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Sample records for hotel dearborn mi

  1. Dearborn: Modern Standard Arabic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a roundup of the Arabic language instruction offered in the Dearborn, Michigan, school district. Only one of the district's 22 elementary schools--Becker--offers Arabic. Pupils receive at least two 40 minute periods of Arabic a week. The school gave up a two-way immersion program, in which students were taught half their…

  2. Dearborn 1981-82 Achievement Test Scores (Fifth Annual Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearborn Public Schools, MI.

    The purpose of the fifth annual Dearborn Achievement Test Score report is to summarize and to help interpret the test results so that Dearborn citizens and educators will have a better understanding of the educational achievements of Dearborn students. The District-wide Testing Program assesses reading readiness, scholastic aptitude, academic…

  3. Chicago's Dearborn Observatory: a study in survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartky, Ian R.

    2000-12-01

    The Dearborn Observatory, located on the Old University of Chicago campus from 1863 until 1888, was America's most promising astronomical facility when it was founded. Established by the Chicago Astronomical Society and directed by one of the country's most gifted astronomers, it boasted the largest telescope in the world and virtually unlimited operating funds. The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 destroyed its funding and demolished its research programme. Only via the sale of time signals and the heroic efforts of two amateur astronomers did the Dearborn Observatory survive.

  4. Source Apportionment of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter in Dearborn, Michigan, using Hourly Resolved PM Chemical Composition Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    High time-resolution aerosol sampling was conducted for one month during July–August 2007 in Dearborn, MI, a non-attainment area for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Measurements of more than 30 PM2.5 species were made using a suite o...

  5. Voc Ed on the Marquees in Dearborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurmas, Daniel A.

    1977-01-01

    The author describes a very successful campaign to publicize National Vocational Education Week 1977 in Dearborn, Michigan through messages on business and industry marquees, posters in store windows, newspaper stories and pictures, and radio and television announcements, including a calendar of promotion events for advance planning. (MF)

  6. Dearborn Forms Elementary Arabic Language Program Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabrizi, Shereen

    2009-01-01

    The Dearborn Public Schools, with 18,300 students, is located in the Detroit urban area with the largest concentration of Arabic-speaking people in the United States. In order to prepare the students for the 21st century skills and global awareness and in response to parents' requests, the author in collaboration with the school principal and…

  7. 77 FR 37326 - Safety Zone; Grand Hotel 125th Anniversary Fireworks Celebration, Mackinaw Island, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grand Hotel 125th Anniversary Fireworks... launched from a point on Lake Huron to commemorate the Grand Hotel's 125th anniversary. The Captain of...

  8. 75 FR 3252 - Ford Motor Company, Dearborn Truck Plant, Dearborn, MI; Notice of Negative Determination on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... October 20, 2009 (74 FR 53766). The investigation resulted in a negative determination based on the... Negative Determination on Reconsideration By application dated September 18, 2009, a petitioner requested administrative reconsideration of the Department's negative determination regarding eligibility to apply...

  9. Sources of fine urban particulate matter in Detroit, MI.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, Amy E; Hopke, Philip K; Kim, Eugene

    2007-10-01

    Data from the speciation trends network (STN) was used to evaluate the amount and temporal patterns of particulate matter originating from local industrial sources and long-range transport at two sites in Detroit, MI: Allen Park, MI, southwest of both Detroit and the areas of heavy industrial activity; Dearborn, MI, located on the south side of Detroit near the most heavily industrialized region. Using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and comparing source contributions at Allen Park to those in Dearborn, contributions made by local industrial sources (power plants, coke refineries, iron smelting, waste incineration), local area sources (automobile and diesel truck) and long range sources of PM(2.5) can be distinguished in greater Detroit. Overall, the mean mass concentration measured at Dearborn was 19% higher than that measured at Allen Park. The mass at Allen Park was apportioned as: secondary sulfate 31%, secondary nitrate 28%, soil 8%, mixed aged sea and road salts 4%, gasoline 15%, diesel 4%, and biomass burning 3%. At Dearborn the mass was apportioned as: secondary sulfate 25%, secondary nitrate 20%, soil 12%, mixed aged sea and road salts 4%, gasoline 20%, diesel 8%, iron and steel, 5%, and mixed industrial 7%. The impact of the iron and steel, soil, and mixed aged sea and road salt was much higher at the Dearborn site than at the Allen Park site, suggesting that close proximity to a local industrial complex has a direct negative impact on local air quality.

  10. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: GRACE DEARBORN INC.'S DARAMEND BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil's ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to microorganisms and...

  11. The UM-Dearborn Observatory: Variable-object Research from an Urban Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, Elisabeth; Clarkson, William I.; Rasmussen, Eric J; Bord, Donald J.; Dage, Kristen; Matzke, David; Swift, Carrie

    2014-06-01

    Since its construction in 2007, the UM-Dearborn Observatory has provided a valuable educational tool both for students at UM-Dearborn and our neighbor-institution the Henry Ford Community College, and for the public at-large. We have recently (Jan 2014) added a systematic long-term research program with our 0.4m main telescope, to photometrically monitor a number of bright variable objects, including X-ray binaries and chemically-peculiar metal-poor stars over long timescales. We ultimately envision assembling a photometric database of (at least) four-color photometry over years-decades (i.e., many hundreds of orbital timescales for close binaries), with the preponderance of datapoints taken by undergraduates. To conduct this program, we have had to overcome a number of site challenges, the solutions of which will be useful to many programs using small telescopes at urban sites. The 0.4m telescope lies on a shared building within UM-Dearborn's main Fairlane campus - i.e., is about 20 meters above sea level, near several sources of water vapor (including an active steam vent less than 15 meters away), experiences significant mechanical vibrations from other building functions, and lies about 6 miles from central Detroit, well within the Detroit-Ann Arbor conurbation. Observing conditions are thus highly variable, with 5 arcsecond seeing typical and significant transparency variations observed even during a clear night. Nevertheless, we are now able to make scientifically useful observations in a semi-automatic way, to which our chosen scientific niche is well-suited. We present here our solutions to these challenges, along with initial results from our ongoing monitoring program.

  12. 57. VIEW LOOKING NORTH OF DENNIS HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. VIEW LOOKING NORTH OF DENNIS HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL IS PARTLY VISABLE TO THE RIGHT; SHELBOURNE HOTEL IS PARTLY VISABLE TO THE LEFT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  13. 54. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  14. 66. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL. BLENHEIM HOTEL IS PARTIALLY VIASBLE TO THE LEFT. CLARIDGE HOTEL IS VISABLE TO THE RIGHT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  15. 41. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT). CLARIDGE HOTEL IS PARTLY VISABLE TO THE RIGHT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  16. Test methods and design allowables for fibrous composites; Proceedings of the Symposium, Dearborn, MI, October 2, 3, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Papers are presented on special test methods for fibrous composites for quantifying design material properties. Studies are divided into four major areas: (1) new and special test methods, including those for transverse tensile strength, shear modulus, longitudinal compression, and impact resistance; (2) special test methods and analysis, including off-axes and angle-plied tension and compression, fracture and fatigue, and biaxial stress states; (3) design allowables, describing procedures for setting and selecting design allowables in general, and also for composite aircraft structures, graphite/polyimide bolted joints, cost-effective mechanical property characterization, statistical considerations, intraply hybrids, and compression and fatigue; (4) design allowables for special applications, describing procedures for buckling of cylindrical components, proof load of pressure vessels, strength of composite joints, and environmental effects and creep. The papers provide considerable information for test methods and for composite analysis of these methods, as well as tests and procedures for establishing design allowables.

  17. The Infinite Hotel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a historical context for the debate between Georg Cantor and Leopold Kronecker regarding the cardinality of different infinities and incorporates the short story "Welcome to the Hotel Infinity," which uses the analogy of a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to help explain this concept. Wanko makes use of this history and…

  18. Spatial Analysis and Land Use Regression of VOCs and NO2 from School-Based Urban Air Monitoring in Detroit-Dearborn, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive ambient air sampling for nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and volatioe organic compounds (VOCs) was conducted at 25 schools and two compliance sites in Detroit and Dearborne, Michigan. Geographic Information System (GIS) data were calculated at each of 116 schools. The ...

  19. Integrating Title I and Title VII: The Evolving Model of Dearborn Public Schools, Michigan. NCBE Program Information Guide Series No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arraf, Shereen; And Others

    This report offers insights on the experiences and techniques used in the Dearborn Public Schools effort to integrate Title VII and Chapter 1 programs prior to their reauthorization. The school system is located near metropolitan Detroit, Michigan, and has over 14,500 students representing 24 languages, many from the Middle East, Romania, and…

  20. Crime wave in hotels.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    A National Development and Research Institutes study of New York's residential hotels, housing 400 AIDS patients, found rampant criminal activity. The 113-page report, commissioned by Mayor Guiliani, found prostitution, loan sharking, extortion, and theft to be commonplace, some of it perpetrated by hotel managers and employees. The unsafe conditions force some residents to miss medical treatments or drug rehabilitation because they are afraid to leave their rooms.

  1. 1. EAST FACADE OF THE MARCUS DALY HOTEL. THE HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAST FACADE OF THE MARCUS DALY HOTEL. THE HOTEL WAS CONSTRUCTED IN A U SHAPE, WITH THE ENTRANCE ARCADE FORMING THE FORTH SIDE OF THE RECTANGLE - Anaconda Historic District, Marcus Daly Hotel, 200-208 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  2. 52. VIEW LOOKING EAST WITH THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW LOOKING EAST WITH THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND THE DENNIS HI=OTEL (TOP TO BOTTOM) IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  3. Cogeneration for resort hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    Resort Hotels should be considered for application of co-generation to take advantage of higher thermal efficiency and consequent energy cost avoidance. Modern resort hotels require comfort and reliability from mechanical and electrical systems on an around the clock basis. Load profiling reveals simultaneous process heating and electricity use requirements that aid in the selection and sizing of co-generation equipment. Resort Hotel needs include electrical loads for lighting, fan motors, elevators, escalators and receptacle uses. Process heat demands arise from kitchen, servery, banquet, restaurant, laundry, and bakery functions. Once the loads requiring service have been quantified and realigned (shifted) to maximize simultaneous demands the engineering task of co-generation application becomes one of economics. National legislation is now in place to foster the use of co-generating central utility plants. Serving utility companies are now by law required to buy back excess energy during periods of reduced hotel demands. Resort Hotel loads, converted into electricity and heat demands are tabulated in terms of savings (positive cash flow) or costs (negative cash flows). Cash flow tabulations expressed in graphs are included. The graphs show the approximate simple payback on initial costs of co-generation systems based on varying electricity charges.

  4. Quantum Hilbert Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoček, Václav; Miatto, Filippo M.; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Oi, Daniel K. L.; Boyd, Robert W.; Jeffers, John

    2015-10-01

    In 1924 David Hilbert conceived a paradoxical tale involving a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to illustrate some aspects of the mathematical notion of "infinity." In continuous-variable quantum mechanics we routinely make use of infinite state spaces: here we show that such a theoretical apparatus can accommodate an analog of Hilbert's hotel paradox. We devise a protocol that, mimicking what happens to the guests of the hotel, maps the amplitudes of an infinite eigenbasis to twice their original quantum number in a coherent and deterministic manner, producing infinitely many unoccupied levels in the process. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by experimentally realizing it on the orbital angular momentum of a paraxial field. This new non-Gaussian operation may be exploited, for example, for enhancing the sensitivity of NOON states, for increasing the capacity of a channel, or for multiplexing multiple channels into a single one.

  5. Quantum Hilbert Hotel.

    PubMed

    Potoček, Václav; Miatto, Filippo M; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; Liapis, Andreas C; Oi, Daniel K L; Boyd, Robert W; Jeffers, John

    2015-10-16

    In 1924 David Hilbert conceived a paradoxical tale involving a hotel with an infinite number of rooms to illustrate some aspects of the mathematical notion of "infinity." In continuous-variable quantum mechanics we routinely make use of infinite state spaces: here we show that such a theoretical apparatus can accommodate an analog of Hilbert's hotel paradox. We devise a protocol that, mimicking what happens to the guests of the hotel, maps the amplitudes of an infinite eigenbasis to twice their original quantum number in a coherent and deterministic manner, producing infinitely many unoccupied levels in the process. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by experimentally realizing it on the orbital angular momentum of a paraxial field. This new non-Gaussian operation may be exploited, for example, for enhancing the sensitivity of NOON states, for increasing the capacity of a channel, or for multiplexing multiple channels into a single one. PMID:26550858

  6. [Deaths in hotels].

    PubMed

    Risse, Manfred; Weilbächer, Nadine; Birngruber, Christoph; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2010-01-01

    There are no verified statistics about deaths occurring in hotels, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. A recent case induced us to conduct a systematic search for deaths in hotels in the autopsy reports of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen for the period from 1968 to 2009. This search yielded 22 evaluable cases in which persons had been found dead or had died in hotels. Data evaluated in the study were sex and age of the deceased, reason for the stay in the hotel and cause of death. Among the deaths, 18 were males and 4 females and the average age was 41 and 40 years respectively. 6 of the male guests had died from a natural and 10 from a non-natural cause. In the remaining two cases, the cause of death could not be determined, but as there was no evidence that another party had been involved, the cases were not further investigated. Of the 4 female guests, 3 had died of a natural cause; in one case, the cause of death remained unclear even after morphological and toxicological investigations. Surprisingly, a third of the men were found to be temporarily living in hotels due to social circumstances. This was not true for any of the women. Our retrospective analysis is based on a comparatively small number of deaths in what were mostly hotels in small to medium-sized towns. Interestingly, the gender ratio of 18:4 for deceased men and women was significantly higher than the usual gender ratio of 2:1 found for forensic autopsies. To be able to draw further conclusions, a greater number of cases would have to be analysed, for example by recruiting additional case files from other institutes of legal medicine. This would also open up the option of investigating possible regional variations.

  7. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different...

  8. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different...

  9. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different...

  10. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different...

  11. 27 CFR 31.82 - Hotels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hotels. 31.82 Section 31... Same Premises § 31.82 Hotels. The proprietor of a hotel who conducts the sale of liquors throughout the hotel premises is only required to register under this part for one place. For example, different...

  12. Agency-Hired Hotel Housekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Sanon, Marie-Anne V.

    2014-01-01

    Hotel housekeepers experience unique workplace hazards and characteristics that increase their risks for poor health outcomes. Today’s agency-hiring practices may further marginalize hotel housekeepers and negatively impact their health. Yet the impact of such hiring practices on the health of this vulnerable worker group remains unexplored. This article presents the debate regarding agency-hiring practices and how these practices may influence the health and well-being of hotel housekeepers. Implications for occupational health nurses are also discussed. PMID:24512722

  13. Human Resource Development and New Technology in the Automobile Industry: A Case Study of Ford Motor Company's Dearborn Engine Plant. The Development and Utilization of Human Resources in the Context of Technological Change and Industrial Restructuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kan; And Others

    This report centers around a plant-level study of the development and utilization of human resources in the context of technological change and industrial restructuring in the crankshaft production area of Ford Motor Company's Dearborn Engine Plant (DEP). The introductory chapter describes how the study was conducted, provides an introduction to…

  14. Towards Universal Design Hotels in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Based on the research project 'Accessible Hotel Rooms' that studies the balance between the experience of supply and demand regarding accessibility features in Danish hotel rooms, this paper demonstrates factors having an influence on Universal Design hotels in Denmark. The research project was financed by the Danish Transport and Construction Agency. Different notions in the hotel sector of the current supply and demand for Universal Design hotel rooms are identified, as well as future demand. Despite supplying accessible rooms, some hotels do not advertise their accessibility features on their website. There exists an attitude in the hotel sector that functions as a barrier for Universal Design: if there are enough guests, for example business travellers, then why market the hotel on Universal Design? The paper points out the coherence between the understanding of the users and the view of demand. Another important factor is Corporate Social Responsibility, which can be regarded as a strategy or platform towards Universal Design hotels.

  15. Towards Universal Design Hotels in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Based on the research project 'Accessible Hotel Rooms' that studies the balance between the experience of supply and demand regarding accessibility features in Danish hotel rooms, this paper demonstrates factors having an influence on Universal Design hotels in Denmark. The research project was financed by the Danish Transport and Construction Agency. Different notions in the hotel sector of the current supply and demand for Universal Design hotel rooms are identified, as well as future demand. Despite supplying accessible rooms, some hotels do not advertise their accessibility features on their website. There exists an attitude in the hotel sector that functions as a barrier for Universal Design: if there are enough guests, for example business travellers, then why market the hotel on Universal Design? The paper points out the coherence between the understanding of the users and the view of demand. Another important factor is Corporate Social Responsibility, which can be regarded as a strategy or platform towards Universal Design hotels. PMID:27534313

  16. 27. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT ROOFS OF DENNIS HOTEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT ROOFS OF DENNIS HOTEL AND BLENHEIM HOTEL. MARLBOROUGH HOTEL IS PARTLY VISIBLE TO THE RIGHT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  17. 6. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TO NORTHEAST OF DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TO NORTHEAST OF DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  18. Proceedings of the Eastern Michigan University Conference on Languages for Business and the Professions (4th, Dearborn, MI, May 2-4, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Comp.

    The proceedings of this conference include 56 papers on program design, classroom techniques, and ideas for second language instruction for business and the professions. The papers are presented in eight groups: (1) "International Business: The Language and Culture Connection," which includes papers on multinational business, marketing,…

  19. Hotels Make Room for Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Hotels, in hopes of gaining a competitive edge, are offering workout rooms, exercise equipment, fitness trails, and jogging tracks, but no standards have been set for safety of the facilities or staff preparedness in exercise screening, equipment use, injury prevention, or first aid. (MT)

  20. 4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  1. 33. VIEW LOOKING NORTHNORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL (PARTIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW LOOKING NORTH-NORTHWEST AT THE DENNIS HOTEL (PARTIAL VIEW OF THE BLENHEIM HOTEL) - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  2. 43. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE BLENHEIM, DENNIS,AND SHELBOURNE HOTELS BEYOUND - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  3. 39. VIEW LOOKING NORTHNORTHEAST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. VIEW LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST AT THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL WITH THE BLENHEIM HOTEL IN THE BACKGROUND - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  4. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM HOTEL; HAMILTON BUNGALOW IN FOREGROUND; BUNGALOW NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM HOTEL; HAMILTON BUNGALOW IN FOREGROUND; BUNGALOW NO. 3 DIRECTLY BEHIND; HINDS & CONNER AND "A" BUNGALOWS IN REAR. VISTA DEL ARROYO HOTEL ON RIGHT - Vista del Arroyo Hotel, 125 South Grand Avenue, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 1. General view of the Moody Hotel, Tremont Square. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of the Moody Hotel, Tremont Square. The hotel was built by William Emerson in 1890-92. - Claremont Village Industrial District, Moody Hotel, Tremont Square, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  6. 88. VIEW LOOKING FROM THE BRIDGE FROM THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. VIEW LOOKING FROM THE BRIDGE FROM THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL TOWARD THE READING LOUNGE OUTSIDE OF THE MAIN DINING ROOM OF THE BLENHEIM HOTEL - Blenheim Hotel, Ohio Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  7. 3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  8. Fireguard Training for Hotel Employees: Sprinkler Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, James

    This thesis examines the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of an instructional development project addressing hotel fireguards. Systematic techniques were applied to produce a session to train the appropriate hotel employees to qualify as fireguards. The portion of training represented in this report is the sprinkler…

  9. Promotion of responsible drinking in hotels.

    PubMed

    McLean, S; Wood, L J; Montgomery, I M; Davidson, J; Jones, M E

    1994-01-01

    This study reports on an intervention programme to promote responsible drinking in hotels. The licensees of eight hotels agreed to participate in a trial of measures designed to assist patrons to avoid drink-driving, and seven other hotels were used as controls. The interventions acceptable to licensees comprised commercial-quality promotional material with the theme "0.05 Know Your Limits", and a breath analysis machine and poster on its use. Patrons leaving the hotels on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights were interviewed and breath-tested. Although the intervention material had been seen by one-third of patrons in the intervention hotels, there was no significant difference between them and control hotel patrons in either median BAC or the proportion who were going to drive with BAC over the legal limit. There was poor compliance by hotels with the intervention procedures, indicating that a major impediment to the implementation and evaluation of programmes to promote responsible drinking is a lack of motivation by many licensees, despite support by some licensees and the Australian Hotels Association.

  10. Hotel Housekeeping Work Influences on Hypertension Management

    PubMed Central

    Sanon, Marie-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Characteristics of hotel housekeeping work increase the risk for hypertension development. Little is known about the influences of such work on hypertension management. Methods For this qualitative study, 27 Haitian immigrant hotel housekeepers from Miami-Dade County, FL were interviewed. Interview transcripts were analyzed with the assistance of the Atlas. ti software for code and theme identification. Results Influences of hotel housekeeping work on hypertension management arose both at the individual and system levels. Factors at the individual level included co-worker dynamics and maintenance of transmigrant life. Factors at the system level included supervisory support, workload, work pace, and work hiring practices. No positive influences were reported for workload and hiring practices. Conclusions Workplace interventions may be beneficial for effective hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. These work influences must be considered when determining effective methods for hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. PMID:23775918

  11. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part II: Program Overviews and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part II of the proceedings includes nine presentations. They are: "Business and Foreign Language Tie the Knot at Nazareth College: A Four Year Program Model" (Octave G. Naulleau); "For an Actual Education in International Management" (Alain Eclache and Georges Labet); "A Foreign Language Program for Majors in Hotel and Restaurant Management:…

  12. 30. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT DENNIS HOTEL SOUTH ELEVATION. BLENHEIM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT DENNIS HOTEL SOUTH ELEVATION. BLENHEIM HOTEL SOUTH ELEVATION IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE TO THE RIGHT. SHELBOURNE HOTEL IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE TO THE LEFT - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  13. Smoke management system considerations for hotel atriums

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    This article examines the many life safety problems inherent in open balcony atriums, particularly those in hotels. Focuses on the smoke-management system of a hotel, and shows what can be achieved by an architect, an owner, a building department and a fire department that works together to achieve an enhanced level of life safety in the building's construction. Emphasizes that the hotel should be fully sprinklered; that it have carefully thought-out detection and alarm systems; that it have a reliably engineered smoke management system; and that it be routinely inspected and maintained. Discusses life safety concerns, smoke extraction, and failure mode analysis.

  14. Geography Matters in Online Hotel Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingshu; Zhou, Xiaolu

    2016-06-01

    In resonance with the popularity of user-generated contents (UGC) and the volunteered geographic information (VGI), this study crowdsourced 77,098 hotel reviews of 220 hotels provided by U.S. reviewers in the city of San Francisco, 2002 to 2015. In this exploratory analysis, we have revealed that there is spatial dependence of customer satisfaction at different locations (of hotels), which violates the assumption that ordinary least-square (OLS) is the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE); therefore, spatial model might be required for analysing any antecedents and consequences of such phenomena. These results have implications in marketing and management strategies.

  15. The homeless: help from hotels and restaurants.

    PubMed

    Hales, A; Eyster, J J; Ford, J L

    1993-07-01

    Specific examples and information are given to service providers to address the needs of homeless people. Together nurses and restaurant and hotel managers combined their expertise to assist local agencies in their community kitchens and shelters.

  16. Spinning reserve from hotel load response

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brendan; Kueck, John; Laughner, Theo; Morris, Keith

    2008-12-15

    Even though preliminary tests were not conducted during times of highest system or hotel loading during the summer, they showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22 to 37 percent depending on the outdoor temperature and time of day. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator's command to shed load was issued and the load drop was very rapid. (author)

  17. Measurement of the direct <mi>CP> -violating parameter <mi>Ami><mi>CP> in the decay <mi>D>+<mi>Kmi>-<mimi>+<mi>π>+

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct mi>Cmi>mi>P>-violating parameter mi>Ami>mi>Cmi>mi>Pmi> for the decay of the charged charm meson, mi>Dmi>+mi>Kmi>-mi>πmi>+mi>πmi>+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 mi>fbmi>-1 sample of mi>p>mi>p>¯ collisions at mi>smi>=1.96 mi>TeVmi> collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from mi>B>mi>D

  18. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  19. Integration of spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity with a multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanaki, Ali N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Marchessoux, Cedric; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Kimpe, Tom R. L.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2013-03-01

    Barten's model of spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function of human visual system is embedded in a multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer. This is done by 3D filtering of the stack of images with the spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function and feeding the result (i.e., the perceived image stack) to the multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer. The proposed procedure of considering spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function is generic in the sense that it can be used with observers other than multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer. Detection performance of the new observer in digital breast tomosynthesis is measured in a variety of browsing speeds, at two spatial sampling rates, using computer simulations. Our results show a peak in detection performance in mid browsing speeds. We compare our results to those of a human observer study reported earlier (I. Diaz et al. SPIE MI 2011). The effects of display luminance, contrast and spatial sampling rate, with and without considering foveal vision, are also studied. Reported simulations are conducted with real digital breast tomosynthesis image stacks, as well as stacks from an anthropomorphic software breast phantom (P. Bakic et al. Med Phys. 2011). Lesion cases are simulated by inserting single micro-calcifications or masses. Limitations of our methods and ways to improve them are discussed.

  20. Viral miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered in double-stranded DNA viruses, mainly herpesviruses and polyomaviruses (Nucleic Acids Res 32:D109-D111, 2004). miRNAs are short 22  ±  3 nt RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs, thereby inducing translational silencing and/or transcript degradation (Nature 431:350-355, 2004; Cell 116:281-297, 2004). Since miRNAs require only limited complementarity for binding, miRNA targets are difficult to determine (Mol Cell 27:91-105, 2007). To date, targets have only been experimentally verified for relatively few viral miRNAs, which either target viral or host cellular gene expression: For example, SV40 and related polyomaviruses encode miRNAs which target viral large T antigen expression (Nature 435:682-686, 2005; J Virol 79:13094-13104, 2005; Virology 383:183-187, 2009; J Virol 82:9823-9828, 2008) and miRNAs of α-, β-, and γ-herpesviruses have been implicated in regulating the transition from latent to lytic gene expression, a key step in the herpesvirus life cycle. Viral miRNAs have also been shown to target various host cellular genes. Although this field is just beginning to unravel the multiple roles of viral miRNA in biology and pathogenesis, the current data strongly suggest that virally encoded miRNAs are able to regulate fundamental biological processes such as immune recognition, promotion of cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and cell differentiation. This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge of viral miRNAs, their targets and function, and the challenges lying ahead to decipher their role in viral biology, pathogenesis, and for γ-herepsvirus-encoded miRNAs, potentially tumorigenesis. PMID:21431678

  1. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of...

  2. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of...

  3. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of...

  4. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of...

  5. Hotel Employees' Japanese Language Experiences: Implications and Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makita-Discekici, Yasuko

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the Japanese language learning experiences of 13 hotel employees in Guam. Results of the study present implications and suggestions for a Japanese language program for the hotel industry. The project began as a result of hotel employees frustrations when they were unable to communicate effectively with their Japanese guests. (Auth/JL)

  6. 40 CFR 30.18 - Hotel and motel fire safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hotel and motel fire safety. 30.18... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.18 Hotel and motel fire safety. The Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-391) establishes a number of...

  7. Jebel Ali Hotel PV lighting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, M.

    1984-05-01

    A large stand-alone PV lighting project was installed in June 1983 at the Jebel Ali Hotel in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. A high mast lighting system provides illumination for a 130 meter diameter traffic roundabout. The high mast system is powered by a 15 kilowatt peak array of Mobil Solar ribbon PV modules. Along the 700 meter access road leading to the hotel entrance, twenty-one PV powered streetlights provide low-level lighting. Each streetlight consists of a 20 watt fluorescent tube powered by two 35 Wp modules. Operation of both systems is completely automatic. Design, installation, and operating experience to date are reviewed.

  8. The Application of Intelligent Building Technologies to Space Hotels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawkes, S.

    This paper reports that over the last few years Intelligent Building technologies have matured and standardised. It compares the functions of command and control systems in future large space facilities such as space hotels to those commonly found in Intelligent Buildings and looks at how Intelligent Building technologies may be applied to space hotels. Many of the functions required in space hotels are the same as those needed in terrestrial buildings. The adaptation of standardised, low cost, Intelligent Building technologies would reduce capital costs and ease development of future space hotels. Other aspects of Intelligent Buildings may also provide useful models for the development and operation of space hotels.

  9. Smoking in hotels: prevalence, and opinions about restrictions.

    PubMed

    Semmonds, A; Bailey, K; Bentley, S; Chase, V; Fernando, S; Guruge, A; King, M; Tan, O M; Walsh, R

    1995-02-01

    Exposure to high levels of environmental tobacco smoke can occur in hotels. Controversy exists about smoking regulation on licensed premises. This survey of 138 people attending one of three Newcastle hotels during 1993 found that 57 per cent of respondents were nonsmokers. Fifty-eight per cent (95 per cent confidence interval (CI) 50 to 66 per cent) of respondents in these hotels believed their health was being adversely affected by other people's smoke in the hotel. Seventy per cent (CI 62 to 78 per cent), including half the smokers, were in favour of restriction of smoking in the hotels. Most preferred the establishment of smoke-free areas to the introduction of total smoking bans in hotels. The failure of hotels to regulate smoking suggests that a legislative approach is required. The case for legislation would be strengthened by a larger study elsewhere in Australia.

  10. Women in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study of the employment of women in the hotel and catering industry indicated that the industry employs nearly 17 percent of the entire paid female work force in the United Kingdom. Women constitute 75 percent of the industry's work force, and 47 percent of its managers are women. Women's position in the industry is characterized by their…

  11. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    PubMed Central

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  12. Legionellosis Outbreak Associated With a Hotel Fountain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shamika S.; Ritger, Kathy; Samala, Usha; Black, Stephanie R.; Okodua, Margaret; Miller, Loretta; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Hicks, Lauri A.; Steinheimer, Craig; Ewaidah, Saadeh; Presser, Lance; Siston, Alicia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In August 2012, the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) was notified of acute respiratory illness, including 1 fatality, among a group of meeting attendees who stayed at a Chicago hotel during July 30–August 3, 2012. Suspecting Legionnaires' disease (LD), CDPH advised the hotel to close their swimming pool, spa, and decorative lobby fountain and began an investigation. Methods. Case finding included notification of individuals potentially exposed during July 16–August 15, 2012. Individuals were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. An environmental assessment was performed. Results. One hundred fourteen cases were identified: 11 confirmed LD, 29 suspect LD, and 74 Pontiac fever cases. Illness onsets occurred July 21–August 22, 2012. Median age was 48 years (range, 22–82 years), 64% were male, 59% sought medical care (15 hospitalizations), and 3 died. Relative risks for hotel exposures revealed that persons who spent time near the decorative fountain or bar, both located in the lobby were respectively 2.13 (95%, 1.64–2.77) and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.09–1.44) times more likely to become ill than those who did not. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from samples collected from the fountain, spa, and women's locker room fixtures. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 environmental isolates and a clinical isolate had matching sequence-based types. Hotel maintenance records lacked a record of regular cleaning and disinfection of the fountain. Conclusions. Environmental testing identified Legionella in the hotel's potable water system. Epidemiologic and laboratory data indicated the decorative fountain as the source. Poor fountain maintenance likely created favorable conditions for Legionella overgrowth. PMID:26716104

  13. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hotels of Greece.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S D; Antoniadis, A; Papapaganagiotou, J; Stefanou, T

    1989-03-01

    Twenty water samples collected from 6 hotels situated in various areas of Greece were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms. Five of the six hotels included in this investigation were associated with cases of legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 8 were isolated from four of six hotels, mainly from the hot water supply system. This is the first isolation and identification of L. pneumophila in Greece.

  14. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  15. HVAC systems and energy conservation in hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect that the design of the basic HVAC has on the relative success of energy conservation efforts in hotels. The unusual nature of a hotel is explained along with the impact that it has on the HVAC system. The paper stresses the practical considerations which must be made by the HVAC system designer when he designs the guest rooms, public areas, back-of-the-house areas, temperature control system, and energy management system. The advantages of providing separate air-handling systems are presented. The benefits of line voltage electric controls for guest room fan coil units are explained. General recommendations for arrangement of ventilation systems and possible opportunities for heat recovery are included.

  16. Renovation And Modernization Of Hotel Buildings - Case Studies In Silesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Uherek-Bradecka, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The cultural heritage of Silesia has different backgrounds and is often characterized by difficult to assess values. There is doubt as to whether some of the existing buildings should be modernized. Since 2000, an increase in the amount of investments in hotel buildings and conference venues in Poland has been observed. The functions and roles of hotels within a city have also changed. The paper presents examples of original projects and realizations of hotel buildings in Silesia. A discussion was also held regarding the issue of adapting and modernizing hotel buildings.

  17. miRWalk database for miRNA-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Dweep, Harsh; Gretz, Norbert; Sticht, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    miRWalk (http://mirwalk.uni-hd.de/) is a publicly available comprehensive resource, hosting the predicted as well as the experimentally validated microRNA (miRNA)-target interaction pairs. This database allows obtaining the possible miRNA-binding site predictions within the complete sequence of all known genes of three genomes (human, mouse, and rat). Moreover, it also integrates many novel features such as a comparative platform of miRNA-binding sites resulting from ten different prediction datasets, a holistic view of genetic networks of miRNA-gene pathway, and miRNA-gene-Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man disorder interactions, and unique experimentally validated information (e.g., cell lines, diseases, miRNA processing proteins). In this chapter, we describe a schematic workflow on how one can access the stored information from miRWalk and subsequently summarize its applications.

  18. Hotel-Motel Occupations: Hotel-Motel Clerk. Front Office Manager. Competency-Based Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, L. S.

    A teacher's guide and student curriculum are provided for a hotel-motel occupations competency-based education curriculum designed to facilitate the learning of skills for front office clerks and managers. The teacher's guide contains an explanation of the curriculum and suggested usage, a list of competencies by job title, evaluation aids,…

  19. Management Trainees in the Hotel Industry: What Do Managers Expect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of a survey of 118 United Kingdom hotel managers (53 percent response) with a similar study of 75 U.S. managers found key differences reflecting the impact of cultures on management expectations. Significant similarities support development of an internationally transferable core curriculum for hotel management. (SK)

  20. HOTEL AND MOTEL HOUSEKEEPING AIDE, A SUGGESTED TRAINING PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    A LOCAL TRAINING PROGRAM TO PREPARE HOTEL AND MOTEL HOUSEKEEPING AIDES CAN BE DEVELOPED FROM RESOURCE MATERIAL IN THIS GUIDE. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES ARE TO PREPARE TRAINEES TO PERFORM THE JOBS INVOLVED IN KEEPING HOTEL OR MOTEL ROOMS CLEAN, TO FOLLOW CORRECT PROCEDURES IN USING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES REQUIRED IN CARING FOR BEDROOMS AND BATHROOMS, AND…

  1. Hotel & Food Service Industries. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCL Brief, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy for the hotel and food service industries and lists program contacts. The following organizations operate employee basic skills programs for hotel and food service employees, provide technical assistance, or operate grant programs: Essential Skills Resource Center; Language Training…

  2. New Employment Forecasts. Hotel and Catering Industry 1988-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measurement for Management Decision, Ltd., London (England).

    Econometric forecasting models were used to forecast employment levels in the hotel and catering industry in Great Britain through 1993 under several different forecasting scenarios. The growth in employment in the hotel and catering industry over the next 5 years is likely to be broadly based, both across income levels of domestic consumers,…

  3. VIEW LOOKING WEST TOWARD RESERVOIR HILL. THE SPRR HOTEL WAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING WEST TOWARD RESERVOIR HILL. THE SPRR HOTEL WAS LOCATED IN THE STRIPED AREA AT THE BOTTOM OF THE IMAGE, AND THE TRACK RAN BETWEEN THE HILL AND THE HOTEL. - Southern Pacific Railroad Water Settling Reservoir, Yuma Crossing, south bank of Colorado River at foot of Madison Avenue, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  4. MI1ANAV

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    MI1ANAV MISR Level 1A Navigation Data: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A Product for the Navigation Data, which contains samples of the Terra Platform position and ... Specification Versioning History:  Engineering, Navigation SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B ...

  5. MAS and MI+ Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grice, Ila M.

    1991-01-01

    Compares the compact disc read-only-memory (CD-ROM) Magazine Article Summaries (MAS) and Magazine Index Plus Backfile (MI+) in terms of system hardware, index coverage, searching capabilities, citation display, printing citations, local holdings, and miscellaneous features and costs. Finds in favor of MAS. (DMM)

  6. MI1AENG1

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    MI1AENG1 MISR Level 1A Engineering Data File Type 1: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A product for the camera engineering data, which represents indicators of sampled measurements. ... Status Production Report Read Software Files :  Data Product Specification Versioning ...

  7. Changing Occupational Profiles in the Hotel Industry: Case Studies in France, Italy and Spain. Synthesis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Mario; Grazia Mereu, Maria; Tagliaferro, Claudio

    Changing occupational profiles in the hotel industry in France, Italy, and Spain were examined in case studies that included interviews with hotel managers, human resource managers, and individuals employed in hotel occupations identified as new or entailing new skills. The study focused on the following topics: (1) changes in the hotel industry…

  8. MiRTargetLink--miRNAs, Genes and Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Hamberg, Maarten; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Hart, Martin; Meder, Benjamin; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-04-14

    Information on miRNA targeting genes is growing rapidly. For high-throughput experiments, but also for targeted analyses of few genes or miRNAs, easy analysis with concise representation of results facilitates the work of life scientists. We developed miRTargetLink, a tool for automating respective analysis procedures that are frequently applied. Input of the web-based solution is either a single gene or single miRNA, but also sets of genes or miRNAs, can be entered. Validated and predicted targets are extracted from databases and an interaction network is presented. Users can select whether predicted targets, experimentally validated targets with strong or weak evidence, or combinations of those are considered. Central genes or miRNAs are highlighted and users can navigate through the network interactively. To discover the most relevant biochemical processes influenced by the target network, gene set analysis and miRNA set analysis are integrated. As a showcase for miRTargetLink, we analyze targets of five cardiac miRNAs. miRTargetLink is freely available without restrictions at www.ccb.uni-saarland.de/mirtargetlink.

  9. miRTargetLink—miRNAs, Genes and Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hamberg, Maarten; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Hart, Martin; Meder, Benjamin; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Information on miRNA targeting genes is growing rapidly. For high-throughput experiments, but also for targeted analyses of few genes or miRNAs, easy analysis with concise representation of results facilitates the work of life scientists. We developed miRTargetLink, a tool for automating respective analysis procedures that are frequently applied. Input of the web-based solution is either a single gene or single miRNA, but also sets of genes or miRNAs, can be entered. Validated and predicted targets are extracted from databases and an interaction network is presented. Users can select whether predicted targets, experimentally validated targets with strong or weak evidence, or combinations of those are considered. Central genes or miRNAs are highlighted and users can navigate through the network interactively. To discover the most relevant biochemical processes influenced by the target network, gene set analysis and miRNA set analysis are integrated. As a showcase for miRTargetLink, we analyze targets of five cardiac miRNAs. miRTargetLink is freely available without restrictions at www.ccb.uni-saarland.de/mirtargetlink. PMID:27089332

  10. Hotel-motel fires: past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmon, J.T. Jr.

    1982-04-23

    The Winecoff Hotel Fire in 1946 triggered a great deal of activities directed toward improving methods of survival should a guest be involved in fire. In the 36 years since that event a great deal has transpired. Building integrity, construction, maintenance, firefighting appliances, occupant self protection systems, emergency communications and controls have drastically improved. However, fires continue to plague the unwary traveler thus this commentary reviews how a guest can probably survive with advanced planning on his or her part. While self preservation is the first priority, one should be actively engaged in learning what is going on in the community so that they can assist the community in providing fire safe structures at their places of business and at the other facilities where guests to their communities can conduct business and relax.

  11. Structure-borne noise at hotels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, George Paul; Jue, Deborah A.

    2002-11-01

    Hotels present a challenging environment for building designers to provide suitable noise and vibration isolation between very incompatible uses. While many are familiar with ways to reduce traditional sources of airborne noise and vibration, structure-borne noise and vibration are often overlooked, often with costly repercussions. Structure-borne noise can be very difficult to pinpoint, and troubleshooting the sources of the vibration can be a tedious process. Therefore, the best approach is to avoid the problem altogether during design, with attention to the building construction, potential vibration sources, building uses and equipment locations. In this paper, the relationship between structure-borne vibration and noise are reviewed, typical vibration sources discussed (e.g., aerobic rooms, laundry rooms, mechanical equipment/building services, and subway rail transit), and key details and design guidance to minimize structure-borne noise provided.

  12. 7. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO WEST: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO WEST: FERGUSON & HAAS AUTOMATIC WRAPPING MACHINE INSTALLED BY 1929 - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  13. 5. FOURTH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINES TO NORTHWEST: PRESS (LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FOURTH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINES TO NORTHWEST: PRESS (LEFT CENTER), MANUAL CUTTERS (CENTER, RIGHT CENTER) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  14. Occupational Programs for the Restaurant/Hotel Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoenninger, Ronald W.; Riegel, Carl D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development of a Hotel and Restaurant Management Program, designed to provide career training, develop educational opportunities, and provide a forum through which the continuing education needs of the local hospitality industry could be assessed and evaluated. (TP)

  15. PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING ALONG F STREET AT THE NORTH (HOTEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING ALONG F STREET AT THE NORTH (HOTEL MONACO ENTRANCE) FACADE - United States General Post Office, Between Seventh, Eighth, E, & F Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. Research on the Hotel Image Based on the Detail Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ban; Shenghua, Zheng; He, Yi

    Detail service management, initially developed as marketing programs to enhance customer loyalty, has now become an important part of customer relation strategy. This paper analyzes the critical factors of detail service and its influence on the hotel image. We establish the theoretical model of influencing factors on hotel image and propose corresponding hypotheses. We use applying statistical method to test and verify the above-mentioned hypotheses. This paper provides a foundation for further study of detail service design and planning issues.

  17. Spinning Reserve from Hotel Air Conditioning Load - SHORT VERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J

    2008-01-01

    Even though preliminary tests were not conducted during times of highest system or hotel loading during the summer, they showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22 to 37 percent depending on the outdoor temperature and time of day. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator's command to shed load was issued and the load drop was very rapid.

  18. Hellish conditions at single-room occupancy hotels.

    PubMed

    Foley, D

    1998-08-01

    Poor conditions exist in many of the commercial single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels for people who are HIV-positive. Living conditions are unsanitary, brutal, and dangerous, and occupants often experience harassment from the hotel owners and staff. Many of the occupants are drug abusers or are mentally incapacitated, and therefore may not have the ability to secure better housing. The situation in the California Suites, an SRO in Manhattan, is described.

  19. Move to outpatient settings may boost medical hotels.

    PubMed

    Burns, J

    1992-06-01

    The shift of surgeries to outpatient settings could be healthy for medical hotels, those amenity-equipped facilities originally developed to ease patients out of costly acute-care beds. Because fewer hospitals have a pressing need to use such alternative lodging, some medical hotels are hoping to hitch their fortunes to the outpatient trade, keeping patients overnight after surgeries that don't require hospital admission.

  20. Role of pri-miRNA tertiary structure in miR-17~92 miRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chaulk, Steven G; Thede, Gina L; Kent, Oliver A; Xu, Zhizhong; Gesner, Emily M; Veldhoen, Richard A; Khanna, Suneil K; Goping, Ing Swie; MacMillan, Andrew M; Mendell, Joshua T; Young, Howard S; Fahlman, Richard P; Glover, J N Mark

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a variety of biological pathways such as development and tumourigenesis. miRNAs are initially expressed as long primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) that undergo sequential processing by Drosha and then Dicer to yield mature miRNAs. miR-17~92 is a miRNA cluster that encodes 6 miRNAs and while it is essential for development it also has reported oncogenic activity. To date, the role of RNA structure in miRNA biogenesis has only been considered in terms of the secondary structural elements required for processing of pri-miRNAs by Drosha. Here we report that the miR-17~92 cluster has a compact globular tertiary structure where miRNAs internalized within the core of the folded structure are processed less efficiently than miRNAs on the surface of the structure. Increased miR-92 expression resulting from disruption of the compact miR-17~92 structure results in increased repression of integrin α5 mRNA, a known target of miR-92a. In summary, we describe the first example of pri-miRNA structure modulating differential expression of constituent miRNAs.

  1. Legionella contamination in hot water of Italian hotels.

    PubMed

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica; Moro, Matteo; Scaltriti, Stefania; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella; Santarpia, Rosalba; Boccia, Stefania

    2005-10-01

    A cross-sectional multicenter survey of Italian hotels was conducted to investigate Legionella spp. contamination of hot water. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine concentration, and trace element concentrations), water systems, and building characteristics were evaluated to study risk factors for colonization. The hot water systems of Italian hotels were strongly colonized by Legionella; 75% of the buildings examined and 60% of the water samples were contaminated, mainly at levels of > or =10(3) CFU liter(-1), and Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (87%). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 45.8% of the contaminated sites and from 32.5% of the hotels examined. When a multivariate logistic model was used, only hotel age was associated with contamination, but the risk factors differed depending on the contaminating species and serogroup. Soft water with higher chlorine levels and higher temperatures were associated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization, whereas the opposite was observed for serogroups 2 to 14. In conclusion, Italian hotels, particularly those located in old buildings, represent a major source of risk for Legionnaires' disease due to the high frequency of Legionella contamination, high germ concentration, and major L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization. The possible role of chlorine in favoring the survival of Legionella species is discussed.

  2. Legionella Contamination in Hot Water of Italian Hotels

    PubMed Central

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica; Moro, Matteo; Scaltriti, Stefania; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella; Santarpia, Rosalba; Boccia, Stefania

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional multicenter survey of Italian hotels was conducted to investigate Legionella spp. contamination of hot water. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine concentration, and trace element concentrations), water systems, and building characteristics were evaluated to study risk factors for colonization. The hot water systems of Italian hotels were strongly colonized by Legionella; 75% of the buildings examined and 60% of the water samples were contaminated, mainly at levels of ≥103 CFU liter−1, and Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (87%). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 45.8% of the contaminated sites and from 32.5% of the hotels examined. When a multivariate logistic model was used, only hotel age was associated with contamination, but the risk factors differed depending on the contaminating species and serogroup. Soft water with higher chlorine levels and higher temperatures were associated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization, whereas the opposite was observed for serogroups 2 to 14. In conclusion, Italian hotels, particularly those located in old buildings, represent a major source of risk for Legionnaires' disease due to the high frequency of Legionella contamination, high germ concentration, and major L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization. The possible role of chlorine in favoring the survival of Legionella species is discussed. PMID:16204491

  3. 77 FR 23273 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ...), American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus), and Mitchell's satyr butterfly (Neonympha mitchellii... Michigan, Dearborn, MI. The applicant requests a permit to take Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides...

  4. Employment Prospects in the Hotel and Catering Trade: A Franco-American Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriot, Sylvie-Anne

    2000-01-01

    In both France and the United States, restaurants remain the hotel and catering sector's main employer. In France, 25% of hotel and catering personnel are self-employers versus fewer than 5% in the United States; however, the growth of hotel and restaurant chains in France may eventually limit opportunities for creating an independent activity.…

  5. Ergonomics and accessibility for people with visual impairment in hotels.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Larissa Nascimento; de Carvalho, Ricardo José Matos

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a diagnosis of luxury or superior hotels in the city of Natal, located in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, in northeastern Brazil, in what concerns accessibility to the visually impaired. The main objective is to present the guiding principles to design actions and interventions that must be considered in the preparation or revision of technical standards and manuals of good practice in accessibility related to people with visual impairments who are hotel users. The survey showed that the hotels do not meet the normative indications of accessibility, their facilities are in-accessible (have prevented access) or of reduced accessibility and its employees are not prepared to provide adequate hospital services for people with visual impairment. It was concluded that some of the accessibility problems faced by people with visual impairments are also faced by people in general.

  6. Space-Hotel Early Bird - Visions for a Commercial Space Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.; Apel, U.

    2002-01-01

    rachid.amekrane@astrium-space.com/Fax: +49 421 539-24801, cholze@zarm.uni-bremen.de/Fax: +49 421 218-7473, The International Space Station was planed for research purposes. In 2001 the first private man, Denis Tito,visited the ISS and the second private man, Mark Shuttleworth is following him. The gate towards the commercial utilization of manned space flight has been pushed open. Space pioneers as Wernher von Braun and Sir Arthur C. Clarke had the dream that one day a space station in earth orbit will host tourists. It is evident that the ISS is not designed to host tourists. Therefore the dream of the pioneers is still open. By asking the question "how should a space station should look like to host tourists?", the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. organized a contest under the patronage of Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA) in April 2001. Because the definition and design of living space is the content of architecture the approach was to gather new ideas from young architects in cooperation with space experts. This contest was directed at students of architecture and the task set was to design a hotel for the earth orbit and to accommodate 220 guests. The contest got the name "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel". The results and models of the student's work were shown in an exhibition in Hamburg/Germany, which was open to the public from September 19th till October 20th 2001. During the summer term of 2001 seventeen designs were completed. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within this interdisciplinary project both parties learned from each other. The 17 different designs were focused on the expectations and needs of a future space tourist. The designs are for sure not feasible today, but the designs are in that sense realistic that they could be

  7. miRNAs Related to Skeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Claudine; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; van Griensven, Martijn

    2016-09-01

    miRNAs as non-coding, short, double-stranded RNA segments are important for cellular biological functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. miRNAs mainly contribute to the inhibition of important protein translations through their cleavage or direct repression of target messenger RNAs expressions. In the last decade, miRNAs got in the focus of interest with new publications on miRNAs in the context of different diseases. For many types of cancer or myocardial damage, typical signatures of local or systemically circulating miRNAs have already been described. However, little is known about miRNA expressions and their molecular effect in skeletal diseases. An overview of published studies reporting miRNAs detection linked with skeletal diseases was conducted. All regulated miRNAs were summarized and their molecular interactions were illustrated. This review summarizes the involvement and interaction of miRNAs in different skeletal diseases. Thereby, 59 miRNAs were described to be deregulated in tissue, cells, or in the circulation of osteoarthritis (OA), 23 miRNAs deregulated in osteoporosis, and 107 miRNAs deregulated in osteosarcoma (OS). The molecular influences of miRNAs regarding OA, osteoporosis, and OS were illustrated. Specific miRNA signatures for skeletal diseases are described in the literature. Some overlapped, but also unique ones for each disease exist. These miRNAs may present useful targets for the development of new therapeutic approaches and are candidates for diagnostic evaluations. PMID:27418331

  8. Spinning Reserve From Hotel Load Response: Initial Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J

    2008-11-01

    This project was motivated by the fundamental match between hotel space conditioning load response capability and power system contingency response needs. As power system costs rise and capacity is strained demand response can provide a significant system reliability benefit at a potentially attractive cost. At ORNL s suggestion, Digital Solutions Inc. adapted its hotel air conditioning control technology to supply power system spinning reserve. This energy saving technology is primarily designed to provide the hotel operator with the ability to control individual room temperature set-points based upon occupancy (25% to 50% energy savings based on an earlier study [Kirby and Ally, 2002]). DSI added instantaneous local load shedding capability in response to power system frequency and centrally dispatched load shedding capability in response to power system operator command. The 162 room Music Road Hotel in Pigeon Forge Tennessee agreed to host the spinning reserve test. The Tennessee Valley Authority supplied real-time metering equipment in the form of an internet connected Dranetz-BMI power quality meter and monitoring expertise to record total hotel load during both normal operations and test results. The Sevier County Electric System installed the metering. Preliminary testing showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22% to 37% depending on the outdoor temperature and the time of day. These results are prior to implementing control over the common area air conditioning loads. Testing was also not at times of highest system or hotel loading. Full response occurred in 12 to 60 seconds from when the system operator s command to shed load was issued. The load drop was very rapid, essentially as fast as the 2 second metering could detect, with all units responding essentially simultaneously. Load restoration was ramped back in over several minutes. The restoration ramp can be adjusted to the power system needs. Frequency response testing was not completed. Initial

  9. Circulating microRNAs, miR-939, miR-595, miR-519d and miR-494, Identify Cirrhotic Patients with HCC

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, Francesca; Ferracin, Manuela; Trerè, Davide; Milazzo, Maddalena; Marinelli, Sara; Galassi, Marzia; Venerandi, Laura; Pollutri, Daniela; Patrizi, Clarissa; Borghi, Alberto; Foschi, Francesco G.; Stefanini, Giuseppe F.; Negrini, Massimo; Bolondi, Luigi; Gramantieri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The performance of circulating biomarkers for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is sub-optimal. In this study we tested circulating microRNAs as biomarkers for HCC in cirrhotic patients by performing a two stage study: a discovery phase conducted by microarray and a validation phase performed by qRT-PCR in an independent series of 118 patients. Beside miRNAs emerged from the discovery phase, miR-21, miR-221, miR-519d were also tested in the validation setting on the basis of literary and tissue findings. Deregulated microRNAs were assayed in HCC-derived cells in the intracellular compartment, cell culture supernatant and exosomal fraction. Serum and tissue microRNA levels were compared in 14 patients surgically treated for HCC. From the discovery study, it emerged that seven circulating microRNAs were differentially expressed in cirrhotic patients with and without HCC. In the validation set, miR-939, miR-595 and miR-519d were shown to differentiate cirrhotic patients with and without HCC. MiR-939 and miR-595 are independent factors for HCC. ROC curves of miR-939, miR-595 and miR-519d displayed that AUC was higher than AFP. An exosomal secretion of miR-519d, miR-21, miR-221 and miR-1228 and a correlation between circulating and tissue levels of miR-519d, miR-494 and miR-21 were found in HCC patients. Therefore, we show that circulating microRNAs deserve attention as non-invasive biomarkers in the diagnostic setting of HCC and that exosomal secretion contributes to discharging a subset of microRNAs into the extracellular compartment. PMID:26509672

  10. Identifying miRNAs, targets and functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Li, Jiuyong

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as the universal specificity factors in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Discovering miRNAs, identifying their targets and further inferring miRNA functions have been a critical strategy for understanding normal biological processes of miRNAs and their roles in the development of disease. In this review, we focus on computational methods of inferring miRNA functions, including miRNA functional annotation and inferring miRNA regulatory modules, by integrating heterogeneous data sources. We also briefly introduce the research in miRNA discovery and miRNA-target identification with an emphasis on the challenges to computational biology. PMID:23175680

  11. Project EXCEL: Hotel Workers Literacy Enhancement Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    Project EXCEL is a federally-funded workplace literacy program involving hotel enterprises in the San Francisco (California) Bay area. Its focus is on identification and instruction of literacy skills essential to job success for limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers. Training is intended to enable employees to understand written work orders,…

  12. Competency Needs in Irish Hotels: Employer and Graduate Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Ciara; Conway, Edel; Farrell, Tara; Monks, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel industry employers' expectations of, and satisfaction with, graduate competencies in comparison with graduate perceptions of what is required for their roles and their satisfaction with how well their education experience prepared them. Design/methodology/approach: The research involved a…

  13. Hotel found liable in firing of HIV-positive bartender.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    A Federal jury in the court of U.S. Magistrate Judge Leslie G. Foschio of the Western District of New York found the Buffalo [name removed] liable for more than $630,000 in damages to bartender [name removed], who was fired because of his HIV infection. The [name removed] unsuccessfully argued that [name removed] was terminated because of unfavorable performance reviews. The plaintiffs claimed that the [name removed] issued false citations for infractions of hotel rules and that these citations were only issued after hotel management determined that [name removed] was HIV-positive. Testimony showed that all relevant decision-making personnel at the hotel were aware that [name removed] was HIV-positive. The hotel failed to show that all but the personnel manager had a legitimate need to know about [name removed]'s HIV status. The jury awarded [name removed] $1,439,000 in damages. Foschio lowered the amount to $637,388 in damages and $133,705 in attorneys' fees. PMID:11364135

  14. 6. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO NORTH: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FOURTH FLOOR, DETAIL OF HOTEL SOAP LINE TO NORTH: AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY COMPANY MANUAL SOAP CUTTER INSTALLED 1932 (FOREGROUND); CONVEYORS; AND R.A. JONES & COMPANY HORIZONTAL PRESS INSTALLED 1931 (BACKGROUND) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  15. 12. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (UPPER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (UPPER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 STORED IN G BLOCK (HAER No. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  16. 13. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (LOWER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF REMOVED PLODDER (LOWER HALF) FROM HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 STORED IN G BLOCK (HAER No. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  17. Women's Path to Management in the Hotel and Catering Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    A study examined the employment patterns of women working in the United Kingdom's hotel and catering industry and the opportunities for vocational education that would lead to careers in management. Sixty-four women from different sectors of the industry were interviewed (including women in senior and middle management and some still looking to be…

  18. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Beginner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains eight lesson plans for a beginning course in work-related English for non-English or limited-English speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives include the following: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand job-related instructions;…

  19. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; Crouter, Ann C; O'Neill, John W

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs' jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  20. Paperwork Plus: Literacy Materials for the Service Industry. Hotel Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Judith; McGill, Teresa

    The instructional materials are intended for use in teaching vocational English and English literacy to limited-English-speaking personnel in the hotel industry. They are designed for learners at three instructional levels, and address job-specific literacy tasks. An introductory section describes the materials and offers suggestions for…

  1. Residents' Coping Strategies in an Extended-Stay Hotel Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewinson, Terri

    2010-01-01

    Some families live in extended-stay hotels as a solution after housing displacement. This temporary accommodation provides a furnished home environment with resources such as a kitchenette, bed, heating/air conditioning, and room services with one payment that can be made weekly or monthly without a credit check or rent deposit. Despite these…

  2. Solar-Cooled Hotel in the Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance of solar cooling system is described in 21-page report. System provides cooling for public areas including ball rooms, restaurant, lounge, lobby and shops. Chilled water from solar-cooling system is also used to cool hot water from hotel's desalinization plant.

  3. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O’Neill, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  4. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-08-15

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality.

  5. Identification of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated regulatory pathways in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Li, Yang; He, Hua; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-10-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression to modulate growth and development and biotic and abiotic stress responses. By analyzing small RNA deep sequencing data in combination with the genome sequence, we identified 75 conserved miRNAs and 11 novel miRNAs. Their target genes were also predicted. For most conserved miRNAs, the miRNA-target pairs were conserved across plant species. In addition to these conserved miRNA-target pairs, we also identified some papaya-specific miRNA-target regulatory pathways. Both miR168 and miR530 target the Argonaute 1 gene, indicating a second autoregulatory mechanism for miRNA regulation. A non-conserved miRNA was mapped within an intron of Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), suggesting a conserved homeostatic autoregulatory mechanism for DCL1 expression. A 21-nt miRNA triggers secondary siRNA production from its target genes, nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat protein genes. Certain phased-miRNAs were processed from their conserved miRNA precursors, indicating a putative miRNA evolution mechanism. In addition, we identified a Carica papaya-specific miRNA that targets an ethylene receptor gene, implying its function in the ethylene signaling pathway. This work will also advance our understanding of miRNA functions and evolution in plants.

  6. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org. PMID:25897123

  7. Serum miRNAs panel (miR-16-2*, miR-195, miR-2861, miR-497) as novel non-invasive biomarkers for detection of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujuan; Zhang, Donghong; Wang, Fei; Xu, Danfei; Guo, Ye; Cui, Wei

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs have been established as critical layer of regulation during tumorigenesis; extracellular miRNAs are extraordinarily stable; and, quantitative reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) provides a sensitive platform for quantifying miRNAs with a broad dynamic range. Herein, we aimed to establish a serum miRNA signature for diagnosing cervical cancer (CC). In this study, we recruited a cohort of 184 CC, 186 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) patients and 193 healthy control subjects. qRT-PCR was performed with serum samples to screen a pool of 444 miRNAs at the initial phase, 66 miRNAs at the training phase, and 7 miRNAs at the validation phase. The profile of 4 circulating miRNAs (miR-16-2*, miR-195, miR-2861, miR-497) was established for CC diagnosis. By Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, this 4-miRNA signature showed high accuracy in discriminating CC (AUC = 0.849), and CIN individuals (AUC = 0.734) from healthy controls. Among these 4 miRNAs, only miR-16-2*, but not miR-195, miR-2861 or miR497, shared a similar pattern in sera of breast cancer and ovarian cancer patients. Overall, our studies have identified a novel noninvasive biomarker constituted with a panel of four miRNAs (miR-16-2*, miR-195, miR-2861, miR-497). PMID:26656154

  8. From Hotel to High School: Converting a Residential Hotel into a New Type of Senior High School. Report and Recommendations of the Concourse Plaza High School Planning Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasserath, Simpson

    This document reports the result of a 5-day meeting held to recommend the structural building adaptations and the curriculum organization necessary to the renovation of Concourse Plaza Hotel into a high school. According to the planning committee, the hotel has many features adaptable to a school, which would permit a meaningful departure from the…

  9. How Clean Are Hotel Rooms? Part II: Examining the Concept of Cleanliness Standards.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Barbara A; Kirsch, Katie; Kline, Sheryl Fried; Sirsat, Sujata; Stroia, Olivia; Choi, Jin Kyung; Neal, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Hotel room cleanliness is based on observation and not on microbial assessment even though recent reports suggest that infections may be acquired while staying in hotel rooms. Exploratory research in the first part of the authors' study was conducted to determine if contamination of hotel rooms occurs and whether visual assessments are accurate indicators of hotel room cleanliness. Data suggested the presence of microbial contamination that was not reflective of visual assessments. Unfortunately, no standards exist for interpreting microbiological data and other indicators of cleanliness in hotel rooms. The purpose of the second half of the authors' study was to examine cleanliness standards in other industries to see if they might suggest standards in hotels. Results of the authors' study indicate that standards from other related industries do not provide analogous criteria, but do provide suggestions for further research. PMID:26427263

  10. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  11. Implementing Motivational Interviewing (MI) in a Non-MI World: A MI Knowledge Adoption Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ambrosio, Ryan; Laws, Katherine E.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Hromco, Joe; Kelly, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The Oregon Practice Improvement Collaborative (OPIC) facilitated the implementation of motivational interviewing (MI) in two community-based substance abuse treatment agencies. "The Change Book: A Blueprint for Technology Transfer" was used to structure and support the implementation of motivational interviewing. As part of the implementation…

  12. miRegulome: a knowledge-base of miRNA regulomics and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barh, Debmalya; Kamapantula, Bhanu; Jain, Neha; Nalluri, Joseph; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Juneja, Lucky; Barve, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Blum, Kenneth; Kumar, Anil; Silva, Artur; Ghosh, Preetam

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs regulate post transcriptional gene expression by targeting multiple mRNAs and hence can modulate multiple signalling pathways, biological processes, and patho-physiologies. Therefore, understanding of miRNA regulatory networks is essential in order to modulate the functions of a miRNA. The focus of several existing databases is to provide information on specific aspects of miRNA regulation. However, an integrated resource on the miRNA regulome is currently not available to facilitate the exploration and understanding of miRNA regulomics. miRegulome attempts to bridge this gap. The current version of miRegulome v1.0 provides details on the entire regulatory modules of miRNAs altered in response to chemical treatments and transcription factors, based on validated data manually curated from published literature. Modules of miRegulome (upstream regulators, downstream targets, miRNA regulated pathways, functions, diseases, etc) are hyperlinked to an appropriate external resource and are displayed visually to provide a comprehensive understanding. Four analysis tools are incorporated to identify relationships among different modules based on user specified datasets. miRegulome and its tools are helpful in understanding the biology of miRNAs and will also facilitate the discovery of biomarkers and therapeutics. With added features in upcoming releases, miRegulome will be an essential resource to the scientific community. Availability: http://bnet.egr.vcu.edu/miRegulome. PMID:26243198

  13. Winning cancer centre has 'hotel-like' quality.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-04-01

    A "highly effective" three-way partnership between architects Anshen + Allen, the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and Laing O'Rourke, has created a non-institutional and welcoming new cancer treatment and renal services centre in Newcastle upon Tyne which, despite the gruelling nature of some of the therapies set to be offered, has a character and feel early users describe as "more like a four-star hotel" than a conventional healthcare facility. Jonathan Baillie reports. PMID:19452798

  14. Use of hygiene protocols to control the spread of viruses in a hotel.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Koenig, David W; Phillips, Ronnie L; Reynolds, Kelly A; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-09-01

    The goals of this study were to observe the spread of viruses in a hotel setting and to assess the effectiveness of a hygiene intervention in reducing their spread. Selected fomites in one hotel room were inoculated with bacteriophage ϕx-174, and fomites in a conference center within the same hotel were inoculated using bacteriophage MS2. Cleaning of the contaminated room resulted in the spread of viruses to other rooms by the housekeeping staff. Furthermore, viruses were transferred by hotel guests to the conference center and a communal kitchen area. Additionally, conference attendees transferred viruses from the conference center to their hotel rooms and a communal kitchen area. This study demonstrated how viruses can be spread throughout a hotel setting by both housekeepers and guests. A hygiene intervention, which included providing hand hygiene products and facial tissues to the guests and disinfecting solutions with disposable wipes to the housekeeping staff, was successful in reducing the spread of viruses between the hotel guest rooms and conference center. The hygiene intervention resulted in significantly reduced transfer of the ϕx-174 between the contaminated hotel room and other hotel rooms, communal areas, and the conference center (p = 0.02).

  15. Single-room occupancy hotels: possible solutions and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Foley, D

    1998-09-01

    New York City's Division of AIDS Services and Income Support (DASIS) places clients in economical, commercial residences in one of 33 hotels in the New York City area, termed single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels. There have been many problems with these hotels in terms of safety and health. One problem is how to enforce housing laws when city agencies have had drastic personnel cutbacks, and landlords are not held accountable for repairs and building conditions. Without a strategic plan to supplement SROs with necessary services, and a way to deal with homeless people with AIDS, it will be difficult to redeem the condition of SROs and lessen dependency on them as a long-term solution. The West Side SRO Law Project offers tips on how tenants in SROs can safeguard their rights and document their cases if they feel that their rights have been violated. Included is a resource list for legal help and emergency numbers for the Department of Buildings in New York City and the surrounding boroughs.

  16. The Hotel Payload, plans for the period 2003-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Gudmund; Mikalsen, Per-Arne

    2003-08-01

    The cost and complexity of scientific experiments, carried by traditional sounding rocket payloads, are increasing. At the same time the scientific environment faces declining funding for this basic research. In order to meet the invitation from the science community, Andøya Rocket Range runs a programme for developing a sounding rocket payload, in order to achieve an inexpensive and cost-effective tool for atmosphere research and educational training. The Hotel Payload is a new technological payload concept in the sounding rocket family. By means of standardized mechanical structures and electronics, flexibility in data collection and transmission, roomy vehicles are affordable to most of the scientific research environments as well as for educational training. A complete vehicle - ready for installation of scientific experiments - is offered to the scientists to a fixed price. The fixed price service also includes launch services. This paper describes the Hotel Payload concept and its technology. In addition the three year plan for the development project is discussed. The opportunity of using the Hotel Payload as a platform for a collaborative triangle between research, education and industry is also discussed.

  17. Work Stress and Well-being in the Hotel Industry.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, John W; Davis, Kelly

    2011-06-01

    Employee stress is a significant issue in the hospitality industry, and it is costly for employers and employees alike. Although addressing and reducing stress is both a noble goal and is capable of resulting in expense reductions for employers, the nature and quantity of hospitality employee stress is not fully understood. The first aim of this study was to identify common work stressors in a sample of 164 managerial and hourly workers employed at 65 different hotels who were each interviewed for eight consecutive days. The two most common stressors were interpersonal tensions at work and overloads (e.g., technology not functioning). The second aim was to determine whether there were differences in the types and frequency of work stressors by job type (i.e., managers v. non-managers), gender, and marital status. Hotel managers reported significantly more stressors than hourly employees. There were no significant differences by gender or marital status. The third aim was to investigate whether the various stressors were linked to hotel employee health and work outcomes. More employee and coworker stressors were linked to more negative physical health symptoms. Also, interpersonal tensions at work were linked to lower job satisfaction and greater turnover intentions. PMID:23794780

  18. Work Stress and Well-being in the Hotel Industry

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, John W.; Davis, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Employee stress is a significant issue in the hospitality industry, and it is costly for employers and employees alike. Although addressing and reducing stress is both a noble goal and is capable of resulting in expense reductions for employers, the nature and quantity of hospitality employee stress is not fully understood. The first aim of this study was to identify common work stressors in a sample of 164 managerial and hourly workers employed at 65 different hotels who were each interviewed for eight consecutive days. The two most common stressors were interpersonal tensions at work and overloads (e.g., technology not functioning). The second aim was to determine whether there were differences in the types and frequency of work stressors by job type (i.e., managers v. non-managers), gender, and marital status. Hotel managers reported significantly more stressors than hourly employees. There were no significant differences by gender or marital status. The third aim was to investigate whether the various stressors were linked to hotel employee health and work outcomes. More employee and coworker stressors were linked to more negative physical health symptoms. Also, interpersonal tensions at work were linked to lower job satisfaction and greater turnover intentions. PMID:23794780

  19. Physiological roles of miR-155

    PubMed Central

    Mashima, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    miR-155 is involved in non-coding microRNAs found in humans, mice and chickens of which the sequence is conserved. Historically, miR-155 was identified as a B-cell integration cluster (bic), which induces B-cell leucosis in chickens, by its activation through viral promoter insertion. Subsequent studies have shown that transgenic mice expressing miR-155 in B cells generated lymphoma, showing that miR-155 is oncogenic. Biochemical investigation identifies many substrates of miR-155, and one of them in B cells and macrophages is the SH2-domain containing inositol-5′-phosphatase 1. A deficiency of miR-155 in the immune system causes attenuated immune functions. Clinically, several types of malignancy including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have high miR-155 expression levels. PMID:25829072

  20. miRNome Analysis of CML Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yadong; Ding, Nan; Dong, Xunong; Fang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have greatly accelerated the biological and medical progression. As one of the applications, miRNA-Seq is invaluable in detecting and characterizing genome-wide miRNAs of either too high or too low abundance. Besides, it can also be used in detecting novel miRNAs. Here, we describe an ab initio analysis of an example chronic myeloid leukemia miRNA sequencing data set to quantify the global expression of miRNAs, detect differential expression and novel miRNAs, and predict target genes. The run time of this protocol may vary depending on the volume of miRNA sequencing data and available computing resources but takes ~5 h of computing time for typical experiments and less than 1 h of hands-on time. PMID:27581150

  1. miRNA Digger: a comprehensive pipeline for genome-wide novel miRNA mining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shao, Chaogang; Ye, Xinghuo; Meng, Yijun; Zhou, Yincong; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technique have greatly facilitated large-scale detection of the miRNAs. However, thoroughly discovery of novel miRNAs from the available HTS data sets remains a major challenge. In this study, we observed that Dicer-mediated cleavage sites for the processing of the miRNA precursors could be mapped by using degradome sequencing data in both animals and plants. In this regard, a novel tool, miRNA Digger, was developed for systematical discovery of miRNA candidates through genome-wide screening of cleavage signals based on degradome sequencing data. To test its sensitivity and reliability, miRNA Digger was applied to discover miRNAs from four organs of Arabidopsis. The results revealed that a majority of already known mature miRNAs along with their miRNA*s expressed in these four organs were successfully recovered. Notably, a total of 30 novel miRNA-miRNA* pairs that have not been registered in miRBase were discovered by miRNA Digger. After target prediction and degradome sequencing data-based validation, eleven miRNA-target interactions involving six of the novel miRNAs were identified. Taken together, miRNA Digger could be applied for sensitive detection of novel miRNAs and it could be freely downloaded from http://www.bioinfolab.cn/miRNA_Digger/index.html. PMID:26732371

  2. Bioinformatics of cardiovascular miRNA biology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Chunguang; Viereck, Janika; Pachel, Christina; Frantz, Stefan; Thum, Thomas; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs and are highly conserved among species. Moreover, miRNAs regulate gene expression of a large number of genes associated with important biological functions and signaling pathways. Recently, several miRNAs have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Thus, investigating the complex regulatory effect of miRNAs may lead to a better understanding of their functional role in the heart. To achieve this, bioinformatics approaches have to be coupled with validation and screening experiments to understand the complex interactions of miRNAs with the genome. This will boost the subsequent development of diagnostic markers and our understanding of the physiological and therapeutic role of miRNAs in cardiac remodeling. In this review, we focus on and explain different bioinformatics strategies and algorithms for the identification and analysis of miRNAs and their regulatory elements to better understand cardiac miRNA biology. Starting with the biogenesis of miRNAs, we present approaches such as LocARNA and miRBase for combining sequence and structure analysis including phylogenetic comparisons as well as detailed analysis of RNA folding patterns, functional target prediction, signaling pathway as well as functional analysis. We also show how far bioinformatics helps to tackle the unprecedented level of complexity and systemic effects by miRNA, underlining the strong therapeutic potential of miRNA and miRNA target structures in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we discuss drawbacks and limitations of bioinformatics algorithms and the necessity of experimental approaches for miRNA target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Non-coding RNAs'.

  3. Association of miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-150 and miR-155 polymorphisms with the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gun Ho; Ko, Ki Han; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Jinkwon; Oh, Seung Hun; Han, In Bo; Cho, Kyung Gi; Kim, Ok Joon; Bae, Jinkun; Kim, Nam Keun

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small (19-23 nt) non-coding RNA molecules that are endogenous regulators of gene expression. Previous studies have found that some miRNAs are related to the progression of ischemia in the cerebral artery. Furthermore, a recent study found a significant association between miRNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the risk of ischemic stroke. Therefore, it may be valuable to investigate associations between megakaryocyte formation-related miRNA polymorphisms and the prevalence of ischemic stroke. We thus conducted a case-control study of 1,000 individuals who were screened for 4 miRNA polymorphisms (miR‑34a rs6577555C>A, miR-130a rs731384C>T, miR-150 rs73056059G>A and miR‑155 rs767649T>A) by PCR-RFLP analysis. The study population comprised 596 patients with ischemic stroke and 404 control subjects without any history of neurological disorders. We observed associations between miRNA polymorphisms and individual stroke subtypes. The miR‑150 polymorphisms were significantly associated with ischemic stroke subgroups, such as left anterior descending artery (LAD) disease [GG vs. AA: adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.922; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.003-3.681] and cardioembolism (GG vs. AA: AOR, 2.996; 95% CI, 1.293-6.939). Additionally, Cox proportional analysis indicated that the miR‑150GA genotype was associated with survival in patients with ischemic stroke [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 2.063; 95% CI, 1.142-3.727; P=0.017] and with the LAD subgroup [adjusted HR, 3.021; 95% CI, 1.345-6.785; P=0.008]. Our findings suggest that miR‑150 polymorphisms may contribute to the development of ischemic stroke and may potentially act as biomarkers to predict the risk of ischemic stroke. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the association between miRNA polymorphisms (miR-34aC>A, miR-130aC>T, miR-150G>A and miR-155T>A) and ischemic stroke. PMID:27246008

  4. Impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on Hotel Industry in Pacific Tohoku Prefectures ---From Spatio-Temporal Dependence of Hotel Availability---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, A.

    This paper investigates the impact of the Great Japan Earthquake(and subsequent tsunami turmoil) on socio-economic activities by using data on hotel opportunities collected from an electronic hotel booking service. A method to estimate both primary and secondary regional effects of a natural disaster on human behavior is proposed. It is confirmed that temporal variation in the regional share of available hotels before and after a natural disaster may be an indicator to measure the socio-economic impact at each district.

  5. miR-340 suppresses glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ruiguang; He, Lei; Li, Mei; Li, Yi; Peng, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRs) contributes to tumorigenesis. Down-regulation of miR-340 is observed in multiple types of cancers. However, the biological function of miR-340 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that expression of miR-340 was downregulated in both glioma cell lines and tissues. Survival of GBM patients with high levels of miR-340 was significantly extended in comparison to patients expressing low miR-340 levels. Biological functional experiments showed that the restoration of miR-340 dramatically inhibited glioma cell proliferation, induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suppressed cell motility and promoted autophagy and terminal differentiation. Mechanistic studies disclosed that, miR-340 over-expression suppressed several oncogenes including p-AKT, EZH2, EGFR, BMI1 and XIAP. Furthermore, ROCK1 was validated as a direct functional target miR-340 and silencing of ROCK1 phenocopied the anti-tumor effect of mR-340. Our findings indicate an important role of miR-340 as a glioma killer, and suggest a potential prognosis biomarker and therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:25831237

  6. So, Why Sol-Mi? American Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Peggy D.

    2005-01-01

    Walk into any primary grade music class in the U.S., and you will likely hear teacher and students singing a musical greeting, such as "Good morning boys and girls" (sol-mi-mi-sol-sol-mi) and the response "Good morning Miss Purdy" (sol-mi-mi-sol-mi-mi). Since about the 1970s, teachers have been beginning and ending music class for young children…

  7. Two miRNA clusters, miR-34b/c and miR-449, are essential for normal brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingwen; Bao, Jianqiang; Kim, Minkyung; Yuan, Shuiqiao; Tang, Chong; Zheng, Huili; Mastick, Grant S.; Xu, Chen; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Ablation of a single miRNA gene rarely leads to a discernable developmental phenotype in mice, in some cases because of compensatory effects by other functionally related miRNAs. Here, we report that simultaneous inactivation of two functionally related miRNA clusters (miR-34b/c and miR-449) encoding five miRNAs (miR-34b, miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-449b, and miR-449c) led to sexually dimorphic, partial perinatal lethality, growth retardation, and infertility. These developmental defects correlated with the dysregulation of ∼240 target genes, which are mainly involved in three major cellular functions, including cell-fate control, brain development and microtubule dynamics. Our data demonstrate an essential role of a miRNA family in brain development, motile ciliogenesis, and spermatogenesis. PMID:24982181

  8. Tertiary structure mapping of the pri-miRNA miR-17~92.

    PubMed

    Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of RNA in regulating gene expression has exploded over the past 15 years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have vastly expanded the role of RNA in gene regulation beyond spliceosomal, ribosomal, and messenger RNAs. Approximately one half of miRNAs are polycistronic, where two or more miRNAs are encoded on a single pri-miRNA transcript, termed a miRNA cluster. The six miRNAs of the miR-17~92 cluster are contained within a ~800 nucleotide region within intron 3 of the cl13orf25 ~7 kb pri-miRNA transcript. We recently reported on the tertiary structured domain of miR-17~92 and its role in modulating miRNA biogenesis. The key finding was that the cluster structure explained the differential processing of the miRNA hairpins by Drosha. This work demonstrated the need to consider pri-miRNA tertiary structure in miRNA biogenesis. Since biochemical structure probing is typically performed on relatively short RNAs (≤200 nucleotides), we had to adapt these methodologies for application on large RNAs (~800 nucleotide miR-17~92 pri-miRNA). We present here our adaptation of a protection footprinting method using ribonucleases to probe the structure of the ~800 nucleotide miR-17~92 pri-miRNA. We outline the technical difficulties involved in probing large RNAs and data visualization using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and how we adapted the existing approaches to probe large RNAs. The methodology outlined here is generally applicable to large RNAs including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA).

  9. miRTarBase 2016: updates to the experimentally validated miRNA-target interactions database

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chih-Hung; Chang, Nai-Wen; Shrestha, Sirjana; Hsu, Sheng-Da; Lin, Yu-Ling; Lee, Wei-Hsiang; Yang, Chi-Dung; Hong, Hsiao-Chin; Wei, Ting-Yen; Tu, Siang-Jyun; Tsai, Tzi-Ren; Ho, Shu-Yi; Jian, Ting-Yan; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Pin-Rong; Lin, Nai-Chieh; Huang, Hsin-Tzu; Yang, Tzu-Ling; Pai, Chung-Yuan; Tai, Chun-San; Chen, Wen-Liang; Huang, Chia-Yen; Liu, Chun-Chi; Weng, Shun-Long; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs of approximately 22 nucleotides, which negatively regulate the gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. This study describes an update of the miRTarBase (http://miRTarBase.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) that provides information about experimentally validated miRNA-target interactions (MTIs). The latest update of the miRTarBase expanded it to identify systematically Argonaute-miRNA-RNA interactions from 138 crosslinking and immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) data sets that were generated by 21 independent studies. The database contains 4966 articles, 7439 strongly validated MTIs (using reporter assays or western blots) and 348 007 MTIs from CLIP-seq. The number of MTIs in the miRTarBase has increased around 7-fold since the 2014 miRTarBase update. The miRNA and gene expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) are integrated to provide an effective overview of this exponential growth in the miRNA experimental data. These improvements make the miRTarBase one of the more comprehensively annotated, experimentally validated miRNA-target interactions databases and motivate additional miRNA research efforts. PMID:26590260

  10. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with...

  11. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with...

  12. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with...

  13. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with...

  14. 24 CFR 203.16 - Certificate and contract regarding use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. 203.16 Section 203.16 Housing and Urban Development... use of dwelling for transient or hotel purposes. Every application filed with respect to insurance of... housing or any part thereof covered by the mortgage for transient or hotel purposes, together with...

  15. REEP/Hotel Workplace Literacy Project. Evaluation Report. 1988-1990 Grant Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Morris

    The Arlington Education and Employment Program (REEP)/Hotel Workplace Literacy Project served 230 functionally illiterate adults working in hotels and a real estate maintenance firm in Virginia. Job-related English and math, citizenship preparation, and work awareness instruction was provided. An evaluation found that: (1) the project effectively…

  16. Does Embedding Social Media Channels in Hotel Websites Influence Travelers' Satisfaction and Purchase Intentions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluri, Ajay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    In the Internet world today, social media channels have emerged as a top share of Internet usage, and more travelers have started using them to make their hotel plans and purchases. Because of the recommendations of researchers and practitioners, hotel organizations have already embraced social media and have embedded their links on their host…

  17. The Marketing Effectiveness of Hotel Facebook Pages: From Perspectives of Customers and Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Xi Yu

    2012-01-01

    In the hotel industry, social media marketing has become a new trend hoteliers are chasing and an increasing number of hotels are using social media to promote their business. However, the marketing effectiveness of social media is still a big challenge in both academic and business world. Since social media marketing is totally different from…

  18. Human Resource Development in the Irish Hotel Industry: The Case of the Small Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Clara

    2002-01-01

    A profile of small businesses in the Irish hotel industry shows that all claim to believe in human resource development but few practice it. Small hotels favor informal, specific job training focused on solution of immediate problems rather than long-term development. (Contains 119 references.) (SK)

  19. What Makes Hotel Expatriates Remain in Their Overseas Assignments: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Zoe Ju-Yu

    2012-01-01

    In this study the researcher uses a qualitative research design to discover what makes hotel expatriates remain in their overseas assignments. In-depth interviews, participant observations, and personal documents are used as data collection methods. Four hotel expatriates are recruited as participants of the study. The collected interview…

  20. Parameters for an Effective Entrepreneurial, Regional, Hotel/Restaurant Management Training Program in Manitoba, Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Rainer C.

    Owners or managers of 34 small and medium-sized hotels and restaurants in the Assiniboine Community College area were interviewed to acquire information for an entrepreneurial, regional hotel and restaurant (H/R) management training program in Manitoba. A literature review revealed the following: employability, vocational technical, and business…

  1. Hospitality Service: Hotel and Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joliet Junior Coll., IL.

    This publication contains competency-based materials for hotel/restaurant management and culinary arts. The materials are designed for students to learn from a work station concept by rotating through a variety of real work settings in a hotel/restaurant environment. In addition, the materials indicate whether or not the students have developed…

  2. Hotel and Restaurant Management; A Bibliography of Books and Audio-Visual Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkames, James P.; And Others

    This bibliography represents a collection of 1,300 book volumes and audiovisual materials collected by the Luzerne County Community College Library in support of the college's Hotel and Restaurant Management curriculum. It covers such diverse topics as advertising, business practices, decoration, nutrition, hotel law, insurance landscaping, health…

  3. A Trip to the Statler Hilton Hotel. The Special Education Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Muriel

    A program designed for high school level work-study classes for students of limited mental ability presents specific curriculum methods and materials to teach information regarding positions available in the hotel industry. A field trip tour of the Boston Statler Hilton Hotel if the focal activity of the unit, and is accompanied by a history of…

  4. Feasibility Study for Hotel/Motel Career Program for Harper College. Volume XIX, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A.; And Others

    In spring 1990, a study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to determine the feasibility of adding a career program in Hotel/Motel Management (HMM) to the current Food Service Program. Surveys were sent to 53 hotels and motels in the WRHC service area to determine employment demands that would affect the hiring of graduates of…

  5. 12. VIEW OF MERCHANTS' HOTEL IN MID 19th CENTURY, 'FOURTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF MERCHANTS' HOTEL IN MID- 19th CENTURY, 'FOURTH STREET, PHILA., WEST SIDE, FROM MARKET TO ARCH', as it appeared in The Baxter Panoramic Business Directory, Est. 1857 which is available for viewing at the Free Library of Philadelphia, in the Castner Collection, Philadelphia Vol. No. 12, 'Streets 1'. - Merchants' Hotel, 40-50 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. The impact of virtual reality functions of a hotel website on travel anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ook; Oh, Ji-Eun

    2007-08-01

    This study deals with the impact of virtual reality (VR) features that are embedded in a hotel website on travelers' anxiety. Having more information is thought to be a factor in relieving anxiety in travel. A hotel website can be a good place for gathering information about the accommodation. In this study, we posit that a hotel website with VR functions should lead to a reduction in travelers' anxiety about travel. We built a website of a hotel and used VR functions to show the exterior, the lobby, a guest room, and a restaurant through an interactive and spatial shot of the hotel images. The experiment was conducted with a premise that the subjects were about to embark on a journey to an unknown place and to stay at an unknown hotel whose website contained VR functions. The subjects were asked to play with VR functions of the hotel website and then to complete a survey with questions regarding the degree of anxiety on the travel and psychological relief that might have been perceived by the subjects. The result confirms our hypothesis that there is a statistically significant relationship between the degree of travel anxiety and psychological relief caused by the use of VR functions of a hotel website.

  7. Prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels in South Western Greece.

    PubMed

    Fragou, K; Kokkinos, P; Gogos, C; Alamanos, Y; Vantarakis, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels located in South Western Greece, to study the molecular epidemiology of the isolated strains and their possible association with bacterial contamination (total count and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), the water pH, and temperature. A prevalence survey for Legionella spp. by culturing techniques in water distribution systems of eight hospitals and nine hotels occurred in South Western Greece. Water sampling and microbiological analysis were carried out following the ISO methods. Legionella pneumophila was detected in 33% and 36% of the distribution systems of hospitals and hotels, respectively. Our survey results suggest a frequent prevalence of elevated concentrations of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels. Our investigation has confirmed the need to regularly monitor the microbiological condition of water systems in hospitals and hotels.

  8. Computational and in vitro Investigation of miRNA-Gene Regulations in Retinoblastoma Pathogenesis: miRNA Mimics Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Nalini; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Retinoblastoma (RB), a primary pediatric intraocular tumor, arises from primitive retinal layers. Several novel molecular strategies are being developed for the clinical management of RB. miRNAs are known to regulate cancer-relevant biological processes. Here, the role of selected miRNAs, namely, miR-532-5p and miR-486-3p, has been analyzed for potential therapeutic targeting in RB. METHODS A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis was performed to predict the posttranscriptional regulators (miRNAs) of the select panel of genes [Group 1: oncogenes (HMGA2, MYCN, SYK, FASN); Group 2: cancer stem cell markers (TACSTD, ABCG2, CD133, CD44, CD24) and Group 3: cell cycle regulatory proteins (p53, MDM2)] using Microcosm, DIANALAB, miRBase v 18, and REFSEQ database, and RNA hybrid. The expressions of five miRNAs, namely, miR-146b-5p, miR-532-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-328, and miR-486-3p, were analyzed by qRT–PCR on primary RB tumor samples (n = 30; including 17 invasive RB tumors and 13 noninvasive RB tumors). Detailed complementary alignment between 5’ seed sequence of differentially expressed miRNAs and the sequence of target genes was determined. Based on minimum energy level and piCTAR scores, the gene targets were selected. Functional roles of these miRNA clusters were studied by using mimics in cultured RB (Y79, Weri Rb-1) cells in vitro. The gene targets (SYK and FASN) of the studied miRNAs were confirmed by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Cell proliferation and apoptotic studies were performed. RESULTS Nearly 1948 miRNAs were identified in the in silico analysis, From this list, only 9 upregulated miRNAs (miR-146b-5p, miR-305, miR-663b, miR-299, miR-532-5p, miR-892b, miR-501, miR-142-5p, and miR-513b) and 10 downregulated miRNAs (miR-1254, miR-328, miR-133a, miR-1287, miR-1299, miR-375, miR-486-3p, miR-720, miR-98, and miR-122*) were found to be common with the RB serum miRNA profile. Downregulation of five miRNAs (miR-146b-5p, miR-532-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-328

  9. miRNA polymorphisms (miR‑146a, miR‑149, miR‑196a2 and miR‑499) are associated with the risk of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Woo-In; Kim, Won-Jang; Moon, Jae-Youn; Kim, In Jai; Cha, Dong-Hun; Cho, Seung-Yun; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ok-Joon; Lim, Sang-Wook; Kim, Nam-Keun

    2016-09-01

    Small non‑coding microRNAs (miRNAs) are not only important for heart and vascular development but are also important in cardiovascular pathophysiology and diseases, such as ischemia and atherosclerosis‑related diseases. However, the effect of miR‑146a, miR‑149, miR‑196a2 and miR‑499 polymorphisms on coronary artery disease (CAD) susceptibility remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine the genotype frequencies of miR‑146a, miR‑149, miR‑196a2 and miR‑499 polymorphisms in patients with CAD, and assess their clinical applications for diagnosing and monitoring CAD. Using polymerase chain reaction‑amplified DNA, microRNA polymorphisms were analyzed in 522 patients with CAD and 535 control subjects. The miR‑149 rs2292832 C>T and miR‑196a2 rs11614913 T>C polymorphisms were shown to be significantly associated with CAD prevalence. In subgroup analyses according to disease severity, the miR‑146a rs2910164GG genotype was significantly associated with CAD risk in the stent ≥2 group. In addition, miR‑146aG/‑149T/‑196a2C/‑499 G allele combination was significantly associated with CAD prevalence (G‑T‑C‑G and G‑C‑C‑G of miR‑146a/‑149/‑196a2/‑499). The combination genotypes of miR‑146aGG/149TC+CC and miR‑149CC/196a2TC were significantly associated with CAD incidence. In subgroup analyses, miR‑146a rs2910164 C>G increased the risk of developing CAD in non‑smoking, hypertensive and nondiabetic subgroups. Furthermore, miR‑149 rs2292832 C>T and miR‑196a2 rs11614913 T>C was shown to increase CAD risk in females and patients aged >63 years old. The miR‑149T allele, miR‑196a2C allele and miR‑146aG/‑149T/‑196a2C/‑499 G allele combination were associated with CAD pathogenesis. The combined effects of environmental factor and genotype combination of miRNA polymorphisms may contribute to CAD prevalence. PMID:27430349

  10. Indoor radon levels in selected hot spring hotels in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Gang; Zhang, Boyou; Wang, Xinming; Gong, Jingping; Chan, Daniel; Bernett, John; Lee, S C

    2005-03-01

    Guangdong is one of the provinces that have most hot springs in China, and many hotels have been set up near hot springs, with spring water introduced into the bath inside each hotel room for hot spring bathing to attract tourists. In the present study, we measured radon in indoor and outdoor air, as well as in hot spring waters, in four hot spring hotels in Guangdong by using NR-667A (III) continuous radon detector. Radon concentrations ranged 53.4-292.5 Bq L(-1) in the hot spring water and 17.2-190.9 Bq m(-3) in outdoor air. Soil gas intrusion, indoor hot spring water use and inefficient ventilation all contributed to the elevated indoor radon levels in the hotel rooms. From the variation of radon levels in closed unoccupied hotel rooms, soil gas intrusion was found to be a very important source of indoor radon in hotel rooms with floors in contact with soils. When there was spring water bathing in the bathes, average radon levels were 10.9-813% higher in the hotel rooms and 13.8-489% higher in bathes compared to their corresponding average levels when there was no spring water use. Spring water use in the hotel rooms had radon transfer coefficients from 1.6x10(-4) to 5.0x10(-3). Radon in some hotel rooms maintained in concentrations much higher than guideline levels might thus have potential health risks to the hotel workers, and technical and management measures should be taken to lower their exposure of radon through inhalation.

  11. Hotel Cedes 7 months' savings for total lighting retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Warrock, A.M.

    1983-07-11

    In an unusual shared-savings agreement, the Hilton Florida Center at Orlando, where a retrofit program was begun two years ago, will give up all savings from a lighting retrofit program for seven months, avoiding upfront costs of equipment purchase, and will then become sole owner of the equipment and beneficiary of the savings. The four-month-old program has improved the lighting and cut electricity costs $2000 to $2500 per month, which would have been a six-month payback. Contracts for two other hotels are expected where retrofitting has begun. Retrofit details are given.

  12. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harber, H.

    1981-09-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  13. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  14. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients.

    PubMed

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Rolston, John D; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients' preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing. PMID:24818061

  15. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients.

    PubMed

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Rolston, John D; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients' preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing.

  16. What do hotels and hospitals have in common? How we can learn from the hotel industry to take better care of patients

    PubMed Central

    Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Rolston, John D.; Treadway, James; Chang, Susan; Kliot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite widely divergent public perceptions and goals, hotels and hospitals share many core characteristics. Both serve demanding and increasingly well-informed clienteles, both employ a large hierarchy of workers with varying levels of responsibility, and both have payments that are increasingly tied to customer/patient evaluations. In the hotel industry, decades of management experience and market research have led to widespread improvements and innovations that improve customer satisfaction. But there has been incredibly little cross-fertilization between the hotel and hospital industries. In this paper, we first consider the changes in the healthcare system that are forcing hospitals to become more concerned with patient satisfaction. We discuss the similarities and differences between the hotel and hospital industries, and then outline several of the unique challenges that neurosurgeons face in taking care of patients and increasing their comfort. We cite specific lessons from the hotel industry that can be applied to patients’ preadmission, check-in, hospital stay, discharge planning, and poststay experiences. We believe that hospitals can and should leverage the successful advances within the hotel industry to improve patient satisfaction, without having to repeat identical research or market experimentation. We hope this will lead to rapid improvements in patient experiences and overall wellbeing. PMID:24818061

  17. Prognostic Significance of miRNA-1 (miR-1) Expression in Patients with Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhenfeng; Shen, Jacson; Yang, Xiaoqian; Yang, Pei; Osaka, Eiji; Choy, Edwin; Cote, Gregory; Harmon, David; Zhang, Yu; Nielsen, G. Petur; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Reliable prognostic biomarkers for chordoma have not yet been established. Recent studies revealed that expression of miRNA-1(miR-1) is frequently downregulated in several cancer types including chordoma. The goal of this follow-up study is to investigate the expression of miR-1 as a prognostic biomarker and further confirm the functional role of miR-1 in chordoma cell growth and proliferation. We determined the relative expression levels of miR-1 and Met in chordoma tissue samples and correlated those to clinical variables. The results showed that miR-1 was downregulated in 93.7% of chordoma tissues and expression was inversely correlated with Met expression. miR-1 expression levels also correlated with clinical prognosis. To characterize and confirm the functional role of miR-1 in the growth and proliferation of chordoma cells, miR-1 precursors were stably transfected into chordoma cell lines UCH-1 and CH-22. Cell Proliferation Assay and MTT were used to evaluate cell growth and proliferation. Restoring expression of miR-1 precursor decreased cell growth and proliferation in UCH-1 and CH-22 cells. These results indicate that suppressed miR-1 expression in chordoma may in part be a driver for tumor growth, and that miR-1 has potential to serve as prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for chordoma patients. PMID:24501096

  18. Evaluation of inhibition of miRNA expression induced by anti-miRNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chae, Dong-Kyu; Ban, Eunmi; Yoo, Young Sook; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules that control the expression of mRNAs associated with various biological processes. Therefore, deregulated miRNAs play an important role in the pathogenesis of diseases. Numerous studies aimed at developing novel miRNA-based drugs or determining miRNA functions have been conducted by inhibiting miRNAs using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs), which inhibit the function by hybridizing with miRNA. To increase the binding affinity and specificity to target miRNA, AMOs with various chemical modifications have been developed. Evaluating the potency of these various types of AMOs is an essential step in their development. In this study, we developed a capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) method to evaluate the potency of AMOs by measuring changes in miRNA levels with fluorescence-labeled ssDNA probes using AMO-miR-23a, which inhibits miR-23a related to lung cancer. In order to eliminate interference by excess AMOs during hybridization of the ssDNA probe with the miR-23a, the concentration of the ssDNA probe was optimized. This newly developed method was used to compare the potency of two different modified AMOs. The data were supported by the results of a luciferase assay. This study demonstrated that CE-LIF analysis could be used to accurately evaluate AMO potency in biological samples. PMID:27178549

  19. Non-inhibited miRNAs shape the cellular response to anti-miR.

    PubMed

    Androsavich, John R; Chau, B Nelson

    2014-06-01

    Identification of primary microRNA (miRNA) gene targets is critical for developing miRNA-based therapeutics and understanding their mechanisms of action. However, disentangling primary target derepression induced by miRNA inhibition from secondary effects on the transcriptome remains a technical challenge. Here, we utilized RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) combined with competitive binding assays to identify novel primary targets of miR-122. These transcripts physically dissociate from AGO2-miRNA complexes when anti-miR is spiked into liver lysates. mRNA target displacement strongly correlated with expression changes in these genes following in vivo anti-miR dosing, suggesting that derepression of these targets directly reflects changes in AGO2 target occupancy. Importantly, using a metric based on weighted miRNA expression, we found that the most responsive mRNA target candidates in both RIP competition assays and expression profiling experiments were those with fewer alternative seed sites for highly expressed non-inhibited miRNAs. These data strongly suggest that miRNA co-regulation modulates the transcriptomic response to anti-miR. We demonstrate the practical utility of this 'miR-target impact' model, and encourage its incorporation, together with the RIP competition assay, into existing target prediction and validation pipelines.

  20. NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (LR) SUBSTATION (MI98D), POWERHOUSE (MI98C), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (L-R) SUBSTATION (MI-98-D), POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), AND COOKE DAM POND IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, North Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  1. Spatiotemporal plasticity of miRNAs functions: The miR-17-92 case.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, Tiziana; Mihailovich, Marija

    2016-05-01

    The functional effect of a specific miRNA is tightly linked to the transcriptome, thus having the potential to elicit distinct outcomes in different cellular states. Our recent discovery of a dual role of the miR-17-92 cluster, which shifts from oncogene to tumor suppressor during lymphoma progression, exemplifies the spatiotemporal plasticity of miRNAs. PMID:27314099

  2. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  3. Best practices to reduce the accident rate hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Revilla, M. R.; Kahale Carrillo, D. T.

    2014-10-01

    Examining the available databases and existing tourism organizations can conclude that appear studies on accidents and their relationship with other variables. But in our case we want to assess this relationship in the performance of the hotel in relation to lower the accident rate. The Industrial Safety studies analyzing this accident causes (why they happen), their sources (committed activities), their agents (participants work means), its type (how the events occur or develop), all in order to develop prevention. In our case, as accidents happen because people commit wrongful acts or because the equipment, tools, machinery or workplaces are not in proper conditions, the preventive point of view we analyze through the incidence of workplace accidents hotel subsector. The crash occurs because there is a risk, so that adequate control of it would avoid despite individual factors. Absenteeism or absence from work was taken into account first by Dubois in 1977, as he realized the time lost in the nineteenth century due to the long working hours, which included the holidays. Motivation and job satisfaction were the elements that have been most important in the phenomenon of social psychology.

  4. [Expressions of miR-21, miR-155 and miR-210 in plasma of patients with lymphoma and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian-Tian; Liang, Yong; Fu, Rong; Wang, Guo-Jin; Ruan, Er-Bao; Qu, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Hong; Wu, Yu-Hong; Song, Jia; Wang, Hua-Quan; Xing, Li-Min; Guan, Jing; Li, Li-Juan; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2012-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the expressions of miR-21, miR-155 and miR-210 in plasma of patients with lymphoma, and explore their role played in diagnosis, evaluation of chemotherapy effect and prognosis of lymphoma. The expressions of miR-21, miR-155 and miR-210 were assayed by RT-PCR in plasma of 54 cases of lymphoma, 10 cases of lymphonode inflammation and 27 cases of normal controls. The results indicated that the expressions of miR-21, miR-155 and miR-210 in plasma of lymphoma patients were higher than those of control group and lymphonode inflammation group (P < 0.05). The expressions of miR-21 and miR-210 in plasma of control group and lymphonode inflammation group had no significant differences (P > 0.05). The expression of miR-21 in plasma of lymphoma patient group significantly correlated with their serum LDH level. The expressions of miR-21 and miR-210 in plasma of previously untreated lymphoma patient group were higher than those of the patients treated for 6 or more courses (P < 0.05). The diagnostic accuracy of miR-21, miR-155 and miR-210 used for lymphoma patients was 56, 65, 48 respectively, and reached to 83 when combined three of them. It is concluded that the expressions of miR-21, miR-155 and miR-210 in plasma of lymphoma patients were significantly higher. Detection of these 3 miRNA in plasma of patients can contribute to the clinical diagnosis, treatment and prognosis evaluation of lymphoma.

  5. Enhancing miRNA annotation confidence in miRBase by continuous cross dataset analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kjems, Jørgen; Bramsen, Jesper B

    2011-01-01

    The immaculate annotation of all microRNAs (miRNAs) is a prerequisite to study their biological function on a genome-wide scale. However, the original criteria for proper miRNA annotation seem unsuited for the automated analysis of the immense number of small RNA reads available in next generation sequencing (NGS) datasets. Here we analyze the confidence of past miRNA annotation in miRBase by cross-analyzing publicly available NGS datasets using strengthened annotation requirements. Our analysis highlights that a large number of annotated human miRNAs in miRBase seems to require more experimental validation to be confidently annotated. Notably, our dataset analysis also identified almost 300 currently non-annotated miRNA*s and 28 novel miRNAs. These observations hereby greatly increase the confidence of past miRNA annotation in miRBase but also illustrate the usefulness of continuous re-evaluating NGS datasets in the identification of novel miRNAs. PMID:21558790

  6. miR-isomiRExp: a web-server for the analysis of expression of miRNA at the miRNA/isomiR levels

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Yu, Jiafeng; Liang, Tingming; Zou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) locus has been found that can generate a series of varied isomiR sequences. Most studies always focus on determining miRNA level, however, the canonical miRNA sequence is only a specific member in the multiple isomiRs. Some studies have shown that isomiR sequences play versatile roles in biological progress, and the analysis and research should be simultaneously performed at the miRNA/isomiR levels. Based on the biological characteristics of miRNA and isomiR, we developed miR-isomiRExp to analyze expression pattern of miRNA at the miRNA/isomiR levels, provide insights into tracking miRNA/isomiR maturation and processing mechanisms, and reveal functional characteristics of miRNA/isomiR. Simultaneously, we also performed expression analysis of specific human diseases using public small RNA sequencing datasets based on the analysis platform, which may help in surveying the potential deregulated miRNA/isomiR expression profiles, especially sequence and function-related isomiRs for further interaction analysis and study. The miR-isomiRExp platform provides miRNA/isomiR expression patterns and more information to study deregulated miRNA loci and detailed isomiR sequences. This comprehensive analysis will enrich experimental miRNA studies. miR-isomiRExp is available at http://mirisomirexp.aliapp.com. PMID:27009551

  7. One for the road: on the utility of citation data for identifying problem hotels.

    PubMed

    Wood, L J; McLean, S; Davidson, J; Montgomery, I M

    1995-01-01

    Drink drivers arrested in Tasmania are routinely asked by police where they had last been drinking, and these data were examined for 716 drivers arrested in Southern Tasmania during a 4-month period in 1992. Nearly half (43%) of arrested drink drivers cited individual hotels as the place where they had last been drinking. This enabled a citation score to be assigned to each of the 82 hotels in metropolitan Hobart. The distribution of citation scores was highly skewed, with eight hotels accounting for 45% of hotel citations, and two accounting for 20%. The hotels' citation scores were compared in relation to the rank order of their licence fees, since better measures of patronage proved unobtainable. Some hotels with small total alcohol sales did appear to have an unexpectedly large number of citations, suggesting less than responsible serving practices. Hoteliers' comments were sought on the interpretation of citation scores, and incorporated into a discussion of the limitations of the data in determining the extent of individual hotel responsibility for drink drivers. Important questions remaining include (1) what is the validity of citations made by drink drivers at the time of arrest; (2) what appropriate and quantifiable denominator can be used to adjust the number of citations to the level of patronage; and (3) what level of citations is too high and requires action?

  8. miRNAFold: a web server for fast miRNA precursor prediction in genomes.

    PubMed

    Tav, Christophe; Tempel, Sébastien; Poligny, Laurent; Tahi, Fariza

    2016-07-01

    Computational methods are required for prediction of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are involved in many biological processes, especially at post-transcriptional level. Among these ncRNAs, miRNAs have been largely studied and biologists need efficient and fast tools for their identification. In particular, ab initio methods are usually required when predicting novel miRNAs. Here we present a web server dedicated for miRNA precursors identification at a large scale in genomes. It is based on an algorithm called miRNAFold that allows predicting miRNA hairpin structures quickly with high sensitivity. miRNAFold is implemented as a web server with an intuitive and user-friendly interface, as well as a standalone version. The web server is freely available at: http://EvryRNA.ibisc.univ-evry.fr/miRNAFold. PMID:27242364

  9. miRNAFold: a web server for fast miRNA precursor prediction in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tav, Christophe; Tempel, Sébastien; Poligny, Laurent; Tahi, Fariza

    2016-01-01

    Computational methods are required for prediction of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are involved in many biological processes, especially at post-transcriptional level. Among these ncRNAs, miRNAs have been largely studied and biologists need efficient and fast tools for their identification. In particular, ab initio methods are usually required when predicting novel miRNAs. Here we present a web server dedicated for miRNA precursors identification at a large scale in genomes. It is based on an algorithm called miRNAFold that allows predicting miRNA hairpin structures quickly with high sensitivity. miRNAFold is implemented as a web server with an intuitive and user-friendly interface, as well as a standalone version. The web server is freely available at: http://EvryRNA.ibisc.univ-evry.fr/miRNAFold. PMID:27242364

  10. MiRNAs in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin T; Xiao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which mainly inhibit protein expression by targeting the 3'UTR (untranslated region) of mRNAs, are known to play various roles in the pathogenesis of many different types of diseases. Specifically, in bone diseases, recent emphasis has been placed on the involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation and proliferation of bone and cartilage cells, particularly with regards to how these mechanisms contribute to bone homeostasis. In this review, we summarize miRNAs that are important in the differentiation and proliferation of bone cells, and specific miRNAs associated with bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review also provides the perspective that miRNA studies will identify not only new mechanisms in basic bone research, but also potential novel diagnostic biomarkers and drug targets for bone diseases.

  11. The reproductive experience of women living in hotels for the homeless in New York City.

    PubMed

    Chavkin, W; Kristal, A; Seabron, C; Guigli, P E

    1987-01-01

    Incidence of low birth weight, infant mortality and attendance at prenatal care were estimated for 401 residents of welfare hotels in New York City and compared to data from housing project residents and the city-wide population. Hotel residents and the pertinent data were ascertained from children's birth certificates dating from January 1982 to June 1984. In 1984 there were 2889 families (3498 adults and 6789 children) housed in 48 privately managed hotels and 7 shelters in the city, set up as emergency housing for the homeless. Most of these families were single women; over 50% were under 25. The racial and ethnic composition of hotel residents was similar to that of housing project tenants. The hotel residents have high birth rates: from 7/month in 1982 to 23/month in 1984. They receive significantly less prenatal care than project or city dwellers; more than half have 0-3 visits. The hotel residents had 2.5 times the likelihood of getting no prenatal care than project tenants, and 4.12 times the likelihood than the citywide population. Mean birth weight for hotel infants was 2979 g; for project infants 3128 g; for city infants 3253 g. Both welfare groups were significantly lower than citywide average birth weights. The infant mortality was 24.9 per 1000 for the hotel group, 16.6 for the project group, and 12.0 for the city population. The stress and inconvenience of living far from social service offices, clinics, schools and shops was considered the likely cause of poor attendance at prenatal care. It was recommended that the city provide on-site health education and care, social and nutrition services in the hotels, and refrigerators for mothers with newborn children.

  12. How Clean Are Hotel Rooms? Part I: Visual Observations vs. Microbiological Contamination.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Barbara A; Kirsch, Katie; Kline, Sheryl Fried; Sirsat, Sujata; Stroia, Olivia; Choi, Jin Kyung; Neal, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence of hotel room cleanliness is based on observation rather than empirically based microbial assessment. The purpose of the study described here was to determine if observation provides an accurate indicator of cleanliness. Results demonstrated that visual assessment did not accurately predict microbial contamination. Although testing standards have not yet been established for hotel rooms and will be evaluated in Part II of the authors' study, potential microbial hazards included the sponge and mop (housekeeping cart), toilet, bathroom floor, bathroom sink, and light switch. Hotel managers should increase cleaning in key areas to reduce guest exposure to harmful bacteria. PMID:26427262

  13. A fuzzy MCDM model with objective and subjective weights for evaluating service quality in hotel industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoraghi, Nima; Amiri, Maghsoud; Talebi, Golnaz; Zowghi, Mahdi

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (FMCDM) model by integrating both subjective and objective weights for ranking and evaluating the service quality in hotels. The objective method selects weights of criteria through mathematical calculation, while the subjective method uses judgments of decision makers. In this paper, we use a combination of weights obtained by both approaches in evaluating service quality in hotel industries. A real case study that considered ranking five hotels is illustrated. Examples are shown to indicate capabilities of the proposed method.

  14. Factors Influencing e-Business Adoption in the Greek Hotel Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Ir.; Kyriazopoulos, P.

    The purpose of this research is to identify the impact of business process improvement in the area of e-marketing in the hotel industry. The research identifies the barriers which block organizational change effort. A sample of thirty hotels in the city of Athens was used.This paper presents a SWOT analysis of the hotel sector, identifying the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that firms faced in the process of change. The results show that the majority of firms use, to a small extent, the e-marketing concept to improve their communication strategy and reach market segments.

  15. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-05-10

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30-50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  16. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Gennaro, Gianfranco Di; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30–50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  17. Classification of various muscular tissues using miRNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Endo, Kosuke; Weng, Huachun; Naito, Yukiko; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Takahashi, Akio; Fukushima, Yasue; Iwai, Naoharu

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs of 18-23 nucleotides that regulate gene expression. Recently, plasma miRNAs have been investigated as biomarkers for various diseases. In the present study, we explored whether miRNA expression profiling of various muscle cells may be useful for the diagnosis of various diseases involving muscle necrosis. miRNA expression profiling was assessed by miRNA array and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using a reverse primer of a stem loop structure. Profiling of various muscle cells of mouse, including cardiac muscles, skeletal muscles, and vascular and visceral smooth muscles, indicated that profiling of miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-145, miR-206, miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR499 were adequate to discriminate muscle cells. miR-145 was remarkably highly expressed in smooth muscles. miR-208a and miR-499 were highly expressed in cardiomyocytes. miR-133a was highly expressed in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. miR-206 and miR-208b were expressed in the slow-twitch skeletal muscles, and they can likely discriminate fast- and slow-twitch types of skeletal muscle cells. We observed that brown fat adipose cells had an miRNA expression profile very similar to those of skeletal muscle cells in the mouse. Plasma concentrations of miR-133a and miR-145 were extremely useful in diagnosing skeletal muscle necrosis in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and colon smooth muscle necrosis in a rat ischemic colitis model, respectively. In the present study, we investigated the miRNA expression profiles of various muscular tissues. Our results suggest that expression profiling would be useful for the diagnosis of various diseases such as muscular necrosis.

  18. Serum miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b are promising biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Atsushi; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Nishida, Naoshi; Honjo, Hajime; Ida, Hiroshi; Kou, Tadayuki; Kusaka, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Yu; Makato, Yagi; Higurashi, Takuma; Yukawa, Norio; Amanuma, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Osamu; Muto, Manabu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as promising diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC), but their usefulness for detecting early colorectal neoplasms (CRNs) remains unclear. This study aimed to identify serum miRNA biomarkers for the identification of patients with early CRNs. Experimental Design A cohort of 237 serum samples from 160 patients with early CRNs (148 precancerous lesions and 12 cancers) and 77 healthy subjects was analyzed in a three-step approach that included: a comprehensive literature review for published biomarkers, a screening phase, and a validation phase. RNA was extracted from sera, and levels of miRNAs were examined by real-time RT-PCR. Results Nine miRNAs (miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20a, miR-21, miR-24, miR-29a, miR-92 and miR-125b) were selected as candidate biomarkers for initial analysis. In the screening phase, serum levels of miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b were significantly higher in patients with early CRN compared to healthy controls. Elevated levels of miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b were confirmed in the validation phase using an independent set of subjects. Area under the curve (AUC) values for serum miR-21, miR-29a, miR-125b, and their combined score in discriminating early CRN patients from healthy controls were 0.706, 0.741, 0.806 and 0.827 respectively. Serum levels of miR-29a and miR-125b were significantly higher in patients who only had small CRNs (≤5mm) compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions Since serum levels of miR-21, miR-29a and miR-125b discriminated early CRN patients from healthy controls, our data highlight the potential clinical use of these molecular signatures for noninvasive screening of patients with colorectal neoplasia. PMID:26038573

  19. miRNA signature identification of retinoblastoma and the correlations between differentially expressed miRNAs during retinoblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinoblastoma (RB) is a common pediatric cancer. The study aimed to uncover the mechanisms of RB progression and identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. Methods The miRNA expression profile GSE7072, which includes three RB samples and three healthy retina samples, was used. After data normalization using the preprocessCore package, differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRs) were selected by the limma package. The targets of the DE-miRs were predicted based on two databases, followed by construction of the miRNA–target network. Pathway enrichment analysis was conducted for the targets of the DE-miRNAs using DAVID. The CTD database was used to predict RB-related genes, followed by clustering analysis using the pvclust package. The correlation network of DE-miRs was established. MiRNA expression was validated in another data set, GSE41321. Results In total, 24 DE-miRs were identified whose targets were correlated with the cell cycle pathway. Among them, hsa-miR-373, hsa-miR-125b, and hsa-miR-181a were highlighted in the miRNA–target regulatory network; 14 DE-miRs, including hsa-miR-373, hsa-miR-125b, hsa-miR-18a, hsa-miR-25, hsa-miR-20a, and hsa-let-7 (a, b, c), were shown to distinguish RB from healthy tissue. In addition, hsa-miR-25, hsa-miR-18a, and hsa-miR-20a shared the common target BCL2L11; hsa-let-7b and hsa-miR-125b targeted the genes CDC25A, CDK6, and LIN28A. Expression of three miRNAs in GSE41321 was consistent with that in GSE7072. Conclusions Several critical miRNAs were identified in RB progression. Hsa-miR-373 might regulate RB invasion and metastasis, hsa-miR-181a might involve in the CDKN1B-mediated cell cycle pathway, and hsa-miR-125b and hsa-let-7b might serve as tumor suppressors by coregulating CDK6, CDC25A, and LIN28A. The miRNAs hsa-miR-25, hsa-miR-18a, and hsa-miR-20a might exert their function by coregulating BCL2L1. PMID:26730174

  20. Early Bird Visions and Telchnology for Space Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station was planed for research purposes. In 2001 the first private man, Denis Tito, visited the ISS and the second private man, Mark Shuttleworth is following him. Space pioneers as Wernher von Braun and Sir Arthur C. Clarke had the dream that one day a space station in earth orbit will host tourists. It is evident that the ISS is not designed to host tourists. Therefore the dream is still open. Asking the question "how should a space station should look like to host tourists?" the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. initiated in April 2001 a contest under the patronage of . Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA). Because the definition and design of living space is the content of architecture the approach was to gather new ideas from young architects in cooperation with space experts. This contest was directed at students of architecture and the task set was to design a hotel for the earth orbit and to accommodate 220 guests. The contest got the name "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel". The results and models of the student's work were shown in an exhibition in Hamburg/Germany, which was open to the public from September 19th till October 20th 2001. During the summer term 2001 fifty students from the university occupied themselves with the topic, "Design of a hotel for space". During this time seventeen designs were completed. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within this interdisciplinary project both parties learned from each other. The 17 different designs were focused on the expectations and needs of a future space tourist. The design are for sure not feasible today, but the designs are in that sense realistic that they could be built in future. This paper will present an overview of the 17 designs as a vision of a future

  1. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet <mi>Mn>1+<mi>δSb>

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-15

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet <mi>Mn>1+<mi>δSb>. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.

  2. Shared-savings cuts hotel's losses from EMS removal

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, C.

    1982-11-08

    A shared-savings contract will minimize the Myrtle Beach, SC Downtown Holiday Inn's losses of replacing a poorly performing Energy Master energy-management system with Scientific Atlanta equipment. The contract with Energy Master Inc. (EMI), which saved Holiday Inn the $80,000 to $90,000 purchase price, also permitted removal (a year after installation) of the equipment when it failed to generate energy savings. A dispute between Associated Energy Consultants (AEC), which was to receive half the savings in exchange for arranging the equipment financing, is described. At $51,745, the 262-point Scientific Atlanta system should have a 1.7-year payback. The hotel's electric bills were $2000 a month lower during the first three months of operation. (DCK)

  3. Inference of gene regulation via miRNAs during ES cell differentiation using MiRaGE method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Taguchi, Y-H; Yasuda, Jun

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a critical regulator of cell growth, differentiation, and development. To identify important miRNAs in a biological process, many bioinformatical tools have been developed. We have developed MiRaGE (MiRNA Ranking by Gene Expression) method to infer the regulation of gene expression by miRNAs from changes of gene expression profiles. The method does not require precedent array normalization. We applied the method to elucidate possibly important miRNAs during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation to neuronal cells and we infer that certain miRNAs, including miR-200 family, miR-429, miR-302 family, and miR-17-92 cluster members may be important to the maintenance of undifferentiated status in ES cells. PMID:22272132

  4. Elevated serum miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 are noninvasive biomarkers for the presence and progression of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Song, Jiaxi; Bu, Xiaomin; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Jia; Cai, Jialu; Wan, Shujun; Fan, Chunli; Zhang, Chunni; Wang, Junjun

    2016-04-01

    The levels of miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 have been reported to be up-regulated in the tissues of experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) rat models. However, the clinical diagnostic and prognostic values of the serum signatures of these 3 miRNAs in TBI remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression levels of these 3 microRNAs (miRNAs) in the sera of TBI patients and to evaluate their relationships with the severity and clinical outcome of TBI. The serum levels of these miRNAs were assessed in TBI patients (n = 76) and healthy controls (n = 38) by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. The severities and clinical outcomes of the TBI patients were evaluated with the Glasgow coma scale and the Glasgow outcome scale. The serum miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 levels were significantly increased in the TBI patients compared with the controls at all examined time points, and these levels were significantly higher in the patients with severe TBI than in those with moderate or mild TBI (p < 0.05). The serum miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 levels were significantly higher in the patients with a poor outcome than in those with a good outcome (p < 0.05). The AUCs of miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 for distinguishing the TBI patients from the healthy controls were 1.000 (p < 0.001), 0.727 (p < 0.001) and 0.801 (p < 0.001), respectively. Interestingly, the AUCs of miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 for distinguishing the mild TBI patients from the healthy controls were 1.000 (p < 0.001), 0.742 (p < 0.001) and 0.819 (p < 0.001), respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 are potentially valuable indicators of the diagnosis, severity, and prognosis of TBI. Our study showed that the serum levels of miR-93, miR-191, and miR-499 are all increased in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. Their serum levels are associated with TBI severity and outcome, which suggest that these miRNAs play important roles in the pathogenesis

  5. Obtaining miRNA-Target Interaction Information from miRWalk2.0.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Alisha; Gretz, Norbert; Dweep, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    miRWalk2.0 (http://zmf.umm.uni-heidelberg.de/mirwalk2) is a freely accessible, regularly updated comprehensive archive supplying the largest available collection of predicted and experimentally verified miRNA-target interactions, with various novel and unique features to assist the scientific community. Approximately 949 million interactions between 11,748 miRNAs, 308,700 genes, and 68,460 lncRNAs are documented in miRWalk2.0 with 5,146,217 different kinds of identifiers to offer a one-stop site to collect an abundance of information. This article describes a schematic workflow on how to obtain miRNA-target interactions from miRWalk2.0. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27603021

  6. Hotel Payload - a low-cost sounding rocket concept - for middle atmosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauglund, Kenneth; Hansen, Gudmund

    2005-08-01

    European scientists are invited to utilize the "Hotel Payload" concept developed at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) for scientific research in Middle Atmosphere and Ionosphere. The concept is shaped to give scientists predictability and assurance on configuration, costs and timeframe for their projects. The scientists are offered one sounding rocket partner from planning till launch - so they can focus on their instruments. To demonstrate the capabilities, this paper presents the "Hotel Payload" concept, its configurations and specific projects with instrumentation.

  7. Search and selection hotel system in Surabaya based on geographic information system (GIS) with fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbandini, Taufik

    2016-03-01

    Surabaya is a metropolitan city in Indonesia. When the visitor has an interest in Surabaya for several days, then the visitor was looking for lodging that is closest to the interests of making it more efficient and practical. It was not a waste of time for the businessman because of congestion and so we need full information about the hotel as an inn during a stay in Surabaya began name, address of the hotel, the hotel's website, the distance from the hotel to the destination until the display of the map along the route with the help of Google Maps. This system was designed using fuzzy logic which aims to assist the user in making decisions. Design of hotel search and selection system was done through four stages. The first phase was the collection of data and as the factors that influence the decision-making along with the limit values of these factors. Factors that influence covers a distance of the hotel, the price of hotel rooms, and hotel reviews. The second stage was the processing of data and information by creating membership functions. The third stage was the analysis of systems with fuzzy logic. The steps were performed in systems analysis, namely fuzzification, inference using Mamdani, and defuzzification. The last stage was the design and construction of the system. Designing the system using use case diagrams and activity diagram to describe any process that occurs. Development system includes system implementation and evaluation systems. Implementation of mobile with Android-based system so that these applications were user friendly.

  8. MiRduplexSVM: A High-Performing MiRNA-Duplex Prediction and Evaluation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Karathanasis, Nestoras; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of predicting the position of a miRNA duplex on a microRNA hairpin via the development and application of a novel SVM-based methodology. Our method combines a unique problem representation and an unbiased optimization protocol to learn from mirBase19.0 an accurate predictive model, termed MiRduplexSVM. This is the first model that provides precise information about all four ends of the miRNA duplex. We show that (a) our method outperforms four state-of-the-art tools, namely MaturePred, MiRPara, MatureBayes, MiRdup as well as a Simple Geometric Locator when applied on the same training datasets employed for each tool and evaluated on a common blind test set. (b) In all comparisons, MiRduplexSVM shows superior performance, achieving up to a 60% increase in prediction accuracy for mammalian hairpins and can generalize very well on plant hairpins, without any special optimization. (c) The tool has a number of important applications such as the ability to accurately predict the miRNA or the miRNA*, given the opposite strand of a duplex. Its performance on this task is superior to the 2nts overhang rule commonly used in computational studies and similar to that of a comparative genomic approach, without the need for prior knowledge or the complexity of performing multiple alignments. Finally, it is able to evaluate novel, potential miRNAs found either computationally or experimentally. In relation with recent confidence evaluation methods used in miRBase, MiRduplexSVM was successful in identifying high confidence potential miRNAs.

  9. MiRduplexSVM: A High-Performing MiRNA-Duplex Prediction and Evaluation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Karathanasis, Nestoras; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of predicting the position of a miRNA duplex on a microRNA hairpin via the development and application of a novel SVM-based methodology. Our method combines a unique problem representation and an unbiased optimization protocol to learn from mirBase19.0 an accurate predictive model, termed MiRduplexSVM. This is the first model that provides precise information about all four ends of the miRNA duplex. We show that (a) our method outperforms four state-of-the-art tools, namely MaturePred, MiRPara, MatureBayes, MiRdup as well as a Simple Geometric Locator when applied on the same training datasets employed for each tool and evaluated on a common blind test set. (b) In all comparisons, MiRduplexSVM shows superior performance, achieving up to a 60% increase in prediction accuracy for mammalian hairpins and can generalize very well on plant hairpins, without any special optimization. (c) The tool has a number of important applications such as the ability to accurately predict the miRNA or the miRNA*, given the opposite strand of a duplex. Its performance on this task is superior to the 2nts overhang rule commonly used in computational studies and similar to that of a comparative genomic approach, without the need for prior knowledge or the complexity of performing multiple alignments. Finally, it is able to evaluate novel, potential miRNAs found either computationally or experimentally. In relation with recent confidence evaluation methods used in miRBase, MiRduplexSVM was successful in identifying high confidence potential miRNAs. PMID:25961860

  10. Global profiling of miRNAs and the hairpin precursors: insights into miRNA processing and novel miRNA discovery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; You, Xintian; Chen, Tao; Mackowiak, Sebastian D.; Friedländer, Marc R.; Weigt, Martina; Du, Hang; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Chang, Zisong; Dieterich, Christoph; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute an important class of small regulatory RNAs that are derived from distinct hairpin precursors (pre-miRNAs). In contrast to mature miRNAs, which have been characterized in numerous genome-wide studies of different organisms, research on global profiling of pre-miRNAs is limited. Here, using massive parallel sequencing, we have performed global characterization of both mouse mature and precursor miRNAs. In total, 87 369 704 and 252 003 sequencing reads derived from 887 mature and 281 precursor miRNAs were obtained, respectively. Our analysis revealed new aspects of miRNA/pre-miRNA processing and modification, including eight Ago2-cleaved pre-miRNAs, eight new instances of miRNA editing and exclusively 5′ tailed mirtrons. Furthermore, based on the sequences of both mature and precursor miRNAs, we developed a miRNA discovery pipeline, miRGrep, which does not rely on the availability of genome reference sequences. In addition to 239 known mouse pre-miRNAs, miRGrep predicted 41 novel ones with high confidence. Similar as known ones, the mature miRNAs derived from most of these novel loci showed both reduced abundance following Dicer knockdown and the binding with Argonaute2. Evaluation on data sets obtained from Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis sp.11 demonstrated that miRGrep could be widely used for miRNA discovery in metazoans, especially in those without genome reference sequences. PMID:23396444

  11. A framework for stochastic simulation of distribution practices for hotel reservations

    SciTech Connect

    Halkos, George E.; Tsilika, Kyriaki D.

    2015-03-10

    The focus of this study is primarily on the Greek hotel industry. The objective is to design and develop a framework for stochastic simulation of reservation requests, reservation arrivals, cancellations and hotel occupancy with a planning horizon of a tourist season. In Greek hospitality industry there have been two competing policies for reservation planning process up to 2003: reservations coming directly from customers and a reservations management relying on tour operator(s). Recently the Internet along with other emerging technologies has offered the potential to disrupt enduring distribution arrangements. The focus of the study is on the choice of distribution intermediaries. We present an empirical model for the hotel reservation planning process that makes use of a symbolic simulation, Monte Carlo method, as, requests for reservations, cancellations, and arrival rates are all sources of uncertainty. We consider as a case study the problem of determining the optimal booking strategy for a medium size hotel in Skiathos Island, Greece. Probability distributions and parameters estimation result from the historical data available and by following suggestions made in the relevant literature. The results of this study may assist hotel managers define distribution strategies for hotel rooms and evaluate the performance of the reservations management system.

  12. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Berstein, R. H.; Biggs, J.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bocean, V.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Bourkland, K.; Cao, S. V.; Castromonte, C. M.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Coelho, J. A.B.; Cobb, J. H.; Corwin, L.; Crane, D.; Cravens, J. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Ducar, R. J.; De Jong, J. K.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Fields, T. H.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallahger, H. R.; Garkusha, V.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Harding, D.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hays, S.; Heller, K.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Ibrahim, A.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnstone, J.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M.S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Laughton, C.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Loiacono, L.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Michael, D. G.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Sher, S. Moed; Moore, C. D.; Morfin, J.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Murtagh, M.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Olsen, M.; Orchanian, M.; Osprey, S.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Patzak, T.; Pavlovic, Z.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Pfutzner, M. M.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Prieto, P.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ratchford, J.; Rebel, B.; Reilly, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Sauer, L.; Schneps, J.; Schoo, D.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Shanahan, P.; Sharma, R.; Smart, W.; Smith, C.; Sousa, A.; Stefanik, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tassotto, G.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Tinsley, D.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Trostin, I.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vaziri, K.; Villegas, E.; Viren, B.; Vogel, G.; Webber, R. C.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Zarucheisky, V.; Zwaska, R.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  13. The NuMI neutrino beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  14. The NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Bernstein, R. H.; Biggs, J.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bocean, V.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Bourkland, K.; Cao, S. V.; Castromonte, C. M.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Corwin, L.; Crane, D.; Cravens, J. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Ducar, R. J.; De Jong, J. K.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Fields, T. H.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garkusha, V.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Harding, D.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hays, S.; Heller, K.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Ibrahim, A.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnstone, J.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Laughton, C.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Loiacono, L.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Michael, D. G.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Murtagh, M.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O`Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Olsen, M.; Orchanian, M.; Osprey, S.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Prieto, P.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ratchford, J.; Rebel, B.; Reilly, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Sauer, L.; Schneps, J.; Schoo, D.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Shanahan, P.; Sharma, R.; Smart, W.; Smith, C.; Sousa, A.; Stefanik, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tassotto, G.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Tinsley, D.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Trostin, I.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vaziri, K.; Villegas, E.; Viren, B.; Vogel, G.; Webber, R. C.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Zarucheisky, V.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  15. "There's no-fresh air there": narratives of smoke exposure among residents of extended-stay hotels.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Terri; Bryant, Lawrence Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Hotel environments have been identified as places where hospitality workers and patrons are at an increased risk for smoke exposure and associated health hazards. However, little research has been conducted to understand experiences of long-term hotel residents. This article presents narrative accounts of tobacco smoke exposure from 37 residents at extended-stay hotels in a large metropolitan Atlanta county. Residents' narratives included an awareness of smoking as an unhealthy habit but a shared activity that facilitates social engagement at the hotel. Secondhand smoke narratives included descriptions of exposure from roommates and hotel neighbors. Thirdhand smoke narratives included reports of persistent pollution and smoke residue in the hotel environment. These results suggest a need for further research to understand the extent and impact of tobacco smoke exposure among this understudied population. The implications of this research support the efforts of social workers to engage in clean air advocacy and policy making for a vulnerable population. PMID:26027415

  16. "There's no-fresh air there": narratives of smoke exposure among residents of extended-stay hotels.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Terri; Bryant, Lawrence Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Hotel environments have been identified as places where hospitality workers and patrons are at an increased risk for smoke exposure and associated health hazards. However, little research has been conducted to understand experiences of long-term hotel residents. This article presents narrative accounts of tobacco smoke exposure from 37 residents at extended-stay hotels in a large metropolitan Atlanta county. Residents' narratives included an awareness of smoking as an unhealthy habit but a shared activity that facilitates social engagement at the hotel. Secondhand smoke narratives included descriptions of exposure from roommates and hotel neighbors. Thirdhand smoke narratives included reports of persistent pollution and smoke residue in the hotel environment. These results suggest a need for further research to understand the extent and impact of tobacco smoke exposure among this understudied population. The implications of this research support the efforts of social workers to engage in clean air advocacy and policy making for a vulnerable population.

  17. Addendum to NuMI shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The original safety assessment and the Safety Envelope for the NuMI beam line corresponds to 400 kW of beam power. The Main Injector is currently capable of and approved for producing 500 kW of beam power2. However, operation of the NuMI beam line at 400 kW of power brings up the possibility of an occasional excursion above 400 kW due to better than usual tuning in one of the machines upstream of the NuMI beam line. An excursion above the DOE approved Safety Envelope will constitute a safety violation. The purpose of this addendum is to evaluate the radiological issues and modifications required to operate the NuMI beam line at 500 kW. This upgrade will allow 400 kW operations with a reasonable safety margin. Configuration of the NuMI beam line, boundaries, safety system and the methodologies used for the calculations are as described in the original NuMI SAD. While most of the calculations presented in the original shielding assessment were based on Monte Carlo simulations, which were based on the design geometries, most of the results presented in this addendum are based on the measurements conducted by the AD ES&H radiation safety group.

  18. Prediction of miRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Karathanasis, Nestoras; Louloupi, Annita; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Poirazi, Panayiota; Kalantidis, Kriton; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for miRNA target prediction are currently undergoing extensive review and evaluation. There is still a great need for improvement of these tools and bioinformatics approaches are looking towards high-throughput experiments in order to validate predictions. The combination of large-scale techniques with computational tools will not only provide greater credence to computational predictions but also lead to the better understanding of specific biological questions. Current miRNA target prediction tools utilize probabilistic learning algorithms, machine learning methods and even empirical biologically defined rules in order to build models based on experimentally verified miRNA targets. Large-scale protein downregulation assays and next-generation sequencing (NGS) are now being used to validate methodologies and compare the performance of existing tools. Tools that exhibit greater correlation between computational predictions and protein downregulation or RNA downregulation are considered the state of the art. Moreover, efficiency in prediction of miRNA targets that are concurrently verified experimentally provides additional validity to computational predictions and further highlights the competitive advantage of specific tools and their efficacy in extracting biologically significant results. In this review paper, we discuss the computational methods for miRNA target prediction and provide a detailed comparison of methodologies and features utilized by each specific tool. Moreover, we provide an overview of current state-of-the-art high-throughput methods used in miRNA target prediction. PMID:25577381

  19. Tumor-suppressing roles of miR-214 and miR-218 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LIU, BO; TIAN, YANFENG; LI, FANG; ZHAO, ZENGREN; JIANG, XIA; ZHAI, CONGJIE; HAN, XIAODONG; ZHANG, LIKE

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. MicroRNA-214 (miR-214) and microRNA-218 (miR-218) have shown the function of tumor suppressors in various types of human cancers. However, the biological functions of miR-214 and miR-218 in breast cancer have not been elucidated completely. The present study evaluated the expression and biological function of miR-214 and miR-218 in human breast cancer. Our results revealed that the expression of miR-214 and miR-218 were significantly decreased in breast cancer tissues compared with adjacent tissues. The aberrant expression of miR-214 and miR-218 were negatively associated with Ki-67, and the miR-218 expression was positively associated with progesterone receptor (PR) in breast cancer tissues. In vitro, the cell proliferation and migration were decreased, cell apoptosis was induced, and cell cycle was also disturbed in miR-214 or miR-218 overexpressed breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that miR-214 and miR-218 function as tumor suppressors in breast cancer, and may become biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:27109339

  20. Telomere Length, TERT, and miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Andrew J.; Wolff, Roger K.; Mullany, Lila E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that miRNAs are involved in the control of telomeres. We test that hypothesis by examining the association between miRNAs and telomere length (TL). Additionally, we evaluate if genetic variation in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is associated with miRNA expression levels. We use data from a population-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), where we have previously shown associations between TL and TERT and CRC, to test associations between TL and miRNA expression and TERT and miRNA expression. To gain insight into functions of miRNAs associated with TERT we tested linear associations between miRNAs and their targeted gene mRNAs. An Agilent platform that contained information on over 2000 miRNAs was used. TL was measured using a multiplexed quantitative PCR (qPCR). RNAseq was used to assess gene expression. Our sample consisted of 1152 individuals with SNP data and miRNA expression data; 363 individuals with both TL and miRNA; and 148 individuals with miRNA and mRNA data. Thirty-three miRNAs were directly associated with TL after adjusting for age and sex (false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05). TERT rs2736118 was associated with differences in miRNA expression between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa for 75 miRNAs (FDR <0.05). Genes regulated by these miRNAs, as indicated by mRNA/miRNA associations, were associated with major signaling pathways beyond their TL-related functions, including PTEN, and PI3K/AKT signaling. Our data support a direct association between miRNAs and TL; differences in miRNA expression levels by TERT genotype were observed. Based on miRNA and targeted mRNA associations our data suggest that TERT is involved in non-TL-related functions by acting through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27627813

  1. Telomere Length, TERT, and miRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Pellatt, Andrew J; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that miRNAs are involved in the control of telomeres. We test that hypothesis by examining the association between miRNAs and telomere length (TL). Additionally, we evaluate if genetic variation in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is associated with miRNA expression levels. We use data from a population-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), where we have previously shown associations between TL and TERT and CRC, to test associations between TL and miRNA expression and TERT and miRNA expression. To gain insight into functions of miRNAs associated with TERT we tested linear associations between miRNAs and their targeted gene mRNAs. An Agilent platform that contained information on over 2000 miRNAs was used. TL was measured using a multiplexed quantitative PCR (qPCR). RNAseq was used to assess gene expression. Our sample consisted of 1152 individuals with SNP data and miRNA expression data; 363 individuals with both TL and miRNA; and 148 individuals with miRNA and mRNA data. Thirty-three miRNAs were directly associated with TL after adjusting for age and sex (false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05). TERT rs2736118 was associated with differences in miRNA expression between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa for 75 miRNAs (FDR <0.05). Genes regulated by these miRNAs, as indicated by mRNA/miRNA associations, were associated with major signaling pathways beyond their TL-related functions, including PTEN, and PI3K/AKT signaling. Our data support a direct association between miRNAs and TL; differences in miRNA expression levels by TERT genotype were observed. Based on miRNA and targeted mRNA associations our data suggest that TERT is involved in non-TL-related functions by acting through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27627813

  2. Novel regulation and functional interaction of polycistronic miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Mary; Islam, Abul B M M K; Frolov, Maxim V

    2016-01-01

    The importance of microRNAs in gene expression and disease is well recognized. However, what is less appreciated is that almost half of miRNA genes are organized in polycistronic clusters and are therefore coexpressed. The mir-11∼998 cluster consists of two miRNAs, miR-11 and miR-998. Here, we describe a novel layer of regulation that links the processing and expression of miR-998 to the presence of the mir-11 gene. We show that the presence of miR-11 in the pri-miRNA is required for processing by Drosha, and deletion of mir-11 prevents the expression of miR-998. Replacing mir-11 with an unrelated miRNA rescued miR-998 expression in vivo and in vitro, as did expressing miR-998 from a shorter, more canonical miRNA scaffold. The embedded regulation of miR-998 is functionally important because unchecked miR-998 expression in the absence of miR-11 resulted in pleiotropic developmental defects. This novel regulation of expression of miRNAs within a cluster is not limited to the mir-11∼998 cluster and, thus, likely reflects the more general cis-regulation of expression of individual miRNAs. Collectively, our results uncover a novel layer of regulation within miRNA clusters that tempers the functions of the individual miRNAs. Unlinking their expression has the potential to change the expression of multiple miRNA targets and shift a biological response. PMID:26554028

  3. Aberrant miRNA profiles associated with chronic benzene poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Yang, Jing; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    Chronic occupational benzene exposure is associated with an increased risk of hematological malignancies. To gain an insight into the new biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of chronic benzene poisoning, miRNA profiles and mRNA expression pattern from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic benzene poisoning patients and health controls matched age and gender without benzene exposure were performed using the Exiqon miRNA PCR ARRAY and Gene Chip Human Gene 2.0ST Arrays, respectively. Totally, 6 up-regulated miRNAs (miR-34a, miR-205, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-185 and miR-423-5p-2) and 7 down-regulated miRNAs (miR-133a, miR-543, hsa-miR-130a, miR-27b,miR-223, miR-142-5p and miR-320b) were found in chronic benzene poisoning group compared to health controls (P ≤ 0.05). By integrating miRNA and mRNA expression data, these differential miRNAs were mainly involved in regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, axon guidance, regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, nervous system development, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Further, pathway analysis indicated that SMAD4, PLCB1, NFAT5, GNAI2, PTEN, VEGFA, BCL2, CTNNB1 and CCND1 were key target genes of differential miRNAs which were implicated in Adherens junction, TGF-beta signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, tight junction and Pathways in cancer. In conclusion, the aberrant miRNAs might be a potential biomarker of chronic benzene poisoning.

  4. Preliminary report: outbreak of Legionnaires disease in a hotel in Calp, Spain, update on 22 February 2012.

    PubMed

    Vanaclocha, H; Guiral, S; Morera, V; Calatayud, M A; Castellanos, M; Moya, V; Jerez, G; Gonzalez, F

    2012-02-23

    Research is ongoing on eighteen cases of Legionellosis, including four deaths, identified among tourists and employees in a hotel in Calp, Spain. Cases occurred during a period of two months, indicating the possibility of a point-source transmission at the hotel. An environmental investigation identified several positive samples in the hotel, which as a precautionary measure, was closed until requested improvements were made. Surveillance measures currently remain active.

  5. miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador

    2015-02-15

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological pathways. As their role in phagocytosis remains poorly understood, we investigated their impact on phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells. Seven miRNAs (miR-24, -30b, -101, 142-3p, -652-3p, -652-5p, and -1275) that were differentially expressed during monocyte to macrophage (Mφ) and monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation were screened for their potential role in phagocytosis. Among these, overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p in human monocyte-derived Mφ, DC, monocytes, and PBMCs significantly attenuate phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the secretion of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40. miRNA-mediated changes in cytokine profiles were observed at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels and importantly exhibit miRNA-specific impact. To examine the underlying mechanism, we monitored the expression of phagocytosis pathway-associated genes and identified several genes that were altered in Mφ and DC transfected with miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p mimics. Some of these genes with altered expression also harbor putative miRNA binding sites. We show that miR-142-3p directly regulates protein kinase Cα (PKCα), a key gene involved in phagocytosis. Interestingly, miR-142-3p and PKCα exhibit antagonistic expression during Mφ and DC differentiation. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKCα in Mφ leads to reduced bacterial uptake, further highlighting the role of the gene in phagocytosis. Overall, these results demonstrate that miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis and associated cytokine production in myeloid inflammatory cells through modulation of various genes involved in the pathway.

  6. miRNA-335 and miRNA-182 affect the occurrence of tongue squamous cell carcinoma by targeting survivin

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Deming; Wu, Ying; Liu, Jun; Lao, Xiaomei; Zhang, Sien; Liao, Guiqing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the roles of two microRNAs (miRs) that have been reported to be differentially expressed in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC), miR-335 and miR-182. In total, 20 tumor tissue samples and 20 corresponding adjacent non-cancerous samples were collected from patients with TSCC to measure the expression of miR-335 and miR-182 and the potential shared target of these miRs, survivin, using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In the TSCC tissue samples, significantly decreased expression of the two miRs and increased expression of survivin were detected compared with adjacent non-cancerous controls. Subsequently, it was confirmed that survivin was the target gene of miR-335 and miR-182 using a luciferase assay in TSCC cells. In order to examine the function of miR-335 and miR-182 in the development of TSCC, TSCC cells were transiently transfected with the mimics of the two miRs, and it was confirmed that the introduction of miR-335 and miR-182 to cells suppressed the expression of survivin and markedly inhibited the proliferation of the TSCC cells. Furthermore, miR-335 and miR-182 were found to induce cell cycle arrest by suppressing the expression of survivin. The present study revealed a negative regulatory role of miR-335 and miR-182 in the proliferation of TSCC cells by targeting survivin, and miR-335 and miR-182 may be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of TSCC. PMID:27698823

  7. miRNA-335 and miRNA-182 affect the occurrence of tongue squamous cell carcinoma by targeting survivin

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Deming; Wu, Ying; Liu, Jun; Lao, Xiaomei; Zhang, Sien; Liao, Guiqing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the roles of two microRNAs (miRs) that have been reported to be differentially expressed in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC), miR-335 and miR-182. In total, 20 tumor tissue samples and 20 corresponding adjacent non-cancerous samples were collected from patients with TSCC to measure the expression of miR-335 and miR-182 and the potential shared target of these miRs, survivin, using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In the TSCC tissue samples, significantly decreased expression of the two miRs and increased expression of survivin were detected compared with adjacent non-cancerous controls. Subsequently, it was confirmed that survivin was the target gene of miR-335 and miR-182 using a luciferase assay in TSCC cells. In order to examine the function of miR-335 and miR-182 in the development of TSCC, TSCC cells were transiently transfected with the mimics of the two miRs, and it was confirmed that the introduction of miR-335 and miR-182 to cells suppressed the expression of survivin and markedly inhibited the proliferation of the TSCC cells. Furthermore, miR-335 and miR-182 were found to induce cell cycle arrest by suppressing the expression of survivin. The present study revealed a negative regulatory role of miR-335 and miR-182 in the proliferation of TSCC cells by targeting survivin, and miR-335 and miR-182 may be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of TSCC.

  8. The Type I IFN-Induced miRNA, miR-21

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chuan He; Li, Kui; Pfeffer, Susan R.; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines not only has antiviral properties at various steps in the viral replication cycle, but also anticancer activity through multiple pathways that include inhibiting cell proliferation, regulating cellular responses to inducers of apoptosis and modulating angiogenesis and the immune system. IFNs are known to induce their biological activity through the induction of protein encoding IFN-stimulated genes. However, recent studies have established that IFNs also induce the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that suppress gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs play critical roles in tumorigenesis and have been implicated to act as either oncogenes or tumor suppressors in various human cancers. Therefore, IFN-induced miRNAs play an important role, not only in the host response to innate immune response to cancer, but also in the tumorigenic process itself. Furthermore, IFN-induced miRNAs may participate in and/or orchestrate antiviral defense in certain viral infections. In this review, we describe our recent studies on the induction of miR-21 by type I IFN, the role of the STAT3 and NFκB signaling pathways in IFN-induced miR-21 expression, the role of miR-21 in different cancers and the role of miR-21 in regulating the antiviral response. PMID:26610525

  9. Close correlation between magnetic properties and the soft phonon mode of the structural transition in <mi>BaFe>2<mi>As>2 and <mi>SrFe>2<mi>As>2

    SciTech Connect

    Parshall, D.; Pintschovius, L.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Castellan, J. -P.; Lamago, D.; Mittal, R.; Wolf, Th.; Reznik, Dmitry

    2015-04-27

    Parent compounds of Fe-based superconductors undergo a structural phase transition from a tetragonal to an orthorhombic structure. We investigated the temperature dependence of the frequencies of TA phonons that extrapolate to the shear vibrational mode at the zone center, which corresponds to the orthorhombic deformation of the crystal structure at low temperatures in <mi>BaFe>2<mi>As>2 and <mi>SrFe>2<mi>As>2. We found that acoustic phonons at small wave vectors soften gradually towards the transition from high temperatures, tracking the increase of the size of slowly fluctuating magnetic domains. On cooling below the transition to base temperature the phonons harden, following the square of the magnetic moment (which we find is proportional to the anisotropy gap). Finally, our results provide evidence for close correlation between magnetic and phonon properties in Fe-based superconductors.

  10. CCAR1 5′ UTR as a natural miRancer of miR-1254 overrides tamoxifen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gaopeng; Wu, Xiaoli; Qian, Wenchang; Cai, Huayong; Sun, Xinbao; Zhang, Weijie; Tan, Sheng; Wu, Zhengsheng; Qian, Pengxu; Ding, Keshuo; Lu, Xuefei; Zhang, Xiao; Yan, Hong; Song, Haifeng; Guang, Shouhong; Wu, Qingfa; Lobie, Peter E; Shan, Ge; Zhu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) typically bind to unstructured miRNA-binding sites in target RNAs, leading to a mutual repression of expression. Here, we report that miR-1254 interacts with structured elements in cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1) 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and this interaction enhances the stability of both molecules. miR-1254 can also act as a repressor when binding to unstructured sites in its targets. Interestingly, structured miR-1254-targeting sites act as both a functional RNA motif-sensing unit, and an independent RNA functional unit that enhances miR-1254 expression. Artificially designed miRNA enhancers, termed “miRancers”, can stabilize and enhance the activity of miRNAs of interest. We further demonstrate that CCAR1 5′ UTR as a natural miRancer of endogenous miR-1254 re-sensitizes tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells to tamoxifen. Thus, our study presents a novel model of miRNA function, wherein highly structured miRancer-like motif-containing RNA fragments or miRancer molecules specifically interact with miRNAs, leading to reciprocal stabilization. PMID:27002217

  11. The microRNAs miR-373 and miR-520c promote tumour invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qihong; Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Schrier, Mariette; le Sage, Carlos; Nagel, Remco; Nair, Suresh; Egan, David A; Li, Anping; Huang, Guanghua; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Coukos, George; Zhang, Lin; Puré, Ellen; Agami, Reuven

    2008-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded, noncoding RNAs that are important in many biological processes. Although the oncogenic and tumour-suppressive functions of several miRNAs have been characterized, the role of miRNAs in mediating tumour metastasis was addressed only recently and still remains largely unexplored. To identify potential metastasis-promoting miRNAs, we set up a genetic screen using a non-metastatic, human breast tumour cell line that was transduced with a miRNA-expression library and subjected to a trans-well migration assay. We found that human miR-373 and miR-520c stimulated cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo, and that certain cancer cell lines depend on endogenous miR-373 activity to migrate efficiently. Mechanistically, the migration phenotype of miR-373 and miR-520c can be explained by suppression of CD44. We found significant upregulation of miR-373 in clinical breast cancer metastasis samples that correlated inversely with CD44 expression. Taken together, our findings indicate that miRNAs are involved in tumour migration and invasion, and implicate miR-373 and miR-520c as metastasis-promoting miRNAs.

  12. miR-126 and miR-126*: new players in cancer.

    PubMed

    Meister, Jeannette; Schmidt, Mirko H H

    2010-01-01

    Cancer progression is characterized by autarky in growth signals, insensitivity to growth-restrictive signals, evasion of apoptosis, a limitless potential to replicate, sustained angiogenesis, and tissue invasion, including metastasis. The regulation of these cellular processes relies on a fine-tuned control of molecular signal cascades. In recent years, short noncoding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have been described as a novel class of molecular regulators. These affect various signaling cascades during the progression of neoplastic diseases by the regulation of gene expression on the post-transcriptional level. The novel endothelial cell-derived secreted protein epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) has been suggested to control vascular tubulogenesis. Further, the two biologically active miRNAs miR-126 and its complement miR-126*, which are encoded by intron 7 of the egfl7 gene, have been described to mediate vascular functions. Knock-out studies in zebrafish and mice suggested a major role of miR-126 in angiogenesis and vascular integrity, which was mediated by the repression of inhibitors of VEGF-induced proliferation in endothelial cells. Recent studies revealed the distribution and function of miR-126 and miR-126* in various types of cancer, and assigned a role to both miRNAs as suppressors of tumor formation. Indeed, miR-126 and miR-126* have been reported to impair cancer progression through signaling pathways that control tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and survival. Conversely, miR-126 and miR-126* may have a supportive role in the progression of cancer as well, which might be mediated by the promotion of blood vessel growth and inflammation. In this work, we will summarize the current knowledge on functions of miR-126/miR-126* that are relevant for cancer formation, and we will discuss their potential clinical use as predictive markers of survival and application as novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of neoplastic

  13. Impact of Host Genes and Strand Selection on miRNA and miRNA* Expression

    PubMed Central

    Biasiolo, Marta; Sales, Gabriele; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; Todoerti, Katia; Bisognin, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Romualdi, Chiara; Neri, Antonino; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of miRNAs expression plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of genetic, multifactorial disorders and in human cancers. We exploited sequence, genomic and expression information to investigate two main aspects of post-transcriptional regulation in miRNA biogenesis, namely strand selection regulation and expression relationships between intragenic miRNAs and host genes. We considered miRNAs expression profiles, measured in five sizeable microarray datasets, including samples from different normal cell types and tissues, as well as different tumours and disease states. First, the study of expression profiles of “sister” miRNA pairs (miRNA/miRNA*, 5′ and 3′ strands of the same hairpin precursor) showed that the strand selection is highly regulated since it shows tissue-/cell-/condition-specific modulation. We used information about the direction and the strength of the strand selection bias to perform an unsupervised cluster analysis for the sample classification evidencing that is able to distinguish among different tissues, and sometimes between normal and malignant cells. Then, considering a minimum expression threshold, in few miRNA pairs only one mature miRNA is always present in all considered cell types, whereas the majority of pairs were concurrently expressed in some cell types and alternatively in others. In a significant fraction of concurrently expressed pairs, the major and the minor forms found at comparable levels may contribute to post-transcriptional gene silencing, possibly in a coordinate way. In the second part of the study, the behaved tendency to co-expression of intragenic miRNAs and their “host” mRNA genes was confuted by expression profiles examination, suggesting that the expression profile of a given host gene can hardly be a good estimator of co-transcribed miRNA(s) for post-transcriptional regulatory networks inference. Our results point out the regulatory importance of post-transcriptional phases of mi

  14. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  15. Introns of plant pri-miRNAs enhance miRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bielewicz, Dawid; Kalak, Malgorzata; Kalyna, Maria; Windels, David; Barta, Andrea; Vazquez, Franck; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Plant MIR genes are independent transcription units that encode long primary miRNA precursors, which usually contain introns. For two miRNA genes, MIR163 and MIR161, we show that introns are crucial for the accumulation of proper levels of mature miRNA. Removal of the intron in both cases led to a drop-off in the level of mature miRNAs. We demonstrate that the stimulating effects of the intron mostly reside in the 5′ss rather than on a genuine splicing event. Our findings are biologically significant as the presence of functional splice sites in the MIR163 gene appears mandatory for pathogen-triggered accumulation of miR163 and proper regulation of at least one of its targets. PMID:23681439

  16. miR-15/miR-16 loss, miR-21 upregulation, or deregulation of their target genes predicts poor prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bonci, Désirée; De Maria, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    It is clear that several prostate cancers remain indolent whereas others develop into advanced forms. There is a need to improve patient management by identifying biomarkers for personalized treatment. We demonstrated that miR-15/miR-16 loss, miR-21 upregulation, and deregulation of their target genes represent a promising predictive signature of poor patient prognosis. PMID:27652312

  17. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  18. Hepatic miRNA expression reprogrammed by Plasmodium chabaudi malaria.

    PubMed

    Delić, Denis; Dkhil, Mohamed; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Wunderlich, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Evidence is accumulating that miRNAs are critically implicated in the outcome of diseases, but little information is available for infectious diseases. This study investigates the hepatic miRNA signature in female C57BL/6 mice infected with self-healing Plasmodium chabaudi malaria. Primary infections result in approximately 50% peak parasitemia on day 8 p.i., approximately 80% survival, and development of protective immunity. The latter is evidenced as 100% survival and 1.5% peak parasitemia upon homolog re-infections of those mice which are still alive on day 56 after primary infection. Such immune mice exhibit increased levels of IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes and still contain P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes in their livers as revealed by light microscopy and PCR analysis. Primary infections, but not secondary infections, induce an upregulation of hepatic mRNAs encoding IL-1β, TNFα, IFNγ, NF-κB, and iNOS, and a downregulation of mRNAs for CYP7A1 and SULT2A2, respectively. Using miRXplore microarrays containing 634 mouse miRNAs in combination with quantitative RT-PCR, the liver is found to respond to primary infections with an upregulation of the three miRNA species miR-26b, MCMV-miR-M23-1-5p, and miR-1274a, and a downregulation of the 16 miRNA species miR-101b, let-7a, let-7g, miR-193a-3p, miR-192, miR-142-5p, miR-465d, miR-677, miR-98, miR-694, miR-374(*), miR-450b-5p, miR-464, miR-377, miR-20a(*), and miR-466d-3p, respectively. Surprisingly, about the same pattern of miRNA expression is revealed in immune mice, and this pattern is even sustained upon homolog re-infections of immune mice. These data suggest that development of protective immunity against malarial blood stages of P. chabaudi is associated with a reprogramming of the expression of distinct miRNA species in the female mouse liver.

  19. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. Results The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1—5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. Conclusions The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we

  20. MI Gap Clearing Kicker Magnet Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The kicker system requirements were originally conceived for the NOvA project. NOvA is a neutrino experiment located in Minnesota. To achieve the desired neutrino flux several upgrades are required to the accelerator complex. The Recycler will be used as a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI). As the Recycler is the same size as the MI, it is possible to do a single turn fill ({approx}11 {micro}sec), minimizing the proton injection time in the MI cycle and maximizing the protons on target. The Recycler can then be filled with beam while the MI is ramping to extract beam to the target. To do this requires two new transfer lines. The existing Recycler injection line was designed for 10{pi} pbar beams, not the 20{pi} proton beams we anticipate from the Booster. The existing Recycler extraction line allows for proton injection through the MI, while we want direct injection from the Booster. These two lines will be decommissioned. The new injection line from the MI8 line into the Recycler will start at 848 and end with injection kickers at RR104. The new extraction line in the RR30 straight section will start with a new extraction kicker at RR232 and end with new MI injection kickers at MI308. Finally, to reduce beam loss activation in the enclosure, a new gap clearing kicker will be used to extract uncaptured beam created during the slip stack injection process down the existing dump line. It was suggested that the MI could benefit from this type of system immediately. This led to the early installation of the gap clearing system in the MI, followed by moving the system to Recycler during NOvA. The specifications also changed during this process. Initially the rise and fall time requirements were 38 ns and the field stability was {+-}1%. The 38 ns is based on having a gap of 2 RF buckets between injections. (There are 84 RF buckets that can be filled from the Booster for each injection, but 82 would be filled with beam. MI and Recycler contain 588 RF buckets

  1. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q value < 0.05). The differential expression of 7 selected miRNAs was confirmed by real time PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P < 0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC. PMID:24966896

  2. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q value<0.05). The differential expression of 7 selected miRNAs was confirmed by real time PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P<0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC. PMID:24966896

  3. Polysome shift assay for direct measurement of miRNA inhibition by anti-miRNA drugs.

    PubMed

    Androsavich, John R; Sobczynski, Daniel J; Liu, Xueqing; Pandya, Shweta; Kaimal, Vivek; Owen, Tate; Liu, Kai; MacKenna, Deidre A; Chau, B Nelson

    2016-01-29

    Anti-miRNA (anti-miR) oligonucleotide drugs are being developed to inhibit overactive miRNAs linked to disease. To help facilitate the transition from concept to clinic, new research tools are required. Here we report a novel method--miRNA Polysome Shift Assay (miPSA)--for direct measurement of miRNA engagement by anti-miR, which is more robust than conventional pharmacodynamics using downstream target gene derepression. The method takes advantage of size differences between active and inhibited miRNA complexes. Active miRNAs bind target mRNAs in high molecular weight polysome complexes, while inhibited miRNAs are sterically blocked by anti-miRs from forming this interaction. These two states can be assessed by fractionating tissue or cell lysates using differential ultracentrifugation through sucrose gradients. Accordingly, anti-miR treatment causes a specific shift of cognate miRNA from heavy to light density fractions. The magnitude of this shift is dose-responsive and maintains a linear relationship with downstream target gene derepression while providing a substantially higher dynamic window for aiding drug discovery. In contrast, we found that the commonly used 'RT-interference' approach, which assumes that inhibited miRNA is undetectable by RT-qPCR, can yield unreliable results that poorly reflect the binding stoichiometry of anti-miR to miRNA. We also demonstrate that the miPSA has additional utility in assessing anti-miR cross-reactivity with miRNAs sharing similar seed sequences.

  4. MIGS: miRNA-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Felippes, Felipe Fenselau de; Wang, Jia-wei; Weigel, Detlef

    2012-05-01

    Gene silencing is an important tool in the study of gene function. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and hairpin RNA interference (hpRNAi), both of which rely on small interfering RNAs, together with artificial microRNAs (amiRNA), are amongst the most popular methods for reduction of gene activity in plants. However, all three approaches have limitations. Here, we introduce miRNA-induced gene silencing (MIGS). This method exploits a special 22-nucleotide miRNA of Arabidopsis thaliana, miR173, which can trigger production of another class of small RNAs called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs). We show that fusion of gene fragments to an upstream miR173 target site is sufficient for effective silencing of the corresponding endogenous gene. MIGS can be reliably used for the knockdown of a single gene or of multiple unrelated genes. In addition, we show that MIGS can be applied to other species by co-expression of miR173.

  5. Foodborne gastroenteritis due to Norwalk virus in a Winnipeg hotel.

    PubMed Central

    Sekla, L; Stackiw, W; Dzogan, S; Sargeant, D

    1989-01-01

    Within 1 week four separate incidents of gastroenteritis presumed to be foodborne were reported by guests of a Winnipeg hotel. Investigation revealed poor food-handling practices and illness among the kitchen staff. Elevated bacterial counts and Escherichia coli were found in 15 of 24 samples of food tested, and Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 2 pastry samples. Culture of 14 stool samples for bacteria yielded Clostridium perfringens in 1 sample from a staff member and coagulase-positive S. aureus in 2 samples from staff members and 3 from guests. All of the S. aureus isolates were nonenterotoxigenic and had three different phage patterns. Electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy revealed the prototype Norwalk virus in five (56%) of nine stool samples; four samples were from guests, and one was from a kitchen employee. The employee had had diarrhea 24 hours before the first outbreak and was thus believed to be the source of the virus infection, possibly through food handling. This is the first report of Norwalk virus isolation and the first of foodborne Norwalk virus transmission in Canada. A review of foodborne Norwalk virus infections is presented. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2541881

  6. The isolation of low frequency impact sounds in hotel construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, John J.; Dong, David W.

    2002-11-01

    One of the design challenges in the acoustical design of hotels is reducing low frequency sounds from footfalls occurring on both carpeted and hard-surfaced floors. Research on low frequency impact noise [W. Blazier and R. DuPree, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1521-1532 (1994)] resulted in a conclusion that in wood construction low frequency impact sounds were clearly audible and that feasible control methods were not available. The results of numerous FIIC (Field Impact Insulation Class) measurements performed in accordance with ASTM E1007 indicate the lack of correlation between FIIC ratings and the reaction of occupants in the room below. The measurements presented include FIIC ratings and sound pressure level measurements below the ASTM E1007 low frequency limit of 100 Hertz, and reveal that excessive sound levels in the frequency range of 63 to 100 Hertz correlate with occupant complaints. Based upon this history, a tentative criterion for maximum impact sound level in the low frequency range is presented. The results presented of modifying existing constructions to reduce the transmission of impact sounds at low frequencies indicate that there may be practical solutions to this longstanding problem.

  7. The regulation roles of miR-125b, miR-221 and miR-27b in porcine Salmonella infection signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Min; Gao, Weihua; Yang, Jun; Liang, Xiongyan; Luo, Jingbo; Huang, Tinghua

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNA molecules typically 18–22 nucleotides long that can suppress the expression of their target genes. Several laboratories have attempted to identify miRNAs from the pig that are involved in Salmonella infection. These bioinformatics strategies using the newly available genomic sequence are generally successful. Here, we report an in silico identification of miRNAs in pig focusing on the Salmonella infection pathway, and further investigated the differential expression of those miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR during pre- and post-natal stage of Salmonella inoculation from the peripheral blood of commercially breed pigs. We identified 29 miRNAs that have predicted targets in the Salmonella infection pathway and nine of them were not yet described in pig. In addition, the expression of nine selected miRNAs was validated in the peripheral blood by northern blotting. Through expression analyses, differences were found between pre- and post-natal stages of Salmonella inoculation for miR-221, miR-125b and miR-27b—all of them were suppressed 2 days after Salmonella inoculation. The predicted targets of those three miRNAs were validated by luciferase reporter assays. We show that FOS is a direct target of miR-221, miR-125b can suppress MAPK14, and miR-27b can target IFNG. These findings will be helpful in understanding the function and processing of these miRNAs in Salmonella infection. The miRNA differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of commercial breed pigs suggest that it can be used as genetic markers for salmonella infection resistance in pigs. PMID:27474500

  8. miRConnect 2.0: identification of oncogenic, antagonistic miRNA families in three human cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on their function in cancer micro(mi)RNAs are often grouped as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes. However, miRNAs regulate multiple tumor relevant signaling pathways raising the question whether two oncogenic miRNAs could be functional antagonists by promoting different steps in tumor progression. We recently developed a method to connect miRNAs to biological function by comparing miRNA and gene array expression data from the NCI60 cell lines without using miRNA target predictions (miRConnect). Results We have now extended this analysis to three primary human cancers (ovarian cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma) available at the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and have correlated the expression of the clustered miRNAs with 158 oncogenic signatures (miRConnect 2.0). We have identified functionally antagonistic groups of miRNAs. One group (the agonists), which contains many of the members of the miR-17 family, correlated with c-Myc induced genes and E2F gene signatures. A group that was directly antagonistic to the agonists in all three primary cancers contains miR-221 and miR-222. Since both miR-17 ~ 92 and miR-221/222 are considered to be oncogenic this points to a functional antagonism of different oncogenic miRNAs. Analysis of patient data revealed that in certain patients agonistic miRNAs predominated, whereas in other patients antagonists predominated. In glioblastoma a high ratio of miR-17 to miR-221/222 was predictive of better overall survival suggesting that high miR-221/222 expression is more adverse for patients than high miR-17 expression. Conclusion miRConnect 2.0 is useful for identifying activities of miRNAs that are relevant to primary cancers. The new correlation data on miRNAs and mRNAs deregulated in three primary cancers are available at miRConnect.org PMID:23497354

  9. Fluoxetine Increases the Expression of miR-572 and miR-663a in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mundalil Vasu, Mahesh; Anitha, Ayyappan; Takahashi, Taro; Thanseem, Ismail; Iwata, Keiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on the developed neurons in the adult brain. In contrast, the drug may be deleterious to immature or undifferentiated neural cells, although the mechanism is unclear. Recent investigations have suggested that microRNAs (miRNA) may be critical for effectiveness of psychotropic drugs including SSRI. We investigated whether fluoxetine could modulate expressions of neurologically relevant miRNAs in two neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Initial screening results revealed that three (miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) and four (miR-320a, miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) miRNAs were up-regulated in SK-N-SH cells and SH-SY5Y cells, respectively, after 24 hours treatment of fluoxetine (1–25 μM). Cell viability was reduced according to the dose of fluoxetine. The upregulation of miR-572 and miR-663a was consistent in both the SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH cells, confirmed by a larger scale culture condition. Our data is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine could increase the expression of miRNAs in undifferentiated neural cells, and that putative target genes of those miRNAs have been shown to be involved in fundamental neurodevelopmental processes. PMID:27716787

  10. miR-29 and miR-30 regulate B-Myb expression during cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ivan; Cazalla, Demian; Almstead, Laura L.; Steitz, Joan A.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a form of irreversible growth arrest and a major tumor suppressor mechanism. We show here that the miR-29 and miR-30 microRNA families are up-regulated during induced and replicative senescence and that up-regulation requires activation of the Rb pathway. Expression of a reporter construct containing the 3′UTR of the B-Myb oncogene is repressed during senescence, and repression is blocked by mutations in conserved miR-29 and miR-30 binding sites in the B-Myb 3′UTR. In proliferating cells, transfection of miR-29 and miR-30 represses a reporter construct containing the wild-type but not the mutant B-Myb 3′UTR, and repression of the mutant 3′UTR is reinstituted by compensatory mutations in miR-29 and miR-30 that restore binding to the mutant sites. miR-29 and miR-30 introduction also represses expression of endogenous B-Myb and inhibits cellular DNA synthesis. Finally, interference with miR-29 and miR-30 expression inhibits senescence. These findings demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-30 regulate B-Myb expression by binding to its 3′UTR and suggest that these microRNAs play an important role in Rb-driven cellular senescence. PMID:21187425

  11. Economic analysis of the water demand in the hotels and restaurants sector: Shadow prices and elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Ana; Atwi, Majed; Barberán, Ramón; Mur, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Despite the growing economic importance of tourism, and its impact on relative water shortage, little is known about the role that water plays in the productive process of hotels and restaurants and, therefore, the possible implications of water demand management policy for this sector. This study aims to fill this gap. It is based on the microdata of 676 firms in the sector, operating in the city of Zaragoza (Spain) for a 12 year period. Based on the Translog cost function, we estimate the shadow price of water in the short run and, from a long-run perspective, its direct price elasticity, its cross elasticities relative to labor, capital, and supplies, and its elasticity with respect to the level of output. The results obtained show that water provides sector firms returns that are on average higher than its price, although in the case of hotels the margin is really narrow. This situation provides policy makers with a margin for applying price increases without affecting the sector's viability, with some caution in the case of hotels. Water demand elasticity equals -0.38 in the case of hotels, but it is not significant in the case of restaurants and bar-cafes; hence, only in hotels is there potential for influencing water use patterns, encouraging the resource's conservation through pricing policy. Moreover, capital is a substitutive factor of water, and the elasticity of water with respect to output is 0.40, all of which should also be considered by policy makers in water resource management.

  12. Energy End-Use Patterns in Full-Service Hotels: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Placet, Marylynn; Katipamula, Srinivas; Liu, Bing; Dirks, James A.; Xie, YuLong; Sullivan, Greg; Walent, Jim; Williamson, Rebecca

    2010-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a program -- Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) -- to work with private-sector companies in the design of highly-efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a project with a major hotel company to retrofit a full-service, large hotel with the goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 30%. The first step of the project was an intensive metering and monitoring effort aimed at understanding energy end use patterns in the hotel. About 10% of the guest rooms (32), as well as circuits for most of the end uses in public spaces (lighting, elevators, air handlers and other HVAC system components, and various equipment), were equipped with meters. Data are being collected at 1- or 5-minute intervals and downloaded on a monthly basis for analysis. This paper presents results from the first four months of the monitoring effort, which revealed energy end-use consumption patterns, variability of guest room energy use, daily load curves, monthly variations, and other aspects of hotel energy use. Metered end-use data for hotels at this level of detail are not available from any currently-available public sources. This study presents unique information and insight into energy end-use patterns in the lodging sector of commercial buildings and can also serve as a case study of a complex sub-metering project.

  13. Suicide by jumping from high-rise hotels. Fulton County, Georgia, 1967-1986.

    PubMed

    Hanzlick, R; Masterson, K; Walker, B

    1990-12-01

    During a 20-year period from 1967 through 1986, 19 suicidal jumps from high-rise hotels (HRHs) accounted for 24% of all fatal jumping episodes and 1% of all suicides in Fulton County, Georgia, U.S.A. The rate of suicidal jumps from HRHs did not increase during the study period. The number of fatal jumps per hotel-year correlated with the height of the interior hotel atrium. The mean age for all victims was 34 years, and 63% of victims were white males. The majority of victims were local residents who were alone when they jumped and were not registered hotel guests. Registered guests tended to jump from the floor on which their room was located whereas nonregistered individuals tended to jump from the upper-most floors in the hotel. Of 19 HRH jumps, 13 occurred from the inside. Suicide notes were found in 37% of cases. HRH jumps were least common between 6 p.m. and midnight, all decedents were dressed in street clothing, only one was heard to have screamed, and all but one were dead on the scene. Alcohol and drug involvement was minimal. We hope that this information will be useful to those who investigate such deaths and to those who study the behavioral manifestations of suicide.

  14. Spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for signal detection from image sequences

    PubMed Central

    Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H.; Rodríguez, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of signals in noisy images is necessary in many applications, including astronomy and medical imaging. The optimal linear observer for performing a detection task, called the Hotelling observer in the medical literature, can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar prewhitening matched filter. Performance on the detection task is limited by randomness in the image data, which stems from randomness in the object, randomness in the imaging system, and randomness in the detector outputs due to photon and readout noise, and the Hotelling observer accounts for all of these effects in an optimal way. If multiple temporal frames of images are acquired, the resulting data set is a spatio-temporal random process, and the Hotelling observer becomes a spatio-temporal linear operator. This paper discusses the theory of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer and estimation of the required spatio-temporal covariance matrices. It also presents a parallel implementation of the observer on a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION 3 gaming consoles. As an example, we consider the use of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for exoplanet detection. PMID:19550494

  15. miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a in human fetal hearts correlate to the apoptotic and proliferation markers

    PubMed Central

    Jerše, Maja; Glavač, Damjan; Zidar, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to function in the developing embryo. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the translational regulation of gene expression, which is beside transcriptional regulation crucial for the morphologic development of muscle tissue. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that the expression of miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a correlates with gestational age as well as with an apoptotic and proliferative index in the developing human heart. Our study included normal heart tissue samples obtained at autopsy from 46 fetuses, 12 children, and 15 adults. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured by the immunohistochemical detection of Ki67 and cleaved-CK18. Expression of miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-208a was measured using real-time PCR. We found a similar level of expression of miR-133a/b in fetal and children hearts that was different from the levels in healthy adults. We also found a correlation between a miR-208a expression to the gestational age of fetuses. We observed an inverse correlation between Ki67 expression and gestational age. Expression of Ki67 was positively correlated to the expression of miR-208a and miR-1, but inversely correlated to the expression of miR-133a/b. Expression of cleaved-CK18 was also inversely correlated to the expression of miR-133a/b. Our results showed a general decrease in the expression of miR-1 and an increase of miR-133a/b with increasing gestational age. We also found a general decrease in the expression of miR-208a, mimicking the expression of its host gene. Our results also suggest the involvement of miR-208a and miR-1 in the proliferation as well as anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic roles of miR-133a/b. PMID:25125495

  16. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity. PMID:27585796

  17. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity. PMID:27585796

  18. miR-511 and miR-1297 Inhibit Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Proliferation by Targeting Oncogene TRIB2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping Yu; Wang, Ya Qi; Zhang, Yan Xia; Deng, Jingti; Lv, Chang Jun; Xie, Shu Yang

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate genes and contribute to many kinds of human diseases, including cancer. Two miRNAs, miR-511 and miR-1297, were investigated for a possible role in adenocarcinoma based on predicted binding sites for the TRIB2 oncogene by microRNA analysis software, and the pcDNA-GFP-TRIB2–3′UTR vector was constructed to investigate the interaction between TRIB2 and miR-511/1297 in the adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was estimated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry after A549 cells were co-transfected with miR-511 (or miR-1297) and pcDNA-GFP-TRIB2–3′UTR vector. The expression of GFP in the miR-511- and miR-1297-treated cells was significantly downregulated in contrast with the negative-control (NC) miRNA-treated cells. The decreased expression of TRIB2 was further detected after miR-511 (or miR-1297) treatment by western blotting. The MTT test showed inhibition of A549 cell proliferation and Annexin V-FITC/PI dual staining showed increased apoptosis in the miR-511- and miR-1297-treated cells compared to the NC cultures. A transcription factor downstream of TRIB2, the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), was expression at higher levels after miR-511 (or miR-1297) decreasing TRIB2 expression. Our results illustrate that miR-511 and miR-1297 act as tumor suppressor genes, which could suppress A549 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo by suppressing TRIB2 and further increasing C/EBPα expression. PMID:23071539

  19. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-09-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity.

  20. miRNAs in Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Garyfallia

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal development is a multistage process during which mesenchymal progenitor cells undergo proliferation and differentiation and subsequently give rise to bone and cartilage forming cells. Each step is regulated by various transcription factors and signaling molecules. microRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Several in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that miRNAs play significant roles in skeletal development. Identifying their functions may give insights into the treatment of developmental disorders of the skeleton. This review summarizes miRNAs that have been shown to participate in various stages of skeletal development by targeting crucial factors. PMID:27019617

  1. PGC-Enriched miRNAs Control Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Bhin, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hoe-Su; Kim, Jong Soo; Shin, Jeong Oh; Hong, Ki Sung; Jung, Han-Sung; Kim, Changhoon; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the translation of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) involved in the growth and development of a variety of cells, including primordial germ cells (PGCs) which play an essential role in germ cell development. However, the target mRNAs and the regulatory networks influenced by miRNAs in PGCs remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate a novel miRNAs control PGC development through targeting mRNAs involved in various cellular pathways. We reveal the PGC-enriched expression patterns of nine miRNAs, including miR-10b, -18a, -93, -106b, -126-3p, -127, -181a, -181b, and -301, using miRNA expression analysis along with mRNA microarray analysis in PGCs, embryonic gonads, and postnatal testes. These miRNAs are highly expressed in PGCs, as demonstrated by Northern blotting, miRNA in situ hybridization assay, and miRNA qPCR analysis. This integrative study utilizing mRNA microarray analysis and miRNA target prediction demonstrates the regulatory networks through which these miRNAs regulate their potential target genes during PGC development. The elucidated networks of miRNAs disclose a coordinated molecular mechanism by which these miRNAs regulate distinct cellular pathways in PGCs that determine germ cell development. PMID:26442865

  2. miRNA expression during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cárdenas, Flor de Fátima; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Gutiérrez-Ramos, Ximena; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are involved in the control of many developmental processes, including fruit development. The increasing amount of information on miRNAs, on their expression, abundance, and conservation between various species, provides a new opportunity to study the role of miRNAs in non-model plant species. In this work, we used a combination of Northern blot and tissue print hybridization analysis to identify conserved miRNAs expressed during prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) fruit development. Comparative profiling detected the expression of 34 miRNAs, which were clustered in three different groups that were associated with the different phases of fruit development. Variation in the level of miRNA expression was observed. Gradual expression increase of several miRNAs was observed during fruit development, including miR164. miR164 was selected for stem-loop RT-PCR and for a detailed spatial-temporal expression analysis. At early floral stages, miR164 was mainly localized in meristematic tissues, boundaries and fusion zones, while it was more homogenously expressed in fruit tissues. Our results provide the first evidence of miRNA expression in the prickly pear cactus and provide the basis for future research on miRNAs in Opuntia. Moreover, our analyses suggest that miR164 plays different roles during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

  3. miEAA: microRNA enrichment analysis and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Christina; Khaleeq, Qurratulain T.; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the development of gene set enrichment and gene regulatory network analysis tools over a decade ago, microRNA enrichment tools are currently gaining importance. Building on our experience with the gene set analysis toolkit GeneTrail, we implemented the miRNA Enrichment Analysis and Annotation tool (miEAA). MiEAA is a web-based application that offers a variety of commonly applied statistical tests such as over-representation analysis and miRNA set enrichment analysis, which is similar to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Besides the different statistical tests, miEAA also provides rich functionality in terms of miRNA categories. Altogether, over 14 000 miRNA sets have been added, including pathways, diseases, organs and target genes. Importantly, our tool can be applied for miRNA precursors as well as mature miRNAs. To make the tool as useful as possible we additionally implemented supporting tools such as converters between different miRBase versions and converters from miRNA names to precursor names. We evaluated the performance of miEAA on two sets of miRNAs that are affected in lung adenocarcinomas and have been detected by array analysis. The web-based application is freely accessible at: http://www.ccb.uni-saarland.de/mieaa_tool/. PMID:27131362

  4. miRNA expression during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cárdenas, Flor de Fátima; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Gutiérrez-Ramos, Ximena; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are involved in the control of many developmental processes, including fruit development. The increasing amount of information on miRNAs, on their expression, abundance, and conservation between various species, provides a new opportunity to study the role of miRNAs in non-model plant species. In this work, we used a combination of Northern blot and tissue print hybridization analysis to identify conserved miRNAs expressed during prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) fruit development. Comparative profiling detected the expression of 34 miRNAs, which were clustered in three different groups that were associated with the different phases of fruit development. Variation in the level of miRNA expression was observed. Gradual expression increase of several miRNAs was observed during fruit development, including miR164. miR164 was selected for stem-loop RT-PCR and for a detailed spatial-temporal expression analysis. At early floral stages, miR164 was mainly localized in meristematic tissues, boundaries and fusion zones, while it was more homogenously expressed in fruit tissues. Our results provide the first evidence of miRNA expression in the prickly pear cactus and provide the basis for future research on miRNAs in Opuntia. Moreover, our analyses suggest that miR164 plays different roles during prickly pear cactus fruit development. PMID:25366556

  5. Dissection of miRNA pathways using arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Cláudia; Confraria, Ana; Elias, Carlos Alexandre; Crozet, Pierre; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Weigel, Detlef; Baena-González, Elena

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression mostly post-transcriptionally by guiding transcript cleavage and/or translational repression of complementary mRNA targets, thereby regulating developmental processes and stress responses. Despite the remarkable expansion of the field, the mechanisms underlying miRNA activity are not fully understood. In this article, we describe a transient expression system in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, which is highly amenable for the dissection of miRNA pathways. We show that by transiently overexpressing primary miRNAs and target mimics, we can manipulate miRNA levels and consequently impact on their targets. Furthermore, we developed a set of luciferase-based sensors for quantifying miRNA activity that respond specifically to both endogenous and overexpressed miRNAs and target mimics. We demonstrate that these miRNA sensors can be used to test the impact of putative components of the miRNA pathway on miRNA activity, as well as the impact of specific mutations, by either overexpression or the use of protoplasts from the corresponding mutants. We further show that our miRNA sensors can be used for investigating the effect of chemicals on miRNA activity. Our cell-based transient expression system is fast and easy to set up, and generates quantitative results, being a powerful tool for assaying miRNA activity in vivo.

  6. Meeting Competence Needs in the Hotel and Catering Industry Now and in the Future. Research Report 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Anne, Ed.; Hayter, Roy, Ed.

    The hotel and catering industry in the United Kingdom is estimated to have employed 2,392,000 people in 1990--about 9 percent of the total work force in employment in the country. These figures came from a major study into the skills needs of the hotel and catering industry in relation to the current provision of vocational education. Data are…

  7. Lack of hygiene routines among patients and family members at patient hotels--a possible route for transmitting puerperal fever.

    PubMed

    Starlander, Gustaf; Lytsy, Birgitta; Melhus, Asa

    2010-07-01

    The use of patient hotels for ambulatory care of women with uncomplicated deliveries has become a routine in Sweden. This report describes a minor outbreak of a group A Streptococcus strain in 2 newly delivered mothers and their newborn babies at a patient hotel.

  8. Diagnostic and prognostic relevance of circulating exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiaodan; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Trillsch, Fabian; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by transporting their molecular cargo from cell to cell. We investigated whether serum levels of exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c and circulating exosomes have diagnostic and prognostic relevance in a cohort of 163 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients using TaqMan MicroRNA assays and ELISA. The serum concentrations of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.0001), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.028) were significantly higher in EOC patients than healthy women. The levels of miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.019) could distinguish between malignant and benign ovarian tumors. While the levels of miR-373 and miR-200a were increased in all FIGO/lymph node stages (p = 0.0001), the levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were higher in patients with FIGO stage III–IV (p = 0.0001, p = 0.008, respectively) including lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0001, p = 0.004, respectively) than FIGO stages I–II. The increased levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were also associated with CA125 values (p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, respectively) and a shorter overall survival (p = 0.007, p = 0.017, respectively). The levels of exosomes were excessively elevated in EOC patients (p = 0.0001). In all three cohorts, they were positively associated with the serum levels of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.004), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.008). In conclusion, the increased levels of exosomal miR-200b and miR-200c mainly observed in advanced EOC suggest that these microRNAs may be involved in tumor progression. The high concentrations of exosomes in EOC patients imply an excessive, active exosomal secretion in EOC. PMID:26943577

  9. Diagnostic and prognostic relevance of circulating exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaodan; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Trillsch, Fabian; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2016-03-29

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by transporting their molecular cargo from cell to cell. We investigated whether serum levels of exosomal miR-373, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-200c and circulating exosomes have diagnostic and prognostic relevance in a cohort of 163 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients using TaqMan MicroRNA assays and ELISA. The serum concentrations of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.0001), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.028) were significantly higher in EOC patients than healthy women. The levels of miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.019) could distinguish between malignant and benign ovarian tumors. While the levels of miR-373 and miR-200a were increased in all FIGO/lymph node stages (p = 0.0001), the levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were higher in patients with FIGO stage III-IV (p = 0.0001, p = 0.008, respectively) including lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0001, p = 0.004, respectively) than FIGO stages I-II. The increased levels of miR-200b and miR-200c were also associated with CA125 values (p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, respectively) and a shorter overall survival (p = 0.007, p = 0.017, respectively). The levels of exosomes were excessively elevated in EOC patients (p = 0.0001). In all three cohorts, they were positively associated with the serum levels of exosomal miR-373 (p = 0.004), miR-200a (p = 0.0001), miR-200b (p = 0.0001) and miR-200c (p = 0.008). In conclusion, the increased levels of exosomal miR-200b and miR-200c mainly observed in advanced EOC suggest that these microRNAs may be involved in tumor progression. The high concentrations of exosomes in EOC patients imply an excessive, active exosomal secretion in EOC.

  10. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones. PMID:25084348

  11. Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psychological wellness, the time pressure of cleaning rooms quickly and work-related stress stemming from workplace mistreatment emerged as major work-related stressors. Recommendations are made for the introduction of multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses and to promote healthier workplaces.

  12. Economic Evaluation of a Worksite Obesity Prevention and Intervention Trial among Hotel Workers in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Meenan, Richard T.; Vogt, Thomas M.; Williams, Andrew E.; Stevens, Victor J.; Albright, Cheryl L.; Nigg, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective Economic evaluation of Work, Weight, and Wellness (3W), a two-year randomized trial of a weight loss program delivered through Hawaii hotel worksites. Methods Business case analysis from hotel perspective. Program resources were micro-costed (2008 dollars). Program benefits were reduced medical costs, fewer absences, and higher productivity. Primary outcome was discounted 24-month net present value (NPV). Results Control program cost $222K to implement over 24 months ($61 per participant), intervention program cost $1.12M ($334). Including overweight participants (body mass index > 25), discounted control NPV was −$217K; −$1.1M for intervention program. Presenteeism improvement of 50% combined with baseline 10% productivity shortfall required to generate positive 24-month intervention NPV. Conclusions 3W’s positive clinical outcomes did not translate into immediate economic benefit for participating hotels, although modest cost savings were observed in the trial’s second year. PMID:20061889

  13. Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psychological wellness, the time pressure of cleaning rooms quickly and work-related stress stemming from workplace mistreatment emerged as major work-related stressors. Recommendations are made for the introduction of multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses and to promote healthier workplaces. PMID:26001842

  14. miR-155: A Novel Target in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Li, Junyao; Gao, Peng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs of 18–24 nucleotides in length, function to posttranscriptionally regulate protein expression. miR-155 was one of the first identified and, to date, the most studied miRNA, and has been linked to various cellular processes such as modulation of immune responses and oncogenesis. Previous studies have identified miR-155 as a crucial positive regulator of Th1 immune response in autoimmune diseases, but as a suppressor of Th2 immunity in allergic disorders. However, recent studies have found new evidence that miR-155 plays an indispensible role in allergic asthma. This review summarizes the recent findings with respect to miR-155 in immune responses and the underlying mechanisms responsible for miR-155-related allergic diseases, as well as the similarities between miR-155 and glucocorticoids in immunity. PMID:27783037

  15. 21. Photocopy of drawing (from Sault Ste. Marie, MI city ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of drawing (from Sault Ste. Marie, MI city archives) showing ROADWAY ACROSS SECTION DETAILS - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  16. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets. PMID:26712751

  17. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets. PMID:26712751

  18. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  19. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kook; Henry, Jon C.; Jiang, Jinmai; Esau, Christine; Gusev, Yuriy; Lerner, Megan R.; Postier, Russell G.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  20. Optimum contracted-for water supply for hotels in arid coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Lamei, A; von Münch, E; van der Zaag, P; Imam, E

    2009-01-01

    Hotels in arid coastal areas use mainly desalinated water for their domestic water demands, and treated wastewater for irrigating green areas. Private water companies supply these hotels with their domestic water needs. There is normally a contractual agreement stating a minimum requirement that has to be supplied by the water company and that the hotel management has to pay for regardless of its actual consumption ("contracted-for water supply"). This paper describes a model to determine what value a hotel should choose for its contracted-for water supply in order to minimize its total annual water costs. An example from an arid coastal tourism-dominated city is presented: Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.The managers of hotels with expected high occupancy rates (74% and above) can contract for more than 80%. On the other hand, hotels with expected lower occupancy rates (60% and less) can contract for less than 70% of the peak daily domestic water demand. With a green area ratio of 40 m(2)/room or less, an on-site wastewater treatment plant can satisfy the required irrigation demand for an occupancy rate as low as 42%. Increasing the ratio of green irrigated area to 100 m(2)/room does not affect the contracted-for water supply at occupancy rates above 72%; at lower occupancy rates, however, on-site treated wastewater is insufficient for irrigating the green areas. Increasing the green irrigated area to 120 m(2)/room increases the need for additional water, either from externally sourced treated wastewater or potable water. The cost of the former is much lower than the latter (0.58 versus 1.52 to 2.14 US$/m(3) in the case study area).

  1. Optimum contracted-for water supply for hotels in arid coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Lamei, A; von Münch, E; van der Zaag, P; Imam, E

    2009-01-01

    Hotels in arid coastal areas use mainly desalinated water for their domestic water demands, and treated wastewater for irrigating green areas. Private water companies supply these hotels with their domestic water needs. There is normally a contractual agreement stating a minimum requirement that has to be supplied by the water company and that the hotel management has to pay for regardless of its actual consumption ("contracted-for water supply"). This paper describes a model to determine what value a hotel should choose for its contracted-for water supply in order to minimize its total annual water costs. An example from an arid coastal tourism-dominated city is presented: Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.The managers of hotels with expected high occupancy rates (74% and above) can contract for more than 80%. On the other hand, hotels with expected lower occupancy rates (60% and less) can contract for less than 70% of the peak daily domestic water demand. With a green area ratio of 40 m(2)/room or less, an on-site wastewater treatment plant can satisfy the required irrigation demand for an occupancy rate as low as 42%. Increasing the ratio of green irrigated area to 100 m(2)/room does not affect the contracted-for water supply at occupancy rates above 72%; at lower occupancy rates, however, on-site treated wastewater is insufficient for irrigating the green areas. Increasing the green irrigated area to 120 m(2)/room increases the need for additional water, either from externally sourced treated wastewater or potable water. The cost of the former is much lower than the latter (0.58 versus 1.52 to 2.14 US$/m(3) in the case study area). PMID:19403967

  2. Theoretical performance analysis of multislice channelized Hotelling observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-02-01

    Quality assessment of 3D medical images is becoming increasingly important, because of clinical practice rapidly moving in the direction of volumetric imaging. In a recent publication, three multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer (msCHO) models are presented for the task of detecting 3D signals in multi-slice images, where each multi-slice image is inspected in a so called stack-browsing mode. The observer models are based on the assumption that humans observe multi-slice images in a simple two stage process, and each of the models implement this principle in a different way. In this paper, we investigate the theoretical performance, in terms of detection signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of msCHO models, for the task of detecting a separable signal in a Gaussian background with separable covariance matrix. We find that, despite the differences in architecture of the three models, they all have the same asymptotical performance in this task (i.e., when the number of training images tends to infinity). On the other hand, when backgrounds with nonseparable covariance matrices are considered, the third model, msCHOc, is expected to perform slightly better than the other msCHO models (msCHOa and msCHOb), but only when sufficient training images are provided. These findings suggest that the choice between the msCHO models mainly depends on the experiment setup (e.g., the number of available training samples), while the relation to human observers depends on the particular choice of the "temporal" channels that the msCHO models use.

  3. Targeting pre-miRNA by Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Concetta; Saviano, Michele; D'Andrea, Luca; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    PNAs conjugated to carrier peptides have been employed for the targeting of miRNA precursor, with the aim to develop molecules able to interfere in the pre-miRNA processing. The capability of the molecules to bind pre-miRNA has been tested in vitro by fluorescence assayes on Thiazole Orange labeled molecules and in vivo, in K562 cells, evaluating the amount of miRNA produced after treatment of cells with two amounts of PNAs. PMID:22699795

  4. 78 FR 36631 - Michigan Disaster #MI-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Michigan Disaster MI-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 03/12/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  5. MiSIS: Michigan Student Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Higher Education Management Services.

    The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) is the student flow component, of the Michigan Community College Occupational Education Evaluation System (MCCOEES), a comprehensive state-wide system for evaluating occupational education. It was developed by the Michigan community college system as a systematic and valid method of collecting…

  6. Viral miRNAs and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Boss, Isaac W; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Viral miRNAs, ~22nt RNA molecules which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, are emerging as important tools in immune evasion. Viral infection is a complex process that requires immune evasion in order to establish persistent life-long infection of the host. During this process viruses express both protein-coding and non-coding genes, which help to modulate the cellular environment making it more favorable for infection. In the last decade, it was uncovered that DNA viruses express a diverse and abundant pool of small non-coding RNA molecules, called microRNAs (miRNAs). These virally encoded miRNAs are non-immunogenic and therefore are important tools used to evade both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of herpesvirus- and polyomavirus-encoded miRNAs, and how they contribute to immune evasion by targeting viral and/or host cellular genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MicroRNAs in viral gene regulation.

  7. A survey of the electrical energy requirement of hotels in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.K.; Chan, K.T. . Dept. of Building Services Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Electrical energy consumption in commercial buildings accounts for about 50 percent of the total electricity produced in Hong Kong. Investigation of the electrical energy requirement in these buildings is essential to energy conservation. With it, norms of energy use for the buildings in use can be deduced and can be used to establish energy management programs. This article reports on a pioneer investigation on the electrical energy use of hotels in Hong Kong. A survey on the actual consumption in 20 hotels has been conducted, and results are presented. Significance of the norms and the various end-use components of the total electrical energy requirement are discussed.

  8. A towel less: social norms enhance pro-environmental behavior in hotels.

    PubMed

    Reese, Gerhard; Loew, Kristina; Steffgen, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that normative appeals to engage in environmentally friendly behavior were most effective when they were accompanied by a provincial norm (e.g., when norms matched individuals' immediate situational circumstances). Analyzing hotel guests' towel-use during their stay, the current study tests whether messages employing provincial norms were more effective in reducing towel-use than standard environmental messages. In line with previous findings, guests of two hotels used significantly fewer towels when provincial normative appeals--rather than standard environmental messages--were communicated. These findings corroborate to the body of research demonstrating the power of social norms on environmental behavior.

  9. Comparison of patrons of hotels with early opening and standard hours.

    PubMed

    Smith, D I

    1986-02-01

    A comparison was made of 72 men who were patrons in hotels with 6 A.M. or 7 A.M. opening, with a control group of 87 men interviewed in nearby hotels with 10 A.M. opening. The two groups were very similar on biographical characteristics, yet the men in the early-opening group consumed significantly more alcohol, had more drinking sessions, spent longer in drinking, and had significantly higher SMAST scores. The early opening was apparently facilitating problem drinking.

  10. Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease associated with person to person spread in hotels and restaurants.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, R J; Wall, P G; Adak, G K; Evans, H S; Cowden, J M; Caul, E O

    1995-09-15

    Twenty-eight outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, reported as being transmitted mainly by the person to person route, were identified in association with retail catering premises, such as hotels, restaurants, and public houses, in England and Wales between 1992 and 1994. Five thousand and forty-eight people were at risk in these outbreaks and 1234 were affected. Most of the outbreaks (over 90%) occurred in hotels. Small round structured viruses were the most commonly detected pathogens. Diarrhoea and vomiting were common symptoms and most of the outbreaks occurred in the summer months. Control measures to contain infectious individuals and improved hygiene measures are necessary to contain such outbreaks.

  11. Hotel water consumption at a seasonal mass tourist destination. The case of the island of Mallorca.

    PubMed

    Deyà Tortella, Bartolomé; Tirado, Dolores

    2011-10-01

    While it is true that tourism is one of the main driving forces behind economic growth in several world regions, it is also true that tourism can have serious negative environmental impacts, especially with regard to water resources. The tourist water demand can generate big problems of sustainability, mainly in those regions where water is scarce, as occurs in most coastal and small island destinations where a large part of world tourism is concentrated. Given the shortage of literature on the subject, further research into the tourist water demand is required, with particular attention to the hotel sector, since hotels are the most popular option for tourists, displaying higher levels of water consumption. The main purpose of this study is to develop a model to analyse hotel water consumption at a mature sun and sand destination with a strong seasonal pattern and scarcity of water; characteristics shared by some of the world's main tourist destinations. Our model includes a set of different hotel variables associated with physical, seasonal and management-related factors and it improves on the capacity to explain water consumption at such destinations. Following a hierarchical regression methodology, the model is empirically tested through a survey distributed to managers of a representative sample of hotels on the island of Mallorca. From the obtained results, interesting recommendations can be made for both hotel managers and policy makers. Among these, it should be highlighted that the strategic move contemplated by many mature destinations towards a higher quality, low-season model could have significant negative effects in terms of the sustainability of water resources. Our results also conclude that managerial decisions, like the system of accommodation that is offered (i.e. the proliferation of the "all-inclusive" formula, both at mature and new destinations), could give rise to the same negative effect. Development of water saving initiatives (usually

  12. Hotel water consumption at a seasonal mass tourist destination. The case of the island of Mallorca.

    PubMed

    Deyà Tortella, Bartolomé; Tirado, Dolores

    2011-10-01

    While it is true that tourism is one of the main driving forces behind economic growth in several world regions, it is also true that tourism can have serious negative environmental impacts, especially with regard to water resources. The tourist water demand can generate big problems of sustainability, mainly in those regions where water is scarce, as occurs in most coastal and small island destinations where a large part of world tourism is concentrated. Given the shortage of literature on the subject, further research into the tourist water demand is required, with particular attention to the hotel sector, since hotels are the most popular option for tourists, displaying higher levels of water consumption. The main purpose of this study is to develop a model to analyse hotel water consumption at a mature sun and sand destination with a strong seasonal pattern and scarcity of water; characteristics shared by some of the world's main tourist destinations. Our model includes a set of different hotel variables associated with physical, seasonal and management-related factors and it improves on the capacity to explain water consumption at such destinations. Following a hierarchical regression methodology, the model is empirically tested through a survey distributed to managers of a representative sample of hotels on the island of Mallorca. From the obtained results, interesting recommendations can be made for both hotel managers and policy makers. Among these, it should be highlighted that the strategic move contemplated by many mature destinations towards a higher quality, low-season model could have significant negative effects in terms of the sustainability of water resources. Our results also conclude that managerial decisions, like the system of accommodation that is offered (i.e. the proliferation of the "all-inclusive" formula, both at mature and new destinations), could give rise to the same negative effect. Development of water saving initiatives (usually

  13. Ferromagnetism and Nonmetallic Transport of Thin-Film <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 : A Stabilized Metastable Material

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guixin; Singh, D. J.; Zhang, X. -G.; Samolyuk, German; Qiao, Liang; Parish, Chad; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Guo, Hangwen; Tang, Siwei; Wang, Wenbin; Yi, Jieyu; Cantoni, Claudia; Siemons, Wolter; Payzant, E. Andrew; Biegalski, Michael; Ward, T. Z.; Mandrus, David; Stocks, G. M.; Gai, Zheng

    2015-04-07

    The epitaxially stabilized metallic <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 thin films on Si(001) were grown using pulsed laser deposition. While the bulk material of <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 is a high temperature metastable phase and nonmagnetic, the thin film is stabilized at room temperature and shows unusual electronic transport and magnetic properties due to strain modification. The transport renders two different conducting states with a strong crossover at 50 K accompanied by an onset of ferromagnetism as well as a substantial magnetocaloric effect and magnetoresistance. These experimental results are discussed in terms of the unusual electronic structure of <mimi>-<mi>FeSi>2 obtained within density functional calculations and Boltzmann transport calculations with and without strain. Our findings provide an example of a tailored material with interesting physics properties for practical applications.

  14. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  15. Protocol for miRNA isolation from biofluids.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Bryzgunova, Olga E; Vlassov, Valentin V; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as promising biomarkers in cancer and other diseases. Packaging of miRNAs into vesicles and complexes with proteins ensures their stability in biological fluids but also complicates their isolation. Conventional protocols used to isolate cell-free RNA are generally successful in overcoming these difficulties; however, they are costly, labor-intensive, or heavily reliant on the use of hazardous chemicals. Here we describe a protocol that is suitable for isolating miRNAs from biofluids, including blood plasma and urine. The protocol is based on precipitation of proteins, denaturation of miRNA-containing complexes with octanoic acid and guanidine isothiocyanate, and subsequent purification of miRNA on spin columns. The efficacy of miRNA extraction by phenol-chloroform extraction, miRCURY RNA isolation kit--biofluids (Exiqon), and the proposed protocol was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR of miR-16 and miR-126. The proposed protocol was slightly more effective for isolating miRNA from plasma and significantly superior to the other two methods for miRNA isolation from urine. Spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE data suggest that the disparity in performance between miRCURY Biofluids and the proposed protocol can be attributed to differences in precipitation mechanisms, as confirmed by the retention of different proteins in the supernatant. PMID:26874020

  16. Dynamic regulation of novel and conserved miRNAs across various tissues of diverse Cucurbit spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA genes (miRNAs) encoding small non-coding RNAs are abundant in plant genomes and play a key role in regulating several biological mechanisms. Five conserved miRNAs, miR156, miR168-1, miR168-2, miR164, and miR166 were selected for analysis from the 21 known plant miRNA families that were rec...

  17. miR-146a and miR-155 Expression Levels in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Atarod, Sadaf; Ahmed, Mohammed Mahid; Lendrem, Clare; Pearce, Kim Frances; Cope, Wei; Norden, Jean; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Collin, Matthew; Dickinson, Anne Mary

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a curative treatment for numerous hematological malignancies. However, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is still the major complication causing mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a significant role in inflammation and have potential as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. This study investigated the role of two immune-specific miRNAs (miR-146a and miR-155) as biomarkers for aGVHD incidence in the peripheral blood of allo-HSCT patients prior to disease onset. The study showed that miR-146a and its statistical interaction with miR-155 at day +28 were predictive of aGVHD incidence. Interestingly, the expression levels of miR-146a and miR-155 negatively correlated with the transcription factor, SPI1 (PU.1gene) mRNA expression. PMID:27014257

  18. Defects in the MITF(mi/mi) apical surface are associated with a failure of outer segment elongation.

    PubMed

    Bumsted, K M; Rizzolo, L J; Barnstable, C J

    2001-09-01

    The loss of MITF function in the MITF(mi/mi)mouse affects not only RPE differentiation, but also the development of rod photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate that opsin immunoreactivity is detected in the cell membrane and along the ONL/RPE border of developing MITF(mi/mi)rod photoreceptors and that rod outer segment morphogenesis is initiated. Although molecules associated with the outer segment continued to be expressed, outer segments did not elongate and develop stacked organized discs perpendicular to the RPE. The MITF(mi/mi)RPE also failed to form apical microvilli and lacked the apical network of the phosphoprotein ezrin seen in wild type tissue. The MITF(mi/mi)RPE basal surface was loosely organized and retained ezrin labelling which indicated some degree of differentiation. The correlation seen in our data suggest that there may be a link between the failure of the RPE apical domain to form and lack of rod outer segment elongation.

  19. MicroRNAs miR-30b, miR-30d, and miR-494 Regulate Human Endometrial Receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Conejero, Jose A.; Esteban, Francisco J.; Ruiz-Alonso, Maria; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Horcajadas, Jose A.; Salumets, Andres

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as important epigenetic posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. We aimed to gain more understanding of the complex gene expression regulation of endometrial receptivity by analyzing miRNA signatures of fertile human endometria. We set up to analyze miRNA signatures of receptive (LH + 7, n = 4) versus prereceptive (LH + 2, n = 5) endometrium from healthy fertile women. We found hsa-miR-30b and hsa-miR-30d to be significantly upregulated, and hsa-miR-494 and hsa-miR-923 to be downregulated in receptive endometrium. Three algorithms (miRanda, PicTar, and TargetScan) were used for target gene prediction. Functional analyses of the targets using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery indicated roles in transcription, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and significant involvement in several relevant pathways, such as axon guidance, Wnt/β-catenin, ERK/MAPK, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), p53 and leukocyte extravasation. Comparison of predicted miRNA target genes and our previous messenger RNA microarray data resulted in a list of 12 genes, including CAST, CFTR, FGFR2, and LIF that could serve as a panel of genes important for endometrial receptivity. In conclusion, we suggest that a subset of miRNAs and their target genes may play important roles in endometrial receptivity. PMID:22902743

  20. The plasma miR-125a, miR-361 and miR-133a are promising novel biomarkers for Late-Onset Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-ping; Wang, Ju; Zhao, Kai; Shang, Xue-jun; Wu, Hui-qin; Qing, Xing-rong; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Shang, Jin; Li, Hong-gang; Zhang, Hui-ping; Guan, Huang-tao; Zhou, Yuan-zhong; Gu, Yi-qun; Wu, Wei-xiong; Xiong, Cheng-liang

    2016-01-01

    Circulating miRNAs have been shown to serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in cancers and other diseases. However, the role of plasma miRNAs in Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) diagnosis is still unknown. Using Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing at discovery phase, and then two-step validated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays in verification phases. We verified that the expression levels of miR-125a-5p, miR-361-5p and miR-133a-3p were significantly altered in LOH group compared to the control group. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) is 0.682, 0.698 and 0.765, respectively. The combination of three miRNAs showed a larger AUC (0.835) that was more efficient for the diagnosis of LOH. Among three miRNAs, miR-133a-3p had the best diagnostic value for LOH with 68.2% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. Regression analyses show that miR-133a-3p level was negatively associated with the ageing males’ symptoms (AMS) scale. However, miR-361-5p level was positively associated with serum testosterone concentrations. In summary, plasma miRNAs are differentially expressed between LOH and healthy controls. We validated three miRNAs that could act as novel biomarkers for diagnosis of LOH. These miRNAs may be involved in the development of LOH. However, further large and functional studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27000524

  1. BayMiR: inferring evidence for endogenous miRNA-induced gene repression from mRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Popular miRNA target prediction techniques use sequence features to determine the functional miRNA target sites. These techniques commonly ignore the cellular conditions in which miRNAs interact with their targets in vivo. Gene expression data are rich resources that can complement sequence features to take into account the context dependency of miRNAs. Results We introduce BayMiR, a new computational method, that predicts the functionality of potential miRNA target sites using the activity level of the miRNAs inferred from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles. We also found that mRNA expression variation can be used as another predictor of functional miRNA targets. We benchmarked BayMiR, the expression variation, Cometa, and the TargetScan “context scores” on two tasks: predicting independently validated miRNA targets and predicting the decrease in mRNA abundance in miRNA overexpression assays. BayMiR performed better than all other methods in both benchmarks and, surprisingly, the variation index performed better than Cometa and some individual determinants of the TargetScan context scores. Furthermore, BayMiR predicted miRNA target sets are more consistently annotated with GO and KEGG terms than similar sized random subsets of genes with conserved miRNA seed regions. BayMiR gives higher scores to target sites residing near the poly(A) tail which strongly favors mRNA degradation using poly(A) shortening. Our work also suggests that modeling multiplicative interactions among miRNAs is important to predict endogenous mRNA targets. Conclusions We develop a new computational method for predicting the target mRNAs of miRNAs. BayMiR applies a large number of mRNA expression profiles and successfully identifies the mRNA targets and miRNA activities without using miRNA expression data. The BayMiR package is publicly available and can be readily applied to any mRNA expression data sets. PMID:24001276

  2. 2. Left to right: coke ovens, wharf with belt conveyor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Left to right: coke ovens, wharf with belt conveyor, coal bunker, coke stack, brick quencher, gas holder, view framed by bracing for overhead conveyor. Looking south/southeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  3. 14. Battery of coke ovens (DX?) on right, pusher cars ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Battery of coke ovens (DX?) on right, pusher cars on right, hot gas pipes on left and overhead; pulverized coal bunker is tall, vertical structure on left. looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  4. 41. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; photo taken from furnace operator's booth. Looking south/southwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  5. 50. Taken from highline; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Taken from high-line; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is main blast furnace gas line from "C" furnace dust catcher; levy, slag hauler, removing slag. Looking east - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  6. 38. 8 sisters and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. 8 sisters and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal conveyor, blast stoves, "A" furnace, stoves, "B" furnace, stoves, "C" furnace, bottle cars. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  7. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  8. 7. FF. Note vertical ribs indicating storage bin inside; conveyor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. FF. Note vertical ribs indicating storage bin inside; conveyor to left brings pulverized coal from GG to FF; 8 sisters in background. Looking northeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  9. 42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; operator takes temperature of iron in trough during pout. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  10. A miRNA-tRNA mix-up: tRNA origin of proposed miRNA.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Heynen, Stephan; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The rapid release of new data from DNA genome sequencing projects has led to a variety of misannotations in public databases. Our results suggest that next generation sequencing approaches are particularly prone to such misannotations. Two related miRNA candidates did recently enter the miRBase database, miR-1274b and miR-1274a, but they share identical 18-nucleotide stretches with tRNA (Lys3) and tRNA (Lys5) , respectively. The possibility that the small RNA fragments that led to the description of these two miRNAs originated from the two tRNAs was examined. The ratio of the miR-1274b:miR-1274a fragments does closely resemble the known tRNA lys3:lys5 ratio in the cell. Furthermore, the proposed miRNA hairpins have a very low prediction score and the proposed miRNA genes are in fact endogenous retroviral elements. We searched for other miRNA-mimics in the human genome and found more examples of tRNA-miRNA mimicry. We propose that the corresponding miRNAs should be validated in more detail, as the small RNA fragments that led to their description are likely derived from tRNA processing. PMID:20818168

  11. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Lanier, Curtis; Dolce, Alexander; Hu, Jianhong; Brulois, Kevin; Haecker, Irina; Turner, Peter; Renne, Rolf; Krueger, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12), and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster) or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all). NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community. PMID:26907327

  12. Human miR-1271 is a miR-96 paralog with distinct non-conserved brain expression pattern

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kevin P.; Covault, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Recent deep-sequencing efforts have identified many novel non-conserved small RNAs that are expressed at low levels in certain mammalian cells. Whether these small RNAs are important for mammalian physiology is debatable, therefore we explored the function of one such RNA, human miR-1271. This small RNA is similar in sequence to miR-96, a highly conserved microRNA that when mutated causes hearing loss in humans and mice. Although the miR-1271 and miR-96 sequences differ slightly, our in vitro assays indicate that they have an identical regulatory activity. We have identified brain-expressed mRNAs from genes including, GPHN, RGS2, HOMER1 and KCC2, which share the same miR-96 and miR-1271 regulatory elements. Interestingly, human miR-1271 is expressed abundantly in brain tissue, where miR-96 is not highly expressed. The rodent miR-1271 precursor contains several sequence differences in the precursor stem, which appear to reduce the efficiency of microRNA processing. Our data indicate that although miR-1271 and miR-96 function identically in vitro, they function to some extent uniquely in vivo. Given the expression patterns and nature of the target genes, miR-1271 may have a significant, although non-conserved, role in regulating aspects of neural development or function in humans. PMID:20864449

  13. PEI-complexed LNA antiseeds as miRNA inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maren; Lange-Grünweller, Kerstin; Dayyoub, Eyas; Bakowsky, Udo; Weirauch, Ulrike; Aigner, Achim; Hartmann, Roland K.; Grünweller, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of oncogenic or other disease-related miRNAs and miRNA families in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies. However, this approach relies on the development of potent miRNA inhibitors and their efficient delivery into cells. Here, we introduce short seed-directed LNA oligonucleotides (12- or 14-mer antiseeds) with a phosphodiester backbone (PO) for efficient miRNA inhibition. We have analyzed such LNA (PO) antiseeds using a let-7a-controlled luciferase reporter assay and identified them as active miRNA inhibitors in vitro. Moreover, LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds against ongogenic miR-17–5p and miR-20a derepress endogenous p21 expression more persistently than corresponding miRNA hairpin inhibitors, which are often used to inhibit miRNA function. Further analysis of the antiseed-mediated derepression of p21 in luciferase reporter constructs - containing the 3′-UTR of p21 and harboring two binding sites for miRNAs of the miR-106b family - provided evidence that the LNA antiseeds inhibit miRNA families while hairpin inhibitors act in a miRNA-specific manner. The derepression caused by LNA antiseeds is specific, as demonstrated via seed mutagenesis of the miR-106b target sites. Importantly, we show functional delivery of LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds into cells upon complexation with polyethylenimine (PEI F25-LMW), which leads to the formation of polymeric nanoparticles. In contrast, attempts to deliver a functional seed-directed tiny LNA 8-mer with a phosphorothioate backbone (PS) by formulation with PEI F25-LMW remained unsuccessful. In conclusion, LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds are attractive miRNA inhibitors, and their PEI-based delivery may represent a promising new strategy for therapeutic applications. PMID:22894918

  14. Maternal Plasma miRNAs Expression in Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hailing; Ge, Qinyu; Guo, Li; Lu, Zuhong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome and one of the leading causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of PE remain poorly known. Recently, circulating miRNAs are considered as potential useful noninvasive biomarkers. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed plasma miRNAs in preeclamptic pregnancies compared with normal pregnancies. Methods. Maternal plasma miRNA expression profiles were detected by SOLiD sequencing. Differential expressions between mPE/sPE and control group were found. Next, four differentially expressed plasma miRNAs were chosen to validate their expression in other large scale samples by real-time PCR. Results. In terms of sequencing results, we identified that 51 miRNAs were differentially expressed. Four differentially expressed plasma miRNAs (miR-141, miR-144, miR-221, and miR-29a) were selected to validate the sequencing results. RT-PCR data confirmed the reliability of sequencing results. The further statistical analysis showed that maternal plasma miR-141 and miR-29a are significantly overexpressed in mPE (P < 0.05). Maternal plasma miR-144 is significantly underexpressed in mPE and sPE (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Results showed that there were differentially expressed maternal plasma miRNAs in patients with preeclampsia. These plasma miRNAs might be used as notable biomarkers for diagnosis of preeclampsia. PMID:24195082

  15. Measurement of Ratios of <mi>νμ> Charged-Current Cross Sections on C, Fe, and Pb to CH at Neutrino Energies 2–20 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, B. G.; Datta, M.; Mousseau, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Barrios Sazo, M. G.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M. J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kordosky, M.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martin Mari, C.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Savage, D. G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Valencia, E.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of mi>νmi>mi>μ> charged-current cross section ratios on carbon, iron, and lead relative to a scintillator (CH) using the fine-grained MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The measurements utilize events of energies 2<mi>Emi>mi>νmi><20mi>GeVmi>, with (mi>Emi>mi>ν>)=8mi>GeVmi>, which have a reconstructed mi>μmi>- scattering angle less than 17° to extract ratios of inclusive total cross sections as a function of neutrino energy mi>Emi>mi>ν> and flux-integrated differential cross sections with respect to the Bjorken scaling variable mi>x>. These results provide the first high-statistics direct measurements of nuclear effects in neutrino scattering using different targets in the same neutrino beam. Measured cross section ratios exhibit a relative

  16. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable.

  17. MiR-205 and MiR-373 Are Associated with Aggressive Human Mucinous Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eyking, Annette; Reis, Henning; Frank, Magdalena; Gerken, Guido; Schmid, Kurt W; Cario, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) represents a distinct histopathological entity of colorectal cancer (CRC), which is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. Here, we found that expression levels of miR-205 and miR-373 were specifically upregulated only in patients with mucinous colon cancers, but not in CRC that lack mucinous components. To investigate the effects of miR-205 and miR-373 on intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) biology by gain- and loss-of-function experiments in a proof-of-concept approach, we chose previously established in-vitro human Caco-2-based models of differentiated, non-invasive (expressing TLR4 wild-type; termed Caco-2[WT]) versus undifferentiated, invasive (expressing TLR4 mutant D299G; termed Caco-2[D299G]) IEC. Enterocyte-like Caco-2[WT] showed low levels of miR-205 and miR-373 expression, while both miRNAs were significantly upregulated in colorectal carcinoma-like Caco-2[D299G], thus resembling the miRNA expression pattern of paired normal versus tumor samples from MAC patients. Using stable transfection, we generated miR-205- or miR-373-expressing and miR-205- or miR-373-inhibiting subclones of these IEC lines. We found that introduction of miR-205 into Caco-2[WT] led to expansion of mucus-secreting goblet cell-like cells, which was associated with induction of KLF4, MUC2 and TGFβ1 expression. Activation of miR-205 in Caco-2[WT] induced chemoresistance, while inhibition of miR-205 in Caco-2[D299G] promoted chemosensitivity. Caco-2[WT] overexpressing miR-373 showed mitotic abnormalities and underwent morphologic changes (loss of epithelial polarity, cytoskeletal reorganization, and junctional disruption) associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression to inflammation-associated colonic carcinoma, which correlated with induction of phosphorylated STAT3 and N-CADHERIN expression. Functionally, introduction of miR-373 into Caco-2[WT] mediated loss of cell-cell adhesion and increased proliferation and invasion

  18. MiR-205 and MiR-373 Are Associated with Aggressive Human Mucinous Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eyking, Annette; Reis, Henning; Frank, Magdalena; Gerken, Guido; Schmid, Kurt W.; Cario, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) represents a distinct histopathological entity of colorectal cancer (CRC), which is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. Here, we found that expression levels of miR-205 and miR-373 were specifically upregulated only in patients with mucinous colon cancers, but not in CRC that lack mucinous components. To investigate the effects of miR-205 and miR-373 on intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) biology by gain- and loss-of-function experiments in a proof-of-concept approach, we chose previously established in-vitro human Caco-2-based models of differentiated, non-invasive (expressing TLR4 wild-type; termed Caco-2[WT]) versus undifferentiated, invasive (expressing TLR4 mutant D299G; termed Caco-2[D299G]) IEC. Enterocyte-like Caco-2[WT] showed low levels of miR-205 and miR-373 expression, while both miRNAs were significantly upregulated in colorectal carcinoma-like Caco-2[D299G], thus resembling the miRNA expression pattern of paired normal versus tumor samples from MAC patients. Using stable transfection, we generated miR-205- or miR-373-expressing and miR-205- or miR-373-inhibiting subclones of these IEC lines. We found that introduction of miR-205 into Caco-2[WT] led to expansion of mucus-secreting goblet cell-like cells, which was associated with induction of KLF4, MUC2 and TGFβ1 expression. Activation of miR-205 in Caco-2[WT] induced chemoresistance, while inhibition of miR-205 in Caco-2[D299G] promoted chemosensitivity. Caco-2[WT] overexpressing miR-373 showed mitotic abnormalities and underwent morphologic changes (loss of epithelial polarity, cytoskeletal reorganization, and junctional disruption) associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression to inflammation-associated colonic carcinoma, which correlated with induction of phosphorylated STAT3 and N-CADHERIN expression. Functionally, introduction of miR-373 into Caco-2[WT] mediated loss of cell-cell adhesion and increased proliferation and invasion

  19. miRNA profiling along tumour progression in ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vaksman, Olga; Stavnes, Helene Tuft; Kærn, Janne; Trope, Claes G; Davidson, Ben; Reich, Reuven

    2011-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that exert a regulatory effect post-transcriptionally by binding target mRNAs and inhibiting gene translation. miRNA expression is deregulated in cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the differences in miRNA expression pattern and the miRNA-regulating machinery between ovarian carcinoma (OC) cells in primary tumours versus effusions. Using miRNA array platforms, we analysed a set of 21 tumours (13 effusions, 8 primary carcinomas) and identified three sets of miRNAs, one that is highly expressed in both primary carcinomas and effusions, one overexpressed in primary carcinomas and one overexpressed in effusions. Levels of selected miRNAs were analysed using quantitative PCR in an independent set of 45 additional tumours (30 effusions, 15 primary carcinomas). Reduced miR-145 and miR-214 and elevated let-7f, miR-182, miR-210, miR-200c, miR-222 and miR-23a levels were found in effusions in both sets. In silico target prediction programs identified potential target genes for some of the differentially expressed miRNAs. Expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (ZEB)1 and c-Myc, targets of miR-200c, as well as of p21 protein (Cdc42/Rac)-activated kinase (PAK)1 and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), predicted targets of miR-222, were analysed. Inverse correlations between expression levels of the indicated miRNAs and of the predicted target genes were found. In addition, higher expression of the miRNA-processing molecules Ago1, Ago2 and Dicer was observed in effusions compared to primary carcinomas. In conclusion, our data are the first to document different miRNA expression and regulation profiles in primary and metastatic OC, suggesting a role for these molecules in tumour progression. PMID:20716115

  20. Predictive Value of Serum miR-10b, miR-29c, and miR-205 as Promising Biomarkers in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Screening

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hang; Yao, Yuanfei; Meng, Fanyu; Qian, Xu; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Li, Xiaoxi; Gao, Zhuo; Gao, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The high mortality of ESCC is mainly due to late diagnosis. Current detection methods have their own weakness, including high costs and invasive procedures. MicroRNA assays are shown to have great potential to be accurate and noninvasive methods for ESCC screening. In this study, we selected 3 microRNAs, miR-10b, miR-29c, and miR-205, to assess their diagnostic value in ESCC screening. Fifty ESCC patients and 50 healthy controls are recruited in our study. Blood samples are collected from the total 100 participants. MicroRNAs were extracted from serum and quantified by qRT-PCR, which their relative expressions were normalized by internal control, U6 snRNA. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare microRNAs level as well as other clinical characteristics between 2 groups. The levels of serum miR-29c and miR-205 were significantly downregulated in ESCC patients compared with healthy volunteers. In contrast, ESCC patients appeared to have a higher level of miR-10b than healthy controls. ROC curve analyses revealed that the AUC value for miR-10b, miR-29c, and miR-205 were 0.85 (95% CI: 0.79–0.93; sensitivity = 76%; specificity = 84%), 0.72 (95% CI: 0.62–0.82; sensitivity = 68%; specificity = 68%), and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.62–0.83; sensitivity = 70%; specificity = 64%), respectively, suggesting that miR-10b, miR-29c, and miR-205 have great potential to be noninvasive screening tools for ESCC detection. PMID:26554762

  1. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  2. Microprocessor activity controls differential miRNA biogenesis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Marsico, Annalisa; Gehre, Maja; Orom, Ulf Andersson

    2014-10-23

    In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  3. miRNA control of tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sen, Chandan K; Ghatak, Subhadip

    2015-10-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration rely on the function of miRNA, molecular silencers that enact post-transcriptional gene silencing of coding genes. Disruption of miRNA homeostasis is developmentally lethal, indicating that fetal tissue development is tightly controlled by miRNAs. Multiple critical facets of adult tissue repair are subject to control by miRNAs, as well. Sources of cell pool for tissue repair and regeneration are diverse and provided by processes including cellular dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and reprogramming. Each of these processes is regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, induced pluripotency may be achieved by miRNA-based strategies independent of transcription factor manipulation. The observation that miRNA does not integrate into the genome makes miRNA-based therapeutic strategies translationally valuable. Tools to manipulate cellular and tissue miRNA levels include mimics and inhibitors that may be specifically targeted to cells of interest at the injury site. Here, we discuss the extraordinary importance of miRNAs in tissue repair and regeneration based on emergent reports and rapid advances in miRNA-based therapeutics.

  4. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  5. miR-150 inhibits terminal erythroid proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiwei; Wang, Ye; Han, Xu; Zhao, Xielan; Peng, Yuanliang; Li, Yusheng; Peng, Minyuan; Song, Jianhui; Wu, Kunlu; Sun, Shumin; Zhou, Weihua; Qi, Biwei; Zhou, Chufan; Chen, Huiyong; An, Xiuli; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding linear RNAs, have been shown to play a crucial role in erythropoiesis. To evaluate the indispensable role of constant suppression of miR-150 during terminal erythropoiesis, we performed miR-150 gain- and loss-of-function experiments on hemin-induced K562 cells and EPO-induced human CD34+ cells. We found that forced expression of miR-150 suppresses commitment of hemoglobinization and CD235a labeling in both cell types. Erythroid proliferation is also inhibited via inducing apoptosis and blocking the cell cycle when miR-150 is overexpressed. In contrast, miR-150 inhibition promotes terminal erythropoiesis. 4.1 R gene is a new target of miR-150 during terminal erythropoiesis, and its abundance ensures the mechanical stability and deformability of the membrane. However, knockdown of 4.1 R did not affect terminal erythropoiesis. Transcriptional profiling identified more molecules involved in terminal erythroid dysregulation derived from miR-150 overexpression. These results shed light on the role of miR-150 during human terminal erythropoiesis. This is the first report highlighting the relationship between miRNA and membrane protein and enhancing our understanding of how miRNA works in the hematopoietic system. PMID:26543232

  6. Do miRNAs have a deep evolutionary history?

    PubMed

    Tarver, James E; Donoghue, Philip C J; Peterson, Kevin J

    2012-10-01

    The recent discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) in unicellular eukaryotes, including miRNAs known previously only from animals or plants, implies that miRNAs have a deep evolutionary history among eukaryotes. This contrasts with the prevailing view that miRNAs evolved convergently in animals and plants. We re-evaluate the evidence and find that none of the 73 plant and animal miRNAs described from protists meet the required criteria for miRNA annotation and, by implication, animals and plants did not acquire any of their respective miRNA genes from the crown ancestor of eukaryotes. Furthermore, of the 159 novel miRNAs previously identified among the seven species of unicellular protists examined, only 28 from the algae Ectocarpus and Chlamydomonas, meet the criteria for miRNA annotation. Therefore, at present only five groups of eukaryotes are known to possess miRNAs, indicating that miRNAs have evolved independently within eukaryotes through exaptation of their shared inherited RNAi machinery.

  7. Determination of MiRNA Targets in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan-Peng; Espinoza-Lewis, Ramón; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small ∼22 nucleotide noncoding RNAs which regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by either destabilizing and consequently degrading their targeted mRNAs or by repressing their translation. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs are essential for normal mammalian development, homeostasis, and many other functions. In addition, deleterious changes in miRNA expression were associated with human diseases. Several muscle-specific miRNAs, including miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-208, have been shown to be important for normal myo-blast differentiation, proliferation, and muscle remodeling in response to stress. They have also been implicated in various cardiac and skeletal muscular diseases. miRNA-based gene therapies hold great potential for the treatment of cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Herein, we describe methods commonly applied to study the biological role of miRNAs, as well as techniques utilized to manipulate miRNA expression and to investigate their target regulation. PMID:22130855

  8. Exploration of miRNA families for hypotheses generation.

    PubMed

    Kamanu, Timothy K K; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2013-01-01

    Technological improvements have resulted in increased discovery of new microRNAs (miRNAs) and refinement and enrichment of existing miRNA families. miRNA families are important because they suggest a common sequence or structure configuration in sets of genes that hint to a shared function. Exploratory tools to enhance investigation of characteristics of miRNA families and the functions of family-specific miRNA genes are lacking. We have developed, miRNAVISA, a user-friendly web-based tool that allows customized interrogation and comparisons of miRNA families for hypotheses generation, and comparison of per-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes in different families. This study illustrates hypothesis generation using miRNAVISA in seven species. Our results unveil a subclass of miRNAs that may be regulated by genomic imprinting, and also suggest that some miRNA families may be species-specific, as well as chromosome- and/or strand-specific.

  9. Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and Infertility in Mice Deficient for miR-34b/c and miR-449 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler; Much, Christian; Azzi, Chiara; Perlas, Emerald; Morgan, Marcos; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2014-01-01

    Male fertility requires the continuous production of high quality motile spermatozoa in abundance. Alterations in all three metrics cause oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, the leading cause of human sub/infertility. Post-mitotic spermatogenesis inclusive of several meiotic stages and spermiogenesis (terminal spermatozoa differentiation) are transcriptionally inert, indicating the potential importance for the post-transcriptional microRNA (miRNA) gene-silencing pathway therein. We found the expression of miRNA generating enzyme Dicer within spermatogenesis peaks in meiosis with critical functions in spermatogenesis. In an expression screen we identified two miRNA loci of the miR-34 family (miR-34b/c and miR-449) that are specifically and highly expressed in post-mitotic male germ cells. A reduction in several miRNAs inclusive of miR-34b/c in spermatozoa has been causally associated with reduced fertility in humans. We found that deletion of both miR34b/c and miR-449 loci resulted in oligoasthenoteratozoospermia in mice. MiR-34bc/449-deficiency impairs both meiosis and the final stages of spermatozoa maturation. Analysis of miR-34bc−/−;449−/− pachytene spermatocytes revealed a small cohort of genes deregulated that were highly enriched for miR-34 family target genes. Our results identify the miR-34 family as the first functionally important miRNAs for spermatogenesis whose deregulation is causal to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and infertility. PMID:25329700

  10. Mitochondria: one of the destinations of miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Tomar, Dhanendra; Singh, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    The cellular processes are controlled by a narrow range of mRNA and proteins levels, where small RNAs (sRNAs) known as miRNAs play a critical role. The spatial and temporal regulation of miRNA processing components and mature miRNA is emerging. The recent studies suggest that mitochondria are one of the destinations of pre as well as mature miRNAs. The role of mitochondria extends beyond energy metabolism to many other cellular processes like metabolism, cell death and inflammation. The new found destination of miRNAs suggest the role of mitochondria in monitoring site specific regulations of proteins as well as the function of mitochondria. The studies in this direction will decipher the novel role of mitochondria-associated miRNAs in different cellular processes. This review is focussed on the recent studies demonstrating the presence of miRNAs in mitochondria and its possible significance in different cellular and physiological conditions.

  11. Career Preparation for Hotel-Motel Management and Services. Grade 11, Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Suggestions arising from a curriculum development workshop led to a curriculum in hotel-motel management and services for high school students which aims to provide them with an opportunity to explore careers in the lodging and hospitality industries. Students will spend half the time in school study of three required subjects and the other half…

  12. Evaluation of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management Graduates: A Ten Year Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dona, Comp.; And Others

    A study of graduates from the Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management program at St. Louis Community College at Forest Park was conducted, primarily in order to elicit information from graduates regarding potentially effective recruitment methods for minority groups and women. The study also sought to obtain evaluation of course curriculum…

  13. Workforce Education. Hotel and Motel Workers. A Section 353 Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL.

    This guide provides an overall view of a program designed to educate adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students in job-related, language-oriented skills vital to their positions in the hotel/motel industry. The program was designed for the employees of Grenelefe Resort and Conference Center in Haines City, Florida,…

  14. Tourists’ attitudes towards ban on smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Viriyachaiyo, V; Lim, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Thailand is internationally renowned for its stringent tobacco control measures. In Thailand, a regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies was issued in late 2006, causing substantial apprehension within the hospitality industry. A survey of tourists’ attitudes toward the ban was conducted. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 5550 travellers staying in various hotels in Bangkok, Surat Thani, Phuket, Krabi and Songkhla provinces, October 2005 to December 2006. Travellers aged 15 years or older with a check-in duration of at least one day and willing to complete the questionnaire were requested by hotel staff to fill in the 5-minute questionnaire at check-in or later at their convenience. Results: Secondhand cigarette smoke was recognised as harmful to health by 89.7% of respondents. 47.8% of travellers were aware of the Thai regulation banning smoking in air-conditioned restaurants. 80.9% of the respondents agreed with the ban, particularly female non-smokers. 38.6% of survey respondents indicated that they would be more likely to visit Thailand again because of the regulation, 53.4% that the regulation would not affect their decision and 7.9% that they would be less likely to visit Thailand again. Conclusion: Banning smoking in air-conditioned hotel lobbies in Thailand is widely supported by tourists. Enforcement of the regulation is more likely to attract tourists than dissuade them from holidaying in Thailand. PMID:19364754

  15. GUIDE FOR COURSE OF STUDY FOR COOK (HOTEL AND RESTAURANT) (ENTRY).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GUNN, VIRLAH

    DESIGNED FOR TEACHER USE, THIS GUIDE FOR TRAINING COOKS IN HOTEL AND RESTAURANT OCCUPATIONS AIMS--(1) TO DEVELOP MANIPULATIVE SKILLS, (2) TO DEVELOP UNDERSTANDING OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND RELATED KNOWLEDGE THAT CONDITION THESE SKILLS, (3) TO UNDERSTAND THE ADVANTAGES OF STEADY EMPLOYMENT, (4) TO DEVELOP HIGH STANDARDS…

  16. 'Bee hotels' as tools for native pollinator conservation: a premature verdict?

    PubMed

    MacIvor, J Scott; Packer, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Society is increasingly concerned with declining wild bee populations. Although most bees nest in the ground, considerable effort has centered on installing 'bee hotels'--also known as nest boxes or trap nests--which artificially aggregate nest sites of above ground nesting bees. Campaigns to 'save the bees' often promote these devices despite the absence of data indicating they have a positive effect. From a survey of almost 600 bee hotels set up over a period of three years in Toronto, Canada, introduced bees nested at 32.9% of sites and represented 24.6% of more than 27,000 total bees and wasps recorded (47.1% of all bees recorded). Native bees were parasitized more than introduced bees and females of introduced bee species provisioned nests with significantly more female larva each year. Native wasps were significantly more abundant than both native and introduced bees and occupied almost 3/4 of all bee hotels each year; further, introduced wasps were the only group to significantly increase in relative abundance year over year. More research is needed to elucidate the potential pitfalls and benefits of using bee hotels in the conservation and population dynamics of wild native bees. PMID:25785609

  17. Colonization of Legionella species in Turkish baths in hotels in Alanya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Legionella species in water samples collected from Turkish baths in hotels in Alanya, Turkey, from August 2003 to September 2013. Water samples were collected in 100-mL sterile containers and then concentrated by filtration. Heat treatment was used to eliminate other microorganisms from the samples, which were then spread on Legionella-selective-buffered charcoal yeast extract alpha (BCYE-α) agar and on BCYE-α agar supplemented with glycine, vancomycin, polymyxin, and cycloheximide. Cysteine-dependent colonies were identified by latex agglutination. In total, 135 samples from 52 hotels with Turkish baths were evaluated. Legionella species were identified in 11/52 (21.2%) hotels and 18/135 (13.3%) samples. The most frequently isolated species was Legionella pneumophila, with most isolates belonging to serogroups 6 (55.6%) and 1 (22.2%). The colony count was <100 colony-forming units (CFU) mL(-1) in nine samples, from 100 to 1000 CFU mL(-1) in six samples, and >1000 CFU mL(-1) in three samples. These findings suggest that the hot water systems of Turkish baths in hotels must be viewed as a possible source of travel-associated Legionnaires' disease, and preventative measures should be put in place. PMID:25850992

  18. Genomic Investigation of a Legionellosis Outbreak in a Persistently Colonized Hotel

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Guiral, Silvia; Crespi, Sebastián; Moya, Víctor; Camaró, María L.; Olmos, María P.; Adrián, Francisco; Morera, Vicente; González-Morán, Francisco; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A long-lasting legionellosis outbreak was reported between November 2011 and July 2012 in a hotel in Calpe (Spain) affecting 44 patients including six deaths. Intensive epidemiological and microbiological investigations were performed in order to detect the reservoirs. Methods: Clinical and environmental samples were tested for the presence and genetic characterization of Legionella pneumophila. Six of the isolates were subjected to whole-genome sequencing. Results: Sequencing of 14 clinical and 260 environmental samples revealed sequence type (ST) 23 as the main responsible strain for the infections. This ST was found in the spa pool, from where it spread to other hotel public spaces, explaining the ST23 clinical cases, including guests who had not visited the spa. Uncultured clinical specimens showed profiles compatible with ST23, ST578, and mixed patterns. Profiles compatible with ST578 were obtained by direct sequencing from biofilm samples collected from the domestic water system, which provided evidence for the source of infection for non ST23 patients. Whole genome data from five ST23 strains and the identification of different STs and Legionella species showed that different hotel premises were likely colonized since the hotel opening thus explaining how different patients had been infected by distinct STs. Conclusions: Both epidemiological and molecular data are essential in the investigation of legionellosis outbreaks. Whole-genome sequencing data revealed significant intra-ST variability and allowed to make further inference on the short-term evolution of a local colonization of L. pneumophila. PMID:26834713

  19. REEP Hotels/Chambers Federal Workplace Literacy Project. April 1, 1990-December 31, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlington County Public Schools, VA. REEP, Arlington Education and Employment Program.

    In an expansion of an earlier National Workplace Literacy Program project, this document reports on a workplace literacy model operated by the Arlington Education and Employment Program (REEP) that includes the Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia Public Schools, the chambers of commerce of both cities, and 14 local hotels. The project provided…

  20. A Follow-Up Study of Junior College Hotel and Restaurant Education in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almarode, Richard L.

    This study examines hospitality programs from the enabling legislation in 1961, which provided for an advisory committee to the Hotel and Restaurant Commission on education. Its purpose was to employ a director of the programs and two field representatives or consultants to offer on-the-job assistance to managers and employees in the state's…

  1. Project EXCEL: Sheraton Palace Hotel, Laundry Department. A Beginning Laundry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    Project EXCEL is a federally-funded workplace literacy program involving hotel enterprises in the San Francisco (California) Bay area. Its focus is on identification and instruction of literacy skills essential to job success for limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers. Training is intended to enable employees to understand written work orders,…

  2. 'Bee hotels' as tools for native pollinator conservation: a premature verdict?

    PubMed

    MacIvor, J Scott; Packer, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Society is increasingly concerned with declining wild bee populations. Although most bees nest in the ground, considerable effort has centered on installing 'bee hotels'--also known as nest boxes or trap nests--which artificially aggregate nest sites of above ground nesting bees. Campaigns to 'save the bees' often promote these devices despite the absence of data indicating they have a positive effect. From a survey of almost 600 bee hotels set up over a period of three years in Toronto, Canada, introduced bees nested at 32.9% of sites and represented 24.6% of more than 27,000 total bees and wasps recorded (47.1% of all bees recorded). Native bees were parasitized more than introduced bees and females of introduced bee species provisioned nests with significantly more female larva each year. Native wasps were significantly more abundant than both native and introduced bees and occupied almost 3/4 of all bee hotels each year; further, introduced wasps were the only group to significantly increase in relative abundance year over year. More research is needed to elucidate the potential pitfalls and benefits of using bee hotels in the conservation and population dynamics of wild native bees.

  3. 76 FR 69753 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, Federal Hotel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...; Comment Request, Federal Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Declaration Form AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management....regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bruce Hensler, Fire Program Specialist, FEMA/U.S. Fire... accommodation meeting minimum requirements for protection of life from fire; the list is known as the...

  4. The Matching Process in E-Mentoring: A Case Study in Luxury Hotels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, David; Lupi, Anne Marie Zammit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the effectiveness of an innovative e-mentoring programme introduced in an international group of luxury hotels. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs the survey method, with quantitative and qualitative data analysis. The research model was developed from a literature review. Findings: While mentoring…

  5. Devolving HRM and HRD to Line managers: The Case of Hilton International's UK Hotels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Gillian; Watson, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores line manager responsibility for human resource management (HRM) and human resource development (HRD) in an international hotel organisation. The results identify a strong support system for line managers in relation to training and good relations with HR specialists. However, less evident is senior management support coupled…

  6. Perceptions toward the Value of Higher Education for Hotel Professionals in Las Vegas: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deel, Gary Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns a qualitative investigation of the views toward higher education and its importance to hospitality career success among hotel professionals in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. Existing literature supported the premise that education may be important to professional career success in several different ways, and that values concerning…

  7. REEP/Hotel Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance. October 1, 1988-March 31, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlington County Public Schools, VA.

    A 1-year workplace literacy program was a joint effort of the Chamber of Commerce, public schools, and seven hotels in Arlington, Virginia. Participants were employees with limited English proficiency. The project resulted in the production of a manual, a video, curricula for housekeeping and food and beverage workers, curricula for more advanced…

  8. 11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, WITH WRAPPER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND CUTTER (RIGHT, BEHIND CHUTE); BUCKET CONVEYOR AT RIGHT MOVED WASTE FROM PRESS TO 5TH FLOOR FOR RE-MANUFACTURE - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  9. The Role of Mathematics in Hotel, Catering and Institutional Management HND and FM Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, I. M.; Ineson, Elizabeth M.

    1980-01-01

    Research was conducted from the viewpoints of students, teaching staff, and industry in relation to mathematical abilities of students taking hotel, catering, and institutional management courses, content and structure of Higher National Diploma and Final Membership courses, industrial applications, and learning strategies. (CT)

  10. SARS: retrospective cohort study among German guests of the Hotel 'M', Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Radun, D; Niedrig, M; Ammon, A; Stark, K

    2003-12-01

    Hong Kong played a pivotal role in the international spread of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS): a doctor who spent the night of 21-22 February 2003 at Hotel 'M' was identified as the index case for four national and international clusters of SARS. In parallel to the international collaborative study led by WHO and United States, a retrospective study on the cohort of German persons staying at Hotel 'M' was conducted. The inclusion criteria covered a period from 21 February to 3 March 2003 to allow the detection of cases possibly due to environmental contamination. In the twenty-one German guests traced as having stayed at Hotel "M" during this period, one case of laboratory confirmed SARS was found. The case history suggests that close vicinity to the index patient may have played a role in transmission. In line with findings of environmental investigations in the hotel, environmental contamination should be considered as a possible source of infection. PMID:14724331

  11. Occupations in the Hotel Tourist Sector within the European Community. A Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peroni, Giovanni; Guerra, Duccio

    This report contains a directory of job profiles in the tourist/hotel sector that is based on seven national monographs. It provides an instrument for comparing factors that characterize practitioners working in the sector in Germany, Spain, France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. A methodological note discusses study objectives,…

  12. Basic Skills in the Hotel & Food Service Industries. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Brief, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a list of 21 contacts and 9 references concerned with workplace literacy programs in the hotel and food service industries. Each listing includes addresses and telephone numbers, prices if applicable, and a brief description of the resource or materials. The materials listed are mostly reports of workplace literacy projects in…

  13. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Advanced Beginner/Intermediate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains 16 lesson plans for an advanced beginning and intermediate course in work-related English for non-English- or limited-English-speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives are as follows: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand…

  14. Comparison of the channelized Hotelling and human observers for lesion detection in hepatic SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michael A.; de Vries, Daniel J.; Soares, Edward J.

    1997-04-01

    The relative rankings of the channelized Hotelling model observer were compared to those of the human observers for the task of detecting 'hot' tumors in simulated hepatic SPECT slices. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were determined using eighty images for each of three slice locations. The acquisition and processing strategies investigated were: (1) imaging solely primary photons, (2) imaging primary plus scatter within a 20% symmetric energy window for Tc-99m, (3) imaging with primary plus an elevated amount of scatter, (4) energy-spectrum-based scatter compensation of the primary plus scatter acquisitions, and (5) energy-spectrum-based scatter compensation of the acquisitions with an elevated amount of scatter. Both square non-overlapping channels (SQR), and overlapping difference- of-Gaussian channels (DOG) were incorporated into the Hotelling model observer. When the scatter compensation results were excluded, both channelized Hotelling model observers exhibited a strong correlation with the rankings of the human-observers. With the inclusion of the scatter compensation results, only with the DOG model observer was the null-hypothesis of no correlation rejected at the p equals 0.05 level. It is concluded that further investigation of the channel model used with the Hotelling observer is indicated to determine if better correlation can be obtained.

  15. Colonization of Legionella species in Turkish baths in hotels in Alanya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Legionella species in water samples collected from Turkish baths in hotels in Alanya, Turkey, from August 2003 to September 2013. Water samples were collected in 100-mL sterile containers and then concentrated by filtration. Heat treatment was used to eliminate other microorganisms from the samples, which were then spread on Legionella-selective-buffered charcoal yeast extract alpha (BCYE-α) agar and on BCYE-α agar supplemented with glycine, vancomycin, polymyxin, and cycloheximide. Cysteine-dependent colonies were identified by latex agglutination. In total, 135 samples from 52 hotels with Turkish baths were evaluated. Legionella species were identified in 11/52 (21.2%) hotels and 18/135 (13.3%) samples. The most frequently isolated species was Legionella pneumophila, with most isolates belonging to serogroups 6 (55.6%) and 1 (22.2%). The colony count was <100 colony-forming units (CFU) mL(-1) in nine samples, from 100 to 1000 CFU mL(-1) in six samples, and >1000 CFU mL(-1) in three samples. These findings suggest that the hot water systems of Turkish baths in hotels must be viewed as a possible source of travel-associated Legionnaires' disease, and preventative measures should be put in place.

  16. Analyzing the Training and Internship Needs Assessment of Verbal Communication Skills amongst Hotel Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahim, Suzana Ab.; Tazijan, Farina

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to expose the learners in the hospitality industry to real workplace requirement in terms of communication skills. In view of its importance, human resource managers, researchers and educators in the field of hospitality management or the hotel practitioners have to pay more serious attention to it. Thus, it is pertinent that both…

  17. Geothermal district-heating potential for casinos/hotels in Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-30

    Results from the pre-feasibility study of a geothermal district heating system for greater Reno and the pre-feasibility study of providing geothermal heat to casinos/hotels located in downtown Reno by connection to the proposed district heating system (DHS) are combined. Geothermal sources were selected from published data. Potential users were selected from aerial and city planning maps, and published building and demographic information. Energy consumption data from the electric and gas utility was matched with consumption information from surveys of representative buildings by category and climatic data. As an example, a written survey was mailed to the casino/hotels and two on-site visits were made. Retrofit methodology and cost were examined for the casino/hotels and representative buildings. Based on the pre-feasibility studies, a geothermal district heating system for Reno appears technically and economically feasible. Furthermore, additional economic savings are achieved when the Reno casinos/hotels are connected to the DHS. Steamboat Hot Springs and a geothermal area east of downtown are the most promising geothermal sources for the DHS. The City of Reno has a large yearly heat load with an average heating degree days per year of 6022/sup 0/F days and a heating season greater than eight months.

  18. Family Hotel Businesses: Strategic Planning and the Need for Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Mike; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2004-01-01

    Small businesses dominate the tourism and hospitality industry worldwide and are of critical importance for the competitiveness of destinations. Small family hotel businesses are characterised by a number of specific business processes which generate particular training and educational needs. It is increasingly clear that small businesses are not…

  19. Role of miRNA-9 in Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Balachandar; Alwin Prem Anand, A.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small regulatory RNAs involved in gene regulation. The regulation is effected by either translational inhibition or transcriptional silencing. In vertebrates, the importance of miRNA in development was discovered from mice and zebrafish dicer knockouts. The miRNA-9 (miR-9) is one of the most highly expressed miRNAs in the early and adult vertebrate brain. It has diverse functions within the developing vertebrate brain. In this article, the role of miR-9 in the developing forebrain (telencephalon and diencephalon), midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord of vertebrate species is highlighted. In the forebrain, miR-9 is necessary for the proper development of dorsoventral telencephalon by targeting marker genes expressed in the telencephalon. It regulates proliferation in telencephalon by regulating Foxg1, Pax6, Gsh2, and Meis2 genes. The feedback loop regulation between miR-9 and Nr2e1/Tlx helps in neuronal migration and differentiation. Targeting Foxp1 and Foxp2, and Map1b by miR-9 regulates the radial migration of neurons and axonal development. In the organizers, miR-9 is inversely regulated by hairy1 and Fgf8 to maintain zona limitans interthalamica and midbrain–hindbrain boundary (MHB). It maintains the MHB by inhibiting Fgf signaling genes and is involved in the neurogenesis of the midbrain–hindbrain by regulating Her genes. In the hindbrain, miR-9 modulates progenitor proliferation and differentiation by regulating Her genes and Elav3. In the spinal cord, miR-9 modulates the regulation of Foxp1 and Onecut1 for motor neuron development. In the forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain, miR-9 is necessary for proper neuronal progenitor maintenance, neurogenesis, and differentiation. In vertebrate brain development, miR-9 is involved in regulating several region-specific genes in a spatiotemporal pattern. PMID:27721656

  20. Healing in the Sámi North.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Randall; Stabbursvik, Ellen Anne Buljo

    2010-12-01

    There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today's tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today's changing global society.

  1. miR-199a and miR-497 Are Associated with Better Overall Survival due to Increased Chemosensitivity in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Troppan, Katharina; Wenzl, Kerstin; Pichler, Martin; Pursche, Beata; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Feichtinger, Julia; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Neumeister, Peter; Deutsch, Alexander

    2015-08-05

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding single-stranded RNA molecules regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs are involved in cell development, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation. miRNAs can either function as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in various important pathways. The expression of specific miRNAs has been identified to correlate with tumor prognosis. For miRNA expression analysis real-time PCR on 81 samples was performed, including 63 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, 15 of germinal center B-cell like subtype, 17 non germinal center B-cell, 23 transformed, and eight unclassified) and 18 controls, including nine peripheral B-cells, 5 germinal-center B-cells, four lymphadenitis samples, and 4 lymphoma cell lines (RI-1, SUDHL4, Karpas, U2932). Expression levels of a panel of 11 miRNAs that have been previously involved in other types of cancer (miR-15b_2, miR-16_1*, miR-16_2, miR-16_2*, miR-27a, miR-27a*, miR-98-1, miR-103a, miR-185, miR-199a, and miR-497) were measured and correlated with clinical data. Furthermore, cell lines, lacking miR-199a and miR-497 expression, were electroporated with the two respective miRNAs and treated with standard immunochemotherapy routinely used in patients with DLBCL, followed by functional analyses including cell count and apoptosis assays. Seven miRNAs (miR-16_1*, miR-16_2*, miR-27a, miR-103, miR-185, miR-199, and miR-497) were statistically significantly up-regulated in DLBCL compared to normal germinal cells. However, high expression of miR-497 or miR-199a was associated with better overall survival (p = 0.042 and p = 0.007). Overexpression of miR-199a and miR-497 led to a statistically significant decrease in viable cells in a dose-dependent fashion after exposure to rituximab and various chemotherapeutics relevant in multi-agent lymphoma therapy. Our data indicate that elevated miR-199a and miR-497 levels are associated with improved survival in aggressive lymphoma

  2. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or ‘miRNA sponges’ that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge. PMID:26424084

  3. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or 'miRNA sponges' that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge.

  4. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or 'miRNA sponges' that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge. PMID:26424084

  5. miRNet - dissecting miRNA-target interactions and functional associations through network-based visual analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yannan; Siklenka, Keith; Arora, Simran K.; Ribeiro, Paula; Kimmins, Sarah; Xia, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate nearly all biological processes and their dysregulation is implicated in various complex diseases and pathological conditions. Recent years have seen a growing number of functional studies of miRNAs using high-throughput experimental technologies, which have produced a large amount of high-quality data regarding miRNA target genes and their interactions with small molecules, long non-coding RNAs, epigenetic modifiers, disease associations, etc. These rich sets of information have enabled the creation of comprehensive networks linking miRNAs with various biologically important entities to shed light on their collective functions and regulatory mechanisms. Here, we introduce miRNet, an easy-to-use web-based tool that offers statistical, visual and network-based approaches to help researchers understand miRNAs functions and regulatory mechanisms. The key features of miRNet include: (i) a comprehensive knowledge base integrating high-quality miRNA-target interaction data from 11 databases; (ii) support for differential expression analysis of data from microarray, RNA-seq and quantitative PCR; (iii) implementation of a flexible interface for data filtering, refinement and customization during network creation; (iv) a powerful fully featured network visualization system coupled with enrichment analysis. miRNet offers a comprehensive tool suite to enable statistical analysis and functional interpretation of various data generated from current miRNA studies. miRNet is freely available at http://www.mirnet.ca. PMID:27105848

  6. Identification and analysis of miRNAs and their targets in ginger using bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Noopur; Srivastava, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-01-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large family of endogenous small RNAs derived from the non-protein coding genes. miRNA regulates the gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and plays an important role in plant development. Zingiber officinale is an important medicinal plant having numerous therapeutic properties. Its bioactive compound gingerol and essential oil posses important pharmacological and physiological activities. In this study, we used a homology search based computational approach for identifying miRNAs in Z. officinale. A total of 16 potential miRNA families (miR167, miR407, miR414, miR5015, miR5021, miR5644, miR5645, miR5656, miR5658, miR5664, miR827, miR838, miR847, miR854, miR862 and miR864) were predicted in ginger. Phylogenetic and conserved analyses were performed for predicted miRNAs. Thirteen miRNA families were found to regulate 300 target transcripts and play an important role in cell signaling, reproduction, metabolic process and stress. To understand the miRNA mediated gene regulatory control and to validate miRNA target predictions, a biological network was also constructed. Gene ontology and pathway analyses were also done. miR5015 was observed to regulate the biosynthesis of gingerol by inhibiting phenyl ammonia lyase (PAL), a precursor enzyme in the biosynthesis of gingerol. Our results revealed that most of the predicted miRNAs were involved in the regulation of rhizome development. miR5021, miR854 and miR838 were identified to regulate the rhizome development and the essential oil biosynthesis in ginger.

  7. A Biogenesis Step Upstream of Microprocessor Controls miR-17∼92 Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Wang, Longfei; Sliz, Piotr; Gregory, Richard I

    2015-08-13

    The precise control of miR-17∼92 microRNA (miRNA) is essential for normal development, and overexpression of certain miRNAs from this cluster is oncogenic. Here, we find that the relative expression of the six miRNAs processed from the primary (pri-miR-17∼92) transcript is dynamically regulated during embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. Pri-miR-17∼92 is processed to a biogenesis intermediate, termed "progenitor-miRNA" (pro-miRNA). Pro-miRNA is an efficient substrate for Microprocessor and is required to selectively license production of pre-miR-17, pre-miR-18a, pre-miR-19a, pre-miR-20a, and pre-miR-19b from this cluster. Two complementary cis-regulatory repression domains within pri-miR-17∼92 are required for the blockade of miRNA processing through the formation of an autoinhibitory RNA conformation. The endonuclease CPSF3 (CPSF73) and the spliceosome-associated ISY1 are responsible for pro-miRNA biogenesis and expression of all miRNAs within the cluster except miR-92. Thus, developmentally regulated pro-miRNA processing is a key step controlling miRNA expression and explains the posttranscriptional control of miR-17∼92 expression in development.

  8. Differential expression of miR-21 and miR-75 in esophageal carcinoma patients and its clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongbo; He, Zhanao; Wang, Hongjiang; Du, Tongxin; Pang, Zuoliang

    2016-01-01

    In Xinjiang, China, esophageal carcinoma has a high incidence in Kazak and Uighur populations. MicroRNA (miR)-21 and miR-375 are related to esophageal carcinoma. This study thus investigated their potencials in early diagnosis and prognosis in Kazak and Uighur populations, to provide evidences for serum markers of esophageal cancer. A total of 126 Kazak or Uighur esophageal cancer patients were enrolled as the disease group, along with 86 local Han patients as disease control cohort, and 80 healthy Kazak or Uighur individuals. MiRNA expression was detected by in situ hybridization in tissues and by qRT-PCR in serum. ROC approach was used to evaluate the diagnostic value of miRNA on esophageal carcinoma. Cox analysis was performed to screen factors governing prognosis. MiR-21 level was significantly elevated in both tissue and serum samples of esophageal cancer patients, while miR-375 was down-regulated. Such difference was more potent in disease group compared to disease control group. MiR expression was correlated with infiltration depth, TNM stage, vascular invasion, and lymph node metastasis. Elevated expression of miR-21 reduced the sensitivity of radio-therapy, and increased recurrence frequency. The diagnostic value of single assay for miR-21 or miR-375 was lower than the combined assay (AUC=0.812 or 0.739 vs. 0.858). They also affected patient prognosis (OR=1.53 or 0.652). MiR-21 and miR-375 presented abnormal expression in Kazak or Uighur esophageal carcinoma patients and were independent factors affecting prognosis. The combined assay of miR-21 and miR-375 may help to make early diagnosis of esophageal cancer. PMID:27508050

  9. Genome-wide analysis reveals downregulation of miR-379/miR-656 cluster in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-uniformly distributed in genomes and ~30% of the miRNAs in the human genome are clustered. In this study we have focused on the imprinted miRNA cluster miR-379/miR-656 on 14q32.31 (hereafter C14) to test their coordinated function. We have analyzed expression profile of >1000 human miRNAs in >1400 samples representing seven different human tissue types obtained from cancer patients along with matched and unmatched controls. Results We found 68% of the miRNAs in this cluster to be significantly downregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 61% downregulated in kidney renal clear cell carcinoma (KIRC), 46% in breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) and 14% in ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV). On a genome-wide scale C14 miRNAs accounted for 12-30% of the total downregulated miRNAs in different cancers. Pathway enrichment for the predicted targets of C14 miRNA was significant for cancer pathways, especially Glioma (p< 3.77x10-6, FDR<0.005). The observed downregulation was confirmed in GBM patients by real-time PCR, where 79% of C14 miRNAs (34/43) showed downregulation. In GBM samples, hypermethylation at C14 locus (p<0.003) and downregulation of MEF2, a crucial transcription factor for the cluster was observed which likely contribute to the observed downregulation of the entire miRNA cluster. Conclusion We provide compelling evidence that the entire C14 miRNA cluster is a tumor suppressor locus involved in multiple cancers, especially in GBM, and points toward a general mechanism of coordinated function for clustered miRNAs. Reviewers Reviewed by: Prof. Gregory J Goodall and Dr. Alexander Max Burroughs PMID:23618224

  10. MiRComb: An R Package to Analyse miRNA-mRNA Interactions. Examples across Five Digestive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Casadesús, Maria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate the expression of target mRNAs by specific binding on the mRNA 3'UTR and promoting mRNA degradation in the majority of cases. It is often of interest to know the specific targets of a miRNA in order to study them in a particular disease context. In that sense, some databases have been designed to predict potential miRNA-mRNA interactions based on hybridization sequences. However, one of the main limitations is that these databases have too many false positives and do not take into account disease-specific interactions. We have developed an R package (miRComb) able to combine miRNA and mRNA expression data with hybridization information, in order to find potential miRNA-mRNA targets that are more reliable to occur in a specific physiological or disease context. This article summarizes the pipeline and the main outputs of this package by using as example TCGA data from five gastrointestinal cancers (colon cancer, rectal cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer and esophageal cancer). The obtained results can be used to develop a huge number of testable hypotheses by other authors. Globally, we show that the miRComb package is a useful tool to deal with miRNA and mRNA expression data, that helps to filter the high amount of miRNA-mRNA interactions obtained from the pre-existing miRNA target prediction databases and it presents the results in a standardised way (pdf report). Moreover, an integrative analysis of the miRComb miRNA-mRNA interactions from the five digestive cancers is presented. Therefore, miRComb is a very useful tool to start understanding miRNA gene regulation in a specific context. The package can be downloaded in http://mircomb.sourceforge.net. PMID:26967326

  11. Rapid divergence and high diversity of miRNAs and miRNA targets in the Camelineae.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa M; Burbano, Hernán A; Wang, Xi; Fitz, Joffrey; Wang, George; Ural-Blimke, Yonca; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs involved in gene regulation through translational inhibition and transcript cleavage. After processing from imperfect fold-back structures, miRNAs are incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) before targeting transcripts with varying degrees of complementarity. Some miRNAs are evolutionarily deep-rooted, and sequence complementarity with their targets is maintained through purifying selection. Both Arabidopsis and Capsella belong to the tribe Camelineae in the Brassicaceae, with Capsella rubella serving as an outgroup to the genus Arabidopsis. The genome sequence of C. rubella has recently been released, which allows characterization of its miRNA complement in comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. Through next-generation sequencing, we identify high-confidence miRNA candidates specific to the C. rubella lineage. Only a few lineage-specific miRNAs have been studied for evolutionary constraints, and there have been no systematic studies of miRNA target diversity within or divergence between closely related plant species. Therefore we contrast sequence variation in miRNAs and their targets within A. thaliana, and between A. thaliana, A. lyrata and C. rubella. We document a surprising amount of small-scale variation in miRNA-target pairs, where many miRNAs are predicted to have species-specific targets in addition to ones that are shared between species. Our results emphasize that the transitive nature of many miRNA-target pairs can be observed even on a relatively short evolutionary time-scale, with non-random occurrences of differences in miRNAs and their complements in the miRNA precursors, the miRNA* sequences. PMID:25557441

  12. miR156 and miR390 regulate tasiRNA accumulation and developmental timing in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hyun; Coruh, Ceyda; Axtell, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    microRNA156 (miR156) affects developmental timing in flowering plants. miR156 and its target relationships with members of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) gene family appear universally conserved in land plants, but the specific functions of miR156 outside of flowering plants are unknown. We find that miR156 promotes a developmental change from young filamentous protonemata to leafy gametophores in the moss Physcomitrella patens, opposite to its role as an inhibitor of development in flowering plants. P. patens miR156 also influences accumulation of trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) dependent upon a second ancient microRNA, miR390. Both miR156 and miR390 directly target a single major tasiRNA primary transcript. Inhibition of miR156 function causes increased miR390-triggered tasiRNA accumulation and decreased accumulation of tasiRNA targets. Overexpression of miR390 also caused a slower formation of gametophores, elevated miR390-triggered tasiRNA accumulation, and reduced level of tasiRNA targets. We conclude that a gene regulatory network controlled by miR156, miR390, and their targets controls developmental change in P. patens. The broad outlines and regulatory logic of this network are conserved in flowering plants, albeit with some modifications. Partially conserved small RNA networks thus influence developmental timing in plants with radically different body plans.

  13. Involvement of miR-605 and miR-34a in the DNA Damage Response Promotes Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. In this study, we focus on miR-605 and miR-34a, which are direct transcriptional targets of p53 and in turn enhance its tumor suppressor function by acting upstream and downstream of it, respectively. miR-605 promotes p53 activation by repressing the expression of mdm2, while miR-34a promotes p53-dependent apoptosis by suppressing the expression of antiapoptotic genes such as bcl-2. What roles they play in the p53-mediated DNA damage response is less well understood. Here, we develop a four-module model of the p53 network to investigate the effect of miR-605 and miR-34a on the cell-fate decision after ionizing radiation. Results of numerical simulation indicate that the cell fate is closely associated with network dynamics. The concentration of p53 undergoes few pulses in response to repairable DNA damage, or it first oscillates and then switches to high plateau levels after irreparable damage. The amplitude of p53 pulses rises to various extents depending on miR-605 expression, and miR-605 accelerates the switching behavior of p53 levels to induce apoptosis. In parallel, miR-34a promotes apoptosis by enhancing the accumulation of free p53AIP1, a key proapoptotic protein. Thus, both miR-605 and miR-34a can mediate cellular outcomes and the timing of apoptosis. Moreover, miR-605 and PTEN complement each other in elevating p53 levels to trigger apoptosis. Taken together, miR-605 and miR-34a cooperate to endow the network with a fail-safe mechanism for apoptosis induction. This computational study also enriches our understanding of the action modes of p53-targeted microRNAs. PMID:24739178

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GRACE DEARBORN INC. DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology may be applied to the remediation of soils and sediments contaminated by a wide variety of organic contaminants including chlorinated phenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. The technology may be ap...

  15. Chen 10-marker miRNA signature for non-small cell lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A panel of 10 serum miRNAs has been identified that were found to have significantly different expression levels in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) serum samples compared with the control serum samples. This panel of miRNAs was able to distinguish NSCLC cases from controls with high sensitivity and specificity. The ten miRNAs are: miR-20a, miR-24, miR-25, miR-145, miR-152, miR-199a-5p, miR-221, miR-222, miR-223, miR-320.

  16. Semirna: searching for plant miRNAs using target sequences.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Perkins, James R; Viguera, Enrique; Thode, Guillermo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2012-04-01

    Many plant genomes are already known, and new ones are being sequenced every year. The next step for researchers is to identify all of the functional elements in these genomes, including the important class of functional elements known as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. However, computational tools for predicting new plant miRNAs are limited, and there is a particular need for tools that can be used easily by laboratory researchers. We present semirna, a new tool for predicting miRNAs in plant genomes, available as a Web server. This tool takes a putative target sequence such as a messenger RNA (mRNA) as input, and allows users to search for miRNAs that target this sequence. It can also be used to determine whether small RNA sequences from massive sequencing analysis represent true miRNAs and to search for miRNAs in new genomes using homology. Semirna has shown a high level of accuracy using various test sets, and gives users the ability to search for miRNAs with several different adjustable parameters. Semirna, a user-friendly and intuitive Web server for predicting miRNA sequences, can be reached at http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/semirna/ . It is useful for researchers searching for miRNAs involved in particular pathways, as well as those searching for miRNAs in newly sequenced genomes.

  17. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  18. Identification of the human mature B cell miRNome

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Katia; Sumazin, Pavel; Morozov, Pavel; Schneider, Christof; Maute, Roy L.; Kitagawa, Yukiko; Mandelbaum, Jonathan; Haddad, Joseph; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The full set of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the human genome is not known. Because presently known miRNAs have been identified by virtue of their abundant expression in a few cell types, many tissue-specific miRNAs remain unrevealed. To understand the role of miRNAs in B-cell function and lymphomagenesis, we generated short-RNA libraries from normal human B cells at different stages of development (naïve, germinal-center, memory) and from a Burkitt lymphoma cell-line. A combination of cloning and computational analysis identified 178 miRNAs (miRNome) expressed in normal and/or transformed B-cell libraries. Most notably, the B-cell miRNome included 75 miRNAs which to our knowledge have not been previously reported and of which 66 have been validated by RNA blot and/or RT-PCR analyses. Numerous miRNAs were expressed in a stage- or transformation-specific fashion in B cells, suggesting specific functional or pathologic roles. These results provide a resource for studying the role of miRNAs in B-cell development, immune function, and lymphomagenesis. PMID:19446474

  19. Semirna: searching for plant miRNAs using target sequences.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Perkins, James R; Viguera, Enrique; Thode, Guillermo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2012-04-01

    Many plant genomes are already known, and new ones are being sequenced every year. The next step for researchers is to identify all of the functional elements in these genomes, including the important class of functional elements known as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. However, computational tools for predicting new plant miRNAs are limited, and there is a particular need for tools that can be used easily by laboratory researchers. We present semirna, a new tool for predicting miRNAs in plant genomes, available as a Web server. This tool takes a putative target sequence such as a messenger RNA (mRNA) as input, and allows users to search for miRNAs that target this sequence. It can also be used to determine whether small RNA sequences from massive sequencing analysis represent true miRNAs and to search for miRNAs in new genomes using homology. Semirna has shown a high level of accuracy using various test sets, and gives users the ability to search for miRNAs with several different adjustable parameters. Semirna, a user-friendly and intuitive Web server for predicting miRNA sequences, can be reached at http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/semirna/ . It is useful for researchers searching for miRNAs involved in particular pathways, as well as those searching for miRNAs in newly sequenced genomes. PMID:22433074

  20. Formulation of New Algorithmics for miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yoichi Robertus

    2008-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs, 21-25 nucleotides (nts) long with single-stranded RNA. miRNA targets the sequences of messenger RNA (mRNA) through incomplete base-pairing of the target sequence. The incomplete pairing of miRNA to mRNA triggers either translational repression or epigenetically mediated transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). miRNA and RNA silencing in mammalian cells may participate in natural ecological interactions and miRNA itself should contain the original information that is required to control viral proliferation, according to the hypothesis of RNA waves. While the hypothesis involves so-called resident and genomic miRNA as the genetic information, resident miRNAs may evolve and jump into other RNAs, and then become genomic miRNAs. Thus, the inheritable character may be acquired by both types of miRNAs. It is reasonable to believe that preparations of new algorithmics models for the flow of miRNAs may provide an opportunity to overcome the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic. PMID:19440463

  1. miR-375 and miR-30d in the effect of chromium-containing Chinese medicine moderating glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Xinhua; Li, Ming; Li, Wenhui; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Huabing; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Zheng, Jia; Xiang, HongDing

    2014-01-01

    In China, TianMai Xiaoke tablet (TM) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. However, the exact mechanism of TM is not clear. This study is to investigate the effect of TM on glucose metabolism in diabetic rats and to identify whether TM takes a direct action through microRNAs on islet. Rats were divided into control group, diabetic group, low dose of TM group (TML), and high dose of TM group (TMH). Pancreas samples were analyzed using microRNA array and Q-PCR. Eight-week treatment with TM significantly decreased fasting blood glucose. The blood glucose was significantly reduced in TM-treated groups before and after oral glucose administration. Fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were suppressed in TM-treated groups. miR-448, let-7b, miR-540, miR-296, miR-880, miR-200a, miR-500, miR-10b, miR-336, miR-30d, miR-208, let-7e, miR-142-5p, miR-874, miR-375, miR-879, miR-501, and miR-188 were upregulated, while miR-301b, miR-134, and miR-652 were downregulated in TMH group. Through target gene analysis and real-time PCR verification, we found that these miRNAs, especially miR-375 and miR-30d, can stimulate insulin secretion in islet. Our data suggest that TM can improve blood glucose in diabetic rats which involved increasing the expression of miR-375 and miR-30d to activate insulin synthesis in islet. PMID:24812635

  2. Patterns of miRNA expression in Arctic charr development.

    PubMed

    Kapralova, Kalina H; Franzdóttir, Sigrídur Rut; Jónsson, Hákon; Snorrason, Sigurður S; Jónsson, Zophonías O

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as a major class of developmental regulators. Sequences of many miRNAs are highly conserved, yet they often exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity in expression among species and have been proposed as an important reservoir for adaptive evolution and divergence. With this in mind we studied miRNA expression during embryonic development of offspring from two contrasting morphs of the highly polymorphic salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a small benthic morph from Lake Thingvallavatn (SB) and an aquaculture stock (AC). These morphs differ extensively in morphology and adult body size. We established offspring groups of the two morphs and sampled at several time points during development. Four time points (3 embryonic and one just before first feeding) were selected for high-throughput small-RNA sequencing. We identified a total of 326 conserved and 427 novel miRNA candidates in Arctic charr, of which 51 conserved and 6 novel miRNA candidates were differentially expressed among developmental stages. Furthermore, 53 known and 19 novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression in the two contrasting morphs. Hierarchical clustering of the 53 conserved miRNAs revealed that the expression differences are confined to the embryonic stages, where miRNAs such as sal-miR-130, 30, 451, 133, 26 and 199a were highly expressed in AC, whereas sal-miR-146, 183, 206 and 196a were highly expressed in SB embryos. The majority of these miRNAs have previously been found to be involved in key developmental processes in other species such as development of brain and sensory epithelia, skeletogenesis and myogenesis. Four of the novel miRNA candidates were only detected in either AC or SB. miRNA candidates identified in this study will be combined with available mRNA expression data to identify potential targets and involvement in developmental regulation. PMID:25170615

  3. Patterns of MiRNA Expression in Arctic Charr Development

    PubMed Central

    Kapralova, Kalina H.; Franzdóttir, Sigrídur Rut; Jónsson, Hákon; Snorrason, Sigurður S.; Jónsson, Zophonías O.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as a major class of developmental regulators. Sequences of many miRNAs are highly conserved, yet they often exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity in expression among species and have been proposed as an important reservoir for adaptive evolution and divergence. With this in mind we studied miRNA expression during embryonic development of offspring from two contrasting morphs of the highly polymorphic salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a small benthic morph from Lake Thingvallavatn (SB) and an aquaculture stock (AC). These morphs differ extensively in morphology and adult body size. We established offspring groups of the two morphs and sampled at several time points during development. Four time points (3 embryonic and one just before first feeding) were selected for high-throughput small-RNA sequencing. We identified a total of 326 conserved and 427 novel miRNA candidates in Arctic charr, of which 51 conserved and 6 novel miRNA candidates were differentially expressed among developmental stages. Furthermore, 53 known and 19 novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression in the two contrasting morphs. Hierarchical clustering of the 53 conserved miRNAs revealed that the expression differences are confined to the embryonic stages, where miRNAs such as sal-miR-130, 30, 451, 133, 26 and 199a were highly expressed in AC, whereas sal-miR-146, 183, 206 and 196a were highly expressed in SB embryos. The majority of these miRNAs have previously been found to be involved in key developmental processes in other species such as development of brain and sensory epithelia, skeletogenesis and myogenesis. Four of the novel miRNA candidates were only detected in either AC or SB. miRNA candidates identified in this study will be combined with available mRNA expression data to identify potential targets and involvement in developmental regulation. PMID:25170615

  4. Staged miRNA re-regulation patterns during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MiRNAs often operate in feedback loops with transcription factors and represent a key mechanism for fine-tuning gene expression. In transcription factor-induced reprogramming, miRNAs play a critical role; however, detailed analyses of miRNA expression changes during reprogramming at the level of deep sequencing have not been previously reported. Results We use four factor reprogramming to induce pluripotent stem cells from mouse fibroblasts and isolate FACS-sorted Thy1- and SSEA1+ intermediates and Oct4-GFP+ induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Small RNAs from these cells, and two partial-iPSC lines, another iPSC line, and mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) were deep sequenced. A comprehensive resetting of the miRNA profile occurs during reprogramming; however, analysis of miRNA co-expression patterns yields only a few patterns of change. Dlk1-Dio3 region miRNAs dominate the large pool of miRNAs experiencing small but significant fold changes early in reprogramming. Overexpression of Dlk1-Dio3 miRNAs early in reprogramming reduces reprogramming efficiency, suggesting the observed downregulation of these miRNAs may contribute to reprogramming. As reprogramming progresses, fewer miRNAs show changes in expression, but those changes are generally of greater magnitude. Conclusions The broad resetting of the miRNA profile during reprogramming that we observe is due to small changes in gene expression in many miRNAs early in the process, and large changes in only a few miRNAs late in reprogramming. This corresponds with a previously observed transition from a stochastic to a more deterministic signal. PMID:24380417

  5. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  6. The Roles of miR-26, miR-29, and miR-203 in the Silencing of the Epigenetic Machinery during Melanocyte Transformation.

    PubMed

    Gasque Schoof, Cláudia Regina; Izzotti, Alberto; Jasiulionis, Miriam Galvonas; Vasques, Luciana Dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic marks located throughout the genome exhibit great variation between normal and transformed cancer cells. While normal cells contain hypomethylated CpG islands near gene promoters and hypermethylated repetitive DNA, the opposite pattern is observed in cancer cells. Recently, it has been reported that alteration in the microenvironment of melanocyte cells, such as substrate adhesion blockade, results in the selection of anoikis-resistant cells, which have tumorigenic characteristics. Melanoma cells obtained through this model show an altered epigenetic pattern, which represents one of the first events during the melanocytes malignant transformation. Because microRNAs are involved in controlling components of the epigenetic machinery, the aim of this work was to evaluate the potential association between the expression of miR-203, miR-26, and miR-29 family members and the genes Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Mecp2, and Ezh2 during cells transformation. Our results show that microRNAs and their validated or predicted targets are inversely expressed, indicating that these molecules are involved in epigenetic reprogramming. We also show that miR-203 downregulates Dnmt3b in mouse melanocyte cells. In addition, treatment with 5-aza-CdR promotes the expression of miR-26 and miR-29 in a nonmetastatic melanoma cell line. Considering the occurrence of CpG islands near the miR-26 and miR-29 promoters, these data suggest that they might be epigenetically regulated in cancer.

  7. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  8. "Front Desk? Send Me a Computer!" The Hotel and Tourism Sector: New Technology Spawns a Revolution in Travel Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The computer and new technologies are revolutionizing the hotel, catering, and tourism businesses. There is consensus that formal training for these changes falls short of new requirements and that schools are having difficulty keeping up. (JOW)

  9. Aberrant Expression of Breast Development-Related MicroRNAs, miR-22, miR-132, and miR-212, in Breast Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Damavandi, Zahra; Torkashvand, Safoora; Vasei, Mohammad; Soltani, Bahram M.; Tavallaei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a major class of small endogenous RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of most genes in the human genome. miRNAs are often located in chromosomal fragile sites, which are suscept-ible to amplification or deletion. Chromosomal deletions are frequent events in breast cancer cells. Deletion and loss of heterozygosity at 17p13.3 have been reported in 49% of breast cancers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential expression alterations of miR-22, miR-132, and miR-212, which are located on the 17p13.3 locus and are required for mammary gland development. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted, which included 36 pairs of tumor and matched nontumor surgical specimens from patients diagnosed with breast invasive ductal carcinoma. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from archival collections at the pathology department of Shariati Hospital were prepared for RNA extraction using the xylene-ethanol method before total RNA was isolated with TRIzol Reagent. Specific primers were designed for cDNA synthesis and miRNA amplification. The expression of miRNAs was then evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results According to our RT-PCR data, the miR-212/miR-132 family was downregulated in breast cancer (0.328-fold, p<0.001), and this reduced expression was the most prominent in high-grade tumors. In contrast, miR-22 exhibited a significant upregulation in breast tumor samples (2.183-fold, p=0.040). Conclusion Consistent with the frequent deletion of the 17p13.3 locus in breast tumor cells, our gene expression data demonstrated a significant downregulation of miR-212 and miR-132 in breast cancer tissues. In contrast, we observed a significant upregulation of miR-22 in breast tumor samples. The latter conflicting result may have been due to the upregulation of miR-22 in stromal/cancer-associated fibroblasts, rather than in the tumor cells. PMID:27382390

  10. MiPS (Mi Prostate Score Urine test) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The MiPS assay is a multiplex analysis of T2-ERG gene fusion, PCA3, and serum PSA (KLK3). It is commercially available through the University of Michigan MLabs. The MiPS assay tests for the presence of two prostate cancer biomarkers: a piece of RNA made from the PCA3 gene, found to be overactive in 95 percent of all prostate cancers, and another RNA marker that is found only when TMPRSS2 and ERG abnormally fuse. TMPRSS2:ERG, or T2-ERG, is a strong indicator of prostate cancer.

  11. Functions of miR-146a and miR-222 in Tumor-associated Macrophages in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanshuang; Zhao, Lianmei; Shi, Bianhua; Ma, Sisi; Xu, Zhenbiao; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play critical roles in promoting tumor progression and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying TAM regulation remain to be further investigated and may make significant contributions to cancer treatment. Mammalian microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified as important regulators of gene expression that function by repressing specific target genes mainly at the post-transcriptional level. However, systematic studies of the functions and mechanisms of miRNAs in TAMs in tumor tissues are rare. In this study, miR-146a and miR-222 were shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs associated with the up-regulated NF-κB p50 subunit. miR-146a promoted the expression of some M2 macrophage phenotype molecules, and miR-146a antagomir transfected RAW264.7 monocyte-macrophage cells inhibited 4T1 tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, overexpression of miR-222 inhibited TAM chemotaxis, and miR-222 in TAMs inhibited 4T1 tumor growth by targeting CXCL12 and inhibiting CXCR4. These data revealed that miRNAs influence breast tumor growth by promoting the M2 type polarization or regulating the recruitment of TAMs. These observations suggest that endogenous miRNAs may exert an important role in controlling the polarization and function of TAMs in breast cancer. PMID:26689540

  12. miRNA Inhibition in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Kelsey R.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are noncoding RNA that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has recently motivated expanding efforts toward development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair. PMID:25553957

  13. Genome-wide miRNA seeds prediction in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqin; Xu, Yuming; Lu, Zuhong

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that miRNA genes exist in the archaeal genome, though the functional role of such noncoding RNA remains unclear. Here, we integrated the phylogenetic information of available archaeal genomes to predict miRNA seeds (typically defined as the 2-8 nucleotides of mature miRNAs) on the genomic scale. Finally, we found 2649 candidate seeds with significant conservation signal. Eleven of 29 unique seeds from previous study support our result (P value <0.01), which demonstrates that the pipeline is suitable to predict experimentally detectable miRNA seeds. The statistical significance of the overlap between the detected archaeal seeds and known eukaryotic seeds shows that the miRNA may evolve before the divergence of these two domains of cellular life. In addition, miRNA targets are enriched for genes involved in transcriptional regulation, which is consistent with the situation in eukaryote. Our research will enhance the regulatory network analysis in Archaea.

  14. miRNAs: biological and clinical determinants in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Alsharafi, Walid A.; Xiao, Bo; Abuhamed, Mutasem M.; Luo, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported to be crucial modulators in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of epilepsies. To date, several miRNAs have been demonstrated to be significantly expressed in the epileptic tissues and strongly associated with the development of epilepsy. Specifically, miRNAs regulate synaptic strength, inflammation, neuronal and glial function, ion channels, and apoptosis. Furthermore, peripheral blood miRNAs can also be utilized as diagnostic biomarkers to assess disease risk and treatment responses. Here, we will summarize the recent available literature regarding the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis and treatment of epilepsy. Moreover, we will provide brief insight into the potential of miRNA as diagnostic biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis of epilepsy. PMID:26528124

  15. Association of miR-146a, miR-149, miR-196a2, and miR-499 Polymorphisms with Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kumar, Hemant; Sohn, Seil; Min, Hyoung Sik; Lee, Jang Bo; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Keung Nyun; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Ok Joon; Ropper, Alexander E.; Kim, Nam Keun; Han, In Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the spine is considered a multifactorial and polygenic disease. We aimed to investigate the association between four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of pre-miRNAs [miR-146aC>G (rs2910164), miR-149T>C (rs2292832), miR-196a2T>C (rs11614913), and miR-499A>G (rs3746444)] and the risk of cervical OPLL in the Korean population. Methods The genotypic frequencies of these four SNPs were analyzed in 207 OPLL patients and 200 controls by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Findings For four SNPs in pre-miRNAs, no significant differences were found between OPLL patients and controls. However, subgroup analysis based on OPLL subgroup (continuous: continuous type plus mixed type, segmental: segmental and localized type) showed that miR-499GG genotype was associated with an increased risk of segmental type OPLL (adjusted odds ratio = 4.314 with 95% confidence interval: 1.109–16.78). In addition, some allele combinations (C-T-T-G, G-T-T-A, and G-T-C-G of miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499) and combined genotypes (miR-149TC/miR-196a2TT) were associated with increased OPLL risk, whereas the G-T-T-G and G-C-C-G allele combinations were associated with decreased OPLL risk. Conclusion The results indicate that GG genotype of miR-499 is associated with significantly higher risks of OPLL in the segmental OPLL group. The miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499 allele combinations may be a genetic risk factor for cervical OPLL in the Korean population. PMID:27454313

  16. Association between single nucleotide polymorphism in miR-499, miR-196a2, miR-146a and miR-149 and prostate cancer risk in a sample of Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Moradi, Nazanin; Ziaee, Seyed Amir Mohsen; Narouie, Behzad; Soltani, Mohammad Hosein; Rezaei, Maryam; Shahkar, Ghazaleh; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and are involved in numerous physiological processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human miRNA genes may affect miRNA biogenesis pathway and influence the susceptibility to several diseases such as cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of miR-499 rs3746444, miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was done on 169 patients with pathologically confirmed PCa and 182 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The genotyping assays were done using T-ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP methods. The findings indicated that CC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.12-2.79, P = 0.019) compared to TT genotype. No statistically significant association was found between miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms and PCa risk. In summary, the findings indicated that miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are necessary to verify the findings of the present study.

  17. Altered Expressions of miR-1238-3p, miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p in the Formation of Chronic Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Ferah; Bal, Salih Haldun; Tezcan, Gulcin; Akalın, Halis; Goral, Guher

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that is still endemic in developing countries. Despite early diagnosis and treatment of patients, chronic infections are seen in 10–30% of patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunological factors that play roles in the transition of brucellosis from acute infection into chronic infection. Here, more than 2000 miRNAs were screened in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with acute or chronic brucellosis and healthy controls by using miRNA array, and the results of the miRNA array were validated through qRT-PCR. Findings were evaluated using GeneSpring GX (Agilent) 13.0 software and KEGG pathway analysis. Four miRNAs were expressed in the chronic group but were not expressed in acute and control groups. Among these miRNAs, the expression level of miR-1238-3p was increased while miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p were decreased (p < 0.05, fold change > 2). These miRNAs have the potential to be markers for chronic cases. The differentially expressed miRNAs and their predicted target genes involved in endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, MAPK signaling pathway, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and its chemokine signaling pathway indicate their potential roles in chronic brucellosis and its progression. It is the first study of miRNA expression analysis of human PBMC to clarify the mechanism of inveteracy in brucellosis. PMID:27722176

  18. Expression of the dermatomyositis autoantigen Mi-2 in regenerating muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, Andrew L.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia A.; Hall, John C.; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Corse, Andrea M.; Rosen, Antony

    2010-01-01

    Objective Autoantibodies against the chromatin remodeler Mi-2 are found in a distinct subset of patients with dermatomyositis (DM). Previous quantitative immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that Mi-2 protein is up-regulated in DM muscle. We undertook this study to define the population of cells expressing high levels of Mi-2 in DM muscle and to explore the regulation and functional role of Mi-2 during muscle regeneration. Methods We analyzed the expression of Mi-2 in human muscle biopsy specimens using immunofluorescence. Then, we used cardiotoxin (CTX) to induce muscle injury and repair in the mouse; Mi-2 expression during muscle regeneration was studied in this model by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analysis. Finally, we utilized a cell culture system of muscle differentiation to artificially modulate Mi-2 levels during myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Results In DM muscle, increased Mi-2 expression is preferentially found in myofibers within fascicles affected by perifascicular atrophy, particularly in the centralized nuclei of small perifascicular muscle fibers expressing markers of regeneration. In the mouse, Mi-2 is dramatically and persistently up-regulated during muscle regeneration in vivo. Premature silencing of Mi-2 with RNAi in vitro resulted in accelerated myoblast differentiation. Conclusions Mi-2 expression is markedly up-regulated during muscle regeneration in the mouse model. It is also up-regulated in DM myofibers expressing markers of regeneration. In vitro studies suggest that this protein may play a role in modulating the kinetics of myoblast differentiation. We propose that high levels of Mi-2 expression in DM muscle biopsies reflect the presence of incompletely differentiated muscle cells. PMID:19950298

  19. Association between single nucleotide polymorphism in miR-499, miR-196a2, miR-146a and miR-149 and prostate cancer risk in a sample of Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Moradi, Nazanin; Ziaee, Seyed Amir Mohsen; Narouie, Behzad; Soltani, Mohammad Hosein; Rezaei, Maryam; Shahkar, Ghazaleh; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and are involved in numerous physiological processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human miRNA genes may affect miRNA biogenesis pathway and influence the susceptibility to several diseases such as cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of miR-499 rs3746444, miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was done on 169 patients with pathologically confirmed PCa and 182 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The genotyping assays were done using T-ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP methods. The findings indicated that CC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.12-2.79, P = 0.019) compared to TT genotype. No statistically significant association was found between miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms and PCa risk. In summary, the findings indicated that miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are necessary to verify the findings of the present study. PMID:27222754

  20. Association between single nucleotide polymorphism in miR-499, miR-196a2, miR-146a and miR-149 and prostate cancer risk in a sample of Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Moradi, Nazanin; Ziaee, Seyed Amir Mohsen; Narouie, Behzad; Soltani, Mohammad Hosein; Rezaei, Maryam; Shahkar, Ghazaleh; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and are involved in numerous physiological processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human miRNA genes may affect miRNA biogenesis pathway and influence the susceptibility to several diseases such as cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of miR-499 rs3746444, miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was done on 169 patients with pathologically confirmed PCa and 182 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The genotyping assays were done using T-ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP methods. The findings indicated that CC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.12–2.79, P = 0.019) compared to TT genotype. No statistically significant association was found between miR-196a2 rs11614913, miR-149 rs2292832, and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms and PCa risk. In summary, the findings indicated that miR-499 rs3746444 polymorphism increased the risk of PCa in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are necessary to verify the findings of the present study. PMID:27222754

  1. Circulating miR-150 and miR-342 in plasma are novel potential biomarkers for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (19-22-nt) single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules whose deregulation of expression can contribute to human disease including the multistep processes of carcinogenesis in human. Circulating miRNAs are emerging biomarkers in many diseases and cancers such as type 2 diabetes, pulmonary disease, colorectal cancer, and gastric cancer among others; however, defining a plasma miRNA signature in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) that could serve as a biomarker for diagnosis or in the follow-up has not been done yet. Methods TaqMan miRNA microarray was performed to identify deregulated miRNAs in the plasma of AML patients. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to validate the results. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the highly and significantly identified deregulated miRNA(s) as potential candidate biomarker(s). Results The plasma expression level of let-7d, miR-150, miR-339, and miR-342 was down-regulated whilst that of let-7b, and miR-523 was up-regulated in the AML group at diagnosis compared to healthy controls. ROC curve analyses revealed an AUC (the areas under the ROC curve) of 0.835 (95% CI: 0.7119– 0.9581; P<0.0001) and 0.8125 (95% CI: 0.6796–0.9454; P=0.0005) for miR-150, and miR-342 respectively. Combined ROC analyses using these 2 miRNAs revealed an elevated AUC of 0.86 (95% CI: 0.7819–0.94; P<0.0001) indicating the additive effect in the diagnostic value of these 2 miRNAs. QRT-PCR results showed that the expression level of these two miRs in complete remission AML patients resembled that of healthy controls. Conclusions Our findings indicated that plasma miR-150 and miR-342 are novel important promising biomarkers in the diagnosis of AML. These novel and promising markers warrant validation in larger prospective studies. PMID:23391324

  2. Methylation of miRNA genes and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loginov, V I; Rykov, S V; Fridman, M V; Braga, E A

    2015-02-01

    Interaction between microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA of target genes at the posttranscriptional level provides fine-tuned dynamic regulation of cell signaling pathways. Each miRNA can be involved in regulating hundreds of protein-coding genes, and, conversely, a number of different miRNAs usually target a structural gene. Epigenetic gene inactivation associated with methylation of promoter CpG-islands is common to both protein-coding genes and miRNA genes. Here, data on functions of miRNAs in development of tumor-cell phenotype are reviewed. Genomic organization of promoter CpG-islands of the miRNA genes located in inter- and intragenic areas is discussed. The literature and our own results on frequency of CpG-island methylation in miRNA genes from tumors are summarized, and data regarding a link between such modification and changed activity of miRNA genes and, consequently, protein-coding target genes are presented. Moreover, the impact of miRNA gene methylation on key oncogenetic processes as well as affected signaling pathways is discussed.

  3. MicroRNA miR-125b causes leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Marina; Harris, Marian H; Zhou, Beiyan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNA miR-125b has been implicated in several kinds of leukemia. The chromosomal translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) found in patients with myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia leads to an overexpression of miR-125b of up to 90-fold normal. Moreover, miR-125b is also up-regulated in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the t(11;14)(q24;q32) translocation. To decipher the presumed oncogenic mechanism of miR-125b, we used transplantation experiments in mice. All mice transplanted with fetal liver cells ectopically expressing miR-125b showed an increase in white blood cell count, in particular in neutrophils and monocytes, associated with a macrocytic anemia. Among these mice, half died of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or a myeloproliferative neoplasm, suggesting an important role for miR-125b in early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, coexpression of miR-125b and the BCR-ABL fusion gene in transplanted cells accelerated the development of leukemia in mice, compared with control mice expressing only BCR-ABL, suggesting that miR-125b confers a proliferative advantage to the leukemic cells. Thus, we show that overexpression of miR-125b is sufficient both to shorten the latency of BCR-ABL-induced leukemia and to independently induce leukemia in a mouse model.

  4. A Novel Putative miRNA Target Enhancer Signal

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thorsten; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Stümpflen, Volker

    2009-01-01

    It is known that miRNA target sites are very short and the effect of miRNA-target site interaction alone appears as being unspecific. Recent experiments suggest further context signals involved in miRNA target site recognition and regulation. Here, we present a novel GC-rich RNA motif downstream of experimentally supported miRNA target sites in human mRNAs with no similarity to previously reported functional motifs. We demonstrate that the novel motif can be found in at least one third of all transcripts regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, we show that motif occurrence and the frequency of miRNA target sites as well as the stability of their duplex structures correlate. The finding, that the novel motif is significantly associated with miRNA target sites, suggests a functional role of the motif in miRNA target site biology. Beyond, the novel motif has the impact to improve prediction of miRNA target sites significantly. PMID:19649282

  5. miRNA expression atlas in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Keiichi; Uehara, Takeki; Morikawa, Yuji; Omura, Ko; Kanki, Masayuki; Horinouchi, Akira; Ono, Atsushi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (~22 nucleotide) noncoding RNAs that play pivotal roles in regulation of gene expression. The value of miRNAs as circulating biomarkers is now broadly recognized; such tissue-specific biomarkers can be used to monitor tissue injury and several pathophysiological conditions in organs. In addition, miRNA profiles of normal organs and tissues are important for obtaining a better understanding of the source of modulated miRNAs in blood and how those modulations reflect various physiological and toxicological conditions. This work was aimed at creating an miRNA atlas in rats, as part of a collaborative effort with the Toxicogenomics Informatics Project in Japan (TGP2). We analyzed genome-wide miRNA profiles of 55 different organs and tissues obtained from normal male rats using miRNA arrays. The work presented herein represents a comprehensive dataset derived from normal samples profiled in a single study. Here we present the whole dataset with miRNA profiles of multiple organs, as well as precise information on experimental procedures and organ-specific miRNAs identified in this dataset. PMID:25977763

  6. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy in <mi>UMn>2<mi>Ge>2 and related Mn-based actinide ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, David S.; Ghimire, Nirmal; Singleton, John; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Baumbach, Ryan; Mandrus, David; Li, Ling; Singh, David J.

    2015-05-04

    We present magnetization isotherms in pulsed magnetic fields up to 62 Tesla, supported by first principles calculations, demonstrating a huge uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy - approximately 20 MJ/m3 - in <mi>UMn>2<mi>Ge>2. This large anisotropy results from the extremely strong spin-orbit coupling affecting the uranium 5 f electrons, which in the calculations exhibit a substantial orbital moment exceeding 2 μB. Finally, we also find from theoretical calculations that a number of isostructural Mn-actinide compounds are expected to have similarly large anisotropy.

  7. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  8. Upgrades to the Fermilab NuMI beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Michael A.; Childress, Sam; Grossman, Nancy; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; McCluskey, Elaine; Moore, Craig Damon; Reilly, Robert; Tariq, Salman; Wehmann, Alan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The NuMI beamline at Fermilab has been delivering high-intensity muon neutrino beams to the MINOS experiment since the spring of 2005. A total of 3.4 x 10{sup 20} protons has been delivered to the NuMI target and a maximum beam power of 320 kW has been achieved. An upgrade of the NuMI facility increasing the beam power capability to 700 kW is planned as part of the NOvA experiment. The plans for this upgrade are presented and the possibility of upgrading the NuMI beamline to handle 1.2 MW is considered.

  9. [Correlation between the levels of miR-21, miR-34c, miR-140 and miR-375 in the sperm from in vitro fertilization patients and the embryo quality].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Liu, Nenghui

    2015-08-01

    目的:通过检测不同胚胎质量的体外受精(in vitro fertilization,IVF)患者精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375的表达情况,探讨精子来源的miRNAs与胚胎质量的相关性。方法:选择2012年9月至12月在中南大学湘雅医院生殖医学中心行IVF治疗原发不育的男性患者44例,收集 IVF取卵当日剩余新鲜精液标本,采用实时荧光定量PCR测定精子miRNAs(miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375)的表达水平。观察胚胎情况后分组,第3天胚胎评分的平均值<8分为实验组,≥8分为对照组。比较实验组和对照组患者一般情况及实验室资料,分析精子miRNAs表达水平与胚胎质量的相关性。结果:实验组精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375表达水平低于对照组(P<0.01)。实验组与对照组的获卵数、减数分裂II期(metaphase II,MII)卵子数、双原核(dual pronuclear,2PN)受精数、卵裂数、受精率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);实验组卵裂率低于对照组(P<0.05)。精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375表达水平与第2,3天胚胎碎片率呈负相关,与第3天胚胎卵裂球数呈正相关,与胚胎评分呈正相关。结论:精子miRNA-21,miRNA-34c,miRNA-140,miRNA-375的表达水平上升可能影响卵裂期胚胎质量,对胚胎发育可能起一定的积极作用。.

  10. Hsa-miR-137, hsa-miR-520e and hsa-miR-590-3p perform crucial roles in Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Changyu; Li, Jiayu; Li, Jiarui; Wan, Yingchun; Li, Tao; Ma, Piyong; Wang, Yingjian; Sang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the differentially expressed microRNAs (DEMs) between Lynch syndrome (LS) and the normal colonic (N-C) control samples, predict the target genes (TGs) and analyze the potential functions of the DEMs and TGs. The miRNA expression dataset GSE30454, which included data of 13 LS and 20 N-C tissue samples, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. The classical t-test in Linear Models for Microarray Data package was used for DEM identification. TG prediction was performed using 5 databases. The regulatory network of the DEMs and their TGs was constructed using Cytoscape. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis was performed. The transcription factors (TFs), tumor-associated genes (TAG) and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) were then identified. Three key DEMs hsa-miR-137, hsa-miR-520e, and hsa-miR-590-3p were identified. Hsa-miR-520e and hsa-miR-137 had 4 common TGs, including SNF related kinase, metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1), round spermatid basic protein 1 and YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 3; hsa-miR-590-3p and hsa-miR-137 had 14 common TGs, including NCK adaptor protein 1 (NCK1), EPH receptor A7, and stress-associated endoplasmic reticulum protein 1; hsa-miR-590-3p and hsa-miR-520e had 12 common TGs, including Krüppel-like factor (KLF) 13, twinfilin actin binding protein 1, and nuclear factor I B. Through the functional and pathway enrichments analysis, MTF1 was involved in regulation of gene expression and metabolic processes, and sequence-specific DNA binding TF activity. KLF13 was involved in regulation of gene expression and regulation of cellular metabolic processes. NCK1 was enriched in the axon guidance pathway. In addition, the functional and pathway enrichment analysis showed certain TGs, such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, AKT serine/threonine kinase 2, and rapamycin-insensitive companion of mammalian target of rapamycin, participated in the mTOR signaling pathway. The 3 key

  11. [The role of miRNA in endometrial cancer in the context of miRNA 205].

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Miłosz; Danielska, Justyna; Dzieniecka, Monika; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-coding molecules of ribonucleic acids of approximately 22 bp length, which serve as regulators of gene expression and protein translation due to interference with messenger RNA (mRNA). MiRNAs, which take part in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, may be associated with carcinogenesis. Aberrant expression of miRNAs in endometrial cancer might contribute to the endometrial cancer initiation or progression, as well as metastasis formation, and may influence cancer invasiveness. Specific-miRNAs expressed in endometrial cancer tissues may serve as diagnostic markers of the disease, prognostic biomarkers, or play an important part in oncological therapy We aimed to describe the role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer with special consideration of miRNA 205. PMID:26817318

  12. MiRNA in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Lidia; Samochocki, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are relatively new molecules that have been widely studied in recent years as to determine their exact function in the human body. It is suggested that microRNAs control approx. 30% of all genes, making them one of the largest groups that control the expression of proteins. Various functions of miRNAs have already been described. In skin diseases, there are more and more studies describing an altered expression of microRNAs in the skin or serum. Relatively little is known about the function of these molecules in atopic dermatitis, which prompted us to gather current reports on this subject. PMID:27512348

  13. Targeting oncomiRNAs and mimicking tumor suppressor miRNAs: New trends in the development of miRNA therapeutic strategies in oncology (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAMBARI, ROBERTO; BROGNARA, ELEONORA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; FABBRI, ENRICA

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA or miR) therapeutics in cancer are based on targeting or mimicking miRNAs involved in cancer onset, progression, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. Several studies conclusively have demonstrated that miRNAs are deeply involved in tumor onset and progression, either behaving as tumor-promoting miRNAs (oncomiRNAs and metastamiRNAs) or as tumor suppressor miRNAs. This review focuses on the most promising examples potentially leading to the development of anticancer, miRNA-based therapeutic protocols. The inhibition of miRNA activity can be readily achieved by the use of miRNA inhibitors and oligomers, including RNA, DNA and DNA analogues (miRNA antisense therapy), small molecule inhibitors, miRNA sponges or through miRNA masking. On the contrary, the enhancement of miRNA function (miRNA replacement therapy) can be achieved by the use of modified miRNA mimetics, such as plasmid or lentiviral vectors carrying miRNA sequences. Combination strategies have been recently developed based on the observation that i) the combined administration of different antagomiR molecules induces greater antitumor effects and ii) some anti-miR molecules can sensitize drug-resistant tumor cell lines to therapeutic drugs. In this review, we discuss two additional issues: i) the combination of miRNA replacement therapy with drug administration and ii) the combination of antagomiR and miRNA replacement therapy. One of the solid results emerging from different independent studies is that miRNA replacement therapy can enhance the antitumor effects of the antitumor drugs. The second important conclusion of the reviewed studies is that the combination of anti-miRNA and miRNA replacement strategies may lead to excellent results, in terms of antitumor effects. PMID:27175518

  14. miRLAB: An R Based Dry Lab for Exploring miRNA-mRNA Regulatory Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuc Duy; Zhang, Junpeng; Liu, Lin; Liu, Huawen; Li, Jiuyong

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are important gene regulators at post-transcriptional level, and inferring miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships is a crucial problem. Consequently, several computational methods of predicting miRNA targets have been proposed using expression data with or without sequence based miRNA target information. A typical procedure for applying and evaluating such a method is i) collecting matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in a specific condition, e.g. a cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), ii) applying the new computational method to the selected dataset, iii) validating the predictions against knowledge from literature and third-party databases, and comparing the performance of the method with some existing methods. This procedure is time consuming given the time elapsed when collecting and processing data, repeating the work from existing methods, searching for knowledge from literature and third-party databases to validate the results, and comparing the results from different methods. The time consuming procedure prevents researchers from quickly testing new computational models, analysing new datasets, and selecting suitable methods for assisting with the experiment design. Here, we present an R package, miRLAB, for automating the procedure of inferring and validating miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. The package provides a complete set of pipelines for testing new methods and analysing new datasets. miRLAB includes a pipeline to obtain matched miRNA and mRNA expression datasets directly from TCGA, 12 benchmark computational methods for inferring miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships, the functions for validating the predictions using experimentally validated miRNA target data and miRNA perturbation data, and the tools for comparing the results from different computational methods. PMID:26716983

  15. Transcription factor NRF2 regulates miR-1 and miR-206 to drive tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anju; Happel, Christine; Manna, Soumen K.; Acquaah-Mensah, George; Carrerero, Julian; Kumar, Sarvesh; Nasipuri, Poonam; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Dewi, Ruby; Boros, Laszlo G.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gabrielson, Edward; Wong, Kwok K.; Girnun, Geoffrey; Biswal, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which deregulated nuclear factor erythroid-2–related factor 2 (NRF2) and kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) signaling promote cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis are poorly understood. Using an integrated genomics and 13C-based targeted tracer fate association (TTFA) study, we found that NRF2 regulates miR-1 and miR-206 to direct carbon flux toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, reprogramming glucose metabolism. Sustained activation of NRF2 signaling in cancer cells attenuated miR-1 and miR-206 expression, leading to enhanced expression of PPP genes. Conversely, overexpression of miR-1 and miR-206 decreased the expression of metabolic genes and dramatically impaired NADPH production, ribose synthesis, and in vivo tumor growth in mice. Loss of NRF2 decreased the expression of the redox-sensitive histone deacetylase, HDAC4, resulting in increased expression of miR-1 and miR-206, and not only inhibiting PPP expression and activity but functioning as a regulatory feedback loop that repressed HDAC4 expression. In primary tumor samples, the expression of miR-1 and miR-206 was inversely correlated with PPP gene expression, and increased expression of NRF2-dependent genes was associated with poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate that microRNA-dependent (miRNA-dependent) regulation of the PPP via NRF2 and HDAC4 represents a novel link between miRNA regulation, glucose metabolism, and ROS homeostasis in cancer cells. PMID:23921124

  16. Performance assessment of AS-SBR and UF-MBR for hotel wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Libralato, G; Volpi Ghirardini, A; Avezzù, F

    2009-01-01

    A large number of tourist structures in Venice (Italy) have small sized on-site treatment systems for their wastewater. Due to its historical characteristics, the city has no public sewerage system and untreated hotel wastewater represents a serious hazard for its lagoon environment. This study focused on the wastewater facilities installed in two hotels adopting an Activated Sludge Sequencing Batch Reactor (AS-SBR) and an Ultra-Filtration Membrane Biological Reactor (UF-MBR). Their performance was checked in terms of both traditional physico-chemical and ecotoxicological parameters, the importance of which has recently been recognised by EU regulatory dispositions and OSPAR indications. Acute and sub-chronic endpoints were both considered on a whole effluent toxicity basis by means of Vibrio fischeri and Crassostrea gigas, respectively. The two months monitoring survey evidenced that the UF-MBR was more efficient than the AS-SBR in providing high-quality discharges under both chemical and ecotoxicological viewpoints. PMID:19809133

  17. Biogas from bio-waste-potential for an ecological waste and energy management in resort hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, D.; Schultheis, A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper gives an overview about waste management in holiday resorts. The objective is to determine the composition of waste and the specific waste quantities per guest. This data represents the basis for planning recycling measures and corresponding treatment facilities. The sorting analyses show the great potential of organic material suitable for biological treatment. Because of the characteristics (water content, structure) of these organic materials, composting is not as suitable as fermentation. Fermentation tests with hotel bio-waste turned out a much higher rate of biogas compared with communal bio-waste. Until now, biogas as a possibility of regenerative energy, has not been taken into consideration for big hotels or holiday resorts. Using biogas as an additional source of energy and the fermentation products as fertilizer would be a further step to an ecologically beneficial tourism.

  18. The Impact of e-Customer Relationship Marketing in Hotel Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Irene

    The present research investigates the extent to which Greek hotels had developed the electronic customer relationship marketing (E-CRM). The study verifies the practices that frequently appear in relationship marketing process within online operations or whether their Internet presence mainly depends on the basic actions of "supplying information" and "reservations". Also, it investigates the effects of e-CRM system on customer loyalty and satisfaction as well as the impact of relationship marketing practices to customer retention and acquisition. They have understood the importance of using electronic channels instead of traditional ones to implement their marketing strategies. Thus, e-crm system has assisted hotel business to manage more effectively their reservations and serve their customers as fast and as effective as possible. They did not seem to apply many of the relationship marketing strategies to emphasize customer retention and continual satisfaction because of difficulties in staff training.

  19. 3,000 kW Suginoi Hotel geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Kisumi

    1996-05-01

    The Suginoi Hotel is located 200 m above sea level, in Beppu City, which is one of the largest hot spring resort area in Japan. In this hotel, there are some unique hot spring baths, which are interesting to visitors. In Beppu, there are numerous hot springs, some are call {open_quotes}Jigoku{close_quotes} (Hells). The main attraction in Beppu are the hell-like spots created by hot springs such as the Torando Hell, which erupt to a heights of more than 50 meters, The Blood Pond Hell which is bloody red due to red clay content. In yield, these hot springs rank second in the world next to those of Yellowstone National Park in the USA.

  20. Improving service quality in NHS Trust hospitals: lessons from the hotel sector.

    PubMed

    Desombre, T; Eccles, G

    1998-01-01

    This article looks to review recent practice undertaken within the UK hotel sector to improve customer service, and suggests ideals that could be implemented within National Health (NHS) Trust hospitals. At a time of increasing competition, hotel firms are using service enhancement as a means to gain competitive advantage, and therefore developing a range of techniques to measure levels of service quality improvement. With continued change in the health service, where greater focus now lies with patient satisfaction, so there is a requirement for managers to adapt techniques presently being offered in other service industries to improve levels of customer service and ensure patients are targeted to define their levels of satisfaction. PMID:10177367

  1. Geothermal district heating and cooling of hotel/casinos in downtown Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cerci, Y.; Kanoglu, M.; Cengel, Y.A.; Turner, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, potential revenues from the proposed geothermal district heating/cooling system for the hotel/casino complexes in downtown Reno, Nevada are estimated by analyzing their actual electricity and natural gas bills during 1993 through 1994. The geothermal system appears to be feasible, and financially very attractive. The geothermal district system can meet the entire heating and cooling requirements of the hotel/casinos, generating total potential revenues of $3,486,000 per year. Also, other buildings around the downtown area such as Saint Mary`s Hospital, several motels, business complexes, Washoe County School District Building, and even the UNR campus will add extra potential revenues, if these buildings are connected to the geothermal grid. Since most buildings around the downtown use central heating and cooling system, the retrofit costs for the both system should be minimal.

  2. Inference of Target Gene Regulation via miRNAs during Cell Senescence by Using the MiRaGE Server.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Y-H

    2012-08-01

    miRNAs have recently been shown to play a key role in cell senescence, by downregulating target genes. Thus, inference of those miRNAs that critically downregulate target genes is important. However, inference of target gene regulation by miRNAs is difficult and is often achieved simply by investigating significant upregulation during cell senescence. Here, we inferred the regulation of target genes by miRNAs, using the recently developed MiRaGE server, together with the change in miRNA expression during fibroblast IMR90 cell senescence. We revealed that the simultaneous consideration of 2 criteria, the up(down)regulation and the down(up) regulatiion of target genes, yields more feasible miRNA, i.e., those that are most frequently reported to be down/upregulated and/or to possess biological backgrounds that induce cell senescence. Thus, when analyzing miRNAs that critically contribute to cell senescence, it is important to consider the level of target gene regulation, simultaneously with the change in miRNA expression. PMID:23185711

  3. Analyzing the miRNA-Gene Networks to Mine the Important miRNAs under Skin of Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Husile

    2016-01-01

    Genetic networks provide new mechanistic insights into the diversity of species morphology. In this study, we have integrated the MGI, GEO, and miRNA database to analyze the genetic regulatory networks under morphology difference of integument of humans and mice. We found that the gene expression network in the skin is highly divergent between human and mouse. The GO term of secretion was highly enriched, and this category was specific in human compared to mouse. These secretion genes might be involved in eccrine system evolution in human. In addition, total 62,637 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in human integument genes (IGs), while 26,280 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in mouse IGs. The interactions between miRNAs and IGs in human are more complex than those in mouse. Furthermore, hsa-miR-548, mmu-miR-466, and mmu-miR-467 have an enormous number of targets on IGs, which both have the role of inhibition of host immunity response. The pattern of distribution on the chromosome of these three miRNAs families is very different. The interaction of miRNA/IGs has added the new dimension in traditional gene regulation networks of skin. Our results are generating new insights into the gene networks basis of skin difference between human and mouse.

  4. CID-miRNA: A web server for prediction of novel miRNA precursors in human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Sonika; Vaz, Candida; Gupta, Vipin; Bhatia, Rohit; Maheshwari, Sachin; Srinivasan, Ashwin; Bhattacharya, Alok

    2008-08-08

    microRNAs (miRNA) are a class of non-protein coding functional RNAs that are thought to regulate expression of target genes by direct interaction with mRNAs. miRNAs have been identified through both experimental and computational methods in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. Though these approaches have been partially successful, there is a need to develop more tools for detection of these RNAs as they are also thought to be present in abundance in many genomes. In this report we describe a tool and a web server, named CID-miRNA, for identification of miRNA precursors in a given DNA sequence, utilising secondary structure-based filtering systems and an algorithm based on stochastic context free grammar trained on human miRNAs. CID-miRNA analyses a given sequence using a web interface, for presence of putative miRNA precursors and the generated output lists all the potential regions that can form miRNA-like structures. It can also scan large genomic sequences for the presence of potential miRNA precursors in its stand-alone form. The web server can be accessed at (http://mirna.jnu.ac.in/cidmirna/)

  5. A defect in inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes in the osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages were activated by administration of an inflammatory lipid metabolite, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc), to wild type mice but not murine (microphthalmic) osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mutant mice. In vitro treatment of wild type mouse peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc efficiently activated macrophages whereas lyso-Pc-treatment of mi mutant mouse peritoneal cells resulted in no activation of macrophages. Generation of macrophage activating factor requires a precursor protein, serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and participation of lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes. Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes was found to be defective in mi mutant mice. PMID:8881764

  6. A genetic screen implicates miRNA-372 and miRNA-373 as oncogenes in testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Voorhoeve, P Mathijs; le Sage, Carlos; Schrier, Mariette; Gillis, Ad J M; Stoop, Hans; Nagel, Remco; Liu, Ying-Poi; van Duijse, Josyanne; Drost, Jarno; Griekspoor, Alexander; Zlotorynski, Eitan; Yabuta, Norikazu; De Vita, Gabriella; Nojima, Hiroshi; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Agami, Reuven

    2006-03-24

    Endogenous small RNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by mechanisms conserved across metazoans. While the number of verified human miRNAs is still expanding, only few have been functionally annotated. To perform genetic screens for novel functions of miRNAs, we developed a library of vectors expressing the majority of cloned human miRNAs and created corresponding DNA barcode arrays. In a screen for miRNAs that cooperate with oncogenes in cellular transformation, we identified miR-372 and miR-373, each permitting proliferation and tumorigenesis of primary human cells that harbor both oncogenic RAS and active wild-type p53. These miRNAs neutralize p53-mediated CDK inhibition, possibly through direct inhibition of the expression of the tumor-suppressor LATS2. We provide evidence that these miRNAs are potential novel oncogenes participating in the development of human testicular germ cell tumors by numbing the p53 pathway, thus allowing tumorigenic growth in the presence of wild-type p53.

  7. Analyzing the miRNA-Gene Networks to Mine the Important miRNAs under Skin of Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Husile

    2016-01-01

    Genetic networks provide new mechanistic insights into the diversity of species morphology. In this study, we have integrated the MGI, GEO, and miRNA database to analyze the genetic regulatory networks under morphology difference of integument of humans and mice. We found that the gene expression network in the skin is highly divergent between human and mouse. The GO term of secretion was highly enriched, and this category was specific in human compared to mouse. These secretion genes might be involved in eccrine system evolution in human. In addition, total 62,637 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in human integument genes (IGs), while 26,280 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in mouse IGs. The interactions between miRNAs and IGs in human are more complex than those in mouse. Furthermore, hsa-miR-548, mmu-miR-466, and mmu-miR-467 have an enormous number of targets on IGs, which both have the role of inhibition of host immunity response. The pattern of distribution on the chromosome of these three miRNAs families is very different. The interaction of miRNA/IGs has added the new dimension in traditional gene regulation networks of skin. Our results are generating new insights into the gene networks basis of skin difference between human and mouse. PMID:27689084

  8. Evaluation of the Implementation of Good Handling Practices in Food and Beverage Areas of Hotels.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A L; Hecktheuer, L H R; Stangarlin-Fiori, L; Medeiros, L B; Martello, L; Machado, C E

    2015-11-01

    Because of the major international-level events that have recently been held in Brazil, concerns about the sensory and hygienic-sanitary conditions of food have increased. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of good handling practices in food and beverage areas of hotels, with and without outsourced professional intervention. We evaluated 19 food and beverage areas in hotels in Porto Alegre, Rio do Sul, Brazil, using a checklist that was developed by a municipal surveillance team based on existing laws for good handling practices. The evaluation was done by a skilled professional in the food safety area on two occasions, at the beginning of the study (January to May 2013) and at the end (July to November 2014), and the establishments were classified as good, regular, or poor. After the baseline evaluation, an action plan listing the noncompliance found at each location was given to those responsible for the establishments, and a period of 1 year 6 months was stipulated for improvements to be made. In the repeat evaluation, those responsible for the establishments were asked whether they had hired an outsourced professional to assist them in the improvements. The hotels showed improvement during the repeat evaluation, but a significant increase in the percentage of overall adequacy was seen only in the food and beverages areas of the 12 hotels that used the intervention of an outsourced professional. The better percentage of adequacy in establishments with outsourced professional intervention underlines the importance of an external and impartial view of routine activities in the implementation of good handling practices.

  9. Evaluation of the Implementation of Good Handling Practices in Food and Beverage Areas of Hotels.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A L; Hecktheuer, L H R; Stangarlin-Fiori, L; Medeiros, L B; Martello, L; Machado, C E

    2015-11-01

    Because of the major international-level events that have recently been held in Brazil, concerns about the sensory and hygienic-sanitary conditions of food have increased. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of good handling practices in food and beverage areas of hotels, with and without outsourced professional intervention. We evaluated 19 food and beverage areas in hotels in Porto Alegre, Rio do Sul, Brazil, using a checklist that was developed by a municipal surveillance team based on existing laws for good handling practices. The evaluation was done by a skilled professional in the food safety area on two occasions, at the beginning of the study (January to May 2013) and at the end (July to November 2014), and the establishments were classified as good, regular, or poor. After the baseline evaluation, an action plan listing the noncompliance found at each location was given to those responsible for the establishments, and a period of 1 year 6 months was stipulated for improvements to be made. In the repeat evaluation, those responsible for the establishments were asked whether they had hired an outsourced professional to assist them in the improvements. The hotels showed improvement during the repeat evaluation, but a significant increase in the percentage of overall adequacy was seen only in the food and beverages areas of the 12 hotels that used the intervention of an outsourced professional. The better percentage of adequacy in establishments with outsourced professional intervention underlines the importance of an external and impartial view of routine activities in the implementation of good handling practices. PMID:26555528

  10. 10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, WITH AUTOMATIC CUTTER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND WRAPPER (RIGHT); LARGE CHUTE AT CENTER FROM 5TH FLOOR BINS TO 3RD FLOOR SOAP MILLS; OVERHEAD AND FLOOR (LOWER RIGHT) FINISHED GOODS CONVEYORS TO G BLOCK (HAER NO. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  11. Circulating miR-22, miR-24 and miR-34a as novel predictive biomarkers to pemetrexed-based chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Tindara; Amodeo, Valeria; Bronte, Giuseppe; Savio, Giuseppina; Ricciardi, Giuseppina R R; Picciotto, Maria; Russo, Antonio; Giordano, Antonio; Adamo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pemetrexed has been widely used in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical relevance of polymorphisms of folate pathway genes for pemetrexed metabolism have not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of circulating miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a, possibly involved in folate pathway, in NSCLC patients treated with pemetrexed compared with healthy controls and to investigate their impact on patient clinical outcomes. A total of 22 consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC, treated with pemetrexed-based chemotherapy and 27 age and sex matched healthy controls were included in this preliminary analysis. miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a targets were identified by TargetScan 6.2 algorithm, validating the involvement of these microRNAs in folate pathway. MicroRNAs were isolated from whole blood and extracted with miRNAeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen). miRNA profiling was performed using Real-Time PCR. SPSS 17 was used to data analysis. miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a were found upregulated (P<0.05) in NSCLC patients versus healthy controls. Higher expression levels were recorded for miR-34a. Nevertheless, significantly higher miR-22 expression was observed in patients developing progressive disease (P=0.03). No significant associations with clinical outcome were recorded for miR-24 and miR-34a. Albeit preliminary, these data support the involvement of miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a in advanced NSCLC. The correlation between high expression of miR-22 in whole blood and the lack of response in pemetrexed treated NSCLC patients indicates that miR-22 could represent a novel predictive biomarker for pemetrexed-based treatment.

  12. The Associations of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in miR196a2, miR-499, and miR-608 With Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhi-Ming; Kang, Hua-Feng; Zhang, Wang-Gang; Li, Hong-Bao; Zhang, Shu-Qun; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Meng; Feng, Yan-Jing; Liu, Kang; Liu, Xing-Han; Xu, Peng; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role as regulators of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in cancer-related processes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs have been shown to be relevant to various different cancers, including breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to estimate the associations between miRNA-related gene polymorphisms (miR-196a2, miR-499, and miR-608) and the risk of BC in a Chinese population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 1143 subjects (controls = 583; BC = 560). The 3 SNPs were genotyped using the Sequenom Mass-ARRAY platform. The associations between the SNP frequencies and BC were assessed by computing odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), as well as by applying Chi-square tests. The miR-196a2 (rs11614913) T allele was associated with a decreased risk of BC based on results from dominant (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.52–0.86), recessive (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.48–0.86), and allele models (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.62–0.86). In contrast, the miR-499 (rs3746444) AG/GG genotypes were associated with an increased risk of BC (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.10–1.91), and miR-608 (rs4919510) was not significantly associated with BC risk. Our study suggested that the polymorphisms of rs11614913 and rs3746444 may be associated with BC risk in Chinese individuals. PMID:26886638

  13. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section and |<mi>Vmi><mi>tb>| in Events with One Charged Lepton, Large Missing Transverse Energy, and Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D’Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2014-12-31

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of mi>smi>=1.96 mi>TeVmi> using a data set corresponding to 7.5 mi>fbmi>-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the single top quark decay process mi>t>mi>Wmi>b>mi>νmi>b> by requiring the presence of an electron or muon, a large imbalance of transverse momentum indicating the presence of a neutrino, and two or three jets including at least one originating from a bottom quark. An artificial neural network is used to discriminate the signal from backgrounds. We measure a single top quark production cross section of 3.04-0.53+0.57 mi>pb> and set a lower limit on the magnitude of the coupling between the top quark and bottom quark |

  14. Healing in the Sámi North

    PubMed Central

    Stabbursvik, Ellen Anne Buljo

    2010-01-01

    There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today’s tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today’s changing global society. PMID:20862528

  15. What is a health worker? How spa therapists in a Norwegian health hotel understand their work.

    PubMed

    Anderssen, Jorid

    2016-01-01

    In Norway, as in many other wealthy countries, the number of health-related services that are being offered outside of the health sector is increasing. The present paper is based on qualitative interviews that were conducted with providers of health-related services at a commercial health hotel in Norway. The hotel is marketed as a health hotel - that is, a place for people with health problems and for those who need relaxation and an escape from their stressful everyday lives. The paper discusses whether the providers of this kind of service consider it a health service or if they distinguish and distance themselves from the health system. The interviews showed that they consider themselves health workers and refer to themselves as therapists. Even though they use therapy in the health sector as a model, they distinguish themselves from therapists in the health sector. They do not want to treat what they call sick people. Most of their therapy is directed toward cultivating or improving people's bodies and souls. These service providers think that they contribute to improving their guests' health by teaching them how to take care of themselves; enjoying oneself (for instance, by receiving skin treatment or a massage) is an important aspect of good health. According to the therapists, modern-day women, in particular, are often worn-out, and they deserve, and are entitled, to enjoy themselves. In these ways, the therapists use health to legitimize their services, and they challenge the current understanding of health. PMID:26324995

  16. Key facilitators and best practices of hotel-style room service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sheehan-Smith, Lisa

    2006-04-01

    This qualitative study sought to identify the features, advantages, and disadvantages of hotel-style room service; the barriers to, and facilitators for, implementing the process; and "best practices." The study took place in four heterogeneous hospitals. Participants included hospital administrators, managers, and room-service employees. Data-collection methods included semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis. Common features of hotel-style room service were meal delivery within 30 to 45 minutes, a restaurant-style menu, procedures to feed ineligible patients, tray assembly on demand, scripting, and waitstaff uniforms for room-service employees. The major barrier to implementing room service was obtaining nursing support. The key facilitators were the hospital's service-oriented culture, using a multidisciplinary planning team, engaging nursing departments early in the planning stages, and intense customer-service training of room-service employees. The overwhelming advantage was patients' control over their food choices. The main disadvantage was cost. Initial best practices in hotel-style room service include: (a) taking a multidisciplinary team approach for developing and implementing the process, (b) customer-service training, (c) using a customer-driven menu, (d) wearing waitstaff uniforms, and (e) using carts with airpots for dispensing hot beverages. PMID:16567154

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Encodes a Mimic of Cellular miR-23

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Mark; Shamulailatpam, Priscilla; Raja, Archana N.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses ∼20 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in latently infected cells. We have previously shown that two of these miRNAs function as mimics of the cellular miRNAs miR-155 and miR-142-3p. Two additional KSHV miRNAs, miR-K3+1 and miR-K3, share perfect and offset 5′ homology with cellular miR-23, respectively. Here, we report a single nucleotide polymorphism that causes miR-K3+1 expression in a subset of KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cell lines as a consequence of altered processing of the primary transcript by the Microprocessor complex. We confirm that miR-K3+1 regulates miR-23 targets, which is expected because these miRNAs share the entire seed region (nucleotides 2 to 8). Surprisingly, we found that miR-K3 also regulates miR-23 targets, despite offset seed sequences. In addition, the offset homology of miR-K3 to miR-23 likely allows this viral miRNA to expand its target repertoire beyond the targets of miR-23. Because miR-23 is highly expressed in endothelial cells but expressed at only low levels in B cells, we hypothesize that miR-K3 may function to introduce miR-23-like activities into KSHV-infected B cells. Together, our data demonstrate that KSHV has evolved at least three distinct viral miRNAs to tap into evolutionarily conserved cellular miRNA-regulatory networks. Furthermore, our data allow fundamental insights into the generation and functional impact of miRNA 5′ end variation. PMID:23986579

  18. Expression of miR-31, miR-125b-5p, and miR-326 in the adipogenic differentiation process of adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Yong; Li, Xiao-Yu; Li, Cai; Tian, Weidong; Liu, Lei

    2009-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded RNAs of 19-22 nucleotides (nt) and are important posttranscriptional regulation of genes. A link between miRNA function and cancer was researched by the miRNAs microarray technology recently. However, during adipogenic differentiation of ADSCs process, this technology was less used to study adipogenic differentiation mechanism of ADSCs. In this study, miRNA microarray technology was used to examine the expression of miRNA that were differences between induced group and noninduced group of ADSC adipogenic differentiation. Real-time quantitative PCR (real-time qPCR) was used to quantify the miRNA expression. The TargetScan 5.0 software was used to find their target genes. Our results showed that the expression of rno-miR-31, rno-miR-125b-5p, and rno-miR-326 were downregulation in the adipogenic differentiation process. By the statistic analysis, this study showed that the expression of rno-miR-31 and rno-miR-326 were significantly deregulation. In addition, the target genes of rno-miR-31 and rno-miR-326 were correlated with the adipogenic differentiation. Our study suggested that the expression of rno-miR-31 and rno-miR-326 were involved in the adipogenic differentiation process.

  19. miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit colorectal cancer progression by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiheng; Liu, Shaojun; Tian, Li; Wu, Minghao; Ai, Feiyan; Tang, Wuliang; Zhao, Lian; Ding, Juan; Zhang, Liyang; Tang, Anliu

    2015-01-01

    miR-124 and miR-506 are reportedly down-regulated and associated with tumor progression in many cancers, but little is known about their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we found that the miR-124 and miR-506 levels were significantly lower in human CRC tissues than in controls, as indicated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization histochemistry. We also found that the overexpression of miR-124 or miR-506 inhibited tumor cell progression and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy in vitro. Increased miR-124 or miR-506 expression also inhibited tumor cell proliferation and invasion in vivo. Luciferase reporter assays and western blotting were used to determine the association between miR-124, miR-506 and their target genes, DNMTs. We further identified that miR-124 and miR-506 directly targeted DNMT3B and indirectly targeted DNMT1. The overexpression of miR-124 and miR-506 reduced global DNA methylation and restored the expression of E-cadherin, MGMT and P16. In conclusion, our data showed that miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit progression and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1 in CRC. These findings may provide novel avenues for the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26497367

  20. Comparison of a healthy miRNome with melanoma patient miRNomes: are microRNAs suitable serum biomarkers for cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Margue, Christiane; Beaume, Nicolas; Walters, Casandra; Schneider, Jochen G.; Nashan, Dorothée; Behrmann, Iris; Kreis, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    MiRNAs are increasingly recognized as biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancers where they are profiled from tumor tissue (intracellular miRNAs) or serum/plasma samples (extracellular miRNAs). To improve detection of reliable biomarkers from blood samples, we first compiled a healthy reference miRNome and established a well-controlled analysis pipeline allowing for standardized quantification of circulating miRNAs. Using whole miRNome and custom qPCR arrays, miRNA expression profiles were analyzed in 126 serum, whole blood and tissue samples of healthy volunteers and melanoma patients and in primary melanocyte and keratinocyte cell lines. We found characteristic signatures with excellent prognostic scores only in late stage but not in early stage melanoma patients. Upon comparison of melanoma tissue miRNomes with matching serum samples, several miRNAs were identified to be exclusively tissue-derived (miR-30b-5p, miR-374a-5p and others) while others had higher expression levels in serum (miR-3201 and miR-122-5p). Here we have compiled a healthy and widely applicable miRNome from serum samples and we provide strong evidence that levels of cell-free miRNAs only change significantly at later stages of melanoma progression, which has serious implications for miRNA biomarker studies in cancer. PMID:25883223

  1. Mutual induction of transcription factor PPARγ and microRNAs miR-145 and miR-329.

    PubMed

    Dharap, Ashutosh; Pokrzywa, Courtney; Murali, Shruthi; Kaimal, Balarama; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are known to control mRNA translation. Most miRNAs are transcribed from specific genes with well-defined promoters located throughout the genome. The mechanisms that control miRNA expression under normal and pathological conditions are not yet understood clearly. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is extensively distributed in the CNS. PPARγ activation induces neuroprotection by modulating genes that contain peroxisome proliferator response elements (PPREs) in their promoters. We presently evaluated if PPARγ modulates miRNA expression. When adult rats were treated with PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, expression of 28 miRNAs altered significantly (12 up- and 16 down-regulated; 3-119 fold) in the cerebral cortex compared to vehicle-treated controls. In silico analysis showed 1-5 PPREs in the putative promoter regions (within 1 Kb upstream of the transcription start site) of these miRNA genes. Cotransfection with a PPARγ constitutively expressing vector significantly induced the miR-145 and miR-329 promoter vectors (each have four PPREs), which was curtailed by point mutations of PPREs in their promoters. Interestingly, the PPARγ promoter has binding sites for both these miRNAs and transfection with miR-329 mimic and miR-145 mimic induced the PPARγ expression. Thus, these studies show a cyclical induction of miRNAs and PPARγ, indicating that the pleiotropic beneficial effects of PPARγ agonists might be modulated in part by miRNAs and their down-stream mRNAs. We proposed that promoters of many microRNAs contain the binding sites for the transcription factor PPARγ. Activation of PPARγ modulates the expression of these microRNAs. Two such PPARγ-responsive microRNAs (miR-145 and miR-329) bind to PPARγ promoter to induce its expression. This indicates the presence of a feedback loop by which transcription factors and microRNAs can modulate each other.

  2. Serum miRNA-499 and miRNA-210: A potential role in early diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Sally M; El-Shal, Amal S; Shoukry, Amira; Khedr, Mohamad H; Abdelraheim, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In clinical practice, there is still a need for novel biomarkers, which can reliably rule in or rule out acute coronary syndrome (ACS) immediately on admission. This is of particular interest in patients with unstable angina (UA) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in whom diagnostic uncertainty is high. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential role of miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 as novel molecular biomarkers for early diagnosis of UA and NSTEMI suspected patients presented at the emergency unit. A total of 110 patients presenting to the intensive care unit (ICU) within 24 h of onset of chest pain suggestive of ACS were enrolled in the study. They included 37 UA, 48 NSTEMI and 25 noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients. Immediately at enrollment, blood samples were taken for estimation of serum miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 expression levels by real time PCR. miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 expression levels were significantly increased in UA and NSTEMI patients compared with NCCP patients (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that the area under curve (AUC) of miR-499 for the diagnosis of UA and NSTEMI was 0.98 and 0.97, respectively; while the AUC of miRNA-210 was 0.84 and 0.90, respectively. The important finding of our study was that the AUC of miRNA-499 for the diagnosis of ACS patients with symptoms onset <3 h was 0.89, while the AUC of miRNA-210 was 0.86. Interestingly, combining miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 significantly improved the diagnostic value by increasing the AUC to 0.96, P < 0.001. In conclusion, serum miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 are associated with UA and NSTEMI and with those presenting within 3 h of symptom onset. Both miRNAs might be potentially novel biomarkers for accelerating the diagnosis of ACS patients in emergency unit. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(8):673-682, 2016. PMID:27346801

  3. Operation of the NuMI beam monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, Robert M.; Indurthy, Dharma; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Pavlovich, Zarko; Proga, Marek; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett; Harris, Deborah A.; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; McDonald, Jeffrey; Naples, Donna; Northacker, David; Erwin, Albert; Ping, Huican; Velissaris, Cristos; /Texas U. /Brookhaven /Fermilab /Pittsburgh U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-06-01

    The NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) facility produces an intense neutrino beam for experiments. The NuMI Beam Monitoring system is four arrays of ion chambers that measure the intensity and distribution of the remnant hadron and tertiary muon beams produced in association with the neutrinos. The ion chambers operate in an environment of high particle fluxes and high radiation.

  4. Regulating cancer stem cells the miR way.

    PubMed

    Peter, Marcus E

    2010-01-01

    A recent study in Nature Cell Biology, Wellner et al. (2009) identifies ZEB1, a known promoter of tumor invasion, as a negative regulator of miRNA clusters that target stem cell factors. These findings provide new insight into the network of transcription factors and miRNAs that regulate cancer stem cells.

  5. 11. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., AMORY Onehalf mi. S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., AMORY One-half mi. S of MS. 6, 1.5 mi. NW of Amory. Aerial view, close-up, from SE of St. Louis and San Francisco RR bridge. David Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, photographer, August 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. Co-expressed miRNAs in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Sally; López, Rocío; Andrade, Rafael E; Rodriguez-Urrego, Paula A; López-Kleine, Liliana; Torres, Maria Mercedes

    2016-08-01

    Co-expression networks may provide insights into the patterns of molecular interactions that underlie cellular processes. To obtain a better understanding of miRNA expression patterns in gastric adenocarcinoma and to provide markers that can be associated with histopathological findings, we performed weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) and compare it with a supervised analysis. Integrative analysis of target predictions and miRNA expression profiles in gastric cancer samples was also performed. WGCNA identified a module of co-expressed miRNAs that were associated with histological traits and tumor condition. Hub genes were identified based on statistical analysis and network centrality. The miRNAs 100, let-7c, 125b and 99a stood out for their association with the diffuse histological subtype. The 181 miRNA family and miRNA 21 highlighted for their association with the tumoral phenotype. The integrated analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles showed the let-7 miRNA family playing a central role in the regulatory relationships. PMID:27422560

  7. Evidence for a cytoplasmic microprocessor of pri-miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jillian S; Langlois, Ryan A; Pham, Alissa M; Tenoever, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of noncoding RNAs that fine-tune gene expression through post-transcriptional silencing. While miRNA biogenesis occurs in a stepwise fashion, initiated by the nuclear microprocessor, rare noncanonical miRNAs have also been identified. Here we characterize the molecular components and unique attributes associated with the processing of virus-derived cytoplasmic primary miRNAs (c-pri-miRNAs). RNA in situ hybridization and inhibition of cellular division demonstrated a complete lack of nuclear involvement in c-pri-miRNA cleavage while genetic studies revealed that maturation still relied on the canonical nuclear RNase III enzyme, Drosha. The involvement of Drosha was mediated by a dramatic relocalization to the cytoplasm following virus infection. Deep sequencing analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic localization of Drosha does not impact the endogenous miRNA landscape during infection, despite allowing for robust synthesis of virus-derived miRNAs in the cytoplasm. Taken together, this research describes a unique function for Drosha in the processing of highly structured cytoplasmic RNAs in the context of virus infection.

  8. MiSIS (Michigan Student Information System) Activities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) is the student flow component of the Michigan Community College Occupational Education Evaluation System (MCCOEES), a comprehensive state-wide system for evaluating occupational education. The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) Activities Manual was designed to help college-level personnel…

  9. Viral miRNAs: tools for immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Boss, Isaac W; Renne, Rolf

    2010-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNA molecules approximately 22 nucleotides in length that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by complementary binding to target mRNAs. MiRNAs have been identified in a diverse range of both metazoan and plant species. Functionally, miRNAs modulate multiple cellular processes including development, hematopoiesis, immunity, and oncogenesis. More recently, DNA viruses were found to encode and express miRNAs during host infection. Although the functions of most viral miRNAs are not well understood, early analysis of target genes pointed to immune modulation suggesting that viral miRNAs are a component of the immune evasion repertoire, which facilitates viral persistence. In addition to directly targeting immune functions, viral encoded miRNAs contribute to immune evasion by targeting proapoptotic genes, and in the case of herpesviruses, by controlling viral latency. Here we summarize the recently discovered targets of viral miRNAs and discuss the complex nature of this novel emerging regulatory mechanism.

  10. MI as a Predictor of Students' Performance in Reading Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajhashemi, Karim

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether performance in MI could predict the performance in reading competency. The other objectives were to identify the components of MI which are correlated with the reading test scores, and to determine the relationship between the multiple intelligences and reading proficiency. A descriptive and ex post…

  11. Water deficit down-regulates miR398 and miR408 in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Živko; Stanisavljević, Nemanja; Mikić, Aleksandar; Radović, Svetlana; Maksimović, Vesna

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), recently recognized as important regulator of gene expression at posttranscriptional level, have been found to be involved in plant stress responses. The observation that some miRNAs are up- or down regulated by stress implies that they could play vital roles in plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stress. We investigated the effect of water stress treatment during 10 days on expression of conserved miRNAs-miR398a/b and miR408 in pea plants. This time frame reflects the changes as close as possible to the changes where water stress causes visible effects under field condition. It was observed that dehydration strongly down regulates the expression of both miR398a/b and miR408 in pea roots and shoots. The down-regulation of miR398a/b and the up-regulation of potential target genes - copper superoxide dismutase, CSD1, highlight the involvement of this miRNA in pea stress response. To the contrary, the mRNA level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 5 (COX5b) did not change in roots and shoots of water-stressed plants, compared to control (well) hydrated plants. This suggests that COX5b is not the target of miR398, or that its expression is regulated by some other mechanism. P1B-ATPase expression increased during water deficit only in the shoots of pea; in the roots there were no changes in expression. Our results help to understand the possible role of investigated miRNAs and their contribution to pea capacity to cope with water deficit.

  12. Plasma miR-601 and miR-760 Are Novel Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qifeng; Huang, Zhaohui; Ni, Shujuan; Xiao, Xiuying; Xu, Qinghua; Wang, Lisha; Huang, Dan; Tan, Cong; Sheng, Weiqi; Du, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic screen methods are urgently needed to improve its survival rates. Stable circulating microRNA offers unique opportunities for the early diagnosis of several diseases, including cancers. Our aim has been to find new plasma miRNAs that can be used as biomarkers for the detection of CRC. Methodology/Principal Findings According to the results of miRNA profiling performed on pooling plasma samples form 10 CRC patients or 10 healthy controls, a panel of miRNAs (hsa-miR-10a, -19a, -22*, -24, -92a, 125a-5p, -141, -150, -188-3p, -192, -210, -221, -224*, -376a, -425*, -495, -572, -601, -720, -760 and hsa-let-7a, -7e) were deregulated in CRC plasma with fold changes >5. After large scale validation by qRT-PCR performed on another 191 independent individuals (90 CRC, 43 advanced adenoma and 58 healthy participants), we found that the levels of plasma miR-601 and miR-760 were significantly decreased in colorectal neoplasia (carcinomas and advanced adenomas) compared with healthy controls. ROC curve analysis showed that plasma miR-601 and miR-760 were of significant diagnostic value for advanced neoplasia. These two miRNAs together yield an AUC of 0.792 with 83.3% sensitivity and 69.1% specificity for separating CRC from normal controls, and yield an AUC of 0.683 with 72.1% sensitivity and 62.1% specificity in discriminating advanced adenomas from normal controls. Conclusions/Significance Plasma miR-601 and miR-760 can potentially serve as promising non-invasive biomarkers for the early detection of CRC. PMID:22970209

  13. Identification of lung cancer miRNA-miRNA co-regulation networks through a progressive data refining approach.

    PubMed

    Song, Renhua; Catchpoole, Daniel R; Kennedy, Paul J; Li, Jinyan

    2015-09-01

    Co-regulations of miRNAs have been much less studied than the research on regulations between miRNAs and their target genes, although these two problems are equally important for understanding the entire mechanisms of complex post-transcriptional regulations. The difficulty to construct a miRNA-miRNA co-regulation network lies in how to determine reliable miRNA pairs from various resources of data related to the same disease such as expression levels, gene ontology (GO) databases, and protein-protein interactions. Here we take a novel integrative approach to the discovery of miRNA-miRNA co-regulation networks. This approach can progressively refine the various types of data and the computational analysis results. Applied to three lung cancer miRNA expression data sets of different subtypes, our method has identified a miRNA-miRNA co-regulation network and co-regulating functional modules common to lung cancer. An example of these functional modules consists of genes SMAD2, ACVR1B, ACVR2A and ACVR2B. This module is synergistically regulated by let-7a/b/c/f, is enriched in the same GO category, and has a close proximity in the protein interaction network. We also find that the co-regulation network is scale free and that lung cancer related miRNAs have more synergism in the network. According to our literature survey and database validation, many of these results are biologically meaningful for understanding the mechanism of the complex post-transcriptional regulations in lung cancer.

  14. Polysome arrest restricts miRNA turnover by preventing exosomal export of miRNA in growth-retarded mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Bose, Mainak; Ray, Anirban; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2015-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression in metazoan cells, where activity and abundance of miRNAs are tightly controlled. Regulated turnover of these regulatory RNAs is important to optimize cellular response to external stimuli. We report that the stability of mature miRNAs increases inversely with cell proliferation, and the increased number of microribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) in growth-restricted mammalian cells are in turn associated with polysomes. This heightened association of miRNA with polysomes also elicits reduced degradation of target mRNAs and impaired extracellular export of miRNA via exosomes. Overall polysome sequestration contributes to an increase of cellular miRNA levels but without an increase in miRNA activity. Therefore miRNA activity and turnover can be controlled by subcellular distribution of miRNPs that may get differentially regulated as a function of cell growth in mammalian cells.

  15. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  16. Diverse functions of miR-373 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Furong; Cao, Chuanhua; Xu, Xiaoqun; Wang, Junfu

    2015-05-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They are involved in almost all cellular processes, and many have been described as potential oncogenes or tumor suppressors. MicroRNA-373 (miR-373), which was first identified as a human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific miRNA, is suggested to be implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, migration and invasion, as well as DNA damage repair following hypoxia stress. Deregulation of miR-373 has been demonstrated in a number of cancers, whether it acts as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor, however, seems to be context dependent. In this review, we focus on the diverse functions of miR-373 and its implication in cancers.

  17. miR-137: a new player in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingwen; Lin, Juda; Luo, Xudong; Chen, Yanyan; Li, Zheng; Ma, Guoda; Li, Keshen

    2014-02-21

    Schizophrenia is a complex genetic disease and characterized by affective, cognitive, neuromorphological, and molecular abnormalities that may have a neurodevelopmental origin. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical to neurodevelopment and adult neuronal processes by modulating the activity of multiple genes within biological networks. MiR-137 as a brain-enriched microRNA, plays important roles in regulating embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) fate determination, neuronal proliferation and differentiation, and synaptic maturation. Its dysregulation causes changes in the gene expression regulation network of the nervous system, thus inducing mental disorders. Recently, miR-137 has been confirmed as a gene related to schizophrenia susceptibility. In the following review, we summarize the expression pattern, epigenetic regulation and functions of miR-137. A more complete picture of the miR-137, which is dysregulated in psychiatric illness, may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia.

  18. miR-200 Regulates Endometrial Development During Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Patricia T; Mainigi, Monica A; Word, R Ann; Kraus, W Lee; Mendelson, Carole R

    2016-09-01

    For successful embryo implantation, endometrial stromal cells must undergo functional and morphological changes, referred to as decidualization. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate implantation and decidualization are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that the estradiol- and progesterone-regulated microRNA (miR)-200 family was markedly down-regulated in mouse endometrial stromal cells prior to implantation, whereas zinc finger E-box binding homeobox-1 and -2 and other known and predicted targets were up-regulated. Conversely, miR-200 was up-regulated during in vitro decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells. Knockdown of miR-200 negatively affected decidualization and prevented the mesenchymal-epithelial transition-like changes that accompanied decidual differentiation. Notably, superovulation of mice and humans altered miR-200 expression. Our findings suggest that hormonal alterations that accompany superovulation may negatively impact endometrial development and decidualization by causing aberrant miR-200 expression. PMID:27533790

  19. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  20. Growth inhibitory effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Ryo; Sato, Mitsuo; Kakumu, Tomohiko; Hase, Tetsunari; Yogo, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Eiichi; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Both pro- and anti-oncogenic roles of miR-221 and miR-222 microRNAs are reported in several types of human cancers. A previous study suggested their oncogenic role in invasiveness in lung cancer, albeit only one cell line (H460) was used. To further evaluate involvement of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer, we investigated the effects of miR-221 and miR-222 overexpression on six lung cancer cell lines, including H460, as well as one immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cell line, HBEC4. miR-221 and miR-222 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like changes in a minority of HBEC4 cells but, unexpectedly, both the microRNAs rather suppressed their invasiveness. Consistent with the prior report, miR-221 and miR-222 promoted growth in H460; however, miR-221 suppressed growth in four other cell lines with no effects in one, and miR-222 suppressed growth in three cell lines but promoted growth in two. These are the first results to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer cells, and we focused on clarifying the mechanisms. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses revealed that growth suppression by miR-221 and miR-222 occurred through intra-S-phase arrest and/or apoptosis. Finally, lung cancer cell lines transfected with miR-221 or miR-222 became more sensitive to the S-phase targeting drugs, possibly due to an increased S-phase population. In conclusion, our data are the first to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and miR-222 on lung cancer, warranting testing their potential as therapeutics for the disease. PMID:25641933

  1. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the

  2. Epigenetic regulation of miR-21 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Angelo; Kontos, Christos K; Boni, Themis; Bantounas, Ioannis; Siakouli, Dimitra; Kosmidou, Vivian; Vlassi, Margarita; Spyridakis, Yannis; Tsipras, Iraklis; Zografos, George; Pintzas, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have uncovered several transcription factors that determine biological alterations in tumor cells to execute the invasion-metastasis cascade, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We sought to investigate the role of miR-21 in colorectal cancer regulation. For this purpose, miR-21 expression was quantified in a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. High expression was found in cell lines with EMT properties and in the vast majority of human tumor specimens. We demonstrate in a cell-specific manner the occupancy of MIR-21 gene promoter by AP-1 and ETS1 transcription factors and, for the first time, the pattern of histone posttranslational modifications necessary for miR-21 overexpression. We also show that Integrin-β4 (ITGβ4), exclusively expressed in polarized epithelial cells, is a novel miR-21 target gene and plays a role in the regulation of EMT, since it is remarkably de-repressed after transient miR-21 silencing and downregulated after miR-21 overexpression. miR-21-dependent change of ITGβ4 expression significantly affects cell migration properties of colon cancer cells. Finally, in a subgroup of tumor specimens, ROC curve analysis performed on quantitative PCR data sets for miR-21, ITGβ4, and PDCD4 shows that the combination of high miR-21 with low ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression is able to predict presence of metastasis. In conclusion, miR-21 is a key player in oncogenic EMT, its overexpression is controlled by the cooperation of genetic and epigenetic alterations, and its levels, along with ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression, could be exploited as a prognostic tool for CRC metastasis. PMID:24149370

  3. Circulating miRNA Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pavan; Dezso, Zoltan; MacKenzie, Crystal; Oestreicher, Judy; Agoulnik, Sergei; Byrne, Michael; Bernier, Francois; Yanagimachi, Mamoru; Aoshima, Ken; Oda, Yoshiya

    2013-01-01

    A minimally invasive diagnostic assay for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is required to select optimal patient groups in clinical trials, monitor disease progression and response to treatment, and to better plan patient clinical care. Blood is an attractive source for biomarkers due to minimal discomfort to the patient, encouraging greater compliance in clinical trials and frequent testing. MiRNAs belong to the class of non-coding regulatory RNA molecules of ∼22 nt length and are now recognized to regulate ∼60% of all known genes through post-transcriptional gene silencing (RNAi). They have potential as useful biomarkers for clinical use because of their stability and ease of detection in many tissues, especially blood. Circulating profiles of miRNAs have been shown to discriminate different tumor types, indicate staging and progression of the disease and to be useful as prognostic markers. Recently their role in neurodegenerative diseases, both as diagnostic biomarkers as well as explaining basic disease etiology has come into focus. Here we report the discovery and validation of a unique circulating 7-miRNA signature (hsa-let-7d-5p, hsa-let-7g-5p, hsa-miR-15b-5p, hsa-miR-142-3p, hsa-miR-191-5p, hsa-miR-301a-3p and hsa-miR-545-3p) in plasma, which could distinguish AD patients from normal controls (NC) with >95% accuracy (AUC of 0.953). There was a >2 fold difference for all signature miRNAs between the AD and NC samples, with p-values<0.05. Pathway analysis, taking into account enriched target mRNAs for these signature miRNAs was also carried out, suggesting that the disturbance of multiple enzymatic pathways including lipid metabolism could play a role in AD etiology. PMID:23922807

  4. miRNAs in mtDNA-less cell mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, N; Peng, Y; Tan, Z; Ciraolo, G; Wang, D; Li, R

    2015-01-01

    The novel regulation mechanism in mtDNA-less cells was investigated. Very low mtDNA copy in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was identified. But no 13 mitochondria-specific proteins were translated in 206 ρ° cells. Their mitochondrial respiration complexes V, III and II were 86.5, 29.4 and 49.6% of 143B cells, respectively. Complexes I and IV completely lack in 206 ρ° cells. Non-mitochondrial respiration to generate ATP in 206 ρ° cells was discovered. The expression levels of some mitochondrial RNAs including 12S rRNA, COX1, COX2, COX3, ND4 and ND5 were low. However, ND1, ND3 and Cyto b were not expressed in 206 ρ° cells. Unequal transcription of mitochondrial RNAs indicated the post-transcriptional cleavage and processing mechanisms in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression in 206 ρ° cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may modulate these mitochondrial RNA expression in these cells. RNA-induced silencing complex indeed within 206 ρ° cell mitochondria indicated miRNAs in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miRNA profile in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was studied by next-generation sequencing of small RNAs. Several mitochondria-enriched miRNAs such as miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p were identified in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p had 23 and 19 potential targets on mitochondrial RNAs respectively, and these two miRNAs had multiple targets on mitochondria-associated messenger RNAs encoded by nuclear genes. These data provided the first direct evidence that miRNAs were imported into mitochondria and regulated mitochondrial RNA expressions. PMID:27551440

  5. miRVaS: a tool to predict the impact of genetic variants on miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; Dierckx, Jenne; Del Favero, Jurgen; De Rijk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants in or near miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA expression and targeting. As user-friendly software for the impact prediction of miRNA variants on a large scale is still lacking, we created a tool called miRVaS. miRVaS automates this prediction by annotating the location of the variant relative to functional regions within the miRNA hairpin (seed, mature, loop, hairpin arm, flanks) and by annotating all predicted structural changes within the miRNA due to the variant. In addition, the tool defines the most important region that is predicted to have structural changes and calculates a conservation score that is indicative of the reliability of the structure prediction. The output is presented in a tab-separated file, which enables fast screening, and in an html file, which allows visual comparison between wild-type and variant structures. All separate images are provided for downstream use. Finally, we tested two different approaches on a small test set of published functionally validated genetic variants for their capacity to predict the impact of variants on miRNA expression. PMID:26384425

  6. 75 FR 16067 - Designation for the Champaign, IL; Emmett, MI; Davenport, IA; Enid, OK; Keokuk, IA; Marshall, MI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Register (74 FR 45803), GIPSA requested applications for designation to provide official services in the... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Champaign, IL; Emmett, MI; Davenport, IA; Enid, OK; Keokuk, IA; Marshall, MI; and Omaha, NE Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers...

  7. Plasma miR-19b and miR-183 as Potential Biomarkers of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Tatyana E.; Ponomaryova, Anastasia A.; Rykova, Elena Yu; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Polovnikov, Evgeny S.; Pashkovskaya, Oksana A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Laktionov, Pavel P.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease that often manifests at the point when treatment is not effective. Introduction of blood-based complementary diagnostics using molecular markers may enhance early detection of this disease and help reduce the burden of lung cancer. Here we evaluated the diagnostic potential of seven plasma miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, -19b, -126, -25, -205, -183, -125b) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Influence clinical and demographical characteristics, including age, tumor stage and cancer subtype on miRNA levels was investigated. Four miRNAs were significantly dysregulated (miR-19b, -21, -25, -183) in lung cancer patients. Combination of miR-19b and miR-183 provided detection of lung cancer with 94.7% sensitivity and 95.2% specificity (AUC = 0.990). Thus, miRNAs have shown the potential to discriminate histological subtypes of lung cancer and reliably distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. PMID:27768748

  8. Regulation of serum response factor by miRNA-200 and miRNA-9 modulates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Buller, Benjamin; Chopp, Michael; Ueno, Yuji; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Morris, Daniel; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2012-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that transactivates actin associated genes, and has been implicated in oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation. To date, it has not been investigated in cerebral ischemia. We investigated the dynamics of SRF expression after stroke in vivo and the role of SRF in oligodendrocyte differentiation in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that SRF was upregulated in OLs and OL precursor cells (OPCs) after stroke. Moreover, upregulation of SRF was concurrent with downregulation of the microRNAs (miRNAs) miR-9 and the miR-200 family in the ischemic white matter region, the corpus callosum. Inhibition of SRF activation by CCG-1423, a specific inhibitor of SRF function, blocked OPCs from differentiating into OLs. Over-expression of miR-9 and miR-200 in cultured OPCs suppressed SRF expression and inhibited OPC differentiation. Moreover, co-expression of miR-9 and miR-200 attenuated activity of a luciferase reporter assay containing the Srf 3′ untranslated region (UTR). Collectively, this study is the first to show that stroke upregulates SRF expression in OPCs and OLs, and that SRF levels are mediated by miRNAs and regulate OPC differentiation. PMID:22907787

  9. Phytoalexins, miRNAs and breast cancer: a review of phytochemical mediated miRNA regulation in breast cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A specific class of endogenous, non-coding RNAs, classified as microRNAs (miRNAs), has been identified. It has been found that miRNAs are associated with many biological processes and disease states, including all stages of cancer from initiation to tumor promotion and progression. These studies d...

  10. MiR-15a and miR-16-1 cluster functions in human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Calin, George A.; Cimmino, Amelia; Fabbri, Muller; Ferracin, Manuela; Wojcik, Sylwia E.; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Taccioli, Cristian; Zanesi, Nicola; Garzon, Ramiro; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Alder, Hansjuerg; Volinia, Stefano; Rassenti, Laura; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Kipps, Thomas J.; Negrini, Massimo; Croce, Carlo M.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs regulating gene expression that play roles in human diseases, including cancer. Each miRNA is predicted to regulate hundreds of transcripts, but only few have experimental validation. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common adult human leukemia, miR-15a and miR-16-1 are lost or down-regulated in the majority of cases. After our previous work indicating a tumor suppressor function of miR-15a/16-1 by targeting the BCL2 oncogene, here, we produced a high-throughput profiling of genes modulated by miR-15a/16-1 in a leukemic cell line model (MEG-01) and in primary CLL samples. By combining experimental and bioinformatics data, we identified a miR-15a/16-1-gene signature in leukemic cells. Among the components of the miR-15a/16-1 signature, we observed a statistically significant enrichment in AU-rich elements (AREs). By examining the Gene Ontology (GO) database, a significant enrichment in cancer genes (such as MCL1, BCL2, ETS1, or JUN) that directly or indirectly affect apoptosis and cell cycle was found. PMID:18362358

  11. An update of miRNASNP database for better SNP selection by GWAS data, miRNA expression and online tools.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Liu, Chunjie; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yuliang; Ma, Zhaowu; Chen, Hu; Guo, An-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression involved in a broad range of biological processes. MiRNASNP aims to provide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs and genes that may impact miRNA biogenesis and/or miRNA target binding. Advanced miRNA research provided abundant data about miRNA expression, validated targets and related phenotypic variants. In miRNASNP v2.0, we have updated our previous database with several new data and features, including: (i) expression level and expression correlation of miRNAs and target genes in different tissues, (ii) linking SNPs to the results of genome-wide association studies, (iii) integrating experimentally validated miRNA:mRNA interactions, (iv) adding multiple filters to prioritize functional SNPs. In addition, as a supplement of the database, we have set up three flexible online tools to analyse the influence of novel variants on miRNA:mRNA binding. A new nice web interface was designed for miRNASNP v2.0 allowing users to browse, search and download. We aim to maintain the miRNASNP as a solid resource for function, genetics and disease studies of miRNA-related SNPs. Database URL: http://bioinfo.life. hust.edu.cn/miRNASNP2/

  12. Integrated Analysis Reveals together miR-182, miR-200c and miR-221 Can Help in the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xia; Chen, Panyu; Zou, Yi ming; Hu, Yanling

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that microRNAs are promising biomarkers that can be used to promote a more accurate diagnosis of cancer. In this study, we developed an integrated multi-step selection process to analyze available high-throughput datasets to obtain information on microRNAs as cancer biomarkers. Applying this approach to the microRNA expression profiles of prostate cancer and the datasets in The Cancer Genome Atlas Data Portal, we identified miRNA-182, miRNA-200c and miRNA-221 as possible biomarkers for prostate cancer. The associations between the expressions of these three microRNAs with clinical parameters as well as their diagnostic capability were studied. Several online databases were used to predict the target genes of these three microRNAs, and the results were confirmed by significant statistical correlations. Comparing with the other 18 types of cancers listed in The Cancer Genome Atlas Data Portal, we found that the combination of both miRNA-182 and miRNA-200c being up-regulated and miRNA-221 being down-regulated only happens in prostate cancer. This provides a unique biological characteristic for prostate cancer that can potentially be used for diagnosis based on tissue testing. In addition, our study also revealed that these three microRNAs are associated with the pathological status of prostate cancer. PMID:26484677

  13. Overcoming melanoma resistance to vemurafenib by targeting CCL2-induced miR-34a, miR-100 and miR-125b.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Elisabetta; Di Guardo, Lorenza; Dugo, Matteo; Rigoletto, Sara; Tragni, Gabrina; Ruggeri, Roberta; Perrone, Federica; Tamborini, Elena; Gloghini, Annunziata; Arienti, Flavio; Vergani, Barbara; Deho, Paola; De Cecco, Loris; Vallacchi, Viviana; Frati, Paola; Shahaj, Eriomina; Villa, Antonello; Santinami, Mario; De Braud, Filippo; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica

    2016-01-26

    In melanoma, the adaptative cell response to BRAF inhibitors includes altered patterns of cytokine production contributing to tumor progression and drug resistance. Among the factors produced by PLX4032-resistant melanoma cell lines, CCL2 was higher compared to the sensitive parental cell lines and increased upon drug treatment. CCL2 acted as an autocrine growth factor for melanoma cells, stimulating the proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. In patients, CCL2 is detected in melanoma cells in tumors and in plasma at levels that correlate with tumor burden and lactate dehydrogenase. Vemurafenib treatment increased the CCL2 levels in plasma, whereas the long-term clinical response was associated with low CCL2 levels.Increased CCL2 production was associated with miRNA deregulation in the resistant cells. miR-34a, miR-100 and miR-125b showed high expression in both resistant cells and in tumor biopsies that were obtained from treated patients, and they were involved in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Inhibition of CCL2 and of the selected miRNAs restored both the cell apoptosis and the drug efficacy in resistant melanoma cells. Therefore, CCL2 and miRNAs are potential prognostic factors and attractive targets for counteracting treatment resistance in metastatic melanoma. PMID:26684239

  14. Overcoming melanoma resistance to vemurafenib by targeting CCL2-induced miR-34a, miR-100 and miR-125b

    PubMed Central

    Rigoletto, Sara; Tragni, Gabrina; Ruggeri, Roberta; Perrone, Federica; Tamborini, Elena; Gloghini, Annunziata; Arienti, Flavio; Vergani, Barbara; Deho, Paola; De Cecco, Loris; Vallacchi, Viviana; Frati, Paola; Shahaj, Eriomina; Villa, Antonello; Santinami, Mario; De Braud, Filippo; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In melanoma, the adaptative cell response to BRAF inhibitors includes altered patterns of cytokine production contributing to tumor progression and drug resistance. Among the factors produced by PLX4032-resistant melanoma cell lines, CCL2 was higher compared to the sensitive parental cell lines and increased upon drug treatment. CCL2 acted as an autocrine growth factor for melanoma cells, stimulating the proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. In patients, CCL2 is detected in melanoma cells in tumors and in plasma at levels that correlate with tumor burden and lactate dehydrogenase. Vemurafenib treatment increased the CCL2 levels in plasma, whereas the long-term clinical response was associated with low CCL2 levels. Increased CCL2 production was associated with miRNA deregulation in the resistant cells. miR-34a, miR-100 and miR-125b showed high expression in both resistant cells and in tumor biopsies that were obtained from treated patients, and they were involved in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Inhibition of CCL2 and of the selected miRNAs restored both the cell apoptosis and the drug efficacy in resistant melanoma cells. Therefore, CCL2 and miRNAs are potential prognostic factors and attractive targets for counteracting treatment resistance in metastatic melanoma. PMID:26684239

  15. miR-93/miR-106b/miR-375-CIC-CRABP1: a novel regulatory axis in prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nahyun; Park, Jongmin; Lee, Jeon-Soo; Yoe, Jeehyun; Park, Guk Yeol; Kim, Eunjeong; Jeon, Hyeongrin; Cho, Yong Mee; Roh, Tae-Young; Lee, Yoontae

    2015-01-01

    Capicua (CIC) has been implicated in pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type-1 (SCA1) neurodegenerative disease and some types of cancer; however, the role of CIC in prostate cancer remains unknown. Here we show that CIC suppresses prostate cancer progression. CIC expression was markedly decreased in human prostatic carcinoma. CIC overexpression suppressed prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, whereas CIC RNAi exerted opposite effects. We found that knock-down of CIC derepresses expression of ETV5 and CRABP1 in LNCaP and PC-3 cells, respectively, thereby promoting cell proliferation and invasion. We also discovered that miR-93, miR-106b, and miR-375, which are known to be frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer patients, cooperatively down-regulate CIC levels to promote cancer progression. Altogether, we suggest miR-93/miR-106b/miR-375-CIC-CRABP1 as a novel key regulatory axis in prostate cancer progression. PMID:26124181

  16. miRNA and miRNA target genes in copy number variations occurring in individuals with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short, non-coding RNAs modulating expression of human protein coding genes (miRNA target genes). Their dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, including neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been recently shown that genomic copy number variations (CNVs) can cause aberrant expression of integral miRNAs and their target genes, and contribute to intellectual disability (ID). Results To better understand the CNV-miRNA relationship in ID, we investigated the prevalence and function of miRNAs and miRNA target genes in five groups of CNVs. Three groups of CNVs were from 213 probands with ID (24 de novo CNVs, 46 familial and 216 common CNVs), one group of CNVs was from a cohort of 32 cognitively normal subjects (67 CNVs) and one group of CNVs represented 40 ID related syndromic regions listed in DECIPHER (30 CNVs) which served as positive controls for CNVs causing or predisposing to ID. Our results show that 1). The number of miRNAs is significantly higher in de novo or DECIPHER CNVs than in familial or common CNV subgroups (P < 0.01). 2). miRNAs with brain related functions are more prevalent in de novo CNV groups compared to common CNV groups. 3). More miRNA target genes are found in de novo, familial and DECIPHER CNVs than in the common CNV subgroup (P < 0.05). 4). The MAPK signaling cascade is found to be enriched among the miRNA target genes from de novo and DECIPHER CNV subgroups. Conclusions Our findings reveal an increase in miRNA and miRNA target gene content in de novo versus common CNVs in subjects with ID. Their expression profile and participation in pathways support a possible role of miRNA copy number change in cognition and/or CNV-mediated developmental delay. Systematic analysis of expression/function of miRNAs in addition to coding genes integral to CNVs could uncover new causes of ID. PMID:23937676

  17. Common miR-590 Variant rs6971711 Present Only in African Americans Reduces miR-590 Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Steven; Kandasamy, Suresh K.; Afzal, Junaid; Mbiyangandu, Blaid; Liao, Susan E.; Guan, Yufan; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P.; Matkovich, Scot J.; Epstein, Neal; Tripodi, Dotti; Huo, Zhaoxia; Cutting, Garry; Abraham, Theodore P.; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as important regulators of cardiac development, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic variations which cause alterations in miRNA:target interactions can lead to disease. We hypothesized that genetic variations in miRNAs that regulate cardiac hypertrophy/fibrosis might be involved in generation of the cardiac phenotype in patients diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To investigate this question, we Sanger sequenced 18 miRNA genes previously implicated in myocyte hypertrophy/fibrosis and apoptosis, using genomic DNA isolated from the leukocytes of 199 HCM patients. We identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6971711, C57T SNP) at the 17th position of mature miR-590-3p (= 57th position of pre-miR-590) that is common in individuals of African ancestry. SNP frequency was higher in African American HCM patients (n = 55) than ethnically-matched controls (n = 100), but the difference was not statistically significant (8.2% vs. 6.5%; p = 0.5). Using a cell culture system, we discovered that presence of this SNP resulted in markedly lower levels of mature miR-590-5p (39 ± 16%, p<0.003) and miR-590-3p (20 ± 2%, p<0.003), when compared with wild-type (WT) miR-590, without affecting levels of pri-miR-590 and pre-miR-590. Consistent with this finding, the SNP resulted in reduced target suppression when compared to WT miR-590 (71% suppression by WT vs 60% suppression by SNP, p<0.03). Since miR-590 can regulate TGF-β, Activin A and Akt signaling, SNP-induced reduction in miR-590 biogenesis could influence cardiac phenotype by de-repression of these signaling pathways. Since the SNP is only present in African Americans, population studies in this patient population would be valuable to investigate effects of this SNP on myocyte function and cardiac physiology. PMID:27196440

  18. miR33a/miR33b* and miR122 as Possible Contributors to Hepatic Lipid Metabolism in Obese Women with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Auguet, Teresa; Aragonès, Gemma; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martí, Andreu; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fàtima; Hernández, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Specific miRNA expression profiles have been shown to be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the correlation between the circulating levels and hepatic expression of miR122 and miR33a/b*, the key lipid metabolism-related gene expression and the clinicopathological factors of obese women with NAFLD. We measured miR122 and miR33a/b* expression in liver samples from 62 morbidly obese (MO), 30 moderately obese (ModO), and eight normal-weight controls. MiR122 and miR33a/b* expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR. Additionally, miR122 and miR33b* circulating levels were analyzed in 122 women. Hepatic miR33b* expression was increased in MO compared to ModO and controls, whereas miR122 expression was decreased in the MO group compared to ModO. In obese cohorts, miR33b* expression was increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Regarding circulating levels, MO patients with NASH showed higher miR122 levels than MO with simple steatosis (SS). These circulating levels are good predictors of histological features associated with disease severity. MO is associated with altered hepatic miRNA expression. In obese women, higher miR33b* liver expression is associated with NASH. Moreover, multiple correlations between miRNAs and the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism were found, that would suggest a miRNA-host gene circuit. Finally, miR122 circulating levels could be included in a panel of different biomarkers to improve accuracy in the non-invasive diagnosis of NASH. PMID:27669236

  19. The Poly-cistronic miR-23-27-24 Complexes Target Endothelial Cell Junctions: Differential Functional and Molecular Effects of miR-23a and miR-23b

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Ying; Ritchie, William; Grau, Georges; Vadas, Mathew A; Gamble, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of function of endothelial cell–cell junctions is fundamental in sustaining vascular integrity. The polycistronic microRNA (miR) complexes containing miR-23a-27a-24-2, and 23b-27b-24-1 are predicted to target the majority of major endothelial junctional proteins. We focus on miR-23a and miR-23b, and investigate the functional effects of these miRs on junctions. While miR-23a and 23b only differ by 1 nucleotide (g19) outside the seed region and thus are predicted to have the same targets, they function differently with miR-23a inhibiting permeability and miR-23b inhibiting angiogenesis. Both miRs target the junctional attractive molecule (tight junction protein 2) ZO-2 and the repulsive molecule junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C), although the inhibition of JAM-C by miR-23a is more profound than by miR-23b. The difference in potency is attributable to differences at g19 since a mutation of the t17, the g19 binding site of miR-23b in the 3′UTR of JAM-C restores identity. We also show that the pattern of expression of miR-23a and miR-23b and their targets are different. Thus, the paralogues miR-23a and miR-23b can have profoundly different effects on endothelial cell function due at least partially to selective effects on target proteins and differences in expression patterns of the miRs. This work exposes a hitherto unappreciated complexity in therapeutically targeting miRs. PMID:27741223

  20. miR33a/miR33b* and miR122 as Possible Contributors to Hepatic Lipid Metabolism in Obese Women with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Auguet, Teresa; Aragonès, Gemma; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martí, Andreu; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fàtima; Hernández, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Specific miRNA expression profiles have been shown to be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the correlation between the circulating levels and hepatic expression of miR122 and miR33a/b*, the key lipid metabolism-related gene expression and the clinicopathological factors of obese women with NAFLD. We measured miR122 and miR33a/b* expression in liver samples from 62 morbidly obese (MO), 30 moderately obese (ModO), and eight normal-weight controls. MiR122 and miR33a/b* expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR. Additionally, miR122 and miR33b* circulating levels were analyzed in 122 women. Hepatic miR33b* expression was increased in MO compared to ModO and controls, whereas miR122 expression was decreased in the MO group compared to ModO. In obese cohorts, miR33b* expression was increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Regarding circulating levels, MO patients with NASH showed higher miR122 levels than MO with simple steatosis (SS). These circulating levels are good predictors of histological features associated with disease severity. MO is associated with altered hepatic miRNA expression. In obese women, higher miR33b* liver expression is associated with NASH. Moreover, multiple correlations between miRNAs and the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism were found, that would suggest a miRNA-host gene circuit. Finally, miR122 circulating levels could be included in a panel of different biomarkers to improve accuracy in the non-invasive diagnosis of NASH. PMID:27669236

  1. miR33a/miR33b* and miR122 as Possible Contributors to Hepatic Lipid Metabolism in Obese Women with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Auguet, Teresa; Aragonès, Gemma; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martí, Andreu; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fàtima; Hernández, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Specific miRNA expression profiles have been shown to be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the correlation between the circulating levels and hepatic expression of miR122 and miR33a/b*, the key lipid metabolism-related gene expression and the clinicopathological factors of obese women with NAFLD. We measured miR122 and miR33a/b* expression in liver samples from 62 morbidly obese (MO), 30 moderately obese (ModO), and eight normal-weight controls. MiR122 and miR33a/b* expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR. Additionally, miR122 and miR33b* circulating levels were analyzed in 122 women. Hepatic miR33b* expression was increased in MO compared to ModO and controls, whereas miR122 expression was decreased in the MO group compared to ModO. In obese cohorts, miR33b* expression was increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Regarding circulating levels, MO patients with NASH showed higher miR122 levels than MO with simple steatosis (SS). These circulating levels are good predictors of histological features associated with disease severity. MO is associated with altered hepatic miRNA expression. In obese women, higher miR33b* liver expression is associated with NASH. Moreover, multiple correlations between miRNAs and the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism were found, that would suggest a miRNA-host gene circuit. Finally, miR122 circulating levels could be included in a panel of different biomarkers to improve accuracy in the non-invasive diagnosis of NASH.

  2. The Poly-cistronic miR-23-27-24 Complexes Target Endothelial Cell Junctions: Differential Functional and Molecular Effects of miR-23a and miR-23b

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Ying; Ritchie, William; Grau, Georges; Vadas, Mathew A; Gamble, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of function of endothelial cell–cell junctions is fundamental in sustaining vascular integrity. The polycistronic microRNA (miR) complexes containing miR-23a-27a-24-2, and 23b-27b-24-1 are predicted to target the majority of major endothelial junctional proteins. We focus on miR-23a and miR-23b, and investigate the functional effects of these miRs on junctions. While miR-23a and 23b only differ by 1 nucleotide (g19) outside the seed region and thus are predicted to have the same targets, they function differently with miR-23a inhibiting permeability and miR-23b inhibiting angiogenesis. Both miRs target the junctional attractive molecule (tight junction protein 2) ZO-2 and the repulsive molecule junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C), although the inhibition of JAM-C by miR-23a is more profound than by miR-23b. The difference in potency is attributable to differences at g19 since a mutation of the t17, the g19 binding site of miR-23b in the 3′UTR of JAM-C restores identity. We also show that the pattern of expression of miR-23a and miR-23b and their targets are different. Thus, the paralogues miR-23a and miR-23b can have profoundly different effects on endothelial cell function due at least partially to selective effects on target proteins and differences in expression patterns of the miRs. This work exposes a hitherto unappreciated complexity in therapeutically targeting miRs.

  3. TP53 regulates miRNA association with AGO2 to remodel the miRNA–mRNA interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin; Carissimi, Claudia; Dabrowska, Aleksandra F.; de Giorgio, Alexander; Frampton, Adam E.; Harding, Victoria; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe; Colombo, Teresa; Castellano, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage activates TP53-regulated surveillance mechanisms that are crucial in suppressing tumorigenesis. TP53 orchestrates these responses directly by transcriptionally modulating genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and by regulating miRNA biogenesis through interacting with the DROSHA complex. However, whether the association between miRNAs and AGO2 is regulated following DNA damage is not yet known. Here, we show that, following DNA damage, TP53 interacts with AGO2 to induce or reduce AGO2's association of a subset of miRNAs, including multiple let-7 family members. Furthermore, we show that specific mutations in TP53 decrease rather than increase the association of let-7 family miRNAs, reducing their activity without preventing TP53 from interacting with AGO2. This is consistent with the oncogenic properties of these mutants. Using AGO2 RIP-seq and PAR-CLIP-seq, we show that the DNA damage–induced increase in binding of let-7 family members to the RISC complex is functional. We unambiguously determine the global miRNA–mRNA interaction networks involved in the DNA damage response, validating them through the identification of miRNA-target chimeras formed by endogenous ligation reactions. We find that the target complementary region of the let-7 seed tends to have highly fixed positions and more variable ones. Additionally, we observe that miRNAs, whose cellular abundance or differential association with AGO2 is regulated by TP53, are involved in an intricate network of regulatory feedback and feedforward circuits. TP53-mediated regulation of AGO2–miRNA interaction represents a new mechanism of miRNA regulation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26701625

  4. TP53 regulates miRNA association with AGO2 to remodel the miRNA-mRNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin; Carissimi, Claudia; Dabrowska, Aleksandra F; de Giorgio, Alexander; Frampton, Adam E; Harding, Victoria; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe; Colombo, Teresa; Castellano, Leandro

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage activates TP53-regulated surveillance mechanisms that are crucial in suppressing tumorigenesis. TP53 orchestrates these responses directly by transcriptionally modulating genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and by regulating miRNA biogenesis through interacting with the DROSHA complex. However, whether the association between miRNAs and AGO2 is regulated following DNA damage is not yet known. Here, we show that, following DNA damage, TP53 interacts with AGO2 to induce or reduce AGO2's association of a subset of miRNAs, including multiple let-7 family members. Furthermore, we show that specific mutations in TP53 decrease rather than increase the association of let-7 family miRNAs, reducing their activity without preventing TP53 from interacting with AGO2. This is consistent with the oncogenic properties of these mutants. Using AGO2 RIP-seq and PAR-CLIP-seq, we show that the DNA damage-induced increase in binding of let-7 family members to the RISC complex is functional. We unambiguously determine the global miRNA-mRNA interaction networks involved in the DNA damage response, validating them through the identification of miRNA-target chimeras formed by endogenous ligation reactions. We find that the target complementary region of the let-7 seed tends to have highly fixed positions and more variable ones. Additionally, we observe that miRNAs, whose cellular abundance or differential association with AGO2 is regulated by TP53, are involved in an intricate network of regulatory feedback and feedforward circuits. TP53-mediated regulation of AGO2-miRNA interaction represents a new mechanism of miRNA regulation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26701625

  5. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA). PMID:26382040

  6. miRNA and methylation: a multifaceted liaison.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Ravindresh

    2015-01-19

    miRNAs and DNA methylation are both critical regulators of gene expression. Aberration in miRNA expression or DNA methylation is a causal factor for numerous pathological conditions. DNA methylation can inhibit the transcription of miRNAs, just like coding genes, by methylating the CpG islands in the promoter regions of miRNAs. Conversely, certain miRNAs can directly target DNA methyltransferases and bring about their inhibition, thereby affecting the whole genome methylation pattern. Recently, methylation patterns have also been revealed in mRNA. Surprisingly, the two most commonly studied methylation states in mRNA (m6A and m5C) are found to be enriched in 3'-UTRs (untranslated regions), the target site for the majority of miRNAs. Whereas m5C is reported to stabilise mRNA, m6A has a destabilising effect on mRNA. However, the effect of mRNA methylation on its interaction with miRNAs is largely unexplored. The review highlights the complex interplay between microRNA and methylation at DNA and mRNA level. PMID:25469751

  7. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter T; Wang, Wang-Xia; Rajeev, Bernard W

    2008-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are the culmination of many different genetic and environmental influences. Prior studies have shown that RNAs are pathologically altered during the inexorable course of some NDs. Recent evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be a contributing factor in neurodegeneration. miRNAs are brain-enriched, small ( approximately 22 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs that participate in mRNA translational regulation. Although discovered in the framework of worm development, miRNAs are now appreciated to play a dynamic role in many mammalian brain-related biochemical pathways, including neuroplasticity and stress responses. Research about miRNAs in the context of neurodegeneration is accumulating rapidly, and the goal of this review is to provide perspective for these new data that may be helpful to specialists in either field. An overview is provided about the normal functions for miRNAs, including some of the newer concepts related to the human brain. Recently published studies pertaining to the roles of miRNAs in NDs--including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and triplet repeat disorders-are described. Finally, a discussion is included with theoretical syntheses and possible future directions in exploring the nexus between miRNA and ND research.

  8. miRNAs: Key Players in Neurodegenerative Disorders and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Hanuma Kumar; Panigrahi, Manas Kumar; Gutti, Ravi Kumar; Greig, Nigel H; Tamargo, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, ∼22 nucleotide, non-coding RNA molecules that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNA dysregulation has been observed in cancer and in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the neurological disorder, epilepsy. Neuronal degradation and death are important hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, abnormalities in metabolism, synapsis and axonal transport have been associated with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal dementia. A number of recently published studies have demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the nervous system and have contributed to the growing body of evidence on miRNA dysregulation in neurological disorders. Knowledge of the expressions and activities of such miRNAs may aid in the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the significance of miRNA dysregulation in the development of neurodegenerative disorders and the use of miRNAs as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA). PMID:26382040

  10. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-09-08

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA).

  11. Milk miRNAs: simple nutrients or systemic functional regulators?

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Kakulas, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T; Hartmann, Peter E; John, Swen Malte; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Cordain, Loren; Schmitz, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Milk is rich in miRNAs that appear to play important roles in the postnatal development of all mammals. Currently, two competing hypotheses exist: the functional hypothesis, which proposes that milk miRNAs are transferred to the offspring and exert physiological regulatory functions, and the nutritional hypothesis, which suggests that these molecules do not reach the systemic circulation of the milk recipient, but merely provide nutrition without conferring active regulatory signals to the offspring. The functional hypothesis is based on indirect evidence and requires further investigation. The nutritional hypothesis is primarily based on three mouse models, which are inherently problematic: 1) miRNA-375 KO mice, 2) miRNA-200c/141 KO mice, and 3) transgenic mice presenting high levels of miRNA-30b in milk. This article presents circumstantial evidence that these mouse models may all be inappropriate to study the physiological traffic of milk miRNAs to the newborn mammal, and calls for new studies using more relevant mouse models or human milk to address the fate and role of milk miRNAs in the offspring and the adult consumer of cow's milk. PMID:27330539

  12. miRNA therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases: promises and problems

    PubMed Central

    Nouraee, Nazila; Mowla, Seyed J.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of non-coding RNAs which found their way into the clinic due to their fundamental roles in cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, miRNAs have been known as micromodulators in cellular communications being involved in cell signaling and microenvironment remodeling. In this review, we will focus on the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and their reliability as diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in these conditions. CVDs comprise a variety of blood vessels and heart disorders with a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This necessitates introduction of novel molecular biomarkers for early detection, prevention, or treatment of these diseases. miRNAs, due to their stability, tissue-specific expression pattern and secretion to the corresponding body fluids, are attractive targets for cardiovascular-associated therapeutics. Explaining the challenges ahead of miRNA-based therapies, we will discuss the exosomes as delivery packages for miRNA drugs and promising novel strategies for the future of miRNA-based therapeutics. These approaches provide insights to the future of personalized medicine for the treatment of CVDs. PMID:26175755

  13. Employee Relations. A Guide and Reference Book for Those Involved or Training to Be Involved in Employee Relations in the Hotel and Catering Industry. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Rodney; Hayter, Roy, Ed.

    This guide and reference book is designed to help those involved or training to be involved in employee relations in the hotel and catering industry. Chapter 1 attempts to define employee relations. Chapter 2 describes the institutions and parties involved in employee relations in the hotel and catering industry. The focus of chapter 3 is on…

  14. Expressional analysis of immune-related miRNAs in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Na, R S; E, G X; Sun, W; Sun, X W; Qiu, X Y; Chen, L P; Huang, Y F

    2015-09-25

    Immune-related miRNAs in breast milk are extracellular miRNAs that are related to immune organ development and regulation of the immune function in infants and young animals. The goal of this study was to compare the expression levels of five immune-related miRNAs in breast milk in black goats, humans, and dairy cattle. The miRNAs from milk were extracted and the expression levels were assessed using quantitive RT-PCR methods. MiR-146, miR-155, miR-181a, miR-223, and miR-150 were all detected in Dazu black goat milk, and these miRNAs were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum than in mature milk of goats (P < 0.01), except for miR-150. Further, all five miRNAs were expressed in human colostrum, but patterns differed from those in goats: miR-146 and miR-155 were highly expressed (P < 0.01) in human colostrum, whereas miR-223 was abundant in goat colostrum (P < 0.01). In addition, five miRNAs were significantly higher in bovine mature milk than in goat milk (P < 0.01). Taken together, these results confirm that immune-related miRNAs are rich in breast milk with different expression levels depending on the lactation phase and species.

  15. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: • Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. • The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. • Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  16. The world's largest photovoltaic hotel roof project: A case study of the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel PowerGuard{reg_sign} system

    SciTech Connect

    Shugar, D.S.; Saito, R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents design, performance, and economic feasibility information of the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Bungalows 100 KWp photovoltaic (PV) roofing system supplied by PowerLight Corporation. The system, called PowerGuard{reg_sign}, was installed in May 1998. Several months of operating data are presented together with information regarding the value of the system. The project achieved several milestones for building-integrated PV (BIPV), such as (1) the largest BIPV project in the USA, (2) the largest PV project in Hawaii by a factor of five, (3) a demonstration of the practicality for constructing BIPV in a premium resort location during normal operations, and (4) a strong economic return for BIPV in tropical applications.

  17. An investigation into anti-proliferative effects of microRNAs encoded by the miR-106a-363 cluster on human carcinoma cells and keratinocytes using microarray profiling of miRNA transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Cuong; Jevnaker, Anne-Marthe; Bryne, Magne; Osmundsen, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Transfection of human oral squamous carcinoma cells (clone E10) with mimics for unexpressed miR-20b or miR-363-5p, encoded by the miR-106a-363 cluster (miR-20b, miR-106a, miR-363-3p, or miR-363-5p), caused 40-50% decrease in proliferation. Transfection with mimics for miR-18a or miR-92a, encoded by the miR-17-92 cluster (all members being expressed in E10 cells), had no effect on proliferation. In contrast, mimic for the sibling miRNA-19a yielded about 20% inhibition of proliferation. To investigate miRNA involvement profiling of miRNA transcriptomes were carried out using deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays. In transfectants for miR-19a, or miR-20b or miR-363-5p most differentially expressed miRNAs exhibited decreased expression, including some miRNAs encoded in paralogous miR-17-92-or miR-106b-25 cluster. Only in cells transfected with miR-19a mimic significantly increased expression of miR-20b observed-about 50-fold as judged by qRT-PCR. Further studies using qRT-PCR showed that transfection of E10 cells with mimic for miRNAs encoded by miR-17-92 - or miR-106a-363 - or the miR-106b-25 cluster confirmed selective effect on expression on sibling miRNAs. We conclude that high levels of miRNAs encoded by the miR-106a-363 cluster may contribute to inhibition of proliferation by decreasing expression of several sibling miRNAs encoded by miR-17-92 or by the miR-106b-25 cluster. The inhibition of proliferation observed in miR-19a-mimic transfectants is likely caused by the miR-19a-dependent increase in the levels of miR-20b and miR-106a. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs from miR-106a, miR-20b and miR-363-5p transfectants, but not miR-92a transfectants, yielded significant associations to "Cellular Growth and Proliferation" and "Cell Cycle." Western blotting results showed that levels of affected proteins to differ between transfectants, suggesting that different anti-proliferative mechanisms may operate in these transfectants. PMID:25202322

  18. miR-124 regulates fetal pulmonary epithelial cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Chaoqun; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Xi, Dong; Weng, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a family of small noncoding RNAs that regulate the expression of their target proteins at the posttranscriptional level. Their functions cover almost every aspect of cell physiology. However, the roles of microRNAs in fetal lung development are not completely understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the regulation and molecular mechanisms of alveolar epithelial cell maturation during fetal lung development by miR-124. We discovered that miR-124 was downregulated during rat fetal lung development and predominantly expressed in the epithelial cells at late stage of the lung development. Overexpression of miR-124 with an adenovirus vector led to the inhibition of epithelial maturation in rat fetal lung organ cultures and fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells, as demonstrated by a decrease in the type II cell marker expression and an increase in glycogen content. We further demonstrated by luciferase reporter assays that miR-124 inhibited the NF-κB, cAMP/PKA, and MAPK/ERK pathways. In addition, nuclear factor I/B (NFIB), a critical protein in fetal lung maturation, was validated as a direct target of miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 expression was induced by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway through a direct interaction of LEF1 and the miR-124 promoter region. We concluded that miR-124 downregulation is critical to fetal lung epithelial maturation and miR-124 inhibits this maturation process at least partially through the inhibition of NFIB. PMID:26071557

  19. Reactivation of epigenetically silenced miR-512 and miR-373 sensitizes lung cancer cells to cisplatin and restricts tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Adi Harel, S; Bossel Ben-Moshe, N; Aylon, Y; Bublik, D R; Moskovits, N; Toperoff, G; Azaiza, D; Biagoni, F; Fuchs, G; Wilder, S; Hellman, A; Blandino, G; Domany, E; Oren, M

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate a variety of cellular processes, and their impaired expression is involved in cancer. Silencing of tumor-suppressive miRs in cancer can occur through epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. We performed comparative miR profiling on cultured lung cancer cells before and after treatment with 5'aza-deoxycytidine plus Trichostatin A to reverse DNA methylation and histone deacetylation, respectively. Several tens of miRs were strongly induced by such 'epigenetic therapy'. Two representatives, miR-512-5p (miR-512) and miR-373, were selected for further analysis. Both miRs were secreted in exosomes. Re-expression of both miRs augmented cisplatin-induced apoptosis and inhibited cell migration; miR-512 also reduced cell proliferation. TEAD4 mRNA was confirmed as a direct target of miR-512; likewise, miR-373 was found to target RelA and PIK3CA mRNA directly. Our results imply that miR-512 and miR-373 exert cell-autonomous and non-autonomous tumor-suppressive effects in lung cancer cells, where their re-expression may benefit epigenetic cancer therapy.

  20. Inhibition of the miR-155 target NIAM phenocopies the growth promoting effect of miR-155 in B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Kluiver, Joost; de Jong, Debora; Smigielska-Czepiel, Katarzyna; Kortman, Gertrud; Winkle, Melanie; Rutgers, Bea; Koerts, Jasper; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2016-01-19

    Several studies have indicated an important role for miR-155 in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. Highly elevated levels of miR-155 were indeed observed in most B-cell lymphomas with the exception of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the oncogenic role of miR-155 in B-cell lymphoma are not well understood. To identify the miR-155 targets relevant for B-cell lymphoma, we performed RNA immunoprecipitation of Argonaute 2 in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cells upon miR-155 inhibition and in BL cells upon ectopic expression of miR-155. We identified 54 miR-155-specific target genes in BL cells and confirmed miR-155 targeting of DET1, NIAM, TRIM32, HOMEZ, PSIP1 and JARID2. Five of these targets are also regulated by endogenous miR-155 in HL cells. Both overexpression of miR-155 and inhibition of expression of the novel miR-155 target gene NIAM increased proliferation of BL cells. In primary B-cell lymphoma NIAM-positive cases have significant lower levels of miR-155 as compared to NIAM-negative cases, suggesting that NIAM is also regulated by miR-155 in primary B-cell lymphoma. Thus, our data indicate an oncogenic role for miR-155 in B-cell lymphoma which involves targeting the tumor suppressor NIAM.