINING PROGRAM TO PREPARE HOTEL AND MOTEL HOUSEKEEPING AIDES CAN BE DEVELOPED FROM RESOURCE MATERIAL IN THIS GUIDE. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES ARE TO PREPARE TRAINEES TO PERFORM THE JOBS INVOLVED IN KEEPING HOTEL OR MOTEL ROOMS CLEAN, TO FOLLOW CORRECT PROCEDURES IN USING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES REQUIRED IN CARING FOR BEDROOMS AND BATHROOMS, AND…

  14. Elderly Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Hotel Tenants: Still Alone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollinson, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    Conducted study of single room occupancy (SRO) hotels in Chicago, Illinois and collected data on everyday experiences of 53 elderly tenants. Findings showed that hotel environments offered anything but independence. Residents were trapped in situation that exacerbated isolation and withdrawal from society and were in desperate need of social…

  15. New Employment Forecasts. Hotel and Catering Industry 1988-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measurement for Management Decision, Ltd., London (England).

    Econometric forecasting models were used to forecast employment levels in the hotel and catering industry in Great Britain through 1993 under several different forecasting scenarios. The growth in employment in the hotel and catering industry over the next 5 years is likely to be broadly based, both across income levels of domestic consumers,…

  16. The Homeless Child at School: From Welfare Hotel to Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtzman, Rena; Fodor, Iris

    1987-01-01

    This article elucidates some causes of homelessness and describes living conditions in shelters and welfare hotels. Recommendations are offered to the school-based support team, in cooperation with teachers, to help ease the child's transition from hotel to school and initiate preventative health measures. (Author/BN)

  17. VIEW LOOKING WEST TOWARD RESERVOIR HILL. THE SPRR HOTEL WAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING WEST TOWARD RESERVOIR HILL. THE SPRR HOTEL WAS LOCATED IN THE STRIPED AREA AT THE BOTTOM OF THE IMAGE, AND THE TRACK RAN BETWEEN THE HILL AND THE HOTEL. - Southern Pacific Railroad Water Settling Reservoir, Yuma Crossing, south bank of Colorado River at foot of Madison Avenue, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  18. Hotel & Food Service Industries. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCL Brief, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy for the hotel and food service industries and lists program contacts. The following organizations operate employee basic skills programs for hotel and food service employees, provide technical assistance, or operate grant programs: Essential Skills Resource Center; Language Training…

  19. Hotel & Food Service Industries. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCL Brief, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy for the hotel and food service industries and lists program contacts. The following organizations operate employee basic skills programs for hotel and food service employees, provide technical assistance, or operate grant programs: Essential Skills Resource Center; Language Training…

  20. Changing Occupational Profiles in the Hotel Industry: Case Studies in France, Italy and Spain. Synthesis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Mario; Grazia Mereu, Maria; Tagliaferro, Claudio

    Changing occupational profiles in the hotel industry in France, Italy, and Spain were examined in case studies that included interviews with hotel managers, human resource managers, and individuals employed in hotel occupations identified as new or entailing new skills. The study focused on the following topics: (1) changes in the hotel industry…

  1. Perceived workplace mistreatment: Case of Latina hotel housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin Jerrie; Sönmez, Sevil; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Latina hotel housekeepers' social class, gender, race/ethnicity, nationality, and United States immigration status render them particularly vulnerable to workplace mistreatment. We sought to reveal the array of policy- and interpersonal-related mistreatment experienced by Latina hotel housekeepers in the southeastern United States employed at 75 local hotels which included 4-star, 3-star, 2-star, and 1-star properties. This ethnographic study involved 27 in-depth interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers. Using semi-structured in-depth interview guides, participants were interviewed until collected data reached saturation. Data were coded to explore themes and relationships for the housekeepers' work environments, and thick descriptions of these environments were developed. Participants ranged in work experience from 1 to 15 years, with all but one unable to reach full-time status, and were paid between $7.25 and $8.00 per hour. Policy-related phenomena, such as low pay, lack of paid sick leave or overtime, and absence of appropriate cleaning tools or protective equipment were all perceived as forms of mistreatment by Latina hotel housekeepers. Interpersonal mistreatment in the form of supervisor favoritism, unfair work assignments, biased allocation of cleaning supplies, disrespect, and verbal abuse due to ethnicity was also perceived. Latina hotel housekeepers endure mistreatment that impacts their psychosocial and physical occupational health. We provide recommendations to minimize workplace mistreatment and improve well-being of Latina hotel housekeepers.

  2. Strategic planning for hotel operations: The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company (Part II).

    PubMed

    Shriver, S J

    1993-01-01

    The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company won the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1992. One key to its success is its strategic planning process. In this second part of a two-part article, Stephen Shriver concludes his review of the Ritz-Carlton's approach to strategic planning. Shriver begins by outlining some key steps in plan development and goes on to describe how the Ritz-Carlton disseminates, implements, and evaluates the plan.

  3. Strategic planning for hotel operations: The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company (Part I).

    PubMed

    Shriver, S J

    1993-01-01

    The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company won the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award in 1992. One key to its success is its strategic planning process. This two-part article reviews the Ritz-Carlton's approach to strategic planning. In particular, it describes (1) the role of senior leadership in the planning process and (2) the specific activities that are associated with plan development and implementation.

  4. Structure-borne noise at hotels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, George Paul; Jue, Deborah A.

    2002-11-01

    Hotels present a challenging environment for building designers to provide suitable noise and vibration isolation between very incompatible uses. While many are familiar with ways to reduce traditional sources of airborne noise and vibration, structure-borne noise and vibration are often overlooked, often with costly repercussions. Structure-borne noise can be very difficult to pinpoint, and troubleshooting the sources of the vibration can be a tedious process. Therefore, the best approach is to avoid the problem altogether during design, with attention to the building construction, potential vibration sources, building uses and equipment locations. In this paper, the relationship between structure-borne vibration and noise are reviewed, typical vibration sources discussed (e.g., aerobic rooms, laundry rooms, mechanical equipment/building services, and subway rail transit), and key details and design guidance to minimize structure-borne noise provided.

  5. Hotel-motel fires: past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmon, J.T. Jr.

    1982-04-23

    The Winecoff Hotel Fire in 1946 triggered a great deal of activities directed toward improving methods of survival should a guest be involved in fire. In the 36 years since that event a great deal has transpired. Building integrity, construction, maintenance, firefighting appliances, occupant self protection systems, emergency communications and controls have drastically improved. However, fires continue to plague the unwary traveler thus this commentary reviews how a guest can probably survive with advanced planning on his or her part. While self preservation is the first priority, one should be actively engaged in learning what is going on in the community so that they can assist the community in providing fire safe structures at their places of business and at the other facilities where guests to their communities can conduct business and relax.

  6. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE C. 1925 HOTEL BENTON, LOCATED AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE C. 1925 HOTEL BENTON, LOCATED AT 408 MONROE AVENUE, VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Corvallis Downtown Historic District, Bounded by First & Sixth Streets, Van Buren & Western Avenues, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  7. Occupational Programs for the Restaurant/Hotel Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoenninger, Ronald W.; Riegel, Carl D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development of a Hotel and Restaurant Management Program, designed to provide career training, develop educational opportunities, and provide a forum through which the continuing education needs of the local hospitality industry could be assessed and evaluated. (TP)

  8. Occupational Programs for the Restaurant/Hotel Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoenninger, Ronald W.; Riegel, Carl D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development of a Hotel and Restaurant Management Program, designed to provide career training, develop educational opportunities, and provide a forum through which the continuing education needs of the local hospitality industry could be assessed and evaluated. (TP)

  9. 5. FOURTH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINES TO NORTHWEST: PRESS (LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FOURTH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINES TO NORTHWEST: PRESS (LEFT CENTER), MANUAL CUTTERS (CENTER, RIGHT CENTER) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  10. 7. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO WEST: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO WEST: FERGUSON & HAAS AUTOMATIC WRAPPING MACHINE INSTALLED BY 1929 - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  11. Discrimination against same-sex couples in hotel reservation policies.

    PubMed

    Jones, D A

    1996-01-01

    Discrimination against same-sex couples in hotel reservations policies was investigated. Hotels and bed and breakfast establishments (N = 320) were sent letters from either a same-sex or opposite-sex couple, requesting weekend reservations for a room with one bed. Same-sex couples were granted significantly fewer reservations than opposite-sex couples, suggesting that there was indeed discrimination against same-sex couples.

  12. [An epidemic of legionnaires' disease in a hotel].

    PubMed

    Gjenero-Margan, I; Drazenović, V; Vrbica, J; Vjerda, R; Aleraj, B; Borcić, B

    1989-03-01

    An outbreak of legionnaires' disease and epidemic control measures taken at one of our hotels are described. Twenty (1% morbidity) hotel guests were affected with one dying. As a result of field investigations and survey the hot water supply system has been identified as the source of infection. Control measures which created conditions unfavourable to Legionella growth and replication in the hot water system stopped the outbreak.

  13. Research on the Hotel Image Based on the Detail Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ban; Shenghua, Zheng; He, Yi

    Detail service management, initially developed as marketing programs to enhance customer loyalty, has now become an important part of customer relation strategy. This paper analyzes the critical factors of detail service and its influence on the hotel image. We establish the theoretical model of influencing factors on hotel image and propose corresponding hypotheses. We use applying statistical method to test and verify the above-mentioned hypotheses. This paper provides a foundation for further study of detail service design and planning issues.

  14. Spinning Reserve from Hotel Air Conditioning Load - SHORT VERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J

    2008-01-01

    Even though preliminary tests were not conducted during times of highest system or hotel loading during the summer, they showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22 to 37 percent depending on the outdoor temperature and time of day. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator's command to shed load was issued and the load drop was very rapid.

  15. Move to outpatient settings may boost medical hotels.

    PubMed

    Burns, J

    1992-06-08

    The shift of surgeries to outpatient settings could be healthy for medical hotels, those amenity-equipped facilities originally developed to ease patients out of costly acute-care beds. Because fewer hospitals have a pressing need to use such alternative lodging, some medical hotels are hoping to hitch their fortunes to the outpatient trade, keeping patients overnight after surgeries that don't require hospital admission.

  16. Hellish conditions at single-room occupancy hotels.

    PubMed

    Foley, D

    1998-08-01

    Poor conditions exist in many of the commercial single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels for people who are HIV-positive. Living conditions are unsanitary, brutal, and dangerous, and occupants often experience harassment from the hotel owners and staff. Many of the occupants are drug abusers or are mentally incapacitated, and therefore may not have the ability to secure better housing. The situation in the California Suites, an SRO in Manhattan, is described.

  17. Carbon monoxide poisoning at motels, hotels, and resorts.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla

    2007-07-01

    Each year, more than 200 people in the United States die from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Poisoning has occurred at motels, hotels, and resorts. Congressional mandate requires smoke alarms in all guest rooms; however, smoke alarms do not detect CO. Data on patients poisoned at hotels, motels, and resorts were evaluated at a hyperbaric medicine service. In 2005, legal databases and online news databanks were searched to discover additional incidents. Only victims evaluated in hospitals or declared dead at the scene were included. Cases of intentional poisoning and poisoning from fires were excluded. Between 1989 and 2004, 68 incidents of CO poisoning occurring at hotels, motels, and resorts were identified, resulting in 772 accidentally poisoned: 711 guests, 41 employees or owners, and 20 rescue personnel. Of those poisoned, 27 died, 66 had confirmed sequelae, and 6 had sequelae resulting in a jury verdict. Lodging-operated, faulty room heating caused 45 incidents, pool/spa boilers 16, CO entrained from outdoors 5, and unreported sources caused 2 incidents. Public verdicts have averaged $4.8 million per incident (range, $1 million to $17.5 million). Poisoning occurred at hotels of all classes. Despite these incidents, most properties did not install CO alarms, and requirements for CO alarms at hotels, motels, and resorts are rare. Guests of motels, hotels, and resorts remain at risk for injury or death from CO poisoning. Measures to prevent CO poisoning of guests and employees of the lodging industry should be evaluated.

  18. Hotel in the Bahamas profits from solar hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    On Paradise Island, located in the Bahamas, American Energy Technologies Inc. (AET) recently designed and supplied a domestic solar water heating system for the new Comfort Suites Hotel. AET is a Florida manufacturer of solar thermal collectors. The hotel has 150 rooms. Hot water usage entails the laundry facilities and the limited kitchen facilities. Access to hot showers is more of a luxury in some places, but guests at the Comfort Suites Hotel need not be concerned. During the development of the hotel, it was noted that the high heating costs of the propane-fueled hotel boiler were somewhat prohibitive. Propane cost approximately $1.67/gallon, causing the cost of heating water for the hotel to be estimated at over $1,000 per month. To offset the high heating costs, a 49-collector system on a 3200 gallon storage tank was designed into the plans for the new facility. The 49 roof mounted collectors were placed on a direct solar link to the 3200 gallon storage tank. The water is preheated before it gets to the boiler, cutting costs tremendously.

  19. Marangoni Inside (MI) Removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-23

    ISS036-E-023083 (23 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, works to remove the Marangoni Inside (MI) from the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  20. Marangoni Inside (MI) Removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-23

    ISS036-E-023070 (23 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, works to remove the Marangoni Inside (MI) from the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  1. Marangoni Inside (MI) Removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-23

    ISS036-E-023061 (23 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, works to remove the Marangoni Inside (MI) from the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  2. Bias in Hotelling observer performance computed from finite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Hesterman, Jacob Y.

    2007-03-01

    An observer performing a detection task analyzes an image and produces a single number, a test statistic, for that image. This test statistic represents the observers "confidence" that a signal (e.g., a tumor) is present. The linear observer that maximizes the test-statistic SNR is known as the Hotelling observer. Generally, computation of the Hotelling SNR, or Hotelling trace, requires the inverse of a large covariance matrix. Recent developments have resulted in methods for the estimation and inversion of these large covariance matrices with relatively small numbers of images. The estimation and inversion of these matrices is made possible by a covariance matrix decomposition that splits the full covariance matrix into an average detector-noise component and a background-variability component. Because the average detector-noise component is often diagonal and/or easily estimated, a full-rank, invertible covariance matrix can be produced with few images. We have studied the bias of estimates of the Hotelling trace using this decomposition for high-detector-noise and low-detector noise situations. In extremely low-noise situations, this covariance decomposition may result in a significant bias. We will present a theoretical evaluation of the Hotelling-trace bias, as well as extensive simulation studies.

  3. Legionella contamination in hot water of Italian hotels.

    PubMed

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica; Moro, Matteo; Scaltriti, Stefania; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella; Santarpia, Rosalba; Boccia, Stefania

    2005-10-01

    A cross-sectional multicenter survey of Italian hotels was conducted to investigate Legionella spp. contamination of hot water. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine concentration, and trace element concentrations), water systems, and building characteristics were evaluated to study risk factors for colonization. The hot water systems of Italian hotels were strongly colonized by Legionella; 75% of the buildings examined and 60% of the water samples were contaminated, mainly at levels of > or =10(3) CFU liter(-1), and Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (87%). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 45.8% of the contaminated sites and from 32.5% of the hotels examined. When a multivariate logistic model was used, only hotel age was associated with contamination, but the risk factors differed depending on the contaminating species and serogroup. Soft water with higher chlorine levels and higher temperatures were associated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization, whereas the opposite was observed for serogroups 2 to 14. In conclusion, Italian hotels, particularly those located in old buildings, represent a major source of risk for Legionnaires' disease due to the high frequency of Legionella contamination, high germ concentration, and major L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization. The possible role of chlorine in favoring the survival of Legionella species is discussed.

  4. Hospitalizations among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry.

    PubMed

    Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Kristensen, Tage S

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a broad picture of the morbidity among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry. Cohorts of all 20-59-year-old employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry in the years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1994 were formed to calculate age-standardized hospitalization ratios (SHR) and time trends (1981-1997) for many different diagnoses. Both for women and men, significantly higher SHRs were found for infectious and parasitic diseases, neoplasms, diseases in the nervous system and sense organs, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the respiratory system, diseases of the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the working population at large. Furthermore, among women a significantly elevated risk was found for injuries in the lower extremities, injuries in the upper extremities and head injuries, and among men a high risk was found for head injuries and a low risk for ruptures in ligaments and muscles. The trend assessments did not detect any significant changes in SHRs over time. Employment in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry is associated with an elevated hospitalization risk due to many diseases, which may be related to occupation and lifestyle. In line with the official policy of reducing inequality in health, focus should be placed on the health problems in this group.

  5. A large hotel outbreak of Norwalk-like virus gastroenteritis among three groups of guests and hotel employees in Virginia.

    PubMed Central

    Love, S. S.; Jiang, X.; Barrett, E.; Farkas, T.; Kelly, S.

    2002-01-01

    A large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred among three different groups of guests and the employees of a Virginia hotel within a 2-week period in November 2000. At least 76 of the hotel's guests and 40 hotel employees had acute gastroenteritis during this period. All tested ill persons were infected with the same strain of Norwalk-like virus, as shown by cloning and sequencing of virus detected in stool specimens from the three guest groups and the employees. Epidemiologic investigation suggested food as the probable source for the guests. Most of the employees, including those sick, did not eat in the hotel, suggesting that environmental contamination and person-to-person transmission could have contributed to the outbreak. The disease continued to spread in the hotel, passing from one guest group to another, by food, environmental contamination, and/or by person-to-person transmission through infected employees and guests. The study describes procedures implemented to control the outbreak and makes recommendations for future outbreak control. PMID:12211579

  6. Space-Hotel Early Bird - Visions for a Commercial Space Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.; Apel, U.

    2002-01-01

    rachid.amekrane@astrium-space.com/Fax: +49 421 539-24801, cholze@zarm.uni-bremen.de/Fax: +49 421 218-7473, The International Space Station was planed for research purposes. In 2001 the first private man, Denis Tito,visited the ISS and the second private man, Mark Shuttleworth is following him. The gate towards the commercial utilization of manned space flight has been pushed open. Space pioneers as Wernher von Braun and Sir Arthur C. Clarke had the dream that one day a space station in earth orbit will host tourists. It is evident that the ISS is not designed to host tourists. Therefore the dream of the pioneers is still open. By asking the question "how should a space station should look like to host tourists?", the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. organized a contest under the patronage of Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA) in April 2001. Because the definition and design of living space is the content of architecture the approach was to gather new ideas from young architects in cooperation with space experts. This contest was directed at students of architecture and the task set was to design a hotel for the earth orbit and to accommodate 220 guests. The contest got the name "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel". The results and models of the student's work were shown in an exhibition in Hamburg/Germany, which was open to the public from September 19th till October 20th 2001. During the summer term of 2001 seventeen designs were completed. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within this interdisciplinary project both parties learned from each other. The 17 different designs were focused on the expectations and needs of a future space tourist. The designs are for sure not feasible today, but the designs are in that sense realistic that they could be

  7. Ergonomics and accessibility for people with visual impairment in hotels.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Larissa Nascimento; de Carvalho, Ricardo José Matos

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a diagnosis of luxury or superior hotels in the city of Natal, located in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, in northeastern Brazil, in what concerns accessibility to the visually impaired. The main objective is to present the guiding principles to design actions and interventions that must be considered in the preparation or revision of technical standards and manuals of good practice in accessibility related to people with visual impairments who are hotel users. The survey showed that the hotels do not meet the normative indications of accessibility, their facilities are in-accessible (have prevented access) or of reduced accessibility and its employees are not prepared to provide adequate hospital services for people with visual impairment. It was concluded that some of the accessibility problems faced by people with visual impairments are also faced by people in general.

  8. Employment Prospects in the Hotel and Catering Trade: A Franco-American Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriot, Sylvie-Anne

    2000-01-01

    In both France and the United States, restaurants remain the hotel and catering sector's main employer. In France, 25% of hotel and catering personnel are self-employers versus fewer than 5% in the United States; however, the growth of hotel and restaurant chains in France may eventually limit opportunities for creating an independent activity.…

  9. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2005-04-01

    Including internal noise in computer model observers to degrade model observer performance to human levels is a common method to allow for quantitatively comparisons of human and model performance. In this paper, we studied two different types of methods for injecting internal noise to Hotelling model observers. The first method adds internal noise to the output of the individual channels: a) Independent non-uniform channel noise, b) Independent uniform channel noise. The second method adds internal noise to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses: a) internal noise standard deviation proportional to decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, b) internal noise standard deviation proportional to decision variable's variance caused by the external noise. We tested the square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO). The studied task was detection of a filling defect of varying size/shape in one of four simulated arterial segment locations with real x-ray angiography backgrounds. Results show that the internal noise method that leads to the best prediction of human performance differs across the studied models observers. The CHO model best predicts human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predict human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. These results might help explain why previous studies have found different results on the ability of each Hotelling model to predict human performance. Finally, the present results might guide researchers with the choice of method to include internal noise into their Hotelling models.

  10. Automatic recognition of biological shapes using the Hotelling transform.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Marin, F J

    2001-03-01

    We present two contour-based techniques, for computerized object recognition that avoid the difficulties due to translations, rotations and scaling. Our techniques do not require any shape representation. The first technique uses the scale-space filtered coordinate functions of contours and their "largest diameters". The second, uses the Hotelling transform of the vector representations of the points of contours. We applied both techniques to recognize human corneal endothelial cells, embedded in a sample of tissue. The results obtained using the Hotelling transform represent a considerable improvement when compared to those previously obtained using the coordinate functions, the curvature function and Fourier descriptors as representations of shape.

  11. Marangoni Inside (MI) Removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-23

    ISS036-E-023006 (23 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, uses a computer as he works to remove the Marangoni Inside (MI) from the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. MI1AENG1

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    MI1AENG1 MISR Level 1A Engineering Data File Type 1: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A product for the camera engineering data, which represents indicators of sampled measurements. ... Status Production Report Read Software Files :  Data Product Specification Versioning ...

  13. MI1ANAV

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    MI1ANAV MISR Level 1A Navigation Data: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A Product for the Navigation Data, which contains samples of the Terra Platform position and ... Specification Versioning History:  Engineering, Navigation SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B ...

  14. Spinning Reserve From Hotel Load Response: Initial Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J

    2008-11-01

    This project was motivated by the fundamental match between hotel space conditioning load response capability and power system contingency response needs. As power system costs rise and capacity is strained demand response can provide a significant system reliability benefit at a potentially attractive cost. At ORNL s suggestion, Digital Solutions Inc. adapted its hotel air conditioning control technology to supply power system spinning reserve. This energy saving technology is primarily designed to provide the hotel operator with the ability to control individual room temperature set-points based upon occupancy (25% to 50% energy savings based on an earlier study [Kirby and Ally, 2002]). DSI added instantaneous local load shedding capability in response to power system frequency and centrally dispatched load shedding capability in response to power system operator command. The 162 room Music Road Hotel in Pigeon Forge Tennessee agreed to host the spinning reserve test. The Tennessee Valley Authority supplied real-time metering equipment in the form of an internet connected Dranetz-BMI power quality meter and monitoring expertise to record total hotel load during both normal operations and test results. The Sevier County Electric System installed the metering. Preliminary testing showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22% to 37% depending on the outdoor temperature and the time of day. These results are prior to implementing control over the common area air conditioning loads. Testing was also not at times of highest system or hotel loading. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator s command to shed load was issued. The load drop was very rapid, essentially as fast as the 2 second metering could detect, with all units responding essentially simultaneously. Load restoration was ramped back in over several minutes. The restoration ramp can be adjusted to the power system needs. Frequency response testing was not completed. Initial

  15. Health status of hotel workers with special reference to high risk practices and STDs.

    PubMed

    Pawar, A T; Kakrani, V A

    2007-01-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted on health status of hotel workers of Pune city. Out of estimated 1000 hotel workers 516 were selected by stratified random sampling technique. The study revealed that 71.5% hotel workers were suffering from one or other type of morbid condition. Anemia was the commonest morbidity with prevalence of 40.3%. 187 (36.2%) of hotel workers had extramarital sexual relations. A total of 77 (14.9%) hotel workers were having STDs at the time of study.

  16. Women's Path to Management in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study examined the employment patterns of women working in the United Kingdom's hotel and catering industry and the opportunities for vocational education that would lead to careers in management. Sixty-four women from different sectors of the industry were interviewed (including women in senior and middle management and some still looking to be…

  17. Paperwork Plus: Literacy Materials for the Service Industry. Hotel Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Judith; McGill, Teresa

    The instructional materials are intended for use in teaching vocational English and English literacy to limited-English-speaking personnel in the hotel industry. They are designed for learners at three instructional levels, and address job-specific literacy tasks. An introductory section describes the materials and offers suggestions for…

  18. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Beginner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains eight lesson plans for a beginning course in work-related English for non-English or limited-English speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives include the following: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand job-related instructions;…

  19. Food and Beverage Industry ESL Workplace Literacy Curriculum for Hotels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Carol; And Others

    The Workplace Literacy Curriculum for Food and Beverage was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes for workers in participating hotels in Arlington County, Virginia, through a national workplace literacy grant with the cooperation of the Arlington County Chamber of Commerce. It is based on an analysis of tasks and interactions at the…

  20. Exposure level of ergonomic risk factors in hotel industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Syahir Muhamad Jaffar, Mohd; Fahrul Hassan, Mohd; Zamani Ngali, Mohd; Pauline, Ong

    2017-08-01

    Ergonomic Risk Factors (ERFs) which contribute to Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) among room attendants were considered as a problem or trouble since these ERFs would affect their work performance for hotel industries. The purpose of this study was to examine the exposure level of ERFs among room attendants in hotel industries. 65 of respondents were obtained from selected hotels in Peninsular Malaysia. Data were collected by direct observation via Workplace Ergonomic Risk Assessment (WERA) and Quick Exposure Checklist (QEC). There were 36 males and 29 females room attendants involved throughout the research. Most of room attendants experienced high exposure level for back, leg, forceful and vibration based on the exposure level evaluation through WERA while QEC results showed that all room attendants were found to have moderate exposure level for risk factors including back for movement use, shoulders/arms, wrists/hands and neck. All the results obtained showed that the related ERFs for MSDs were associated and essential ergonomic interventions are needed in order to eliminate risk of exposures to MSDs among room attendants in hotel industries.

  1. Paperwork Plus: Literacy Materials for the Service Industry. Hotel Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Judith; McGill, Teresa

    The instructional materials are intended for use in teaching vocational English and English literacy to limited-English-speaking personnel in the hotel industry. They are designed for learners at three instructional levels, and address job-specific literacy tasks. An introductory section describes the materials and offers suggestions for…

  2. Psychosocial work factors and shoulder pain in hotel room cleaners.

    PubMed

    Burgel, Barbara J; White, Mary C; Gillen, Marion; Krause, Niklas

    2010-07-01

    Hotel room cleaners have physically demanding jobs that place them at high risk for shoulder pain. Psychosocial work factors may also play a role in shoulder pain, but their independent role has not been studied in this group. Seventy-four percent (941 of 1,276) of hotel room cleaners from five Las Vegas hotels completed a 29-page survey assessing health status, working conditions, and psychosocial work factors. For this study, 493 of the 941 (52%) with complete data for 21 variables were included in multivariate logistic regression analyses. Fifty-six percent reported shoulder pain in the prior four weeks. Room cleaners with effort-reward imbalance (ERI) were three times as likely to report shoulder pain (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.95-4.59, P = 0.000) even after adjustment for physical workload and other factors. After adjustment for physical workload, job strain and iso-strain were not significantly associated with shoulder pain. ERI is independently associated with shoulder pain in hotel room cleaners even after adjustment for physical workload and other risk factors. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. OpinionSeer: interactive visualization of hotel customer feedback.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingcai; Wei, Furu; Liu, Shixia; Au, Norman; Cui, Weiwei; Zhou, Hong; Qu, Huamin

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of Web technology has resulted in an increasing number of hotel customers sharing their opinions on the hotel services. Effective visual analysis of online customer opinions is needed, as it has a significant impact on building a successful business. In this paper, we present OpinionSeer, an interactive visualization system that could visually analyze a large collection of online hotel customer reviews. The system is built on a new visualization-centric opinion mining technique that considers uncertainty for faithfully modeling and analyzing customer opinions. A new visual representation is developed to convey customer opinions by augmenting well-established scatterplots and radial visualization. To provide multiple-level exploration, we introduce subjective logic to handle and organize subjective opinions with degrees of uncertainty. Several case studies illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of OpinionSeer on analyzing relationships among multiple data dimensions and comparing opinions of different groups. Aside from data on hotel customer feedback, OpinionSeer could also be applied to visually analyze customer opinions on other products or services.

  4. Project EXCEL: Hotel Workers Literacy Enhancement Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    Project EXCEL is a federally-funded workplace literacy program involving hotel enterprises in the San Francisco (California) Bay area. Its focus is on identification and instruction of literacy skills essential to job success for limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers. Training is intended to enable employees to understand written work orders,…

  5. Residents' Coping Strategies in an Extended-Stay Hotel Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewinson, Terri

    2010-01-01

    Some families live in extended-stay hotels as a solution after housing displacement. This temporary accommodation provides a furnished home environment with resources such as a kitchenette, bed, heating/air conditioning, and room services with one payment that can be made weekly or monthly without a credit check or rent deposit. Despite these…

  6. Residents' Coping Strategies in an Extended-Stay Hotel Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewinson, Terri

    2010-01-01

    Some families live in extended-stay hotels as a solution after housing displacement. This temporary accommodation provides a furnished home environment with resources such as a kitchenette, bed, heating/air conditioning, and room services with one payment that can be made weekly or monthly without a credit check or rent deposit. Despite these…

  7. Colonization of Legionella species in hotel water systems in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Legionella species in hotel water distribution systems in Alanya, Turkey, which is an important tourism center. Water and swab samples were obtained from 52 Turkish hotels from August 2003 to September 2005. Water samples were collected in 100 mL sterile containers and were concentrated by membrane filters with a pore size of 0.45 microm. Heat treatment was used to eliminate other microorganisms from the samples, which were then spread on buffered charcoal yeast extract alpha agar plates and glycine, vancomycin, polymyxin, cycloheximide agar plates. Cysteine-dependent colonies were identified by latex agglutination. In all, 491 water and swab samples were analyzed. The results of all samples were negative for Legionella in 16 (30.8%) hotels. Legionella species (92.5% of which were Legionella pneumophila) were detected in 93 (18.9%) of the samples. The most frequently isolated species were L pneumophila serogroups 6 (63.5%) and 1 (21.5%). Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 was the most common isolate detected in Turkish hotel water systems in our study. The result of Legionella urinary antigen tests, which are the diagnostic tests most often used to identify legionnaires' disease, may be negative in people infected with L pneumophila serogroup 6. We suggest that clinicians should apply the whole spectrum of laboratory methods for the detection of legionnaires' disease in patients with pneumonia of unknown origin and history of travel to Alanya, Turkey.

  8. Competency Needs in Irish Hotels: Employer and Graduate Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Ciara; Conway, Edel; Farrell, Tara; Monks, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel industry employers' expectations of, and satisfaction with, graduate competencies in comparison with graduate perceptions of what is required for their roles and their satisfaction with how well their education experience prepared them. Design/methodology/approach: The research involved a…

  9. Perspective view of the Drexel Hotel, view looking southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the Drexel Hotel, view looking southwest - Vale Commercial Historic District, A Street between Holland & Longfellow Streets, north side of B Street between Holland & Main Streets, Main Street South from A Street through B Street, & Stone House at 283 Main Street South, Vale, Malheur County, OR

  10. Perspective view of the Goodrich Hotel (Building H), located at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the Goodrich Hotel (Building H), located at 225 A Street West, view looking southeast - Vale Commercial Historic District, A Street between Holland & Longfellow Streets, north side of B Street between Holland & Main Streets, Main Street South from A Street through B Street, & Stone House at 283 Main Street South, Vale, Malheur County, OR

  11. 13. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (LOWER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (LOWER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 STORED IN G BLOCK (HAER No. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  12. 12. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (UPPER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (UPPER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 STORED IN G BLOCK (HAER No. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  13. 6. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO NORTH: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO NORTH: AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY COMPANY MANUAL SOAP CUTTER INSTALLED 1932 (FOREGROUND); CONVEYORS; AND R.A. JONES & COMPANY HORIZONTAL PRESS INSTALLED 1931 (BACKGROUND) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  14. Applying revised gap analysis model in measuring hotel service quality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Che; Chien, Chih-Hung; Wu, Chia-Huei; Lu, Shu-Chiung; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dong, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    With the number of tourists coming to Taiwan growing by 10-20 % since 2010, the number has increased due to an increasing number of foreign tourists, particularly after deregulation allowed admitting tourist groups, followed later on by foreign individual tourists, from mainland China. The purpose of this study is to propose a revised gap model to evaluate and improve service quality in Taiwanese hotel industry. Thus, service quality could be clearly measured through gap analysis, which was more effective for offering direction in developing and improving service quality. The HOLSERV instrument was used to identify and analyze service gaps from the perceptions of internal and external customers. The sample for this study included three main categories of respondents: tourists, employees, and managers. The results show that five gaps influenced tourists' evaluations of service quality. In particular, the study revealed that Gap 1 (management perceptions vs. customer expectations) and Gap 9 (service provider perceptions of management perceptions vs. service delivery) were more critical than the others in affecting perceived service quality, making service delivery the main area of improvement. This study contributes toward an evaluation of the service quality of the Taiwanese hotel industry from the perspectives of customers, service providers, and managers, which is considerably valuable for hotel managers. It was the aim of this study to explore all of these together in order to better understand the possible gaps in the hotel industry in Taiwan.

  15. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; Crouter, Ann C; O'Neill, John W

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs' jobs and retention.

  16. Competency Needs in Irish Hotels: Employer and Graduate Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Ciara; Conway, Edel; Farrell, Tara; Monks, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel industry employers' expectations of, and satisfaction with, graduate competencies in comparison with graduate perceptions of what is required for their roles and their satisfaction with how well their education experience prepared them. Design/methodology/approach: The research involved a…

  17. Solar-Cooled Hotel in the Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance of solar cooling system is described in 21-page report. System provides cooling for public areas including ball rooms, restaurant, lounge, lobby and shops. Chilled water from solar-cooling system is also used to cool hot water from hotel's desalinization plant.

  18. Solar-Cooled Hotel in the Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance of solar cooling system is described in 21-page report. System provides cooling for public areas including ball rooms, restaurant, lounge, lobby and shops. Chilled water from solar-cooling system is also used to cool hot water from hotel's desalinization plant.

  19. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O’Neill, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  20. Women's Path to Management in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study examined the employment patterns of women working in the United Kingdom's hotel and catering industry and the opportunities for vocational education that would lead to careers in management. Sixty-four women from different sectors of the industry were interviewed (including women in senior and middle management and some still looking to be…

  1. Greening the work force in Brazilian hotels: the role of environmental training.

    PubMed

    Dias-Angelo, Fernanda; Jabbour, Charbel J C; Calderaro, José Armando

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly required to reduce their environmental impact through the adoption of environmental management, which requires the support of human resource practices. The objective of this study is to determine whether human resource management practices, especially training, are supporting environmental management practices at four hotels located in Brazil. This research is qualitative, based on the analysis of four hotels in Brazil. Based on the systematized empirical evidence collected from four hotels (Hotels A, B, C, and D), it can be concluded that: (1) human resource management is still not fully aligned with environmental objectives at the hotels studied; (2) only Hotel B has implemented environmental management practices and aligned with human resource management in a more developed manner, which may indicate that these two variables of analysis could have interrelations; (3) environmental training as a human resource management practice was verified in all hotels analyzed. The greening of human resources practices is not fully aligned with environmental objectives in the hotels studied. If these hotels really wish to "go green," environmental training will be necessary. Hotel stakeholders play a major role in implementing the greening of the hotel industry.

  2. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-08-15

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality.

  3. From Hotel to High School: Converting a Residential Hotel into a New Type of Senior High School. Report and Recommendations of the Concourse Plaza High School Planning Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasserath, Simpson

    This document reports the result of a 5-day meeting held to recommend the structural building adaptations and the curriculum organization necessary to the renovation of Concourse Plaza Hotel into a high school. According to the planning committee, the hotel has many features adaptable to a school, which would permit a meaningful departure from the…

  4. The Crystal Hotel: A Microfluidic Approach to Biomimetic Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wang, Yun-Wei; Ihli, Johannes; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Li, Shunbo; Walshaw, Richard; Chen, Li; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-12-02

    A "crystal hotel" microfluidic device that allows crystal growth in confined volumes to be studied in situ is used to produce large calcite single crystals with predefined crystallographic orientation, microstructure, and shape by control of the detailed physical environment, flow, and surface chemistry. This general approach can be extended to form technologically important, nanopatterned single crystals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Perspective view of the Drexel (or Vale) Hotel (Building L), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the Drexel (or Vale) Hotel (Building L), located at 123 Main Street South, view looking southwest. This building is a National Register listed property - Vale Commercial Historic District, A Street between Holland & Longfellow Streets, north side of B Street between Holland & Main Streets, Main Street South from A Street through B Street, & Stone House at 283 Main Street South, Vale, Malheur County, OR

  6. Winning cancer centre has 'hotel-like' quality.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-04-01

    A "highly effective" three-way partnership between architects Anshen + Allen, the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and Laing O'Rourke, has created a non-institutional and welcoming new cancer treatment and renal services centre in Newcastle upon Tyne which, despite the gruelling nature of some of the therapies set to be offered, has a character and feel early users describe as "more like a four-star hotel" than a conventional healthcare facility. Jonathan Baillie reports.

  7. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer for signal detection in 2D tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRoque, Samuel J.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Edwards, Darrin C.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-03-01

    Signal detection by the channelized Hotelling (ch-Hotelling) observer is studied for tomographic application by employing a small, tractable 2D model of a computed tomography (CT) system. The primary goal of this manuscript is to develop a practical method for evaluating the ch-Hotelling observer that can generalize to larger 3D cone-beam CT systems. The use of the ch-Hotelling observer for evaluating tomographic image reconstruction algorithms is also demonstrated. For a realistic model for CT, the ch-Hotelling observer can be a good approximation to the ideal observer. The ch-Hotelling observer is applied to both the projection data and the reconstructed images. The difference in signal-to-noise ratio for signal detection in both of these domains provides a metric for evaluating the image reconstruction algorithm.

  8. How Clean Are Hotel Rooms? Part II: Examining the Concept of Cleanliness Standards.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Barbara A; Kirsch, Katie; Kline, Sheryl Fried; Sirsat, Sujata; Stroia, Olivia; Choi, Jin Kyung; Neal, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Hotel room cleanliness is based on observation and not on microbial assessment even though recent reports suggest that infections may be acquired while staying in hotel rooms. Exploratory research in the first part of the authors' study was conducted to determine if contamination of hotel rooms occurs and whether visual assessments are accurate indicators of hotel room cleanliness. Data suggested the presence of microbial contamination that was not reflective of visual assessments. Unfortunately, no standards exist for interpreting microbiological data and other indicators of cleanliness in hotel rooms. The purpose of the second half of the authors' study was to examine cleanliness standards in other industries to see if they might suggest standards in hotels. Results of the authors' study indicate that standards from other related industries do not provide analogous criteria, but do provide suggestions for further research.

  9. The Hotel Payload, plans for the period 2003-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Gudmund; Mikalsen, Per-Arne

    2003-08-01

    The cost and complexity of scientific experiments, carried by traditional sounding rocket payloads, are increasing. At the same time the scientific environment faces declining funding for this basic research. In order to meet the invitation from the science community, Andøya Rocket Range runs a programme for developing a sounding rocket payload, in order to achieve an inexpensive and cost-effective tool for atmosphere research and educational training. The Hotel Payload is a new technological payload concept in the sounding rocket family. By means of standardized mechanical structures and electronics, flexibility in data collection and transmission, roomy vehicles are affordable to most of the scientific research environments as well as for educational training. A complete vehicle - ready for installation of scientific experiments - is offered to the scientists to a fixed price. The fixed price service also includes launch services. This paper describes the Hotel Payload concept and its technology. In addition the three year plan for the development project is discussed. The opportunity of using the Hotel Payload as a platform for a collaborative triangle between research, education and industry is also discussed.

  10. Work Stress and Well-being in the Hotel Industry.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, John W; Davis, Kelly

    2011-06-01

    Employee stress is a significant issue in the hospitality industry, and it is costly for employers and employees alike. Although addressing and reducing stress is both a noble goal and is capable of resulting in expense reductions for employers, the nature and quantity of hospitality employee stress is not fully understood. The first aim of this study was to identify common work stressors in a sample of 164 managerial and hourly workers employed at 65 different hotels who were each interviewed for eight consecutive days. The two most common stressors were interpersonal tensions at work and overloads (e.g., technology not functioning). The second aim was to determine whether there were differences in the types and frequency of work stressors by job type (i.e., managers v. non-managers), gender, and marital status. Hotel managers reported significantly more stressors than hourly employees. There were no significant differences by gender or marital status. The third aim was to investigate whether the various stressors were linked to hotel employee health and work outcomes. More employee and coworker stressors were linked to more negative physical health symptoms. Also, interpersonal tensions at work were linked to lower job satisfaction and greater turnover intentions.

  11. Work Stress and Well-being in the Hotel Industry

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, John W.; Davis, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Employee stress is a significant issue in the hospitality industry, and it is costly for employers and employees alike. Although addressing and reducing stress is both a noble goal and is capable of resulting in expense reductions for employers, the nature and quantity of hospitality employee stress is not fully understood. The first aim of this study was to identify common work stressors in a sample of 164 managerial and hourly workers employed at 65 different hotels who were each interviewed for eight consecutive days. The two most common stressors were interpersonal tensions at work and overloads (e.g., technology not functioning). The second aim was to determine whether there were differences in the types and frequency of work stressors by job type (i.e., managers v. non-managers), gender, and marital status. Hotel managers reported significantly more stressors than hourly employees. There were no significant differences by gender or marital status. The third aim was to investigate whether the various stressors were linked to hotel employee health and work outcomes. More employee and coworker stressors were linked to more negative physical health symptoms. Also, interpersonal tensions at work were linked to lower job satisfaction and greater turnover intentions. PMID:23794780

  12. Single-room occupancy hotels: possible solutions and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Foley, D

    1998-09-01

    New York City's Division of AIDS Services and Income Support (DASIS) places clients in economical, commercial residences in one of 33 hotels in the New York City area, termed single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels. There have been many problems with these hotels in terms of safety and health. One problem is how to enforce housing laws when city agencies have had drastic personnel cutbacks, and landlords are not held accountable for repairs and building conditions. Without a strategic plan to supplement SROs with necessary services, and a way to deal with homeless people with AIDS, it will be difficult to redeem the condition of SROs and lessen dependency on them as a long-term solution. The West Side SRO Law Project offers tips on how tenants in SROs can safeguard their rights and document their cases if they feel that their rights have been violated. Included is a resource list for legal help and emergency numbers for the Department of Buildings in New York City and the surrounding boroughs.

  13. The impact of later trading hours for Australian public houses (hotels) on levels of violence.

    PubMed

    Chikritzhs, Tanya; Stockwell, Tim

    2002-09-01

    To examine the impact of later trading hours for licensed hotels (Australian public houses are usually known as "hotels") in Perth, Western Australia, on levels of violent assault on or near these premises. Data on assault offenses reported to police between July 1, 1991, and June 30, 1997, were examined to identify those offenses that occurred on or close to hotels. During this period, 45 (24%) of the 188 hotels meeting study criteria were granted an extended trading permit for 1AM closing ("ETP hotels"), whereas the rest continued to close at midnight ("non-ETP hotels"). A time-series analysis employing linear regression was used to test whether there was a relationship between the introduction of extended trading and monthly rates of assaults associated with ETP hotels, while controlling for the general trend in assault rates among normally trading hotels. Possible confounders and other variables of interest (e.g., levels of alcohol purchases) were also examined. After controlling for the general trend in assaults occurring throughout Perth hotels, there was a significant increase in monthly assault rates for hotels with late trading following the introduction of extended trading permits. This relationship was largely accounted for by higher volumes of high alcohol content beer, wine and distilled spirits purchased by late trading hotels. Late trading was associated with both increased violence in and around Perth hotels and increased levels of alcohol consumption during the study period. It is suggested that greater numbers of patrons and increased levels of intoxication contributed to the observed increase in violence and that systematic planning and evaluation of late trading licenses is required.

  14. Use of hygiene protocols to control the spread of viruses in a hotel.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Koenig, David W; Phillips, Ronnie L; Reynolds, Kelly A; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-09-01

    The goals of this study were to observe the spread of viruses in a hotel setting and to assess the effectiveness of a hygiene intervention in reducing their spread. Selected fomites in one hotel room were inoculated with bacteriophage ϕx-174, and fomites in a conference center within the same hotel were inoculated using bacteriophage MS2. Cleaning of the contaminated room resulted in the spread of viruses to other rooms by the housekeeping staff. Furthermore, viruses were transferred by hotel guests to the conference center and a communal kitchen area. Additionally, conference attendees transferred viruses from the conference center to their hotel rooms and a communal kitchen area. This study demonstrated how viruses can be spread throughout a hotel setting by both housekeepers and guests. A hygiene intervention, which included providing hand hygiene products and facial tissues to the guests and disinfecting solutions with disposable wipes to the housekeeping staff, was successful in reducing the spread of viruses between the hotel guest rooms and conference center. The hygiene intervention resulted in significantly reduced transfer of the ϕx-174 between the contaminated hotel room and other hotel rooms, communal areas, and the conference center (p = 0.02).

  15. Role of pri-miRNA tertiary structure in miR-17~92 miRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chaulk, Steven G; Thede, Gina L; Kent, Oliver A; Xu, Zhizhong; Gesner, Emily M; Veldhoen, Richard A; Khanna, Suneil K; Goping, Ing Swie; MacMillan, Andrew M; Mendell, Joshua T; Young, Howard S; Fahlman, Richard P; Glover, J N Mark

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a variety of biological pathways such as development and tumourigenesis. miRNAs are initially expressed as long primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) that undergo sequential processing by Drosha and then Dicer to yield mature miRNAs. miR-17~92 is a miRNA cluster that encodes 6 miRNAs and while it is essential for development it also has reported oncogenic activity. To date, the role of RNA structure in miRNA biogenesis has only been considered in terms of the secondary structural elements required for processing of pri-miRNAs by Drosha. Here we report that the miR-17~92 cluster has a compact globular tertiary structure where miRNAs internalized within the core of the folded structure are processed less efficiently than miRNAs on the surface of the structure. Increased miR-92 expression resulting from disruption of the compact miR-17~92 structure results in increased repression of integrin α5 mRNA, a known target of miR-92a. In summary, we describe the first example of pri-miRNA structure modulating differential expression of constituent miRNAs.

  16. Study of the <mi>Zc>+ channel using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, Sasa; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Recently experimentalists have discovered several charged charmoniumlike hadrons mi>Zmi>mi>cmi>+ with unconventional quark content mi>c>¯mi>c>mi>d>¯mi>u>. We perform a search for mi>Zmi>mi>cmi>+ with mass below 4.2 GeV in the channel mi>Imi>mi>G>(mi>Jmi>mi>Pmi>mi>C>)=1+(1+-) using lattice QCD. The major challenge is presented by the two-meson states mi>Jmi>/mi>ψmi>π>, mi>ψ>2mi>Smi>mi>π>, mi>ψ>1mi>Dmi>

  17. Impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on Hotel Industry in Pacific Tohoku Prefectures ---From Spatio-Temporal Dependence of Hotel Availability---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, A.

    This paper investigates the impact of the Great Japan Earthquake(and subsequent tsunami turmoil) on socio-economic activities by using data on hotel opportunities collected from an electronic hotel booking service. A method to estimate both primary and secondary regional effects of a natural disaster on human behavior is proposed. It is confirmed that temporal variation in the regional share of available hotels before and after a natural disaster may be an indicator to measure the socio-economic impact at each district.

  18. Hotel NHS and the acute abdomen - admit first, investigate later.

    PubMed

    Aryal, K; Bhowmick, A; Beveridge, A J; Scott, N A

    2009-12-01

    To determine the financial consequences of a policy of admission first, followed by definitive investigation for patients with an admission diagnosis of suspected acute abdomen. Over a 1-month period, 122 patients were admitted with a suspected surgical diagnosis of acute abdomen (55 men, 67 women); age range 16-95 years (median: 56.5). Based on surgical operation required (n = 36), death after admission (n = 6, three postoperative deaths) and/or severe surgical illness (n = 17), 56 required surgical inpatient admission, while 66 did not. The patients who did not require admission spent significantly shorter time in hospital than those who required admission (median: 5 days vs. 8.5 days; p = 0.0000). Total hospital hotel and investigation cost (not including ITU or theatre costs) for all 122 patients was 330,468 pounds. Overall, 205,468 pounds was consumed by these 56 patients who required admission, while 125,000 pounds was spent on 66 patients whose clinical course did not justify admission; 92% of which was spent on hospital hotel costs and 8% on the cost of imaging and/or endoscopy. On a national basis, emergency General Surgery admissions account for 1000 Finished Consultant Episodes per 100,000 population. The findings of this study suggest that this equates to a national NHS spend of 650 million pounds each year, for the hotel costs of patients that could arguably avoid surgical admission altogether. Continuing to admit patients with a suspected acute abdomen first and then requesting definitive investigation makes neither clinical nor economic sense.

  19. Nutrition and health in hotel staff on different shift patterns.

    PubMed

    Seibt, R; Süße, T; Spitzer, S; Hunger, B; Rudolf, M

    2015-08-01

    Limited research is available that examines the nutritional behaviour and health of hotel staff working alternating and regular shifts. To analyse the nutritional behaviour and health of employees working in alternating and regular shifts. The study used an ex post facto cross-sectional analysis to compare the nutritional behaviour and health parameters of workers with alternating shifts and regular shift workers. Nutritional behaviour was assessed with the Food Frequency Questionnaire. Body dimensions (body mass index, waist hip ratio, fat mass and active cell mass), metabolic values (glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol and low- and high-density lipoprotein), diseases and health complaints were included as health parameters. Participants worked in alternating (n = 53) and regular shifts (n = 97). The average age of subjects was 35 ± 10 years. There was no significant difference in nutritional behaviour, most surveyed body dimensions or metabolic values between the two groups. However, alternating shift workers had significantly lower fat mass and higher active cell mass but nevertheless reported more pronounced health complaints. Sex and age were also confirmed as influencing the surveyed parameters. Shift-dependent nutritional problems were not conspicuously apparent in this sample of hotel industry workers. Health parameters did not show significantly negative attributes for alternating shift workers. Conceivably, both groups could have the same level of knowledge on the health effects of nutrition and comparable opportunities to apply this. Further studies on nutritional and health behaviour in the hotel industry are necessary in order to create validated screening programmes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Optimized MBR for greywater reuse systems in hotel facilities.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Natasa; Dalmau, Montserrat; Comas, Joaquim; Poch, Manel; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Buttiglieri, Gianluigi

    2017-05-15

    Greywater is an important alternative water source, particularly in semi-arid, touristic areas, where the biggest water demand is usually in the dry period. By using this source wisely, tourist facilities can substantially reduce the pressure to scarce water resources. In densely urbanized touristic areas, where space has high value, compact solutions such as MBR based greywater reuse systems appear very appropriate. This research focuses on technical and economical evaluation of such solution by implementing a pilot MBR to a hotel with separated grey water. The pilot was operated for 6 months, with thorough characterisation of the GW performed, its operation was monitored and its energy consumption was optimized by applying a control system for the air scour. Based on the pilot operation a design and economic model was set to estimate the feasibility (CAPEX, OPEX, payback period of investment) of appropriate scales of MBR based GW systems, including separation of GW, MBR technology, clean water storage and disinfection. The model takes into account water and energy prices in Spain and a planning period of 20 years. The results demonstrated an excellent performance in terms of effluent quality, while the energy demand for air-scour was reduced by up to 35.2%, compared to the manufacturer recommendations. Economical evaluation of the entire MBR based GW reuse system shows its feasibility for sizes already at 5 m(3)/day (60 PE). The payback period of the investment for hotels like the demonstration hotel, treating 30 m(3)/day is 3 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Marketing Effectiveness of Hotel Facebook Pages: From Perspectives of Customers and Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Xi Yu

    2012-01-01

    In the hotel industry, social media marketing has become a new trend hoteliers are chasing and an increasing number of hotels are using social media to promote their business. However, the marketing effectiveness of social media is still a big challenge in both academic and business world. Since social media marketing is totally different from…

  2. A Trip to the Statler Hilton Hotel. The Special Education Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Muriel

    A program designed for high school level work-study classes for students of limited mental ability presents specific curriculum methods and materials to teach information regarding positions available in the hotel industry. A field trip tour of the Boston Statler Hilton Hotel if the focal activity of the unit, and is accompanied by a history of…

  3. CAREER TRAINING IN HOTEL AND RESTAURANT OPERATION...AT CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BATMALE, LOUIS F.; MULLANY, GEORGE G.

    THE HOTEL AND RESTAURANT PROGRAM, ONE OF 35 SEMIPROFESSIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS AT CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO, COMBINES GENERAL EDUCATION, RELATED BUSINESS INSTRUCTION, HOTEL AND RESTAURANT CLASSES, FOOD PREPARATION AND SERVICE TRAINING, AND WORK EXPERIENCE. THIS DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM INCLUDES (1) PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES, (2) CURRICULUM,…

  4. The impact of virtual reality functions of a hotel website on travel anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ook; Oh, Ji-Eun

    2007-08-01

    This study deals with the impact of virtual reality (VR) features that are embedded in a hotel website on travelers' anxiety. Having more information is thought to be a factor in relieving anxiety in travel. A hotel website can be a good place for gathering information about the accommodation. In this study, we posit that a hotel website with VR functions should lead to a reduction in travelers' anxiety about travel. We built a website of a hotel and used VR functions to show the exterior, the lobby, a guest room, and a restaurant through an interactive and spatial shot of the hotel images. The experiment was conducted with a premise that the subjects were about to embark on a journey to an unknown place and to stay at an unknown hotel whose website contained VR functions. The subjects were asked to play with VR functions of the hotel website and then to complete a survey with questions regarding the degree of anxiety on the travel and psychological relief that might have been perceived by the subjects. The result confirms our hypothesis that there is a statistically significant relationship between the degree of travel anxiety and psychological relief caused by the use of VR functions of a hotel website.

  5. Human Resource Development in the Irish Hotel Industry: The Case of the Small Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Clara

    2002-01-01

    A profile of small businesses in the Irish hotel industry shows that all claim to believe in human resource development but few practice it. Small hotels favor informal, specific job training focused on solution of immediate problems rather than long-term development. (Contains 119 references.) (SK)

  6. REEP/Hotel Workplace Literacy Project. Evaluation Report. 1988-1990 Grant Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Morris

    The Arlington Education and Employment Program (REEP)/Hotel Workplace Literacy Project served 230 functionally illiterate adults working in hotels and a real estate maintenance firm in Virginia. Job-related English and math, citizenship preparation, and work awareness instruction was provided. An evaluation found that: (1) the project effectively…

  7. Hospitality Service: Hotel and Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joliet Junior Coll., IL.

    This publication contains competency-based materials for hotel/restaurant management and culinary arts. The materials are designed for students to learn from a work station concept by rotating through a variety of real work settings in a hotel/restaurant environment. In addition, the materials indicate whether or not the students have developed…

  8. What Makes Hotel Expatriates Remain in Their Overseas Assignments: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Zoe Ju-Yu

    2012-01-01

    In this study the researcher uses a qualitative research design to discover what makes hotel expatriates remain in their overseas assignments. In-depth interviews, participant observations, and personal documents are used as data collection methods. Four hotel expatriates are recruited as participants of the study. The collected interview…

  9. Does Embedding Social Media Channels in Hotel Websites Influence Travelers' Satisfaction and Purchase Intentions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluri, Ajay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    In the Internet world today, social media channels have emerged as a top share of Internet usage, and more travelers have started using them to make their hotel plans and purchases. Because of the recommendations of researchers and practitioners, hotel organizations have already embraced social media and have embedded their links on their host…

  10. Hospitality Service: Hotel and Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joliet Junior Coll., IL.

    This publication contains competency-based materials for hotel/restaurant management and culinary arts. The materials are designed for students to learn from a work station concept by rotating through a variety of real work settings in a hotel/restaurant environment. In addition, the materials indicate whether or not the students have developed…

  11. Hotel and Restaurant Management; A Bibliography of Books and Audio-Visual Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkames, James P.; And Others

    This bibliography represents a collection of 1,300 book volumes and audiovisual materials collected by the Luzerne County Community College Library in support of the college's Hotel and Restaurant Management curriculum. It covers such diverse topics as advertising, business practices, decoration, nutrition, hotel law, insurance landscaping, health…

  12. Accurate computation of the Hotelling template for SKE/BKE detection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; LaRoque, Samuel J.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2008-03-01

    An accurate method for evaluating the Hotelling observer for large linear systems is generalized. The method involves solving an m-channel channelized Hotelling observer where the channels are refined in an iterative manner. Challenging numerical examples are shown in order to illustrate the method and give a sense of the convergence rates as a function of m.

  13. Human Resource Development in the Irish Hotel Industry: The Case of the Small Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Clara

    2002-01-01

    A profile of small businesses in the Irish hotel industry shows that all claim to believe in human resource development but few practice it. Small hotels favor informal, specific job training focused on solution of immediate problems rather than long-term development. (Contains 119 references.) (SK)

  14. Does Embedding Social Media Channels in Hotel Websites Influence Travelers' Satisfaction and Purchase Intentions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluri, Ajay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    In the Internet world today, social media channels have emerged as a top share of Internet usage, and more travelers have started using them to make their hotel plans and purchases. Because of the recommendations of researchers and practitioners, hotel organizations have already embraced social media and have embedded their links on their host…

  15. Parameters for an Effective Entrepreneurial, Regional, Hotel/Restaurant Management Training Program in Manitoba, Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Rainer C.

    Owners or managers of 34 small and medium-sized hotels and restaurants in the Assiniboine Community College area were interviewed to acquire information for an entrepreneurial, regional hotel and restaurant (H/R) management training program in Manitoba. A literature review revealed the following: employability, vocational technical, and business…

  16. The Marketing Effectiveness of Hotel Facebook Pages: From Perspectives of Customers and Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Xi Yu

    2012-01-01

    In the hotel industry, social media marketing has become a new trend hoteliers are chasing and an increasing number of hotels are using social media to promote their business. However, the marketing effectiveness of social media is still a big challenge in both academic and business world. Since social media marketing is totally different from…

  17. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harber, H.

    1981-09-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  18. Primary group interaction of residents in a retirement hotel.

    PubMed

    Hampe, G D; Blevins, A L

    1975-01-01

    The interaction patterns of sixty-three residents age 55 and over living in a retirement hotel for three types of primary groups-kin, friends, and neighbors-were studied. Almost all residents voiced high housing satisfaction and were involved to various degrees in their primary group network. The relative with whom visited the most, usually the adult child, influences the primary group interaction the most, but at the same time may contribute to feelings of uselessness on the part of the retired residents of the apartment complex.

  19. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  20. Post-MI pericarditis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Post-MI pericarditis is inflammation of the pericardium (the sac-like covering of the heart). Any previous injury to the heart muscle can cause pericarditis. Incidences of pericarditis are associated with ...

  1. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with the...

  2. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with the...

  3. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with the...

  4. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with the...

  5. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with the...

  6. Creating Innovative Solutions for Future Hotel Rooms with Intelligent Multimedia and Pervasive Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharda, Nalin K.

    Pervasive computing and intelligent multimedia technologies are becoming increasingly important to the modern way of living. However, many of their potential applications have not been fully realized yet. This chapter explores how innovative applications can be developed to meet the needs of the next generation hotels. Futuristic hotel rooms aim to be more than “home-away-from-home,” and as a consequence, offer tremendous opportunities for developing innovative applications of pervasive computing and intelligent multimedia. Next generation hotels will make increased use of technology products to attract new customers. High end TV screens, changeable room ambiance, biometric guest recognition, and electronic check-in facilities are some of the features already being implemented by some hotels. Entirely futuristic hotels in the sea, the stratosphere or the outer space, are also being proposed. All of these provide many novel opportunities for developing innovative solutions using intelligent multimedia and ubiquitous computing.

  7. Prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels in South Western Greece.

    PubMed

    Fragou, K; Kokkinos, P; Gogos, C; Alamanos, Y; Vantarakis, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels located in South Western Greece, to study the molecular epidemiology of the isolated strains and their possible association with bacterial contamination (total count and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), the water pH, and temperature. A prevalence survey for Legionella spp. by culturing techniques in water distribution systems of eight hospitals and nine hotels occurred in South Western Greece. Water sampling and microbiological analysis were carried out following the ISO methods. Legionella pneumophila was detected in 33% and 36% of the distribution systems of hospitals and hotels, respectively. Our survey results suggest a frequent prevalence of elevated concentrations of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels. Our investigation has confirmed the need to regularly monitor the microbiological condition of water systems in hospitals and hotels.

  8. Time-dependent analysis of <mi>B>0<mi>KS>0<mimi><mi>π+γ> decays and studies of the <mi>Kmi>+<mimi><mi>π>+ system in <mi>B>+<mi>Kmi>+<mimi><mi>π+γ> decays

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2016-03-29

    We measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry in the radiative-penguin decay <mi>B>0<mi>KS>0<mimi>-<mi>π+γ>, using a sample of 471×106 Υ(4S)→BB-events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring at SLAC. Using events with mKππ < 1.8 GeV/c2, we measure the branching fractions of B+→K+π-π+γ and B0→K0π-π+γ, the branching fractions of the kaonic resonances decaying to K+π-π+, as well as the overall branching fractions of the B+→ρ0K+γ, B+→K*0π+γ and S-wave B+→(Kπ)0*0π+γ components. For events from the ρ mass band, we measure the CP-violating parameters SKS0π+π-γ=0.14±0.25±0.03 and CKS0π+π-γ=-0.39±0.20-0.02+0.03, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We extract from this measurement the time-dependent CP asymmetry related to the CP eigenstate ρ0KS0 and obtain SKS0ργ=-0.18±0.32-0.05+0.06, which provides information on the photon polarization in the underlying b→sγ transition.

  9. <mi>J/ψ> production at low transverse momentum in <mi>p+p> and <mi>d> + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2016-06-10

    In this paper, we report on the measurement of J/ψ production in the dielectron channel at midrapidity (|y| < 1) in p + p and d + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum pT spectra in p + p for pT < 4 GeV/c and d + Au collisions for pT < 3 GeV/c are presented. These measurements extend the STAR coverage for J/ψ production in p + p collisions to low pT . The < p$2\\atop{T}$ > from the measured J/ψ invariant cross section in p + p and d + Au collisions are evaluated and compared to similar measurements at other collision energies. The nuclear modification factor for J/ψ is extracted as a function of pT and collision centrality in d + Au and compared to model calculations using the modified nuclear parton distribution function and a final-state J/ψ nuclear absorption cross section.

  10. <mi>J/ψ> production at low transverse momentum in <mi>p+p> and <mi>d> + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2016-06-10

    In this paper, we report on the measurement of J/ψ production in the dielectron channel at midrapidity (|y| < 1) in p + p and d + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum pT spectra in p + p for pT < 4 GeV/c and d + Au collisions for pT < 3 GeV/c are presented. These measurements extend the STAR coverage for J/ψ production in p + p collisions to low pT . The < p$2\\atop{T}$ > from the measured J/ψ invariant cross section in p + p and d + Au collisions are evaluated and compared to similar measurements at other collision energies. The nuclear modification factor for J/ψ is extracted as a function of pT and collision centrality in d + Au and compared to model calculations using the modified nuclear parton distribution function and a final-state J/ψ nuclear absorption cross section.

  11. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients.

    PubMed

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Rolston, John D; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients' preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing.

  12. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients

    PubMed Central

    Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Rolston, John D.; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients’ preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing. PMID:24818061

  13. Indoor radon levels in selected hot spring hotels in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Gang; Zhang, Boyou; Wang, Xinming; Gong, Jingping; Chan, Daniel; Bernett, John; Lee, S C

    2005-03-01

    Guangdong is one of the provinces that have most hot springs in China, and many hotels have been set up near hot springs, with spring water introduced into the bath inside each hotel room for hot spring bathing to attract tourists. In the present study, we measured radon in indoor and outdoor air, as well as in hot spring waters, in four hot spring hotels in Guangdong by using NR-667A (III) continuous radon detector. Radon concentrations ranged 53.4-292.5 Bq L(-1) in the hot spring water and 17.2-190.9 Bq m(-3) in outdoor air. Soil gas intrusion, indoor hot spring water use and inefficient ventilation all contributed to the elevated indoor radon levels in the hotel rooms. From the variation of radon levels in closed unoccupied hotel rooms, soil gas intrusion was found to be a very important source of indoor radon in hotel rooms with floors in contact with soils. When there was spring water bathing in the bathes, average radon levels were 10.9-813% higher in the hotel rooms and 13.8-489% higher in bathes compared to their corresponding average levels when there was no spring water use. Spring water use in the hotel rooms had radon transfer coefficients from 1.6x10(-4) to 5.0x10(-3). Radon in some hotel rooms maintained in concentrations much higher than guideline levels might thus have potential health risks to the hotel workers, and technical and management measures should be taken to lower their exposure of radon through inhalation.

  14. Comparison of non-prewhitening and Hotelling observer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    1995-04-01

    Recent investigations of human signal detection performance for noise limited tasks have used statistically defined signal or image parameters. The Bayesian ideal observer procedure is then nonlinear and analysis becomes mathematically intractable. Linear, but suboptimal, observer models have been proposed for mathematical convenience. Experiments by Rolland and Barrett involving detection of completely defined signals in white noise superimposed on statistically defined (Lumpy) backgrounds showed that the Fisher-Hotelling model gave a good fit while the simple nonprewhitening (NPW) matched filter gave a poor fit. Burgess showed that the NPW model can be modified to fit their data by adding a spatial frequency filter with response similar to the human contrast sensitivity function. New experimental results will be presented demonstrating that neither model is satisfactory. The results of our experiments done with a variety of spectral densities for the background can be described by a Fisher-Hotelling model modified to include simple circularly symmetric spatial frequency channels as proposed by Myers and Barrett. However, results of our variable viewing distance experiments do not agree with predictions of this simple channelized model. It will be necessary to use a more complex F model with physiologically reasonable spatial frequency channels.

  15. Human annoyance and reactions to hotel room specific noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everhard, Ian L.

    2004-05-01

    A new formula is presented where multiple annoyance sources and transmission loss values of any partition are combined to produce a new single number rating of annoyance. The explanation of the formula is based on theoretical psychoacoustics and survey testing used to create variables used to weight the results. An imaginary hotel room is processed through the new formula and is rated based on theoretical survey results that would be taken by guests of the hotel. The new single number rating compares the multiple sources of annoyance to a single imaginary unbiased source where absolute level is the only factor in stimulating a linear rise in annoyance [Fidell et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1427 (1979); D. M. Jones and D. E. Broadbent, ``Human performance and noise,'' in Handbook of Noise Control, 3rd ed., edited by C. M. Harris (ASA, New York, 1998), Chap. 24; J. P. Conroy and J. S. Roland, ``STC Field Testing and Results,'' in Sound and Vibration Magazine, Acoustical Publications, pp. 10-15 (July 2003)].

  16. Occupational injury disparities in the US hotel industry.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Susan; Vossenas, Pamela; Krause, Niklas; Moriarty, Joan; Frumin, Eric; Shimek, Jo Anna M; Mirer, Franklin; Orris, Peter; Punnett, Laura

    2010-02-01

    Hotel employees have higher rates of occupational injury and sustain more severe injuries than most other service workers. OSHA log incidents from five unionized hotel companies for a three-year period were analyzed to estimate injury rates by job, company, and demographic characteristics. Room cleaning work, known to be physically hazardous, was of particular concern. A total of 2,865 injuries were reported during 55,327 worker-years of observation. The overall injury rate was 5.2 injuries per 100 worker-years. The rate was highest for housekeepers (7.9), Hispanic housekeepers (10.6), and about double in three companies versus two others. Acute trauma rates were highest in kitchen workers (4.0/100) and housekeepers (3.9/100); housekeepers also had the highest rate of musculoskeletal disorders (3.2/100). Age, being female or Hispanic, job title, and company were all independently associated with injury risk. Sex- and ethnicity-based disparities in injury rates were only partially due to the type of job held and the company in which the work was performed. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Best practices to reduce the accident rate hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Revilla, M. R.; Kahale Carrillo, D. T.

    2014-10-01

    Examining the available databases and existing tourism organizations can conclude that appear studies on accidents and their relationship with other variables. But in our case we want to assess this relationship in the performance of the hotel in relation to lower the accident rate. The Industrial Safety studies analyzing this accident causes (why they happen), their sources (committed activities), their agents (participants work means), its type (how the events occur or develop), all in order to develop prevention. In our case, as accidents happen because people commit wrongful acts or because the equipment, tools, machinery or workplaces are not in proper conditions, the preventive point of view we analyze through the incidence of workplace accidents hotel subsector. The crash occurs because there is a risk, so that adequate control of it would avoid despite individual factors. Absenteeism or absence from work was taken into account first by Dubois in 1977, as he realized the time lost in the nineteenth century due to the long working hours, which included the holidays. Motivation and job satisfaction were the elements that have been most important in the phenomenon of social psychology.

  18. miRNA Digger: a comprehensive pipeline for genome-wide novel miRNA mining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shao, Chaogang; Ye, Xinghuo; Meng, Yijun; Zhou, Yincong; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technique have greatly facilitated large-scale detection of the miRNAs. However, thoroughly discovery of novel miRNAs from the available HTS data sets remains a major challenge. In this study, we observed that Dicer-mediated cleavage sites for the processing of the miRNA precursors could be mapped by using degradome sequencing data in both animals and plants. In this regard, a novel tool, miRNA Digger, was developed for systematical discovery of miRNA candidates through genome-wide screening of cleavage signals based on degradome sequencing data. To test its sensitivity and reliability, miRNA Digger was applied to discover miRNAs from four organs of Arabidopsis. The results revealed that a majority of already known mature miRNAs along with their miRNA*s expressed in these four organs were successfully recovered. Notably, a total of 30 novel miRNA-miRNA* pairs that have not been registered in miRBase were discovered by miRNA Digger. After target prediction and degradome sequencing data-based validation, eleven miRNA-target interactions involving six of the novel miRNAs were identified. Taken together, miRNA Digger could be applied for sensitive detection of novel miRNAs and it could be freely downloaded from http://www.bioinfolab.cn/miRNA_Digger/index.html.

  19. Circulating microRNAs, miR-939, miR-595, miR-519d and miR-494, Identify Cirrhotic Patients with HCC

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, Francesca; Ferracin, Manuela; Trerè, Davide; Milazzo, Maddalena; Marinelli, Sara; Galassi, Marzia; Venerandi, Laura; Pollutri, Daniela; Patrizi, Clarissa; Borghi, Alberto; Foschi, Francesco G.; Stefanini, Giuseppe F.; Negrini, Massimo; Bolondi, Luigi; Gramantieri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The performance of circulating biomarkers for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is sub-optimal. In this study we tested circulating microRNAs as biomarkers for HCC in cirrhotic patients by performing a two stage study: a discovery phase conducted by microarray and a validation phase performed by qRT-PCR in an independent series of 118 patients. Beside miRNAs emerged from the discovery phase, miR-21, miR-221, miR-519d were also tested in the validation setting on the basis of literary and tissue findings. Deregulated microRNAs were assayed in HCC-derived cells in the intracellular compartment, cell culture supernatant and exosomal fraction. Serum and tissue microRNA levels were compared in 14 patients surgically treated for HCC. From the discovery study, it emerged that seven circulating microRNAs were differentially expressed in cirrhotic patients with and without HCC. In the validation set, miR-939, miR-595 and miR-519d were shown to differentiate cirrhotic patients with and without HCC. MiR-939 and miR-595 are independent factors for HCC. ROC curves of miR-939, miR-595 and miR-519d displayed that AUC was higher than AFP. An exosomal secretion of miR-519d, miR-21, miR-221 and miR-1228 and a correlation between circulating and tissue levels of miR-519d, miR-494 and miR-21 were found in HCC patients. Therefore, we show that circulating microRNAs deserve attention as non-invasive biomarkers in the diagnostic setting of HCC and that exosomal secretion contributes to discharging a subset of microRNAs into the extracellular compartment. PMID:26509672

  20. miRConnect: Identifying Effector Genes of miRNAs and miRNA Families in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Niels; Kjems, Jørgen; Lund, Anders H.; Peter, Marcus E.

    2011-01-01

    micro(mi)RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of most mRNAs. They are powerful regulators of various differentiation stages, and the expression of genes that either negatively or positively correlate with expressed miRNAs is expected to hold information on the biological state of the cell and, hence, of the function of the expressed miRNAs. We have compared the large amount of available gene array data on the steady state system of the NCI60 cell lines to two different data sets containing information on the expression of 583 individual miRNAs. In addition, we have generated custom data sets containing expression information of 54 miRNA families sharing the same seed match. We have developed a novel strategy for correlating miRNAs with individual genes based on a summed Pearson Correlation Coefficient (sPCC) that mimics an in silico titration experiment. By focusing on the genes that correlate with the expression of miRNAs without necessarily being direct targets of miRNAs, we have clustered miRNAs into different functional groups. This has resulted in the identification of three novel miRNAs that are linked to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in addition to the known EMT regulators of the miR-200 miRNA family. In addition, an analysis of gene signatures associated with EMT, c-MYC activity, and ribosomal protein gene expression allowed us to assign different activities to each of the functional clusters of miRNAs. All correlation data are available via a web interface that allows investigators to identify genes whose expression correlates with the expression of single miRNAs or entire miRNA families. miRConnect.org will aid in identifying pathways regulated by miRNAs without requiring specific knowledge of miRNA targets. PMID:22046300

  1. Urinary miR-21, miR-29, and miR-93: novel biomarkers of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Chow, Kai-Ming; Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Szeto, Cheuk-Chun

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the progression of renal fibrosis. We studied the urinary levels of miR-21, miR-29 family and miR-93, which are downstream mediators of the transforming growth factor-β(1) (TGF-β(1)), in patients with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy. We studied the urinary miRNA levels of 43 IgA nephropathy patients and 13 healthy controls. The IgA nephropathy group had significantly lower urinary miR-29b and miR-29c, but higher miR-93 levels than controls. Proteinuria significantly correlated with urinary levels of miR-29b (r = -0.388, p = 0.003) and miR-29c (r = -0.409, p = 0.002). Glomerular filtration rate significantly correlated with urinary levels of miR-21 (r = 0.338, p = 0.028), miR-29b (r = 0.333, p = 0.031) and miR-29c (r = 0.304, p = 0.050). Urinary miR-93 level significantly correlated with glomerular scarring (r = -0.392, p = 0.010). Urinary miRNA level of SMAD3, but not TGF-β(1), correlated with urinary miR-21 (r = 0.624, p < 0.001), miR-29b (r = 0.566, p < 0.001), miR-29c (r = 0.619, p < 0.001) and miR-93 (r = 0.332, p = 0.032). Urinary miR-29b and miR-29c levels correlated with proteinuria and renal function, while urinary miR-93 level correlated with glomerular scarring. More importantly, urinary levels of these miRNA targets significantly correlated with urinary SMAD3 level. Our results suggest that these miRNA targets are regulated by the TGF-β(1)/SMAD3 pathway and they may play important roles in the development of progressive renal fibrosis in IgA nephropathy. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Identifying miRNAs, targets and functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Li, Jiuyong

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as the universal specificity factors in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Discovering miRNAs, identifying their targets and further inferring miRNA functions have been a critical strategy for understanding normal biological processes of miRNAs and their roles in the development of disease. In this review, we focus on computational methods of inferring miRNA functions, including miRNA functional annotation and inferring miRNA regulatory modules, by integrating heterogeneous data sources. We also briefly introduce the research in miRNA discovery and miRNA-target identification with an emphasis on the challenges to computational biology. PMID:23175680

  3. Platelet miRNAs and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo

    2015-07-15

    Activated platelets play a critical role in the acute complications of atherosclerosis that cause life-threatening ischemic events at late stages of the disease. The miRNAs are a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that play a significant role in both inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. The miRNAs are known to be present in platelets and exert important regulatory functions. Here we systematically examine the genes that are regulated by platelet miRNAs (miRNA-223,miRNA-126,miRNA-21, miRNA-24 and miRNA-197) and the association with cardiovascular disease risks. Platelet-secreted miRNAs could be novel biomarkers associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  4. One for the road: on the utility of citation data for identifying problem hotels.

    PubMed

    Wood, L J; McLean, S; Davidson, J; Montgomery, I M

    1995-01-01

    Drink drivers arrested in Tasmania are routinely asked by police where they had last been drinking, and these data were examined for 716 drivers arrested in Southern Tasmania during a 4-month period in 1992. Nearly half (43%) of arrested drink drivers cited individual hotels as the place where they had last been drinking. This enabled a citation score to be assigned to each of the 82 hotels in metropolitan Hobart. The distribution of citation scores was highly skewed, with eight hotels accounting for 45% of hotel citations, and two accounting for 20%. The hotels' citation scores were compared in relation to the rank order of their licence fees, since better measures of patronage proved unobtainable. Some hotels with small total alcohol sales did appear to have an unexpectedly large number of citations, suggesting less than responsible serving practices. Hoteliers' comments were sought on the interpretation of citation scores, and incorporated into a discussion of the limitations of the data in determining the extent of individual hotel responsibility for drink drivers. Important questions remaining include (1) what is the validity of citations made by drink drivers at the time of arrest; (2) what appropriate and quantifiable denominator can be used to adjust the number of citations to the level of patronage; and (3) what level of citations is too high and requires action?

  5. The reproductive experience of women living in hotels for the homeless in New York City.

    PubMed

    Chavkin, W; Kristal, A; Seabron, C; Guigli, P E

    1987-01-01

    Incidence of low birth weight, infant mortality and attendance at prenatal care were estimated for 401 residents of welfare hotels in New York City and compared to data from housing project residents and the city-wide population. Hotel residents and the pertinent data were ascertained from children's birth certificates dating from January 1982 to June 1984. In 1984 there were 2889 families (3498 adults and 6789 children) housed in 48 privately managed hotels and 7 shelters in the city, set up as emergency housing for the homeless. Most of these families were single women; over 50% were under 25. The racial and ethnic composition of hotel residents was similar to that of housing project tenants. The hotel residents have high birth rates: from 7/month in 1982 to 23/month in 1984. They receive significantly less prenatal care than project or city dwellers; more than half have 0-3 visits. The hotel residents had 2.5 times the likelihood of getting no prenatal care than project tenants, and 4.12 times the likelihood than the citywide population. Mean birth weight for hotel infants was 2979 g; for project infants 3128 g; for city infants 3253 g. Both welfare groups were significantly lower than citywide average birth weights. The infant mortality was 24.9 per 1000 for the hotel group, 16.6 for the project group, and 12.0 for the city population. The stress and inconvenience of living far from social service offices, clinics, schools and shops was considered the likely cause of poor attendance at prenatal care. It was recommended that the city provide on-site health education and care, social and nutrition services in the hotels, and refrigerators for mothers with newborn children.

  6. Early Bird Visions and Telchnology for Space Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station was planed for research purposes. In 2001 the first private man, Denis Tito, visited the ISS and the second private man, Mark Shuttleworth is following him. Space pioneers as Wernher von Braun and Sir Arthur C. Clarke had the dream that one day a space station in earth orbit will host tourists. It is evident that the ISS is not designed to host tourists. Therefore the dream is still open. Asking the question "how should a space station should look like to host tourists?" the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. initiated in April 2001 a contest under the patronage of . Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA). Because the definition and design of living space is the content of architecture the approach was to gather new ideas from young architects in cooperation with space experts. This contest was directed at students of architecture and the task set was to design a hotel for the earth orbit and to accommodate 220 guests. The contest got the name "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel". The results and models of the student's work were shown in an exhibition in Hamburg/Germany, which was open to the public from September 19th till October 20th 2001. During the summer term 2001 fifty students from the university occupied themselves with the topic, "Design of a hotel for space". During this time seventeen designs were completed. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within this interdisciplinary project both parties learned from each other. The 17 different designs were focused on the expectations and needs of a future space tourist. The design are for sure not feasible today, but the designs are in that sense realistic that they could be built in future. This paper will present an overview of the 17 designs as a vision of a future

  7. Factors Influencing e-Business Adoption in the Greek Hotel Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Ir.; Kyriazopoulos, P.

    The purpose of this research is to identify the impact of business process improvement in the area of e-marketing in the hotel industry. The research identifies the barriers which block organizational change effort. A sample of thirty hotels in the city of Athens was used.This paper presents a SWOT analysis of the hotel sector, identifying the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that firms faced in the process of change. The results show that the majority of firms use, to a small extent, the e-marketing concept to improve their communication strategy and reach market segments.

  8. A fuzzy MCDM model with objective and subjective weights for evaluating service quality in hotel industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoraghi, Nima; Amiri, Maghsoud; Talebi, Golnaz; Zowghi, Mahdi

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (FMCDM) model by integrating both subjective and objective weights for ranking and evaluating the service quality in hotels. The objective method selects weights of criteria through mathematical calculation, while the subjective method uses judgments of decision makers. In this paper, we use a combination of weights obtained by both approaches in evaluating service quality in hotel industries. A real case study that considered ranking five hotels is illustrated. Examples are shown to indicate capabilities of the proposed method.

  9. How Clean Are Hotel Rooms? Part I: Visual Observations vs. Microbiological Contamination.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Barbara A; Kirsch, Katie; Kline, Sheryl Fried; Sirsat, Sujata; Stroia, Olivia; Choi, Jin Kyung; Neal, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence of hotel room cleanliness is based on observation rather than empirically based microbial assessment. The purpose of the study described here was to determine if observation provides an accurate indicator of cleanliness. Results demonstrated that visual assessment did not accurately predict microbial contamination. Although testing standards have not yet been established for hotel rooms and will be evaluated in Part II of the authors' study, potential microbial hazards included the sponge and mop (housekeeping cart), toilet, bathroom floor, bathroom sink, and light switch. Hotel managers should increase cleaning in key areas to reduce guest exposure to harmful bacteria.

  10. Description of the food safety system in hotels and how it compares with HACCP standards.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephanie M; Maharaj, Satnarine R; James, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Tourism is an important earner of foreign exchange in Jamaica; hence, the protection of the visitors' health is very important. A study of travelers to Jamaica in 1996 to 1997 found that travelers' diarrhea (TD) affected almost 25% of visitors. The Ministry of Health (Jamaica) initiated a program for the prevention and control of TD aimed at reducing attack rates from 25.0% to 12.0% over a 5-year period through environmental health and food safety standards of hotels. This article examines the food safety systems in Jamaican hotels located in a popular resort area to find out how comparable they are with the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) strategy. A cross-sectional study was done of hotels in St. Mary and St. Ann. Quantitative data were obtained from food and beverage/sanitation staff and qualitative data through in-depth interviews with hotel managers. Observation of the food safety operations was also done. The majority (75%) of larger hotels used a combination of HACCP and Ministry of Health food safety strategies (p = 0.02) and offered all-inclusive services (r =-0.705, p = 0.001). Larger hotels were more likely to have a better quality team approach, HACCP plan, and monitoring of critical control points (CCPs) and more likely to receive higher scores (p < 0.05). More than two thirds of hotel staff were knowledgeable of HACCP. Significantly smaller hotels (87.5%) received less than 70% in overall score (r = 0.75, p = 0.01). Identification of CCPs and monitoring of CCPs explained 96.6% of the change in the overall HACCP scores (p = 0.001). Hotel managers felt that some hotels' systems were comparable with HACCP and that larger properties were ready for mandatory implementation. Conclusions. While some components of the HACCP system were observed in larger hotels, there were serious shortcomings in its comparison. Mandatory implementation of HACCP would require that sector-specific policies be developed for smaller hotels and implemented on a

  11. Identification of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated regulatory pathways in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Li, Yang; He, Hua; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-10-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression to modulate growth and development and biotic and abiotic stress responses. By analyzing small RNA deep sequencing data in combination with the genome sequence, we identified 75 conserved miRNAs and 11 novel miRNAs. Their target genes were also predicted. For most conserved miRNAs, the miRNA-target pairs were conserved across plant species. In addition to these conserved miRNA-target pairs, we also identified some papaya-specific miRNA-target regulatory pathways. Both miR168 and miR530 target the Argonaute 1 gene, indicating a second autoregulatory mechanism for miRNA regulation. A non-conserved miRNA was mapped within an intron of Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), suggesting a conserved homeostatic autoregulatory mechanism for DCL1 expression. A 21-nt miRNA triggers secondary siRNA production from its target genes, nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat protein genes. Certain phased-miRNAs were processed from their conserved miRNA precursors, indicating a putative miRNA evolution mechanism. In addition, we identified a Carica papaya-specific miRNA that targets an ethylene receptor gene, implying its function in the ethylene signaling pathway. This work will also advance our understanding of miRNA functions and evolution in plants.

  12. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, Raoul J P; Rossi, Riccardo L; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-07-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org.

  13. Exact confidence intervals for channelized Hotelling observer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic; Heilbrun, Marta

    2013-03-01

    Task-based assessments of image quality constitute a rigorous, principled approach to the evaluation of imaging system performance. To conduct such assessments, it has been recognized that mathematical model observers are very useful, particularly for purposes of imaging system development and optimization. One type of model observer that has been widely applied in the medical imaging community is the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). In the present work, we address the need for reliable confidence interval estimators of CHO performance. Specifically, we observe that a procedure proposed by Reiser for interval estimation of the Mahalanobis distance can be applied to obtain confidence intervals for CHO performance. In addition, we find that these intervals are well-defined with theoretically-exact coverage probabilities, which is a new result not proved by Reiser. The confidence intervals are tested with Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrated with an example comparing x-ray CT reconstruction strategies.

  14. Heating facilities for the MGM Grand Hotel, Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The MGM Grand Hotel-Reno is located adjacent to an area with a well-documented geothermal resource. Currently, there is a number of entities seeking to determine the exact nature of the resource at the MGM site. This report concerns itself with identifying current natural gas loads within the MGM complex which could be met by geothermal should a source become available. The two principle assumptions upon which the following material is based are (1) that a source of 190/sup 0/F or higher temperature water is available and (2) all systems discussed would be installed in parallel with existing systems. That is, existing systems would remain in place providing 100 percent backup for the geothermal systems.

  15. Shared-savings cuts hotel's losses from EMS removal

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, C.

    1982-11-08

    A shared-savings contract will minimize the Myrtle Beach, SC Downtown Holiday Inn's losses of replacing a poorly performing Energy Master energy-management system with Scientific Atlanta equipment. The contract with Energy Master Inc. (EMI), which saved Holiday Inn the $80,000 to $90,000 purchase price, also permitted removal (a year after installation) of the equipment when it failed to generate energy savings. A dispute between Associated Energy Consultants (AEC), which was to receive half the savings in exchange for arranging the equipment financing, is described. At $51,745, the 262-point Scientific Atlanta system should have a 1.7-year payback. The hotel's electric bills were $2000 a month lower during the first three months of operation. (DCK)

  16. Misexpression of miR482, miR1512, and miR1515 increases soybean nodulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Deng, Ying; Wu, Tianlong; Subramanian, Senthil; Yu, Oliver

    2010-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of plant growth and development. Previously, we identified a group of conserved and novel miRNA families from soybean (Glycine max) roots. Many of these miRNAs are specifically induced during soybean-Bradyrhizobium japonicum interactions. Here, we examined the gene expression levels of six families of novel miRNAs and investigated their functions in nodule development. We used northern-blot analyses to study the tissue specificity and time course of miRNA expression. Transgenic expression of miR482, miR1512, and miR1515 led to significant increases of nodule numbers, while root length, lateral root density, and the number of nodule primordia were not altered in all tested miRNA lines. We also found differential expression of these miRNAs in nonnodulating and supernodulating soybean mutants. The expression levels of 22 predicted target genes regulated by six novel miRNAs were studied by real-time polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that miRNAs play important roles in soybean nodule development.

  17. Personnel scheduling using an integer programming model- an application at Avanti Blue-Nile Hotels.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Biniyam Asmare; Tizazu, Anteneh Eshetu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report perhaps a first of its kind application of management science in the Ethiopian hotel industry. Avanti Blue Nile Hotels, a newly established five star hotel in Bahir Dar, is the company for which we developed an integer programming model that determines an optimal weekly shift schedule for the Hotel's engineering department personnel while satisfying several constraints including weekly rest requirements per employee, rest requirements between working shifts per employee, required number of personnel per shift, and other constraints. The model is implemented on an excel solver routine. The model enables the company's personnel department management to develop a fair personnel schedule as needed and to effectively utilize personnel resources while satisfying several technical, legal and economic requirements. These encouraging achievements make us optimistic about the gains other Ethiopian organizations can amass by introducing management science approaches in their management planning and decision making systems.

  18. 90. Paso Del Norte Hotel, 115117 South El Paso St.,east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. Paso Del Norte Hotel, 115-117 South El Paso St.,east facade, west side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  19. Search and selection hotel system in Surabaya based on geographic information system (GIS) with fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbandini, Taufik

    2016-03-01

    Surabaya is a metropolitan city in Indonesia. When the visitor has an interest in Surabaya for several days, then the visitor was looking for lodging that is closest to the interests of making it more efficient and practical. It was not a waste of time for the businessman because of congestion and so we need full information about the hotel as an inn during a stay in Surabaya began name, address of the hotel, the hotel's website, the distance from the hotel to the destination until the display of the map along the route with the help of Google Maps. This system was designed using fuzzy logic which aims to assist the user in making decisions. Design of hotel search and selection system was done through four stages. The first phase was the collection of data and as the factors that influence the decision-making along with the limit values of these factors. Factors that influence covers a distance of the hotel, the price of hotel rooms, and hotel reviews. The second stage was the processing of data and information by creating membership functions. The third stage was the analysis of systems with fuzzy logic. The steps were performed in systems analysis, namely fuzzification, inference using Mamdani, and defuzzification. The last stage was the design and construction of the system. Designing the system using use case diagrams and activity diagram to describe any process that occurs. Development system includes system implementation and evaluation systems. Implementation of mobile with Android-based system so that these applications were user friendly.

  20. [Recurrent epidemics of gastroenteritis caused by norovirus GI.3 in a small hotel].

    PubMed

    Soini, Jani; Hemminki, Kaisa; Pirnes, Aija; Roivainen, Merja; Al-Hello, Haider; Maunula, Leena; Kauppinen, Ari; Miettinen, Likka; Smit, Pieter W; Huusko, Sari; Toikkanen, Salla; Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent cases of gastroenteritis occurred in a small hotel. The causative agent of disease could not be detected. The cause and the source of the disease were established through epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnosis. The causative agent of the disease was norovirus GI.3. Norovirus GI was detected in the water from the well and on surfaces at the hotel. Both epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnostics are needed in resolving epidemics. Continuous development of laboratory methods is important.

  1. Tourism and hotel revenues before and after passage of smoke-free restaurant ordinances.

    PubMed

    Glantz, S A; Charlesworth, A

    1999-05-26

    Claims that ordinances requiring smoke-free restaurants will adversely affect tourism have been used to argue against passing such ordinances. Data exist regarding the validity of these claims. To determine the changes in hotel revenues and international tourism after passage of smoke-free restaurant ordinances in locales where the effect has been debated. Comparison of hotel revenues and tourism rates before and after passage of 100% smoke-free restaurant ordinances and comparison with US hotel revenue overall. Three states (California, Utah, and Vermont) and 6 cities (Boulder, Colo; Flagstaff, Ariz; Los Angeles, Calif; Mesa, Ariz; New York, NY; and San Francisco, Calif) in which the effect on tourism of smoke-free restaurant ordinances had been debated. Hotel room revenues and hotel revenues as a fraction of total retail sales compared with preordinance revenues and overall US revenues. In constant 1997 dollars, passage of the smoke-free restaurant ordinance was associated with a statistically significant increase in the rate of change of hotel revenues in 4 localities, no significant change in 4 localities, and a significant slowing in the rate of increase (but not a decrease) in 1 locality. There was no significant change in the rate of change of hotel revenues as a fraction of total retail sales (P=.16) or total US hotel revenues associated with the ordinances when pooled across all localities (P = .93). International tourism was either unaffected or increased following implementation of the smoke-free ordinances. Smoke-free ordinances do not appear to adversely affect, and may increase, tourist business.

  2. Enhancing appropriateness of acute bed use: role of the patient hotel.

    PubMed

    Harvey, I; Jenkins, R; Llewellyn, L

    1993-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the appropriateness of bed use by determining patients' suitability for patient hotel accommodation and day treatment and by examining timeliness of discharge, and to assess patient and staff views about patient hotels. Patients were assessed by a doctor and nurse in terms of an agreed case definition for patient hotel use. Patient suitability was validated and patient acceptability measured by semi-structured interviews with a random sample of patients judged suitable for hotel accommodation. All senior medical and nursing staff completed a further questionnaire. The study took place at University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (856 beds), and all specialties, except intensive care wards, participated. Patients occupying a total of 3972 bed days, accumulated over seven randomly chosen census days, were studied. Data were available for 88% of eligible inpatients. Ten per cent (405 of 3972) of patients were judged suitable for a patient hotel. Specialties indicating major use were obstetrics and gynaecology, general surgery, and general and geriatric medicine. Sixty three per cent (254 of 405) of these subjects required low level investigation or treatment. Preoperative and postoperative and antenatal patients were often suitable also. Three per cent (119 of 3972, 95% confidence interval 2.5, 3.6%) of inpatients were judged suitable for day treatment/investigation. Seventy nine per cent (291 of 369) of patients suitable for discharge were discharged on the same or the next day. The patient hotel idea was acceptable to 58 of 68 (85%) randomly selected patients and to 84 of 93 (90%) staff. With allowance for non-response, our study indicates that a general hospital of this size generates the need (inpatients, relatives, and ward attenders) for a mean of 72 patient hotel beds. There is also residual scope for increasing day treatment/investigation and for releasing beds by speeding discharge. The patient hotel idea is highly acceptable to both

  3. Fungal DNA in hotel rooms in Europe and Asia--associations with latitude, precipitation, building data, room characteristics and hotel ranking.

    PubMed

    Norbäck, Dan; Cai, Gui-Hong

    2011-10-01

    There is little information on the indoor environment in hotels. Analysis of fungal DNA by quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a new method which can detect general and specific sequences. Dust was collected through swab sampling of door frames in 69 hotel rooms in 20 countries in Europe and Asia (2007-2009). Five sequences were detected by qPCR: total fungal DNA, Aspergillus and Penicillium DNA (Asp/Pen DNA), Aspergillus versicolor (A. versicolor DNA), Stachybotrys chartarum (S. chartarum DNA) and Streptomyces spp. (Streptomyces DNA). Associations were analysed by multiple linear regression. Total fungal DNA (GM = 1.08 × 10(8) cell equivalents m(-2); GSD = 6.36) and Asp/Pen DNA (GM = 1.79 × 10(7) cell equivalents m(-2); GSD = 10.12) were detected in all rooms. A. versicolor DNA, S. chartarum DNA and Streptomyces DNA were detected in 84%, 28% and 47% of the samples. In total, 20% of the rooms had observed dampness/mould, and 30% had odour. Low latitude (range 1.5-64.2 degrees) was a predictor of Asp/Pen DNA. Seaside location, lack of mechanical ventilation, and dampness or mould were other predictors of total fungal DNA and Asp/Pen DNA. Hotel ranking (Trip Advisor) or self-rated quality of the interior of the hotel room was a predictor of total fungal DNA, A. versicolor DNA and Streptomyces DNA. Odour was a predictor of S. chartarum DNA. In conclusion, fungal DNA in swab samples from hotel rooms was related to latitude, seaside location, ventilation, visible dampness and indoor mould growth. Hotels in tropical areas may have 10-100 times higher levels of common moulds such as Aspergillus and Penicillium species, as compared to a temperate climate zone.

  4. A framework for stochastic simulation of distribution practices for hotel reservations

    SciTech Connect

    Halkos, George E.; Tsilika, Kyriaki D.

    2015-03-10

    The focus of this study is primarily on the Greek hotel industry. The objective is to design and develop a framework for stochastic simulation of reservation requests, reservation arrivals, cancellations and hotel occupancy with a planning horizon of a tourist season. In Greek hospitality industry there have been two competing policies for reservation planning process up to 2003: reservations coming directly from customers and a reservations management relying on tour operator(s). Recently the Internet along with other emerging technologies has offered the potential to disrupt enduring distribution arrangements. The focus of the study is on the choice of distribution intermediaries. We present an empirical model for the hotel reservation planning process that makes use of a symbolic simulation, Monte Carlo method, as, requests for reservations, cancellations, and arrival rates are all sources of uncertainty. We consider as a case study the problem of determining the optimal booking strategy for a medium size hotel in Skiathos Island, Greece. Probability distributions and parameters estimation result from the historical data available and by following suggestions made in the relevant literature. The results of this study may assist hotel managers define distribution strategies for hotel rooms and evaluate the performance of the reservations management system.

  5. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  6. Implementing Motivational Interviewing (MI) in a Non-MI World: A MI Knowledge Adoption Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ambrosio, Ryan; Laws, Katherine E.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Hromco, Joe; Kelly, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The Oregon Practice Improvement Collaborative (OPIC) facilitated the implementation of motivational interviewing (MI) in two community-based substance abuse treatment agencies. "The Change Book: A Blueprint for Technology Transfer" was used to structure and support the implementation of motivational interviewing. As part of the…

  7. "There's no-fresh air there": narratives of smoke exposure among residents of extended-stay hotels.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Terri; Bryant, Lawrence Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Hotel environments have been identified as places where hospitality workers and patrons are at an increased risk for smoke exposure and associated health hazards. However, little research has been conducted to understand experiences of long-term hotel residents. This article presents narrative accounts of tobacco smoke exposure from 37 residents at extended-stay hotels in a large metropolitan Atlanta county. Residents' narratives included an awareness of smoking as an unhealthy habit but a shared activity that facilitates social engagement at the hotel. Secondhand smoke narratives included descriptions of exposure from roommates and hotel neighbors. Thirdhand smoke narratives included reports of persistent pollution and smoke residue in the hotel environment. These results suggest a need for further research to understand the extent and impact of tobacco smoke exposure among this understudied population. The implications of this research support the efforts of social workers to engage in clean air advocacy and policy making for a vulnerable population.

  8. [Selected aspects of style behaviours among the hotel industry employees].

    PubMed

    Gacek, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The mode of nutrition, physical activity and the lifestyle are very important elements influencing on the health of employees. The subject of this study was to evaluate the selected aspects of lifestyle of a group of hotel employees. The questionnaire-based research was carried out in a group of 241 employees of the hotel industry (121 women and 120 men). The prevalent eating model in the group involved 3 meals daily, and was more frequent in men (62.9% vs. 47.9%; P < 0.05) who ate less regularly than women (28.6% vs. 55.5%; P < 0.001). Fast-food bars were more often frequented by men (a few times a week: 17.1% vs. 7%; P < 0.05). Fish were consumed a few times weekly by 21.1% of women and 30% of men, while vegetables a few times daily by 25.4% of women and 15.7% of men. Women more frequently consumed a few portions of fruit daily (25.4% vs. 8.6%; P < 0.01). As for alcohols, women more frequently opted for wine (49.3% vs. 18.6%; P < 0.001), while men chose beer (50% vs. 33.3%; P < 0.01) and hard liquors (31.4% vs. 17.4%; P < 0.01). The frequency of alcohol consumption was higher in men (P < 0.001). Recreational physical activity in leisure time was undertaken by 15.2% of women and 20.7% of men who simultaneously reported a higher range of physical activity than women (P < 0.01). Women more frequently opted for fitness exercises, while men for team games (P < 0.001). The role of physical activity in reducing emotional pressure was noticed by 18.7% of women and 29.8% of men (P < 0.05). It has also been demonstrated that the subjective rating of physical fitness dropped together with the increase of BMI (P < 0.05). Persons who perceived their fitness level as very good had a BMI of 22.1 kg/m2, while persons with a low rating of fitness had a BMI of 23.7 kg/m2. The studies have shown the prevalence of nutritional mistakes and a low level of recreational physical activity, as well as diversification of certain health behaviours depending on the sex.

  9. A Study of the Geographic Origin, Education, and Experience of Hotel General Managers. RHI 590 Individual Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    Department of Restaurant, Hotel, Institutional, and Tourism Management; West Lafayette, IN. Mobil Travel Guide. (1992). Seven regional editions. New...DEPARTMENT OF RESTAURANT, HOTEL, INSTITUTIONAL, AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 93-19390..9 8 19 1.00’,ltl/i/lI/l•li!l!!•I• II A STUDY OF THE GEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN...DEPARTMENT OF RESTAURANT, HOTEL, INSTITUTIONAL, AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S

  10. Preliminary report: outbreak of Legionnaires disease in a hotel in Calp, Spain, update on 22 February 2012.

    PubMed

    Vanaclocha, H; Guiral, S; Morera, V; Calatayud, M A; Castellanos, M; Moya, V; Jerez, G; Gonzalez, F

    2012-02-23

    Research is ongoing on eighteen cases of Legionellosis, including four deaths, identified among tourists and employees in a hotel in Calp, Spain. Cases occurred during a period of two months, indicating the possibility of a point-source transmission at the hotel. An environmental investigation identified several positive samples in the hotel, which as a precautionary measure, was closed until requested improvements were made. Surveillance measures currently remain active.

  11. The impact of later trading hours for hotels on levels of impaired driver road crashes and driver breath alcohol levels.

    PubMed

    Chikritzhs, Tanya; Stockwell, Tim

    2006-09-01

    To examine the impact of later trading hours for licensed hotels in Perth, Western Australia on levels of associated impaired driver road crashes and driver breath alcohol levels (BALs). Police data on the "last place of drinking" for impaired drivers involved in road crashes and their corresponding BALs were examined to identify those associated with Perth hotels between 1 July 1990 and 30 June 1997. During this period, 43 (23%) of the 186 hotels meeting study criteria were granted an Extended Trading Permit for 1 a.m. closing (ETP hotels), while the rest continued to close at midnight (non-ETP hotels). Time-series analyses employing multiple linear regressions were applied to determine whether an association existed between the introduction of extended trading and (i) monthly levels of impaired driver road crashes associated with ETP hotels and (ii) driver BALs associated with ETP hotels. Trends associated with non-ETP hotels were included as controls and possible confounders were considered. After controlling for the trend in crash rates associated with non-ETP hotels and the introduction of mobile police breath testing stations to Perth freeways, a significant increase in monthly crash rates for ETP hotels was found. This relationship was largely accounted for by higher volumes of high-alcohol content beer, wine and spirits purchased by ETP hotels. No relation was found between driver BALs and the introduction of ETPs. Late trading was associated with increased levels of impaired driver road crashes and alcohol consumption, particularly high-risk alcoholic beverages. Greater numbers of patrons and characteristics specific to clientele of hotels which applied for late trading hours (i.e. younger age, greater propensity to drunk-drive, preference for high-risk beverages) were suggested as having contributed to this increase.

  12. Bioinformatics of cardiovascular miRNA biology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Chunguang; Viereck, Janika; Pachel, Christina; Frantz, Stefan; Thum, Thomas; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs and are highly conserved among species. Moreover, miRNAs regulate gene expression of a large number of genes associated with important biological functions and signaling pathways. Recently, several miRNAs have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Thus, investigating the complex regulatory effect of miRNAs may lead to a better understanding of their functional role in the heart. To achieve this, bioinformatics approaches have to be coupled with validation and screening experiments to understand the complex interactions of miRNAs with the genome. This will boost the subsequent development of diagnostic markers and our understanding of the physiological and therapeutic role of miRNAs in cardiac remodeling. In this review, we focus on and explain different bioinformatics strategies and algorithms for the identification and analysis of miRNAs and their regulatory elements to better understand cardiac miRNA biology. Starting with the biogenesis of miRNAs, we present approaches such as LocARNA and miRBase for combining sequence and structure analysis including phylogenetic comparisons as well as detailed analysis of RNA folding patterns, functional target prediction, signaling pathway as well as functional analysis. We also show how far bioinformatics helps to tackle the unprecedented level of complexity and systemic effects by miRNA, underlining the strong therapeutic potential of miRNA and miRNA target structures in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we discuss drawbacks and limitations of bioinformatics algorithms and the necessity of experimental approaches for miRNA target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Non-coding RNAs'.

  13. Measurement of target and double-spin asymmetries for the <mi>e><mi>pmi><mi>emi><mimi>+(<mi>n>) reaction in the nucleon resonance region at low <mi>Q>2

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Drozdov, V.; El Fassi, L.; Kang, Hyekoo; Kovacs, K.; Kuhn, S.; Long, E.; Phillips, S. K.; Ripani, M.; Slifer, K.; Smith, L. C.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chen, J. -P.; Chetry, T.; Choi, Seonho; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovach, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2016-10-01

    We report measurements of target- and double-spin asymmetries for the exclusive channel <mi>e><mi>pmi><mi>emi><mimi>+(<mi>n>) in the nucleon resonance region at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These asymmetries were extracted from data obtained using a longitudinally polarized NH3 target and a longitudinally polarized electron beam with energies 1.1, 1.3, 2.0, 2.3, and 3.0 GeV. The new results are consistent with previous CLAS publications but are extended to a low Q2 range from 0.0065 to 0.35 (GeV/c)2. The Q2 access was made possible by a custom-built Cherenkov detector that allowed the detection of electrons for scattering angles as low as 6 degrees. These results are compared with the unitary isobar models JANR and MAID, the partial-wave analysis prediction from SAID, and the dynamic model DMT. In many kinematic regions our results, in particular results on the target asymmetry, help to constrain the polarization-dependent components of these models.

  14. Regulation of miRNA-mediated gene silencing by miRNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Chaudhuri, Biswajoy; Valdmanis, Paul N.; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Qing; Luo, Qingjun; Kay, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Processing of miRNAs from their precursors to the biologically active mature form is regulated during development and cancer. We show that mouse precursor-miR-151 can bind to and compete with mature miR-151-5p and miR-151-3p for binding sites contained within the complementary regions of the E2f6 mRNA 3′UTR. In agreement, E2f6 mRNA levels were regulated by precursor-miR-151. Conversely, the miR-151-mediated repression of ARHGDIA mRNA was only dependent on the mature miR-151 level as only the mature miRNA was able to bind to the 3′UTR. This suggests that processing of miR-151 can have different effects on separate mRNA targets within a cell. A bioinformatics pipeline revealed additional candidate regions where pre-miRNAs can compete with their mature miRNA counterparts. This was experimentally validated for miR-124 and the SNAI2 3′UTR. Hence, miRNA precursors can serve as post-transcriptional regulators of miRNA activity and are not mere biogenesis intermediates. PMID:25086740

  15. The isolation of low frequency impact sounds in hotel construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, John J.; Dong, David W.

    2002-11-01

    One of the design challenges in the acoustical design of hotels is reducing low frequency sounds from footfalls occurring on both carpeted and hard-surfaced floors. Research on low frequency impact noise [W. Blazier and R. DuPree, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1521-1532 (1994)] resulted in a conclusion that in wood construction low frequency impact sounds were clearly audible and that feasible control methods were not available. The results of numerous FIIC (Field Impact Insulation Class) measurements performed in accordance with ASTM E1007 indicate the lack of correlation between FIIC ratings and the reaction of occupants in the room below. The measurements presented include FIIC ratings and sound pressure level measurements below the ASTM E1007 low frequency limit of 100 Hertz, and reveal that excessive sound levels in the frequency range of 63 to 100 Hertz correlate with occupant complaints. Based upon this history, a tentative criterion for maximum impact sound level in the low frequency range is presented. The results presented of modifying existing constructions to reduce the transmission of impact sounds at low frequencies indicate that there may be practical solutions to this longstanding problem.

  16. Practical implementation of channelized hotelling observers: effect of ROI size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Andrea; Favazza, Christopher P.; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental to the development and application of channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) models is the selection of the region of interest (ROI) to evaluate. For assessment of medical imaging systems, reducing the ROI size can be advantageous. Smaller ROIs enable a greater concentration of interrogable objects in a single phantom image, thereby providing more information from a set of images and reducing the overall image acquisition burden. Additionally, smaller ROIs may promote better assessment of clinical patient images as different patient anatomies present different ROI constraints. To this end, we investigated the minimum ROI size that does not compromise the performance of the CHO model. In this study, we evaluated both simulated images and phantom CT images to identify the minimum ROI size that resulted in an accurate figure of merit (FOM) of the CHO's performance. More specifically, the minimum ROI size was evaluated as a function of the following: number of channels, spatial frequency and number of rotations of the Gabor filters, size and contrast of the object, and magnitude of the image noise. Results demonstrate that a minimum ROI size exists below which the CHO's performance is grossly inaccurate. The minimum ROI size is shown to increase with number of channels and be dictated by truncation of lower frequency filters. We developed a model to estimate the minimum ROI size as a parameterized function of the number of orientations and spatial frequencies of the Gabor filters, providing a guide for investigators to appropriately select parameters for model observer studies.

  17. Practical implementation of Channelized Hotelling Observers: Effect of ROI size

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental to the development and application of channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) models is the selection of the region of interest (ROI) to evaluate. For assessment of medical imaging systems, reducing the ROI size can be advantageous. Smaller ROIs enable a greater concentration of interrogable objects in a single phantom image, thereby providing more information from a set of images and reducing the overall image acquisition burden. Additionally, smaller ROIs may promote better assessment of clinical patient images as different patient anatomies present different ROI constraints. To this end, we investigated the minimum ROI size that does not compromise the performance of the CHO model. In this study, we evaluated both simulated images and phantom CT images to identify the minimum ROI size that resulted in an accurate figure of merit (FOM) of the CHO’s performance. More specifically, the minimum ROI size was evaluated as a function of the following: number of channels, spatial frequency and number of rotations of the Gabor filters, size and contrast of the object, and magnitude of the image noise. Results demonstrate that a minimum ROI size exists below which the CHO’s performance is grossly inaccurate. The minimum ROI size is shown to increase with number of channels and be dictated by truncation of lower frequency filters. We developed a model to estimate the minimum ROI size as a parameterized function of the number of orientations and spatial frequencies of the Gabor filters, providing a guide for investigators to appropriately select parameters for model observer studies. PMID:28943699

  18. Foodborne gastroenteritis due to Norwalk virus in a Winnipeg hotel.

    PubMed Central

    Sekla, L; Stackiw, W; Dzogan, S; Sargeant, D

    1989-01-01

    Within 1 week four separate incidents of gastroenteritis presumed to be foodborne were reported by guests of a Winnipeg hotel. Investigation revealed poor food-handling practices and illness among the kitchen staff. Elevated bacterial counts and Escherichia coli were found in 15 of 24 samples of food tested, and Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 2 pastry samples. Culture of 14 stool samples for bacteria yielded Clostridium perfringens in 1 sample from a staff member and coagulase-positive S. aureus in 2 samples from staff members and 3 from guests. All of the S. aureus isolates were nonenterotoxigenic and had three different phage patterns. Electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy revealed the prototype Norwalk virus in five (56%) of nine stool samples; four samples were from guests, and one was from a kitchen employee. The employee had had diarrhea 24 hours before the first outbreak and was thus believed to be the source of the virus infection, possibly through food handling. This is the first report of Norwalk virus isolation and the first of foodborne Norwalk virus transmission in Canada. A review of foodborne Norwalk virus infections is presented. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2541881

  19. miRDeep*: an integrated application tool for miRNA identification from RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    An, Jiyuan; Lai, John; Lehman, Melanie L; Nelson, Colleen C

    2013-01-01

    miRDeep and its varieties are widely used to quantify known and novel micro RNA (miRNA) from small RNA sequencing (RNAseq). This article describes miRDeep*, our integrated miRNA identification tool, which is modeled off miRDeep, but the precision of detecting novel miRNAs is improved by introducing new strategies to identify precursor miRNAs. miRDeep* has a user-friendly graphic interface and accepts raw data in FastQ and Sequence Alignment Map (SAM) or the binary equivalent (BAM) format. Known and novel miRNA expression levels, as measured by the number of reads, are displayed in an interface, which shows each RNAseq read relative to the pre-miRNA hairpin. The secondary pre-miRNA structure and read locations for each predicted miRNA are shown and kept in a separate figure file. Moreover, the target genes of known and novel miRNAs are predicted using the TargetScan algorithm, and the targets are ranked according to the confidence score. miRDeep* is an integrated standalone application where sequence alignment, pre-miRNA secondary structure calculation and graphical display are purely Java coded. This application tool can be executed using a normal personal computer with 1.5 GB of memory. Further, we show that miRDeep* outperformed existing miRNA prediction tools using our LNCaP and other small RNAseq datasets. miRDeep* is freely available online at http://www.australianprostatecentre.org/research/software/mirdeep-star.

  20. So, Why Sol-Mi? American Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Peggy D.

    2005-01-01

    Walk into any primary grade music class in the U.S., and you will likely hear teacher and students singing a musical greeting, such as "Good morning boys and girls" (sol-mi-mi-sol-sol-mi) and the response "Good morning Miss Purdy" (sol-mi-mi-sol-mi-mi). Since about the 1970s, teachers have been beginning and ending music class for young children…

  1. So, Why Sol-Mi? American Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Peggy D.

    2005-01-01

    Walk into any primary grade music class in the U.S., and you will likely hear teacher and students singing a musical greeting, such as "Good morning boys and girls" (sol-mi-mi-sol-sol-mi) and the response "Good morning Miss Purdy" (sol-mi-mi-sol-mi-mi). Since about the 1970s, teachers have been beginning and ending music class for young children…

  2. miRNA-based drought regulation in wheat.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Guray; Tufekci, Ebru Derelli; Uranbey, Serkan; Unver, Turgay

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding regulatory RNAs that regulate gene expression by guiding target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Drought is a common environmental stress influencing crop growth and development. To date, it has been reported that a number of plant miRNA are involved in drought stress response. In this study, we comparatively investigated drought stress-responsive miRNAs in the root and leaf of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Sivas 111/33) by miRNA microarray screening. miRNA microarray analysis showed that 285 miRNAs (207 upregulated and 78 downregulated) and 244 miRNAs (115 upregulated and 129 downregulated) were differentially expressed in leaf and root tissues, respectively. Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, 23 miRNAs were only expressed in the leaf and 26 miRNAs were only expressed in the root of wheat growth under drought stress. Upon drought treatment, expression of miR159, miR160, miR166, miR169, miR172, miR395, miR396, miR408, miR472, miR477, miR482, miR1858, miR2118, and miR5049 were found to be significantly differentiated in bread wheat. The regulatory network analysis showed that miR395 has connections with a number of target transcripts, and miR159 and miR319 share a number of target genes. Drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive wheat cultivars showed altered expression pattern upon drought stress in terms of investigated miRNA and their target transcript expression level.

  3. Two miRNA clusters, miR-34b/c and miR-449, are essential for normal brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingwen; Bao, Jianqiang; Kim, Minkyung; Yuan, Shuiqiao; Tang, Chong; Zheng, Huili; Mastick, Grant S.; Xu, Chen; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Ablation of a single miRNA gene rarely leads to a discernable developmental phenotype in mice, in some cases because of compensatory effects by other functionally related miRNAs. Here, we report that simultaneous inactivation of two functionally related miRNA clusters (miR-34b/c and miR-449) encoding five miRNAs (miR-34b, miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-449b, and miR-449c) led to sexually dimorphic, partial perinatal lethality, growth retardation, and infertility. These developmental defects correlated with the dysregulation of ∼240 target genes, which are mainly involved in three major cellular functions, including cell-fate control, brain development and microtubule dynamics. Our data demonstrate an essential role of a miRNA family in brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis. PMID:24982181

  4. miRLocator: Machine Learning-Based Prediction of Mature MicroRNAs within Plant Pre-miRNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Haibo; Zhai, Jingjing; Ma, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short, non-coding RNA that play regulatory roles in a wide variety of biological processes, such as plant growth and abiotic stress responses. Although several computational tools have been developed to identify primary miRNAs and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs), very few provide the functionality of locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. This manuscript introduces a novel algorithm for predicting miRNAs named miRLocator, which isbased on machine learning techniques and sequence and structural features extracted from miRNA:miRNA* duplexes. To address the class imbalance problem (few real miRNAs and a large number of pseudo miRNAs), the prediction models in miRLocator were optimized by considering critical (and often ignored) factors that can markedly affect the prediction accuracy of mature miRNAs, including the machine learning algorithm and the ratio between training positive and negative samples. Ten-fold cross-validation on 5854 experimentally validated miRNAs from 19 plant species showed that miRLocator performed better than the state-of-art miRNA predictor miRdup in locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. miRLocator will aid researchers interested in discovering miRNAs from model and non-model plant species. PMID:26558614

  5. miRLocator: Machine Learning-Based Prediction of Mature MicroRNAs within Plant Pre-miRNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haibo; Zhai, Jingjing; Ma, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short, non-coding RNA that play regulatory roles in a wide variety of biological processes, such as plant growth and abiotic stress responses. Although several computational tools have been developed to identify primary miRNAs and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs), very few provide the functionality of locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. This manuscript introduces a novel algorithm for predicting miRNAs named miRLocator, which is based on machine learning techniques and sequence and structural features extracted from miRNA:miRNA* duplexes. To address the class imbalance problem (few real miRNAs and a large number of pseudo miRNAs), the prediction models in miRLocator were optimized by considering critical (and often ignored) factors that can markedly affect the prediction accuracy of mature miRNAs, including the machine learning algorithm and the ratio between training positive and negative samples. Ten-fold cross-validation on 5854 experimentally validated miRNAs from 19 plant species showed that miRLocator performed better than the state-of-art miRNA predictor miRdup in locating mature miRNAs within plant pre-miRNAs. miRLocator will aid researchers interested in discovering miRNAs from model and non-model plant species.

  6. [Evaluation of a Legionella outbreak emerged in a recently opening hotel].

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2013-04-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is a systemic infection caused by Legionella species especially colonized in the water systems. Hotels are common locations in which waterwork-associated sporadic or epidemic legionellosis can be detected. The aim of this study was to evaluate a small Legionella outbreak emerged in a recently opened 600-bed hotel in Alanya, a touristic county in Mediterranean part of Turkey. A 66 years old male patient who stayed in this hotel opened on May 15th, 2009, was admitted to our hospital on May 21st, 2009 with the complaints of high fever, headache and diarrhea lasting for three days. Since chest X-ray revealed non-homogenous density increase in left middle and inferior zone, the patient was diagnosed as atypical pneumoniae and LD was confirmed by positive urinary Legionella antigen test (Card test, BinaxNOW®Legionella Urinary Antigen Test; Alere Co, USA) result. Following the identification of the index case, the records of our hospital were reviewed and revealed another case being treated with the diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia who was also the guest of the same hotel. This patient was then diagnosed as LD by positive urinary antigen test. Since new cases were identified during the following days (May 22, 25 and 26) the Antalya County Health Department and hotel management were informed about a cluster of LD. In addition subsequent investigation for environmental surveillance and water sampling were conducted. The LD diagnosis and environmental inspections were performed according to the procedure described in the guideline from "Turkish Ministry of Health Travel-Associated Legionnaires' Disease Control Programme". Five definitive cases and one presumptive case of LD were identified during the outbreak period (May 20-26, 2009). All of the cases were successfully treated (intravenous ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin or clarithromycin), however one patient died due to sudden death during sleep after being discharged. Since sputum

  7. Tertiary structure mapping of the pri-miRNA miR-17~92.

    PubMed

    Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of RNA in regulating gene expression has exploded over the past 15 years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have vastly expanded the role of RNA in gene regulation beyond spliceosomal, ribosomal, and messenger RNAs. Approximately one half of miRNAs are polycistronic, where two or more miRNAs are encoded on a single pri-miRNA transcript, termed a miRNA cluster. The six miRNAs of the miR-17~92 cluster are contained within a ~800 nucleotide region within intron 3 of the cl13orf25 ~7 kb pri-miRNA transcript. We recently reported on the tertiary structured domain of miR-17~92 and its role in modulating miRNA biogenesis. The key finding was that the cluster structure explained the differential processing of the miRNA hairpins by Drosha. This work demonstrated the need to consider pri-miRNA tertiary structure in miRNA biogenesis. Since biochemical structure probing is typically performed on relatively short RNAs (≤200 nucleotides), we had to adapt these methodologies for application on large RNAs (~800 nucleotide miR-17~92 pri-miRNA). We present here our adaptation of a protection footprinting method using ribonucleases to probe the structure of the ~800 nucleotide miR-17~92 pri-miRNA. We outline the technical difficulties involved in probing large RNAs and data visualization using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and how we adapted the existing approaches to probe large RNAs. The methodology outlined here is generally applicable to large RNAs including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA).

  8. Energy End-Use Patterns in Full-Service Hotels: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Placet, Marylynn; Katipamula, Srinivas; Liu, Bing; Dirks, James A.; Xie, YuLong; Sullivan, Greg; Walent, Jim; Williamson, Rebecca

    2010-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a program -- Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) -- to work with private-sector companies in the design of highly-efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a project with a major hotel company to retrofit a full-service, large hotel with the goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 30%. The first step of the project was an intensive metering and monitoring effort aimed at understanding energy end use patterns in the hotel. About 10% of the guest rooms (32), as well as circuits for most of the end uses in public spaces (lighting, elevators, air handlers and other HVAC system components, and various equipment), were equipped with meters. Data are being collected at 1- or 5-minute intervals and downloaded on a monthly basis for analysis. This paper presents results from the first four months of the monitoring effort, which revealed energy end-use consumption patterns, variability of guest room energy use, daily load curves, monthly variations, and other aspects of hotel energy use. Metered end-use data for hotels at this level of detail are not available from any currently-available public sources. This study presents unique information and insight into energy end-use patterns in the lodging sector of commercial buildings and can also serve as a case study of a complex sub-metering project.

  9. Economic analysis of the water demand in the hotels and restaurants sector: Shadow prices and elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Ana; Atwi, Majed; Barberán, Ramón; Mur, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Despite the growing economic importance of tourism, and its impact on relative water shortage, little is known about the role that water plays in the productive process of hotels and restaurants and, therefore, the possible implications of water demand management policy for this sector. This study aims to fill this gap. It is based on the microdata of 676 firms in the sector, operating in the city of Zaragoza (Spain) for a 12 year period. Based on the Translog cost function, we estimate the shadow price of water in the short run and, from a long-run perspective, its direct price elasticity, its cross elasticities relative to labor, capital, and supplies, and its elasticity with respect to the level of output. The results obtained show that water provides sector firms returns that are on average higher than its price, although in the case of hotels the margin is really narrow. This situation provides policy makers with a margin for applying price increases without affecting the sector's viability, with some caution in the case of hotels. Water demand elasticity equals -0.38 in the case of hotels, but it is not significant in the case of restaurants and bar-cafes; hence, only in hotels is there potential for influencing water use patterns, encouraging the resource's conservation through pricing policy. Moreover, capital is a substitutive factor of water, and the elasticity of water with respect to output is 0.40, all of which should also be considered by policy makers in water resource management.

  10. Suicide by jumping from high-rise hotels. Fulton County, Georgia, 1967-1986.

    PubMed

    Hanzlick, R; Masterson, K; Walker, B

    1990-12-01

    During a 20-year period from 1967 through 1986, 19 suicidal jumps from high-rise hotels (HRHs) accounted for 24% of all fatal jumping episodes and 1% of all suicides in Fulton County, Georgia, U.S.A. The rate of suicidal jumps from HRHs did not increase during the study period. The number of fatal jumps per hotel-year correlated with the height of the interior hotel atrium. The mean age for all victims was 34 years, and 63% of victims were white males. The majority of victims were local residents who were alone when they jumped and were not registered hotel guests. Registered guests tended to jump from the floor on which their room was located whereas nonregistered individuals tended to jump from the upper-most floors in the hotel. Of 19 HRH jumps, 13 occurred from the inside. Suicide notes were found in 37% of cases. HRH jumps were least common between 6 p.m. and midnight, all decedents were dressed in street clothing, only one was heard to have screamed, and all but one were dead on the scene. Alcohol and drug involvement was minimal. We hope that this information will be useful to those who investigate such deaths and to those who study the behavioral manifestations of suicide.

  11. Spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for signal detection from image sequences.

    PubMed

    Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-22

    Detection of signals in noisy images is necessary in many applications, including astronomy and medical imaging. The optimal linear observer for performing a detection task, called the Hotelling observer in the medical literature, can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar prewhitening matched filter. Performance on the detection task is limited by randomness in the image data, which stems from randomness in the object, randomness in the imaging system, and randomness in the detector outputs due to photon and readout noise, and the Hotelling observer accounts for all of these effects in an optimal way. If multiple temporal frames of images are acquired, the resulting data set is a spatio-temporal random process, and the Hotelling observer becomes a spatio-temporal linear operator. This paper discusses the theory of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer and estimation of the required spatio-temporal covariance matrices. It also presents a parallel implementation of the observer on a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION 3 gaming consoles. As an example, we consider the use of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for exoplanet detection.

  12. Spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for signal detection from image sequences

    PubMed Central

    Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H.; Rodríguez, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of signals in noisy images is necessary in many applications, including astronomy and medical imaging. The optimal linear observer for performing a detection task, called the Hotelling observer in the medical literature, can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar prewhitening matched filter. Performance on the detection task is limited by randomness in the image data, which stems from randomness in the object, randomness in the imaging system, and randomness in the detector outputs due to photon and readout noise, and the Hotelling observer accounts for all of these effects in an optimal way. If multiple temporal frames of images are acquired, the resulting data set is a spatio-temporal random process, and the Hotelling observer becomes a spatio-temporal linear operator. This paper discusses the theory of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer and estimation of the required spatio-temporal covariance matrices. It also presents a parallel implementation of the observer on a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION 3 gaming consoles. As an example, we consider the use of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for exoplanet detection. PMID:19550494

  13. Knockout of miR-221 and miR-222 reveals common and specific targets for paralogous miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Geon; Lim, Yeong-Hwan; Kim, Nam Joong; Wee, Gabbine; Kim, Young-Kook

    2017-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of mRNA through sequence-specific binding of the 3' untranslated region (UTR). The seed sequence of miRNAs is the key determinant for target site recognition. Paralogous miRNAs, which share the same seed sequences but differ in their 3' regions, are known to regulate largely overlapping groups of mRNAs. However, no study has analyzed functional differences between paralogous miRNAs with proper experimental methods. In this study, we compared the targets of paralogous miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-222. Using a nuclease-mediated genome engineering technique, we established knockout cell lines for these miRNAs, and precisely analyzed differences in target regulation. We found that miR-221 and miR-222 suppress the previously identified targets, CDKN1B and CDKN1C, differentially. Whereas both miRNAs suppressed CDKN1B, only miR-221 suppressed CDKN1C. From transcriptome analyses, we found that several different target mRNAs were regulated by each of miR-221 and miR-222 independently, although a large number of mRNAs responded commonly to miR-221 and miR-222. This is the first study to compare the mRNA regulations by paralogous miRNAs and illustrate that paralogous miRNAs with the same seed sequence also have difference in target regulation.

  14. The miRNome of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fries, Gabriel R; Carvalho, Andre F; Quevedo, Joao

    2017-09-23

    Epigenetic mechanisms have been suggested to play a key role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD), among which microRNAs (miRNAs) may be of particular significance according to recent studies. We aimed to summarize miRNA studies in BD to identify consistent findings, limitations, and future directions of this emerging field. We performed a comprehensive search on PUBMED and Medline for studies investigating an association between BD and miRNAs. The included studies report miRNA alterations in postmortem brain tissues and in the periphery, cell culture and preclinical findings, genetic associations, and the effects of medications. Several studies report changes in miRNA expression levels in postmortem brain and in the periphery of patients, although most of the results so far have not been replicated and are not concordant between different populations. Genetic studies also suggest that miRNA genes are located within susceptibility loci of BD, and also a putative role of miRNAs in modulating genes previously shown to confer risk of BD. We did not perform a systematic review of the literature, and miRNAs represent only one facet of the plethora of epigenetic mechanisms that might be involved in BD's pathophysiology. miRNA findings in BD significantly vary between studies, but are consistent to suggest a key role for these molecules in BD's pathophysiology and treatment, particularly miR-34a and miR-137. Accordingly, miRNA might represent important biomarkers of illness to be used in the clinical settings, and potentially also for the development of novel therapeutics for BD in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric slowing down of decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartlomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh Behari

    2016-10-27

    Here, we investigate <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric quantum systems ultraweakly coupled to an environment. We find that such open systems evolve under <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric, purely dephasing and unital dynamics. The dynamical map describing the evolution is then determined explicitly using a quantum canonical transformation. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of why <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric dephasing-type interactions lead to a critical slowing down of decoherence. This effect is further exemplified with an experimentally relevant system, a <mi mathvariant='script'>PTmi>-symmetric qubit easily realizable, e.g., in optical or microcavity experiments.

  16. miRClassify: an advanced web server for miRNA family classification and annotation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Mao, Yaozong; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Yunfeng; Ji, Zhiliang

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) family is a group of miRNAs that derive from the common ancestor. Normally, members from the same miRNA family have similar physiological functions; however, they are not always conserved in primary sequence or secondary structure. Proper family prediction from primary sequence will be helpful for accurate identification and further functional annotation of novel miRNA. Therefore, we introduced a novel machine learning-based web server, the miRClassify, which can rapidly identify miRNA from the primary sequence and classify it into a miRNA family regardless of similarity in sequence and structure. Additionally, the medical implication of the miRNA family is also provided when it is available in PubMed. The web server is accessible at the link http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/software/MIR/home.html.

  17. Theoretical performance analysis of multislice channelized Hotelling observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-02-01

    Quality assessment of 3D medical images is becoming increasingly important, because of clinical practice rapidly moving in the direction of volumetric imaging. In a recent publication, three multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer (msCHO) models are presented for the task of detecting 3D signals in multi-slice images, where each multi-slice image is inspected in a so called stack-browsing mode. The observer models are based on the assumption that humans observe multi-slice images in a simple two stage process, and each of the models implement this principle in a different way. In this paper, we investigate the theoretical performance, in terms of detection signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of msCHO models, for the task of detecting a separable signal in a Gaussian background with separable covariance matrix. We find that, despite the differences in architecture of the three models, they all have the same asymptotical performance in this task (i.e., when the number of training images tends to infinity). On the other hand, when backgrounds with nonseparable covariance matrices are considered, the third model, msCHOc, is expected to perform slightly better than the other msCHO models (msCHOa and msCHOb), but only when sufficient training images are provided. These findings suggest that the choice between the msCHO models mainly depends on the experiment setup (e.g., the number of available training samples), while the relation to human observers depends on the particular choice of the "temporal" channels that the msCHO models use.

  18. miRNAs in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farazi, Thalia A.; Spitzer, Jessica I.; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNA molecules of 20- to 23-nucleotide (nt) length that control gene expression in many cellular processes. These molecules typically reduce the stability of mRNAs, including those of genes that mediate processes in tumorigenesis, such as inflammation, cell cycle regulation, stress response, differentiation, apoptosis, and invasion. miRNA targeting is mostly achieved through specific base-pairing interactions between the 5′ end (“seed” region) of the miRNA and sites within coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs; target sites in the 3′ UTR lead to more effective mRNA destabilization. Since miRNAs frequently target hundreds of mRNAs, miRNA regulatory pathways are complex. To provide a critical overview of miRNA dysregulation in cancer we first discuss the methods currently available for studying the role of miRNAs in cancer and then review miRNA genomic organization, biogenesis, and mechanism of target recognition examining how these processes are altered in tumorigenesis. Given the critical role miRNAs play in tumorigenesis processes and their disease specific expression, they hold potential as therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers. PMID:21125669

  19. Thermal evolution of antiferromagnetic correlations and tetrahedral bond angles in superconducting <mi mathvariant='normal'>FeTemi>1<mi>x mathvariant='normal'>Semi>x>

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijun; Schneeloch, J. A.; Wen, Jinsheng; Božin, E. S.; Granroth, G. E.; Winn, B. L.; Feygenson, M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Gu, Genda; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Tranquada, J. M.; Xu, Guangyong

    2016-03-14

    It has recently been demonstrated that dynamical magnetic correlations measured by neutron scattering in iron chalcogenides can be described with models of short-range correlations characterized by particular choices of four-spin plaquettes, where the appropriate choice changes as the parent material is doped towards superconductivity. Here we apply such models to describe measured maps of magnetic scattering as a function of two-dimensional wave vectors obtained for optimally superconducting crystals of <mi mathvariant='normal'>FeTemi>1<mi>x mathvariant='normal'>Semi>x>. We show that the characteristic antiferromagnetic wave vector evolves from that of the bicollinear structure found in underdoped chalcogenides (at high temperature) to that associated with the stripe structure of antiferromagnetic iron arsenides (at low temperature); these can both be described with the same local plaquette, but with different interplaquette correlations. While the magnitude of the low-energy magnetic spectral weight is substantial at all temperatures, it actually weakens somewhat at low temperature, where the charge carriers become more itinerant. The observed change in spin correlations is correlated with the dramatic drop in the electronic scattering rate and the growth of the bulk nematic response upon cooling. In conclusion, we also present powder neutron diffraction results for lattice parameters in <mi mathvariant='normal'>FeTemi>1<mi>x mathvariant='normal'>Semi>x> indicating that the tetrahedral bond angle tends to increase towards the ideal value upon cooling, in agreement with the increased screening of the crystal field by more itinerant electrons and the correspondingly smaller splitting of the Fe 3d orbitals.

  20. Meeting Competence Needs in the Hotel and Catering Industry Now and in the Future. Research Report 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Anne, Ed.; Hayter, Roy, Ed.

    The hotel and catering industry in the United Kingdom is estimated to have employed 2,392,000 people in 1990--about 9 percent of the total work force in employment in the country. These figures came from a major study into the skills needs of the hotel and catering industry in relation to the current provision of vocational education. Data are…

  1. Meeting Competence Needs in the Hotel and Catering Industry Now and in the Future. Research Report 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Anne, Ed.; Hayter, Roy, Ed.

    The hotel and catering industry in the United Kingdom is estimated to have employed 2,392,000 people in 1990--about 9 percent of the total work force in employment in the country. These figures came from a major study into the skills needs of the hotel and catering industry in relation to the current provision of vocational education. Data are…

  2. Lack of hygiene routines among patients and family members at patient hotels--a possible route for transmitting puerperal fever.

    PubMed

    Starlander, Gustaf; Lytsy, Birgitta; Melhus, Asa

    2010-07-01

    The use of patient hotels for ambulatory care of women with uncomplicated deliveries has become a routine in Sweden. This report describes a minor outbreak of a group A Streptococcus strain in 2 newly delivered mothers and their newborn babies at a patient hotel.

  3. [Duration of sick-leave and the moment of recovery in the hotel industry].

    PubMed

    Folgerø, I S; Larsen, S

    1991-09-10

    The paper addresses the problem of sick leave in the hotel industry. It was hypothesized that there would be a tendency for granted sick leaves to include weekends, thus imposing an additional financial burden on the hotel in question. A total of 401 medical certificates from a large city hotel were reviewed. According to these certificates one third of the patients regained their health between Sunday and Monday. Of the patients with "short" sick leaves (less than a fortnight), 40% recovered between Sunday and Monday. The average duration of the sick leave for this group was 1.3 days longer than that of the patients whose sick leaves ended on other days of the week. The results are discussed in terms of the ambiguous position of the medical practitioner.

  4. A gastroenteritis outbreak due to norovirus associated with a Colorado hotel.

    PubMed

    Dippold, Laura; Lee, Robin; Selman, Carol; Monroe, Steve; Henry, Chuck

    2003-12-01

    Describing the system components of norovirus outbreaks is important in understanding how to prevent future outbreaks. Investigation of these components includes environmental, epidemiologic, and laboratory perspectives. This study describes how an investigation from these three perspectives was conducted and the significance of each component in understanding norovirus outbreaks. On May 23, 2000, members of a professional group attending two meetings at a local hotel in Englewood, Colorado, began to complain of gastrointestinal illness. Sixty-nine illnesses were reported among 133 attendees. Eight hotel employees also complained of illness. Staff from the Tri-County Health Department and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated the outbreak. Three stool specimens collected from ill attendees contained norovirus. While the epidemiologic component did not identify a specific vehicle of transmission, the environmental investigation revealed food-handling practices, food handler perceptions, and hotel policies that may have contributed to disease transmission.

  5. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  6. Post natal use of analgesics: comparisons between conventional postnatal wards and a maternity hotel.

    PubMed

    Nordeng, Hedvig; Eskild, Anne; Nesheim, Britt-Ingjerd

    2010-04-01

    To investigate factors related to analgesic use after delivery, and especially whether rates of analgesic use were different in a midwife-managed maternity hotel as compared to conventional postnatal wards. One maternity hotel and two conventional postnatal wards at Ullevål University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. Data were obtained from hospital records for 804 women with vaginal deliveries. Postnatal analgesic use. Overall, approximately half the women used analgesics after vaginal delivery in both conventional postnatal wards and maternity hotel. The factors that were significantly associated with use of analgesics postnatally in multivariate analysis were multiparity, having a non-Western ethnicity, smoking in pregnancy, younger age, instrumental delivery, analgesic use during labour, maternal complications post partum, and duration of postnatal stay 4 days or more. The use of analgesics is determined by socio-demographic and obstetric factors rather than the organisation of the ward.

  7. Economic evaluation of a worksite obesity prevention and intervention trial among hotel workers in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Meenan, Richard T; Vogt, Thomas M; Williams, Andrew E; Stevens, Victor J; Albright, Cheryl L; Nigg, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Economic evaluation of Work, Weight, and Wellness (3W), a 2-year randomized trial of a weight loss program delivered through Hawaii hotel worksites. Business case analysis from hotel perspective. Program resources were micro-costed (2008 dollars). Program benefits were reduced medical costs, fewer absences, and higher productivity. Primary outcome was discounted 24-month net present value (NPV). Control program cost $222K to implement over 24 months ($61 per participant), intervention program cost $1.12M ($334). Including overweight participants (body mass index >25), discounted control NPV was -$217K; -$1.1M for intervention program. Presenteeism improvement of 50% combined with baseline 10% productivity shortfall required to generate positive 24-month intervention NPV. 3W's positive clinical outcomes did not translate into immediate economic benefit for participating hotels, although modest cost savings were observed in the trial's second year.

  8. Legionnaires' disease in the Caribbean. An outbreak associated with a resort hotel.

    PubMed

    Schlech, W F; Gorman, G W; Payne, M C; Broome, C V

    1985-11-01

    Outbreaks of legionnaires' disease (LD) in tourists visiting Italian and Spanish resorts have been recently reported. An unusual number of reports of LD in tourists visiting the US Virgin Islands prompted an investigation of risk factors for development of LD in this area. Twenty-seven cases of LD were identified between 1979 and 1982 through press reports, personal communication, the national LD surveillance system, a review of hospital records, and a mail survey. Twenty-four of 27 persons with the disease had visited St Croix and 12 of them had stayed at a single hotel in 1981. Available evidence suggested that infection was due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1; L pneumophila serogroups 1 and 3 and several new Legionella species were isolated from the potable water system at the hotel. Following hyperchlorination of the potable water system, no further cases of LD in hotel visitors have been identified to date.

  9. Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psychological wellness, the time pressure of cleaning rooms quickly and work-related stress stemming from workplace mistreatment emerged as major work-related stressors. Recommendations are made for the introduction of multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses and to promote healthier workplaces.

  10. Economic Evaluation of a Worksite Obesity Prevention and Intervention Trial among Hotel Workers in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Meenan, Richard T.; Vogt, Thomas M.; Williams, Andrew E.; Stevens, Victor J.; Albright, Cheryl L.; Nigg, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective Economic evaluation of Work, Weight, and Wellness (3W), a two-year randomized trial of a weight loss program delivered through Hawaii hotel worksites. Methods Business case analysis from hotel perspective. Program resources were micro-costed (2008 dollars). Program benefits were reduced medical costs, fewer absences, and higher productivity. Primary outcome was discounted 24-month net present value (NPV). Results Control program cost $222K to implement over 24 months ($61 per participant), intervention program cost $1.12M ($334). Including overweight participants (body mass index > 25), discounted control NPV was −$217K; −$1.1M for intervention program. Presenteeism improvement of 50% combined with baseline 10% productivity shortfall required to generate positive 24-month intervention NPV. Conclusions 3W’s positive clinical outcomes did not translate into immediate economic benefit for participating hotels, although modest cost savings were observed in the trial’s second year. PMID:20061889

  11. A Room with a Viewpoint Revisited: Descriptive Norms and Hotel Guests' Towel Reuse Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E.

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group (“hotel guests” vs. “guests in this room”) and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones. PMID:25084348

  12. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes.

  13. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes. PMID:26407127

  14. NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (LR) SUBSTATION (MI98D), POWERHOUSE (MI98C), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (L-R) SUBSTATION (MI-98-D), POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), AND COOKE DAM POND IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, North Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  15. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  16. Welfare Hotels. Uses, Costs, and Alternatives. Briefing Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    "Welfare hotels" are commercially-owned, single- or multi-story hotels or motels providing shelter to a clientele composed exclusively or primarily of homeless families receiving public assistance. They often provide inadequate physical conditions and services. Information in the following areas is given about welfare hotels: (1)…

  17. Optimum contracted-for water supply for hotels in arid coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Lamei, A; von Münch, E; van der Zaag, P; Imam, E

    2009-01-01

    Hotels in arid coastal areas use mainly desalinated water for their domestic water demands, and treated wastewater for irrigating green areas. Private water companies supply these hotels with their domestic water needs. There is normally a contractual agreement stating a minimum requirement that has to be supplied by the water company and that the hotel management has to pay for regardless of its actual consumption ("contracted-for water supply"). This paper describes a model to determine what value a hotel should choose for its contracted-for water supply in order to minimize its total annual water costs. An example from an arid coastal tourism-dominated city is presented: Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.The managers of hotels with expected high occupancy rates (74% and above) can contract for more than 80%. On the other hand, hotels with expected lower occupancy rates (60% and less) can contract for less than 70% of the peak daily domestic water demand. With a green area ratio of 40 m(2)/room or less, an on-site wastewater treatment plant can satisfy the required irrigation demand for an occupancy rate as low as 42%. Increasing the ratio of green irrigated area to 100 m(2)/room does not affect the contracted-for water supply at occupancy rates above 72%; at lower occupancy rates, however, on-site treated wastewater is insufficient for irrigating the green areas. Increasing the green irrigated area to 120 m(2)/room increases the need for additional water, either from externally sourced treated wastewater or potable water. The cost of the former is much lower than the latter (0.58 versus 1.52 to 2.14 US$/m(3) in the case study area).

  18. Legionnaires' Disease in Hotels and Passenger Ships: A Systematic Review of Evidence, Sources, and Contributing Factors.

    PubMed

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Rudge, James W

    2015-01-01

    Travel-associated Legionnaires' disease (LD) is a serious problem, and hundreds of cases are reported every year among travelers who stayed at hotels, despite the efforts of international and governmental authorities and hotel operators to prevent additional cases. A systematic review of travel-associated LD events (cases, clusters, outbreaks) and of environmental studies of Legionella contamination in accommodation sites was conducted. Two databases were searched (PubMed and EMBASE). Data were extracted from 50 peer-reviewed articles that provided microbiological and epidemiological evidence for linking the accommodation sites with LD. The strength of evidence was classified as strong, possible, and probable. Three of the 21 hotel-associated events identified and four of nine ship-associated events occurred repeatedly on the same site. Of 197 hotel-associated cases, 158 (80.2%) were linked to hotel cooling towers and/or potable water systems. Ship-associated cases were most commonly linked to hot tubs (59/83, 71.1%). Common contributing factors included inadequate disinfection, maintenance, and monitoring; water stagnation; poor temperature control; and poor ventilation. Across all 30 events, Legionella concentrations in suspected water sources were >10,000 cfu/L, <10,000 cfu/L, and unknown in 11, 3, and 13 events, respectively. In five events, Legionella was not detected only after repeated disinfections. In environmental studies, Legionella was detected in 81.1% of ferries (23/28) and 48.9% of hotels (587/1,200), while all 12 cruise ships examined were negative. This review highlights the need for LD awareness strategies targeting operators of accommodation sites. Increased standardization of LD investigation and reporting, and more rigorous follow-up of LD events, would help generate stronger, more comparable evidence on LD sources, contributing factors, and control measure effectiveness. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  19. Improving service quality in NHS Trust hospitals: lessons from the hotel sector.

    PubMed

    Desombre, T; Eccles, G

    1998-01-01

    This article looks to review recent practice undertaken within the UK hotel sector to improve customer service, and suggests ideals that could be implemented within National Health (NHS) Trust hospitals. At a time of increasing competition, hotel firms are using service enhancement as a means to gain competitive advantage, and therefore developing a range of techniques to measure levels of service quality improvement. With continued change in the health service, where greater focus now lies with patient satisfaction, so there is a requirement for managers to adapt techniques presently being offered in other service industries to improve levels of customer service and ensure patients are targeted to define their levels of satisfaction.

  20. Enhancing appropriateness of acute bed use: role of the patient hotel.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, I; Jenkins, R; Llewellyn, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--This study aimed to assess the appropriateness of bed use by determining patients' suitability for patient hotel accommodation and day treatment and by examining timeliness of discharge, and to assess patient and staff views about patient hotels. DESIGN--Patients were assessed by a doctor and nurse in terms of an agreed case definition for patient hotel use. Patient suitability was validated and patient acceptability measured by semi-structured interviews with a random sample of patients judged suitable for hotel accommodation. All senior medical and nursing staff completed a further questionnaire. SETTING--The study took place at University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (856 beds), and all specialties, except intensive care wards, participated. SUBJECTS--Patients occupying a total of 3972 bed days, accumulated over seven randomly chosen census days, were studied. RESULTS--Data were available for 88% of eligible inpatients. Ten per cent (405 of 3972) of patients were judged suitable for a patient hotel. Specialties indicating major use were obstetrics and gynaecology, general surgery, and general and geriatric medicine. Sixty three per cent (254 of 405) of these subjects required low level investigation or treatment. Preoperative and postoperative and antenatal patients were often suitable also. Three per cent (119 of 3972, 95% confidence interval 2.5, 3.6%) of inpatients were judged suitable for day treatment/investigation. Seventy nine per cent (291 of 369) of patients suitable for discharge were discharged on the same or the next day. The patient hotel idea was acceptable to 58 of 68 (85%) randomly selected patients and to 84 of 93 (90%) staff. CONCLUSIONS--With allowance for non-response, our study indicates that a general hospital of this size generates the need (inpatients, relatives, and ward attenders) for a mean of 72 patient hotel beds. There is also residual scope for increasing day treatment/investigation and for releasing beds by speeding

  1. Hotel water consumption at a seasonal mass tourist destination. The case of the island of Mallorca.

    PubMed

    Deyà Tortella, Bartolomé; Tirado, Dolores

    2011-10-01

    While it is true that tourism is one of the main driving forces behind economic growth in several world regions, it is also true that tourism can have serious negative environmental impacts, especially with regard to water resources. The tourist water demand can generate big problems of sustainability, mainly in those regions where water is scarce, as occurs in most coastal and small island destinations where a large part of world tourism is concentrated. Given the shortage of literature on the subject, further research into the tourist water demand is required, with particular attention to the hotel sector, since hotels are the most popular option for tourists, displaying higher levels of water consumption. The main purpose of this study is to develop a model to analyse hotel water consumption at a mature sun and sand destination with a strong seasonal pattern and scarcity of water; characteristics shared by some of the world's main tourist destinations. Our model includes a set of different hotel variables associated with physical, seasonal and management-related factors and it improves on the capacity to explain water consumption at such destinations. Following a hierarchical regression methodology, the model is empirically tested through a survey distributed to managers of a representative sample of hotels on the island of Mallorca. From the obtained results, interesting recommendations can be made for both hotel managers and policy makers. Among these, it should be highlighted that the strategic move contemplated by many mature destinations towards a higher quality, low-season model could have significant negative effects in terms of the sustainability of water resources. Our results also conclude that managerial decisions, like the system of accommodation that is offered (i.e. the proliferation of the "all-inclusive" formula, both at mature and new destinations), could give rise to the same negative effect. Development of water saving initiatives (usually

  2. The use of a mid-Manhattan hotel as a support system.

    PubMed

    Cohen, C I; Sichel, W R; Berger, D

    1977-01-01

    The mass media have focused recently on the failure of psychiatric institutions to provide adequate follow-up for its patients released into the inner city. Many expatients deteriorate and become part of the "revolving door": single-room occupancy--city hospitals--state hospital. This paper attempts to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing existing community resources (for example, a large midtown Manhattan hotel and local service agencies) to cope with this problem. A description of the multiagency organized hotel programs as well as objective and subjective data is provided in order to substantiate our contention that this approach offers a viable alternative to long-term hospitalization.

  3. A towel less: social norms enhance pro-environmental behavior in hotels.

    PubMed

    Reese, Gerhard; Loew, Kristina; Steffgen, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that normative appeals to engage in environmentally friendly behavior were most effective when they were accompanied by a provincial norm (e.g., when norms matched individuals' immediate situational circumstances). Analyzing hotel guests' towel-use during their stay, the current study tests whether messages employing provincial norms were more effective in reducing towel-use than standard environmental messages. In line with previous findings, guests of two hotels used significantly fewer towels when provincial normative appeals--rather than standard environmental messages--were communicated. These findings corroborate to the body of research demonstrating the power of social norms on environmental behavior.

  4. Comparison of patrons of hotels with early opening and standard hours.

    PubMed

    Smith, D I

    1986-02-01

    A comparison was made of 72 men who were patrons in hotels with 6 A.M. or 7 A.M. opening, with a control group of 87 men interviewed in nearby hotels with 10 A.M. opening. The two groups were very similar on biographical characteristics, yet the men in the early-opening group consumed significantly more alcohol, had more drinking sessions, spent longer in drinking, and had significantly higher SMAST scores. The early opening was apparently facilitating problem drinking.

  5. Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease associated with person to person spread in hotels and restaurants.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, R J; Wall, P G; Adak, G K; Evans, H S; Cowden, J M; Caul, E O

    1995-09-15

    Twenty-eight outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, reported as being transmitted mainly by the person to person route, were identified in association with retail catering premises, such as hotels, restaurants, and public houses, in England and Wales between 1992 and 1994. Five thousand and forty-eight people were at risk in these outbreaks and 1234 were affected. Most of the outbreaks (over 90%) occurred in hotels. Small round structured viruses were the most commonly detected pathogens. Diarrhoea and vomiting were common symptoms and most of the outbreaks occurred in the summer months. Control measures to contain infectious individuals and improved hygiene measures are necessary to contain such outbreaks.

  6. Mite and pet allergen exposure in hotels in Uberlândia, Midwestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Simplício, E C; Silva, D A O; Braga, I A; Sopelete, M C; Sung, S J; Taketomi, E A

    2007-08-01

    Mite allergens are involved in airway sensitization and allergic diseases. We evaluated the exposure to house dust-mite (Der p 1 and Der f 1) and pet (Fel d 1 and Can f 1) allergens in hotels in Uberlândia, Midwestern Brazil. A total of 140 dust samples were collected from bedding (n = 98) and carpet (n = 42) of bedrooms in 20 hotels enrolled for this study. Geometric mean (GM) levels of Der f 1 (11.30 microg/g of dust; 95% CI: 8.34-15.30 microg/g) were significantly higher than Der p 1 (0.15 microg/g of dust; 95% CI: 0.13-0.18 microg/g) in bedding dust samples (P < 0.001), regardless of the hotel classes. Der f 1 levels were significantly higher in bedding (11.30 microg/g of dust; 95% CI: 8.34-15.30 microg/g) than carpet (6.32 microg/g of dust; 95% CI: 4.31-9.26 microg/g) dust samples (P < 0.05). High levels of Der f 1 (>10 microg/g of dust) were found in 58%, 76%, and 69% of dust samples from Simple, Economical, and Tourist/Superior hotels, respectively, while GM levels of Fel d 1 (0.11 microg/g of dust; 95% CI: 0.09-0.14 microg/g) and Can f 1 (0.30 microg/g of dust; 95% CI: 0.20-0.44 microg/g) were relatively low. These results indicate that Der f 1 is the predominant allergen in hotels in Uberlândia, especially in bedding dust samples, regardless of the hotel classes and could represent an important risk factor for exacerbation of allergic symptoms in previously mite-sensitized guests. Mites and pets are important sources of indoor allergens. Most people spend the greatest part of their time indoors. Hotels can constitute an important allergen reservoir of the indoor environment and could represent an important risk for exacerbation of allergic symptoms in previously sensitized guests. Thus, hotels should also be included for planning indoor allergen avoidance as part of a global management strategy, especially in patients with respiratory allergy.

  7. Can fire safety in hotels be improved? Results from the survey of a panel of experts in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Romero, Juan Carlos; Márquez-Sierra, Francisco; Suárez-Cebador, Manuel

    2016-06-08

    The hotel industry is an important driver of the European labour market with over 250,000 hotels employing some 2 million people. In Spain, 240 workers were injured by fires in hotels from 2004 to 2008. Fire is considered to be the most important risk in the hotel industry, but the lack of an EU-wide data recording system for hotels makes it difficult to give exact figures for fire events. We analysed the state of fire prevention systems in hotels in Spain with the aim of proposing strategies to improve fire safety. A 10-item questionnaire was administered from 2007 to 2009 to 15 Spanish experts in fire safety. The questions were measured using a Likert scale and classified into 4 sections: current state of installations, influence of establishment characteristics, application of regulations and priority ranking of actions. Descriptive statistics summarized the data and t-tests evaluated the agreement foreach statement in the questionnaire. The statistical analysis showed homogeneity in the responses by the experts in all four categories: current state of fire safety installations, influence of establishment characteristics, application of regulations, and priority of actions. There was consensus among the experts over the necessity to improve the enforcement of regulations and also regarding the existence of an association between the hotel category (in Spain they are ranked using a 1 to 5 "star" rating system) and the level of fire safety; hotels with a higher category had higher levels of safety. There is a need to identify ways to apply fire safety standards to older hotels so that they comply with new regulations, to standardize regulations for different regions and countries, to improve the maintenance of installations and equipment, to increase the effectiveness of inspections conducted by government bodies, and to raise the general awareness of stakeholders involved in hotel fire prevention.

  8. Analysis of miRNA Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    After transcription, a large number of cellular RNAs employ modifications to increase their diversity and functional potential. Modifications can occur on the base, ribose, or both, and are important steps in the maturation of many RNAs. Our lab recently showed that plant microRNAs (miRNAs) possess a 2′-O-methyl group on the ribose of the 3′ terminal nucleotide, and that this methyl group is added after miRNA/miRNA* formation. One function of this modification is to protect miRNAs from 3′ terminal uridylation by an unknown enzymatic activity. It is possible that uridylation of miRNAs triggers their degradation. Here we describe a protocol to purify a specific miRNA in order to determine its molecular mass so that the presence of a modification can be inferred, an in vivo method to detect 3′ terminal modification of miRNAs, and an (α-32P) dATP incorporation assay to study 3′ terminal uridylation of miRNAs. PMID:19802594

  9. Vasopressin-regulated miRNAs and AQP2-targeting miRNAs in kidney collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eun; Jung, Hyun Jun; Lee, Yu-Jung; Kwon, Tae-Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Mature microRNA (miRNA) acts as an important posttranscriptional regulator. We aimed to profile vasopressin-responsive miRNAs in kidney inner medullary collecting duct cells and to identify aquaporin-2 (AQP2)-targeting miRNAs. Microarray chip assay was carried out in inner medullary collecting duct tubule suspensions from rat kidneys in the absence or presence of desmopressin (dDAVP) stimulation (10(-9) M, 2 h). The results demonstrated 19 miRNAs, including both precursor and mature miRNAs, as potential candidates that showed significant changes in expression after dDAVP stimulation (P < 0.05). Nine mature miRNAs exhibiting >1.3-fold changes in expression on the microarray (miR-127, miR-1, miR-873, miR-16, miR-206, miR-678, miR-496, miR-298, and miR-463) were further examined by quantitative real-time PCR, and target genes of the selected miRNAs were predicted. Next, to identify AQP2-targeting miRNAs, in silico analysis was performed. Four miRNAs (miR-32, miR-137, miR-216a, and miR-216b) target the 3'-untranslated region of rat AQP2 mRNA. Target seed regions of miR-32 and miR-137 were also conserved in the 3'-untranslated region of mouse AQP2 mRNA. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that dDAVP-induced AQP2 expression was significantly attenuated in mpkCCDc14 cells when cells were transfected with miRNA mimics of miR-32 or miR-137. Moreover, luciferase reporter assay demonstrated a significant decrease of AQP2 translation in mpkCCDc14 cells transfected with miRNA mimics of miR-32 or miR-137. The present study provides novel insights into the regulation of AQP2 by RNA interference; however, vasopressin-regulated miRNAs did not include miR-32 or miR-137, indicating that the interaction of miRNAs with the AQP2 regulatory pathway requires further analysis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. MiRNAs in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin T; Xiao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which mainly inhibit protein expression by targeting the 3'UTR (untranslated region) of mRNAs, are known to play various roles in the pathogenesis of many different types of diseases. Specifically, in bone diseases, recent emphasis has been placed on the involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation and proliferation of bone and cartilage cells, particularly with regards to how these mechanisms contribute to bone homeostasis. In this review, we summarize miRNAs that are important in the differentiation and proliferation of bone cells, and specific miRNAs associated with bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review also provides the perspective that miRNA studies will identify not only new mechanisms in basic bone research, but also potential novel diagnostic biomarkers and drug targets for bone diseases.

  11. MiR-200, a new star miRNA in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiangling; Wang, Zhengming; Fillmore, Rebecca; Xi, Yaguang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of non-coding small RNA molecules in control of gene expression at posttranscriptional/translational level. They not only play crucial roles in normal developmental progress, but also are commonly dysregulated in human diseases, including cancer. MiR-200 is a family of tumor suppressor miRNAs consisting of five members, which are significantly involved in inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), repression of cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal and differentiation, modulation of cell division and apoptosis, and reversal of chemoresistance. In this article, we summarize the latest findings with regard to the tumor suppressor signatures of miR-200 and the regulatory mechanisms of miR-200 expression. The collected evidence supports that miR-200 is becoming a new star miRNA in study of human cancer. PMID:24262661

  12. MiRNAs and miRNA Polymorphisms Modify Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Peng; Hu, Yao-Dong; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Yang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Chun; Tang, Jie; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Differences in expression of drug response-related genes contribute to inter-individual variation in drugs’ biological effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs emerging as new players in epigenetic regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs regulate the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, drug transportation, drug targets and downstream signal molecules directly or indirectly. MiRNA polymorphisms, the genetic variations affecting miRNA expression and/or miRNA-mRNA interaction, provide a new insight into the understanding of inter-individual difference in drug response. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress in miRNAs mediated regulation of biotransformation enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors. We also describe the implications of miRNA polymorphisms in cancer chemotherapy response. PMID:27834829

  13. Strong anisotropy and magnetostriction in the two-dimensional Stoner ferromagnet <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Kent, P. R. C.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2016-04-06

    Computationally characterizing magnetic properies of novel two-dimensional (2D) materials serves as an important first step of exploring possible applications. Using density-functional theory, we show that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 is a potential 2D material with sufficiently low formation energy to be synthesized by mechanical exfoliation from the bulk phase with a van der Waals layered structure. In addition, we calculated the phonon dispersion demonstrating that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2is dynamically stable. Furthermore, we find that similar to the bulk phase, 2D <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 exhibits amagnetic moment that originates from a Stoner instability. In contrast to other 2D materials, we find that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 exhibits a significant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of 920μ eV per Fe atom originating from spin-orbit coupling. In conclusion, we show that applying biaxial tensile strains enhances the anisotropy energy, which reveals strong magnetostriction in single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 with a sizable magneostrictive coefficient. Our results indicate that single-layer <mi>Fe>3<mi>GeTe>2 is potentially useful for magnetic storage applications.

  14. Deficient Differentiation of Mast Cells in the Skin of mi/mi Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kasugai, Tsutomu; Oguri, Kayoko; Jippo-Kanemoto, Tomoko; Morimoto, Masahiro; Yamatodani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Keiichi; Ebi, Yoshitaka; Isozaki, Koji; Tei, Hideki; Tsujimura, Tohru; Nomura, Shintaro; Okayama, Minoru; Kitamura, Yukihiko

    1993-01-01

    The staining property of skin mast cells changed from Alcian blue+/berberine sulfate- to Alcian blue +/berberine sulfate+ in the skin of normal (+/+) and Wv/Wv mice. In contrast, this change did not occur in the skin of mi/mi mice. Heparin content and histamine content per a mi/mi skin mast cell were estimated to be 34% and 18% those of a +/+ skin mast cell, respectively. The low heparin content of mi/mi skin mast cells seemed to be consistent with the Alcian blue+/berberine sulfate- staining property. Expression of genes encoding mast cell-specific proteolytic enzymes was examined by Northern blotting and in situ hybridization. Messenger RNA of mast cell carboxypeptidase A was expressed most of all by +/+, WV Wv/W+ and mi/mi skin mast cells, but mRNA of mouse mast cell protease (MMCP)-6 was expressed by approximately a half of +/+ and Wv/Wv skin mast cells and by only 3% of mi/mi skin mast cells. A significant amount of MMCP-2 mRNA was not expressed in the skin of all +/+, Wv/Wv and mi/mi mice. This shows the presence of at least three phenotypes in skin mast cells of mice: berberine sulfate+/MMCP-6+, berberine sulfate+/MMCP-6-, and berberine sulfate-/ MMCP-6-. The in situ hybridization of mRNA of mast cell-specific proteolytic enzymes seemed to be useful to describe abnormalities of mast cell differentiation in the skin of mi/mi mice. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:8238251

  15. miRNome landscape analysis reveals a 30 miRNA core in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Castro-Magdonel, Blanca Elena; Orjuela, Manuela; Camacho, Javier; García-Chéquer, Adda Jeanette; Cabrera-Muñoz, Lourdes; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Orozco-Romero, María de Jesús; Velázquez-Wong, Ana Claudia; Hernández-Ángeles, Adriana; Hernández-Galván, Claudia; Lara-Molina, Citlali; Ponce-Castañeda, M Verónica

    2017-07-01

    miRNAs exert their effect through a negative regulatory mechanism silencing expression upon hybridizing to their target mRNA, and have a prominent position in the control of many cellular processes including carcinogenesis. Previous miRNA studies on retinoblastoma (Rb) have been limited to specific miRNAs reported in other tumors or to medium density arrays. Here we report expression analysis of the whole miRNome on 12 retinoblastoma tumor samples using a high throughput microarray platform including 2578 mature miRNAs. Twelve retinoblastoma tumor samples were analyzed using an Affymetrix platform including 2578 mature miRNAs. We applied RMA analysis to normalize raw data, obtained categorical data from detection call values, and also used signal intensity derived expression data. We used Diana-Tools-microT-CDS to find miRNA targets and ChromDraw to map miRNAs in chromosomes. We discovered a core-cluster of 30 miRNAs that were highly expressed in all the cases and a cluster of 993 miRNAs that were uniformly absent in all cases. Another 1022 miRNA were variably present in the samples reflecting heterogeneity between tumors. We explored mRNA targets, pathways and biological processes affected by some of these miRNAs. We propose that the core-cluster of 30 miRs represent miRNA machinery common to all Rb, and affecting most pathways considered hallmarks of cancer. In this core, we identified miR-3613 as a potential and critical down regulatory hub, because it is highly expressed in all the samples and its potential mRNA targets include at least 36 tumor suppressor genes, including RB1. In the variably expressed miRNA, 36 were differentially expressed between males and females. Some of the potential pathways targeted by these 36 miRNAs were associated with hormonal production. These findings indicate that Rb tumor samples share a common miRNA expression profile regardless of tumor heterogeneity, and shed light on potential novel therapeutic targets such as mir-3613 This

  16. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-05-10

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30-50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs.

  17. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Gennaro, Gianfranco Di; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30–50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  18. Expression profiles of miRNAs in Gossypium raimondii *

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Guo, Teng-long; Wang, Qing-lian; Wang, Kun-bo; Sun, Run-run; Zhang, Bao-hong

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are a class of conserved, small, endogenous, and non-protein-coding RNA molecules with 20–24 nucleotides (nt) in length that function as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Functional studies have demonstrated that plant miRNAs are involved in the regulation of a wide range of plant developmental processes. To date, however, no research has been carried out to study the expression profiles of miRNAs in Gossypium raimondii, a model cotton species. We selected 16 miRNAs to profile their tissue-specific expression patterns in G. raimondii four different tissues, and these miRNAs are reported to play important roles in plant growth and development. Our results showed that the expression levels of these miRNAs varied significantly from one to another in a tissue-dependent manner. Eight miRNAs, including miR-159, miR-162, miR-164, miR-172, miR-390, miR-395, miR-397, and miR-398, exhibited exclusively high expression levels in flower buds, suggesting that these miRNAs may play significant roles in floral development. The expression level of miR-164 was relatively high in shoots beside flower buds, implying that the function of miR-164 is not only limited to floral development but it may also play an important role in shoot development. Certain miRNAs such as miR-166 and miR-160 were extremely highly expressed in all of the four tissues tested compared with other miRNAs investigated, suggesting that they may play regulatory roles at multiple development stages. This study will contribute to future studies on the functional characterization of miRNAs in cotton. PMID:25845363

  19. Classification of various muscular tissues using miRNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Endo, Kosuke; Weng, Huachun; Naito, Yukiko; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Takahashi, Akio; Fukushima, Yasue; Iwai, Naoharu

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs of 18-23 nucleotides that regulate gene expression. Recently, plasma miRNAs have been investigated as biomarkers for various diseases. In the present study, we explored whether miRNA expression profiling of various muscle cells may be useful for the diagnosis of various diseases involving muscle necrosis. miRNA expression profiling was assessed by miRNA array and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using a reverse primer of a stem loop structure. Profiling of various muscle cells of mouse, including cardiac muscles, skeletal muscles, and vascular and visceral smooth muscles, indicated that profiling of miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-145, miR-206, miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR499 were adequate to discriminate muscle cells. miR-145 was remarkably highly expressed in smooth muscles. miR-208a and miR-499 were highly expressed in cardiomyocytes. miR-133a was highly expressed in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. miR-206 and miR-208b were expressed in the slow-twitch skeletal muscles, and they can likely discriminate fast- and slow-twitch types of skeletal muscle cells. We observed that brown fat adipose cells had an miRNA expression profile very similar to those of skeletal muscle cells in the mouse. Plasma concentrations of miR-133a and miR-145 were extremely useful in diagnosing skeletal muscle necrosis in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and colon smooth muscle necrosis in a rat ischemic colitis model, respectively. In the present study, we investigated the miRNA expression profiles of various muscular tissues. Our results suggest that expression profiling would be useful for the diagnosis of various diseases such as muscular necrosis.

  20. A novel panel of serum miR-21/miR-155/miR-365 as a potential diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Guang; Jiang, Yong-Dong; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Yang, Yan-Mei; Pang, Da; Song, Yan-Ni

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Insufficient sensitivity and specificity prevent the use of most existing biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer. Recently, it was reported that serum microRNAs (miRNAs) may be potential biomarkers in many cancer diseases. In this study, we investigated whether serum levels of 5 miRNAs including miR-21, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, and miR-365 could discriminate breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Methods Serum levels of miRNAs were measured by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 99 breast cancer patients and 21 healthy controls. The abundance change of serum miRNAs were also evaluated following surgical resection in 20 breast cancer patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers. Results Serum levels of miR-21 and miR-155 was significantly higher, while miR-365 was significantly lower in breast cancer as compared with healthy controls. The serum levels of miR-21 and miR-155 significantly decreased following surgical resection. Additionally, the serum level of miR-155 at stages I and II was significantly higher compared to stage III. The serum miR-145 level was remarkably higher in progesterone receptor (PR)-positive patients than PR-negative. The positivity of miR-21, miR-155, and miR-365 was high compared to CA 153 and CEA in breast cancer. ROC curve analyses of a combination of miR-21, miR-155, and miR-365 yielded much higher area under curve and enhanced sensitivity and specificity in comparison to each miRNA alone. Conclusion The combination of serum miR-21/miR-155/miR-365 may potentially serve as a sensitive and specific biomarker that enables differentiation of breast cancer from healthy controls. PMID:28203552

  1. 'Bee hotels' as tools for native pollinator conservation: a premature verdict?

    PubMed

    MacIvor, J Scott; Packer, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Society is increasingly concerned with declining wild bee populations. Although most bees nest in the ground, considerable effort has centered on installing 'bee hotels'--also known as nest boxes or trap nests--which artificially aggregate nest sites of above ground nesting bees. Campaigns to 'save the bees' often promote these devices despite the absence of data indicating they have a positive effect. From a survey of almost 600 bee hotels set up over a period of three years in Toronto, Canada, introduced bees nested at 32.9% of sites and represented 24.6% of more than 27,000 total bees and wasps recorded (47.1% of all bees recorded). Native bees were parasitized more than introduced bees and females of introduced bee species provisioned nests with significantly more female larva each year. Native wasps were significantly more abundant than both native and introduced bees and occupied almost 3/4 of all bee hotels each year; further, introduced wasps were the only group to significantly increase in relative abundance year over year. More research is needed to elucidate the potential pitfalls and benefits of using bee hotels in the conservation and population dynamics of wild native bees.

  2. Workforce Education. Hotel and Motel Workers. A Section 353 Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL.

    This guide provides an overall view of a program designed to educate adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students in job-related, language-oriented skills vital to their positions in the hotel/motel industry. The program was designed for the employees of Grenelefe Resort and Conference Center in Haines City, Florida,…

  3. Basic Skills in the Hotel & Food Service Industries. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Brief, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a list of 21 contacts and 9 references concerned with workplace literacy programs in the hotel and food service industries. Each listing includes addresses and telephone numbers, prices if applicable, and a brief description of the resource or materials. The materials listed are mostly reports of workplace literacy projects in…

  4. Career Preparation for Hotel-Motel Management and Services. Grade 11, Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Suggestions arising from a curriculum development workshop led to a curriculum in hotel-motel management and services for high school students which aims to provide them with an opportunity to explore careers in the lodging and hospitality industries. Students will spend half the time in school study of three required subjects and the other half…

  5. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Advanced Beginner/Intermediate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains 16 lesson plans for an advanced beginning and intermediate course in work-related English for non-English- or limited-English-speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives are as follows: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand…

  6. Tourists' attitudes towards ban on smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Viriyachaiyo, V; Lim, A

    2009-06-01

    Thailand is internationally renowned for its stringent tobacco control measures. In Thailand, a regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies was issued in late 2006, causing substantial apprehension within the hospitality industry. A survey of tourists' attitudes toward the ban was conducted. A cross-sectional survey of 5550 travellers staying in various hotels in Bangkok, Surat Thani, Phuket, Krabi and Songkhla provinces, October 2005 to December 2006. Travellers aged 15 years or older with a check-in duration of at least one day and willing to complete the questionnaire were requested by hotel staff to fill in the 5-minute questionnaire at check-in or later at their convenience. Secondhand cigarette smoke was recognised as harmful to health by 89.7% of respondents. 47.8% of travellers were aware of the Thai regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned restaurants. 80.9% of the respondents agreed with the ban, particularly female non-smokers. 38.6% of survey respondents indicated that they would be more likely to visit Thailand again because of the regulation, 53.4% that the regulation would not affect their decision and 7.9% that they would be less likely to visit Thailand again. Banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand is widely supported by tourists. Enforcement of the regulation is more likely to attract tourists than dissuade them from holidaying in Thailand.

  7. 76 FR 69753 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, Federal Hotel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...; Comment Request, Federal Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Declaration Form AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management....regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bruce Hensler, Fire Program Specialist, FEMA/U.S. Fire... accommodation meeting minimum requirements for protection of life from fire; the list is known as the...

  8. Older Women in Single Room Occupant (SRO) Hotels: A Seattle Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, Maureen; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Life histories and daily routines of women over the age of 55 living in Seattle single room occupant (SRO) hotels were studied using observational and interviewing methods. Residence in SRO's appears to be part of a natural life history progression for these women rather than a result of social pathology. (Author)

  9. GUIDE FOR COURSE OF STUDY FOR COOK (HOTEL AND RESTAURANT) (ENTRY).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GUNN, VIRLAH

    DESIGNED FOR TEACHER USE, THIS GUIDE FOR TRAINING COOKS IN HOTEL AND RESTAURANT OCCUPATIONS AIMS--(1) TO DEVELOP MANIPULATIVE SKILLS, (2) TO DEVELOP UNDERSTANDING OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND RELATED KNOWLEDGE THAT CONDITION THESE SKILLS, (3) TO UNDERSTAND THE ADVANTAGES OF STEADY EMPLOYMENT, (4) TO DEVELOP HIGH STANDARDS…

  10. The effect of the water tariff structures on the water consumption in Mallorcan hotels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyà-Tortella, Bartolomé; Garcia, Celso; Nilsson, William; Tirado, Dolores

    2016-08-01

    Tourism increases water demand, especially in coastal areas and on islands, and can also cause water shortages during the dry season and the degradation of the water supply. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of water price structures on hotel water consumption on the island of Mallorca (Spain). All tourist municipalities on the island use different pricing structures, such as flat or block rates, and different tariffs. This exogenous variation is used to evaluate the effect of prices on water consumption for a sample of 134 hotels. The discontinuity of the water tariff structure and the fixed rate, which depends on the number of hotel beds, generate endogeneity problems. We propose an econometric model, an instrumental variable quantile regression for within artificial blocks transformed data, to solve both problems. The coefficients corresponding to the price variables are not found to be significantly different from zero. The sign of the effect is negative, but the magnitude is negligible: a 1% increase in all prices would reduce consumption by an average of only 0.024%. This result is probably due to the small share of water costs with respect to the total hotel operational costs (around 4%). Our regression model concludes that the introduction of water-saving initiatives constitutes an effective way to reduce consumption.

  11. Devolving HRM and HRD to Line managers: The Case of Hilton International's UK Hotels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Gillian; Watson, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores line manager responsibility for human resource management (HRM) and human resource development (HRD) in an international hotel organisation. The results identify a strong support system for line managers in relation to training and good relations with HR specialists. However, less evident is senior management support coupled…

  12. Genomic Investigation of a Legionellosis Outbreak in a Persistently Colonized Hotel.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Guiral, Silvia; Crespi, Sebastián; Moya, Víctor; Camaró, María L; Olmos, María P; Adrián, Francisco; Morera, Vicente; González-Morán, Francisco; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    A long-lasting legionellosis outbreak was reported between November 2011 and July 2012 in a hotel in Calpe (Spain) affecting 44 patients including six deaths. Intensive epidemiological and microbiological investigations were performed in order to detect the reservoirs. Clinical and environmental samples were tested for the presence and genetic characterization of Legionella pneumophila. Six of the isolates were subjected to whole-genome sequencing. Sequencing of 14 clinical and 260 environmental samples revealed sequence type (ST) 23 as the main responsible strain for the infections. This ST was found in the spa pool, from where it spread to other hotel public spaces, explaining the ST23 clinical cases, including guests who had not visited the spa. Uncultured clinical specimens showed profiles compatible with ST23, ST578, and mixed patterns. Profiles compatible with ST578 were obtained by direct sequencing from biofilm samples collected from the domestic water system, which provided evidence for the source of infection for non ST23 patients. Whole genome data from five ST23 strains and the identification of different STs and Legionella species showed that different hotel premises were likely colonized since the hotel opening thus explaining how different patients had been infected by distinct STs. Both epidemiological and molecular data are essential in the investigation of legionellosis outbreaks. Whole-genome sequencing data revealed significant intra-ST variability and allowed to make further inference on the short-term evolution of a local colonization of L. pneumophila.

  13. Respiratory and ocular symptoms among employees of a hotel indoor waterpark resort--Ohio, 2007.

    PubMed

    2009-02-06

    During January--March 2007, the Warren County Combined Health District (WCCHD) received 665 reports of respiratory and eye irritation from patrons and lifeguards at a hotel indoor waterpark resort in Ohio. Tests revealed normal water chemistry and air chlorine concentrations, and exposure to airborne trichloramine in the waterpark was suspected as the cause of the symptoms. Because of the number of symptom reports and WCCHD's limited ability to measure trichloramine, the district requested an investigation by CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). This report describes the results of that investigation, which revealed that trichloramine concentrations in the waterpark ranged from below the limit of detection to 1.06 mg/m3, and some concentrations were at levels that have been reported to cause irritation symptoms (>/=0.5 mg/m3). Lifeguards reported significantly more work-related symptoms (e.g., cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and eye irritation) than unexposed hotel employees. Lifeguards also reported significantly more eye irritation and cough on days when hotel occupancy was high versus low. Insufficient air movement and distribution likely led to accumulation of trichloramine and exacerbation of symptoms. Based on recommendations to increase air movement and distribution at pool deck level, hotel management modified the ventilation system extensively, and subsequently no new cases were reported to WCCHD. The results of this investigation emphasize the importance of appropriate design and monitoring of ventilation and water systems in preventing illness in indoor waterparks.

  14. Analyzing the Training and Internship Needs Assessment of Verbal Communication Skills amongst Hotel Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahim, Suzana Ab.; Tazijan, Farina

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to expose the learners in the hospitality industry to real workplace requirement in terms of communication skills. In view of its importance, human resource managers, researchers and educators in the field of hospitality management or the hotel practitioners have to pay more serious attention to it. Thus, it is pertinent that both…

  15. Genomic Investigation of a Legionellosis Outbreak in a Persistently Colonized Hotel

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Guiral, Silvia; Crespi, Sebastián; Moya, Víctor; Camaró, María L.; Olmos, María P.; Adrián, Francisco; Morera, Vicente; González-Morán, Francisco; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A long-lasting legionellosis outbreak was reported between November 2011 and July 2012 in a hotel in Calpe (Spain) affecting 44 patients including six deaths. Intensive epidemiological and microbiological investigations were performed in order to detect the reservoirs. Methods: Clinical and environmental samples were tested for the presence and genetic characterization of Legionella pneumophila. Six of the isolates were subjected to whole-genome sequencing. Results: Sequencing of 14 clinical and 260 environmental samples revealed sequence type (ST) 23 as the main responsible strain for the infections. This ST was found in the spa pool, from where it spread to other hotel public spaces, explaining the ST23 clinical cases, including guests who had not visited the spa. Uncultured clinical specimens showed profiles compatible with ST23, ST578, and mixed patterns. Profiles compatible with ST578 were obtained by direct sequencing from biofilm samples collected from the domestic water system, which provided evidence for the source of infection for non ST23 patients. Whole genome data from five ST23 strains and the identification of different STs and Legionella species showed that different hotel premises were likely colonized since the hotel opening thus explaining how different patients had been infected by distinct STs. Conclusions: Both epidemiological and molecular data are essential in the investigation of legionellosis outbreaks. Whole-genome sequencing data revealed significant intra-ST variability and allowed to make further inference on the short-term evolution of a local colonization of L. pneumophila. PMID:26834713

  16. Tourists’ attitudes towards ban on smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Viriyachaiyo, V; Lim, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Thailand is internationally renowned for its stringent tobacco control measures. In Thailand, a regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies was issued in late 2006, causing substantial apprehension within the hospitality industry. A survey of tourists’ attitudes toward the ban was conducted. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 5550 travellers staying in various hotels in Bangkok, Surat Thani, Phuket, Krabi and Songkhla provinces, October 2005 to December 2006. Travellers aged 15 years or older with a check-in duration of at least one day and willing to complete the questionnaire were requested by hotel staff to fill in the 5-minute questionnaire at check-in or later at their convenience. Results: Secondhand cigarette smoke was recognised as harmful to health by 89.7% of respondents. 47.8% of travellers were aware of the Thai regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned restaurants. 80.9% of the respondents agreed with the ban, particularly female non-smokers. 38.6% of survey respondents indicated that they would be more likely to visit Thailand again because of the regulation, 53.4% that the regulation would not affect their decision and 7.9% that they would be less likely to visit Thailand again. Conclusion: Banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand is widely supported by tourists. Enforcement of the regulation is more likely to attract tourists than dissuade them from holidaying in Thailand. PMID:19364754

  17. French for "Hotellies": A Recently Instituted Course at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandjean-Levy, Andree

    The Cornell School of Hotel Administration in collaboration with the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics offers a course in French for a small group of students who have had the equivalent of at least two semesters of college French. The course emphasizes oral/aural French with very little class time spent on grammar study. Grammar…

  18. Perceptions toward the Value of Higher Education for Hotel Professionals in Las Vegas: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deel, Gary Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns a qualitative investigation of the views toward higher education and its importance to hospitality career success among hotel professionals in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. Existing literature supported the premise that education may be important to professional career success in several different ways, and that values concerning…

  19. The Matching Process in E-Mentoring: A Case Study in Luxury Hotels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, David; Lupi, Anne Marie Zammit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the effectiveness of an innovative e-mentoring programme introduced in an international group of luxury hotels. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs the survey method, with quantitative and qualitative data analysis. The research model was developed from a literature review. Findings: While mentoring…

  20. Family Hotel Businesses: Strategic Planning and the Need for Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Mike; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2004-01-01

    Small businesses dominate the tourism and hospitality industry worldwide and are of critical importance for the competitiveness of destinations. Small family hotel businesses are characterised by a number of specific business processes which generate particular training and educational needs. It is increasingly clear that small businesses are not…

  1. A Follow-Up Study of Junior College Hotel and Restaurant Education in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almarode, Richard L.

    This study examines hospitality programs from the enabling legislation in 1961, which provided for an advisory committee to the Hotel and Restaurant Commission on education. Its purpose was to employ a director of the programs and two field representatives or consultants to offer on-the-job assistance to managers and employees in the state's…

  2. Evaluation of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management Graduates: A Ten Year Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dona, Comp.; And Others

    A study of graduates from the Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management program at St. Louis Community College at Forest Park was conducted, primarily in order to elicit information from graduates regarding potentially effective recruitment methods for minority groups and women. The study also sought to obtain evaluation of course curriculum…

  3. The Role of Mathematics in Hotel, Catering and Institutional Management HND and FM Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, I. M.; Ineson, Elizabeth M.

    1980-01-01

    Research was conducted from the viewpoints of students, teaching staff, and industry in relation to mathematical abilities of students taking hotel, catering, and institutional management courses, content and structure of Higher National Diploma and Final Membership courses, industrial applications, and learning strategies. (CT)

  4. French for "Hotellies": A Recently Instituted Course at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandjean-Levy, Andree

    The Cornell School of Hotel Administration in collaboration with the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics offers a course in French for a small group of students who have had the equivalent of at least two semesters of college French. The course emphasizes oral/aural French with very little class time spent on grammar study. Grammar…

  5. Project EXCEL: Sheraton Palace Hotel, Laundry Department. A Beginning Laundry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    Project EXCEL is a federally-funded workplace literacy program involving hotel enterprises in the San Francisco (California) Bay area. Its focus is on identification and instruction of literacy skills essential to job success for limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers. Training is intended to enable employees to understand written work orders,…

  6. 11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, WITH WRAPPER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND CUTTER (RIGHT, BEHIND CHUTE); BUCKET CONVEYOR AT RIGHT MOVED WASTE FROM PRESS TO 5TH FLOOR FOR RE-MANUFACTURE - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  7. REEP/Hotel Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance. October 1, 1988-March 31, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlington County Public Schools, VA.

    A 1-year workplace literacy program was a joint effort of the Chamber of Commerce, public schools, and seven hotels in Arlington, Virginia. Participants were employees with limited English proficiency. The project resulted in the production of a manual, a video, curricula for housekeeping and food and beverage workers, curricula for more advanced…

  8. The Special Needs of Homeless Children: Early Intervention at a Welfare Hotel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Roy

    1991-01-01

    This case study of 72 homeless families and their 78 children in day care at a large welfare hotel in New York City evaluates the children's health status, separation and attachment, sleep patterns, eating patterns, emotional status, attention span, gross motor development, speech and language development, and cognitive development. (JDD)

  9. Family Hotel Businesses: Strategic Planning and the Need for Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Mike; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2004-01-01

    Small businesses dominate the tourism and hospitality industry worldwide and are of critical importance for the competitiveness of destinations. Small family hotel businesses are characterised by a number of specific business processes which generate particular training and educational needs. It is increasingly clear that small businesses are not…

  10. REEP Hotels/Chambers Federal Workplace Literacy Project. April 1, 1990-December 31, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlington County Public Schools, VA. REEP, Arlington Education and Employment Program.

    In an expansion of an earlier National Workplace Literacy Program project, this document reports on a workplace literacy model operated by the Arlington Education and Employment Program (REEP) that includes the Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia Public Schools, the chambers of commerce of both cities, and 14 local hotels. The project provided…

  11. Perceptions toward the Value of Higher Education for Hotel Professionals in Las Vegas: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deel, Gary Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns a qualitative investigation of the views toward higher education and its importance to hospitality career success among hotel professionals in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. Existing literature supported the premise that education may be important to professional career success in several different ways, and that values concerning…

  12. The Matching Process in E-Mentoring: A Case Study in Luxury Hotels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, David; Lupi, Anne Marie Zammit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the effectiveness of an innovative e-mentoring programme introduced in an international group of luxury hotels. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs the survey method, with quantitative and qualitative data analysis. The research model was developed from a literature review. Findings: While mentoring…

  13. Workforce Education. Hotel and Motel Workers. A Section 353 Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL.

    This guide provides an overall view of a program designed to educate adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students in job-related, language-oriented skills vital to their positions in the hotel/motel industry. The program was designed for the employees of Grenelefe Resort and Conference Center in Haines City, Florida,…

  14. Colonization of Legionella species in Turkish baths in hotels in Alanya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Legionella species in water samples collected from Turkish baths in hotels in Alanya, Turkey, from August 2003 to September 2013. Water samples were collected in 100-mL sterile containers and then concentrated by filtration. Heat treatment was used to eliminate other microorganisms from the samples, which were then spread on Legionella-selective-buffered charcoal yeast extract alpha (BCYE-α) agar and on BCYE-α agar supplemented with glycine, vancomycin, polymyxin, and cycloheximide. Cysteine-dependent colonies were identified by latex agglutination. In total, 135 samples from 52 hotels with Turkish baths were evaluated. Legionella species were identified in 11/52 (21.2%) hotels and 18/135 (13.3%) samples. The most frequently isolated species was Legionella pneumophila, with most isolates belonging to serogroups 6 (55.6%) and 1 (22.2%). The colony count was <100 colony-forming units (CFU) mL(-1) in nine samples, from 100 to 1000 CFU mL(-1) in six samples, and >1000 CFU mL(-1) in three samples. These findings suggest that the hot water systems of Turkish baths in hotels must be viewed as a possible source of travel-associated Legionnaires' disease, and preventative measures should be put in place.

  15. Occupations in the Hotel Tourist Sector within the European Community. A Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peroni, Giovanni; Guerra, Duccio

    This report contains a directory of job profiles in the tourist/hotel sector that is based on seven national monographs. It provides an instrument for comparing factors that characterize practitioners working in the sector in Germany, Spain, France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. A methodological note discusses study objectives,…

  16. Are Physical Activity and Nutrition Indicators of the Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (CHEW) Associated with Employee Obesity among Hotel Workers?

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Claudio R.; Albright, Cheryl; Williams, Rebecca; Nichols, Carol; Renda, Gloria; Stevens, Victor J.; Vogt, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Worksites provide opportunities to reach more than 60% of adults in the United States, including populations diverse in race, ethnicity, gender, age, occupation, income, and health status. Employers that provide worksite weight management interventions have the potential to reduce sick leave, healthcare costs, and workers compensation costs, and increase employee morale and worker efficiency. Hotels specifically, represent a broad cross-section of job categories, and most hotels are staffed and operated similarly around the world. However, from our literature review, there have been no investigations of the association between the hotel environment and employees’ obesity. Methods For this study, we tested the relationship between environmental factors in hotels and employees’ body mass index (BMI). Results Overall no substantial correlations were found on any environmental variable. However, hotel size affected some relationships. Higher BMI was related to greater number of stairs, stair facilitation, and the healthy eating facilitation variables (excluding nutrition signs or posters) in medium sized hotels. Lower BMI was found with greater stair facilitation in small hotels; and with greater number of PA signs, lunchroom nutrition signs, and hotel nutrition signsin large hotels. Unionized status affected only two environmental variables. For unionized hotels, BMI was negatively correlated with PA signs and positively correlated with the healthy eating facilitation. Conclusions No logical pattern of association was found between workplace environmental factors and hotel employee BMI levels. Further research should investigate the interaction of the size and structure of the workplace with the impact of environmental efforts to reduce overweight and obesity. PMID:20061886

  17. Are physical activity and nutrition indicators of the checklist of health promotion environments at worksites (CHEW) associated with employee obesity among hotel workers?

    PubMed

    Nigg, Claudio R; Albright, Cheryl; Williams, Rebecca; Nichols, Carol; Renda, Gloria; Stevens, Victor J; Vogt, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    Worksites provide opportunities to reach more than 60% of adults in the United States, including populations diverse in race, ethnicity, gender, age, occupation, income, and health status. Employers that provide worksite weight management interventions have the potential to reduce sick leave, health care costs, and workers compensation costs, and increase employee morale and worker efficiency. Hotels specifically, represent a broad cross-section of job categories, and most hotels are staffed and operated similarly around the world. However, from our literature review, there have been no investigations of the association between the hotel environment and employees' obesity. For this study, we tested the relationship between environmental factors in hotels and employees' body mass index (BMI). Overall no substantial correlations were found on any environmental variable. However, hotel size affected some relationships. Higher BMI was related to greater number of stairs, stair facilitation, and the healthy eating facilitation variables (excluding nutrition signs or posters) in medium sized hotels. Lower BMI was found with greater stair facilitation in small hotels; and with greater number of physical activity (PA) signs, lunch room nutrition signs, and hotel nutrition signs in large hotels. Unionized status affected only two environmental variables. For unionized hotels, BMI was negatively correlated with PA signs and positively correlated with the healthy eating facilitation. No logical pattern of association was found between workplace environmental factors and hotel employee BMI levels. Further research should investigate the interaction of the size and structure of the workplace with the impact of environmental efforts to reduce overweight and obesity.

  18. miRNA signature identification of retinoblastoma and the correlations between differentially expressed miRNAs during retinoblastoma progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Mei, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a common pediatric cancer. The study aimed to uncover the mechanisms of RB progression and identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. The miRNA expression profile GSE7072, which includes three RB samples and three healthy retina samples, was used. After data normalization using the preprocessCore package, differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRs) were selected by the limma package. The targets of the DE-miRs were predicted based on two databases, followed by construction of the miRNA-target network. Pathway enrichment analysis was conducted for the targets of the DE-miRNAs using DAVID. The CTD database was used to predict RB-related genes, followed by clustering analysis using the pvclust package. The correlation network of DE-miRs was established. MiRNA expression was validated in another data set, GSE41321. In total, 24 DE-miRs were identified whose targets were correlated with the cell cycle pathway. Among them, hsa-miR-373, hsa-miR-125b, and hsa-miR-181a were highlighted in the miRNA-target regulatory network; 14 DE-miRs, including hsa-miR-373, hsa-miR-125b, hsa-miR-18a, hsa-miR-25, hsa-miR-20a, and hsa-let-7 (a, b, c), were shown to distinguish RB from healthy tissue. In addition, hsa-miR-25, hsa-miR-18a, and hsa-miR-20a shared the common target BCL2L11; hsa-let-7b and hsa-miR-125b targeted the genes CDC25A, CDK6, and LIN28A. Expression of three miRNAs in GSE41321 was consistent with that in GSE7072. Several critical miRNAs were identified in RB progression. Hsa-miR-373 might regulate RB invasion and metastasis, hsa-miR-181a might involve in the CDKN1B-mediated cell cycle pathway, and hsa-miR-125b and hsa-let-7b might serve as tumor suppressors by coregulating CDK6, CDC25A, and LIN28A. The miRNAs hsa-miR-25, hsa-miR-18a, and hsa-miR-20a might exert their function by coregulating BCL2L1.

  19. MiR-125b, miR-100 and miR-99a co-regulate vincristine resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Akbari Moqadam, F; Lange-Turenhout, E A M; Ariës, I M; Pieters, R; den Boer, M L

    2013-10-01

    MicroRNA-125b (miR-125b), miR-99a and miR-100 are overexpressed in vincristine-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cellular viability of ETV6-RUNX1-positive Reh cells significantly increased in presence of 9 ng/mL vincristine upon co-expression of miR-125b/miR-99a (91 ± 4%), miR-125b/miR-100 (93 ± 5%) or miR-125b/miR-99a/miR-100 (82 ± 17%) compared with miR-125b-transduced cells (38 ± 13%, P<0.05). Co-expression of these miRNAs resulted in downregulation of DNTT, NUCKS1, MALAT1, SNRPE, PNO1, SET, KIF5B, PRPS2, RPS11, RPL38 and RPL23A (fold-change 1.3-1.9, p<0.05). Similarly, 7 out of these genes are lower expressed in vincristine-resistant ALL cells of children (p<0.05). The concerted function of miR-125b in combination with miR-99a and/or miR-100 illustrates the complexity of vincristine-resistant pediatric ALL.

  20. MiMiR – an integrated platform for microarray data sharing, mining and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Chris; Thimma, Manjula; Alexandrakis, Stelios; Castillo, Tito; Dennis, Jayne L; Brooks, Anthony; Bradley, Thomas; Turnbull, Carly; Blaveri, Ekaterini; Barton, Geraint; Chiba, Norie; Maratou, Klio; Soutter, Pat; Aitman, Tim; Game, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite considerable efforts within the microarray community for standardising data format, content and description, microarray technologies present major challenges in managing, sharing, analysing and re-using the large amount of data generated locally or internationally. Additionally, it is recognised that inconsistent and low quality experimental annotation in public data repositories significantly compromises the re-use of microarray data for meta-analysis. MiMiR, the Microarray data Mining Resource was designed to tackle some of these limitations and challenges. Here we present new software components and enhancements to the original infrastructure that increase accessibility, utility and opportunities for large scale mining of experimental and clinical data. Results A user friendly Online Annotation Tool allows researchers to submit detailed experimental information via the web at the time of data generation rather than at the time of publication. This ensures the easy access and high accuracy of meta-data collected. Experiments are programmatically built in the MiMiR database from the submitted information and details are systematically curated and further annotated by a team of trained annotators using a new Curation and Annotation Tool. Clinical information can be annotated and coded with a clinical Data Mapping Tool within an appropriate ethical framework. Users can visualise experimental annotation, assess data quality, download and share data via a web-based experiment browser called MiMiR Online. All requests to access data in MiMiR are routed through a sophisticated middleware security layer thereby allowing secure data access and sharing amongst MiMiR registered users prior to publication. Data in MiMiR can be mined and analysed using the integrated EMAAS open source analysis web portal or via export of data and meta-data into Rosetta Resolver data analysis package. Conclusion The new MiMiR suite of software enables systematic and

  1. The impact of later trading hours for hotels (public houses) on breath alcohol levels of apprehended impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Chikritzhs, Tanya; Stockwell, Tim

    2007-10-01

    To examine the impact of extended trading permits (ETPs) for licensed hotels in Perth, Western Australia on impaired driver breath alcohol levels (BALs) between July 1993 and June 1997. Forty-three hotels obtained ETPs allowing later closing hours and 130 maintained standard closing time (controls). Impaired driver BALs were linked to 'last place of drinking' hotels. Before and after period BALs of drivers who last drank at ETP or non-ETP hotels were compared by time of day of apprehension and sex, controlling for age. Impaired female drivers apprehended between 10.01 p.m. and 12 midnight (before closing time) had significantly lower BALs after drinking at ETP hotels. Male drivers aged 18-25 years and apprehended between 12.01 and 2.00 a.m. after drinking at ETP hotels had significantly higher BALs than drivers who drank at non-ETP hotels. At peak times for alcohol-related offences, late trading is associated with higher BALs among those drinkers most at risk of alcohol-related harm.

  2. MiMiR: a comprehensive solution for storage, annotation and exchange of microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Navarange, Mahendra; Game, Laurence; Fowler, Derek; Wadekar, Vihar; Banks, Helen; Cooley, Nicola; Rahman, Fatimah; Hinshelwood, Justin; Broderick, Peter; Causton, Helen C

    2005-01-01

    Background The generation of large amounts of microarray data presents challenges for data collection, annotation, exchange and analysis. Although there are now widely accepted formats, minimum standards for data content and ontologies for microarray data, only a few groups are using them together to build and populate large-scale databases. Structured environments for data management are crucial for making full use of these data. Description The MiMiR database provides a comprehensive infrastructure for microarray data annotation, storage and exchange and is based on the MAGE format. MiMiR is MIAME-supportive, customised for use with data generated on the Affymetrix platform and includes a tool for data annotation using ontologies. Detailed information on the experiment, methods, reagents and signal intensity data can be captured in a systematic format. Reports screens permit the user to query the database, to view annotation on individual experiments and provide summary statistics. MiMiR has tools for automatic upload of the data from the microarray scanner and export to databases using MAGE-ML. Conclusion MiMiR facilitates microarray data management, annotation and exchange, in line with international guidelines. The database is valuable for underpinning research activities and promotes a systematic approach to data handling. Copies of MiMiR are freely available to academic groups under licence. PMID:16280078

  3. MiRTDL: a deep learning approach for miRNA target prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuang; Guo, Maozu; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Xuejian

    2015-12-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate genes that are associated with various diseases. To better understand miRNAs, the miRNA regulatory mechanism needs to be investigated and the real targets identified. Here, we present miRTDL, a new miRNA target prediction algorithm based on convolutional neural network (CNN). The CNN automatically extracts essential information from the input data rather than completely relying on the input dataset generated artificially when the precise miRNA target mechanisms are poorly known. In this work, the constraint relaxing method is first used to construct a balanced training dataset to avoid inaccurate predictions caused by the existing unbalanced dataset. The miRTDL is then applied to 1,606 experimentally validated miRNA target pairs. Finally, the results show that our miRTDL outperforms the existing target prediction algorithms and achieves significantly higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 88.43%, 96.44% and 89.98%, respectively. We also investigate the miRNA target mechanism, and the results show that the complementation features are more important than the others.

  4. miRNA Modulation of Cholesterol Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the roles of the SREBP1 and SREBP2 transcription factors in regulating fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis and uptake have been known for some time, it was recently discovered that two related microRNAs, miR-33a and miR-33b, are embedded in these genes. Studies indicate that miR-33a and miR-33b act with their host genes, Srebp2 and Srebp1, respectively, to reciprocally regulate cholesterol homeostasis and fatty acid metabolism in a negative feedback loop. miR-33 has been shown to post-transcriptionally repress key genes involved in cellular cholesterol export and HDL metabolism (Abca1, Abcg1, Npc1), fatty acid oxidation (Crot, Cpt1a, Hadhb, Ampk), and glucose metabolism (Sirt6, Irs2). Delivery of inhibitors of miR-33 in vitro and in vivo relieves repression of these genes resulting in up-regulation of the associated metabolic pathways. In mouse models, miR-33 antagonism has proven has proven to be an effective strategy for increasing plasma HDL cholesterol and fatty acid oxidation, and protecting from atherosclerosis. These exciting findings have opened up promising new avenues for the development of therapeutics to treat dyslipidemia and other metabolic disorders. PMID:22011750

  5. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet <mi>Mn>1+<mi>δSb>

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-15

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet <mi>Mn>1+<mi>δSb>. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.

  6. Time Series miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis reveals critical miRNAs and targets in macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liangqun; McCurdy, Sara; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Peplowska, Karolina; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Boisvert, William A.; Garmire, Lana X.

    2016-01-01

    Polarization of macrophages is regulated through complex signaling networks. Correlating miRNA and mRNA expression over time after macrophage polarization has not yet been investigated. We used paired RNA-Seq and miRNA-Seq experiments to measure the mRNA and miRNA expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages over a time-series of 8 hours. Bioinformatics analysis identified 31 differentially expressed miRNAs between M1 and M2 polarized macrophages. The top 4 M1 miRNAs (miR-155-3p, miR-155-5p, miR-147-3p and miR-9-5p) and top 4 M2 miRNAs (miR-27a-5p, let-7c-1-3p, miR-23a-5p and miR-23b-5p) were validated by qPCR. Interestingly, M1 specific miRNAs could be categorized to early- and late-response groups, in which three new miRNAs miR-1931, miR-3473e and miR-5128 were validated as early-response miRNAs. M1 polarization led to the enrichment of genes involved in immune responses and signal transduction, whereas M2 polarization enriched genes involved in cell cycle and metabolic processes. C2H2 zinc-finger family members are key targets of DE miRNAs. The integrative analysis between miRNAs and mRNAs demonstrates the regulations of miRNAs on nearly four thousand differentially expressed genes and most of the biological pathways enriched in macrophage polarization. In summary, this study elucidates the expression profiles of miRNAs and their potential targetomes during macrophage polarization. PMID:27981970

  7. Inventory analysis and carbon footprint of coastland-hotel services: A Spanish case study.

    PubMed

    Puig, Rita; Kiliç, Eylem; Navarro, Alejandra; Albertí, Jaume; Chacón, Lorenzo; Fullana-I-Palmer, Pere

    2017-04-03

    Tourism is a key industry in the Spanish economy. Spain was in the World top three ranking by international tourist arrivals and by income in 2015. The development of the tourism industry is essential to maintain the established economic system. However, if the environmental requirements were not taken into account, the country would face a negative effect on depletion of local environmental resources from which tourism depends. This case study evaluates, through a life cycle perspective, the average carbon footprint of an overnight stay in a Spanish coastland hotel by analyzing 14 two-to-five-stars hotels. Inventory and impact data are analyzed and presented both for resource use and greenhouse gases emissions, with the intention of helping in the environmental decision-making process. The main identified potential hotspots are electricity and fuels consumption (6 to 30kWh/overnight stay and 24 to 127MJ/overnight stay respectively), which are proportional to the number of stars and unoccupancy rate and they produce more than 75% of the impact. It is also revealed that voluntary implementation of environmental monitoring systems (like EMAS regulation) promotes collection of more detailed and accurate data, which helps in a more efficient use of resources. A literature review on LCA and tourism is also discussed. Spanish hotels inventory data presented here for the first time will be useful for tourism related managers (destination managers, policy makers and hotel managers among others) to calculate sustainability key indicators, which can lead to achieve real sustainable-tourism goals. Further data collection will be needed in future projects to gather representative data from more hotels, other accommodation facilities and also other products/services offered by tourist sector in Spain (like transport of tourists, food and beverage, culture-sports & recreation and others).

  8. Changes in clinical and hotel expenditures following publication of the nursing home compare report card.

    PubMed

    Mukamel, Dana B; Spector, William D; Zinn, Jacqueline; Weimer, David L; Ahn, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Nursing Home Compare first published clinical quality measures at the end of 2002. It is a quality report card that for the first time offers consumers easily accessible information about the clinical quality of nursing homes. It led to changes in consumers' demand, increasing the relative importance of clinical versus hotel aspects of quality in their search and choice of a nursing home. To examine the hypothesis that nursing homes responding to these changes in demand shifted the balance of resources from hotel to clinical activities. The study included 10,022 free-standing nursing homes nationwide during 2001 to 2006. RESEARCH DESIGN AND DATA: A retrospective multivariate statistical analysis of trends in the ratio of clinical to hotel expenditures, using Medicare cost reports, Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data, controlling for changes in residents' acuity and facility fixed effects. Inference is based on robust standard errors. The ratio of clinical to hotel expenditures averaged 1.78. It increased significantly (P < 0.001) by 5% following the publication of the report card. The increase was larger and more significant among nursing homes with worse reported quality, lower occupancy, those located in more competitive markets, for-profit ownership and owned by a chain. The increase in the ratio of clinical to hotel expenditures following publication of the report card suggests that nursing homes responded as expected to the changes in the elasticity of demand with respect to clinical quality brought about by the public reporting of clinical quality measures. The response was stronger among nursing homes facing stronger incentives.

  9. Circulating miR-92a, miR-143 and miR-342 in Plasma are Novel Potential Biomarkers for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Elhamamsy, Amr Rafat; El Sharkawy, Muhammad Suleiman; Zanaty, Ahmed Farouk; Mahrous, Mohammed Ahmed; Mohamed, Ahmed Ezzat; Abushaaban, Eslam Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional gene expression regulators. The expression profiling of miRNAs has already entered into cancer clinics as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to assess tumor initiation, progression and response to treatment in cancer patients. Recent studies have opened the way for the use of circulating miRNAs as non-invasive diagnosis and prognosis of Acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was to identify plasma miR-92a, miR-143 and miR-342 expression signatures in AML patients to introduce new markers for establishing AML diagnosis and prognosis. Blood samples were collected from 65 AML patients and 50 controls. The expression of three target miRNAs (miR-92a, miR-143 and miR-342) was measured using quantitative real-time PCR method. Plasma levels of miR-92a, miR-143 and miR-342 were significantly lower in AML patients in comparison with control group. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that the sensitivity and specificity values of miR-92a were 81.5% and 94%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 0.704. The sensitivity and specificity values of miR-143 were 87.7% and 80%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 0.65. The sensitivity and specificity values of miR-342 were 75.4% and 90%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 0.479. Our findings suggest that plasma miR-92a, miR-143 and miR-342 could be promising novel circulating biomarkers in clinical detection of AML. PMID:28890884

  10. Patient evaluation of the hotel function of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Zikria, J; Mutrie, C; Slater, J P; Scott, C; Lehman, S; Connolly, M W; Asher, D T; Ting, W; Namerow, P B

    2001-01-01

    A means of measuring patient satisfaction is essential in the effort to improve the quality of health care delivered in our nation's hospitals. Accurate feedback allows employers to better meet patients' needs and allows hospital administrators to improve service delivery. Patients are empowered by having a voice in the manner in which their health care is delivered. Moreover, improving the efficiency of the health care delivery system decreases health care costs. Hospital comparisons can be made readily available to a large audience through the Internet, resulting in empowerment of the patient and a universal improvement in hospital care. This is the first multi-institutional analysis of patient satisfaction among New York City and northern New Jersey area tertiary care hospitals. In this study, we evaluated the patient-assessed hotel function of hospitals in a single geographic region to determine whether clinically and statistically significant differences would be revealed that could provide beneficial information to stakeholders in the healthcare system. Patients (n = 261) who had spent a night during the past year in one of eleven hospitals within 60 miles of New York City were chosen at random from doctors' waiting rooms. On average, 24 patients from each hospital were surveyed. They were asked to complete a questionnaire that rated the various departments in the hospital on qualities such as courtesy, promptness, and cleanliness. The questionnaire also rated important characteristics of the patient experience, such as the ease of parking and the taste of the food. Each item on the survey was coded on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most positive response. The 26 specific questions were divided into 14 domains. Averages in each domain were compared by gender, age, and hospital identity, attractiveness, and setting. All statistical calculations were performed using SPSS/PC, and means were compared using t-tests. Analysis designed to evaluate outcomes

  11. MI high power operation and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.

  12. Effect of miR-146a and miR-155 on cardiac xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhicheng; Qi, Feng; Liu, Tong; Fu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155 in a cardiac xenograft model treated with the immunosuppressant FK506, and to construct lentiviral vectors to further study the roles of miR-146a and miR-155 in cardiac xenotransplantation. Expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155 were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and protein expression of RelA, which is a member of the nuclear factor-κB family, was examined by western blot analysis. Pre-miR-146a and pre-miR-155 fragments were designed and synthesized according to MiRBase and were cloned into the plasmid pCDH1-MCS1-EF1-copGFP. Recombinant plasmids were identified by enzyme digestion and sequencing. Survival time of cardiac grafts in the FK506 treatment group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the histopathological grading results were significantly decreased in the treatment group (P<0.05). A significant decrease in RelA protein expression levels was observed in the treatment group (P<0.05), along with a significant increase in miR-146a expression levels (P<0.05) and a significant decrease in miR-155 expression levels (P<0.05). Digestion and sequencing findings demonstrated that the insertion of miRNA into the plasmid pCDH1-MCS1-EF1-copGFP conformed with the pre-miRNAs, and the lentiviral vectors were concentrated to a titer of 5×107 IFU/ml. These findings demonstrated that FK506 is able to inhibit the rejection effect in a mouse-to-rat cardiac xenotransplantation model. FK506 treatment altered the expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155, indicating that they may have an important role in regulating the immune response to the rejection effect. miR-146a and miR-155 lentiviral vectors were successfully constructed for further experiments both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:28101175

  13. Inference of gene regulation via miRNAs during ES cell differentiation using MiRaGE method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Taguchi, Y-H; Yasuda, Jun

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a critical regulator of cell growth, differentiation, and development. To identify important miRNAs in a biological process, many bioinformatical tools have been developed. We have developed MiRaGE (MiRNA Ranking by Gene Expression) method to infer the regulation of gene expression by miRNAs from changes of gene expression profiles. The method does not require precedent array normalization. We applied the method to elucidate possibly important miRNAs during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation to neuronal cells and we infer that certain miRNAs, including miR-200 family, miR-429, miR-302 family, and miR-17-92 cluster members may be important to the maintenance of undifferentiated status in ES cells.

  14. Inference of Gene Regulation via miRNAs During ES Cell Differentiation Using MiRaGE Method

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Taguchi, Y-h.; Yasuda, Jun

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a critical regulator of cell growth, differentiation, and development. To identify important miRNAs in a biological process, many bioinformatical tools have been developed. We have developed MiRaGE (MiRNA Ranking by Gene Expression) method to infer the regulation of gene expression by miRNAs from changes of gene expression profiles. The method does not require precedent array normalization. We applied the method to elucidate possibly important miRNAs during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation to neuronal cells and we infer that certain miRNAs, including miR-200 family, miR-429, miR-302 family, and miR-17-92 cluster members may be important to the maintenance of undifferentiated status in ES cells. PMID:22272132

  15. miR-15 and miR-16 induce apoptosis by targeting BCL2.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Amelia; Calin, George Adrian; Fabbri, Muller; Iorio, Marilena V; Ferracin, Manuela; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Wojcik, Sylwia E; Aqeilan, Rami I; Zupo, Simona; Dono, Mariella; Rassenti, Laura; Alder, Hansjuerg; Volinia, Stefano; Liu, Chang-Gong; Kipps, Thomas J; Negrini, Massimo; Croce, Carlo M

    2005-09-27

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common human leukemia and is characterized by predominantly nondividing malignant B cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) protein. miR-15a and miR-16-1 are deleted or down-regulated in the majority of CLLs. Here, we demonstrate that miR-15a and miR-16-1 expression is inversely correlated to Bcl2 expression in CLL and that both microRNAs negatively regulate Bcl2 at a posttranscriptional level. BCL2 repression by these microRNAs induces apoptopsis in a leukemic cell line model. Therefore, miR-15 and miR-16 are natural antisense Bcl2 interactors that could be used for therapy of Bcl2-overexpressing tumors.

  16. MiD49 and MiD51, new components of the mitochondrial fission machinery

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Catherine S; Osellame, Laura D; Laine, David; Koutsopoulos, Olga S; Frazier, Ann E; Ryan, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria form intricate networks through fission and fusion events. Here, we identify mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51, respectively) anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane. MiD49/51 form foci and rings around mitochondria similar to the fission mediator dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). MiD49/51 directly recruit Drp1 to the mitochondrial surface, whereas their knockdown reduces Drp1 association, leading to unopposed fusion. Overexpression of MiD49/51 seems to sequester Drp1 from functioning at mitochondria and cause fused tubules to associate with actin. Thus, MiD49/51 are new mediators of mitochondrial division affecting Drp1 action at mitochondria. PMID:21508961

  17. Predictive and Prognostic Roles of Abnormal Expression of Tissue miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxing; Zheng, Jihui; Chen, Liangyu; Diao, Hongyu; Liu, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most prevalent primary brain tumors in adults. In addition to the high incidence and mortality rate, the 5-year survival rate of glioma is also extremely low. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as a class of small non-coding RNAs, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. It was also proposed that miRNAs might also be associated with glioma diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we aimed at investigating the predictive and prognostic values of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in glioma and, hopefully, to provide some evidence for novel therapy of glioma. Tissue specimens were obtained from tumor tissue and adjacent non-tumor tissue. RNA was extracted and qRT-PCR was performed with U6 being the internal control. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed, and the area under the ROC curves (AUC) was calculated to evaluate the significance of candidate miRNAs in distinguishing glioma tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Survival curves of Kaplan-Meier method were constructed for both high expression group and low expression group, and the difference between curves was evaluated by log-rank test. All the statistical analyses were performed using Stata version 12.0 software, and graphs were generated by GraphPad Prism 5.0. The significance of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 expression level in distinguishing glioma tumor from adjacent non-tumor tissues was further validated. Combination of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-22 was significantly superior compared to the clinical standard of using these miRNAs alone. A clear demarcation was shown by survival analysis between patients with high miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 expression and patients with poor prognosis. Similarly, panel of these miRNAs could play a better prognostic role in glioma. In this study, we confirmed the significance of miR-125b, miR-221, and miR-222 in distinguishing glioma tumor from adjacent non-tumor tissues. Higher expressions of miR-125b and miR-222 have also been proved

  18. Evolution of the miR-290–295/miR-371–373 Cluster Family Seed Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Aksoy, Munevver; Shi, Jianting; Houbaviy, Hristo Botev

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the mouse miR-290–295 cluster and its miR-371–373 homolog in human is restricted to early embryos, primordial germ cells, the germ line stem cell compartment of the adult testis and to stem cell lines derived from the early embryonic lineages. Sequencing data suggest considerable seed diversification between the seven homologous pre-miRNAs of miR-290–295 but it is not clear if all of the implied miR-290–295 seeds are also conserved in the human miR-371–373 cluster, which consists of only three homologous pre-miRNAs. By employing miRNA target reporters we show that most, if not all, seeds in miR-290–295 are represented in miR-371–373. In the mouse, pre-miR-290, pre-miR-292 and pre-miR-293 express subsets of the miRNA isoforms processed from the single human pre-miR-371. Comparison of the possible miR-290–295/miR-371–373 seed repertoires in placental mammals suggests a model for the evolution of this miRNA cluster family, which would be otherwise difficult to deduce based solely on pre-miRNA sequence comparisons. The conservation of co-expressed seeds that is characteristic of miR-290–295/miR-371–373 should be taken into account in models of the corresponding miRNA-target interaction networks. PMID:25268927

  19. Using miRNA-Analyzer for the Analysis of miRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Tradigo, Giuseppe; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small biological molecules that play an important role during the mechanisms of protein formation. Recent findings have demonstrated that they act as both positive and negative regulators of protein formation. Thus, the investigation of miRNAs, i.e., the determination of their level of expression, has developed a huge interest in the scientific community. One of the leading technologies for extracting miRNA data from biological samples is the miRNA Affymetrix platform. It provides the quantification of the level of expression of the miRNA in a sample, thus enabling the accumulation of data and allowing the determination of relationships among miRNA, genes, and diseases. Unfortunately, there is a lack of a comprehensive platform able to provide all the functions needed for the extraction of information from miRNA data. We here present miRNA-Analyzer, a complete software tool providing primary functionalities for miRNA data analysis. The current version of miRNA-Analyzer wraps the Affymetrix QCTool for the preprocessing of binary data files, and then provides feature selection (the filtering by species and by the associated p-value of preprocessed files). Finally, preprocessed and filtered data are analyzed by the Multiple Experiment Viewer (T-MEV) and Short Time Series Expression Miner (STEM) tools, which are also wrapped into miRNA-Analyzer, thus providing a unique environment for miRNA data analysis. The tool offers a plug-in interface so it is easily extensible by adding other algorithms as plug-ins. Users may download the tool freely for academic use at https://sites.google.com/site/mirnaanalyserproject/d. PMID:27983673

  20. MiRduplexSVM: A High-Performing MiRNA-Duplex Prediction and Evaluation Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Nestoras; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of predicting the position of a miRNA duplex on a microRNA hairpin via the development and application of a novel SVM-based methodology. Our method combines a unique problem representation and an unbiased optimization protocol to learn from mirBase19.0 an accurate predictive model, termed MiRduplexSVM. This is the first model that provides precise information about all four ends of the miRNA duplex. We show that (a) our method outperforms four state-of-the-art tools, namely MaturePred, MiRPara, MatureBayes, MiRdup as well as a Simple Geometric Locator when applied on the same training datasets employed for each tool and evaluated on a common blind test set. (b) In all comparisons, MiRduplexSVM shows superior performance, achieving up to a 60% increase in prediction accuracy for mammalian hairpins and can generalize very well on plant hairpins, without any special optimization. (c) The tool has a number of important applications such as the ability to accurately predict the miRNA or the miRNA*, given the opposite strand of a duplex. Its performance on this task is superior to the 2nts overhang rule commonly used in computational studies and similar to that of a comparative genomic approach, without the need for prior knowledge or the complexity of performing multiple alignments. Finally, it is able to evaluate novel, potential miRNAs found either computationally or experimentally. In relation with recent confidence evaluation methods used in miRBase, MiRduplexSVM was successful in identifying high confidence potential miRNAs. PMID:25961860

  1. miRsig: a consensus-based network inference methodology to identify pan-cancer miRNA-miRNA interaction signatures

    PubMed Central

    Nalluri, Joseph J.; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco; Ghosh, Preetam

    2017-01-01

    Decoding the patterns of miRNA regulation in diseases are important to properly realize its potential in diagnostic, prog- nostic, and therapeutic applications. Only a handful of studies computationally predict possible miRNA-miRNA interactions; hence, such interactions require a thorough investigation to understand their role in disease progression. In this paper, we design a novel computational pipeline to predict the common signature/core sets of miRNA-miRNA interactions for different diseases using network inference algorithms on the miRNA-disease expression profiles; the individual predictions of these algorithms were then merged using a consensus-based approach to predict miRNA-miRNA associations. We next selected the miRNA-miRNA associations across particular diseases to generate the corresponding disease-specific miRNA-interaction networks. Next, graph intersection analysis was performed on these networks for multiple diseases to identify the common signature/core sets of miRNA interactions. We applied this pipeline to identify the common signature of miRNA-miRNA inter- actions for cancers. The identified signatures when validated using a manual literature search from PubMed Central and the PhenomiR database, show strong relevance with the respective cancers, providing an indirect proof of the high accuracy of our methodology. We developed miRsig, an online tool for analysis and visualization of the disease-specific signature/core miRNA-miRNA interactions, available at: http://bnet.egr.vcu.edu/miRsig. PMID:28045122

  2. Universal MI definition update for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    White, Harvey; Thygesen, Kristian; Alpert, Joseph S; Jaffe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The new third universal definition of myocardial infarction (MI) is based on troponin elevation together with ischemic symptoms, ischemic ECG changes, and imaging evidence. MIs are classified into five types as to whether they are spontaneous, secondary to imbalance between coronary artery blood supply and demand, related to sudden death, or related to revascularization procedures. The definition is based on a rise and/or fall in troponin levels occurring in a clinical setting. There have been modifications over previous definitions with adding intracoronary thrombus as a criterion, adding a new type of MI type 4c, and raising the cutpoint for the diagnosis of MI related to percutaneous coronary intervention to five times the 99(th) percentile upper reference limit and requiring evidence of ischemia or angiographic complications. In clinical practice, trials, and registries, different definitions are used. There is a need for consistency with regard to the definition of MI and the universal definition should be implemented.

  3. 78 FR 15796 - Michigan Disaster #MI-00038.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Michigan Disaster MI-00038. AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Mecosta. Contiguous Counties: Michigan:...

  4. <mi>GW> calculations using the spectral decomposition of the dielectric matrix: Verification, validation, and comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, T. Anh; Nguyen, Huy -Viet; Rocca, Dario; Galli, Giulia

    2013-04-26

    In a recent paper we presented an approach to evaluate quasiparticle energies based on the spectral decomposition of the static dielectric matrix. This method does not require the calculation of unoccupied electronic states or the direct diagonalization of large dielectric matrices, and it avoids the use of plasmon-pole models. The numerical accuracy of the approach is controlled by a single parameter, i.e., the number of eigenvectors used in the spectral decomposition of the dielectric matrix. Here we present a comprehensive validation of the method, encompassing calculations of ionization potentials and electron affinities of various molecules and of band gaps for several crystalline and disordered semiconductors. Lastly, we demonstrate the efficiency of our approach by carrying out <mi>GW> calculations for systems with several hundred valence electrons.

  5. Mi-DISCOVERER: A bioinformatics tool for the detection of mi-RNA in human genome

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Saadia; Mumtaz, Asia; Ahmad, Freed; Liaquat, Sadia; Nadeem, Shahid; Mehboob, Shahid; Afzal, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 22 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that play pivotal regulatory roles in diverse organisms including the humans and are difficult to be identified due to lack of either sequence features or robust algorithms to efficiently identify. Therefore, we made a tool that is Mi-Discoverer for the detection of miRNAs in human genome. The tools used for the development of software are Microsoft Office Access 2003, the JDK version 1.6.0, BioJava version 1.0, and the NetBeans IDE version 6.0. All already made miRNAs softwares were web based; so the advantage of our project was to make a desktop facility to the user for sequence alignment search with already identified miRNAs of human genome present in the database. The user can also insert and update the newly discovered human miRNA in the database. Mi-Discoverer, a bioinformatics tool successfully identifies human miRNAs based on multiple sequence alignment searches. It's a non redundant database containing a large collection of publicly available human miRNAs. PMID:21364831

  6. The NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Bernstein, R. H.; Biggs, J.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bocean, V.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Bourkland, K.; Cao, S. V.; Castromonte, C. M.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Corwin, L.; Crane, D.; Cravens, J. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Ducar, R. J.; De Jong, J. K.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Fields, T. H.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garkusha, V.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Harding, D.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hays, S.; Heller, K.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Ibrahim, A.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnstone, J.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Laughton, C.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Loiacono, L.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Michael, D. G.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Murtagh, M.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O`Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Olsen, M.; Orchanian, M.; Osprey, S.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Prieto, P.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ratchford, J.; Rebel, B.; Reilly, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Sauer, L.; Schneps, J.; Schoo, D.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Shanahan, P.; Sharma, R.; Smart, W.; Smith, C.; Sousa, A.; Stefanik, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tassotto, G.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Tinsley, D.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Trostin, I.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vaziri, K.; Villegas, E.; Viren, B.; Vogel, G.; Webber, R. C.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Zarucheisky, V.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  7. The NuMI neutrino beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; ...

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  8. miR-148a- and miR-216a-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses targeting pancreatic tumors attenuate tissue damage without perturbation of miRNA activity.

    PubMed

    Bofill-De Ros, Xavier; Gironella, Meritxell; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy shows promise for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) treatment, but there is the need to minimize associated-toxicities. In the current work, we engineered artificial target sites recognized by miR-216a and/or miR-148a to provide pancreatic tumor-selectivity to replication-competent adenoviruses (Ad-miRTs) and improve their safety profile. Expression analysis in PDAC patients identified miR-148a and miR-216a downregulated in resectable (FC(miR-148a) = 0.044, P < 0.05; FC(miR-216a) = 0.017, P < 0.05), locally advanced (FC(miR-148a) = 0.038, P < 0.001; FC(miR-216a) = 0.001, P < 0.001) and metastatic tumors (FC(miR-148a) = 0.041, P < 0.01; FC(miR-216a) = 0.002, P < 0.001). In mouse tissues, miR-216a was highly specific of the exocrine pancreas whereas miR-148a was abundant in the exocrine pancreas, Langerhans islets, and the liver. In line with the miRNA content and the miRNA target site design, we show E1A gene expression and viral propagation efficiently controlled in Ad-miRT-infected cells. Consequently, Ad-miRT-infected mice presented reduced pancreatic and liver damage without perturbation of the endogenous miRNAs and their targets. Interestingly, the 8-miR148aT design showed repressing activity by all miR-148/152 family members with significant detargeting effects in the pancreas and liver. Ad-miRTs preserved their oncolytic activity and triggered strong antitumoral responses. This study provides preclinical evidences of miR-148a and miR-216a target site insertions to confer adenoviral selectivity and proposes 8-miR148aT as an optimal detargeting strategy for genetically-engineered therapies against PDAC.

  9. Five freely circulating miRNAs and bone tissue miRNAs are associated with osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Claudine; Karpinski, Katrin; Haug, Alexander T; Vester, Helen; Schmitt, Andreas; Bauer, Jan S; van Griensven, Martijn

    2014-08-01

    Osteoporosis as a systemic skeletal disorder is characterized by increased bone fragility and the risk of fractures. According to the World Health Organization, osteoporosis is one of the 10 most common diseases and affects approximately 75 million people in Europe, the United States, and Japan. In this context, the identification of specific microRNA (miRNA) signatures is an important step for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The focus of interest on miRNAs as biomarkers came with new publications identifying free circulating extracellular miRNAs associated with various types of cancer. This study aimed to identify specific miRNAs in patients with osteoporotic fractures compared with nonosteoporotic fractures. For the array analysis, miRNAs were isolated from the serum of 20 patients with hip fractures, transcribed, and the samples were pooled into 10 osteoporotic and 10 nonosteoporotic specimens. With each pool of samples, human serum and plasma miRNA PCR arrays were performed, which are able to identify 83 different miRNAs. Subsequently, a separate validation analysis of each miRNA found to be regulated in the array followed with miRNA samples isolated from the serum of 30 osteoporotic and 30 nonosteoporotic patients and miRNA samples isolated from the bone tissue of 20 osteoporotic and 20 nonosteoporotic patients. With the validation analysis of the regulated miRNAs, we identified 9 miRNAs, namely miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-93, miR-100, miR-122a, miR-124a, miR-125b, and miR-148a, that were significantly upregulated in the serum of patients with osteoporosis. In the bone tissue of osteoporotic patients, we identified that miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-25, miR-100, and miR-125b displayed a significantly higher expression. A total of 5 miRNAs display an upregulation both in serum and bone tissue. This study reveals an important role for several miRNAs in osteoporotic patients and suggested that they may be used as biomarkers for diagnostic purposes and

  10. Addendum to NuMI shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The original safety assessment and the Safety Envelope for the NuMI beam line corresponds to 400 kW of beam power. The Main Injector is currently capable of and approved for producing 500 kW of beam power2. However, operation of the NuMI beam line at 400 kW of power brings up the possibility of an occasional excursion above 400 kW due to better than usual tuning in one of the machines upstream of the NuMI beam line. An excursion above the DOE approved Safety Envelope will constitute a safety violation. The purpose of this addendum is to evaluate the radiological issues and modifications required to operate the NuMI beam line at 500 kW. This upgrade will allow 400 kW operations with a reasonable safety margin. Configuration of the NuMI beam line, boundaries, safety system and the methodologies used for the calculations are as described in the original NuMI SAD. While most of the calculations presented in the original shielding assessment were based on Monte Carlo simulations, which were based on the design geometries, most of the results presented in this addendum are based on the measurements conducted by the AD ES&H radiation safety group.

  11. miRNAsong: a web-based tool for generation and testing of miRNA sponge constructs in silico.

    PubMed

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Hampl, Ales

    2016-11-18

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA transcripts containing multiple high-affinity binding sites that associate with and sequester specific miRNAs to prevent them from interacting with their target messenger (m)RNAs. Due to the high specificity of miRNA sponges and strong inhibition of target miRNAs, these molecules have become increasingly applied in miRNA loss-of-function studies. However, improperly designed sponge constructs may sequester off-target miRNAs; thus, it has become increasingly important to develop a tool for miRNA sponge construct design and testing. In this study, we introduce microRNA sponge generator and tester (miRNAsong), a freely available web-based tool for generation and in silico testing of miRNA sponges. This tool generates miRNA sponge constructs for specific miRNAs and miRNA families/clusters and tests them for potential binding to miRNAs in selected organisms. Currently, miRNAsong allows for testing of sponge constructs in 219 species covering 35,828 miRNA sequences. Furthermore, we also provide an example, supplemented with experimental data, of how to use this tool. Using miRNAsong, we designed and tested a sponge for miR-145 inhibition, and cloned the sequence into an inducible lentiviral vector. We found that established cell lines expressing miR-145 sponge strongly inhibited miR-145, thus demonstrating the usability of miRNAsong tool for sponge generation. URL: http://www.med.muni.cz/histology/miRNAsong/.

  12. miRNAsong: a web-based tool for generation and testing of miRNA sponge constructs in silico

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Hampl, Ales

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA transcripts containing multiple high-affinity binding sites that associate with and sequester specific miRNAs to prevent them from interacting with their target messenger (m)RNAs. Due to the high specificity of miRNA sponges and strong inhibition of target miRNAs, these molecules have become increasingly applied in miRNA loss-of-function studies. However, improperly designed sponge constructs may sequester off-target miRNAs; thus, it has become increasingly important to develop a tool for miRNA sponge construct design and testing. In this study, we introduce microRNA sponge generator and tester (miRNAsong), a freely available web-based tool for generation and in silico testing of miRNA sponges. This tool generates miRNA sponge constructs for specific miRNAs and miRNA families/clusters and tests them for potential binding to miRNAs in selected organisms. Currently, miRNAsong allows for testing of sponge constructs in 219 species covering 35,828 miRNA sequences. Furthermore, we also provide an example, supplemented with experimental data, of how to use this tool. Using miRNAsong, we designed and tested a sponge for miR-145 inhibition, and cloned the sequence into an inducible lentiviral vector. We found that established cell lines expressing miR-145 sponge strongly inhibited miR-145, thus demonstrating the usability of miRNAsong tool for sponge generation. URL: http://www.med.muni.cz/histology/miRNAsong/. PMID:27857164

  13. "Front Desk? Send Me a Computer!" The Hotel and Tourism Sector: New Technology Spawns a Revolution in Travel Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The computer and new technologies are revolutionizing the hotel, catering, and tourism businesses. There is consensus that formal training for these changes falls short of new requirements and that schools are having difficulty keeping up. (JOW)

  14. "Front Desk? Send Me a Computer!" The Hotel and Tourism Sector: New Technology Spawns a Revolution in Travel Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The computer and new technologies are revolutionizing the hotel, catering, and tourism businesses. There is consensus that formal training for these changes falls short of new requirements and that schools are having difficulty keeping up. (JOW)

  15. Regulation of miRNA 219 and miRNA Clusters 338 and 17-92 in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Faria Jr., Omar; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Bin, Jenea M.; Bull, Sarah-Jane; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P.; Colman, David R.; Dhaunchak, Ajit S.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate diverse molecular and cellular processes including oligodendrocyte (OL) precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and differentiation in rodents. However, the role of miRs in human OPCs is poorly understood. To identify miRs that may regulate these processes in humans, we isolated OL lineage cells from human white matter and analyzed their miR profile. Using endpoint RT-PCR assays and quantitative real-time PCR, we demonstrate that miR-219, miR-338, and miR-17-92 are enriched in human white matter and expressed in acutely isolated human OLs. In addition, we report the expression of closely related miRs (miR-219-1-3p, miR-219-2-3p, miR-1250, miR-657, miR-3065-5p, miR-3065-3p) in both rodent and human OLs. Our findings demonstrate that miRs implicated in rodent OPC proliferation and differentiation are regulated in human OLs and may regulate myelination program in humans. Thus, these miRs should be recognized as potential therapeutic targets in demyelinating disorders. PMID:22470405

  16. Aberrant miRNA profiles associated with chronic benzene poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Yang, Jing; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    Chronic occupational benzene exposure is associated with an increased risk of hematological malignancies. To gain an insight into the new biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of chronic benzene poisoning, miRNA profiles and mRNA expression pattern from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic benzene poisoning patients and health controls matched age and gender without benzene exposure were performed using the Exiqon miRNA PCR ARRAY and Gene Chip Human Gene 2.0ST Arrays, respectively. Totally, 6 up-regulated miRNAs (miR-34a, miR-205, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-185 and miR-423-5p-2) and 7 down-regulated miRNAs (miR-133a, miR-543, hsa-miR-130a, miR-27b,miR-223, miR-142-5p and miR-320b) were found in chronic benzene poisoning group compared to health controls (P ≤ 0.05). By integrating miRNA and mRNA expression data, these differential miRNAs were mainly involved in regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, axon guidance, regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, nervous system development, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Further, pathway analysis indicated that SMAD4, PLCB1, NFAT5, GNAI2, PTEN, VEGFA, BCL2, CTNNB1 and CCND1 were key target genes of differential miRNAs which were implicated in Adherens junction, TGF-beta signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, tight junction and Pathways in cancer. In conclusion, the aberrant miRNAs might be a potential biomarker of chronic benzene poisoning.

  17. Telomere Length, TERT, and miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Andrew J.; Wolff, Roger K.; Mullany, Lila E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that miRNAs are involved in the control of telomeres. We test that hypothesis by examining the association between miRNAs and telomere length (TL). Additionally, we evaluate if genetic variation in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is associated with miRNA expression levels. We use data from a population-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), where we have previously shown associations between TL and TERT and CRC, to test associations between TL and miRNA expression and TERT and miRNA expression. To gain insight into functions of miRNAs associated with TERT we tested linear associations between miRNAs and their targeted gene mRNAs. An Agilent platform that contained information on over 2000 miRNAs was used. TL was measured using a multiplexed quantitative PCR (qPCR). RNAseq was used to assess gene expression. Our sample consisted of 1152 individuals with SNP data and miRNA expression data; 363 individuals with both TL and miRNA; and 148 individuals with miRNA and mRNA data. Thirty-three miRNAs were directly associated with TL after adjusting for age and sex (false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05). TERT rs2736118 was associated with differences in miRNA expression between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa for 75 miRNAs (FDR <0.05). Genes regulated by these miRNAs, as indicated by mRNA/miRNA associations, were associated with major signaling pathways beyond their TL-related functions, including PTEN, and PI3K/AKT signaling. Our data support a direct association between miRNAs and TL; differences in miRNA expression levels by TERT genotype were observed. Based on miRNA and targeted mRNA associations our data suggest that TERT is involved in non-TL-related functions by acting through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27627813

  18. DAB2IP-Coordinated miRNA Biogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    work provides a mechanistic insight of miR-363 regulation within the miR-106a-363 cluster by interferon -induced protein with tetratricopeptide...suppressive miRNA within a cluster containing mostly oncogenic miRNAs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, microRNA turnover machinery, Interferon ...12,13. In this study, we unveil a new post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism specific to miR-363 turnover by a novel protein complex- Interferon

  19. miRNAmeConverter: an R/bioconductor package for translating mature miRNA names to different miRBase versions.

    PubMed

    Haunsberger, Stefan J; Connolly, Niamh M C; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2017-02-15

    The miRBase database is the central and official repository for miRNAs and the current release is miRBase version 21.0. Name changes in different miRBase releases cause inconsistencies in miRNA names from version to version. When working with only a small number of miRNAs the translation can be done manually. However, with large sets of miRNAs, the necessary correction of such inconsistencies becomes burdensome and error-prone. We developed miRNAmeConverter , available as a Bioconductor R package and web interface that addresses the challenges associated with mature miRNA name inconsistencies. The main algorithm implemented enables high-throughput automatic translation of species-independent mature miRNA names to user selected miRBase versions. The web interface enables users less familiar with R to translate miRNA names given in form of a list or embedded in text and download of the results. The miRNAmeConverter R package is open source under the Artistic-2.0 license. It is freely available from Bioconductor ( http://bioconductor.org/packages/miRNAmeConverter ). The web interface is based on R Shiny and can be accessed under the URL http://www.systemsmedicineireland.ie/tools/mirna-name-converter/ . The database that miRNAmeConverter depends on is provided by the annotation package miRBaseVersions.db and can be downloaded from Bioconductor ( http://bioconductor.org/packages/miRBaseVersions.db ). Minimum R version 3.3.0 is required. stefanhaunsberger@rcsi.ie. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 Enhance Adipogenic Differentiation from Porcine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Xinglan; Ma, Kuiying; Zhang, Zhiren; Zhao, Tianchuang; Zhang, Xueming; Tang, Bo; Li, Ziyi

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have multilineage differentiation abilities toward adipocytes and osteoblasts. Recently, numerous studies have focused on the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the process of adipogenic differentiation of human and mouse cells. However, the role of miRNAs in adipogenic differentiation process of porcine BMSCs (pBMSCs) remains unclear. In this study, pBMSCs were induced to differentiate into adipocytes using a chemical approach, and the roles of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 in this process were investigated. Our results showed that pBMSCs could be chemically induced to differentiate into adipocytes and that the expression of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 increased during differentiation. Then, overexpression of mimics of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 increased the number of oil red O-positive cells of adipocyte differentiation. The expression levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) mRNA showed increases of 1.8-, 1.5-, and 1.2-fold in the groups expressing mimics of miR-21, miR-17, and miR-143, respectively, at day 20. These results demonstrate that miR-17, miR-21, and miR-143 are involved in and promote the adipogenic differentiation of pBMSCs. This study provides an experimental basis for establishing a stable and efficient adipogenic differentiation model for applications in cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  1. miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador

    2015-02-15

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological pathways. As their role in phagocytosis remains poorly understood, we investigated their impact on phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells. Seven miRNAs (miR-24, -30b, -101, 142-3p, -652-3p, -652-5p, and -1275) that were differentially expressed during monocyte to macrophage (Mφ) and monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation were screened for their potential role in phagocytosis. Among these, overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p in human monocyte-derived Mφ, DC, monocytes, and PBMCs significantly attenuate phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the secretion of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40. miRNA-mediated changes in cytokine profiles were observed at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels and importantly exhibit miRNA-specific impact. To examine the underlying mechanism, we monitored the expression of phagocytosis pathway-associated genes and identified several genes that were altered in Mφ and DC transfected with miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p mimics. Some of these genes with altered expression also harbor putative miRNA binding sites. We show that miR-142-3p directly regulates protein kinase Cα (PKCα), a key gene involved in phagocytosis. Interestingly, miR-142-3p and PKCα exhibit antagonistic expression during Mφ and DC differentiation. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKCα in Mφ leads to reduced bacterial uptake, further highlighting the role of the gene in phagocytosis. Overall, these results demonstrate that miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis and associated cytokine production in myeloid inflammatory cells through modulation of various genes involved in the pathway.

  2. miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Rune; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2017-02-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as important post transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In higher vertebrates, a subset of miRNAs has been identified as important regulators of a number of key genes in immune system gene networks, and this paper review recent studies on miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish. Challenge studies conducted in several species have identified differently expressed miRNAs associated with viral or bacterial infection. The results from these studies point out several miRNAs that are likely to have evolutionary conserved functions that are related to immune response in teleost fish. Changed expression levels of mature miRNAs from the five miRNA genes miRNA-462, miRNA-731, miRNA-146, miRNA-181 and miRNA-223 are observed following viral as well as bacterial infection in several teleost fish. Furthermore, significant changes in expression of mature miRNAs from the five genes miRNA-21, miRNA-155, miRNA-1388, miRNA-99 and miRNA-100 are observed in multiple studies of virus infected fish while changes in expression of mature miRNA from the three genes miRNA-122, miRNA-192 and miRNA-451 are observed in several studies of fish with bacterial infections. Interestingly, some of these genes are not present in higher vertebrates. The function of the evolutionary conserved miRNAs responding to infection depends on the target gene(s) they regulate. A few target genes have been identified while a large number of target genes have been predicted by in silico analysis. The results suggest that many of the targets are genes from the host's immune response gene networks. We propose a model with expected temporal changes in miRNA expression if they target immune response activators/effector genes or immune response inhibitors, respectively. The best way to understand the function of a miRNA is to identify its target gene(s), but as the amount of genome resources for teleost fish is limited, with less well characterized genomes

  3. miR-15a and miR-16-1 in cancer: discovery, function and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, R I; Calin, G A; Croce, C M

    2010-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) encoded by the miR-15/16 cluster are known to act as tumor suppressors. Expression of these miRNAs inhibits cell proliferation, promotes apoptosis of cancer cells, and suppresses tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo. miR-15a and miR-16-1 function by targeting multiple oncogenes, including BCL2, MCL1, CCND1, and WNT3A. Down-regulation of these miRNAs has been reported in chronic lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL), pituitary adenomas, and prostate carcinoma. This review summarizes the discovery, functions, and clinical relevance of these miRNAs in cancer, particularly CLL.

  4. Recurrence of legionnaires disease at a hotel in the United States Virgin Islands over a 20-year period.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Karen D; Lucas, Claressa E; Benson, Robert F; Chamany, Shadi; Brown, Ellen W; Fields, Barry S; Feikin, Daniel R

    2005-04-15

    We investigated 3 cases of legionnaires disease (LD) that developed in travelers who stayed at a hotel in the United States Virgin Islands where cases of LD occurred in 1981-1982 and in 1998. The temperature of the potable water at the hotel was in a range that could optimally support the growth of Legionella species, and the potable water was colonized with Legionella pneumophila in 1981-1982 and in 2002-2003.

  5. Provision of a multi-range program for clients in a downtown hotel by baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Mealey, A

    1981-02-01

    The ability of nursing programs to enter untraditional clinical areas to provide services to needy clients is a resource for both nursing schools and clients. This outreach program in a downtown hotel resulted in favorable impacts on the student nurses, the ICNE program, the community and, most of all, the residents of the hotel. It is possible that enlargement of this model could have a significant positive effect upon the face of the central business district of any city.

  6. MiRNATIP: a SOM-based miRNA-target interactions predictor.

    PubMed

    Fiannaca, Antonino; Rosa, Massimo La; Paglia, Laura La; Rizzo, Riccardo; Urso, Alfonso

    2016-09-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA sequences with regulatory functions to post-transcriptional level for several biological processes, such as cell disease progression and metastasis. MiRNAs interact with target messenger RNA (mRNA) genes by base pairing. Experimental identification of miRNA target is one of the major challenges in cancer biology because miRNAs can act as tumour suppressors or oncogenes by targeting different type of targets. The use of machine learning methods for the prediction of the target genes is considered a valid support to investigate miRNA functions and to guide related wet-lab experiments. In this paper we propose the miRNA Target Interaction Predictor (miRNATIP) algorithm, a Self-Organizing Map (SOM) based method for the miRNA target prediction. SOM is trained with the seed region of the miRNA sequences and then the mRNA sequences are projected into the SOM lattice in order to find putative interactions with miRNAs. These interactions will be filtered considering the remaining part of the miRNA sequences and estimating the free-energy necessary for duplex stability. We tested the proposed method by predicting the miRNA target interactions of both the Homo sapiens and the Caenorhbditis elegans species; then, taking into account validated target (positive) and non-target (negative) interactions, we compared our results with other target predictors, namely miRanda, PITA, PicTar, mirSOM, TargetScan and DIANA-microT, in terms of the most used statistical measures. We demonstrate that our method produces the greatest number of predictions with respect to the other ones, exhibiting good results for both species, reaching the for example the highest percentage of sensitivity of 31 and 30.5 %, respectively for Homo sapiens and for C. elegans. All the predicted interaction are freely available at the following url: http://tblab.pa.icar.cnr.it/public/miRNATIP/ . Results state miRNATIP outperforms or is comparable to the other six state

  7. Reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Volinia, Stefano; Galasso, Marco; Costinean, Stefan; Tagliavini, Luca; Gamberoni, Giacomo; Drusco, Alessandra; Marchesini, Jlenia; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Sana, Maria Elena; Abu Jarour, Ramzey; Desponts, Caroline; Teitell, Michael; Baffa, Raffaele; Aqeilan, Rami; Iorio, Marilena V.; Taccioli, Cristian; Garzon, Ramiro; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Fabbri, Muller; Catozzi, Marco; Previati, Maurizio; Ambs, Stefan; Palumbo, Tiziana; Garofalo, Michela; Veronese, Angelo; Bottoni, Arianna; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Harris, Curtis C.; Visone, Rosa; Pekarsky, Yuri; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomston, Mark; Dillhoff, Mary; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Huebner, Kay; Pichiorri, Flavia; Lenze, Dido; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Zanesi, Nicola; Rossi, Simona; Calin, George A.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Vecchione, Andrea; Rosenberg, Anne; Croce, Carlo M.

    2010-01-01

    We studied miRNA profiles in 4419 human samples (3312 neoplastic, 1107 nonmalignant), corresponding to 50 normal tissues and 51 cancer types. The complexity of our database enabled us to perform a detailed analysis of microRNA (miRNA) activities. We inferred genetic networks from miRNA expression in normal tissues and cancer. We also built, for the first time, specialized miRNA networks for solid tumors and leukemias. Nonmalignant tissues and cancer networks displayed a change in hubs, the most connected miRNAs. hsa-miR-103/106 were downgraded in cancer, whereas hsa-miR-30 became most prominent. Cancer networks appeared as built from disjointed subnetworks, as opposed to normal tissues. A comparison of these nets allowed us to identify key miRNA cliques in cancer. We also investigated miRNA copy number alterations in 744 cancer samples, at a resolution of 150 kb. Members of miRNA families should be similarly deleted or amplified, since they repress the same cellular targets and are thus expected to have similar impacts on oncogenesis. We correctly identified hsa-miR-17/92 family as amplified and the hsa-miR-143/145 cluster as deleted. Other miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-30 and hsa-miR-204, were found to be physically altered at the DNA copy number level as well. By combining differential expression, genetic networks, and DNA copy number alterations, we confirmed, or discovered, miRNAs with comprehensive roles in cancer. Finally, we experimentally validated the miRNA network with acute lymphocytic leukemia originated in Mir155 transgenic mice. Most of miRNAs deregulated in these transgenic mice were located close to hsa-miR-155 in the cancer network. PMID:20439436

  8. Reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Volinia, Stefano; Galasso, Marco; Costinean, Stefan; Tagliavini, Luca; Gamberoni, Giacomo; Drusco, Alessandra; Marchesini, Jlenia; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Sana, Maria Elena; Abu Jarour, Ramzey; Desponts, Caroline; Teitell, Michael; Baffa, Raffaele; Aqeilan, Rami; Iorio, Marilena V; Taccioli, Cristian; Garzon, Ramiro; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Fabbri, Muller; Catozzi, Marco; Previati, Maurizio; Ambs, Stefan; Palumbo, Tiziana; Garofalo, Michela; Veronese, Angelo; Bottoni, Arianna; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Harris, Curtis C; Visone, Rosa; Pekarsky, Yuri; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomston, Mark; Dillhoff, Mary; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Huebner, Kay; Pichiorri, Flavia; Lenze, Dido; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Zanesi, Nicola; Rossi, Simona; Calin, George A; Liu, Chang-Gong; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Vecchione, Andrea; Rosenberg, Anne; Croce, Carlo M

    2010-05-01

    We studied miRNA profiles in 4419 human samples (3312 neoplastic, 1107 nonmalignant), corresponding to 50 normal tissues and 51 cancer types. The complexity of our database enabled us to perform a detailed analysis of microRNA (miRNA) activities. We inferred genetic networks from miRNA expression in normal tissues and cancer. We also built, for the first time, specialized miRNA networks for solid tumors and leukemias. Nonmalignant tissues and cancer networks displayed a change in hubs, the most connected miRNAs. hsa-miR-103/106 were downgraded in cancer, whereas hsa-miR-30 became most prominent. Cancer networks appeared as built from disjointed subnetworks, as opposed to normal tissues. A comparison of these nets allowed us to identify key miRNA cliques in cancer. We also investigated miRNA copy number alterations in 744 cancer samples, at a resolution of 150 kb. Members of miRNA families should be similarly deleted or amplified, since they repress the same cellular targets and are thus expected to have similar impacts on oncogenesis. We correctly identified hsa-miR-17/92 family as amplified and the hsa-miR-143/145 cluster as deleted. Other miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-30 and hsa-miR-204, were found to be physically altered at the DNA copy number level as well. By combining differential expression, genetic networks, and DNA copy number alterations, we confirmed, or discovered, miRNAs with comprehensive roles in cancer. Finally, we experimentally validated the miRNA network with acute lymphocytic leukemia originated in Mir155 transgenic mice. Most of miRNAs deregulated in these transgenic mice were located close to hsa-miR-155 in the cancer network.

  9. Effects of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sex hormones, and obesity on circulating miRNA-21, miRNA-27b, miRNA-103, and miRNA-155 expression.

    PubMed

    Murri, Mora; Insenser, María; Fernández-Durán, Elena; San-Millán, José L; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA sequences that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNA-21, miRNA-27b, miRNA-103, and miRNA-155 have been associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes, which are also associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We aimed to evaluate the effects of sex, sex hormones, and PCOS and their interactions with obesity on the expression in the circulation of these miRNAs. This was a case-control study. The setting was an academic hospital. We included 12 control women, 12 patients with PCOS, and 12 men selected as to have similar body mass index (BMI) and age. Six subjects per group had normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)), and six subjects per group were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Blood samples were collected early in the morning after a 12-hour fast. We measured whole blood expression of miRNA-21, miRNA-27b, miRNA-103, and miRNA-155. Obesity significantly reduced the expression of miRNA-21, miRNA-27b, and miRNA-103. However, there was a significant interaction between obesity and the group of subjects in the expression of miRNA-21, miRNA-27b, miRNA-103, and miRNA-155 consisting of obesity reducing the expression of these miRNAs in control woman and men, but tending to increase their expression in women with PCOS. These differences paralleled those observed in serum T concentrations. The present results suggest that miRNAs that play an important role in metabolic and immune system processes are influenced by obesity and circulating androgen concentrations.

  10. Geothermal district heating and cooling of hotel/casinos in downtown Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cerci, Y.; Kanoglu, M.; Cengel, Y.A.; Turner, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, potential revenues from the proposed geothermal district heating/cooling system for the hotel/casino complexes in downtown Reno, Nevada are estimated by analyzing their actual electricity and natural gas bills during 1993 through 1994. The geothermal system appears to be feasible, and financially very attractive. The geothermal district system can meet the entire heating and cooling requirements of the hotel/casinos, generating total potential revenues of $3,486,000 per year. Also, other buildings around the downtown area such as Saint Mary`s Hospital, several motels, business complexes, Washoe County School District Building, and even the UNR campus will add extra potential revenues, if these buildings are connected to the geothermal grid. Since most buildings around the downtown use central heating and cooling system, the retrofit costs for the both system should be minimal.

  11. Bit-plane-channelized hotelling observer for predicting task performance using lossy-compressed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmanske, Brian M.; Loew, Murray H.

    2003-05-01

    A technique for assessing the impact of lossy wavelet-based image compression on signal detection tasks is presented. A medical image"s value is based on its ability to support clinical decisions such as detecting and diagnosing abnormalities. Image quality of compressed images is, however, often stated in terms of mathematical metrics such as mean square error. The presented technique provides a more suitable measure of image degradation by building on the channelized Hotelling observer model, which has been shown to predict human performance of signal detection tasks in noise-limited images. The technique first decomposes an image into its constituent wavelet subband coefficient bit-planes. Channel responses for the individual subband bit-planes are computed, combined,and processed with a Hotelling observer model to provide a measure of signal detectability versus compression ratio. This allows a user to determine how much compression can be tolerated before signal detectability drops below a certain threshold.

  12. Analytical approximations to the Hotelling trace for digital x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Eric; Pineda, Angel R.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2001-06-01

    The Hotelling trace is the signal-to-noise ratio for the ideal linear observer in a detection task. We provide an analytical approximation for this figure of merit when the signal is known exactly and the background is generated by a stationary random process, and the imaging system is an ideal digital x-ray detector. This approximation is based on assuming that the detector is infinite in extent. We test this approximation for finite-size detectors by comparing it to exact calculations using matrix inversion of the data covariance matrix. After verifying the validity of the approximation under a variety of circumstances, we use it to generate plots of the Hotelling trace as a function of pairs of parameters of the system, the signal and the background.

  13. Performance assessment of AS-SBR and UF-MBR for hotel wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Libralato, G; Volpi Ghirardini, A; Avezzù, F

    2009-01-01

    A large number of tourist structures in Venice (Italy) have small sized on-site treatment systems for their wastewater. Due to its historical characteristics, the city has no public sewerage system and untreated hotel wastewater represents a serious hazard for its lagoon environment. This study focused on the wastewater facilities installed in two hotels adopting an Activated Sludge Sequencing Batch Reactor (AS-SBR) and an Ultra-Filtration Membrane Biological Reactor (UF-MBR). Their performance was checked in terms of both traditional physico-chemical and ecotoxicological parameters, the importance of which has recently been recognised by EU regulatory dispositions and OSPAR indications. Acute and sub-chronic endpoints were both considered on a whole effluent toxicity basis by means of Vibrio fischeri and Crassostrea gigas, respectively. The two months monitoring survey evidenced that the UF-MBR was more efficient than the AS-SBR in providing high-quality discharges under both chemical and ecotoxicological viewpoints.

  14. Biogas from bio-waste-potential for an ecological waste and energy management in resort hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, D.; Schultheis, A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper gives an overview about waste management in holiday resorts. The objective is to determine the composition of waste and the specific waste quantities per guest. This data represents the basis for planning recycling measures and corresponding treatment facilities. The sorting analyses show the great potential of organic material suitable for biological treatment. Because of the characteristics (water content, structure) of these organic materials, composting is not as suitable as fermentation. Fermentation tests with hotel bio-waste turned out a much higher rate of biogas compared with communal bio-waste. Until now, biogas as a possibility of regenerative energy, has not been taken into consideration for big hotels or holiday resorts. Using biogas as an additional source of energy and the fermentation products as fertilizer would be a further step to an ecologically beneficial tourism.

  15. The Impact of e-Customer Relationship Marketing in Hotel Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Irene

    The present research investigates the extent to which Greek hotels had developed the electronic customer relationship marketing (E-CRM). The study verifies the practices that frequently appear in relationship marketing process within online operations or whether their Internet presence mainly depends on the basic actions of "supplying information" and "reservations". Also, it investigates the effects of e-CRM system on customer loyalty and satisfaction as well as the impact of relationship marketing practices to customer retention and acquisition. They have understood the importance of using electronic channels instead of traditional ones to implement their marketing strategies. Thus, e-crm system has assisted hotel business to manage more effectively their reservations and serve their customers as fast and as effective as possible. They did not seem to apply many of the relationship marketing strategies to emphasize customer retention and continual satisfaction because of difficulties in staff training.

  16. 3,000 kW Suginoi Hotel geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Kisumi

    1996-05-01

    The Suginoi Hotel is located 200 m above sea level, in Beppu City, which is one of the largest hot spring resort area in Japan. In this hotel, there are some unique hot spring baths, which are interesting to visitors. In Beppu, there are numerous hot springs, some are call {open_quotes}Jigoku{close_quotes} (Hells). The main attraction in Beppu are the hell-like spots created by hot springs such as the Torando Hell, which erupt to a heights of more than 50 meters, The Blood Pond Hell which is bloody red due to red clay content. In yield, these hot springs rank second in the world next to those of Yellowstone National Park in the USA.

  17. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi><mi>N>=200 <mi>GeV>

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-24

    We measured jet production rates in p+p and d+Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi><mi>N>=200 <mi>GeV> recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12T<50 GeV/c, within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η|<0.3. The nuclear-modification factor (RdAu) values for 0%–100% d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. Nonetheless, the centrality-selected RdAu values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  18. miReader: Discovering Novel miRNAs in Species without Sequenced Genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Along with computational approaches, NGS led technologies have caused a major impact upon the discoveries made in the area of miRNA biology, including novel miRNAs identification. However, to this date all microRNA discovery tools compulsorily depend upon the availability of reference or genomic sequences. Here, for the first time a novel approach, miReader, has been introduced which could discover novel miRNAs without any dependence upon genomic/reference sequences. The approach used NGS read data to build highly accurate miRNA models, molded through a Multi-boosting algorithm with Best-First Tree as its base classifier. It was comprehensively tested over large amount of experimental data from wide range of species including human, plants, nematode, zebrafish and fruit fly, performing consistently with >90% accuracy. Using the same tool over Illumina read data for Miscanthus, a plant whose genome is not sequenced; the study reported 21 novel mature miRNA duplex candidates. Considering the fact that miRNA discovery requires handling of high throughput data, the entire approach has been implemented in a standalone parallel architecture. This work is expected to cause a positive impact over the area of miRNA discovery in majority of species, where genomic sequence availability would not be a compulsion any more. PMID:23805282

  19. Close correlation between magnetic properties and the soft phonon mode of the structural transition in <mi>BaFe>2<mi>As>2 and <mi>SrFe>2<mi>As>2

    SciTech Connect

    Parshall, D.; Pintschovius, L.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Castellan, J. -P.; Lamago, D.; Mittal, R.; Wolf, Th.; Reznik, Dmitry

    2015-04-27

    Parent compounds of Fe-based superconductors undergo a structural phase transition from a tetragonal to an orthorhombic structure. We investigated the temperature dependence of the frequencies of TA phonons that extrapolate to the shear vibrational mode at the zone center, which corresponds to the orthorhombic deformation of the crystal structure at low temperatures in <mi>BaFe>2<mi>As>2 and <mi>SrFe>2<mi>As>2. We found that acoustic phonons at small wave vectors soften gradually towards the transition from high temperatures, tracking the increase of the size of slowly fluctuating magnetic domains. On cooling below the transition to base temperature the phonons harden, following the square of the magnetic moment (which we find is proportional to the anisotropy gap). Finally, our results provide evidence for close correlation between magnetic and phonon properties in Fe-based superconductors.

  20. Ab initio human miRNA and pre-miRNA prediction.

    PubMed

    Titov, Igor I; Vorozheykin, Pavel S

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded noncoding RNAs that play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In this paper, we present a web server for ab initio prediction of the human miRNAs and their precursors. The prediction methods are based on the hidden Markov Models and the context-structural characteristics. By taking into account the identified patterns of primary and secondary structures of the pre-miRNAs, a new HMM model is proposed and the existing context-structural Markov model is modified. The evaluation of the method performance has shown that it can accurately predict novel human miRNAs. Comparing with the existing methods we demonstrate that our method has a higher prediction quality both for human pre-miRNAs and miRNAs. The models have also showed good results in the prediction of the mouse miRNAs. The web server is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/mgs/programs/rnaanalys (mirror http://miRNA.at.nsu.ru ).

  1. Small RNA zippers lock miRNA molecules and block miRNA function in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyu; Liu, Cuicui; Lü, Jinhui; Zhao, Qian; Deng, Shengqiong; Wang, Guangxue; Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Chuyi; Zhen, Lixiao; Lu, Ying; Li, Wenshu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Pestell, Richard G.; Fan, Huiming; Chen, Yi-Han; Liu, Zhongmin; Yu, Zuoren

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) loss-of-function phenotypes are mainly induced by chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides. Here we develop an alternative inhibitor for miRNAs, termed ‘small RNA zipper'. It is designed to connect miRNA molecules end to end, forming a DNA–RNA duplex through a complementary interaction with high affinity, high specificity and high stability. Two miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-17, are tested in human breast cancer cell lines, demonstrating the 70∼90% knockdown of miRNA levels by 30–50 nM small RNA zippers. The miR-221 zipper shows capability in rescuing the expression of target genes of miR-221 and reversing the oncogenic function of miR-221 in breast cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the miR-221 zipper attenuates doxorubicin resistance with higher efficiency than anti-miR-221 in human breast cancer cells. Taken together, small RNA zippers are a miRNA inhibitor, which can be used to induce miRNA loss-of-function phenotypes and validate miRNA target genes. PMID:28045030

  2. Comprehensive expression analysis of miRNA in breast cancer at the miRNA and isomiR levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianjin; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Shaoke; Zhong, Jixin; Yang, Lawei; Xu, Junfa

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer (BC) is the main factor that leads cause of cancer death in women worldwide. A class of small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), has been widely studied in human cancers as crucial regulatory molecule. Recent studies indicate that a series of isomiRs can be yielded from a miRNA locus, and these physiological miRNA isoforms have versatile roles in miRNA biogenesis. Herein, we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNAs at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC using next-generation sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Abnormally expressed miRNA (miR-21, miR-221, miR-155, miR-30e and miR-25) and isomiR profiles could be obtained at the miRNA and isomiR levels, and similar biological roles could be detected. IsomiR expression profiles should be further concerned, and especially isomiRs are actual regulatory molecules in the miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. The study provides a comprehensive expression analysis at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC, which indicates biological roles of isomiRs.

  3. Role of miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b in gastric cancer hypoxia-induced chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Katia; Silvestris, Nicola; Simone, Giovanni; Signorile, Michele; Saragoni, Luca; Brunetti, Oronzo; Monti, Manlio; Mazzotta, Annalisa; De Summa, Simona; Mangia, Anita; Tommasi, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the search for new therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer (GC), there is much evidence of progression due to resistance to chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the ability of cancer cells to survive after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. The involvement of miRNAs in the development of MDR has been well described but miRNAs able to modulate the sensitivity to chemotherapy by regulating hypoxia signaling pathways have not yet been fully addressed in GC. Our aim was to analyze miR-20b, miR-27a and miR-181a expression with respect to (epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX)) chemotherapy regimen in a set of GC patients, in order to investigate whether miRNAs deregulation may influence GC MDR also via hypoxia signaling modulation. Cancer biopsy were obtained from 21 untreated HER2 negative advanced GC patients, retrospectively analyzed. All patients received a first-line chemotherapy (EOX) regimen. MirWalk database was used to identify miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b target genes. The expression of miRNAs and of HIPK2, HIF1A and MDR1 genes were detected by real-time PCR. HIPK2 localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Our data showed the down-regulation of miR-20b, miR-27a, miR-181a concomitantly to higher levels of MDR1, HIF1A and HIPK2 genes in GC patients with a progressive disease respect to those with a disease control rate. Moreover, immunohistochemistry assay highlighted a higher cytoplasmic HIPK2 staining, suggesting a different role for it. We showed that aberrant expression of miR-20b, miR27a and miR-181a was associated with chemotherapeutic response in GC through HIF1A, MDR1 and HIPK2 genes modulation, suggesting a possible novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:26793992

  4. Role of miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b in gastric cancer hypoxia-induced chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; Silvestris, Nicola; Simone, Giovanni; Signorile, Michele; Saragoni, Luca; Brunetti, Oronzo; Monti, Manlio; Mazzotta, Annalisa; De Summa, Simona; Mangia, Anita; Tommasi, Stefania

    2016-04-02

    Despite the search for new therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer (GC), there is much evidence of progression due to resistance to chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the ability of cancer cells to survive after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. The involvement of miRNAs in the development of MDR has been well described but miRNAs able to modulate the sensitivity to chemotherapy by regulating hypoxia signaling pathways have not yet been fully addressed in GC. Our aim was to analyze miR-20b, miR-27a and miR-181a expression with respect to (epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX)) chemotherapy regimen in a set of GC patients, in order to investigate whether miRNAs deregulation may influence GC MDR also via hypoxia signaling modulation. Cancer biopsy were obtained from 21 untreated HER2 negative advanced GC patients, retrospectively analyzed. All patients received a first-line chemotherapy (EOX) regimen. MirWalk database was used to identify miR-27a, miR-181a and miR-20b target genes. The expression of miRNAs and of HIPK2, HIF1A and MDR1 genes were detected by real-time PCR. HIPK2 localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Our data showed the down-regulation of miR-20b, miR-27a, miR-181a concomitantly to higher levels of MDR1, HIF1A and HIPK2 genes in GC patients with a progressive disease respect to those with a disease control rate. Moreover, immunohistochemistry assay highlighted a higher cytoplasmic HIPK2 staining, suggesting a different role for it. We showed that aberrant expression of miR-20b, miR27a and miR-181a was associated with chemotherapeutic response in GC through HIF1A, MDR1 and HIPK2 genes modulation, suggesting a possible novel therapeutic strategy.

  5. A genome-wide miRNA screen revealed miR-603 as a MGMT-regulating miRNA in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny C.; Sarkaria, Jann; Jiang, Tao; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2014-01-01

    MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs and characterized the top candidate, miR-603. Transfection of miR-603 suppressed MGMT mRNA/protein expression in vitro and in vivo; this effect was reversed by transfection with antimiR-603. miR-603 affinity-precipitated with MGMT mRNA and suppressed luciferase activity in an MGMT-3'UTR-luciferase assay, suggesting direct interaction between miR-603 and MGMT 3'UTR. miR-603 transfection enhanced the temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity of MGMT-expressing glioblastoma cell lines. Importantly, miR-603 mediated MGMT suppression and TMZ resistance were reversed by expression of an MGMT cDNA. In a collection of 74 clinical glioblastoma specimens, both miR-603 and miR-181d levels inversely correlated with MGMT expression. Moreover, a combined index of the two miRNAs better reflected MGMT expression than each individually. These results suggest that MGMT is co-regulated by independent miRNAs. Characterization of these miRNAs should contribute toward strategies for enhancing the efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. PMID:24994119

  6. US acculturation, food intake, and obesity among Asian-Pacific hotel workers.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Rachel; Williams, Andrew E; Vinoya, Aleli C; Oshiro, Caryn E S; Vogt, Thomas M

    2009-10-01

    Both obesity and immigration continue to increase in the United States. Studies suggest that a transition in lifestyle patterns, such as food intake, may mediate the relationship between immigration and obesity. We examine obesity among hotel workers in relation to age, sex, race/ethnicity, and indicators of food intake, immigration, and acculturation. Four thousand five hundred thirty hotel workers in 30 hotels were studied from the first year of the Work, Weight and Wellness program, before intervention (during 2005-2006). Weight and height were measured, whereas race/ethnicity, language, education, immigration, acculturation, and food intake variables were assessed by questionnaire. The study included 43% male and 57% female hotel workers (mean age 44.4+/-11.3 years; 42% Filipino, 32% other Asian, 13% Pacific Islander, 9% white, 1% black/African American, and 3% other race/ethnicity). On average (mean value), 55% of participants were born outside the United States; 57% were overweight or obese (body mass index [BMI] >25). The BMI of those born in the United States was 1.3 higher than that of those born in another country, adjusting for sex and race/ethnicity. Intake of sweet drinks and meat was positively associated with BMI while intake of fruit was negatively associated with BMI. Age at arrival in United States ("generation") was negatively associated with BMI, whereas greater acculturation was positively associated with BMI. Food intake behaviors are probably related to place of birth, generation of migration to the United States, and acculturation. Direct measures of food intake added explanatory power to models, suggesting the importance of food intake to obesity. Further study of the influence of immigration, acculturation, and food intake on obesity using longitudinal study designs is warranted.

  7. 10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, WITH AUTOMATIC CUTTER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND WRAPPER (RIGHT); LARGE CHUTE AT CENTER FROM 5TH FLOOR BINS TO 3RD FLOOR SOAP MILLS; OVERHEAD AND FLOOR (LOWER RIGHT) FINISHED GOODS CONVEYORS TO G BLOCK (HAER NO. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  8. Evaluation of the Implementation of Good Handling Practices in Food and Beverage Areas of Hotels.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A L; Hecktheuer, L H R; Stangarlin-Fiori, L; Medeiros, L B; Martello, L; Machado, C E

    2015-11-01

    Because of the major international-level events that have recently been held in Brazil, concerns about the sensory and hygienic-sanitary conditions of food have increased. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of good handling practices in food and beverage areas of hotels, with and without outsourced professional intervention. We evaluated 19 food and beverage areas in hotels in Porto Alegre, Rio do Sul, Brazil, using a checklist that was developed by a municipal surveillance team based on existing laws for good handling practices. The evaluation was done by a skilled professional in the food safety area on two occasions, at the beginning of the study (January to May 2013) and at the end (July to November 2014), and the establishments were classified as good, regular, or poor. After the baseline evaluation, an action plan listing the noncompliance found at each location was given to those responsible for the establishments, and a period of 1 year 6 months was stipulated for improvements to be made. In the repeat evaluation, those responsible for the establishments were asked whether they had hired an outsourced professional to assist them in the improvements. The hotels showed improvement during the repeat evaluation, but a significant increase in the percentage of overall adequacy was seen only in the food and beverages areas of the 12 hotels that used the intervention of an outsourced professional. The better percentage of adequacy in establishments with outsourced professional intervention underlines the importance of an external and impartial view of routine activities in the implementation of good handling practices.

  9. Introns of plant pri-miRNAs enhance miRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bielewicz, Dawid; Kalak, Malgorzata; Kalyna, Maria; Windels, David; Barta, Andrea; Vazquez, Franck; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Plant MIR genes are independent transcription units that encode long primary miRNA precursors, which usually contain introns. For two miRNA genes, MIR163 and MIR161, we show that introns are crucial for the accumulation of proper levels of mature miRNA. Removal of the intron in both cases led to a drop-off in the level of mature miRNAs. We demonstrate that the stimulating effects of the intron mostly reside in the 5′ss rather than on a genuine splicing event. Our findings are biologically significant as the presence of functional splice sites in the MIR163 gene appears mandatory for pathogen-triggered accumulation of miR163 and proper regulation of at least one of its targets. PMID:23681439

  10. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  11. Expression profiles of miRNAs and involvement of miR-100 and miR-34 in regulation of cell cycle arrest in Artemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Jin, Feng; Ye, Xiang; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of the cell cycle is complex but critical for proper development, reproduction and stress resistance. To survive unfavourable environmental conditions, the crustacean Artemia produces diapause embryos whose metabolism is maintained at extremely low levels. In the present study, the expression profiles of miRNAs during Artemia diapause entry and termination were characterized using high-throughput sequencing. A total of 13 unclassified miRNAs and 370 miRNAs belonging to 87 families were identified; among them, 107 were differentially expressed during diapause entry and termination. We focused on the roles of two of these miRNAs, miR-100 and miR-34, in regulating cell cycle progression; during the various stages of diapause entry, these miRNAs displayed opposing patterns of expression. A functional analysis revealed that miR-100 and miR-34 regulate the cell cycle during diapause entry by targeting polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), leading to activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (MEK-ERK-RSK2) pathway and cyclin K, leading to suppression of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) activity respectively. The findings presented in the present study provide insights into the functions of miR-100 and miR-34 and suggest that the expression profiles of miRNAs in Artemia can be used to characterize their functions in cell cycle regulation.

  12. Effects of a work injury prevention program for housekeeping in the hotel industry.

    PubMed

    Landers, Merrill; Maguire, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the effectiveness of a work injury prevention program in the housekeeping department of a hotel. Studies have validated the use of different injury prevention strategies to decrease the incidence of work-related injuries. Few studies, however, have reported the efficacy of an on-site work injury prevention program by a physical therapist. In 1995, implementation of a work injury prevention program by a physical therapist to 50 housekeeping supervisors, 60 house persons and 340 guest room attendants at a large hotel began. This program included a detailed work risk analysis of the work environment, development of job descriptions, identification of injury-related problematic work situations, and implementation of a job specific supervisor-training program. Supervisor, house person and guest room attendant training was also conducted at the end of 1995 and the beginning of 1997. Data of injury reports in 1995, 1996, and 1997 were analyzed to determine the results of the program. There was a reduction in total injury claims, total medical expenses, total lost work time and total restricted duty time. These results demonstrate the cost effectiveness of implementing a work injury prevention program for housekeeping guest room attendants in the hotel industry. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  13. Key facilitators and best practices of hotel-style room service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sheehan-Smith, Lisa

    2006-04-01

    This qualitative study sought to identify the features, advantages, and disadvantages of hotel-style room service; the barriers to, and facilitators for, implementing the process; and "best practices." The study took place in four heterogeneous hospitals. Participants included hospital administrators, managers, and room-service employees. Data-collection methods included semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis. Common features of hotel-style room service were meal delivery within 30 to 45 minutes, a restaurant-style menu, procedures to feed ineligible patients, tray assembly on demand, scripting, and waitstaff uniforms for room-service employees. The major barrier to implementing room service was obtaining nursing support. The key facilitators were the hospital's service-oriented culture, using a multidisciplinary planning team, engaging nursing departments early in the planning stages, and intense customer-service training of room-service employees. The overwhelming advantage was patients' control over their food choices. The main disadvantage was cost. Initial best practices in hotel-style room service include: (a) taking a multidisciplinary team approach for developing and implementing the process, (b) customer-service training, (c) using a customer-driven menu, (d) wearing waitstaff uniforms, and (e) using carts with airpots for dispensing hot beverages.

  14. Norovirus outbreak associated with a hotel in the west of Ireland, 2006.

    PubMed

    Michel, A; Fitzgerald, R; Whyte, D; Fitzgerald, A; Beggan, E; O'Connell, N; Greally, T

    2007-07-01

    An outbreak of gastrointestinal disease (nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea) occurred among a party of wedding guests, staff and other guests in a hotel in the west of Ireland, in October 2006. Upon notification, a multi-disciplinary outbreak control team was convened to investigate and control the outbreak. In all, 98 people were ascertained ill. The median duration of illness was 48 hours. The attack rate ranged between 48 and 85%. The hotel voluntarily notified health authorities and co-operated fully with investigation and control measures. Strict prevention and control measures were instituted promptly, including air ventilation, enhanced hand hygiene, isolation of cases, temporary "cooked food only", temporary alternative accommodation and specialised cleaning. Three cases of norovirus infection were laboratory-confirmed. There was no evidence of food- or water-borne transmission. Clinical and epidemiological findings indicated person-to-person transmission of norovirus. This report highlights the potential for large social gatherings to facilitate the spread of viral gastroenteritis by person-to-person transmission and via contaminated environment. Effective community management of this outbreak appears to have prevented its having an impact on local acute hospital services. The authors conclude that in addition to the existing national guidelines on the management of outbreaks of norovirus in healthcare settings, agreed guidelines for the management of norovirus outbreaks in the hotel and tourism industry are needed in Ireland.

  15. Assessment of a fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging system using the Hotelling observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Amit K.; Joshi, Amit; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2006-08-01

    This study represents a first attempt to assess the detection capability of a fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging system as quantified by the Hotelling observer. The imaging system is simulated by the diffusion approximation of the time-dependent radiative transfer equation, which describes near infra-red (NIR) light propagation through clinically relevant tissue volumes. The random structures in the background are introduced using a lumpy-object model as a representation of anatomical structure as well as non-uniform distribution of disease markers. The systematic errors and noise associated with the actual experimental conditions are incorporated into the simulated boundary measurements to acquire imaging data sets. A large number of imaging data sets are considered in order to perform Hotelling observer studies. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of Hotelling observer (i) decreases as the strength of lumpy perturbations in the background increases, (ii) decreases as the target depth increases, and (iii) increases as excitation light leakage decreases, and reaches a maximum for filter optical density values of 5 or higher.

  16. What is a health worker? How spa therapists in a Norwegian health hotel understand their work.

    PubMed

    Anderssen, Jorid

    2016-01-01

    In Norway, as in many other wealthy countries, the number of health-related services that are being offered outside of the health sector is increasing. The present paper is based on qualitative interviews that were conducted with providers of health-related services at a commercial health hotel in Norway. The hotel is marketed as a health hotel - that is, a place for people with health problems and for those who need relaxation and an escape from their stressful everyday lives. The paper discusses whether the providers of this kind of service consider it a health service or if they distinguish and distance themselves from the health system. The interviews showed that they consider themselves health workers and refer to themselves as therapists. Even though they use therapy in the health sector as a model, they distinguish themselves from therapists in the health sector. They do not want to treat what they call sick people. Most of their therapy is directed toward cultivating or improving people's bodies and souls. These service providers think that they contribute to improving their guests' health by teaching them how to take care of themselves; enjoying oneself (for instance, by receiving skin treatment or a massage) is an important aspect of good health. According to the therapists, modern-day women, in particular, are often worn-out, and they deserve, and are entitled, to enjoy themselves. In these ways, the therapists use health to legitimize their services, and they challenge the current understanding of health.

  17. The locked psychiatric ward: hotel or detention camp for people with dual diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Terkelsen, Toril Borch; Larsen, Inger Beate

    2013-10-01

    The concepts of autonomy and liberty are established goals in mental health care; however, involuntary commitment is used towards people with mental health and substance abuse problems (dual diagnosis). To explore how patients and staff act in the context of involuntary commitment, how interactions are described and how they might be interpreted. Ethnographic methodology in a locked psychiatric ward in Norway. Two parallel images emerged: (a) The ward as a hotel. Several patients wanted a locked ward for rest and safety, even when admission was classified as involuntary. The staff was concerned about using the ward for real treatment of motivated people, rather than merely as a comfortable hotel for the unmotivated. (b) The ward as a detention camp. Other patients found involuntary commitment and restrictions in the ward as a kind of punishment, offending them as individuals. Contrary, the staff understood people with dual diagnoses more like a generalized group in need of their control and care. Patients and staff have different perceptions of involuntary commitment. Based on the patients' points of view, mental health care ought to be characterized by inclusion and recognition, treating patients as equal citizens comparable to guests in a hotel.

  18. A large common-source outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis in a hotel in Singapore, 2012.

    PubMed

    Raj, P; Tay, J; Ang, L W; Tien, W S; Thu, M; Lee, P; Pang, Q Y; Tang, Y L; Lee, K Y; Maurer-Stroh, S; Gunalan, V; Cutter, J; Goh, K T

    2017-02-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis affected 453 attendees (attack rate 28·5%) of six separate events held at a hotel in Singapore. Active case detection, case-control studies, hygiene inspections and microbial analysis of food, environmental and stool samples were conducted to determine the aetiology of the outbreak and the modes of transmission. The only commonality was the food, crockery and cutlery provided and/or handled by the hotel's Chinese banquet kitchen. Stool specimens from 34 cases and 15 food handlers were positive for norovirus genogroup II. The putative index case was one of eight norovirus-positive food handlers who had worked while they were symptomatic. Several food samples and remnants tested positive for Escherichia coli or high faecal coliforms, aerobic plate counts and/or total coliforms, indicating poor food hygiene. This large common-source outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis was caused by the consumption of contaminated food and/or contact with contaminated crockery or cutlery provided or handled by the hotel's Chinese banquet kitchen.

  19. Microbiological and parasitological investigation among food handlers in hotels in the Dead Sea area, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Dayem, Muna; Al Zou'bi, Renad; Hani, Rehan Bani; Amr, Zuhair Sami

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal parasitic and bacterial infections constitute a major health issue in developing countries. The present study investigates and assesses infection rates among food handlers with intestinal parasites and microbial agents in luxurious hotels in the Dead Sea area of Jordan. A total of 901 stool samples were collected from food handlers (35 females and 866 males) employed in four main hotels in the Dead Sea area. Fecal samples were examined microscopically for intestinal parasites. Standard culture and biochemical techniques were used for the isolation and identification of Salmonella and Shigella spp. in stool samples. Five species of protozoan (Blastocystis hominis, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica, and Endolimax nana), one helminth (Hymenolepis nana), and one cylindrical worm (Enterobius vermicularis) were recovered with an overall infection rate of 3.7%. G. intestinalis was the most prevalent parasitic infection with infection rate of 2.44%. All samples were negative for both Salmonella and Shigella. Findings highlight the important role of food handlers in the transmission of intestinal parasites to high-class clients accommodated in luxury hotels, and stress the urgent need for regular health and parasitologic examination of food handlers. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  1. miRBase: the microRNA sequence database.

    PubMed

    Griffiths-Jones, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The miRBase Sequence database is the primary repository for published microRNA (miRNA) sequence and annotation data. miRBase provides a user-friendly web interface for miRNA data, allowing the user to search using key words or sequences, trace links to the primary literature referencing the miRNA discoveries, analyze genomic coordinates and context, and mine relationships between miRNA sequences. miRBase also provides a confidential gene-naming service, assigning official miRNA names to novel genes before their publication. The methods outlined in this chapter describe these functions. miRBase is freely available to all at http://microrna.sanger.ac.uk/.

  2. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1-5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we have identified several mi

  3. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. Results The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1—5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. Conclusions The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we

  4. miRandb: a resource of online services for miRNA research.

    PubMed

    Aghaee-Bakhtiari, Seyed Hamid; Arefian, Ehsan; Lau, Pierre

    2017-01-03

    Recent discovery of thousands of small and large noncoding RNAs, in parallel to technical improvements enabling scientists to study the transcriptome in much higher depth, has resulted in massive data generation. This burst of information prompts the development of easily accessible resources for storage, retrieval and analysis of raw and processed data, and hundreds of Web-based tools dedicated to these tasks have been made available. However, the increasing number and diversity of bioinformatics tools, each covering a specific and specialized area, as well as their redundancies, represent potential sources of complication for end users. To overcome these issues, we are introducing an easy-to-follow classification of microRNA (miRNA)-related bioinformatics tools for biologists interested in studying this important class of small noncoding RNAs. We also developed our miRNA database miRNA algorithmic network database (miRandb) that is a meta-database, which presents a survey of > 180 Web-based miRNA databases. These include miRNA sequence, discovery, target prediction, target validation, expression and regulation, functions and their roles in diseases, interactions in cellular pathways and networks and deep sequencing. miRandb recapitulates the diverse possibilities and facilitates that access to the different categories of miRNA resources. Researchers can easily select the category of miRNA information and desired organism, in result eligible databases with their features are presented. This database introducing an easy-to-follow classification of available resources that can facilitate selection of appropriate resources for miRNA-related bioinformatics tools. Finally, we described current shortages and future necessities that assist researchers to use these tools easily. Our database is accessible at http://mirandb.ir. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. MI Gap Clearing Kicker Magnet Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The kicker system requirements were originally conceived for the NOvA project. NOvA is a neutrino experiment located in Minnesota. To achieve the desired neutrino flux several upgrades are required to the accelerator complex. The Recycler will be used as a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI). As the Recycler is the same size as the MI, it is possible to do a single turn fill ({approx}11 {micro}sec), minimizing the proton injection time in the MI cycle and maximizing the protons on target. The Recycler can then be filled with beam while the MI is ramping to extract beam to the target. To do this requires two new transfer lines. The existing Recycler injection line was designed for 10{pi} pbar beams, not the 20{pi} proton beams we anticipate from the Booster. The existing Recycler extraction line allows for proton injection through the MI, while we want direct injection from the Booster. These two lines will be decommissioned. The new injection line from the MI8 line into the Recycler will start at 848 and end with injection kickers at RR104. The new extraction line in the RR30 straight section will start with a new extraction kicker at RR232 and end with new MI injection kickers at MI308. Finally, to reduce beam loss activation in the enclosure, a new gap clearing kicker will be used to extract uncaptured beam created during the slip stack injection process down the existing dump line. It was suggested that the MI could benefit from this type of system immediately. This led to the early installation of the gap clearing system in the MI, followed by moving the system to Recycler during NOvA. The specifications also changed during this process. Initially the rise and fall time requirements were 38 ns and the field stability was {+-}1%. The 38 ns is based on having a gap of 2 RF buckets between injections. (There are 84 RF buckets that can be filled from the Booster for each injection, but 82 would be filled with beam. MI and Recycler contain 588 RF buckets

  6. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q value<0.05). The differential expression of 7 selected miRNAs was confirmed by real time PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P<0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC.

  7. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q value < 0.05). The differential expression of 7 selected miRNAs was confirmed by real time PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P < 0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC. PMID:24966896

  8. Polysome shift assay for direct measurement of miRNA inhibition by anti-miRNA drugs.

    PubMed

    Androsavich, John R; Sobczynski, Daniel J; Liu, Xueqing; Pandya, Shweta; Kaimal, Vivek; Owen, Tate; Liu, Kai; MacKenna, Deidre A; Chau, B Nelson

    2016-01-29

    Anti-miRNA (anti-miR) oligonucleotide drugs are being developed to inhibit overactive miRNAs linked to disease. To help facilitate the transition from concept to clinic, new research tools are required. Here we report a novel method--miRNA Polysome Shift Assay (miPSA)--for direct measurement of miRNA engagement by anti-miR, which is more robust than conventional pharmacodynamics using downstream target gene derepression. The method takes advantage of size differences between active and inhibited miRNA complexes. Active miRNAs bind target mRNAs in high molecular weight polysome complexes, while inhibited miRNAs are sterically blocked by anti-miRs from forming this interaction. These two states can be assessed by fractionating tissue or cell lysates using differential ultracentrifugation through sucrose gradients. Accordingly, anti-miR treatment causes a specific shift of cognate miRNA from heavy to light density fractions. The magnitude of this shift is dose-responsive and maintains a linear relationship with downstream target gene derepression while providing a substantially higher dynamic window for aiding drug discovery. In contrast, we found that the commonly used 'RT-interference' approach, which assumes that inhibited miRNA is undetectable by RT-qPCR, can yield unreliable results that poorly reflect the binding stoichiometry of anti-miR to miRNA. We also demonstrate that the miPSA has additional utility in assessing anti-miR cross-reactivity with miRNAs sharing similar seed sequences.

  9. 41. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; photo taken from furnace operator's booth. Looking south/southwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  10. 38. 8 sisters and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. 8 sisters and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal conveyor, blast stoves, "A" furnace, stoves, "B" furnace, stoves, "C" furnace, bottle cars. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  11. 50. Taken from highline; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Taken from high-line; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is main blast furnace gas line from "C" furnace dust catcher; levy, slag hauler, removing slag. Looking east - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  12. SOUTHERN END OF ASSEMBLY PLANT, LOOKING N ON SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN END OF ASSEMBLY PLANT, LOOKING N ON SECOND FLOOR, WHICH DID NOT EXIST ON DURING SHIP BUILDING DAYS. NOTE VEHICLE ELEVATOR. ABOVE AND TO THE LEFT IS SHIP BUILDING BALCONY. - B Building, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  13. 14. Battery of coke ovens (DX?) on right, pusher cars ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Battery of coke ovens (DX?) on right, pusher cars on right, hot gas pipes on left and overhead; pulverized coal bunker is tall, vertical structure on left. looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  14. 18. Photocopy of Photograph (Original held by Henry Ford Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of Photograph (Original held by Henry Ford Archives, Dearborn, Michigan, Detroit Edison Negative No. 3545, 5 October 1915) INTERIOR VIEW, MACHINE ROOM, LOOKING SOUTH - Detroit Edison Hart Substation, 11736 East Vernor, Detroit, MI

  15. 17. Photocopy of Photograph (Original held by Henry Ford Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of Photograph (Original held by Henry Ford Archives, Dearborn, Michigan, Detroit Edison Negative No. 2976, 8 March 1915) NORTH SIDE AND EAST FRONT, FROM HART, LOOKING SOUTH - Detroit Edison Hart Substation, 11736 East Vernor, Detroit, MI

  16. 2. Left to right: coke ovens, wharf with belt conveyor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Left to right: coke ovens, wharf with belt conveyor, coal bunker, coke stack, brick quencher, gas holder, view framed by bracing for overhead conveyor. Looking south/southeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  17. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  18. 4. From west side of boat slip; ore piles, unloaders, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. From west side of boat slip; ore piles, unloaders, blast furnaces, tube conveyors, ore conveyors, stock house, powerhouse. Looking north/northeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  19. 42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; operator takes temperature of iron in trough during pout. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  20. Differentially expressed miRNAs in trisomy 21 placentas.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, Iveta; Korabečná, Marie; Calda, Pavel; Břešťák, Miroslav; Pazourková, Eva; Pospíšilová, Šárka; Krkavcová, Miroslava; Novotná, Michaela; Hořínek, Aleš

    2016-08-01

    Molecular pathogenesis of Down syndrome (DS) is still incompletely understood. Epigenetic mechanisms, including miRNAs gene expression regulation, belong to potential influencing factors. The aims of this study were to compare miRNAs expressions in placentas with normal and trisomic karyotype and to associate differentially expressed miRNAs with concrete biological pathways. A total of 80 CVS samples - 41 with trisomy 21 and 39 with normal karyotype - were included in our study. Results obtained in the pilot study using real-time PCR technology and TaqMan Human miRNA Array Cards were subsequently validated on different samples using individual TaqMan miRNA Assays. Seven miRNAs were verified as upregulated in DS placentas (miR-99a, miR-542-5p, miR-10b, miR-125b, miR-615, let-7c and miR-654); three of these miRNAs are located on chromosome 21 (miR-99a, miR-125b and let-7c). Many essential biological processes, transcriptional regulation or apoptosis, were identified as being potentially influenced by altered miRNA levels. Moreover, miRNAs overexpressed in DS placenta apparently regulate genes involved in placenta development (GJA1, CDH11, EGF, ERVW-1, ERVFRD-1, LEP or INHA). These findings suggest the possible participation of miRNAs in Down syndrome impaired placentation and connected pregnancy pathologies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. miR-10b, miR-26a, miR-146a And miR-153 Expression in Triple Negative Vs Non Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Potential Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Fkih M'hamed, Insaf; Privat, Maud; Trimeche, Mounir; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Kenani, Abderraouf

    2017-01-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs composed of 18-25 nucleotides that can post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and have key regulatory roles in cancer, acting as both oncogenes and tumor suppressors. About 1000 genes in humans encode miRNAs, which account for approximately 3% of the human genome, and up to 30% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. The objective of this article is to evaluate the expression profile of four miRNAs previously implicated in triple negative breast cancer: miR-10b, miR-26a, miR-146a and miR-153, and to determine their possible interaction in triple negative and non triple negative breast cancer based on clinical outcome and the expression of BRCA1. 24 triple-negative and 13 non triple negative breast cancer cases, were studied by q-RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of the four studied miRNAs and the BRCA1 protein, respectively. We observed that the BRCA1 protein was absent in 62.5% of the triple negative cases. Besides, the miR-146a and miR-26a were over expressed in triple negative breast cancer. These two miRNAs, miR-10b and miR-153 were significantly associated to lymph node metastases occurrence in triple negative breast carcinoma. All the analyzed microRNAs were not associated with the expression of BRCA1 in our conditions. Our work provides evidence that miR-146a, miR-26a, miR-10b and miR-153 could be defined as biomarkers in triple negative breast cancer to predict lymph node metastases (LNM).

  2. Genetic variants in miR-146a, miR-149, miR-196a2, miR-499 and their influence on relative expression in lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Serena; Gelmini, Stefania; Pratesi, Nicola; Conti, Simona; Malentacchi, Francesca; Simi, Lisa; Pazzagli, Mario; Orlando, Claudio

    2011-09-09

    The presence of sequence variants in miRNA genes may influence their processing, expression and binding to target mRNAs. Since single miRNA can have a large number of potential mRNA targets, even minor variations in its expression can have influences on hundreds of putative mRNAs. Here, we evaluated 101 paired samples (cancer and normal tissues) from non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients to study the genotype distribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miR-146a (rs2910164 C-G), miR-149 (rs2292832 C-T), miR-196a2 (rs11614913 C-T) and miR-499 (rs3746444 G-A) and their influence on the expression of respective miRNAs. Relative expression of miR-146a, miR-149 and miR-499 were comparable in NSCLC and in paired control tissues. On the contrary, we clearly detected a significant increase (p<0.001) of miR-196a2 expression in NSCLC. In particular we found a significant association between miR-196a2 CC genotype and high expression, whereas TT geno-type showed a very low expression in comparison to both CT (p<0.005) and CC patients (p<0.01). We did not find any association between miR-149, miR-196a2 and miR-499 genotype and risk of NSCLC. Conversely, CG genotype of miR-146a appeared associated to an increased risk for NSCLC (p=0.042 and 1.77 OR). Our results seem to demonstrate that sequence variants of miR-196a2 can have an influence on its expression, while miR-146a can have a role in increasing the risk of NSCLC.

  3. Association of miR-196a-2 and miR-499 variants with ulcerative colitis and their correlation with expression of respective miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ranjha, Raju; Meena, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Abhiraman; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in regulating the gene expression of their target genes. SNP miR-196a-2 rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 are reported to have association with the risk and prognosis of multiple-types of inflammatory diseases including IBD. This study was conducted to show if any association of SNP miR-196a-2rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 exists with ulcerative colitis (UC) patients of north Indian population and how these polymorphisms modulate the expression profile of the respective miRNAs. Methods A total of 638 participants including 197 UC patients and 441 controls were included in this study. Polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-RFLP and the miRNA expression was measured using qRT-PCR. Genotypes and allele frequencies were calculated using SPSS 16 software. Results MiR-196a-2 rs11614913 (C>T) and miR-499 rs3746444 (T>C) were found to be associated with UC. TT genotype of miR-196a-2 rs11614913 (p = 0.03) was negatively associated with UC whereas the heterozygous TC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 (p = 0.003) was showing positive association with UC. Patients having a combination of both SNPs, developed disease at older age and they suffered from severe disease extent. Genotype that showed association with the disease also showed correlation with the changes in miRNA expression. Conclusion In this study we found miR-196a-2 rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 were associated with UC in north Indian population. We found the genotype that showed association with UC also altered the expression of respective miRNA in the patient harboring the genotype. There was correlation between associated genotype and altered miRNA expression. PMID:28301487

  4. Diagnostic Value of Circulating Extracellular miR-134, miR-185, and miR-22 Levels in Lung Adenocarcinoma-Associated Malignant Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon Mi; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lim, Sung-Nam; An, Jin Young; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Lee, Ki Man; Choe, Kang Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The accurate and timely diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (MPE) in lung cancer patients is important because MPE has a poor prognosis and is classified as stage IV disease. Molecular biomarkers for pleural effusion, such as circulating extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) isolated from pleural fluid, may help in the diagnosis of MPE. The present study examined whether miRNAs that are deregulated in lung cancer (miR-134, miR-185, and miR-22) can serve as diagnostic markers for lung adenocarcinoma-associated MPE (LA-MPE). Materials and Methods Real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the expression of the three miRNAs in samples from 87 patients with pleural effusion comprising 45 LA-MPEs and 42 benign pleural effusions (BPEs). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was then used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of each of the three miRNAs and compare it with that of the common tumor marker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Results The expression of all three miRNAs was significantly lower in LA-MPE than in BPE (p <0.001). The AUCs for miR-134, miR-185, miR-22, and CEA were 0.721, 0.882, 0.832, and 0.898, respectively. Combining CEA with the three miRNAs increased the diagnostic performance, yielding an AUC of 0.942 (95% confidence interval, 0.864 to 0.982), with a sensitivity of 91.9% and a specificity of 92.5%. Conclusion The present study suggests that the expression levels of circulating extracellular miR-134, miR-185, and miR-22 in patients with pleural effusion may have diagnostic value when differentiating between LA-MPE and BPE. PMID:24851110

  5. The regulation roles of miR-125b, miR-221 and miR-27b in porcine Salmonella infection signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Min; Gao, Weihua; Yang, Jun; Liang, Xiongyan; Luo, Jingbo; Huang, Tinghua

    2016-08-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNA molecules typically 18-22 nucleotides long that can suppress the expression of their target genes. Several laboratories have attempted to identify miRNAs from the pig that are involved in Salmonella infection. These bioinformatics strategies using the newly available genomic sequence are generally successful. Here, we report an in silico identification of miRNAs in pig focusing on the Salmonella infection pathway, and further investigated the differential expression of those miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR during pre- and post-natal stage of Salmonella inoculation from the peripheral blood of commercially breed pigs. We identified 29 miRNAs that have predicted targets in the Salmonella infection pathway and nine of them were not yet described in pig. In addition, the expression of nine selected miRNAs was validated in the peripheral blood by northern blotting. Through expression analyses, differences were found between pre- and post-natal stages of Salmonella inoculation for miR-221, miR-125b and miR-27b-all of them were suppressed 2 days after Salmonella inoculation. The predicted targets of those three miRNAs were validated by luciferase reporter assays. We show that FOS is a direct target of miR-221, miR-125b can suppress MAPK14, and miR-27b can target IFNG. These findings will be helpful in understanding the function and processing of these miRNAs in Salmonella infection. The miRNA differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of commercial breed pigs suggest that it can be used as genetic markers for salmonella infection resistance in pigs.

  6. The regulation roles of miR-125b, miR-221 and miR-27b in porcine Salmonella infection signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Min; Gao, Weihua; Yang, Jun; Liang, Xiongyan; Luo, Jingbo; Huang, Tinghua

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNA molecules typically 18–22 nucleotides long that can suppress the expression of their target genes. Several laboratories have attempted to identify miRNAs from the pig that are involved in Salmonella infection. These bioinformatics strategies using the newly available genomic sequence are generally successful. Here, we report an in silico identification of miRNAs in pig focusing on the Salmonella infection pathway, and further investigated the differential expression of those miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR during pre- and post-natal stage of Salmonella inoculation from the peripheral blood of commercially breed pigs. We identified 29 miRNAs that have predicted targets in the Salmonella infection pathway and nine of them were not yet described in pig. In addition, the expression of nine selected miRNAs was validated in the peripheral blood by northern blotting. Through expression analyses, differences were found between pre- and post-natal stages of Salmonella inoculation for miR-221, miR-125b and miR-27b—all of them were suppressed 2 days after Salmonella inoculation. The predicted targets of those three miRNAs were validated by luciferase reporter assays. We show that FOS is a direct target of miR-221, miR-125b can suppress MAPK14, and miR-27b can target IFNG. These findings will be helpful in understanding the function and processing of these miRNAs in Salmonella infection. The miRNA differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of commercial breed pigs suggest that it can be used as genetic markers for salmonella infection resistance in pigs. PMID:27474500

  7. Involvement of miRNAs in equine follicle development.

    PubMed

    Schauer, S N; Sontakke, S D; Watson, E D; Esteves, C L; Donadeu, F X

    2013-09-01

    Previous evidence from in vitro studies suggests specific roles for a subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-23a, miR-145, miR-503, miR-224, miR-383, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212, in regulating ovarian follicle development. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the levels of these miRNAs in relation to follicle selection, maturation, and ovulation in the monovular equine ovary. In Experiment 1, follicular fluid was aspirated during ovulatory cycles from the dominant (DO) and largest subordinate (S) follicles of an ovulatory wave and the dominant (DA) follicle of a mid-cycle anovulatory wave (n=6 mares). Follicular fluid levels of progesterone and estradiol were lower (P<0.01) in S follicles than in DO follicles, whereas mean levels of IGF1 were lower (P<0.01) in S and DA follicles than in DO follicles. Relative to DO and DA follicles, S follicles had higher (P≤0.01) follicular fluid levels of miR-145 and miR-378. In Experiment 2, follicular fluid and granulosa cells were aspirated from dominant follicles before (DO) and 24 h after (L) administration of an ovulatory dose of hCG (n=5 mares/group). Relative to DO follicles, L follicles had higher follicular fluid levels of progesterone (P=0.05) and lower granulosa cell levels of CYP19A1 and LHCGR (P<0.005). Levels of miR-21, miR-132, miR-212, and miR-224 were increased (P<0.05) in L follicles; this was associated with reduced expression of the putative miRNA targets, PTEN, RASA1, and SMAD4. These novel results may indicate a physiological involvement of miR-21, miR-145, miR-224, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212 in the regulation of cell survival, steroidogenesis, and differentiation during follicle selection and ovulation in the monovular ovary.

  8. Fluoxetine Increases the Expression of miR-572 and miR-663a in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mundalil Vasu, Mahesh; Anitha, Ayyappan; Takahashi, Taro; Thanseem, Ismail; Iwata, Keiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on the developed neurons in the adult brain. In contrast, the drug may be deleterious to immature or undifferentiated neural cells, although the mechanism is unclear. Recent investigations have suggested that microRNAs (miRNA) may be critical for effectiveness of psychotropic drugs including SSRI. We investigated whether fluoxetine could modulate expressions of neurologically relevant miRNAs in two neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Initial screening results revealed that three (miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) and four (miR-320a, miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) miRNAs were up-regulated in SK-N-SH cells and SH-SY5Y cells, respectively, after 24 hours treatment of fluoxetine (1–25 μM). Cell viability was reduced according to the dose of fluoxetine. The upregulation of miR-572 and miR-663a was consistent in both the SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH cells, confirmed by a larger scale culture condition. Our data is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine could increase the expression of miRNAs in undifferentiated neural cells, and that putative target genes of those miRNAs have been shown to be involved in fundamental neurodevelopmental processes. PMID:27716787

  9. Use of Mature miRNA Strand Selection in miRNAs Families in Cervical Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Granados-López, Angelica Judith; Ruiz-Carrillo, José Luis; Servín-González, Luis Steven; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Luis; Reyes-Estrada, Claudia Araceli; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rosalinda; López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-02-14

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as a cancer hallmark, nevertheless miRNA function and expression does not always correlate in patients tissues and cell lines studies. In addition to this issue, miRNA strand usage conduces to increased cell signaling pathways modulation diversifying cellular processes regulation. In cervical cancer, 20 miRNA families are involved in carcinogenesis induction and development to this moment. These families have 5p and 3p strands with different nucleotide (nt) chain sizes. In general, mature 5p strands are larger: two miRNAs of 24 nt, 24 miRNAs of 23 nt, 35 miRNAs of 22 nt and three miRNAs of 21 nt. On the other hand, the 3p strands lengths observed are: seven miRNAs of 23 nt, 50 miRNAs of 22 nt, six miRNAs of 21 nt and four miRNAs of 20 nt. Based on the analysis of the 20 miRNA families associated with cervical cancer, 67 3p strands and 65 5p strands are selected suggesting selectivity and specificity mechanisms regulating cell processes like proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, metabolism and Warburg effect. The insight reviewed here could be used in the miRNA based therapy, diagnosis and prognosis approaches.

  10. Use of Mature miRNA Strand Selection in miRNAs Families in Cervical Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Granados-López, Angelica Judith; Ruiz-Carrillo, José Luis; Servín-González, Luis Steven; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Luis; Reyes-Estrada, Claudia Araceli; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rosalinda; López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as a cancer hallmark, nevertheless miRNA function and expression does not always correlate in patients tissues and cell lines studies. In addition to this issue, miRNA strand usage conduces to increased cell signaling pathways modulation diversifying cellular processes regulation. In cervical cancer, 20 miRNA families are involved in carcinogenesis induction and development to this moment. These families have 5p and 3p strands with different nucleotide (nt) chain sizes. In general, mature 5p strands are larger: two miRNAs of 24 nt, 24 miRNAs of 23 nt, 35 miRNAs of 22 nt and three miRNAs of 21 nt. On the other hand, the 3p strands lengths observed are: seven miRNAs of 23 nt, 50 miRNAs of 22 nt, six miRNAs of 21 nt and four miRNAs of 20 nt. Based on the analysis of the 20 miRNA families associated with cervical cancer, 67 3p strands and 65 5p strands are selected suggesting selectivity and specificity mechanisms regulating cell processes like proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, metabolism and Warburg effect. The insight reviewed here could be used in the miRNA based therapy, diagnosis and prognosis approaches. PMID:28216603

  11. Identification of miR414 and expression analysis of conserved miRNAs from Stevia rebaudiana.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) usually contain 19-24 nucleotides and have been identified as important eukaryotic gene regulators. Applications of various computational approaches have simplified the task by predicting miRNAs from available sequence data sources. In this study, we identified a conserved miR414 from a computational analysis of EST sequence data available from Stevia rebaudiana. In addition, we also identified six conserved miRNAs namely miR169, miR319, miR414, miR164, miR167 and miR398 using stem-loop RT-PCR analysis. Hence, miR414 was commonly identified using both methods. The expression analysis of these miRNAs documented their roles in growth and development of Stevia. Furthermore, the detected miRNAs were found to target genes involved in plant growth, development, metabolism and signal transduction. This is the first study reporting these conserved miRNAs and their expression in Stevia.

  12. Long Noncoding RNA miR210HG Sponges miR-503 to Facilitate Osteosarcoma Cell Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Wu, Quan-Min; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Cheng-Qiang

    2017-10-03

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been illustrated to function as important regulator in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. However, roles of lncRNA miR210HG (miR210 host gene) in osteosarcoma remain unclear. In this study, miR210HG expression level was significantly upregulated in 55 cases of osteosarcoma tissue samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Besides, the aberrantly enhanced miR210HG expression predicted poor prognosis and lower survival rate. In vitro, miR210HG knockdown suppressed the osteosarcoma cell proliferation, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression. In vivo, miR210HG silencing decreased the tumor growth. MiR-503 was verified to be the target miRNA of miR210HG using bioinformatics online program and luciferase assay. Furthermore, miR-503 could reverse the role of miR210HG on osteosarcoma cells. In conclusion, our study indicates that miR210HG sponges miR-503 to facilitate osteosarcoma cell invasion and metastasis, revealing the oncogenic role of miR210HG on osteosarcoma cells.

  13. Mechanosensitive miRNAs and Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihao; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Chao; Chen, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli are required for the maintenance of skeletal integrity and bone mass. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that multiple regulators (e.g., hormone, cytoskeleton proteins and signaling pathways) are involved in the mechanical stimuli modulating the activities of osteogenic cells and the process of bone formation. Significantly, recent studies have showed that several microRNAs (miRNAs) were sensitive to various mechanical stimuli and played a crucial role in osteogenic differentiation and bone formation. However, the functional roles and further mechanisms of mechanosensitive miRNAs in bone formation are not yet completely understood. This review highlights the roles of mechanosensitive miRNAs in osteogenic differentiation and bone formation and underlines their potential therapeutic application for bone loss induced by the altering of mechanical stimuli. PMID:28767056

  14. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-09-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity.

  15. Individual- and Organization-Level Work-to-Family Spillover Are Uniquely Associated with Hotel Managers' Work Exhaustion and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomi; Davis, Kelly D; Neuendorf, Claudia; Grandey, Alicia; Lam, Chun Bun; Almeida, David M

    2016-01-01

    Building on the Conservation of Resources theory, this paper examined the unique and interactive associations of negative and positive work-to-family spillover (NWFS and PWFS, respectively) at the individual and organizational level with hotel managers' work exhaustion and satisfaction, beyond job demands and supervisors' leadership style. Guided by the levels of analysis framework, we first tested the unique associations of NWFS and PWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction at the individual level (571 hotel managers), beyond job demands supervisors' leadership style. Second, using multilevel modeling, we tested the climate effects of NWFS and PWFS on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction aggregated at the organizational level (41 hotels). Third, we examined the role of the organizational climate of PWFS in the associations of individual-level NWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Beyond the effects of psychological job demands and supervisor's transformational leadership, at the individual level, hotel managers who experienced higher NWFS than other managers reported more exhaustion and lower job satisfaction, whereas those with higher PWFS reported less exhaustion and higher satisfaction. At the organizational level, working in hotels where the average level of NWFS was higher than other hotels was associated with feeling more exhaustion of the individual members; working in hotels with higher PWFS was associated with feeling less exhaustion. The negative link between individual-level NWFS and job satisfaction was buffered when organization-level PWFS was higher, compared to when it was lower. This study moves beyond a focus on traditional job characteristics, toward considering individual and organizational experiences in the work-family interface as unique predictors of work exhaustion and satisfaction. Strengths of the study include illuminating organizational work-family climate effects such that coworkers' shared experiences of

  16. Antagonists of the miRNA-Argonaute 2 Protein Complex: Anti-miR-AGOs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marco F; Korb, Oliver; Abell, Chris

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as high-value drug targets. A widely applied strategy in miRNA inhibition is the use of antisense agents. However, it has been shown that oligonucleotides are poorly cell permeable because of their complex chemical structure and due to their negatively charged backbone. Consequently, the general application of oligonucleotides in therapy is limited. Since miRNAs' functions are executed exclusively by the Argonaute 2 protein, we therefore describe a protocol for the design of a novel miRNA inhibitor class: antagonists of the miRNA-Argonaute 2 protein complex, so-called anti-miR-AGOs, that not only block the crucial binding site of the target miRNA but also bind to the protein's active site. Due to their lower molecular weight and, thus, more drug-like chemical structure, the novel inhibitor class may show better pharmacokinetic properties than reported oligonucleotide inhibitors, enabling them for potential therapeutic use.

  17. Dynamic expression of miR-132, miR-212, and miR-146 in the brain of different hosts infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liping; Liao, Qi; Chen, Xiaoguang; Xu, Lian; Zeng, Xin; Lv, Zhiyue; Sun, Xi; Zhen, Huanqin; Wu, Zhongdao

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of regulatory molecules involved in many physiological processes, including the inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) and neurological disorders. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the major cause of human infectious eosinophilic meningitis and can induce CNS injury. In the present study, we investigated the expression of miRNAs involved in neuronal functions such as miR-132-3p/212-3p, and miR-146a-5p, inflammation-related miRNA, in the modulation of inflammation of CNS of mice and rats induced by A. cantonensis. The functions of differentially expressed miRNAs were analyzed through bioinformatics methods, and the expression of chosen target genes were investigated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that miR-146a-5p upregulated in the brain of rats after 21 days; A. cantonensis infection and the expression of miR-132-3p and miR-146a-5p upregulated in the brain of mice model infected by A. cantonensis. The expression of the target genes of mmu-miR-146a-5p such as Irak1 and Traf6 downregulated in 14 days and 21 days after A. cantonensis infection. Our results supply more information about the involvement of the miRNAs in the regulation of inflammation of CNS induced by A. cantonensis.

  18. Dysregulation of miR-499, miR-708 and miR-1908 during a depression episode in bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Banach, Ewa; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Pawlak, Joanna; Kapelski, Pawel; Szczepankiewicz, Aleksandra; Rajewska-Rager, Aleksandra; Slopien, Agnieszka; Skibinska, Maria; Czerski, Piotr; Hauser, Joanna

    2017-07-27

    Affective disorders include unipolar disorder (UP) (depression episodes) and bipolar disorder (BP) (depression and mania episodes). Currently, no biological markers are known that can help to differentiate these disorders. However, recent studies have suggested that psychiatric disorders can be connected with small, non-coding RNA, like microRNA. The objective of this study was to analyse the expression level of three microRNAs (miR-499, miR-708, miR-1908) in bipolar and unipolar disorder during depression episodes and after entering the remission state. The group consisted of adult women only, 17 UP (age: 50±17) and 15 BP (age: 33±13) patients. The expression level of miRNAs was investigated by RT-qPCR with the TaqMan assay. Our study has shown a lower expression level of miR-499 (p=0.008), miR-708 (p=0.02) and miR-1908 (p=0.004) in depression episodes of the bipolar disorder patients in comparison to remission state. We have not found similar differences in unipolar disorder and between those types in acute phase of depression and during remission. Obtained results indicate that miRNAs: miR-499, miR-708 and miR-1908 are the most promising candidates for biomarkers of depression episodes of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of miR-34 Family in Neuronal Development.

    PubMed

    Jauhari, Abhishek; Singh, Tanisha; Singh, Parul; Parmar, Devendra; Yadav, Sanjay

    2017-01-13

    Differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC's) to mature and functional neurons requires coordinated expression of mRNA, microRNAs (miRNAs) and regulatory proteins. Our earlier unbiased miRNA profiling studies have identified miR-200, miR-34 and miR-221/222 as maximally up-regulated miRNA families in differentiating PC12 cells and demonstrated the capability of miR-200 family in inducing neuronal differentiation (J. Neurochem, 2015, 133, 640-652). In present study, we have investigated role of miR-34 family in neuronal differentiation and identified P53 as mediator of nerve growth factor (NGF) induced miR-34a expression in differentiating PC12 cells. Our studies have shown that NGF induced miR-34a, arrests proliferating PC12 cells to G1 phase, which is pre-requisite for neuronal differentiation. Our studies have also shown that increased expression of miR-34a controls the P53 level in differentiated PC12 cells in feedback inhibition manner, which probably prevents differentiated cells from P53 induced apoptosis. Expression profiling of miR-34 family in different neuronal, non-neuronal and developing cells have identified differentiated and aged brain cells as richest source of miR-34, which also indicates that higher expression of miR-34 family helps in maintaining the mature neurons in non-proliferative stage. In conclusion, our studies have shown that miR-34 is brain enriched miRNA family, which up-regulates with neuronal maturation and brain ageing and co-operative regulation of P53 and miR-34a helps in neuronal differentiation by arresting cells in G1 phase.

  20. miRNA expression during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cárdenas, Flor de Fátima; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Gutiérrez-Ramos, Ximena; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are involved in the control of many developmental processes, including fruit development. The increasing amount of information on miRNAs, on their expression, abundance, and conservation between various species, provides a new opportunity to study the role of miRNAs in non-model plant species. In this work, we used a combination of Northern blot and tissue print hybridization analysis to identify conserved miRNAs expressed during prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) fruit development. Comparative profiling detected the expression of 34 miRNAs, which were clustered in three different groups that were associated with the different phases of fruit development. Variation in the level of miRNA expression was observed. Gradual expression increase of several miRNAs was observed during fruit development, including miR164. miR164 was selected for stem-loop RT-PCR and for a detailed spatial-temporal expression analysis. At early floral stages, miR164 was mainly localized in meristematic tissues, boundaries and fusion zones, while it was more homogenously expressed in fruit tissues. Our results provide the first evidence of miRNA expression in the prickly pear cactus and provide the basis for future research on miRNAs in Opuntia. Moreover, our analyses suggest that miR164 plays different roles during prickly pear cactus fruit development.