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Sample records for hpv16 gene copy

  1. Critical evaluation of HPV16 gene copy number quantification by SYBR green PCR.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ian; Ng, Grace; Foster, Nicola; Stanley, Margaret; Herdman, Michael T; Pett, Mark R; Teschendorff, Andrew; Coleman, Nicholas

    2008-07-24

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) load and physical status are considered useful parameters for clinical evaluation of cervical squamous cell neoplasia. However, the errors implicit in HPV gene quantification by PCR are not well documented. We have undertaken the first rigorous evaluation of the errors that can be expected when using SYBR green qPCR for quantification of HPV type 16 gene copy numbers. We assessed a modified method, in which external calibration curves were generated from a single construct containing HPV16 E2, HPV16 E6 and the host gene hydroxymethylbilane synthase in a 1:1:1 ratio. When testing dilutions of mixed HPV/host DNA in replicate runs, we observed errors in quantifying E2 and E6 amplicons of 5-40%, with greatest error at the lowest DNA template concentration (3 ng/microl). Errors in determining viral copy numbers per diploid genome were 13-53%. Nevertheless, in cervical keratinocyte cell lines we observed reasonable agreement between viral loads determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. The mean E2/E6 ratio in episome-only cells was 1.04, but with a range of 0.76-1.32. In three integrant-only lines the mean E2/E6 ratios were 0.20, 0.72 and 2.61 (values confirmed by gene-specific Southern blotting). When E2/E6 ratios in fourteen HPV16-positive cervical carcinomas were analysed, conclusions regarding viral physical state could only be made in three cases, where the E2/E6 ratio was < or = 0.06. Run-to-run variation in SYBR green qPCR produces unavoidable inaccuracies that should be allowed for when quantifying HPV gene copy number. While E6 copy numbers can be considered to provide a useable indication of viral loads, the E2/E6 ratio is of limited value. Previous studies may have overestimated the frequency of mixed episomal/integrant HPV infections.

  2. Higher prevalence and gene amplification of HPV16 in oropharynx as compared to oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; SUGIYAMA, Masaru; OHTA, Kouji; RAHMAN, Mohammad Zeshaan; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to clarify differences regarding HPV16 infection and gene amplification between the oral cavity and oropharynx in healthy individuals. Material and Methods The subjects were 94 healthy asymptomatic individuals (41 males, 53 females; mean age 58.6 years, range 16-97 years) who visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery of the Hiroshima University Hospital from 2014 to 2015. Oral epithelial cells were collected from oral rinse and pharynx gargle samples and placed in saline. The human endogenous retrovirus gene ERV3-1 was used as a reference to estimate the number of human cells in each sample. DNA samples were extracted from approximately 10,000 human cells and tested for HPV16 DNA by PCR using a type-specific primer. Similarly, we analyzed the HPV16 viral copy number in HPV16-positive cases using real-time PCR to examine genomic amplification. Results The percentage of HPV16-positive cases was higher in the gargle (28.7%) as compared to the rinse (16.0%) samples. In the oral rinse samples, males (26.8%) showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 than females (7.5%) (P=0.021). Importantly, in older subjects (aged 60-89 years), gargle samples showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 (33.3%) than oral rinse samples (13.7%) (P=0.034). The average number of viral copies was approximately 8 times higher in the gargle than in the oral rinse samples (0.16±0.27 vs. 1.35±1.26 copy numbers per cell), a significant difference (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the oropharynx is more susceptible to HPV16 infection as compared to the oral cavity, while HPV16 gene amplification is also more commonly found in the oropharynx. PMID:27556212

  3. Comparative analysis of HPV16 gene expression profiles in cervical and in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cerasuolo, Andrea; Annunziata, Clorinda; Tortora, Marianna; Starita, Noemy; Stellato, Giovanni; Greggi, Stefano; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major cause of cervical cancer and of a fraction of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Few studies compared the viral expression profiles in the two types of tumor. We analyzed HPV genotypes and viral load as well as early (E2/E4, E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II, E7) and late (L1 and L2) gene expression of HPV16 in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer biopsies. The study included 28 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and ten oropharyngeal SCC, along with pair-matched non-tumor tissues, as well as four oropharynx dysplastic tissues and 112 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia biopsies. Viral load was found higher in cervical SCC (<1 to 694 copies/cell) and CIN (<1 to 43 copies/cell) compared to oropharyngeal SCC (<1 to 4 copies/cell). HPV16 E2/E4 and E5 as well as L1 and L2 mRNA levels were low in cervical SCC and CIN and undetectable in oropharynx cases. The HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were consistently high in cervical SCC and low in oropharyngeal SCC. The analysis of HPV16 E6 mRNA expression pattern showed statistically significant higher levels of E6*I versus E6*II isoform in cervical SCC (p = 0.002) and a slightly higher expression of E6*I versus E6*II in oropharyngeal cases. In conclusion, the HPV16 E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II and E7 mRNA levels were more abundant in cervical SCC compared to oropharyngeal SCC suggesting different carcinogenic mechanisms in the two types of HPV-related cancers. PMID:28423662

  4. Comparative analysis of HPV16 gene expression profiles in cervical and in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cerasuolo, Andrea; Annunziata, Clorinda; Tortora, Marianna; Starita, Noemy; Stellato, Giovanni; Greggi, Stefano; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-05-23

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major cause of cervical cancer and of a fraction of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Few studies compared the viral expression profiles in the two types of tumor. We analyzed HPV genotypes and viral load as well as early (E2/E4, E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II, E7) and late (L1 and L2) gene expression of HPV16 in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer biopsies. The study included 28 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and ten oropharyngeal SCC, along with pair-matched non-tumor tissues, as well as four oropharynx dysplastic tissues and 112 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia biopsies. Viral load was found higher in cervical SCC (<1 to 694 copies/cell) and CIN (<1 to 43 copies/cell) compared to oropharyngeal SCC (<1 to 4 copies/cell). HPV16 E2/E4 and E5 as well as L1 and L2 mRNA levels were low in cervical SCC and CIN and undetectable in oropharynx cases. The HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were consistently high in cervical SCC and low in oropharyngeal SCC. The analysis of HPV16 E6 mRNA expression pattern showed statistically significant higher levels of E6*I versus E6*II isoform in cervical SCC (p = 0.002) and a slightly higher expression of E6*I versus E6*II in oropharyngeal cases. In conclusion, the HPV16 E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II and E7 mRNA levels were more abundant in cervical SCC compared to oropharyngeal SCC suggesting different carcinogenic mechanisms in the two types of HPV-related cancers.

  5. HPV-16 E2 contributes to induction of HPV-16 late gene expression by inhibiting early polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cecilia; Somberg, Monika; Li, Xiaoze; Backström Winquist, Ellenor; Fay, Joanna; Ryan, Fergus; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence; Schwartz, Stefan

    2012-05-22

    We provide evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein regulates HPV late gene expression. High levels of E2 caused a read-through at the early polyadenylation signal pAE into the late region of the HPV genome, thereby inducing expression of L1 and L2 mRNAs. This is a conserved property of E2 of both mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Induction could be reversed by high levels of HPV-16 E1 protein, or by the polyadenylation factor CPSF30. HPV-16 E2 inhibited polyadenylation in vitro by preventing the assembly of the CPSF complex. Both the N-terminal and hinge domains of E2 were required for induction of HPV late gene expression in transfected cells as well as for inhibition of polyadenylation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of HPV-16 E2 induced late gene expression from a full-length genomic clone of HPV-16. We speculate that the accumulation of high levels of E2 during the viral life cycle, not only turns off the expression of the pro-mitotic viral E6 and E7 genes, but also induces the expression of the late HPV genes L1 and L2.

  6. HPV-16 E2 contributes to induction of HPV-16 late gene expression by inhibiting early polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Cecilia; Somberg, Monika; Li, Xiaoze; Backström Winquist, Ellenor; Fay, Joanna; Ryan, Fergus; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence; Schwartz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We provide evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein regulates HPV late gene expression. High levels of E2 caused a read-through at the early polyadenylation signal pAE into the late region of the HPV genome, thereby inducing expression of L1 and L2 mRNAs. This is a conserved property of E2 of both mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Induction could be reversed by high levels of HPV-16 E1 protein, or by the polyadenylation factor CPSF30. HPV-16 E2 inhibited polyadenylation in vitro by preventing the assembly of the CPSF complex. Both the N-terminal and hinge domains of E2 were required for induction of HPV late gene expression in transfected cells as well as for inhibition of polyadenylation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of HPV-16 E2 induced late gene expression from a full-length genomic clone of HPV-16. We speculate that the accumulation of high levels of E2 during the viral life cycle, not only turns off the expression of the pro-mitotic viral E6 and E7 genes, but also induces the expression of the late HPV genes L1 and L2. PMID:22617423

  7. Identification of a differentiation-inducible promoter in the E7 open reading frame of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) in raft cultures of a new cell line containing high copy numbers of episomal HPV-16 DNA.

    PubMed

    Grassmann, K; Rapp, B; Maschek, H; Petry, K U; Iftner, T

    1996-04-01

    Gene expression of human papillomaviruses (HPV) is tightly linked to differentiation processes within the pluristratified epithelium. To analyze changes in the transcription pattern of HPV-16 during epithelial cell differentiation, we established a permanently growing HPV-16 positive cell line, designated KG, from a vulvar intraepithelial neoplasm. KG cells of early passages harbored multiple copies of the HPV-16 DNA as episomes and were able to form a stratified epithelium in an organotypic raft culture system. Analysis of viral gene expression revealed the known transcription pattern of the early region of HPV-16 with the exception of a so far undefined mRNA class with start sites in the E7 open reading frame. Quantitative analysis of primer extension experiments with RNA from KG cells grown in monolayer and raft culture showed a strong induction of this transcript in differentiated KG cells, whereas the level of the mRNAs initiated at the early promoter P97 remained almost constant. Primer extension analyses with four different primers and direct sequencing of the extension product revealed that the differentiation-inducible transcript initiated at a novel promoter with a major start site around nucleotide position 670 (P670) in the E7 open reading frame of HPV-16. Sequence analysis of cDNAs derived from RNA of KG cells grown in raft culture suggested that the transcripts initiated at P670 have a coding potential for an E1E4 fusion protein and for the E5 protein.

  8. Effect of HSV-2 infection on the expression of HPV 16 genes in CaSki cells.

    PubMed

    Pisani, S; Imperi, M; Seganti, L; Superti, F; Tinari, A; Bucci, M; Degener, A M

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been proposed to be the most important etiological factors for cervical cancer although different agents may act in conjunction. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection is considered as a possible cofactor to malignant transformation. To examine the influence of HSV-2 infection on the HPV genes expression, CaSki cells bearing 60 to 600 copies of HPV-16 DNA per cell were used as a model system. Twenty hours post HSV-2 infection the mRNA transcripts for HPV-16 early (E1, E2 and E6) and late (L1) genes were analysed by RT-PCR assay. Results indicated that the level of transcription of E1, E2 and E6 genes was up to 3-fold enhanced in HSV-2 infected CaSki cells suggesting that HSV-2 infection could increase the risk of cervical cancer by overexpression of both HPV regulatory and oncogenic genes.

  9. Prevalence of HPV 16 genomic variant carrying a 63 bp duplicated sequence within the E1 gene in Slovenian women.

    PubMed

    Bogovac, Zeljka; Lunar, Maja M; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Seme, Katja; Jančar, Nina; Poljak, Mario

    2011-09-01

    High-risk HPV, particularly HPV-16, is etiologically associated with the development of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions - cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, most precancerous lesions will not progress to cancer. Numerous studies have shown that HPV-16 consists of several genomic variants, which differ in their association with cervical cancer, viral persistence and the frequency of recurrence of cervical disease. Recently, a novel, presumably less pathogenic, HPV-16 E6-T350G genomic variant has been identified, carrying a 63-bp in-frame insertion in the E1 gene. No data from Slovenian patients have so far been reported for this specific HPV-16 variant. In the present study, therefore, a total of 390 HPV-16 positive samples obtained from the same number of women with normal cytology, CIN I, CIN II, CIN III or cervical cancer, were analyzed. The HPV-16 E1 insert variant was detected using real-time PCR-amplification of a 146-210-bp fragment of the E1 gene and PCR-sequencing of a 169-bp fragment of the E6 gene. The HPV-16 E1 insert variant was identified in 7/48 (14.6%), 1/21 (4.8%), 2/20 (10.0%), 9/131 (6.9%) and 12/170 (7.1%) of women with normal cytology, CIN I, CIN II, CIN III and cervical cancer, respectively. All HPV-16 E1 insert variants with an amplifiable E6 gene belonged to the European HPV-16 E6-350G variant group. No statistically significant differences in the prevalence of HPV-16 E1 insert genomic variant in women presenting with normal cytology and those with the different stages of HPV-16-induced disease were found.

  10. Gene Expression Patterns Induced by HPV-16 L1 VLP in Leukocytes from Vaccine Recipients

    PubMed Central

    García-Piñeres, Alfonso J.; Hildesheim, Allan; Dodd, Lori; Kemp, Troy J.; Yang, Jun; Fullmer, Brandie; Harro, Clayton; Lowy, Douglas R.; Lempicki, Richard A.; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2009-01-01

    Human papilloma (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines were recently licensed. Though neutralizing antibody titers are thought to be the main effectors of protection against infection, early predictors of long-term efficacy are not yet defined and a comprehensive understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccination is still lacking. Here, microarrays were used to compare the gene expression signature in HPV-16 L1 VLP-stimulated PBMC from 17 vaccine and 4 placebo recipients before vaccination, and 1 month after receiving the second immunization. Vaccination with a monovalent HPV-16 L1 VLP vaccine was associated with modulation of genes involved in the inflammatory/defense response, cytokine, interferon and cell cycle pathways in VLP-stimulated PBMC. Additionally, there was up-regulation of probesets associated with cytotoxic (GZMB, TNFSF10) and regulatory (INDO, CTLA4) activities. The strongest correlations with neutralizing antibody titers were found for cyclin d2 (CCND2) and galectin (LGALS2). Twenty-two differentially expressed probesets were selected for confirmation by RT-PCR in an independent sample set. Agreement with microarray data was seen for over two-thirds of these probesets. Up-regulation of immune/defense response genes by HPV-16 L1 VLP, in particular interferon-induced genes was observed in PBMC collected prior to vaccination, with many of these genes being further induced following vaccination. In conclusion, we identified important innate and adaptive response related- genes induced by vaccination with HPV-16 L1 VLP. Further studies are needed to identify gene expression signatures of immunogenicity and long-term protection with potential utility in prediction of long-term HPV vaccination outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:19155521

  11. Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy Using HPV-16 Pseudovirion Carrying the HSV-tk Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Chiang, An Jen; Tsai, Hsiao-Hsuan; Pomper, Martin G.; Kang, Tae Heung; Roden, Richard R.; Wu, T.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from all gynecological cancers and conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy usually fail to control advanced stages of the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for alternative and innovative therapeutic options. We reason that cancer gene therapy using a vector capable of specifically delivering an enzyme-encoding gene to ovarian cancer cells will allow the cancer cell to metabolize a harmless prodrug into a potent cytotoxin, which will lead to therapeutic effects. In the current study, we explore the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) pseudovirion to deliver a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene to ovarian tumor cells. We found that the HPV-16 pseudovirion was able to preferentially infect murine and human ovarian tumor cells when administered intraperitoneally. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of HPV-16 pseudovirions carrying the HSV-tk gene followed by treatment with ganciclovir led to significant therapeutic anti-tumor effects in murine ovarian cancer-bearing mice. Our data suggest that HPV pseudovirion may serve as a potential delivery vehicle for ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:22815887

  12. Ovarian cancer gene therapy using HPV-16 pseudovirion carrying the HSV-tk gene.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Chiang, An Jen; Tsai, Hsiao-Hsuan; Pomper, Martin G; Kang, Tae Heung; Roden, Richard R; Wu, T-C

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from all gynecological cancers and conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy usually fail to control advanced stages of the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for alternative and innovative therapeutic options. We reason that cancer gene therapy using a vector capable of specifically delivering an enzyme-encoding gene to ovarian cancer cells will allow the cancer cell to metabolize a harmless prodrug into a potent cytotoxin, which will lead to therapeutic effects. In the current study, we explore the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) pseudovirion to deliver a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene to ovarian tumor cells. We found that the HPV-16 pseudovirion was able to preferentially infect murine and human ovarian tumor cells when administered intraperitoneally. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of HPV-16 pseudovirions carrying the HSV-tk gene followed by treatment with ganciclovir led to significant therapeutic anti-tumor effects in murine ovarian cancer-bearing mice. Our data suggest that HPV pseudovirion may serve as a potential delivery vehicle for ovarian cancer gene therapy.

  13. High-resolution melting analysis of HPV-16L1 gene methylation: A promising method for prognosing cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cui; Zhi, Yanfang; Shen, Yong; Gong, Jiaomei; Li, Ya; Li, Xiaofu

    2015-09-01

    Methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) is a new technique for DNA methylation analysis, but it is rarely used for the detection of viral DNA methylation. In this study, we investigated the HPV-16L1 gene methylation that is detected by MS-HRM as a potential biomarker for prognosing cervical dysplasia and cancer. A total of 114 HPV-16 infected patients (normal (17), CIN1 (25), CIN2 (29), CIN3 (32), SCC (11)) who underwent liquid-based cytology test and biopsy were included in this study. 17 cases with HPV-16 infection and negative cytologic and histologic results served as the control group. The HPV-16L1 gene methylation statuses of these samples were investigated using a methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) assay after bisulfite modification. The HPV-16L1 gene methylation statuses of all the 114 specimens were successfully detected by MS-HRM, and we observed increasing methylation levels in severe lesions, as determined using histologic assays. In addition, the methylation levels of CIN2+ (CIN2, CIN3 and SCC) were significantly higher than that of CIN2- (normal and CIN1, P<0.001). When taking CIN2+ as the reference, our HPV-16L1 DNA methylation assay achieved 91.7% sensitivity and 59.5% specificity, respectively. The results of the present work demonstrated that HPV-16L1 gene methylation was closely associated with cervical precancerosis and cancer. Moreover, using MS-HRM to detect HPV-16L1 gene methylation may be a powerful assay for the triage of HPV-16-positive females, which could identify patients with high risk of invasive cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene expression profile regulated by the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and estradiol in cervical tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M.; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Díaz-Chávez, José; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra; Üren, Aykut; Çelik, Haydar; McCormick, Matthew; Munguía-Moreno, José A.; Ibarra-Sierra, Eloisa; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; Lambert, Paul F.; Mendoza-Villanueva, Daniel; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M.; Gariglio, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    The HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and 17β-estradiol are important factors for the induction of premalignant lesions and cervical cancer. The study of these factors is crucial for a better understanding of cervical tumorigenesis. Here, we assessed the global gene expression profiles induced by the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and/or 17β-estradiol in cervical tissue of FvB and K14E7 transgenic mice. We found that the most dramatic changes in gene expression occurred in K14E7 and FvB groups treated with 17β-estradiol. A large number of differentially expressed genes involved in the immune response were observed in 17β-estradiol treated groups. The E7 oncoprotein mainly affected the expression of genes involved in cellular metabolism. Our microarray data also identified differentially expressed genes that have not previously been reported in cervical cancer. The identification of genes regulated by E7 and 17β-estradiol, provides the basis for further studies on their role in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:24210110

  15. High Levels of EBV-Encoded RNA 1 (EBER1) Trigger Interferon and Inflammation-Related Genes in Keratinocytes Expressing HPV16 E6/E7

    PubMed Central

    Aromseree, Sirinart; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Pientong, Chamsai; van Eijndhoven, Monique; Ramayanti, Octavia; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Pegtel, D. Michiel; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2017-01-01

    Different types of cells infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can release exosomes containing viral components that functionally affect neighboring cells. Previously, we found that EBV was localized mostly in infiltrating lymphocytes within the stromal layer of cervical lesions. In this study, we aimed to determine effects of exosome-transferred EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) on keratinocytes expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6/E7 (DonorI-HPV16 HFKs). Lipid transfection of in vitro-transcribed EBER1 molecules (ivt EBER1) into DonorI-HPV16 HFKs caused strong induction of interferon (IFN)-related genes and interleukin 6 (IL-6). To gain insights into the physiological situation, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), low passage DonorI-HPV16 HFKs and primary keratinocytes were used as recipient cells for internalization of exosomes from wild-type EBV (wt EBV) or B95-8 EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). qRT-PCR was used to determine the expression of EBER1, HPV16 E6/E7, IFN-related genes and IL-6 in recipient cells. The secretion of inflammatory cytokines was investigated using cytometric bead array. Wt EBV-modified exosomes induced both IFN-related genes and IL-6 upon uptake into moDCs, while exosomes from B95-8 EBV LCLs induced only IL-6 in moDCs. Internalization of EBV–modified exosomes was demonstrated in DonorI-HPV16 HFKs, yielding only EBER1 but not EBER2. However, EBER1 transferred by exosomes did not induce IFN-related genes or IL-6 expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion in DonorI-HPV16 HFKs and primary keratinocytes. EBER1 copy numbers in exosomes from wt EBV-infected LCLs were 10-fold higher than in exosomes from B95-8 LCLs (equal cell equivalent), whereas ivt EBER1 was used at approximately 100-fold higher concentration than in exosomes. These results demonstrated that the induction of IFN-related genes and IL-6 by EBER1 depends on quantity of EBER1 and type of recipient cells. High levels of EBER1 in cervical cells or

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) viral load and persistence of HPV-16 infection in women infected or at risk for HIV.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Julie; Hankins, Catherine; Money, Deborah; Rachlis, Anita; Pourreaux, Karina; Ferenczy, Alex; Coutlée, François

    2008-11-01

    Persistent HPV-16 infection is a marker for risk of progression to high-grade cervical lesions. The predictive value of HPV-16 viral loads for persistent HPV-16 infection was assessed longitudinally in a cohort of 1055 sexually active women. HPV-16 viral loads were measured with real-time PCR targeting the E6 gene in 948 genital specimens collected from 139 women (100 HIV-seropositive, 39 HIV-seronegative). Forty of 139 participants were classified as having persistent HPV-16 infection (lasting more than 12 months) and 27 women had transient infection. CD4 counts were negatively correlated with HPV-16 loads (R=-0.29, p=0.02). In multivariate analysis controlling for age, HIV, race and CD4 counts, peak HPV-16 viral loads (odds ratio (OR) 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.7) and CD4 cell counts (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) were associated with persistence of HPV-16 infection. Women with > or =10(7) HPV-16copies/microg cellular DNA were infected for a longer period of time than women with a lower viral load after controlling for age, CD4 count and HIV status (p=0.01). Higher HPV-16 viral loads were predictive of persistence of HPV-16 infection, a marker risk for potential progression to high-grade pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix.

  17. Analysis of E2 gene integrity in HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from women with cervical pathology

    PubMed Central

    González-Losa, María del R; Puerto-Solis, Marylin; Tenorio Ruiz, Juan; Rosado-López, Ariel I; Hau-Aviles, Oscar; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Cisneros-Cutz, Isidro; Conde-Ferráez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into human cells accompanied by the disruption of the viral genome has been described as a prerequisite for cancer development. This study aimed to investigate E2 gene integrity of HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from infected women with cervical lesions. Forty-two HPV16- and 31 HPV58-positive samples were analysed. E2 integrity was assumed when all fragments covering the E2 gene were amplified with specific polymerase chain reaction primers. Overall, in 59% of the samples, at least one fragment was not amplified in HPV16- (57%) and HPV58-positive samples (61%). Samples from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions had the highest frequency of E2 gene disruptions (73%), followed by samples from low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (63%) and, finally, samples from invasive cervical cancer (35%). Association between the integrity status of the E2 gene, and lesion grade was assessed by the chi-squared test applied to the combined set of viruses (p = 0.6555) or to populations of the same virus type (HPV58, p = 0.3101; HPV16, p = 0.3024). In conclusion, in this study, no association was found between the presence of E2 gene disruptions and the grade of cervical lesions caused by HPV16 and HPV58. PMID:27812600

  18. Analysis of E2 gene integrity in HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from women with cervical pathology.

    PubMed

    González-Losa, María Del R; Puerto-Solis, Marylin; Tenorio Ruiz, Juan; Rosado-López, Ariel I; Hau-Aviles, Oscar; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Cisneros-Cutz, Isidro; Conde-Ferráez, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into human cells accompanied by the disruption of the viral genome has been described as a prerequisite for cancer development. This study aimed to investigate E2 gene integrity of HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from infected women with cervical lesions. Forty-two HPV16- and 31 HPV58-positive samples were analysed. E2 integrity was assumed when all fragments covering the E2 gene were amplified with specific polymerase chain reaction primers. Overall, in 59% of the samples, at least one fragment was not amplified in HPV16- (57%) and HPV58-positive samples (61%). Samples from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions had the highest frequency of E2 gene disruptions (73%), followed by samples from low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (63%) and, finally, samples from invasive cervical cancer (35%). Association between the integrity status of the E2 gene, and lesion grade was assessed by the chi-squared test applied to the combined set of viruses (p = 0.6555) or to populations of the same virus type (HPV58, p = 0.3101; HPV16, p = 0.3024). In conclusion, in this study, no association was found between the presence of E2 gene disruptions and the grade of cervical lesions caused by HPV16 and HPV58.

  19. Nasal Immunization of Mice with Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) Virus-Like Particles or with the HPV-16 L1 Gene Elicits Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Vaginal Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Catherine; Buzoni-Gatel, Dominique; Touzé, Antoine; Bout, Daniel; Coursaget, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) infects the genital tract and is closely associated with the development of cervical cancer. HPV-16 initiates infection at the genital mucosal surface; thus, mucosal immune responses are likely to contribute to defense against HPV-16 infection. However, little information is available regarding the induction of immune responses in the genital tract mucosa. In this study, we evaluated the potential of intranasally administered papillomavirus vaccines to elicit both systemic and vaginal immune responses. HPV-16 virus-like particles (VLPs) produced by self-assembly of L1 protein and the HPV-16 L1 gene cloned into a mammalian expression vector were used as vaccines. Intranasally administered VLPs induced serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and vaginal IgA secretory antibodies. Very weak serum IgG and vaginal IgA responses were found after DNA immunization. Both splenic and vaginal lymphocytes could be activated by intranasal immunization with VLPs and the HPV-16 L1 gene. Activated CD4+ Th1-like T cells were shown to synthesize gamma interferon, and activated CD8+ T cells were demonstrated to be cytotoxic. PMID:10516012

  20. Chitosan nanoparticles as a potential nonviral gene delivery for HPV-16 E7 into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tabarraei, Alijan; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Dinarvand, Meshkat; Kelishadi, Mishar; Ghaemi, Amir; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) were prepared as a carrier for Human papillomavirus type 16 HPV-16) E7 gene and their gene transfection ability were evaluated in vitro. The plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) was used as a reporter gene. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated full binding of CS NPs with the pDNA. The transfection of CS-pEGFP NPs was efficient in CHO cells and the expression of green fluorescent proteins was well observed. The expression of E7 proteins was confirmed under SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis. As a conclusion CS NPs may serve as an effective nonviral carrier for delivery of nucleotides into eukaryotic cells.

  1. Viral load, gene expression and mapping of viral integration sites in HPV16-associated HNSCC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Nadine C.; Huebbers, Christian U.; Kolligs, Jutta; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C.S.; Cornet, Iris; van Lent-Albrechts, Josefa A.; Stegmann, Sander P.A.; Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Carey, Thomas E.; Walline, Heather M.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Hoffmann, Thomas K.; de Winter, Johan; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Speel, Ernst-Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    HPV-related HNSCC generally have a better prognosis than HPV-negative HNSCC. However, a subgroup of HPV-positive tumors with poor prognosis has been recognized, particularly related to smoking, EGFR overexpression and chromosomal instability. Viral integration into the host genome might contribute to carcinogenesis, as is shown for cervical carcinomas. Therefore, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines currently available have been carefully analysed for viral and host genome parameters. The viral integration status, viral load, viral gene expression and the presence of aneusomies was evaluated in the cell lines UD-SCC-2, UM-SCC-047, UM-SCC-104, UPCI:SCC090, UPCI:SCC152, UPCI:SCC154 and 93VU147T. HPV integration was examined using FISH, APOT-PCR and DIPS-PCR. Viral load and the expression of the viral genes E2, E6 and E7 were determined via quantitative PCR. All cell lines showed integration-specific staining patterns and signals indicating transcriptional activity using FISH. APOT- and DIPS-PCR identified integration-derived fusion products in six cell lines, and only episomal products for UM-SCC-104. Despite the observed differences in viral load and the number of viral integration sites, this did not relate to the identified viral oncogene expression. Furthermore, cell lines exhibited EGFR expression, and aneusomy (except UPCI:SCC154). In conclusion, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines showed integrated and/or episomal viral DNA that is transcriptionally active, although viral oncogene expression was independent of viral copy number and the number of viral integration sites. Because these cell lines also contain EGFR expression and aneusomy, which are parameters of poor prognosis, they should be considered suitable model systems for the development of new antiviral therapies. PMID:25082736

  2. Viral load, gene expression and mapping of viral integration sites in HPV16-associated HNSCC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Olthof, Nadine C; Huebbers, Christian U; Kolligs, Jutta; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Cornet, Iris; van Lent-Albrechts, Josefa A; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Carey, Thomas E; Walline, Heather M; Gollin, Susanne M; Hoffmann, Thomas K; de Winter, Johan; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens P; Speel, Ernst-Jan M

    2015-03-01

    HPV-related HNSCC generally have a better prognosis than HPV-negative HNSCC. However, a subgroup of HPV-positive tumors with poor prognosis has been recognized, particularly related to smoking, EGFR overexpression and chromosomal instability. Viral integration into the host genome might contribute to carcinogenesis, as is shown for cervical carcinomas. Therefore, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines currently available have been carefully analyzed for viral and host genome parameters. The viral integration status, viral load, viral gene expression and the presence of aneusomies was evaluated in the cell lines UD-SCC-2, UM-SCC-047, UM-SCC-104, UPCI:SCC090, UPCI:SCC152, UPCI:SCC154 and 93VU147T. HPV integration was examined using FISH, APOT-PCR and DIPS-PCR. Viral load and the expression of the viral genes E2, E6 and E7 were determined via quantitative PCR. All cell lines showed integration-specific staining patterns and signals indicating transcriptional activity using FISH. APOT- and DIPS-PCR identified integration-derived fusion products in six cell lines and only episomal products for UM-SCC-104. Despite the observed differences in viral load and the number of viral integration sites, this did not relate to the identified viral oncogene expression. Furthermore, cell lines exhibited EGFR expression and aneusomy (except UPCI:SCC154). In conclusion, all HPV16-positive HNSCC cell lines showed integrated and/or episomal viral DNA that is transcriptionally active, although viral oncogene expression was independent of viral copy number and the number of viral integration sites. Because these cell lines also contain EGFR expression and aneusomy, which are parameters of poor prognosis, they should be considered suitable model systems for the development of new antiviral therapies.

  3. Targeting of HPV-16+ epithelial cancer cells by TCR gene engineered T cells directed against E6

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lindsey M.; Kwong, Mei Li; Gros, Alena; Stevanović, Sanja; Tran, Eric; Kerkar, Sid; Raffeld, Mark; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-associated epithelial cancers are in principle ideal immunotherapeutic targets, but evidence that T cells specific for these antigens can recognize and kill HPV+ tumor cells is limited. We sought to determine if TCR gene engineered T cells directed against an HPV oncoprotein can successfully target HPV+ tumor cells. Experimental design T cell responses against the HPV-16 oncoproteins were investigated in a patient with an ongoing 22-month disease-free interval after her second resection of distant metastatic anal cancer. T cells genetically engineered to express an oncoprotein-specific TCR from this patient’s tumor-infiltrating T cells were tested for specific reactivity against HPV+ epithelial tumor cells. Results We identified, from an excised metastatic anal cancer tumor, T cells that recognized an HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitope of HPV-16 E6. The frequency of the dominant T cell clonotype from these cells was approximately 400-fold greater in the patient’s tumor than in her peripheral blood. T cells genetically engineered to express the TCR from this clonotype displayed high avidity for an HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitope of HPV-16, and they showed specific recognition and killing of HPV-16+ cervical, and head and neck cancer cell lines. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that HPV-16+ tumors can be targeted by E6-specific TCR gene engineered T cells, and they provide the foundation for a novel cellular therapy directed against HPV-16+ malignancies including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal, vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancers. PMID:26429982

  4. The transcriptional regulator gene E2 of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 influences the radiosensitivity of cervical keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical studies have demonstrated that HPV induced tumors constitute a specific subclass of cancer with a better response to radiation treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate meaning of viral E2-gene for radiosensitivity. Methods W12 cells contain episomal HPV 16 genomes, whereas S12 cells, which derive from the W12 line, contain HPV DNA as integrated copies. Clonogenic survival was analyzed using 96-well in vitro test. Using flow cytometry cell cycle analyses were performed. Expression of pRb and p53 were analyzed using intracellular staining. Results W12 cells (intact E2 gene) showed a lower survival fraction than S12 cells. W12 cells developed a G2/M block 24 h after irradiation with 2 Gy whereas S12 showed no G2/M bloc. After irradiation S12 cells developed polyploidy and pRb-positive cells decreased. W12 cells showed no change of pRb-positive cells. Conclusions Depending on E2 gene status differences in cell cycle regulation might cause radioresistance. The E2/E7/pRb pathway seems to influence HPV-induced radiosensitivity. Our experiments demonstrated an effect of HPV on radiosensitivity of cervical keratinocytes via viral transcription regulator E2 pathway. PMID:23134732

  5. Depletion of HPV16 early genes induces autophagy and senescence in a cervical carcinogenesis model, regardless of viral physical state.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Jennifer E; Saini, Harpreet K; Murray, Matthew J; Caffarel, Maria M; van Dongen, Stijn; Ward, Dawn; Barker, Emily M; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Stanley, Margaret A; Enright, Anton J; Pett, Mark R; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-11-01

    In cervical carcinomas, high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) may be integrated into host chromosomes or remain extra-chromosomal (episomal). We used the W12 cervical keratinocyte model to investigate the effects of HPV16 early gene depletion on in vitro cervical carcinogenesis pathways, particularly effects shared by cells with episomal versus integrated HPV16 DNA. Importantly, we were able to study the specific cellular consequences of viral gene depletion by using short interfering RNAs known not to cause phenotypic or transcriptional off-target effects in keratinocytes. We found that while cervical neoplastic progression in vitro was characterized by dynamic changes in HPV16 transcript levels, viral early gene expression was required for cell survival at all stages of carcinogenesis, regardless of viral physical state, levels of early gene expression or histology in organotypic tissue culture. Moreover, HPV16 early gene depletion induced changes in host gene expression that were common to both episome-containing and integrant-containing cells. In particular, we observed up-regulation of autophagy genes, associated with enrichment of senescence and innate immune-response pathways, including the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). In keeping with these observations, HPV16 early gene depletion induced autophagy in both episome-containing and integrant-containing W12 cells, as evidenced by the appearance of autophagosomes, punctate expression of the autophagy marker LC3, conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, and reduced levels of the autophagy substrate p62. Consistent with the reported association between autophagy and senescence pathways, HPV16 early gene depletion induced expression of the senescence marker beta-galactosidase and increased secretion of the SASP-related protein IGFBP3. Together, these data indicate that depleting HR-HPV early genes would be of potential therapeutic benefit in all cervical carcinogenesis pathways, regardless of viral

  6. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the HPV 16 E4 gene in cervical lesions from women in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsakogiannis, D; Ruether, I G A; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Pliaka, V; Skordas, V; Gartzonika, C; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Markoulatos, P

    2012-09-01

    The HPV16 E1(∧)E4 protein is thought to contribute to the release of newly formed viral particles from infected epithelia. In order to investigate amino acid mutations in the HPV16 E1(∧)E4 protein, the complete E4 ORF was amplified by PCR in 27 HPV16-positive cervical samples, and the amplicons were cloned. Fifteen nucleic acid variations were identified in the E4 ORF, including seven silent nucleic acid mutations. In addition, nine amino acid mutations (A7V, A7P, L16I, D45E, L59I, L59T, Q66P, S72F, H75Q) were detected in the E1(∧)E4 protein, and these were associated with the severity of cervical malignancy. A maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the E4 ORF, and nucleotide sequence analysis of the E4, E6 and E7 genes from the same samples was conducted in order to determine the phylogenetic origin of the cloned sequences from the amplified HPV16 E4. Based on the nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis it was revealed that even though E4 ORF constitutes a small polymorphic portion of the viral genome (288 bp), it could provide valuable information about the origins of the HPV16 genome. In addition, molecular evolutionary analysis of the E4 coding region revealed that neutral selection is dominant in the overlapping region of the E4 and E2 ORFs.

  7. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena; and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  8. Gene expression patterns induced by HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles in leukocytes from vaccine recipients.

    PubMed

    García-Piñeres, Alfonso J; Hildesheim, Allan; Dodd, Lori; Kemp, Troy J; Yang, Jun; Fullmer, Brandie; Harro, Clayton; Lowy, Douglas R; Lempicki, Richard A; Pinto, Ligia A

    2009-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines were recently licensed. Although neutralizing Ab titers are thought to be the main effectors of protection against infection, early predictors of long-term efficacy are not yet defined and a comprehensive understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccination is still lacking. Here, microarrays were used to compare the gene expression signature in HPV-16 L1 VLP-stimulated PBMCs from 17 vaccine and 4 placebo recipients before vaccination and 1 mo after receiving the second immunization. Vaccination with a monovalent HPV-16 L1 VLP vaccine was associated with modulation of genes involved in the inflammatory/defense response, cytokine, IFN, and cell cycle pathways in VLP-stimulated PBMCs. Additionally, there was up-regulation of probesets associated with cytotoxic (GZMB, TNFSF10) and regulatory (INDO, CTLA4) activities. The strongest correlations with neutralizing Ab titers were found for cyclin D2 (CCND2) and galectin (LGALS2). Twenty-two differentially expressed probesets were selected for confirmation by RT-PCR in an independent sample set. Agreement with microarray data was seen for more than two-thirds of these probesets. Up-regulation of immune/defense response genes by HPV-16 L1 VLP, in particular, IFN-induced genes, was observed in PBMCs collected before vaccination, with many of these genes being further induced following vaccination. In conclusion, we identified important innate and adaptive response-related genes induced by vaccination with HPV-16 L1 VLP. Further studies are needed to identify gene expression signatures of immunogenicity and long-term protection with potential utility in prediction of long-term HPV vaccination outcomes in clinical trials.

  9. Multifocal Epithelial Hyperplasia of Oral Cavity Expressing HPV 16 Gene: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Prabhat, M P V; Raja Lakshmi, Chintamaneni; Sai Madhavi, N; Bhavana, Sujana Mulk; Sarat, Gummadapu; Ramamohan, Kodali

    2013-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare contagious disease caused by human papilloma virus. Usually HPV involves either cutaneous or mucosal surfaces, whereas concomitant mucocutaneous involvement is extremely rare. We report such a unique case of multifocal epithelial hyperplasia involving multiple sites of oral cavity along with skin lesions in a 65-year-old female. We also discuss the probable multifactorial etiology and variable clinical presentations of the lesions, including evidence of HPV 16 expression, as detected by polymerase chain reaction. The present report illustrates the need for careful examination and prompt diagnosis of the disease, as it might be associated with high risk genotypes such as HPV 16 and 18.

  10. Multifocal Epithelial Hyperplasia of Oral Cavity Expressing HPV 16 Gene: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Prabhat, M. P. V.; Raja Lakshmi, Chintamaneni; Sai Madhavi, N.; Bhavana, Sujana Mulk; Sarat, Gummadapu; Ramamohan, Kodali

    2013-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare contagious disease caused by human papilloma virus. Usually HPV involves either cutaneous or mucosal surfaces, whereas concomitant mucocutaneous involvement is extremely rare. We report such a unique case of multifocal epithelial hyperplasia involving multiple sites of oral cavity along with skin lesions in a 65-year-old female. We also discuss the probable multifactorial etiology and variable clinical presentations of the lesions, including evidence of HPV 16 expression, as detected by polymerase chain reaction. The present report illustrates the need for careful examination and prompt diagnosis of the disease, as it might be associated with high risk genotypes such as HPV 16 and 18. PMID:24455323

  11. Expression of cellular genes in HPV16-immortalized and cigarette smoke condensate-transformed human endocervical cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Nakao, Y; Pater, M M; Tang, S C; Pater, A

    1997-09-01

    We studied the molecular mechanism of successive multistep cervical carcinogenic progression with our previously established in vitro model system. This system was composed of primary human endocervical cells (HEN), two lines of HEN immortalized by HPV16 and their counterparts subsequently malignantly transformed by cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). The expression was examined of diverse cellular genes associated with oncogenesis and senescence, especially for cervical cancer. Consistent results were seen for the pairs of immortalized and malignantly transformed lines. Immortalization of HEN by HPV16 resulted in enhanced expression of H-ras, c-myc, B-myb, p53, p16INK4 and PCNA mRNA; enhanced expression of p16 and PCNA proteins; decreased expression of WAF1/p21/Cip1/Sid1 and fibronectin mRNA; and decreased p53 protein. On the other hand, the CSC-transformed counterparts of HPV16-immortalized cells had up-regulated levels of B-myb, p53 and WAF1 mRNA and p53 protein. Our results indicate that the differential activation or inactivation of multiple cellular genes is important for the immortalization, as well as the transformation, of human cervical cells. Further, we suggest that our in vitro model system is useful for investigating the molecular mechanism of multistep cervical carcinogenesis.

  12. Sites of disruption within E1 and E2 genes of HPV16 and association with cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Tsakogiannis, D; Gortsilas, P; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Ruether, I G A; Dimitriou, T G; Orfanoudakis, G; Markoulatos, P

    2015-11-01

    Integration of HPV16 DNA into the host chromosome usually disrupts the E1 and/or E2 genes. The present study investigated the disruption of E1, E2 genes in a total of eighty four HPV16-positive precancerous and cervical cancer specimens derived from Greek women (seventeen paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies and sixty seven Thin Prep samples). Complete E2 and E1 genes were amplified using three and nine overlapping primer sets respectively, in order to define the sites of disruption. Extensive mapping analysis revealed that disruption/deletion events within E2 gene occurred in high grade and cervical cancer samples (x(2) test, P < 0.01), while no evidence of E2 gene disruption was documented among low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias. In addition, disruptions within the E1 gene occur both in high and low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This leads to the assumption that in low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias only E1 gene disruption was involved (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.05), while in high grade malignancies and cervical cancer cases deletions in both E1 and E2 genes occurred. Furthermore, the most prevalent site of disruption of E1 gene was located between nucleotides 1059 and 1323, while the most prevalent deleted region of the E2 gene was located between nucleotides 3172 and 3649 (E2 hinge region). Therefore, it is proposed that each population has its own profile of frequencies and sites of disruptions and extensive mapping analysis of E1 and E2 genes is mandatory in order to determine suitable markers for HPV16 DNA integration analysis in distinct populations.

  13. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types, viral load and physical status of HPV16 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma from the South Swedish Health Care Region.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Eldenhed Alwan, Erika; Roslin, Alexander; Wennerberg, Johan; Forslund, Ola

    2016-11-01

    Incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is rising in several countries. Intriguingly, large variations of HPV16 viral load and different proportions of the physical viral status among HNSCC have been reported. We analysed fresh biopsies of 275 HNSCC patients from the South Swedish Health Care Region for HPV types with modified general primer PCR and Luminex. Seventy-eight HPV16-positive HNSCC cases were further investigated for viral DNA load and physical status using quantitative PCR for HPV E2 and E7 genes. Presence of intact E2 gene, as a surrogate marker for episomal HPV, was investigated with conventional PCR. Fifteen different HPV types were detected in HNSCC cases and HPV16 was present in 74 % of the HPV-positive cases. HPV was detected in 65 % (92/141) and 11 % (15/134) of oropharyngeal and non-oropharyngeal carcinomas, respectively (P<0.0001). HPV was detected in 73 % (75/103) of tonsillar carcinomas. The median load of HPV16 was 13 copies cell-1 (range 0.003-1080). Among HPV16-positive patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, metastases to regional lymph nodes were observed in 100 % (17/17) and 68 % (40/58) for those with <1 HPV16 copy cell-1 and >1 HPV16 copy cell-1, respectively (P=0.007). Among HPV16 cases, purely integrated HPV16 was found in 6 %, whereas entirely episomal and mixed virus was detected in 51 and 42 % of cases, respectively. Conclusively, HPV16 viral DNA load demonstrated a large diversity among HNSCCs. Although integration of HPV16 is common (48 %), the episomal HPV16 is salient (93 %) among HPV16 HNSCCs. In addition, low amount of HPV16 was associated with lymph node metastases among oropharyngeal carcinomas.

  14. A higher degree of methylation of the HPV 16 E6 gene is associated with a lower likelihood of being diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J.; Macaluso, Maurizio; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Chen, Min; Badiga, Suguna; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Partridge, Edward E; Johanning, Gary L

    2010-01-01

    Background Even though HPV 16 is the most common HPV genotype associated with cancerous lesions of the cervix, only a fraction of HPV 16 infected women are diagnosed with pre-cancerous lesions of the cervix. Therefore, molecular changes in HPV 16 rather than infections per se may serve as better screening or diagnostic biomarkers. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether methylation status of specific regions of the HPV E6 gene promoter and enhancer is independently associated with the likelihood of being diagnosed with higher grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+). Methods The study included 75 HPV 16 positive women diagnosed with CIN 2+ or ≤ CIN 1. Pyrosequencing technology was applied to quantify methylation at 6 cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites of the HPV 16 E6 promoter and enhancer. CIN 2+ (yes/no) was the dependent variable in logistic regression models that specified the degree of methylation of the CpG sites of the HPV 16 E6 gene as the primary independent predictors. All models were adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, known risk factors for cervical cancer and circulating concentrations of “cancer-protective” micronutrients. Results The odds of being diagnosed with CIN 2+ was 79% lower when the degree of methylation of the HPV 16 enhancer and promoter sites were ≥9.5% (OR= 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06–0.79; P=0.02). Conclusions Results suggested that CpG methylation is independently involved in the biology of HPV-16 as well as in the development of higher grades of CIN. PMID:20945322

  15. Polymorphism in exon 4 of TP53 gene associated to HPV 16 and 18 in Mexican women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Hernández-Hernández, Dulce María; Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; González-Herrera, Ana Lilia; Rodea-Avila, Carlos; Apresa-García, Teresa; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Vázquez-Ortíz, Guelaguetza; Mendoza-Lorenzo, Patricia; Dueñas-González, Alfonso; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2011-12-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer in Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary but not sufficient for CC development. Furthermore, genetic factors as polymorphisms could be important susceptibility factors. Controversial results regarding TP53 polymorphisms specifically in codon 72 of CC have been reported. In the present work, the exon 4 sequence of TP53 gene in CC and healthy Mexican-mestizo women were analyzed. A group of 111 women with CC and 126 healthy women (control) were included. Peripheral blood cells for polymorphism analysis and cervical scrape for HPV detection were used. PCR of exon 4 of TP53 were subjected to denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis and sequencing. HPV detection was subjected to PCR and sequencing. The statistical analysis was carried out using the Arlequin software. Codon 72 Arg/Arg was the most common SNP detected, and Hardy-Weinberg analysis showed equilibrium in control and CC samples (P>0.05). Wild type sequence of TP53 exon 4 was detected in 66 and 57% in control and CC samples, respectively. For codon 72 Arg/Arg, differences between control and CC women were found (P=0.043). An association between HPV 16/18 infection and 72 Arg/Arg in woman with CC was found (P=0.026). Haplotype GC (codon 36 and 72) was statistically significantly associated with CC (P=0.011). HPV 16 was the most common viral type. Codon 72 Arg/Arg is the most common polymorphism in the Mexican population and could be associated to HPV 16 and/or HPV 18 infection in CC.

  16. Antitumor efficacy of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles encoding mutated HPV16 E6 and E7 genes.

    PubMed

    Cassetti, M Cristina; McElhiney, Sue P; Shahabi, Vafa; Pullen, Jeffrey K; Le Poole, I Caroline; Eiben, Gretchen L; Smith, Larry R; Kast, W Martin

    2004-01-02

    An effective vaccine for treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated malignancies such as cervical cancer should elicit strong T cell-mediated immunity (CMI) against the E6 and/or E7 proteins necessary for the malignant state. We have developed Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon particle (VRP) vaccines encoding the HPV16 E6 and E7 genes and tested their immunogenicity and antitumor efficacy. The E6 and E7 genes were fused to create one open reading frame and mutated at four or at five amino acid positions to inactivate their oncogenic potential. VRP encoding mutant or wild type E6 and E7 proteins elicited comparable cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to an immunodominant E7(49-57) epitope and generated comparable antitumor responses in several HPV16 E6(+)E7(+) tumor challenge models: protection from either C3 or TC-1 tumor challenge was observed in 100% of VRP-vaccinated mice. Eradication of C3 tumors was observed in approximately 90% of mice following therapeutic VRP vaccination. Eradication of HLF16 tumors lacking the E7(49-57) epitope was observed in 90% of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A(*)0201 transgenic mice following therapeutic VRP vaccination. Finally, the predicted inactivation of E6 and E7 oncogenic potential was confirmed by demonstrating normal levels of both p53 and retinoblastoma proteins in human mammary epithelial cells (MEC) infected with VRP expressing mutant E6 and E7 genes. These promising results support the continued development of mutant E6 and E7 VRP as safe and effective candidates for clinical evaluation against HPV-associated disease.

  17. GSK3β mediates the carcinogenic effect of HPV16 in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cuiling; Zeng, Chenglong; Jin, Liang; Yang, Yang; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Liangfeng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most prevalent and fatal cancers among women and infection of the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor. This study investigated how HPV16 regulated GSK3β expression and function to promote cervical cancers. The expression of GSK3β was analyzed by quantitative PCR and western blot. The proliferation, invasion, and clonogenic survival of cells with different E6/E7 levels were measured by MTT, transwell invasion assays, and soft agar colony-forming assays, respectively. The levels of GSK3β were correlated with the copy numbers and expression levels of HPV16 E6/E7 genes. HPV16 E6/E7 genes regulated GSK3β transcription through an element located in the promoter 85 and 250 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. The abilities of cell proliferation, invasion, and clonogenic survival were increased in C33A cells by ectopic HPV16 E6/E7 and decreased in CaSki cells by knocking down HPV16 E6/E7 levels. Meanwhile, LiCl increased GSK3β transcript levels and the proliferation of CaSki cells in a HPV16-dependent manner. These data indicated that GSK3β may participated in HPV16 mediated deregulation of wnt/β-catenin and other signaling pathways promoting the progression and invasion of cervical cancers. PMID:26560046

  18. The Efficacy a DNA Vaccine Containing Inserted and Replicated Regions of the E7 Gene for Treatment of HPV 16 Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Joeli A.; Xu, Xuemei; Kast, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    A majority of cervical cancers are associated with HPV-16. A DNA vaccine (E7IR) was designed for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of HPV-16+ tumors containing two repeats of the E7 gene to inactivate transformation and duplicate available epitopes. Mice were vaccinated then tumor challenged, or challenged and then immunized and monitored for tumor volume and survival. Splenocytes were utilized for in vivo CTL assays. The E7IR vaccine demonstrated decreased tumor volume and enhanced survival in prophylactic and therapeutic experiments and improved CTL mediated lysis. The E7IR vaccine shows promise in prevention of tumor formation and elimination of established tumors. PMID:17241713

  19. The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing inserted and replicated regions of the E7 gene for treatment of HPV-16 induced tumors.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Joeli A; Xu, Xuemei; Kast, W Martin

    2007-04-30

    A majority of cervical cancers are associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-16. A DNA vaccine (E7IR) was designed for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of HPV-16+ tumors containing two repeats of the E7 gene to inactivate transformation and duplicate available epitopes. Mice were vaccinated then tumor challenged, or challenged and then immunized and monitored for tumor volume and survival. Splenocytes were utilized for in vivo CTL assays. The E7IR vaccine demonstrated decreased tumor volume and enhanced survival in prophylactic and therapeutic experiments and improved CTL-mediated lysis. The E7IR vaccine shows promise in prevention of tumor formation and elimination of established tumors.

  20. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells.

    PubMed

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena; Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy Omar; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants.

  1. Optimization of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 expression in plants: comparison of the suitability of different HPV-16 L1 gene variants and different cell-compartment localization.

    PubMed

    Maclean, J; Koekemoer, M; Olivier, A J; Stewart, D; Hitzeroth, I I; Rademacher, T; Fischer, R; Williamson, A-L; Rybicki, E P

    2007-05-01

    Virus-like particle-based vaccines for high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) appear to have great promise; however, cell culture-derived vaccines will probably be very expensive. The optimization of expression of different codon-optimized versions of the HPV-16 L1 capsid protein gene in plants has been explored by means of transient expression from a novel suite of Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary expression vectors, which allow targeting of recombinant protein to the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or chloroplasts. A gene resynthesized to reflect human codon usage expresses better than the native gene, which expresses better than a plant-optimized gene. Moreover, chloroplast localization allows significantly higher levels of accumulation of L1 protein than does cytoplasmic localization, whilst ER retention was least successful. High levels of L1 (>17% total soluble protein) could be produced via transient expression: the protein assembled into higher-order structures visible by electron microscopy, and a concentrated extract was highly immunogenic in mice after subcutaneous injection and elicited high-titre neutralizing antibodies. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a human codon-optimized gene linked to a chloroplast-targeting signal expressed L1 at levels up to 11% of the total soluble protein. These are the highest levels of HPV L1 expression reported for plants: these results, and the excellent immunogenicity of the product, significantly improve the prospects of making a conventional HPV vaccine by this means.

  2. The relationship between the antitumor effect of the IL-12 gene therapy and the expression of Th1 cytokines in an HPV16-positive murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    García Paz, Flor; Madrid Marina, Vicente; Morales Ortega, Ausencio; Santander González, Abimelec; Peralta Zaragoza, Oscar; Burguete García, Ana; Torres Poveda, Kirvis; Moreno, José; Alcocer González, Juan; Hernandez Marquez, Eva; Bermúdez Morales, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of IL-12 expressed in plasmid on the Th1 cytokine profile in an experimental HPV16-positive murine tumor model and the association with the IL-12's antitumor effect. Mice were injected with BMK-16/myc cells to establish HPV16-positive tumor and then pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid; pcDNA3 plasmid or PBS was injected directly into tumor site. The antitumor effect of the treatment was evaluated and the cytokines expression profile in each tumor tissue was analyzed. Treatment with pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid had a significant antitumor effect, and a Th2-Th3-type cytokines prolife was detected in the murine tumor model with expression of the cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. However, after the tumor was treated with three intratumoral injections of plasmid containing IL-12 cDNA, it showed a cytokine profile associated with Th1 with expression of IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ cytokines and reduced expression of IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. The treatment with the IL-12 gene in the experimental HPV16-positive tumor model promoted the activation of the cellular immune response via expression of a Th1-type cytokine profile and was associated with the inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, IL-12 treatment represents a novel approach for gene therapy against cervical cancer.

  3. Using the omega leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus to transform tomato fruits with the papillomavirus hpv16 L1 gene to enhance production of the antigenic protein HPV16 L11.

    PubMed

    Salyaev, R K; Rekoslavskaya, N I; Stolbikov, A S; Tret'yakova, A V

    2016-05-01

    To enhance translation of the L1 protein antigen of the oncogenic human papillomavirus type HPV16 L1, the Ω sequence of the 5'-untranslated region of tobacco mosaic virus was inserted into a genetic construct as an enhancer. To transform plants, A. tumefaciens EHA105 cells were transfected with this construct. After the genetic transformation, the HPV16 L1 protein antigen was detected in tomato fruit in amounts of 287-2330 ng per 1 mg total soluble protein, which significantly exceeds the amount of the protein antigen obtained in our previous studies without using the omega leader sequence.

  4. Prevalence of HPV and variation of HPV 16/HPV 18 E6/E7 genes in cervical cancer in women in South West China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijuan; Yang, Hongying; Wu, Kun; Shi, Xinan; Ma, Shaohui; Sun, Qiangming

    2014-11-01

    Genetic variations of High-Risk HPV E6/E7 may be associated with the development of cervical cancer in specific geographic regions. Few data have been reported about the HPV prevalence and E6/E7 variants among cervical cancer patients in Southwest China. This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of HPV and E6/E7 variants of most prevalent HPV among cervical cancer patients in Southwest China. After genotyping, E6/E7 genes of most prevalent HR HPV samples were sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic trees were then constructed, followed by an analysis of the diversity of secondary structure and selection pressures. HPV 16 (73.8%) and HPV 18 (16.4%) are the most prevalent infection types among cervical cancer patients, followed by HPV 58, HPV 56 and HPV 59, which is different from the high HPV 58 infection rate of outpatients in this region. Eighteen single nucleotide changes were observed in HPV 16 E6 with 13/18 non-synonymous mutations (5 in beta sheet and 2 in alpha helix). Ten single nucleotide changes were identified among HPV 16 E7 with 3/10 non-synonymous mutations. Three single nucleotide changes were observed in HPV 18 E6 with one non-synonymous mutation, and only one synonymous mutation was identified in HPV 18 E7. HPV 16 E6-D25E, E7-N29S and E7-T846C (S95S) exhibited a prevalent linkage mutation. The phylogenetic tree demonstrates that European and Asian lineages were the main patterns. This study may help understand the intrinsic geographical relatedness and oncogenic potential of HR HPV and contributes further to research of diagnostic, therapeutic and therapeutic vaccine strategy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Polymorphisms in TP53 (rs1042522), p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566) genes in Thai cervical cancer patients with HPV 16 infection.

    PubMed

    Chansaenroj, Jira; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Junyangdikul, Pairoj; Swangvaree, Sukumarn; Karalak, Anant; Chinchai, Teeraporn; Poovorawan, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The risk of cervical cancer development in women infected with HPV varies in relation to the individual host's genetic makeup. Many studies on polymorphisms as genetic factors have been aimed at analyzing associations with cervical cancer. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3 genes were investigated in relation to cervical cancer progression in HPV16 infected women with lesions. Two thousand cervical specimens were typed by PCR sequencing methods for TP53 (rs1042522), p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566). Ninety two HPV16 positive cases and thirty two normal cases were randomly selected. Analysis of TP53 (rs1042522) showed a significantly higher frequency in cancer samples (OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.004-1.481, p-value=0.016) while differences in frequency were not significant within each group (p-value=0.070). The genotype distributions of p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566) did not show any significantly higher frequency in cancer samples (p-value=0.106, 0.675 and 0.132, respectively) or within each group (p-value=0.347, 0.939 and 0.111, respectively). The results indicated that the polymorphism in TP53 (rs1042522) might be associated with risk of cervical cancer development in HPV16 infected women. Further studies of possible mechanisms of influence on cervical cancer development would be useful to manage HPV infected patients.

  6. Rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18 by multiplex nested PCR-immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Bin; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are known to be high-risk viruses that cause cervical cancer. An HPV rapid testing kit that could help physicians to make early and more informed decisions regarding patient care is needed urgently but not yet available. This study aimed to develop a multiplex nested polymerase chain reaction-immunochromatographic test (PCR-ICT) for the rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18. A multiplex nested PCR was constructed to amplify the HPV 16 and 18 genotype-specific L1 gene fragments and followed by ICT which coated with antibodies to identify rapidly the different PCR products. The type-specific gene regions of high-risk HPV 16 and 18 could be amplified successfully by multiplex nested PCR at molecular sizes of approximately 99 and 101bp, respectively. The capture antibodies raised specifically against the moleculars labeled on the PCR products could be detected simultaneously both HPV 16 and 18 in one strip. Under optimal conditions, this PCR-ICT assay had the capability to detect HPV in a sample with as low as 100 copies of HPV viral DNA. The PCR-ICT system has the advantage of direct and simultaneous detection of two high-risk HPV 16 and 18 DNA targets in one sample, which suggested a significant potential of this assay for clinical application.

  7. The Relationship between the Antitumor Effect of the IL-12 Gene Therapy and the Expression of Th1 Cytokines in an HPV16-Positive Murine Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    García Paz, Flor; Madrid Marina, Vicente; Morales Ortega, Ausencio; Santander González, Abimelec; Peralta Zaragoza, Oscar; Burguete García, Ana; Torres Poveda, Kirvis; Moreno, José; Alcocer González, Juan; Hernandez Marquez, Eva; Bermúdez Morales, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of IL-12 expressed in plasmid on the Th1 cytokine profile in an experimental HPV16-positive murine tumor model and the association with the IL-12's antitumor effect. Methods. Mice were injected with BMK-16/myc cells to establish HPV16-positive tumor and then pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid; pcDNA3 plasmid or PBS was injected directly into tumor site. The antitumor effect of the treatment was evaluated and the cytokines expression profile in each tumor tissue was analyzed. Results. Treatment with pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid had a significant antitumor effect, and a Th2-Th3-type cytokines prolife was detected in the murine tumor model with expression of the cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. However, after the tumor was treated with three intratumoral injections of plasmid containing IL-12 cDNA, it showed a cytokine profile associated with Th1 with expression of IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ cytokines and reduced expression of IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. Conclusions. The treatment with the IL-12 gene in the experimental HPV16-positive tumor model promoted the activation of the cellular immune response via expression of a Th1-type cytokine profile and was associated with the inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, IL-12 treatment represents a novel approach for gene therapy against cervical cancer. PMID:24808638

  8. AKT1 loss correlates with episomal HPV16 in vulval intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ekeowa-Anderson, Arucha L; Purdie, Karin J; Gibbon, Karen; Byrne, Carolyn R; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Harwood, Catherine A; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L

    2012-01-01

    Anogenital malignancy has a significant association with high-risk mucosal alpha-human papillomaviruses (alpha-PV), particularly HPV 16 and 18 whereas extragenital SCC has been linked to the presence of cutaneous beta and gamma-HPV types. Vulval skin may be colonised by both mucosal and cutaneous (beta-, mu-, nu- and gamma-) PV types, but there are few systematic studies investigating their presence and their relative contributions to vulval malignancy. Dysregulation of AKT, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in several cancers. Mucosal HPV types can increase AKT phosphorylation and activity whereas cutaneous HPV types down-regulate AKT1 expression, probably to weaken the cornified envelope to promote viral release. We assessed the presence of mucosal and cutaneous HPV in vulval malignancy and its relationship to AKT1 expression in order to establish the corresponding HPV and AKT1 profile of normal vulval skin, vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and vulval squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC). We show that HPV16 is the principle HPV type present in VIN, there were few detectable beta types present and AKT1 loss was not associated with the presence of these cutaneous HPV. We show that HPV16 early gene expression reduced AKT1 expression in transgenic mouse epidermis. AKT1 loss in our VIN cohort correlated with presence of high copy number, episomal HPV16. Maintained AKT1 expression correlated with low copy number, an increased frequency of integration and increased HPV16E7 expression, a finding we replicated in another untyped cohort of vSCC. Since expression of E7 reflects tumour progression, these findings suggest that AKT1 loss associated with episomal HPV16 may have positive prognostic implications in vulval malignancy.

  9. HSP70 and modified HPV 16 E7 fusion gene without the addition of a signal peptide gene sequence as a candidate therapeutic tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jinbao; Wang, Changyuan; Wang, Qingyong; Peng, Qinglin; Xu, Yufei; Xie, Xixiu; Xu, Xuemei

    2013-12-01

    Millions of women are currently infected with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), which is considered to be a major risk factor for cervical cancer. Thus, it is urgent to develop therapeutic vaccines to eliminate the established infections or HPV-related diseases. In the present study, using the mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 (MtHSP70) gene linked to the modified HPV 16 E7 (mE7) gene, we generated two potential therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines, mE7/MtHSP70 and SigmE7/MtHSP70, the latter was linked to the signal peptide gene sequence of human CD33 at the upstream of the fusion gene. We found that vaccination with the mE7/MtHSP70 DNA vaccine induced a stronger E7-specific CD8+ T cell response and resulted in a more significant therapeutic effect against E7-expressing tumor cells in mice. Our results demonstrated that HSP70 can play a more important role in mE7 and MtHSP70 fusion DNA vaccine without the help of a signal peptide. This may facilitate the use of HSP70 and serve as a significant reference for future study.

  10. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Variants and Genetic Diversity in the L1 Gene and Long Control Region of HPV16, HPV31, and HPV58 Found in North-East Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel, Ana Pavla Almeida Diniz; Chagas, Bárbara Simas; do Amaral, Carolina Medeiros; Nascimento, Kamylla Conceição Gomes; Leal, Lígia Rosa Sales; Silva Neto, Jacinto da Costa; Cartaxo Muniz, Maria Tereza; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study showed the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) variants as well as nucleotide changes within L1 gene and LCR of the HPV16, HPV31, and HPV58 found in cervical lesions of women from North-East Brazil. PMID:25793187

  11. Mutation of the endogenous p53 gene in cells transformed by HPV-16 E7 and EJ c-ras confers a growth advantage involving an autocrine mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, J W; Benchimol, S

    1994-01-01

    Rat embryo fibroblasts transformed with the HPV-16 E7 gene and the activated c-H-ras gene fall into two distinct phenotypic classes. At high cell density, clones of one class form colonies in methylcellulose supplemented with low serum; at low cell density, these cells display responsiveness to mitogenic factors present in serum-free conditioned medium from rat embryo fibroblasts. In contrast, clones of the second class exhibit an absolute dependency on growth factors present in serum at all cell densities in the methylcellulose colony assay and fail to respond to conditioned medium. We find that the status of the endogenous p53 gene is tightly correlated with these two classes of clones. Clones of the first class contain missense mutations in the p53 gene and have lost the wild-type allele. Clones of the second class express wild-type p53 protein. The importance of mutant p53 expression in reducing the growth factor dependency of transformed clones was confirmed in a separate series of experiments in which rat embryo fibroblasts were transformed with three genes, E7 + ras + mutant p53. The growth behaviour of these triply transfected clones was similar to that of the E7 + ras clones expressing endogenous mutant p53. We demonstrate that the enhanced proliferation of E7 + ras clones expressing mutant p53 protein involves an autocrine mechanism. Images PMID:8131742

  12. Chemotherapy, IL-12 gene therapy and combined adjuvant therapy of HPV 16-associated MHC class I-proficient and -deficient tumours.

    PubMed

    Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Tána; Vonka, Vladimír; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elzbieta; Reinis, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Moderately immunogenic HPV 16-associated murine tumour cell line mimicking human HPV 16-associated neoplasms TC-1 (MHC class I(+)) and its variants, TC-1/P3C10 and TC-1/A9, with a marked down-regulation of MHC I molecules, were used to examine the effect of local interleukin 12 (IL-12) gene therapy for the treatment of early tumour transplants and minimal residual tumour disease obtained after cytoreductive chemotherapy (CMRTD). Experiments were designed to examine whether down-regulation of MHC class I molecules plays a role during chemotherapy and gene therapy of early tumour transplants. It was found that peritumoral administration of IL-12-producing tumour cell vaccines (single dose, day 8 after tumour cell administration) inhibited the growth of both TC-1 (MHC class I positive) tumours and their MHC class I-deficient variants. To investigate the antitumour effects in a clinically relevant setting, IL-12 gene therapy was utilised for the treatment of minimal residual tumour disease after cytoreductive chemotherapy. Intra-peritoneal treatment of tumour-bearing mice with ifosfamide derivative, CBM-4A, produced a significant tumour-inhibitory effect. This treatment was followed by peritumoral s.c. administration of genetically modified TC-1 (MHC class I positive) or MK16/I/IIIABC (MHC class I negative) vaccines producing IL-12 (single dose, day 7 after chemotherapy) or with recombinant interleukin 12 (rIL-12) in two cycles of 5 daily doses (days 8-19) after chemotherapy. This combined therapy significantly inhibited the growth of TC-1 and TC-1/A9 (MHC class I-) tumours. When the combined therapy of TC-1 (MHC class I positive) tumours was followed by peritumoral administration of bone marrow dendritic cell (BMDC) vaccines, the IL-12-mediated inhibitory effect was significantly boosted. In the next set of experiments, the impacts of chemotherapy and IL-12 adjuvant therapy on MHC class I surface expression were assessed. Chemotherapy and gene therapy of tumours led

  13. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 each complement the Ad5 helper gene set, increasing rAAV2 and wt AAV2 production.

    PubMed

    Cao, M; Zhu, H; Bandyopadhyay, S; You, H; Hermonat, P L

    2012-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is a popular vector for human gene therapy, because of its safety record and ability to express genes long term. Yet large-scale recombinant (r) AAV production remains problematic because of low particle yield. The adenovirus (Ad) and herpes (simplex) virus helper genes for AAV have been widely used and studied, but the helper genes of human papillomavirus (HPV) have not. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 help wild-type (wt) AAV productive infection in differentiating keratinocytes, however, HEK293 cells are the standard cell line used for generating rAAV. Here we demonstrate that the three HPV genes were unable to stimulate significant rAAV replication in HEK293 cells when used alone. However, when used in conjunction (complementation) with the standard Ad5 helper gene set, E1, E2 and E6 were each capable of significantly boosting rAAV DNA replication and virus particle yield. Moreover, wt AAV DNA replication and virion yield were also significantly boosted by each HPV gene along with wt Ad5 virus co-infection. Mild-to-moderate changes in rep- and cap-encoded protein levels were evident in the presence of the E1, E2 and E6 genes. Higher wt AAV DNA replication was not matched by similar increases in the levels of rep-encoded protein. Moreover, although rep mRNA was upregulated, cap mRNA was upregulated more. Higher virus yields did correlate most consistently with increased Rep52-, VP3- and VP-related 21/31 kDa species. The observed boost in wt and rAAV production by HPV genes was not unexpected, as the Ad and HPV helper gene sets do not seem to recapitulate each other. These results raise the possibility of generating improved helper gene sets derived from both the Ad and HPV helper gene sets.

  14. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 each complement the Ad5 helper gene set, increasing rAAV2 and wt AAV2 production

    PubMed Central

    Cao, M.; Zhu, H.; Bandyopadhyay, S; You, H; Hermonat, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is a popular vector for human gene therapy, because of its safety record and ability to express genes long term. Yet large scale recombinant (r)AAV production remains problematic due to low particle yield. The adenovirus (Ad) and herpes (simplex) virus (HSV) helper genes for AAV have been widely used and studied, but the helper genes of human papillomavirus (HPV) have not. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 help wild type (wt) AAV productive infection in differentiating keratinocytes, however HEK293 cells are the standard cell line used for generating rAAV. Here we demonstrate that the three HPV genes were unable to stimulate significant rAAV replication in HEK293 cells when used alone. However, when used in conjunction (complementation) with the standard Ad5 helper gene set, E1, E2 and E6 were each capable of significantly boosting rAAV DNA replication and virus particle yield. Moreover, wt AAV DNA replication and virion yield were also significantly boosted by each HPV gene along with wt Ad5 virus co-infection. Mild to moderate changes in rep- and cap–encoded protein levels were evident in the presence of the E1, E2 and E6 genes. Higher wt AAV DNA replication was not matched by similar increases in the levels of rep-encoded protein. Moreover, while rep mRNA was up-regulated, cap mRNA was up-regulated more. Higher virus yields did correlate most consistently with increased Rep52, VP3 and VP-related 21/31 kDa species. The observed boost in wt and rAAV production by HPV genes was not unexpected, as the Ad and HPV helper gene sets do not seem to recapitulate each other. These results raise the possibility of generating improved helper gene sets derived from both the Ad and HPV helper gene sets. PMID:21850053

  15. HPV-16 E2 gene disruption and sequence variation in CIN 3 lesions and invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix: relation to numerical chromosome abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Graham, D A; Herrington, C S

    2000-01-01

    Aim—To test the hypothesis that, because the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein represses viral early gene transcription, E2 gene sequence variation or disruption could play a part in the induction of the numerical chromosome abnormalities that have been described in squamous cervical lesions. Methods—The integrity and sequence of the E2 gene from 11 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 lesions and 14 invasive squamous cell carcinomas, all of which contained HPV-16, were analysed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The E2 gene was amplified in three overlapping fragments and PCR products sequenced directly. Chromosome abnormalities were identified by interphase cytogenetics using chromosome specific probes for chromosomes 1, 3, 11, 17, 18, and X. Results—E2 gene disruption was present in significantly more invasive carcinomas (eight of 14) than CIN 3 lesions (one of 11) (p = 0.03). No association was found between E2 disruption and the presence of a numerical chromosome abnormality. The E2 gene from the non-disrupted isolates was sequenced and wild-type (n = 5) and variant (n = 11) sequences identified. Variant sequences belonged to European and African classes and contained from one to 15 amino acid substitutions. Although numerical chromosome abnormalities were significantly more frequent in invasive squamous cell carcinoma than CIN 3 (p = 0.04), there was no significant relation between the presence of sequence variation and either histological diagnosis or chromosome abnormality. Conclusions—These data do not support the hypothesis that E2 gene disruption or variation is important in the induction of chromosome imbalance in these lesions. However, there is a relation between E2 gene disruption and the presence of invasive disease. PMID:11040943

  16. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao; Miao, Ji; Zhao, Qinjian

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  17. Expression of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in papillomavirus-positive cells: role of the human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and HPV8 E7 gene products.

    PubMed

    Smola-Hess, Sigrun; Pahne, Jenny; Mauch, Cornelia; Zigrino, Paola; Smola, Hans; Pfister, Herbert J

    2005-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade extracellular matrix. They are involved in cellular proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. MT-1 MMP, a membrane-bound MMP, is expressed in carcinomas of the uterine cervix in vivo. This type of cancer is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Here it was shown that keratinocytes transformed with HPV16 or HPV18 in vitro, and HPV-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines, constitutively expressed MT-1 MMP. Expression of the E7 protein from the mucosal and cutaneous high-risk types HPV16 and HPV8, but not from the cutaneous low-risk type HPV1, was sufficient to induce MT-1 MMP expression in primary human keratinocytes and HaCaT cells. As a consequence, MMP-2 was activated. MT-1 MMP expression might play a role in the HPV life cycle by promoting proliferation of host cells and might contribute to their invasive phenotype during malignant progression.

  18. Comparative study of HPV16 integration in cervical lesions between ethnicities with high and low rates of infection with high-risk HPV and the correlation between integration rate and cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Han, Lili; Maimaitiming, Tuerxunayi; Husaiyin, Sulaiya; Wang, Lin; Wusainahong, Kunduozi; Ma, Chunhua; Niyazi, Mayinuer

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of a high incidence of cervical cancer in populations with a low human papillomavirus (HPV) infection rate is unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the role of HPV16 DNA integration in cervical lesions in women of Han and Uygur ethnicity and to explore the association between viral integration and a high cervical cancer morbidity with a low HPV infection rate. DNA was extracted from the biopsy specimens of cervical lesions of 379 patients of Uygur ethnicity and 464 patients of Han ethnicity, and multiple quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were performed to determine the copy numbers of the HPV16 E2 and E6 genes. The copy number of the HPV16 DNA was evaluated according to the E2/E6 ratio. Among these cases, 122 Uygur and 121 Han specimens were found to be HPV16 positive. In the two populations, the percentage of cases with HPV16 integration (the sum of integrated-type infection only or a mixture of free-and integrated-type infection) increased with the grade of the cervical lesions (P<0.001). Within groups with the same cervical lesion grade, no significant differences in HPV16 integration were found between women of Uygur and Han ethnicity (rank sum test, P>0.05). No significant differences in the distribution of the HPV16 integration rate according to lesion grade were found in either population (P>0.05). When the two subpopulations were considered as one sample population, the integration rate significantly increased with lesion grade (P=0.02). These results indicate that the integration rate of HPV16 E2 may serve as a molecular biological marker for the development of cervical lesions.

  19. The HPV16 E7 oncoprotein increases the expression of Oct3/4 and stemness-related genes and augments cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; García-Villa, Enrique; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Lagunas-Martínez, Alfredo; Tapia, Jesús Santa-Olalla; Lambert, Paul F; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Gariglio, Patricio

    2016-12-01

    Oct3/4 is a transcription factor involved in maintenance of the pluripotency and self-renewal of stem cells. The E7 oncoprotein and 17β-estradiol (E2) are key factors in cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and E2 on the expression pattern of Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog and Fgf4. We also determined whether the E7 oncoprotein is associated with cell self-renewal. The results showed that Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog and Fgf4 were upregulated by the E7 oncoprotein in vivo and in vitro and implicate E2 in the upregulation of these factors in vivo. We also demonstrated that E7 is involved in cell self-renewal, suggesting that the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein upregulates Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog and Fgf4 expression to maintain the self-renewal capacity of cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of HPV16 E5 produces enlarged nuclei and polyploidy through endoreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Potapova, Tamara A.; Li Shibo; Rankin, Susannah; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2010-09-30

    Anogenital cancers and head and neck cancers are causally associated with infection by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The mechanism by which high-risk HPVs contribute to oncogenesis is poorly understood. HPV16 encodes three genes (HPV16 E5, E6, and E7) that can transform cells when expressed independently. HPV16 E6 and E7 have well-described roles causing genomic instability and unregulated cell cycle progression. The role of HPV16 E5 in cell transformation remains to be elucidated. Expression of HPV16 E5 results in enlarged, polyploid nuclei that are dependent on the level and duration of HPV16 E5 expression. Live cell imaging data indicate that these changes do not arise from cell-cell fusion or failed cytokinesis. The increase in nuclear size is a continual process that requires DNA synthesis. We conclude that HPV16 E5 produces polyploid cells by endoreplication. These findings provide insight into how HPV16 E5 can contribute to cell transformation.

  1. Influence of Physiologic Folate Deficiency on Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16)-harboring Human Keratinocytes in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Suhong; Tang, Ying-Sheng; Khan, Rehana A.; Zhang, Yonghua; Kusumanchi, Praveen; Stabler, Sally P.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Antony, Aśok C.

    2012-01-01

    Although HPV16 transforms infected epithelial tissues to cancer in the presence of several co-factors, there is insufficient molecular evidence that poor nutrition has any such role. Because physiological folate deficiency led to the intracellular homocysteinylation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP-E1) and activated a nutrition-sensitive (homocysteine-responsive) posttranscriptional RNA operon that included interaction with HPV16 L2 mRNA, we investigated the functional consequences of folate deficiency on HPV16 in immortalized HPV16-harboring human (BC-1-Ep/SL) keratinocytes and HPV16-organotypic rafts. Although homocysteinylated hnRNP-E1 interacted with HPV16 L2 mRNA cis-element, it also specifically bound another HPV16 57-nucleotide poly(U)-rich cis-element in the early polyadenylation element (upstream of L2̂L1 genes) with greater affinity. Together, these interactions led to a profound reduction of both L1 and L2 mRNA and proteins without effects on HPV16 E6 and E7 in vitro, and in cultured keratinocyte monolayers and HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts developed in physiological low folate medium. In addition, HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts contained fewer HPV16 viral particles, a similar HPV16 DNA viral load, and a much greater extent of integration of HPV16 DNA into genomic DNA when compared with HPV16-high folate-organotypic rafts. Subcutaneous implantation of 18-day old HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts into folate-replete immunodeficient mice transformed this benign keratinocyte-derived raft tissue into an aggressive HPV16-induced cancer within 12 weeks. Collectively, these studies establish a likely molecular linkage between poor folate nutrition and HPV16 and predict that nutritional folate and/or vitamin-B12 deficiency, which are both common worldwide, will alter the natural history of HPV16 infections and also warrant serious consideration as reversible co-factors in oncogenic transformation of HPV16-infected tissues to cancer

  2. Influence of physiologic folate deficiency on human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16)-harboring human keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Suhong; Tang, Ying-Sheng; Khan, Rehana A; Zhang, Yonghua; Kusumanchi, Praveen; Stabler, Sally P; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Antony, Asok C

    2012-04-06

    Although HPV16 transforms infected epithelial tissues to cancer in the presence of several co-factors, there is insufficient molecular evidence that poor nutrition has any such role. Because physiological folate deficiency led to the intracellular homocysteinylation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP-E1) and activated a nutrition-sensitive (homocysteine-responsive) posttranscriptional RNA operon that included interaction with HPV16 L2 mRNA, we investigated the functional consequences of folate deficiency on HPV16 in immortalized HPV16-harboring human (BC-1-Ep/SL) keratinocytes and HPV16-organotypic rafts. Although homocysteinylated hnRNP-E1 interacted with HPV16 L2 mRNA cis-element, it also specifically bound another HPV16 57-nucleotide poly(U)-rich cis-element in the early polyadenylation element (upstream of L2L1 genes) with greater affinity. Together, these interactions led to a profound reduction of both L1 and L2 mRNA and proteins without effects on HPV16 E6 and E7 in vitro, and in cultured keratinocyte monolayers and HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts developed in physiological low folate medium. In addition, HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts contained fewer HPV16 viral particles, a similar HPV16 DNA viral load, and a much greater extent of integration of HPV16 DNA into genomic DNA when compared with HPV16-high folate-organotypic rafts. Subcutaneous implantation of 18-day old HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts into folate-replete immunodeficient mice transformed this benign keratinocyte-derived raft tissue into an aggressive HPV16-induced cancer within 12 weeks. Collectively, these studies establish a likely molecular linkage between poor folate nutrition and HPV16 and predict that nutritional folate and/or vitamin-B(12) deficiency, which are both common worldwide, will alter the natural history of HPV16 infections and also warrant serious consideration as reversible co-factors in oncogenic transformation of HPV16-infected tissues to cancer.

  3. Influence of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E2 polymorphism on quantification of HPV-16 episomal and integrated DNA in cervicovaginal lavages from women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Naoufel; Brazete, Jessica; Hankins, Catherine; Money, Deborah; Fontaine, Julie; Koushik, Anita; Rachlis, Anita; Pourreaux, Karina; Ferenczy, Alex; Franco, Eduardo; Coutlée, François

    2008-07-01

    Integrated human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) viral loads are currently estimated by quantification with real-time PCR of HPV-16 E6 (RT-E6 and HPV-16 PG) and E2 (RT-E2-1) DNA. We assessed the influence of HPV-16 E2 polymorphism on quantification of integrated HPV-16 DNA in anogenital specimens. HPV-16 E2 was sequenced from 135 isolates (123 from European and 12 from non-European lineages). An assay targeting conserved HPV-16 E2 sequences (RT-E2-2) was optimized and applied with RT-E6 and RT-E2-1 on 139 HPV-16-positive cervicovaginal lavages collected from 74 women [58 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and 16 HIV-seronegative]. Ratios of HPV-16 copies measured with RT-E2-2 and RT-E2-1 obtained with African 2 (median=3.23, range=1.92-3.49) or Asian-American (median=3.78, range=1.47-37) isolates were greater than those obtained with European isolates (median=1.02, range=0.64-1.80; P<0.02 for each comparison). The distribution of HPV-16 E2 copies measured in 139 samples with RT-E2-2 (median=6150) and RT-E2-1 (median=8960) were different (P<0.0001). The risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN-2,3) compared with women without CIN was increased with higher HPV-16 total [odds ratio (OR)=2.17, 95 % confidence interval (CI)=1.11-4.23], episomal (OR=2.14, 95 % CI=1.09-4.19), but not for HPV-16 integrated viral load (OR=1.71, 95 % CI=0.90-3.26), after controlling for age, race, CD4 count, HIV and HPV-16 polymorphism. The proportion of samples with an E6/E2 ratio >2 in women without squamous intraepithelial lesion (7 of 35) was similar to that of women with CIN-2,3 (5 of 11, P=0.24) or CIN-1 (5 of 14, P=0.50). HPV-16 E2 polymorphism was a significant factor that influenced measures of HPV-16 integrated viral load.

  4. HPV16E7-specific siRNA inhibits cell proliferation in CaSki cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-guo; Li, Li; Zhang, Shui-Wen; Wei, Xiaoguang

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the main cause for the genesis of cervical carcinomas. After infection, E6 and E7 genes of HPV were integrated to the genome of the cervical epithelium. Continued expression of the transforming oncoproteins E6 and E7 not only drives the neoplastic progression in cervical epithelium, but also plays an important role in maintaining the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer cells. The aim of this study is to explore the effects of liposomal transfection of HPV16E7 siRNA on the proliferation of cervical carcinoma cell line CaSki. The siRNA interfering HPV16E7 gene was synthesized and transfected into CaSki cells by liposome to observe the cell morphology changes under microscope. The cell proliferation index was detected by flow cytometry; HPV16E7 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR and its protein level was determined by Western blot. After transfection of the CaSki cell by siRNA, cell proliferation was inhibited significantly, and the expression of HPV16E7 mRNA and protein level of HPV16E7 decreased. HPV16E7 siRNA is able to inhibit growth of CaSki cells. HPV16E7 might become a new target for genetic therapy of cervical carcinoma.

  5. Radioimmunotherapy of experimental head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with E6-specific antibody using a novel HPV-16 positive HNSCC cell line.

    PubMed

    Harris, Matthew; Wang, Xing Guo; Jiang, Zewei; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2011-02-12

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide with a poor prognosis. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is associated with 20% HNSCC, and 50% of oropharyngeal carcinoma. HPV16 type is detected in 90% of all HPV+ HNSCC. Recently we suggested a fundamentally different approach to treatment of cancers of viral origin by targeting viral antigens on cancer cells with radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) which promises exquisite specificity of treatment. We aimed at extending this approach to HPV-related head and neck cancer by performing radioimmunotherapy (RIT) targeting E6 and E7 oncogenes with radiolabeled mAbs. We first aimed at developing HPV16+ cell line and animal model for RIT of HNSCC as at present there are no commercially available HPV16+ HNSCC cell lines and there is only one HPV+ cell line among the collection maintained by Dusseldorf, Michigan and Turku groups. Commercially available HNSCC cell line FaDu was transfected with pLXSN16E6E7 vector containing HPV16 E6 and E7 genes. Generated novel cell lines were evaluated by PCR and western blot and the tumorigenecity was assessed in nude mice. Proof of principle RIT targeting E6 oncoprotein in 2A3 tumor-bearing nude mice was conducted using unlabeled or 188-Rhenium (188Re)-labeled C1P5 mAb to E6. Novel HPV16+ 2A3 cell line reliably expressed E6 oncoprotein. E6 expression was modifiable with proteasome inhibitor MG132 in a dose-dependent manner. The levels of E6 expression in 2A3 cell line were estimated to be around 200 HPV copies per cell. The HPV16+ 2A3 cell line preserved 100% tumorigenicity of parent FaDu cells in nude mice. During RIT of 2A3 tumors in nude mice the relatively low dose of 200 μCi 188Re-C1P5 mAb was effective in decreasing the tumor growth in comparison with untreated controls. Unlabeled C1P5 mAb also caused some decrease in tumor progression, however, much less pronounced than 188Re-C1P5 mAb. We describe a proof-of-principle RIT study targeting

  6. Variants of human papillomaviruses 16 (HPV16) in Uigur women in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    He, Hongchang; Li, Hongtao; Fan, Peiwen; Zhu, Junling; Pan, Zhenzhen; Pan, Huan; Wu, Dan; Ren, Xianxian; Guo, Xiaoqing; Li, Dongmei; Pan, Zemin; Shao, Renfu

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infection of high-risk human papillomaviruses 16 (HPV16) has been considered as the leading cause of cervical cancer. In this study we assessed HPV16 sequence variation and genetic diversity of HPV16 variants in cervical cancer in Uigur women in Xinjiang, China. We analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the open reading frames of E6 and E7, and part of the open reading frames of L1 of HPV16 in Uigur women. Biopsies of histologically confirmed HPV16 infections with cervical cancer were obtained from 43 Uigur women in Xinjiang, China. E6, E7 and L1 genes of HPV16 of all samples were amplified and sequenced; the sequences were used in phylogenetic analysis of HPV16 variants. Our analysis revealed nine nucleotide changes in E6 (five changes), E7 (one change) and L1 (three changes) gene. The most frequently observed variations were T350G (79.1 %). One variation T295G (D64E) at E6 were detected in 6 cases (KT959536, KT959542, KT959546, KT959550, KT959553, KT959558). Deletion (464Asp) along with insertion (448Ser) were observed in L1 (100 %). Most variants were European lineage (97.7 %); only one belongs to Asia variants with common T178G (D25E) in E6 and A647G (N29S) in E7. The most prevalent HPV16 variants in the Uigur women we studied were of the European lineage. Our results indicate that HPV16 European lineage may serve as a harmful factor associated with the development and progression of cervical cancer.

  7. The human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) oncoprotein E7 conjugates with and mediates the role of the transforming growth factor-beta inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Shu; Lin, Ching-Hui; Yang, Chien-Hui; Liang, Yuh-Jin; Yu, Winston C Y

    2010-11-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoprotein E7 is a major transforming protein. The E7 protein does not possess intrinsic enzymatic activity, but rather functions through direct and indirect interactions with cellular proteins, several of which are well known cellular tumor suppressors. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that transforming growth factor-beta inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1), a member of the Krüppel-like family (KLF) that has been implicated as a putative tumor suppressor, interacts and forms a specific complex with HPV-16 E7. TIEG1 has been shown to mimic the effects of TGF-beta in various carcinoma cells and plays a critical role in the apoptotic cascade. Our results indicate that E7 binds to the C-terminus of TIEG1 and induces its degradation via the ubiquitin pathway. E7 not only increased the ubiquitination of TIEG1 but also influenced the ability of TIEG1 to affect apoptosis. Our results suggest that suppression of TIEG1-mediated signaling by E7 may contribute to HPV-associated carcinogenesis.

  8. HPV-16 E2 physical status and molecular evolution in vivo in cervical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kahla, Saloua; Kochbati, Lotfi; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis; Maalej, Mongi; Oueslati, Ridha

    2014-03-24

    A key event in the development of cervical carcinoma is the deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) oncogenes, most commonly due to HPV integration into host DNA. Here we explored whether HPV-16 E2 gene integrity is a biomarker of progressive disease with oncogenes expression. HPV-16 genome disruption was assessed by amplification of the entire E2 gene, while mRNA expression patterns of the E1, E2, E6, and E7 genes were evaluated by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). As expected, E2 disruption was significantly higher among patients with cervical cancers than subjects with benign lesions (p=0.02). The status of the E2 gene correlated with tumorogenesis, and seemed also to correlate with the stage of the carcinomas, since integrated HPV-16 DNA was frequently detected in patients with advanced cancer stages (75% of stage III vs 60% stages I and II). In bivariate analysis, the lesions’ grade was most significantly associated with HPV-16 DNA disruption (p<0.05). In cervical carcinoma the deletion pattern involved more frequently the E2 gene rather than the E1 gene (62.5% vs 45.8%). The prevalence of the E6/E7 HPV-16 transcripts in cervical carcinoma specimens and in benign cervical lesions were detected with frequencies of, respectively, 91.6% and 45.4%. The mRNA levels of the HPV-16 E6/E7 genes were expressed at approximately the same levels in each physical state. We consistently observed that E6/E7 were absent or weakly detectable in the presence of E2. However, in the absence of E2 the levels of E6/E7 markedly increased (p<0.05). This study underscores the significance of investigating alternative mechanisms of E2 expression and oncogenes E6/E7 transcripts in vivo as biomarkers for disease severity in cervical carcinomas.

  9. Characterization of the plasma membrane localization and orientation of HPV16 E5 for cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus with an approx 8000 base pair genome. Infection with certain types of HPV is associated with cervical cancer, although the molecular mechanism by which HPV induces carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Three genes encoded by HPV16 are regarded as oncogenic - E5, E6, and E7. The role of E5 has been controversial. Expression of HPV16 E5 causes cell-cell fusion, an event that can lead to increased chromosomal instability, particularly in the presence of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors like HPV16 E6 and E7. Using biochemical and cell biological assays to better understand HPV16 E5, we find that HPV16 E5 localizes to the plasma membrane with an intracellular amino terminus and an extracellular carboxyl-terminus. Further, HPV16 E5 must be expressed on both cells for cell fusion to occur. When the extracellular epitope of HPV16 E5 is targeted with an antibody, the number of bi-nucleated cells decreases.

  10. HPV16 E6 seropositivity among cancer-free men with oral, anal or genital HPV16 infection.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Waterboer, Tim; Campbell, Christine M Pierce; Ingles, Donna J; Kuhs, Krystle A Lang; Nyitray, Alan G; Hildesheim, Allan; Pawlita, Michael; Kreimer, Aimée R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-12-01

    Antibodies against the Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein appear years prior to clinical diagnosis of anal and oropharyngeal cancer, but whether they develop around the time of HPV infection is unclear. Serum samples from 173 cancer-free men from the Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men (HIM) Study were tested for HPV antibodies and DNA. HPV16 E6 seropositivity was low among men with oral HPV16-infection (1/28; 3.6%, 95%CI=0.0%-18.4%), anal HPV16-infection (1/61; 1.6%, 95%CI=0.0%-8.8%), and 24-month persistent genital HPV16-infection (1/84; 1.2%, 0.0-6.5%). This suggests E6 seroconversion may not occur around the time of oral, anal, or genital HPV16 acquisition.

  11. Eight Nucleotide Substitutions Inhibit Splicing to HPV-16 3′-Splice Site SA3358 and Reduce the Efficiency by which HPV-16 Increases the Life Span of Primary Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Cardoso Palacios, Carlos; Mossberg, Anki; Dhanjal, Soniya; Bergvall, Monika; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used 3′-splice site on the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genome named SA3358 is used to produce HPV-16 early mRNAs encoding E4, E5, E6 and E7, and late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. We have previously shown that SA3358 is suboptimal and is totally dependent on a downstream splicing enhancer containingmultiple potential ASF/SF2 binding sites. Here weshow that only one of the predicted ASF/SF2 sites accounts for the majority of the enhancer activity. We demonstrate that single nucleotide substitutions in this predicted ASF/SF2 site impair enhancer function and that this correlates with less efficient binding to ASF/SF2 in vitro. We provide evidence that HPV-16 mRNAs that arespliced to SA3358 interact with ASF/SF2 in living cells. In addition,mutational inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site weakened the enhancer at SA3358 in episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome, indicating that the enhancer is active in the context of the full HPV-16 genome.This resulted in induction of HPV-16 late gene expression as a result of competition from late splice site SA5639. Furthermore, inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site of the SA3358 splicing enhancer reduced the ability of E6- and E7-encoding HPV-16 plasmids to increase the life span of primary keratinocytes in vitro, demonstrating arequirement for an intact splicing enhancer of SA3358 forefficient production of the E6 and E7 mRNAs. These results link the strength of the HPV-16 SA3358 splicing enhancer to expression of E6 and E7 and to the pathogenic properties of HPV-16. PMID:24039800

  12. Differential Methylation of the HPV 16 Upstream Regulatory Region during Epithelial Differentiation and Neoplastic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Vinokurova, Svetlana; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses are squamous epitheliotropic viruses that may cause cervical and other cancers. HPV replication depends on squamous epithelial differentiation. Transformation of HPV-infected cells goes along with substantial alteration of the viral gene expression profile and preferentially occurs at transformation zones usually at the uterine cervix. Methylation of the viral genome may affect regulatory features that control transcription and replication of the viral genome. Therefore, we analyzed the methylation pattern of the HPV16 upstream regulatory region (URR) during squamous epithelial differentiation and neoplastic transformation and analyzed how shifts in the HPV URR methylome may affect viral gene expression and replication. HPV 16 positive biopsy sections encompassing all stages of an HPV infection (latent, permissive and transforming) were micro-dissected and DNA was isolated from cell fractions representing the basal, intermediate, and superficial cell layers, each, as well as from transformed p16INK4a-positive cells. We observed fundamental changes in the methylation profile of transcription factor binding sites in the HPV16 upstream regulatory region linked to the squamous epithelial differentiation stage. Squamous epithelial transformation indicated by p16INK4a overexpression was associated with methylation of the distal E2 binding site 1 leading to hyper-activation of the HPV 16 URR. Adjacent normal but HPV 16-infected epithelial areas retained hyper-methylated HPV DNA suggesting that these viral genomes were inactivated. These data suggest that distinct shifts of the HPV 16 methylome are linked to differentiation dependent transcription and replication control and may trigger neoplastic transformation. PMID:21915330

  13. HPV16 E7 Genetic Conservation Is Critical to Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mirabello, Lisa; Yeager, Meredith; Yu, Kai; Clifford, Gary M; Xiao, Yanzi; Zhu, Bin; Cullen, Michael; Boland, Joseph F; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Nelson, Chase W; Raine-Bennett, Tina; Chen, Zigui; Bass, Sara; Song, Lei; Yang, Qi; Steinberg, Mia; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael; Roberson, David; Mitchell, Jason; Lorey, Thomas; Franceschi, Silvia; Castle, Philip E; Walker, Joan; Zuna, Rosemary; Kreimer, Aimée R; Beachler, Daniel C; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Porras, Carolina; Burk, Robert D; Schiffman, Mark

    2017-09-07

    Although most cervical human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infections become undetectable within 1-2 years, persistent HPV16 causes half of all cervical cancers. We used a novel HPV whole-genome sequencing technique to evaluate an exceptionally large collection of 5,570 HPV16-infected case-control samples to determine whether viral genetic variation influences risk of cervical precancer and cancer. We observed thousands of unique HPV16 genomes; very few women shared the identical HPV16 sequence, which should stimulate a careful re-evaluation of the clinical implications of HPV mutation rates, transmission, clearance, and persistence. In case-control analyses, HPV16 in the controls had significantly more amino acid changing variants throughout the genome. Strikingly, E7 was devoid of variants in precancers/cancers compared to higher levels in the controls; we confirmed this in cancers from around the world. Strict conservation of the 98 amino acids of E7, which disrupts Rb function, is critical for HPV16 carcinogenesis, presenting a highly specific target for etiologic and therapeutic research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. In situ hybridization analysis of HPV 16 DNA sequences in early cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Crum, C. P.; Nagai, N.; Levine, R. U.; Silverstein, S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined 18 cervical intraepithelial neoplasms (CIN) for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences by Southern blot hybridization and DNA-DNA in situ hybridizations for HPV DNA sequences and compared the epithelial distribution of HPV 16 DNA sequences with HPV 6/11 sequences in selected condylomas. Fifteen of the 18 CIN lesions contained HPV 16 DNA as determined by Southern blot hybridization. With the use of biotinylated HPV 16 DNA probes, 10 of the 18 were positive by in situ hybridization, 9 of which were also positive by Southern blot hybridization. In situ hybridization to HPV 16 probes was found primarily in areas of CIN which contained either maturation or koilocytotic atypia, although in two cases hybridizing sequences were detected in superficial cells from epithelium with no discernible maturation. Staining in both condylomas and CIN lesions varied in distribution and intensity. However, in some CIN lesions staining from cell to cell varied considerably. This greater variability in staining appeared to correlate with greater morphologic variations which characterize CIN, and which may influence greater variation in HPV DNA replication. Thus, some differences in patterns of hybridization for HPV DNA between CIN and condylomas may be explained by morphologic differences in the two classes of lesions. Differences in viral gene expression between condylomas and CIN and their relationship to morphologic findings remain to be clarified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2421580

  15. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose HPV16 is associated with ∼50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (∼600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. Experimental Design We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1–2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 µCi 188Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. 188Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic. PMID:20861673

  16. Validation of an HPV16-mediated carcinogenesis mouse model.

    PubMed

    De Azambuja, Katherine; Barman, Provabati; Toyama, Joy; Elashoff, David; Lawson, Gregory W; Williams, Lisa K; Chua, Kristofer; Lee, Deborah; Kehoe, Joseph J; Brodkorb, Andre; Schwiebert, Rebecca; Kitchen, Scott; Bhimani, Aamir; Wiley, Dorothy J

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16) infection is a necessary but alone insufficient cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and likely causes other genital cancers. Individual genetic variability influences the natural history of the neoplasm. Developing a variety of animal models to investigate HPV16-mediated carcinogenesis is important to Phase 1 trials for human cancer treatments. C57BL/6 mice expressing the HPV16-E7 transgene were treated with 100 nmoles of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) on dorsal-thoracolumbar skin for ≤20 weeks. Transgenic-HPV16E7 mice showed more tumors (14.11±1.49 vs. 7.2±0.73) that more quickly reached maximal size (17.53±0.53 vs. 28.75±0.67 weeks) than syngeneic controls. DMBA topically-treated C57BL/6-HPV16E7 mice developed chronic inflammation as well as benign and malignant lesions, many of which ulcerated. Histology showed that the HPV16-E7 transgene more than doubled the effect of complete carcinogenesis against a C57BL/6 background alone, strongly influencing the number, size, and time-to-maximal tumor burden for DMBA-exposed transgenic-C57BL/6 mice. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of an HPV16-mediated Carcinogenesis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Azambuja, Katherine DE; Barman, Provabati; Toyama, Joy; David, Elashoff D; Lawson, Gregory W.; Williams, Lisa K.; Chua, Kristofer; Lee, Deborah; Kehoe, Joseph J.; Brodkorb, Andre; Schwiebert, Rebecca; Kitchen, Scott; Bhimani, Aamir; Wiley, Dorothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16) infection is a necessary but alone insufficient cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and likely causes other genital cancers. Individual genetic variability influences the natural history of neoplasm. Developing a variety of animal models to investigate HPV16-mediated carcinogenesis is important to Phase 1 trials for human cancer treatments. Methods C57BL/6 mice expressing HPV16-E7 transgene were treated with 100 nmoles of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) on dorsal-thoracolumbar skin for ≤20 weeks. Results Transgenic-HPV16E7 mice showed more tumors (14.11 ±1.49 vs. 7.2 ±0.73) that more quickly reached maximal size (17.53 ±0.53 vs. 28.75 ±0.67 weeks) than syngeneic controls. Conclusion DMBA topically-treated C57BL/6-HPV16E7 mice developed chronic inflammation as well as benign and malignant lesions, many of which ulcerated. Histology showed the HPV16-E7 transgene more than doubled the effect of complete carcinogenesis against a C57BL/6 background alone, strongly influencing the number, size, and time to maximal tumor burden for DMBA-exposed transgenic-C57BL/6 mice. PMID:25189887

  18. HPV16 Seropositivity and Subsequent HPV16 Infection Risk in a Naturally Infected Population: Comparison of Serological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Wen; Ghosh, Arpita; Porras, Carolina; Markt, Sarah C.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Wacholder, Sholom; Kemp, Troy J.; Pinto, Ligia A.; Gonzalez, Paula; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Esser, Mark T.; Matys, Katie; Meuree, Ariane; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Several serological assays have been developed to detect antibodies elicited against infections with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16. The association between antibody levels measured by various assays and subsequent HPV infection risk may differ. We compared HPV16-specific antibody levels previously measured by a virus-like particle (VLP)-based direct enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) with levels measured by additional assays and evaluated the protection against HPV16 infection conferred at different levels of the assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Replicate enrollment serum aliquots from 388 unvaccinated women in the control arm of the Costa Rica HPV vaccine trial were measured for HPV16 seropositivity using three serological assays: a VLP-based direct ELISA; a VLP-based competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA); and a secreted alkaline phosphatase protein neutralization assay (SEAP-NA). We assessed the association of assay seropositivity and risk of subsequent HPV16 infection over four years of follow-up by calculating sampling-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and HPV16 seropositivity based on standard cutoff from the cLIA was significantly associated with protection from subsequent HPV16 infection (OR = 0.48, CI = 0.27–0.86, compared with seronegatives). Compared with seronegatives, the highest seropositive tertile antibody levels from the direct ELISA (OR = 0.53, CI = 0.28–0.90) as well as the SEAP-NA (OR = 0.20, CI = 0.06, 0.64) were also significantly associated with protection from HPV16 infection. Conclusions/Significance Enrollment HPV16 seropositivity by any of the three serological assays evaluated was associated with protection from subsequent infection, although cutoffs for immune protection were different. We defined the assays and seropositivity levels after natural infection that better measure and translate to protective immunity. PMID:23301022

  19. Genetic Diversity in the Major Capsid L1 Protein of HPV-16 and HPV-18 in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    King, Audrey J.; Sonsma, Jan A.; Vriend, Henrike J.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Feltkamp, Mariet C.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Intratypic molecular variants of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-16 and -18 exist. In the Netherlands, a bivalent vaccine, composed of recombinant L1 proteins from HPV-16 and -18, is used to prevent cervical cancer since 2009. Long-term vaccination could lead to changes in HPV-16 and -18 virus population, thereby hampering vaccination strategies. We determined the genetic diversity of the L1 gene in HPV-16 and -18 viral strains circulating in the Netherlands at the start of vaccination in order to understand the baseline genetic diversity in the Dutch population. Methods DNA sequences of the L1 gene were determined in HPV-16 (n = 241) and HPV-18 (n = 108) positive anogenital samples collected in 2009 and 2011 among Dutch 16- to 24-year old female and male attendees of the sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics. Phylogenetic analysis was performed and sequences were compared to reference sequences HPV-16 (AF536179) and HPV-18 (X05015) using BioNumerics 7.1. Results For HPV-16, ninety-five single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, twenty–seven (28%) were non-synonymous variations. For HPV-18, seventy-one SNPs were identified, twenty-nine (41%) were non-synonymous. The majority of the non-silent variations were located in sequences encoding alpha helix, beta sheet or surface loops, in particular in the immunodominant FG loop, and may influence the protein secondary structure and immune recognition. Conclusions This study provides unique pre-vaccination/baseline data on the genetic L1 diversity of HPV-16 and -18 viruses circulating in the Netherlands among adolescents and young adults. PMID:27070907

  20. Genetic Diversity in the Major Capsid L1 Protein of HPV-16 and HPV-18 in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    King, Audrey J; Sonsma, Jan A; Vriend, Henrike J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Feltkamp, Mariet C; Boot, Hein J; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2016-01-01

    Intratypic molecular variants of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-16 and -18 exist. In the Netherlands, a bivalent vaccine, composed of recombinant L1 proteins from HPV-16 and -18, is used to prevent cervical cancer since 2009. Long-term vaccination could lead to changes in HPV-16 and -18 virus population, thereby hampering vaccination strategies. We determined the genetic diversity of the L1 gene in HPV-16 and -18 viral strains circulating in the Netherlands at the start of vaccination in order to understand the baseline genetic diversity in the Dutch population. DNA sequences of the L1 gene were determined in HPV-16 (n = 241) and HPV-18 (n = 108) positive anogenital samples collected in 2009 and 2011 among Dutch 16- to 24-year old female and male attendees of the sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics. Phylogenetic analysis was performed and sequences were compared to reference sequences HPV-16 (AF536179) and HPV-18 (X05015) using BioNumerics 7.1. For HPV-16, ninety-five single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, twenty-seven (28%) were non-synonymous variations. For HPV-18, seventy-one SNPs were identified, twenty-nine (41%) were non-synonymous. The majority of the non-silent variations were located in sequences encoding alpha helix, beta sheet or surface loops, in particular in the immunodominant FG loop, and may influence the protein secondary structure and immune recognition. This study provides unique pre-vaccination/baseline data on the genetic L1 diversity of HPV-16 and -18 viruses circulating in the Netherlands among adolescents and young adults.

  1. Anal HPV 16 and 18 viral load: a comparison between HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM and association with persistence.

    PubMed

    Marra, Elske; King, Audrey; van Logchem, Elske; van der Weele, Pascal; Mooij, Sofie H; Heijman, Titia; M Meijer, Chris J L; Verhagen, Dominique W M; van der Sande, Marianne A B; van der Loeff, Maarten F Schim

    2017-07-12

    Objective Does anal HPV viral load explain the difference in anal HPV persistence between HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM)? Methods MSM ≥18 years were recruited in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in 2010-2011. Anal self-swabs were collected every 6 months and genotyped (SPF10 -PCR-DEIA-LIPA25 -system). HPV16 and HPV18 load was determined with a type specific quantitative (q)PCR, and compared between HIV-negative and HIV-positive men using ranksum test. Persistence was defined as ≥3 positive samples for the same HPV-type. Determinants of persistent HPV16/18 infection and its association with HPV16/18 load were assessed with logistic regression. Results Of 777 recruited MSM, 54 and 22 HIV negative men were HPV16 and HPV18 positive at baseline, and 64 and 39 HIV-positive MSM. The geometric mean titer (GMT) of HPV16 was 19.6 (95%CI 10.1-38.0) and of HPV18 8.6 (95%CI 2.7-27.5) DNA copies/ human cell. HPV16 and HPV18 load did not differ significantly between HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM (P = 0.7; P = 0.8, respectively). In multivariable analyses HPV16 load was an independent determinant of HPV16 persistence (OR 1.8, 95%CI 1.3-2.4). Conclusion No difference in anal HPV viral load was found between HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. HPV 16/18 viral load is an independent determinant of type-specific persistence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaccination of full-length HPV16 E6 or E7 protein inhibits the growth of HPV16 associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Li; Qiu, Xu-Hua; Shen, Chen; Liu, Jian-Ning; Zhang, Jing

    2010-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary etiologic agent of cervical cancer. Two HPV16 proteins, E6 and E7, are consistently expressed in tumor cells. Most therapeutic vaccines target one or both of these proteins. Taking the advantages of safety and no human leukocyte antigen restriction, protein vaccine has become the most popular form of HPV therapeutic vaccines. Here we demonstrate that immunization with full-length HPV16 E6 or E7 protein elicited specific immunological effect and inhibition of TC-1 cell growth using TC-1 mouse model. HPV16 E6 and E7 genes were cloned into pET-28a(+) and introduced into E. coli Rosetta. Expression of the genes was induced by IPTG. Proteins were purified by Ni-NTA agarose and they were detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with 1.5 nmol HPV16 E6 or E7 protein. Then they were implanted with 1x10(5) TC-1 cells. No tumor was detected in any mouse vaccinated with E7 protein. Forty days later, the tumor-free mice and control mice were challenged with 2x10(5) TC-1 cells. All control mice developed tumors 6 days later, but E7 immunized mice were tumor free until 90 days. Tumor growth was slow in the E6 immunized mice, but 83% of the mice developed tumors and the survival percentage was not significantly different from the control. An adoptive immune model was used to demonstrate the therapeutic effect. Results showed that the development of TC-1 cells was obviously reduced by transfusion of T-cells but not serum from mice immunized with E7 protein. T-cells from E7 immunized mice also induced the lysis of TC-1 cells in the cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. These findings show that immunization with HPV16 E6 or E7 protein was able to elicit specific protective immunity against TC-1 tumor growth.

  3. High sensitivity detection of HPV-16 in SiHa and CaSki cells utilizing FISH enhanced by TSA.

    PubMed

    Adler, K; Erickson, T; Bobrow, M

    1997-01-01

    Detection of integrated human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA in SiHa and CaSki cells was used as a model system to demonstrate sensitivity and resolution of a well defined target. Using 293- to 1987-base polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-synthesized probes to the E6 and E7 open reading frames of HPV-16, several fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) detection methods, enhanced with tyramide signal amplification (TSA), were compared. The synthetic probes were biotin labeled by a nick translation method and the hybridized probes were detected by various fluorescent TSA methods using cyanine 3 tyramide, biotinyl tyramide and a biotin TSA Plus reagent. High sensitivity detection in SiHa cells was demonstrated using a 619-base probe to detect two single copies of integrated HPV-16 DNA. In CaSki cells, which contain up to 600 copies of HPV-16 DNA, a 293-base probe was used for detection. The results of these comparisons show that with refinement of TSA methods and reagents, increasing levels of high sensitivity detection can be achieved and that these methods allow subnuclear localization as well.

  4. HPV16 E6 upregulates Aurora A expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yi; Ma, Jiaming; Zheng, Yahong; Li, Lu; Gui, Xiaowei; Wang, Qian; Meng, Xiangkai; Shang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of Aurora A kinase occurs in certain types of cancer, and therefore results in chromosome instability and phosphorylation-mediated ubiquitylation and degradation of p53 for tumorigenesis. The high-risk subtype human papillomavirus (HPV)16 early oncoprotein E6 is a major contributor inducing host cell immortalization and transformation through interaction with a number of cellular factors. In the present study, co-immunoprecipitation, glutathione S-transferase pull-down and immunostaining were used to show that HPV16 E6 and Aurora A bind to each other in vivo and in vitro. Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to reveal that HPV16 E6 inhibited cell apoptosis by stabilizing Aurora A expression. The present study may report a new mechanism for the involvement of HPV16 E6 in carcinogenesis, as HPV16 E6 elevates Aurora A expression and the latter may be a common target for oncogenic viruses that result in cell carcinogenesis. PMID:27446442

  5. Genome wide expression analysis in HPV16 Cervical Cancer: identification of altered metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; López-Romero, Ricardo; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Moreno, José; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Background Cervical carcinoma (CC) is a leading cause of death among women worldwide. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a major etiological factor in CC and HPV 16 is the more frequent viral type present. Our aim was to characterize metabolic pathways altered in HPV 16 tumor samples by means of transcriptome wide analysis and bioinformatics tools for visualizing expression data in the context of KEGG biological pathways. Results We found 2,067 genes significantly up or down-modulated (at least 2-fold) in tumor clinical samples compared to normal tissues, representing ~3.7% of analyzed genes. Cervical carcinoma was associated with an important up-regulation of Wnt signaling pathway, which was validated by in situ hybridization in clinical samples. Other up-regulated pathways were those of calcium signaling and MAPK signaling, as well as cell cycle-related genes. There was down-regulation of focal adhesion, TGF-β signaling, among other metabolic pathways. Conclusion This analysis of HPV 16 tumors transcriptome could be useful for the identification of genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma. Understanding the possible role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of CC deserves further studies. PMID:17822553

  6. In vitro antigene therapy targeting HPV-16 E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, M; Janicek, M F; Sevin, B U; Perras, J; Estape, R; Peñalver, M; Averette, H E

    1997-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is believed to play a central role in cervical carcinogenesis. Specifically, two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, possess transforming ability and have been shown to interact with the cellular tumor suppressors p53 and p105, the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene product. To test the hypothesis that E6 and E7 play an active role in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype and may be ideal targets for antigene therapy, we tested the antiproliferative effects of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (oligos) targeting HPV-16 E6 and E7 in cervical cancer cell lines and primary tumor explants. The ATP cell viability assay was used to measure growth effects of 27-mer antisense oligos targeting the ATG translational start region of HPV-16 E6 and E7 sequences in HPV-16-positive cell lines SiHa and CaSki and four advanced, primary cervical tumor explants. A random oligo sequence, an HPV-18-positive and HPV-negative cell line, one histologically confirmed endometrial and two ovarian tumors were used as negative controls. HPV type was confirmed by hybrid capture techniques. Cell lines and sterile (staging laparotomy) tumor cells were plated at 5000 cells/0.1 ml and 100,000 cells/0.5 ml in 96-well plates or soft agar, respectively, and incubated at 37 degrees C with a single treatment of oligos at 0-16 microM. E6/E7 combinations at a fixed ratio of 1:1 were used at 0-8 microM for each oligo. Cellular ATP was measured by luciferin/luciferase fluorescence on Day 6. HPV-16 E6 and E7 oligos showed antiproliferative effects in all HPV-16-positive cell lines and primary tumor explants (IC50s 6.9-9.5 microM for cell lines, 9.1-12.1 microM primary cervical tumors), while the HPV-negative C33-A cell line and HPV-18-positive cell line HeLa were relatively insensitive to the HPV-16 oligos (IC50s > 30 microM extrapolated). The endometrial and two ovarian primary tumors were also insensitive to the HPV E6 and E7 oligos (IC50s > 25 microM extrapolated). Random

  7. Immunogenicity of an HPV-16 L2 DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hitzeroth, Inga I.; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Shephard, Enid; Stewart, Debbie; Müller, Martin; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P.; Kast, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    The ability to elicit cross-neutralizing antibodies makes human papillomavirus (HPV) L2 capsid protein a possible HPV vaccine. We examined and compared the humoral response of mice immunised with a HPV-16 L2 DNA vaccine or with HPV-16 L2 protein. The L2 DNA vaccine elicited a non-neutralising antibody response unlike the L2 protein. L2 DNA vaccination suppressed the growth of L2-expressing C3 tumor cells, which is a T cell mediated effect, demonstrating that the lack of non-neutralizing antibody induction by L2 DNA was not caused by lack of T cell immunogenicity of the construct. PMID:19559114

  8. Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) enhances tumor growth and cancer stemness of HPV-negative oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells via miR-181 regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hee; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Rigas, Nicole Kristina; Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Shin, Ki-Hyuk

    2015-12-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (e.g., HPV16, HPV18) are closely associated with the development of head and neck cancers including oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We previously demonstrated immortalization of normal human oral keratinocytes by introducing high-risk HPV whole genome, suggesting that HPV infection plays an important role in the early stage of oral carcinogenesis. Although HPV infection may occur in different stages of cancer development, roles of HPV in exacerbating malignant phenotypes in already-transformed cells in the context of cancer stemness are not clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the role of HPV16 in promoting the virulence of HPV-negative OSCC. Introducing HPV16 whole genome in HPV-negative OSCC increased malignant growth and self-renewal capacity, a key characteristic of cancer stem cells (CSCs). HPV16 also enhanced other CSC properties, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity, migration/invasion, and CSC-related factor expression. Mechanistically, we found that HPV16 inhibited the expression of miR-181a and miR-181d (miR-181a/d) at the transcriptional level. Ectopic expression of miR-181a/d decreased anchorage independent growth and CSC phenotype of HPV16-transfected OSCC. Furthermore, silencing of miR-181a/d target genes, i.e., K-ras and ALDH1, abrogated the effects of HPV16 in HPV16-transfected OSCC, supporting the functional importance of HPV16/miR-181a/d axis in HPV-mediated oral carcinogenesis. Our study suggests that high-risk HPV infection further promotes malignancy in HPV-negative OSCC by enhancing cancer stemness via miR-181a/d regulation. Consequently, miR-181a/d may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of HPV-positive OSCC.

  9. Isolation and characterization of an RNA aptamer for the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Toscano-Garibay, Julia D; Benítez-Hess, María L; Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2011-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a common neoplastic disease affecting women worldwide. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/E7 genes is frequently associated with cervical cancer, representing ideal targets for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands capable of binding with high affinity and specificity to relevant markers in therapeutics and disease detection. The aim of the study was to isolate an RNA aptamer specific for the HPV-16 E7 protein. Aptamers were selected from a randomized oligonucleotide library using a modified SELEX method and recombinant HPV-16 E7 protein. Isolated aptamers were cloned and sequenced for in silico analysis. Interaction and electromobility shift assays (EMSA) were performed to establish aptamer specificity and affinity for E7. RNase footprinting and serial deletions of the aptamer and the E7 protein were made to characterize the aptamer-protein complex. Sandwich slot-blot assays were used for K(D) determination. After several rounds of SELEX, an aptamer (G5α3N.4) exhibited specificity for E7 using cell-free and protein extracts. G5α3N.4 binding yielded a K(D) comparable to aptamers directed to other small targets. Enzymatic and genetic analysis of G5α3N.4 binding showed a secondary structure with two stem-loop domains joined by single-stranded region contacting E7 in a clamp-like manner. The G5α3N.4 aptamer also produced specific complexes in HPV-positive cervical carcinoma cells. The affinity and specificity of G5α3N.4 binding domains for the HPV-16 E7 protein may be used for the detection of papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extrachromosomal HPV-16 LCR transcriptional activation by HDACi opposed by cellular differentiation and DNA integration

    PubMed Central

    Bojilova, Ekaterina Dimitrova; Weyn, Christine; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Fontaine, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to render HPV-carrying cells susceptible to intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals. As such, these epigenetic drugs have entered clinical trials in the effort to treat cervical cancer. Here, we studied the effect of common HDACi, with an emphasis on Trichostatin A (TSA), on the transcriptional activity of the HPV-16 Long Control Region (LCR) in order to better understand the impact of these agents in the context of the HPV life cycle and infection. HDACi strongly induced transcription of the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the HPV-16 LCR in a variety of cell lines. In the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line undergoing differentiation induced by TSA, we observed a reduction in LCR-controlled transcription. Three major AP-1 binding sites in the HPV-16 LCR are involved in the regulation by TSA. However, whatever the status of differentiation of the HaCaT cells, TSA induced integration of extra-chromosomal transfected DNA into the cellular genome. Although these data suggest caution using HDACi in the treatment of HR HPV infection, further in vivo studies are necessary to better assess the risk. PMID:27705914

  11. Expression and characterization of HPV-16 L1 capsid protein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Silvia Boschi; de Alencar Muniz Chaves, Agtha; Aires, Karina Araújo; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Garcea, Robert L.; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are responsible for the most common human sexually transmitted viral infections. Infection with high-risk HPVs, particularly HPV16, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The papillomavirus L1 major capsid protein, the basis of the currently marketed vaccines, self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs). Here, we describe the expression, purification and characterization of recombinant HPV16 L1 produced by a methylotrophic yeast. A codon-optimized HPV16 L1 gene was cloned into a non-integrative expression vector under the regulation of a methanol-inducible promoter and used to transform competent Pichia pastoris cells. Purification of L1 protein from yeast extracts was performed using heparin–sepharose chromatography, followed by a disassembly/reassembly step. VLPs could be assembled from the purified L1 protein, as demonstrated by electron microscopy. The display of conformational epitopes on the VLPs surface was confirmed by hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition assays and by immuno-electron microscopy. This study has implications for the development of an alternative platform for the production of a papillomavirus vaccine that could be provided by public health programs, especially in resource-poor areas, where there is a great demand for low-cost vaccines. PMID:19756360

  12. SOX2 as a New Regulator of HPV16 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ramírez, Imelda; del-Castillo-Falconi, Víctor; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B.; Amador-Molina, Alfredo; Carrillo-García, Adela; Langley, Elizabeth; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Herrera, Luis A.; Lizano, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Persistent infections with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) constitute the main risk factor for cervical cancer development. HPV16 is the most frequent type associated to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), followed by HPV18. The long control region (LCR) in the HPV genome contains the replication origin and sequences recognized by cellular transcription factors (TFs) controlling viral transcription. Altered expression of E6 and E7 viral oncogenes, modulated by the LCR, causes modifications in cellular pathways such as proliferation, leading to malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to identify specific TFs that could contribute to the modulation of high-risk HPV transcriptional activity, related to the cellular histological origin. We identified sex determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (SOX2) response elements present in HPV16-LCR. SOX2 binding to the LCR was demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro assays. The overexpression of this TF repressed HPV16-LCR transcriptional activity, as shown through reporter plasmid assays and by the down-regulation of endogenous HPV oncogenes. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that three putative SOX2 binding sites are involved in the repression of the LCR activity. We propose that SOX2 acts as a transcriptional repressor of HPV16-LCR, decreasing the expression of E6 and E7 oncogenes in a SCC context. PMID:28678184

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of antibodies against HPV16 E6 and other early proteins for the detection of HPV16-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dana; Wichmann, Gunnar; Baboci, Lorena; Michel, Angelika; Höfler, Daniela; Wiesenfarth, Manuel; Schroeder, Lea; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Herold-Mende, Christel; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Boehm, Andreas; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Bosch, Franz X; Dietz, Andreas; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim

    2017-06-15

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of HPV16 serology as diagnostic marker for HPV16-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 214 HNSCC patients from Germany and Italy with fresh-frozen tumor tissues and sera collected before treatment were included in this study. Hundred and twenty cancer cases were from the oropharynx and 94 were from head and neck cancer regions outside the oropharynx (45 oral cavity, 12 hypopharynx and 35 larynx). Serum antibodies to early (E1, E2, E6 and E7) and late (L1) HPV16 proteins were analyzed by multiplex serology and were compared to tumor HPV RNA status as the gold standard. A tumor was defined as HPV-driven in the presence of HPV16 DNA and HPV16 transformation-specific RNA transcript patterns (E6*I, E1(∧) E4 and E1C). Of 120 OPSCC, 66 (55%) were HPV16-driven. HPV16 E6 seropositivity was the best predictor of HPV16-driven OPSCC (diagnostic accuracy 97% [95%CI 92-99%], Cohen's kappa 0.93 [95%CI 0.8-1.0]). Of the 66 HPV-driven OPSCC, 63 were HPV16 E6 seropositive, compared to only one (1.8%) among the 54 non-HPV-driven OPSCC, resulting in a sensitivity of 96% (95%CI 88-98) and a specificity of 98% (95%CI 90-100). Of 94 HNSCC outside the oropharynx, six (6%) were HPV16-driven. In these patients, HPV16 E6 seropositivity had lower sensitivity (50%, 95%CI 19-81), but was highly specific (100%, 95%CI 96-100). In conclusion, HPV16 E6 seropositivity appears to be a highly reliable diagnostic marker for HPV16-driven OPSCC with very high sensitivity and specificity, but might be less sensitive for HPV16-driven HNSCC outside the oropharynx. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Dynamic response of HPV16/anti-HPV16 pairs with unbinding events studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiming; Hong, Chung-Hung; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Wu, Long-Xin; Huang, Wan-Chen; Huang, Wei-Chih; Guo, Cheng-Yan

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes an effective approach to distinguish whether samples include Human Papilloma virus type-16 (HPV16) by Atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is an important instrument in nanobiotechnology field. At first we identified the HPV16 by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and Western blotting from specimen of the HPV patient (E12) and the normal (C2), and then we used an AFM to observe the surface ultrastructure by tapping mode and to measure the unbinding force between HPV16 coupled to an AFM tip and anti-HPV16 L1 coated on the substrate surface by contact mode. The experimental results by tapping mode show that the size of a single HPV viron was similar to its SEM image from the previous literatures; moreover, based on the purposed methods and the analysis, two obvious findings that we can determine whether or not the subject is a HPV patient can be derived from the results; one is based on the distribution of unbinding forces, and the other is based on the distribution of the stiffness. Furthermore, the proposed method could be a useful technique for further investigating the potential role among subtypes of HPVs in the oncogenesis of human cervical cancer.

  15. Oxymatrine downregulates HPV16E7 expression and inhibits cell proliferation in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma Hep-2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xin-Jiang; Jin, Bin; Chen, Xin-Wei; Xie, Jin; Xu, Hong-Ming; Dong, Pin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the possible mechanisms of oxymatrine's role in anti laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We examined the effects of oxymatrine on the proliferation, cell cycle phase distribution, apoptosis, and the protein and mRNA expression levels of HPV16E7 gene in laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells in vitro. The HPV16E7 siRNA inhibition was also done to confirm the effect of downregulating HPV16E7 on the proliferation in Hep-2 cells. Oxymatrine significantly inhibited the growth and proliferation of Hep-2 cells in a dose-dependence and time-dependence manner. Oxymatrine blocked Hep-2 cells in G0/G1 phase, resulting in an obvious accumulation of G0/G1 phase cells while decreasing S phase cells. Oxymatrine induced apoptosis of Hep-2 cells, whose apoptotic rate amounted to about 42% after treatment with 7 mg/mL oxymatrine for 72 h. Oxymatrine also downregulated the expression of HPV16E7 gene, as determined by the western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Knockdown of HPV16E7 effectively inhibited the proliferation of Hep-2 cells. Oxymatrine inhibits the proliferation and induces apoptosis of laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells, which might be mediated by a significant cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and downregulation of HPV16E7 gene. Oxymatrine is considered to be a likely preventive and curative candidate for laryngeal cancer.

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genomes integrated in head and neck cancers and in HPV-16-immortalized human keratinocyte clones express chimeric virus-cell mRNAs similar to those found in cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Lace, Michael J; Anson, James R; Klussmann, Jens P; Wang, Dong Hong; Smith, Elaine M; Haugen, Thomas H; Turek, Lubomir P

    2011-02-01

    Many human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive high-grade lesions and cancers of the uterine cervix harbor integrated HPV genomes expressing the E6 and E7 oncogenes from chimeric virus-cell mRNAs, but less is known about HPV integration in head and neck cancer (HNC). Here we compared viral DNA status and E6-E7 mRNA sequences in HPV-16-positive HNC tumors to those in independent human keratinocyte cell clones derived from primary tonsillar or foreskin epithelia immortalized with HPV-16 genomes. Three of nine HNC tumors and epithelial clones containing unintegrated HPV-16 genomes expressed mRNAs spliced from HPV-16 SD880 to SA3358 and terminating at the viral early gene p(A) signal. In contrast, most integrated HPV genomes in six HNCs and a set of 31 keratinocyte clones expressed HPV-16 major early promoter (MEP)-initiated mRNAs spliced from viral SD880 directly to diverse cellular sequences, with a minority spliced to SA3358 followed by a cellular DNA junction. Sequence analysis of chimeric virus-cell mRNAs from HNC tumors and keratinocyte clones identified viral integration sites in a variety of chromosomes, with some located in or near growth control genes, including the c-myc protooncogene and the gene encoding FAP-1 phosphatase. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that HPV integration in cancers is a stochastic process resulting in clonal selection of aggressively expanding cells with altered gene expression of integrated HPV genomes and potential perturbations of cellular genes at or near viral integration sites. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that this selection also takes place and can be studied in primary human keratinocytes in culture.

  17. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) Genomes Integrated in Head and Neck Cancers and in HPV-16-Immortalized Human Keratinocyte Clones Express Chimeric Virus-Cell mRNAs Similar to Those Found in Cervical Cancers ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Michael J.; Anson, James R.; Klussmann, Jens P.; Wang, Dong Hong; Smith, Elaine M.; Haugen, Thomas H.; Turek, Lubomir P.

    2011-01-01

    Many human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive high-grade lesions and cancers of the uterine cervix harbor integrated HPV genomes expressing the E6 and E7 oncogenes from chimeric virus-cell mRNAs, but less is known about HPV integration in head and neck cancer (HNC). Here we compared viral DNA status and E6-E7 mRNA sequences in HPV-16-positive HNC tumors to those in independent human keratinocyte cell clones derived from primary tonsillar or foreskin epithelia immortalized with HPV-16 genomes. Three of nine HNC tumors and epithelial clones containing unintegrated HPV-16 genomes expressed mRNAs spliced from HPV-16 SD880 to SA3358 and terminating at the viral early gene p(A) signal. In contrast, most integrated HPV genomes in six HNCs and a set of 31 keratinocyte clones expressed HPV-16 major early promoter (MEP)-initiated mRNAs spliced from viral SD880 directly to diverse cellular sequences, with a minority spliced to SA3358 followed by a cellular DNA junction. Sequence analysis of chimeric virus-cell mRNAs from HNC tumors and keratinocyte clones identified viral integration sites in a variety of chromosomes, with some located in or near growth control genes, including the c-myc protooncogene and the gene encoding FAP-1 phosphatase. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that HPV integration in cancers is a stochastic process resulting in clonal selection of aggressively expanding cells with altered gene expression of integrated HPV genomes and potential perturbations of cellular genes at or near viral integration sites. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that this selection also takes place and can be studied in primary human keratinocytes in culture. PMID:21123375

  18. Prevalence of HPV 16 and HPV 18 Lineages in Galicia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Sonia; Cid, Ana; Iñarrea, Amparo; Pato, Mónica; Lamas, María José; Couso, Bárbara; Gil, Margarita; Álvarez, María Jesús; Rey, Sonia; López-Miragaya, Isabel; Melón, Santiago; de Oña, María

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 (HPV16/18) could differ in their cancer risk. We studied the prevalence and association with high-grade cervical lesions of different HPV16/18 variant lineages in a case-control study including 217 cases (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or grade 3 or worse: CIN2 or CIN3+) and 116 controls (no CIN2 or CIN3+ in two-year follow-up). HPV lineages were determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 gene. Phylogenetic analysis of HPV16 confirmed that isolates clustered into previously described lineages: A (260, 87.5%), B (4, 1.3%), C (8, 2.7%), and D (25, 8.4%). Lineage D/lineage A strains were, respectively, detected in 4/82 control patients, 19/126 CIN3+ cases (OR = 3.1, 95%CI: 1.0–12.9, p = 0.04), 6/1 glandular high-grade lesions (OR = 123, 95%CI: 9.7–5713.6, p<0.0001), and 4/5 invasive lesions (OR = 16.4, 95%CI: 2.2–113.7, p = 0.002). HPV18 clustered in lineages A (32, 88.9%) and B (4, 11.1%). Lineage B/lineage A strains were respectively detected in 1/23 control patients and 2/5 CIN3+ cases (OR = 9.2, 95%CI: 0.4–565.4, p = 0.12). In conclusion, lineages A of HPV16/18 were predominant in Spain. Lineage D of HPV16 was associated with increased risk for CIN3+, glandular high-grade lesions, and invasive lesions compared with lineage A. Lineage B of HPV18 may be associated with increased risk for CIN3+ compared with lineage A, but the association was not significant. Large well-designed studies are needed before the application of HPV lineage detection in clinical settings. PMID:25111834

  19. The E8∧E2 Gene Product of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Represses Early Transcription and Replication but Is Dispensable for Viral Plasmid Persistence in Keratinocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Michael J.; Anson, James R.; Thomas, Gregory S.; Turek, Lubomir P.; Haugen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    A conserved E8∧E2 spliced mRNA is detected in keratinocytes transfected with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) plasmid DNA. Expression of HPV-16 E8∧E2 (16-E8∧E2) is independent of the major early promoter, P97, and is modulated by both specific splicing events and conserved cis elements in the upstream regulatory region in a manner that differs from transcriptional regulation of other early viral genes. Mutations that disrupt the predicted 16-E8∧E2 message also increase initial HPV-16 plasmid amplification 8- to 15-fold and major early gene (P97) transcription 4- to 5-fold over those of the wild type (wt). Expressing the 16-E8∧E2 gene product from the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter represses HPV-16 early gene transcription from P97 in a dose-dependent manner, as detected by RNase protection assays. When expressed from the CMV promoter, 16-E8∧E2 also inhibits the amplification of an HPV-16 plasmid and a heterologous simian virus 40 (SV40) ori plasmid that contains E2 binding sites in cis. In contrast, cotransfections with HPV-16 wt genomes that express physiologic levels of 16-E8∧E2 are sufficient to repress HPV-16 plasmid amplification but are limiting and insufficient for the repression of SV40 amplification. 16-E8∧E2-dependent repression of HPV-16 E1 expression is sufficient to account for this observed inhibition of initial HPV-16 plasmid amplification. Unlike with other papillomaviruses, primary human keratinocytes immortalized by the HPV-16 E8 mutant genome contain more than eightfold-higher levels of unintegrated plasmid than the wt, demonstrating that 16-E8∧E2 limits the viral copy number but is not required for plasmid persistence and maintenance. PMID:18753207

  20. Vaccine generated immunity targets an HPV16 E7 HLA-A2.1-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitope relocated to an early gene or a late gene of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) genome in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bounds, Callie E; Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Balogh, Karla; Christensen, Neil D

    2011-02-01

    The newly established HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model has proven useful for testing the immunogenicity of well known and computer-predicted A2-restricted epitopes. In the current study we compared the protective immunity induced to a preferred HPV16 E7 A2-restricted epitope that has been relocated to positions within the CRPV E7 gene and the CRPV L2 gene. Epitope expression from both the E7 protein and the L2 protein resulted in increased protection against viral DNA challenge of the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits as compared to control-vaccinated rabbit groups. These data indicate that proteins expressed at both early and late time points during a natural papillomavirus infection can be targeted by epitope-specific immunity and indicate this immunity is increased to early rather than late expressed proteins of papillomaviruses. This study also highlights the broad utility of the HLAA2.1 transgenic rabbit model for testing numerous immunological factors involved in vaccine generated protective immunity.

  1. Human papillomavirus type distribution and HPV16 intratype diversity in southern Brazil in women with and without cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gisele R; Vieira, Valdimara C; Ávila, Emiliana C; Finger-Jardim, Fabiana; Caldeira, Thaís DM; Gatti, Fabiane AA; Gonçalves, Carla V; Oliveira, Sandro G; da Hora, Vanusa P; Soares, Marcelo A; de Martinez, Ana MB

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing evidence suggests that human papillomavirus (HPV) intratype variants (specific lineages and sublineages) are associated with pathogenesis and progression from HPV infection to persistence and the development of cervical cancer. OBJECTIVES This study aimed to verify the prevalence of HPV infection and distribution of HPV types and HPV16 variants in southern Brazil in women with normal cytology or intraepithelial lesions. METHODS HPV typing was determined by L1 gene sequencing. To identify HPV16 variants, the LCR and E6 regions were sequenced, and characteristic single nucleotide variants were identified. FINDINGS A total of 445 samples were studied, with 355 from cervical scrapes and 90 from cervical biopsies. HPV was detected in 24% and 91% of these samples, respectively. The most prevalent HPV types observed were 16 (cervical, 24%; biopsies, 57%) and 58 (cervical, 12%; biopsies, 12%). Seventy-five percent of the HPV16-positive samples were classified into lineages, with 88% defined as lineage A, 10% as lineage D, and 2% as lineage B. MAIN CONCLUSIONS This study identified a high frequency of European and North American HPV16 lineages, consistent with the genetic background of the human population in southern Brazil. PMID:28591310

  2. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in an experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6.

    PubMed

    Phaeton, Rébécca; Harris, Matthew; Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2010-11-15

    HPV16 is associated with ~50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (~600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1-2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (¹⁸⁸Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 μCi ¹⁸⁸Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 μCi ¹⁸⁸Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 μCi ¹⁸⁸Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. ¹⁸⁸Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic.

  3. Unexpected inverse correlation between Native American ancestry and Asian American variants of HPV16 in admixed Colombian cervical cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Lopera, Esteban A; Baena, Armando; Florez, Victor; Montiel, Jehidys; Duque, Constanza; Ramirez, Tatiana; Borrero, Mauricio; Cordoba, Carlos M; Rojas, Fredy; Pareja, Rene; Bedoya, Astrid M; Bedoya, Gabriel; Sanchez, Gloria I

    2014-12-01

    European (E) variants of HPV 16 are evenly distributed among world regions, meanwhile Non-European variants such as European-Asian (EAs), Asian American (AA) and African (Af) are mostly confined to Eastern Asia, The Americas and African regions respectively. Several studies have shown that genetic variation of HPV 16 is associated with the risk of cervical cancer, which also seems to be dependent on the population. This relationship between ethnicity and variants have led to the suggestion that there is co-evolution of variants with humankind. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between the individual ancestry proportion and infection with HPV 16 variants in cervical cancer. We examined the association between ancestry and HPV 16 variants in samples of 82 cervical cancer cases from different regions of Colombia. Individual ancestry proportions (European, African and Native American) were estimated by genotyping 106 ancestry informative markers. Variants were identified by PCR amplification of the E6 gene, followed by reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) with variants specific probes. Overall European (E) and Asian American (AA) variants frequency was 66.5% and 33.5% respectively. Similar distribution was observed in cases with higher proportions of European or African ancestry. A higher Native American ancestry was significantly associated with higher frequency of E variants (median ancestry>23.6%, Age and place of birth adjusted OR: 3.55, 95% CI: 1.26-10.03, p=0.01). Even further, an inverse geographic correlation between Native American ancestry and frequency of infections with AA variants was observed (ρ=-0.825, p=0.008). Regions with higher proportion of Native American ancestry had a lower frequency of AA variants of HPV 16. This study suggests replacement of AA variants by E variants of human papillomavirus 16 in cervical cancer cases with high Native American ancestry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome amplification of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 in cervical carcinomas is related to the retention of E1/E2 genes.

    PubMed

    Berumen, J; Casas, L; Segura, E; Amezcua, J L; Garcia-Carranca, A

    1994-03-01

    The level of amplification (copy number/cell) of HPV16 and HPV18 viral genomes and its correlation with the presence of E1/E2 genes were analyzed in a sample of 42 HPV16- and 21 HPV18-positive cervical carcinomas of different clinical stages and histological types. The viral copy number/cell was assessed by dot-blot hybridization and the presence of E1/E2 genes by PCR and Southern blot. The copy number/cell was significantly lower in HPV18-positive than in HPV16-positive tumours (23 +/- 8 and 457 +/- 191 respectively). Nearly half of the HPV16s (43%) were distributed similarly to the HPV18s in the ranges of 50 or less copies, having its peak at the group of 1 to 10 copies, whereas the remaining HPV16s (57%) spread over the groups of 51 or more copies, with another peak at the group of 101 to 500. The E1/E2 region was absent in all tumours positive for HPV18 and present in 64% of those positive for HPV16. The HPV16 tumours negative for E1/E2 had a much lower viral copy number (17 +/- 12) than the positive ones (582 +/- 212), thus resembling HPV18-positive tumours. Viral copy number was negatively correlated with the clinical stage of the tumours and directly associated with the degree of histological differentiation. However, these correlations are primarily attributable to the presence or absence of an intact E1/E2 region.

  5. Gene copy number and malaria biology

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tim J.C.; Patel, Jigar; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration in gene copy number provides a simple way to change expression levels and alter phenotype. This was fully appreciated by bacteriologists more than 25 years ago, but the extent and implications of copy number polymorphism (CNP) have only recently become apparent in other organisms. New methods demonstrate the ubiquity of CNPs in eukaryotes and their medical importance in humans. CNP is also widespread in the Plasmodium falciparum genome and has an important and underappreciated role in determining phenotype. In this review, we summarize the distribution of CNP, its evolutionary dynamics within populations, its functional importance and its mode of evolution. PMID:19559648

  6. Repression of MHC class I transcription by HPV16E7 through interaction with a putative RXR{beta} motif and NF-{kappa}B cytoplasmic sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Zhan, TaiLan; Li, Chang; Liu, Mugen; Wang, Qing K.

    2009-10-16

    Down-regulation of transcription of the MHC class I genes in HPV16 tumorigenic cells is partly due to HPV16E7 associated with the MHC class I promoter and repressed chromatin activation. In this study, we further demonstrated that HPV16E7 is physically associated with a putative RXR{beta} binding motif (GGTCA) of the proximal promoter of the MHC class I genes by using reporter transcriptional assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our data also provide evidence that HPV16E7 inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced up-regulation of MHC class I transcription by impaired nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. More importantly, CaSki tumor cells treated with TSA and transfected with the constitutively active mutant form of IKK-{alpha} (which can activate NF-{kappa}B directly) showed a maximal level of up-regulation of MHC-I expression. Taken together, our results suggest that HPV16E7 may employ two independent mechanisms to ensure that either the constitutive or inducible transcription of MHC class I genes is down-regulated.

  7. Integration of the full-length HPV16 genome in cervical cancer and Caski and Siha cell lines and the possible ways of HPV integration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Cao, Meng; Shi, Qinfeng; Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Yili; Li, Xu

    2015-04-01

    Integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is a key event for cervical carcinogenesis. Different methods have been used to explore the physical states of the HPV genome to reveal the mechanisms for malignant transformation of the infected cells. Consensus has been reached that, although variable portions of the HPV genome are deleted in the integrated HPV sequences, common disruption of the viral E2 gene has been demonstrated in different studies. The head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome is another typical integration pattern of HPV16, typically found in Caski cell lines, but its prevalence in cervical cancer has never been tested. Here, by introducing a modified PCR, we identified this head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV genomes in advanced cervical cancer with HPV16 single positive. Our results show that more than half of the cases contain this integrated head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV16 genomes. Further studies in two cervical cell lines, Caski cells and Siha cells, revealed a correlation between the prevalence of the spliced variants of integrated HPV16 sequences and the full-length transcription of the integrated head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome. Based on these results, we propose that HPV16 integrated into host cells by two mechanisms: one mechanism is shared by other DNA virus and cause integration of the head-to-tail concatemers of the viral genome; another is related to the reverse transcription process, which the integrated HPV sequence is generated by the reverse transcription of the viral mRNA.

  8. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  9. Reversal of the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer CaSki cells through adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of HPV16 E7 antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sufang; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Wang, Wei; Xi, Ling; Tian, Xun; Chen, Gang; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yunping; Ma, Ding

    2006-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most important risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. The oncogene E7 from high-risk HPV strains has the ability to immortalize epithelial cells and increase cellular transformation in culture. In this study, we explored the possibility of preventing cervical cancer growth by inhibiting HPV16 E7 expression through gene transfer of an antisense construct. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector was chosen for the transfer, based on its transfection efficiency, in vivo stability, and lack of detectable pathology. In vitro transfer of an rAAV vector expressing antisense HPV16 E7 (AAV-HPV16E7AS) inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced cell migration, and restrained in vivo proliferation of HPV16/HPV18-positive cervical cancer CaSki cells. These results indicate that down-regulation of HPV16 E7 with antisense RNA is beneficial in reducing the tumorigenicity of CaSki cells, and rAAV vectors ought to be a new efficient approach for delivering the expression of therapeutic genes.

  10. A Role for MicroRNA-155 Expression in Microenvironment Associated to HPV-Induced Carcinogenesis in K14-HPV16 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Isabel; Gil da Costa, Rui M.; Ribeiro, Joana; Sousa, Hugo; Bastos, Margarida; Rocha, Ana Faustino Carlos; Oliveira, Paula A; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus cause a number of diseases most notably cervical cancer. K14-HPV16 transgenic mice expressing the HPV16 early genes in squamous epithelial cells provide a suitable experimental model for studying these diseases. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in regulating gene expression and have been suggested to play an important role in cancer development. The role of miR-155 in cancer remains controversial and there is limited evidence linking this miRNA to HPV- associated diseases. We hypothesized that miR-155 expression modulates each tissue’s susceptibility to develop HPV-associated carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed miR-155 expression in ear and chest skin samples from 22-26 weeks old, female K14-HPV16 transgenic (HPV16+/-) and wild-type (HPV-/-) mice. Among wild-type mice the expression of miR-155 was lower in ear skin compared with chest skin (p = 0.028). In transgenic animals, in situ carcinoma was present in all ear samples whereas chest tissues only showed epidermal hyperplasia. Furthermore, in hyperplastic chest skin samples, miR-155 expression was lower than in normal chest skin (p = 0,026). These results suggest that miR-155 expression may modulate the microenvironmental susceptibility to cancer development and that high miR155 levels may be protective against the carcinogenesis induced by HPV16. PMID:25625305

  11. The evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification-quartz crystal microbalance (LAMP-QCM) biosensor as a real-time measurement of HPV16 DNA.

    PubMed

    Jearanaikoon, Patcharee; Prakrankamanant, Preeda; Leelayuwat, Chanvit; Wanram, Surasak; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Promptmas, Chamras

    2016-03-01

    We have previously developed quartz crystal microbalance biosensor integrated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP-QCM) for human papillomavirus (HPV) type58 DNA detection. Infection with HPV, particularly HPV16, remains a serious health problem due to its major risk factor contributing to cervical cancer. In the present study, LAMP-QCM biosensor was evaluated in terms of a quantitative assay for copy number of HPV16 DNA in cervical samples compared to quantitative PCR using TaqMan assay (TaqMan-qPCR). The detection limit of LAMP-QCM was found to be 10 fold more sensitive than TaqMan-qPCR with 100% specificity and 7.6% imprecision. Different plot of HPV16 DNA copy number using Bland-Altman analysis revealed 94% correlation between LAMP-QCM and qPCR. We therefore concluded that the developed LAMP-QCM biosensor provides a possible rapid and sensitive assay for HPV16 DNA quantification in a routine laboratory.

  12. Interaction between polymorphisms of the Human Leukocyte Antigen and HPV-16 Variants on the risk of invasive cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Souza, Patricia S; Maciag, Paulo C; Ribeiro, Karina B; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Franco, Eduardo L; Villa, Luisa L

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major risk factor for invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and non-European variants of HPV-16 are associated with an increased risk of persistence and ICC. HLA class II polymorphisms are also associated with genetic susceptibility to ICC. Our aim is to verify if these associations are influenced by HPV-16 variability. Methods We characterized HPV-16 variants by PCR in 107 ICC cases, which were typed for HLA-DQA1, DRB1 and DQB1 genes and compared to 257 controls. We measured the magnitude of associations by logistic regression analysis. Results European (E), Asian-American (AA) and African (Af) variants were identified. Here we show that inverse association between DQB1*05 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–1.12]) and HPV-16 positive ICC in our previous report was mostly attributable to AA variant carriers (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.10–0.75). We observed similar proportions of HLA DRB1*1302 carriers in E-P positive cases and controls, but interestingly, this allele was not found in AA cases (p = 0.03, Fisher exact test). A positive association with DRB1*15 was observed in both groups of women harboring either E (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13–7.86) or AA variants (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.00–5.46). There was an inverse association between DRB1*04 and ICC among women with HPV-16 carrying the 350T [83L] single nucleotide polymorphism in the E6 gene (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08–0.96). An inverse association between DQB1*05 and cases carrying 350G (83V) variants was also found (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.15–0.89). Conclusion Our results suggest that the association between HLA polymorphism and risk of ICC might be influenced by the distribution of HPV-16 variants. PMID:18721466

  13. Human papillomavirus hpv-16 DNA as an epitheliotropic virus that induces hyperproliferation in squamous penile tissue.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Edith L; Mercado, E; Calzada, L

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus HPV-16DNA sequences in 57 penile carcinoma biopsies was examined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with type specific internal probes, employing HPV consensus primers from the L1 region. The cases comprised 39 typical squamous cell carcinoma and 18 specimens with different subtype. PCR products were analyzed and HPV-16DNA was detected in a high percentage of specimens. Thirty-eight biopsies were HPV-16DNA positive. This determination was correlated with cellular differentiation and growth pattern. Our data corroborates that squamous cell carcinoma was invariably associated with HPV-16DNA.

  14. Cleavage of HPV-16 E6/E7 mRNA mediated by modified 10-23 deoxyribozymes.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gutiérrez, Pablo; Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2009-09-01

    Deoxyribozymes (DXZs) are small oligodeoxynucleotides capable of mediating phosphodiester bond cleavage of a target RNA in a sequence-specific manner. These molecules are a new generation of artificial catalytic nucleic acids currently used to silence many disease-related genes. The present study describes a DXZ (Dz1023-434) directed against the polycistronic mRNA from the E6 and E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16), the main etiological agent of cervical cancer. Dz1023-434 showed efficient cleavage against a bona fide antisense window at nt 410-445 within HPV-16 E6/E7 mRNA even in low [Mg(2+)] conditions. Using a genetic analysis as guidance, we introduced diverse chemical modifications within Dz1023-434 catalytic core to produce a stable locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified DXZ (Dz434-LNA) with significant cleavage activity of full E6/E7 transcripts. Cell culture testing of Dz434-LNA produced a sharp decrement of E6/E7 mRNA levels in HPV-16-positive cells resulting in decreased proliferation and considerable cell death in a specific and dose-dependent manner. No significant effects were observed with inactive or scrambled control DXZs nor from using HPV-negative cells, suggesting catalysis-dependent effect and high specificity. The biological effects of Dz434-LNA suggest a potential use for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  15. HPV-16 in a distinct subset of oral epithelial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Mark A; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Lindeman, Neal; Hall, Dimity; Villa, Alessandro; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2017-08-11

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 is the most common high-risk HPV type identified in oropharyngeal and cervical neoplasia. Recently, HPV-associated oral epithelial dysplasia with specific histopathologic features and demographics similar to HPV-oropharyngeal carcinoma has been identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate histopathologically all cases of HPV-oral epithelial dysplasia seen in one center and identify HPV types in a subset of cases. Cases with specific histopathology for HPV-oral epithelial dysplasia that were positive both by immunohistochemical studies for p16 and by in situ hybridization for high-risk types of HPV were further analyzed using QIAamp DNA Tissue Kits (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany). DNA was extracted, amplified, and digested with restriction enzymes and run on a polyacrylamide gel. Digestion patterns were visually compared with a database of known HPV digestion patterns for identification. There were 53 specimens included in the analysis. There were 47 males and six females (7.8:1), with a median age of 55 years (range 41-81). The most common site of involvement was the tongue/floor of mouth (77% of cases). Of the 53 cases, 94% exhibited parakeratosis and/or hyperkeratosis. All the cases featured karyorrhexis, apoptosis, and characteristics of conventional carcinoma in situ. The quantity of DNA extracted was sufficient for analysis in 22 cases. HPV-16 was identified in 20/22 (91%) cases. One case was associated with HPV-33 and one with HPV-58 (5% each). Eight of the 53 cases (15%) were associated with invasive squamous cell carcinomas.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 11 August 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.71.

  16. Multisite HPV16/18 Vaccine Efficacy Against Cervical, Anal, and Oral HPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Quint, Wim; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Struijk, Linda; Schussler, John; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) reports separately demonstrated vaccine efficacy against HPV16 and HPV18 (HPV16/18) infections at the cervical, anal, and oral regions; however, the combined overall multisite efficacy (protection at all three sites) and vaccine efficacy among women infected with HPV16 or HPV18 prior to vaccination are less known. Methods: Women age 18 to 25 years from the CVT were randomly assigned to the HPV16/18 vaccine (Cervarix) or a hepatitis A vaccine. Cervical, oral, and anal specimens were collected at the four-year follow-up visit from 4186 women. Multisite and single-site vaccine efficacies (VEs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for one-time detection of point prevalent HPV16/18 in the cervical, anal, and oral regions four years after vaccination. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was highest among “naïve” women (HPV16/18 seronegative and cervical HPV high-risk DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 83.5%, 95% CI = 72.1% to 90.8%). Multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was also demonstrated among women with evidence of a pre-enrollment HPV16 or HPV18 infection (seropositive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 but cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 57.8%, 95% CI = 34.4% to 73.4%), but not in those with cervical HPV16 and/or HPV18 DNA at vaccination (anal/oral HPV16/18 VE = 25.3%, 95% CI = -40.4% to 61.1%). Concordant HPV16/18 infections at two or three sites were also less common in HPV16/18-infected women in the HPV vaccine vs control arm (7.4% vs 30.4%, P < .001). Conclusions: This study found high multisite vaccine efficacy among “naïve” women and also suggests the vaccine may provide protection against HPV16/18 infections at one or more anatomic sites among some women infected with these types prior to HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:26467666

  17. Genetic characterization and clinical implications of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) variants from northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Badano, Inés; Totaro, Maria Elina; Culasso, Andrés Carlos Alberto; Sanabria, Daiana Jimena; Schurr, Theodore G; Balette, Ileana Cristina; Roisman, Alejandro; Basiletti, Jorge; Picconi, María Alejandra; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor; Liotta, Domingo Javier

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) plays a central role in the development of cervical cancer. Worldwide studies indicate the existence of HPV16 variants that show different geographic distributions and oncogenic potential. Our goal was to describe the genetic variation of HPV16 isolates identified in urban women with different grades of cervical lesions living in northeastern Argentina. We analyzed 116 HPV16-positive cervical samples (16 NLIM, 62 L-SIL, 16 H-SIL and 22 cervical cancer) from patients attending health centers in Misiones (Argentina) during 2006-13. HPV16 isolates were genetically characterized through PCR amplification and direct sequencing of 364 bp within the long control region, and the resulting sequences classified into variants based on phylogenetic analysis (lineages A, B, C and D). A potential association between HPV16 variants and lesion grade was evaluated through an odds ratio (OR) test. A temporal framework for the origin of HPV16 variants was assessed through coalescence analysis (BEAST v 1.7.5). Phylogenetic analysis of HPV16 sequences showed that 92.1% of the samples clustered with lineage A, and 6.9% to lineage D. HPV16 variants from lineage D were more frequently associated with high-grade lesions and cancer (HSIL+) than lineage A variants at an OR of 13.8 (1.6-117.0). The time to most common recent ancestor (tMCRA) of all variants was 119,103 years before present (HPD 95%=48,486-197,239), a date consistent with the time frame for modern human evolution. Our results suggest that HPV16 variants from lineage D may represent an additional risk factor for the development of cervical cancer in women living in northeastern Argentina. This study provides new information about viral isolates present in Argentina that will contribute to the monitoring of HPV16 infection in the vaccine era. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. HPV16 variants distribution in invasive cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, and anus.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Párraga, Sara; Gandini, Carolina; Pimenoff, Ville N; Alemany, Laia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Xavier Bosch, F; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2016-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)16 is the most oncogenic human papillomavirus, responsible for most papillomavirus-induced anogenital cancers. We have explored by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis the viral variant lineages present in 692 HPV16-monoinfected invasive anogenital cancers from Europe, Asia, and Central/South America. We have assessed the contribution of geography and anatomy to the differential prevalence of HPV16 variants and to the nonsynonymous E6 T350G polymorphism. Most (68%) of the variance in the distribution of HPV16 variants was accounted for by the differential abundance of the different viral lineages. The most prevalent variant (above 70% prevalence) in all regions and in all locations was HPV16_A1-3, except in Asia, where HPV16_A4 predominated in anal cancers. The differential prevalence of variants as a function of geographical origin explained 9% of the variance, and the differential prevalence of variants as a function of anatomical location accounted for less than 3% of the variance. Despite containing similar repertoires of HPV16 variants, we confirm the worldwide trend of cervical cancers being diagnosed significantly earlier than other anogenital cancers (early fifties vs. early sixties). Frequencies for alleles in the HPV16 E6 T350G polymorphism were similar across anogenital cancers from the same geographical origin. Interestingly, anogenital cancers from Central/South America displayed higher 350G allele frequencies also within HPV16_A1-3 lineage compared with Europe. Our results demonstrate ample variation in HPV16 variants prevalence in anogenital cancers, which is partly explained by the geographical origin of the sample and only marginally explained by the anatomical location of the lesion, suggesting that tissue specialization is not essential evolutionary forces shaping HPV16 diversity in anogenital cancers. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. HPV16E7 silencing enhances susceptibility of CaSki cells to natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huimin; Hu, Ruili; Guan, Xinlei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhang, Xueying

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells to CaSki cells following knockdown of the E7 protein of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16E7). Recombinant adenovirus-short hairpin-E7 protein of the human panillomavirus type 16 (Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7) was constructed and used to infect CaSki cells. The expression of HPV16E7 in CaSki cells was assessed using western blot analysis. The expression of cell surface molecule major histocompatibility complex‑I (MHC‑I) in CaSki cells infected with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7 was examined using flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of NK cells isolated and expanded from healthy volunteers on Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7‑infected CaSki cells was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7 was successfully constructed and able to inhibit HPV16E7 the expression in CaSki cells. The expression of major histocompa-tibility complex I (MHC‑I), a surface molecule, in CaSki cells was increased after infection with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7. Compared with the controls, the cytotoxicity of NK cells on CaSki cells, which were infected with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7, was decreased (p<0.05). In conclusion, HPV16E7 suppresses the expression of MHC‑I on CaSki cells to evade cytotoxic T‑cell (CTL) response. However, it was possible to enhance the cytotoxicity of expanded NK cells to cervical cancer cells or HPV16‑infected cells in vitro, indicating that NK cells may be used for immunotherapy of cervical cancer.

  20. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Gonzalèz, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Background Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of ∼1.5 per 100,000 women annually) but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus-16 (HPV16) infection causes most cases. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) of an ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection. Methods In a randomized double-blind controlled trial designed to evaluate VE against persistent cervical HPV16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions in Costa Rica, 4210 healthy women underwent anal specimen collection (4224 of 5968= 70.8% of eligible women) at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination to evaluate anal HPV16/18 VE. Cervical HPV16/18 VE among the same women at the same visit was calculated as a comparator. For this ancillary work, analyses were conducted in a restricted cohort of women both cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative and HPV 16/18 seronegative prior at enrollment (N=1989), and in the full cohort (all women with an anal specimen). Findings In the restricted cohort, VE against prevalent HPV16/18 anal infection measured one-time, four-years post-vaccination was 83.6% (95%CI 66.7% to 92.8%), which was comparable to cervical HPV16/18 VE (87.9%, 95%CI 77.4% to 94.0%). In the full cohort, HPV16/18 VE was statistically lower at the anus (62.0%, 95%CI 47.1% to 73.1%) compared to the cervix (76.4%, 95%CI 67.0% to 83.5%) (p for anatomic-site interaction =0.03). Significant and comparable VE estimates against a composite endpoint of HPV31/33/45 (i.e.: cross-protection) was observed at the anus and cervix. Interpretation The ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine affords strong protection against anal HPV, particularly among women more likely to be HPV naïve at vaccination. Funding. The Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial is sponsored and funded by the NCI (contract N01-CP-11005), with funding support from the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, and conducted with support from the Ministry of Health of Costa Rica. Vaccine was

  1. Real-time duplex PCR for simultaneous HPV 16 and HPV 18 DNA quantitation.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, Elise; Saunier, Maëlle; Mauny, Frédéric; Schwarz, Elisabeth; Mougin, Christiane; Prétet, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-01

    HPV 16 and HPV 18 are responsible for more than 75% of cervical cancers and high HPV 16 loads are associated with both prevalent and incident lesions. The objective of the present study was to develop a method allowing the detection and quantitation of HPV 16 and 18 DNA to improve future strategies for cervical cancer screening. A duplex real-time PCR allowing the simultaneous quantitation of both HPV 16 and HPV 18 was carried out. Mixes of HPV 16 and HPV 18 whole genome plasmids were prepared to test a wide range of viral DNA concentrations. The values obtained for each mix of plasmids with the simplex and the duplex PCR were very close to the theoretical values except when a HPV type represented only 1:1000 genome equivalent or lower than the concurrent type. Cervical samples harboring HPV 16, HPV 18 or both types were tested by comparing the results with simplex and duplex real-time PCR assays. HPV 16 and HPV 18 genome titers were similar with the two assays. In conclusion, the real-time duplex PCR proved to be robust for HPV 16 and HPV 18 DNA quantitation.

  2. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen P.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Groves, Ian J.; Odle, Richard I.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of ‘master regulators’ for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  3. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen P; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Odle, Richard I; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-07-26

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of 'master regulators' for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins.

  4. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha expression is increased in infected positive HPV16 DNA oral squamous cell carcinoma and positively associated with HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence for the role of High Risk (HR) Human PapillomaVirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). The E6 and E7 oncogenes from HR HPVs are responsible for the deregulation of p53 and pRB proteins involved in cell cycle and apoptotic pathways. In cell lines experiments, the HPV E7 protein seems to be able to enhance Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) activity, normally involved in the response to hypoxia and able to enhance angiogenesis. Results We studied tumor specimens from 62 OSCC; a higher prevalence of tumors in TNM stage II and also in pT2 class between OSCC infected positive HPV16 DNA than non-infected ones was observed. HIF-1α positivity was detected throughout the analysed fields, not associated with areas of necrosis and also observed in cells immediately adjacent to blood vessels. A significant increase in mean values of the HIF-1α labeling indexes was observed for pT1-T2, as well for stage I-II, in the infected positive HPV16 DNA tumors than non-infected ones. HIF-1α and HPV16 E7 labeling indexes showed a significantly positive correlation which suggested a positive association between HPV16 E7 and HIF-1α expression. Conclusions In our specimens HIF-1α immunoreactivity hints for an O2-independent regulatory mechanism in infected positive HPV16 DNA tumors, especially for pT1-T2 and stage I-II tumors, suggesting a very early involvement in the development of HPV-induced OSCC. HIF-1α and HPV16 E7 labeling indexes suggest also a positive association between the two proteins in infected positive HPV16 DNA OSCC. PMID:22032288

  5. HPV-16 E6/E7 promotes cell migration and invasion in cervical cancer via regulating cadherin switch in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongxiao; Zhou, Jiansong; Wang, Fenfen; Shi, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Li, Baohua

    2015-12-01

    Cadherin switch, as a key hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is characterized by reduced E-cadherin expression and increased N-cadherin or P-cadherin expression, and has been implicated in many aggressive tumors, but the importance and regulatory mechanism of cadherin switch in cervical cancer have not been investigated. Our study aimed to explore the role of cadherin switch by regulation of HPV-16 E6/E7 in progression and metastasis of cervical cancer. The expressions of E-cadherin and P-cadherin were examined by immunohistochemical staining in 40 cases of high-grade cervical lesions with HPV-16 infection only in which HPV-16 E6 and E7 expression had been detected using qRT-PCR method. Through modulating E6 and E7 expression using HPV-16 E6/E7 promoter-targeting siRNAs or expressed vector in vitro, cell growth, migration, and invasion were separately tested by MTT, wound-healing and transwell invasion assays, as well as the expressions of these cadherins by western blot analyses. Finally, the expressions of these cadherins in cancerous tissues of BALB/c-nu mouse model inoculated with the stable HPV-16 E6/E7 gene silencing Siha and Caski cells were also measured by immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation coefficient analyses showed the strongly inverse correlation of E-cadherin expression and strongly positive correlation of P-cadherin expression with E6/E7 level in 40 cases of high-grade cervical lesions. Furthermore, the modulation of HPV-16 E6/E7 expression remarkably influenced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, as well as the protein levels of E-cadherin and P-cadherin in cervical cell lines. Finally, the reduction of HPV-16 E6/E7 expression led to up-regulated expression of E-cadherin and down-regulated expression of P-cadherin in BALB/c-nu mouse model in vivo assay. Our results unraveled the possibility that HPV-16 E6/E7 could promote cell invasive potential via regulating cadherin switching, and consequently contribute

  6. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes, assessment of HPV 16 and 18 viral load and anal related lesions in HIV positive patients: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Tamalet, Catherine; Obry-Roguet, Veronique; Ressiot, Emmanuelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Del Grande, Jean; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle

    2014-03-01

    Natural history of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer is not fully understood. Factors associated with cytological abnormalities and predictors of progression to high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia still deserve investigation. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of HPV types, the relationship between HPV genotypes, HPV 16/18 viral load and cytological abnormalities in male and female HIV-infected patients. One hundred and twenty-two (72.6%) patients were infected with HPV, 75 (61%) had multiple HPV infection, and 94 (77%) had high-risk HPV infection. The most frequently identified HPV types were HPV 16 (64%), HPV 6 (39%), HPV 18 (31%), HPV 53 (14.7%), HPV 33 (10.6%), HPV 11 (8.2%), HPV 70 (5.7%), and HPV 61 (4.9%). The HPV types which were most frequently found in combination were HPV 6 + 16 (9.8%), 6 + 16 + 18 (8.2%), 16 + 18 (6.6%), 6 + 18 (4.9%), 16 + 33 (3.3%), 16 + 53 (3.3%). Median HPV16 and 18 viral loads were 6.1 log10 copies/10(6) cells [IQR 5.0-7.3] and 6.1 log10 copies/10(6) cells [IQR 5.7-6.0], respectively. Male gender (P = 0.03, OR: 1.2 [1.0-1.4]) and homo/bisexual transmission routes (P = 0.044, OR: 1.4 [1.0-1.9]) were associated with HPV 16 infection. An HPV 16 viral load cut-off ≥5.3 log10 copies/10(6) cells and a CD4+ cell count ≤200/µl were independent factors associated with abnormal cytology. In the absence of national consensus guidelines, a strict regular follow-up at shorter intervals is recommended for HIV-infected patients with abnormal cytology, especially low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, an HPV 16 viral load ≥5.3 log/10(6) cells and a CD4+ cell count ≤200/µl.

  7. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV 16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Aimée R; González, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-09-01

    Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of about 1·5 per 100,000 women yearly), but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 infections cause most cases of anal cancer. We assessed efficacy of an AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16 and HPV 18 vaccine against anal infection with HPV 16, HPV 18, or both (HPV 16/18). Women from Costa Rica were registered between June 28, 2004, and Dec 21, 2005, in a randomised double-blind controlled trial that was designed to assess vaccine efficacy against persistent cervical HPV 16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions. Eligible women were residents of Guanacaste and selected areas of Puntarenas, Costa Rica, age 18-25 years, in good general health, willing to provide informed consent, and were not pregnant or breastfeeding. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive an HPV vaccine (Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium) or a control hepatitis A vaccine (modified preparation of Havrix, GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium). Vaccines were administered in three 0·5 mL doses at enrolment, 1 month, and 6 months. Women, selected at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination, provided anal specimens for assessment of vaccine efficacy against anal HPV 16/18 infection. Prevalence of anal HPV 16/18 infections, reported as vaccine efficacy, was the primary endpoint of the study described here. Vaccine efficacy against cervical HPV 16/18 infection in the same women at the 4-year visit was used as a comparator. Analyses were done in a restricted cohort of women who were negative for both cervical HPV 16 and HPV 18 DNA and who were HPV 16 and HPV 18 seronegative before enrolment (HPV naive), and also in the full cohort of women who provided an anal specimen. Investigators were masked to group assignment. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00128661. All women who attended the final blinded study visit and consented to anal specimen collection were included in

  8. Efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine: final according to protocol results from the blinded phase of the randomized Costa Rica HPV-16/18 vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Catteau, Gregory; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary; Herrero, Rolando

    2014-09-03

    A community-based randomized trial was conducted in Costa Rica to evaluate the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (NCT00128661). The primary objective was to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine to prevent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or more severe disease (CIN2+) associated with incident HPV-16/18 cervical infections. Secondary objectives were to evaluate efficacy against CIN2+ associated with incident cervical infection by any oncogenic HPVs and to evaluate duration of protection against incident cervical infection with HPV-16/18. Vaccine safety and immunogenicity over the 4-year follow-up were also evaluated. We randomized (3727 HPV arm; 3739 control arm), vaccinated (HPV-16/18 or Hepatitis A) and followed (median 53.8 months) 7466 healthy women aged 18-25 years. 5312 women (2635 HPV arm; 2677 control arm) were included in the according to protocol analysis for efficacy. The full cohort was evaluated for safety. Immunogenicity was considered on a subset of 354 (HPV-16) and 379 (HPV-18) women. HPV type was assessed by PCR on cervical specimens. Immunogenicity was assessed using ELISA and inhibition enzyme immunoassays. Disease outcomes were histologically confirmed. Vaccine efficacy and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were computed. Vaccine efficacy was 89.8% (95% CI: 39.5-99.5; N=11 events total) against HPV-16/18 associated CIN2+, 59.9% (95% CI: 20.7-80.8; N=39 events total) against CIN2+ associated with non-HPV-16/18 oncogenic HPVs and 61.4% (95% CI: 29.5-79.8; N=51 events total) against CIN2+ irrespective of HPV type. The vaccine had an acceptable safety profile and induced robust and long-lasting antibody responses. Our findings confirm the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against incident HPV infections and cervical disease associated with HPV-16/18 and other oncogenic HPV types. These results will serve as a benchmark to which we can compare future findings from the ongoing extended follow-up of participants in the Costa Rica

  9. Efficacy of the HPV-16/18 Vaccine: Final according to protocol results from the blinded phase of the randomized Costa Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Catteau, Gregory; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary; Herrero, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    Background A community-based randomized trial was conducted in Costa Rica to evaluate the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (NCT00128661). The primary objective was to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine to prevent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or more severe disease (CIN2+) associated with incident HPV-16/18 cervical infections. Secondary objectives were to evaluate efficacy against CIN2+ associated with incident cervical infection by any oncogenic HPVs and to evaluate duration of protection against incident cervical infection with HPV-16/18. Vaccine safety and immunogenicity over the 4-year follow-up were also evaluated. Methods We randomized (3,727 HPV arm; 3,739 Control arm), vaccinated (HPV-16/18 or Hepatitis A) and followed (median 53.8 months) 7,466 healthy women aged 18-25 years. 5,312 women (2,635 HPV arm; 2,677 Control arm) were included in the according to protocol analysis for efficacy. The full cohort was evaluated for safety. Immunogenicity was considered on a subset of 354 (HPV-16) and 379 (HPV-18) women. HPV type was assessed by PCR on cytology specimens. Immunogenicity was assessed using ELISA and inhibition enzyme immunoassays. Disease outcomes were histologically confirmed. Vaccine efficacy and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were computed. Results Vaccine efficacy was 89.8% (95% CI: 39.5 - 99.5; N=11 events total) against HPV-16/18 associated CIN2+, 59.9% (95% CI: 20.7 - 80.8; N=39 events total) against CIN2+ associated with non-HPV-16/18 oncogenic HPVs and 61.4% (95% CI: 29.5-79.8; N=51 events total) against CIN2+ irrespective of HPV type. The vaccine had an acceptable safety profile and induced robust and long-lasting antibody responses. Conclusions Our findings confirm the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against incident HPV infections and cervical disease associated with HPV-16/18 and other oncogenic HPV types. These results will serve as a benchmark to which we can compare future findings from ongoing extended

  10. Differential HPV16 variant distribution in squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Párraga, S; Alemany, L; de Sanjosé, S; Bosch, F X; Bravo, I G

    2017-05-01

    Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) causes 70% of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) worldwide. Interaction between HPV16 genetic diversity, host genetics and target tissue largely determine the chances to trigger carcinogenesis. We have analyzed the differential prevalence of viral variants in 233 HPV16-monoinfected squamous (SCC), glandular (ADC) and mixed (ADSC) ICCs from four continents, assessing the contribution of geographical origin and cancer histology. We have further quantified the contribution of viral variants and cancer histology to differences in age at tumor diagnosis. The model fitted to the data explained 97% of the total variance: the largest explanatory factors were differential abundance among HPV16 variants (78%) and their interaction with cancer histology (9.2%) and geography (10.1%). HPV16_A1-3 variants were more prevalent in SCC while HPV16_D variants were increased in glandular ICCs. We confirm further a non-random geographical structure of the viral variants distribution. ADCs were diagnosed at younger ages than SCCs, independently of the viral variant triggering carcinogenesis. HPV16 variants are differentially associated with histological ICCs types, and ADCs are systematically diagnosed in younger women. Our results have implications for the implementation of cervical cancer screening algorithms, to ensure proper early detection of elusive ADCs.

  11. HPV16 E6 regulates annexin 1 (ANXA1) protein expression in cervical carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Sichero, Laura; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa Lina; Rahal, Paula

    2016-09-15

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a substrate for E6AP mediated ubiquitylation. It has been hypothesized that HPV 16 E6 protein redirects E6AP away from ANXA1, increasing its stability and possibly contributing to viral pathogenesis. We analyzed ANXA1 expression in HPV-positive and negative cervical carcinoma-derived cells, in cells expressing HPV-16 oncogenes and in cells transduced with shRNA targeting E6AP. We observed that ANXA1 protein expression increased in HPV-16-positive tumor cells, in keratinocytes expressing HPV-16 E6wt (wild-type) or E6/E7 and C33 cells expressing HPV-16 E6wt. ANXA1 protein expression decreased in cells transfected with E6 Dicer-substrate RNAs (DsiRNA) and C33 cells cotransduced with HPV-16 E6wt and E6AP shRNA. Moreover, colony number and proliferation rate decreased in HPV16-positive cells transduced with ANXA1 shRNA. We observed that in cells infected with HPV16, the E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1. We suggest that ANXA1 may play a role in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • ANXA1 upregulation requires the presence of E6 and E6AP and is dependent on E6 integrity. • E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1 in cells infected with HPV16. • ANXA1 plays a role in cell proliferation in HPV-positive cervical cells.

  12. Association between human papillomavirus (HPV) 16, HPV18, and other HR-HPV viral load and the histological classification of cervical lesions: Results from a large-scale cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeni; Qin, Yu; Yu, Lulu; Lin, Chunqing; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jianfeng; Liu, Bin; Liao, Yiqun; Warren, De'Andre; Zhang, Xun; Chen, Wen

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between HPV viral load and histological grades in the development of cervical cancer is in argument. It is helpful to better understand the association by quantitatively detecting viral load of HPV16, 18, and a pool of 12 other high-risk HPV type (OT) independently on the samples of precancer and cancer. A cross-sectional study was performed in five medical centers of China. Histological diagnosis made by local pathologists was adjudicated via a pathology expert panel. A fully automated real-time PCR test was used for the measurement of HPV16, 18, OT, and human β-globin gene. A total of 2,513 women [1,341 normal, 209 low grade intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), 392 high grade intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), 520 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 51 adenocarcinoma (ADC)] were included. There is a linear increase in the total 14 HPV viral load with histological grade from normal to SCC. This trend was not observed in HPV18 infection but HPV16. The viral load for OT was low in normal, peaked in LSIL and HSIL, and declined in SCC and ADC. In the co-infection of HPV16 and HPV18, HPV16 viral load was significantly higher than HPV18 in LSIL and HSIL. In co-infection of HPV16 and OT, higher HPV16 viral load was also seen in SCC and ADC. Viral load of HPV16 increases with cervical lesion grade and is predominant in cervical cancer. HPV18 viral load is low in precancer, but going up in cancer. OT viral load shows inverse trend of HPV18. J. Med. Virol. 89:535-541, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) for the detection and quantification of HPV 16, 18, 33 and 45 - a short report.

    PubMed

    Lillsunde Larsson, Gabriella; Helenius, Gisela

    2017-07-26

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is associated with several anogenital malignancies. Here, we set out to evaluate digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) as a tool for HPV 16, 18, 33 and 45 viral load quantification and, in addition, to compare the efficacy of the ddPCR assay for HPV 16 detection with that of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Clinical samples, positive for HPV genotypes 16, 18, 33 and 45 were analyzed for viral load using ddPCR. Sample DNA was cleaved before droplet generation and PCR. Droplets positive for VIC and FAM fluorescence were read in a QX200 Droplet reader™ (BIO-RAD) after which the viral load was calculated using Quantasoft software. We found that DNAs extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples yielded lower amplification signals compared to those obtained from liquid based cytology (LBC) samples, but they were clearly distinguishable from negative background signals. The viral limit of detection was 1.6 copies of HPV 16, 2.8 copies of HPV 18, 4.6 copies of HPV 33 and 1.6 copies of HPV 45. The mean inter-assay coefficients of variability (CV) for the assays ranged from 3.4 to 7.0%, and the mean intra-assay CV from 2.6 to 8.2%. The viral load in the different cohorts of tumor samples ranged from 154 to 340,200 copies for HPV 16, 244 to 31,300 copies for HPV 18 and 738 to 69,100 copies for HPV 33. One sample positive for HPV 45 contained 1331 viral copies. When comparing qPCR data with ddPCR copy number data, the qPCR values were found to be 1 to 31 times higher. Separation of fragments in nanodroplets may facilitate the amplification of fragmented human and viral DNA. The method of digital droplet PCR may, thus, provide a new and promising tool for evaluating the HPV viral load in clinical samples.

  14. Six1 overexpression at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes promotes differentiation resistance and EMT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hanwen; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • Six1 expression increases during HPV16-mediated transformation. • Six1 overexpression causes differentiation resistance in HPV16-immortalized cells. • Six1 overexpression in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes activates MAPK. • Activation of MAPK promotes EMT and differentiation resistance. • Six1 overexpression reduces Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling.

  15. Frequency of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 Detection in Paraffin- Embedded Laryngeal Carcinoma Tissue

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Zinab; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbafzade, Alireza; Timori, Ali; Ranjbar, Nastaran; Saki, Nader; Nisi, Nilofar; Shahani, Toran; Varnaseri, Mehran; Angali Ahmadi, Kambiz

    2017-04-01

    Background and Objective: Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and HPV18 have been detected in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and there is evidence that detection of HPVs would have better prognostic value than patients with HNSCC negative for HPVs. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate frequency of HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotypes in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Materials and methods: Fifty formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks of laryngeal cancers were collected. Sections were prepared at 5 μm and DNA was extracted from each sample and subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect HPV-16/18 DNA s. Results: All samples were squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Overall 14/50 (28%) were positive for HPVs, 8 (18%) with HPV-16 and 6 (12%) with HPV-18. Additionally, 2 (4%) mixed infections of HPV 16 and 18 genotypes were observed among these cases. Conclusions: Overall, 28% of HNSCC samples proved positive for HPV16 and HPV18 genotypes, two high-risk HPV types. It is important to further assess whether such viral infection, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. Seropositivity of HPV 16 E6 and E7 and the risk of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, G R; Ha, K O; Himratul-Aznita, W H; Yang, Y H; Wan Mustafa, W M; Yuen, K M; Abraham, M T; Tay, K K; Karen-Ng, L P; Cheong, S C; Zain, R B

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of HPV seropositivity among patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy individuals and to correlate the association between HPV 16 seropositivity and risk of OSCC. HPV 16 E6 and E7 plasmids were constructed for the production of recombinant protein, which was used as the antigen in ELISA. HPV ELISA was performed on serum samples from 50 healthy individuals and 50 patients with OSCC. Using the HPV ELISA, 30% (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 0.85-5.93) and 18% (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 0.53-4.92) of patients with oral cancer were found to be HPV 16 E6 and E7 seropositive, respectively. Significant association was found between HPV 16 seropositivity and increased risk of OSCC in men, but not in male subjects. A similar trend was observed in non-betel quid chewers. Potential associations between HPV 16 E6/E7 seropositivity and oral cancer were revealed in men and non-betel quid chewer subjects, suggesting a possible etiological role of HPV 16 in subgroup of patients with OSCC in Malaysia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Deep sequencing of HPV16 genomes: A new high-throughput tool for exploring the carcinogenicity and natural history of HPV16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Michael; Boland, Joseph F.; Schiffman, Mark; Zhang, Xijun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Yang, Qi; Chen, Zigui; Yu, Kai; Mitchell, Jason; Roberson, David; Bass, Sara; Burdette, Laurie; Machado, Moara; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Andersen, Mark; Osentoski, Matt; Laptewicz, Michael; Wacholder, Sholom; Feldman, Ashlie; Raine-Bennett, Tina; Lorey, Thomas; Castle, Philip E.; Yeager, Meredith; Burk, Robert D.; Mirabello, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    For unknown reasons, there is huge variability in risk conferred by different HPV types and, remarkably, strong differences even between closely related variant lineages within each type. HPV16 is a uniquely powerful carcinogenic type, causing approximately half of cervical cancer and most other HPV-related cancers. To permit the large-scale study of HPV genome variability and precancer/cancer, starting with HPV16 and cervical cancer, we developed a high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) whole-genome method. We designed a custom HPV16 AmpliSeq™ panel that generated 47 overlapping amplicons covering 99% of the genome sequenced on the Ion Torrent Proton platform. After validating with Sanger, the current “gold standard” of sequencing, in 89 specimens with concordance of 99.9%, we used our NGS method and custom annotation pipeline to sequence 796 HPV16-positive exfoliated cervical cell specimens. The median completion rate per sample was 98.0%. Our method enabled us to discover novel SNPs, large contiguous deletions suggestive of viral integration (OR of 27.3, 95% CI 3.3–222, P=0.002), and the sensitive detection of variant lineage coinfections. This method represents an innovative high-throughput, ultra-deep coverage technique for HPV genomic sequencing, which, in turn, enables the investigation of the role of genetic variation in HPV epidemiology and carcinogenesis. PMID:26645052

  18. Evolution vs the number of gene copies per primitive cell.

    PubMed

    Koch, A L

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the rate at which an advantageous mutant would displace the prototype in a replicating system without an accurate segregation mechanism. If the number of gene copies in the system is indefinitely large, Darwinian evolution is essentially stopped because there is no coupling of phenotype with genotype, i.e., there is no growth advantage to the advantageous gene relative to the prototype and therefore no "survival of the fittest." The inhibition of evolution due to a number of gene copies less than 100 would have been not insurmountable. Although the presence of multiple copies would have allowed replacement by an advantageous mutant, it provided a way for the primitive cell to conserve less immediately useful genes that could evolve into different or more effective genes. This possibility was lost as accurate segregation mechanisms evolved and cells with few copies of each gene, such as modern procaryotes, arose.

  19. Age-specific occurrence of HPV16- and HPV18-related cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quint, Wim G. V.; Hunt, William C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Alemany, Laia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Myers, Evan R.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    The age-specific of occurrence of cervical cancer related to human papillomavirus genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, the two targeted by current HPV vaccines, is not well described. We therefore used data from two large, tissue-based HPV genotyping studies of cervical cancer, one conducted in New Mexico (USA) (n = 744) and an international study restricted to cancers (n = 1,729) from Europe, North America, and Australia to represent those regions with widely available cervical cancer screening facilities. HPV results were categorized as HPV16 or HPV18 positive (HPV16/18) versus other HPV genotype. We observed a decreasing proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers with increasing age in the international study (ptrend < 0.001) and New Mexico study (ptrend < 0.001). There was no heterogeneity in the relationship between age of diagnosis and the proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers between studies (p = 0.8). Combining results from the two studies (n = 2,473), the percentages of HPV16/18-positive cases were 77.0% (95%CI: 75.1%-78.9%) for women less than 65 years old and 62.7% (95%CI: 58.4%-66.9%) for women aged 65 and older (p < 0.001). In women who are under the age of 25 and have been vaccinated before becoming sexually active, the cervical cancer incidence is expected to be approximately 3.5 per million by 2020. HPV vaccination against HPV16/18 may have a greater impact on cervical cancers in women under 65 than in women aged 65 and older. These data will inform the age-specific impact of HPV vaccination and its integration with cervical cancer screening activities. PMID:23632816

  20. Oxymatrine inhibits the proliferation of CaSki cells via downregulating HPV16E7 expression.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhijun; Zeng, Jing; Gao, Yan; Li, Fuyan; Li, Wei; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Yi; Wu, Ruimin; Chen, Yijia; Liu, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer remains a challenge, especially in developing countries, which lack efficient screening programs. HPV16E7 has been reported to play an important role in the development of cervical cancer. In recent years, oxymatrine, which was traditionally used as anti-malarial agent, has been shown to inhibit tumor growth with low toxicity to normal cells. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of oxymatrine in cervical cancer. The CCK-8 assay was used to compare the proliferation of untreated and oxymatrine-treated cervical cancer CaSki cells. Flow cytometry was applied to observe the effect of oxymatrine on apoptosis and the cell cycle distribution of CaSki cells. We used qRT-PCR and western blot analysis to determine the mRNA level and protein level of HPV16E7. The HPV16E7 siRNA inhibition was also performed to confirm the effect of downregulating HPV16E7 on the proliferation in CaSki cells. Our results revealed that oxymatrine-treated cells showed time-dependent and dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and a significant increase in apoptosis. Oxymatrine arrested CaSki cells in G0/G1 phase and S phase while decreased the cells in G2/M phase. The expression of HPV16E7 was significantly downregulated in oxymatrine-treated cells compared with control cells. Knock-down of HPV16E7 effectively inhibited the proliferation of CaSki cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that oxymatrine inhibits cervical cancer growth via downregulation of HPV16E7. Oxymatrine can be considered to be a potential preventive and therapeutic target for cervical cancer.

  1. Age-specific occurrence of HPV16- and HPV18-related cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    de Sanjose, Silvia; Wheeler, Cosette M; Quint, Wim G V; Hunt, William C; Joste, Nancy E; Alemany, Laia; Bosch, F Xavier; Myers, Evan R; Castle, Philip E

    2013-07-01

    The age-specific occurrence of cervical cancer related to human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, the two targeted by current HPV vaccines, is not well described. We therefore used data from two large, tissue-based HPV genotyping studies of cervical cancer, one conducted in New Mexico (n = 744) and an International study restricted to cancers (n = 1,729) from Europe, North America, and Australia to represent those regions with widely available cervical cancer screening facilities. HPV results were categorized as HPV16- or HPV18-positive (HPV16/18) versus other HPV genotype. We observed a decreasing proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers with increasing age in the International study (Ptrend < 0.001) and New Mexico study (Ptrend < 0.001). There was no heterogeneity in the relationship between age of diagnosis and the proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers between studies (P = 0.8). Combining results from the two studies (n = 2,473), the percentages of HPV16/18-positive cases were 77.0% [95% confidence interval (CI): 75.1%-78.9%] for women less than 65 years old and 62.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 58.4%-66.9%] for women aged 65 and older (P < 0.001). In women who are under the age of 25 and have been vaccinated before becoming sexually active, the cervical cancer incidence is expected to be approximately 3.5 per million by 2020. HPV vaccination against HPV16/18 may have a greater impact on cervical cancers in women under 65 than in women aged 65 and older. These data will inform the age-specific impact of HPV vaccination and its integration with cervical cancer screening activities.

  2. Mechanisms of change in gene copy number.

    PubMed

    Hastings, P J; Lupski, James R; Rosenberg, Susan M; Ira, Grzegorz

    2009-08-01

    Deletions and duplications of chromosomal segments (copy number variants, CNVs) are a major source of variation between individual humans and are an underlying factor in human evolution and in many diseases, including mental illness, developmental disorders and cancer. CNVs form at a faster rate than other types of mutation, and seem to do so by similar mechanisms in bacteria, yeast and humans. Here we review current models of the mechanisms that cause copy number variation. Non-homologous end-joining mechanisms are well known, but recent models focus on perturbation of DNA replication and replication of non-contiguous DNA segments. For example, cellular stress might induce repair of broken replication forks to switch from high-fidelity homologous recombination to non-homologous repair, thus promoting copy number change.

  3. Characterization of an RNA aptamer against HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Leija-Montoya, Ana Gabriela; Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Toscano-Garibay, Julia Dolores; Alvarez-Salas, Luis Marat

    2014-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is mainly composed of the L1 protein that can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are structurally and immunologically similar to the infectious virions. We report here the characterization of RNA aptamers that recognize baculovirus-produced HPV-16 L1 VLPs. Interaction and slot-blot binding assays showed that all isolated aptamers efficiently bound HPV-16 VLPs, although the Sc5-c3 aptamer showed the highest specificity and affinity (Kd=0.05 pM). Sc5-c3 secondary structure consisted of a hairpin with a symmetric bubble and an unstructured 3'end. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that the Sc5-c3 main loop is directly involved on VLPs binding. In particular, binding specificity appeared mediated by five non-consecutive nucleotide positions. Experiments using bacterial-produced HPV-16 L1 resulted in low Sc5-c3 binding, suggesting that recognition of HPV-16 L1 VLPs relies on quaternary structure features not present in bacteria-produced L1 protein. Sc5-c3 produced specific and stable binding to HPV-16 L1 VLPs even in biofluid protein mixes and thus it may provide a potential diagnostic tool for active HPV infection.

  4. Characterization of an RNA Aptamer Against HPV-16 L1 Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Leija-Montoya, Ana Gabriela; Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Toscano-Garibay, Julia Dolores

    2014-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is mainly composed of the L1 protein that can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are structurally and immunologically similar to the infectious virions. We report here the characterization of RNA aptamers that recognize baculovirus-produced HPV-16 L1 VLPs. Interaction and slot-blot binding assays showed that all isolated aptamers efficiently bound HPV-16 VLPs, although the Sc5-c3 aptamer showed the highest specificity and affinity (Kd=0.05 pM). Sc5-c3 secondary structure consisted of a hairpin with a symmetric bubble and an unstructured 3′end. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that the Sc5-c3 main loop is directly involved on VLPs binding. In particular, binding specificity appeared mediated by five non-consecutive nucleotide positions. Experiments using bacterial-produced HPV-16 L1 resulted in low Sc5-c3 binding, suggesting that recognition of HPV-16 L1 VLPs relies on quaternary structure features not present in bacteria-produced L1 protein. Sc5-c3 produced specific and stable binding to HPV-16 L1 VLPs even in biofluid protein mixes and thus it may provide a potential diagnostic tool for active HPV infection. PMID:25111024

  5. Functional Regulatory Role of STAT3 in HPV16-Mediated Cervical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shirish; Mahata, Sutapa; Shishodia, Gauri; Pandey, Arvind; Tyagi, Abhishek; Vishnoi, Kanchan; Basir, Seemi F.; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharti, Alok C.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic transcription factor constitutively active and aberrantly expressed in cervical cancer. However, the functional role of STAT3 in regulation of HPV's viral oncogene expression and downstream events associated with cervical carcinogenesis is not known. Our present study performed on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell lines (SiHa and CaSki) and primary tumor tissues revealed a strong positive correlation of constitutively active STAT3 with expression of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins and a negative association with levels of p53 and pRB. Pharmacologic targeting of STAT3 expression in cervical cancer cell lines either by STAT3-specific siRNA or blocking its tyrosine phosphorylation by AG490 or curcumin led to dose-dependent accumulation of p53 and pRb in cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, the suppression of STAT3 expression or activation was associated with the gradual loss of HPV16 E6 and E7 expression and was accompanied by loss of cell viability. The viability loss was specifically high in HPV16-positive cells as compared to HPV negative C33a cells. These findings substantiate the regulatory role of STAT3 in HPV16-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. Leads obtained from the present study provide a strong rationale for developing novel STAT3-based approaches for therapeutic interventions against HPV infection to control cervical cancer. PMID:23874455

  6. The HPV-16 E7 oncogene sensitizes malignant cells to IFN-alpha-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong

    2005-10-01

    Interferons (IFNs) exert antitumor effects in several human malignancies, but their mechanism of action is unclear. There is a great variability in sensitivity to IFN treatment depending on both tumor type and the individual patient. The reason for this variable sensitivity is not known. The fact that several IFN-induced anticellular effects are exerted through modulation of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes may indicate that the malignant genotype may be decisive in the cell's sensitivity to IFN. To determine if a deregulated oncogene could alter the cellular response to IFN, a mouse lymphoma cell line (J3D) was stably transfected with the viral human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) E7 oncogene. The E7-transfected cells and their respective mock-transfected sister clones were treated with IFN-{alpha} and examined for possible IFN-induced anticellular effects. We found that the E7-transfected clones were greatly sensitized to IFN-{alpha}-induced apoptosis compared with their mock-transfected counterparts. Induction of apoptosis in the transfected cells correlated with the ability of IFN to activate parts of the proapoptotic machinery specifically in these cells, including activation of caspases and the proapoptotic protein Bak. In summary, our data suggest that transfection of malignant cells with the E7 oncogene can sensitize them to IFN-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. This demonstrates that an oncogenic event may alter the cellular sensitivity to IFN and might also have implications for treatment of HPV related diseases with IFN.

  7. SHC2 gene copy number in multiple system atrophy (MSA).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Marcus C; Garland, Emily M; Hedges, Lora; Womack-Nunley, Bethany; Hamid, Rizwan; Phillips, John A; Shibao, Cyndya A; Raj, Satish R; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2014-02-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic, late onset, rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by autonomic failure, together with Parkinsonian, cerebellar, and pyramidal motor symptoms. The pathologic hallmark is the glial cytoplasmic inclusion with α-synuclein aggregates. MSA is thus an α-synucleinopathy. Recently, Sasaki et al. reported that heterozygosity for copy number loss of Src homology 2 domain containing-transforming protein 2 (SHC2) genes (heterozygous SHC2 gene deletions) occurred in DNAs from many Japanese individuals with MSA. Because background copy number variation can be distinct in different human populations, we assessed SHC2 allele copy number in DNAs from a US cohort of individuals with MSA, to determine the contribution of SHC2 gene copy number variation in an American cohort followed at a US referral center for MSA. Our cohort included 105 carefully phenotyped individuals with MSA. We studied 105 well-characterized patients with MSA and 5 control subjects with reduced SHC2 gene copy number. We used two TaqMan Gene Copy Number Assays, to determine the copy number of two segments of the SHC2 gene that are separated by 27 kb. Assay results of DNAs from all of our 105 subjects with MSA showed 2 copies of both segments of their SHC2 genes. Our results indicate that SHC2 gene deletions underlie few, if any, cases of well-characterized MSA in the US population. This is in contrast to the Japanese experience reported by Sasaki et al., likely reflecting heterogeneity of the disease in different genetic backgrounds.

  8. Karyopherin {beta}3: A new cellular target for the HPV-16 E5 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Ewa; Hanover, John A.; Schlegel, Richard; Suprynowicz, Frank A.

    2008-07-11

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer worldwide, and that HPV-16 is associated with more than half of these cases. In addition to the well-characterized E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-16, recent evidence increasingly has implicated the HPV-16 E5 protein (16E5) as an important mediator of oncogenic transformation. Since 16E5 has no known intrinsic enzymatic activity, its effects on infected cells are most likely mediated by interactions with various cellular proteins and/or its documented association with lipid rafts. In the present study, we describe a new cellular target that binds to 16E5 in COS cells and in stable human ectocervical cell lines. This target is karyopherin {beta}3, a member of the nuclear import receptor family with critical roles in the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins and in the secretory pathway.

  9. E6D25E, HPV16 Asian variant shows specific proteomic pattern correlating in cells transformation and suppressive innate immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Chopjitt, Peechanika; Pientong, Chamsai; Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Haonon, Ornuma; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kikawa, Satomi; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kiyono, Tohru; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2016-09-09

    HPV16 Asian variant (HPV16As) containing E6D25E oncogene, is commonly associated with cervical cancers of Asian populations. To explore a mechanism of E6D25E oncoprotein in carcinogenesis, we compared protein profiles in human keratinocytes expressing E6D25E with E6 of HPV16 prototype (E6Pro). A human cervical keratinocyte cell line, HCK1T, was transduced with retroviruses containing E6D25E or E6Pro genes. Biological properties of E6D25E or E6Pro transduced HCK1T cells were characterized. Protein profiles of the transduced HCK1T cells were analyzed using 2D-PAGE and characterized by mass spectrometry and western blotting. Reactomes of modulated proteins were analyzed by using the Reactome Knowledgebase. The E6D25E and E6Pro oncoproteins were comparable for their abilities to degrade p53 and suppress the induction of p21, and induce cell proliferation. Interestingly, the protein profiles of the HCK1T cells transduced with E6D25E showed specific proteomic patterns different from those with E6Pro. Among altered proteins, more than 1.5-fold up- or down- regulation was observed in E6D25E-expressing cells for gp96 and keratin7 which involved in activation of TLR signaling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells, respectively. This report describes new cellular proteins specifically targeted by E6D25E oncoprotein that may contribute to impair immune response against viral infection and cell transformation associated with oncogenic property of HPV16As variant. - Highlights: • E6D25E HPV16 specifically modulates protein profile of human keratinocytes. • E6D25E HPV16 modulates protein profile which involves in TLR signalling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells. • E6D25E oncoprotein may correlate to impair of immune response against viral infection and cells transformation.

  10. The expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 E7) induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in radiation and hypoxia resistant glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung-Ung; Choi, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Han Jo; Kumar Bokara, Kiran; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong-Eun

    2011-01-01

    p53 is a widely known tumor-suppressor gene product that plays a key role in apoptotic cell death induced by DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. Human glioma cells with functional p53 are known to be more resistant to γ-radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the mutant glioblastoma cells (U87MG) transfected with human papilloma virus-type 16 E7 (HPV16 E7) genes were capable of increasing sensitivity towards irradiation and hypoxia-induced cell death. The pLXSN retroviral vector expressed HPV-16E7 genes and was infected into the p53 mutated U87MG cell line. A specific amplification band of HPV16 E7 genes was detected in E7 genes and transfected in the U87MG cell line using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The experimental groups included the mutant glioblastoma cell line (U87MG), empty vector (pLXSN) transfected to mutant glioblastoma cell line (U87MG-LXSN), and retrovirus carrying HPV16 E7 genes transfected to the mutant glioblastoma cell line (U87MG-E7). Hypoxic conditions were optimized using LDH assay and the subjects were exposed to hypoxia (16 and 20 h) and irradiation (9 h). Hoechst-propidium iodide (PI) staining results showed that hypoxia and irradiation increased the number of dead cells in the U87MG-E7 cells compared to U87MG and U87MG-LXSN cells. Results of the FACS analysis showed a similar pattern and recorded 80.44 and 58.94% of apoptotic cells in U87MG-E7 and U87MG cells, respectively. Cell cycle analysis by FACS revealed that, following irradiation and hypoxia, cells showed G2-M arrest. Additionally, the Western blot analysis results showed altered expression of E2F-1, Rb and p53 in the irradiation- and hypoxia-induced U87MG-E7 cells compared to U87MG and U87MG LXSN cells. In conclusion, the over-expression of HPV16 E7 genes in U87MG cell lines increasd cell apoptosis and E2F1 expression compared to the HPV non-infected U87MG cells following irradiation and hypoxia. These results indicate that tumor

  11. Copy number variations exploration of multiple genes in Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rong-hua; Shao, Xiao-qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jin-an

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Few previous published papers reported copy number variations of genes could affect the predisposition of Graves’ disease (GD). Herein, the aim of this study was to explore the association between copy number variations (CNV) profile and GD. Methods: The preliminary copy number microarray used to screen copy number variant genes was performed in 6 GD patients. Five CNV candidate genes (CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) were then validated in an independent set of samples (50 GD patients and 50 matched healthy ones) by the Accucopy assay method. The CNV of the other 2 genes TRY6 and CCL3L1 was investigated in 144 GD patients and 144 healthy volunteers by the definitive genotyping technique using the Taqman quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (Taqman qPCR). TRY6 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13230029, was genotyped by the PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) in 675 GD patients and 898 healthy controls. Results: There were no correlation of the gene copy number (GCN) of CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 with GD. In comparison with that of controls, the GCN distribution of TRY6 and CCL3L1 in GD patients did not show significantly differ (P > 0.05). Furthermore, TRY6-related polymorphism (rs13230029) showed no difference between GD patients and controls. No correlation was found between CNV or SNP genotype and clinical phenotypes. Generally, there were no link of the copy numbers of several genes, including CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1 to GD. Conclusion: Our results clearly indicated that the copy number variations of multiple genes, namely CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1, were not associated with the development of GD. PMID:28121931

  12. Copy number variations exploration of multiple genes in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong-Hua; Shao, Xiao-Qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jin-An

    2017-01-01

    Few previous published papers reported copy number variations of genes could affect the predisposition of Graves' disease (GD). Herein, the aim of this study was to explore the association between copy number variations (CNV) profile and GD. The preliminary copy number microarray used to screen copy number variant genes was performed in 6 GD patients. Five CNV candidate genes (CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) were then validated in an independent set of samples (50 GD patients and 50 matched healthy ones) by the Accucopy assay method. The CNV of the other 2 genes TRY6 and CCL3L1 was investigated in 144 GD patients and 144 healthy volunteers by the definitive genotyping technique using the Taqman quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (Taqman qPCR). TRY6 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13230029, was genotyped by the PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) in 675 GD patients and 898 healthy controls. There were no correlation of the gene copy number (GCN) of CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 with GD. In comparison with that of controls, the GCN distribution of TRY6 and CCL3L1 in GD patients did not show significantly differ (P > 0.05). Furthermore, TRY6-related polymorphism (rs13230029) showed no difference between GD patients and controls. No correlation was found between CNV or SNP genotype and clinical phenotypes. Generally, there were no link of the copy numbers of several genes, including CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1 to GD. Our results clearly indicated that the copy number variations of multiple genes, namely CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1, were not associated with the development of GD.

  13. Acquisition and persistence of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 among men with high-HPV viral load infections in a circumcision trial in Kisumu, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Senkomago, Virginia; Backes, Danielle M; Hudgens, Michael G; Poole, Charles; Agot, Kawango; Moses, Stephen; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Chris J L M; Hesselink, Albertus T; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Bailey, Robert C; Smith, Jennifer S

    2015-03-01

    Circumcision and lower human papillomavirus (HPV) viral loads in men are possibly associated with a reduced risk of HPV transmission to women. However, the association between male circumcision and HPV viral load remains unclear. Swab specimens from the glans and shaft of the penis were collected from men enrolled in a circumcision trial in Kisumu, Kenya. GP5+/6+ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to identify HPV DNA types. HPV-16 and HPV-18 loads were measured with a LightCycler real-time PCR and classified as high (>250 copies/scrape) or low (≤250 copies/scrape). A total of 1159 men were randomly assigned to undergo immediate circumcision, and 1140 men were randomly assigned to the control arm (these individuals were asked to remain uncircumcised until the study ended). The hazard of acquisition of high-viral load infections in the glans was lower in the circumcision arm, compared with the control arm, for HPV-16 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.32 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .20-.49]) and HPV-18 (HR, 0.34 [95% CI, .21-.54]). The 6-month risk of HPV persistence among men with high-viral load infections in the glans at baseline was lower in the circumcision arm, compared with the control arm, for HPV-16 (risk ratio [RR], 0.36 [95% CI, .18-.72]) and HPV-18 (RR 0.34 [95% CI, .13-.86]). Weaker and less precise results were obtained for shaft samples. Male circumcision could potentially reduce the risk of HPV transmission to women by reducing the hazard of acquisition, and the risk of persistence of high-HPV viral load infections in the glans in men. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Acquisition and Persistence of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 Among Men With High-HPV Viral Load Infections in a Circumcision Trial in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Senkomago, Virginia; Backes, Danielle M.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Poole, Charles; Agot, Kawango; Moses, Stephen; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Hesselink, Albertus T.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Bailey, Robert C.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Circumcision and lower human papillomavirus (HPV) viral loads in men are possibly associated with a reduced risk of HPV transmission to women. However, the association between male circumcision and HPV viral load remains unclear. Methods. Swab specimens from the glans and shaft of the penis were collected from men enrolled in a circumcision trial in Kisumu, Kenya. GP5+/6+ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to identify HPV DNA types. HPV-16 and HPV-18 loads were measured with a LightCycler real-time PCR and classified as high (>250 copies/scrape) or low (≤250 copies/scrape). Results. A total of 1159 men were randomly assigned to undergo immediate circumcision, and 1140 men were randomly assigned to the control arm (these individuals were asked to remain uncircumcised until the study ended). The hazard of acquisition of high-viral load infections in the glans was lower in the circumcision arm, compared with the control arm, for HPV-16 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.32 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .20–.49]) and HPV-18 (HR, 0.34 [95% CI, .21–.54]). The 6-month risk of HPV persistence among men with high-viral load infections in the glans at baseline was lower in the circumcision arm, compared with the control arm, for HPV-16 (risk ratio [RR], 0.36 [95% CI, .18–.72]) and HPV-18 (RR 0.34 [95% CI, .13–.86]). Weaker and less precise results were obtained for shaft samples. Conclusions. Male circumcision could potentially reduce the risk of HPV transmission to women by reducing the hazard of acquisition, and the risk of persistence of high-HPV viral load infections in the glans in men. PMID:25261492

  15. Upstream Regulatory Region Alterations Found in Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) Isolates from Cervical Carcinomas Increase Transcription, ori Function, and HPV Immortalization Capacity in Culture▿

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Michael J.; Isacson, Christina; Anson, James R.; Lörincz, Attila T.; Wilczynski, Sharon P.; Haugen, Thomas H.; Turek, Lubomír P.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs isolated from cervical and head and neck carcinomas frequently contain nucleotide sequence alterations in the viral upstream regulatory region (URR). Our study has addressed the role such sequence changes may play in the efficiency of establishing HPV persistence and altered keratinocyte growth. Genomic mapping of integrated HPV type 16 (HPV-16) genomes from 32 cervical cancers revealed that the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes, as well as the L1 region/URR, were intact in all of them. The URR sequences from integrated and unintegrated viral DNA were found to harbor distinct sets of nucleotide substitutions. A subset of the altered URRs increased the potential of HPV-16 to establish persistent, cell growth-altering viral-genome replication in the cell. This aggressive phenotype in culture was not solely due to increased viral early gene transcription, but also to augmented initial amplification of the viral genome. As revealed in a novel ori-dependent HPV-16 plasmid amplification assay, the altered motifs that led to increased viral transcription from the intact genome also greatly augmented HPV-16 ori function. The nucleotide sequence changes correlate with those previously described in the distinct geographical North American type 1 and Asian-American variants that are associated with more aggressive disease in epidemiologic studies and encompass, but are not limited to, alterations in previously characterized sites for the negative regulatory protein YY1. Our results thus provide evidence that nucleotide alterations in HPV regulatory sequences could serve as potential prognostic markers of HPV-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:19458011

  16. Generation and characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against baculo-expressed HPV 16 VLPs.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, P; Sridevi, V N; Rajan, S; Praveen, A; Srikanth, A; Abhinay, G; Siva Kumar, V; Verma, R R; Rajendra, L

    2014-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the well-known second most cause of cervical cancer in women worldwide. According to the WHO survey, 70% of the total cervical cancers are associated with types HPV 16 and 18. Presently used prophylactic vaccine for HPV contains mainly capsid protein of L1 virus like particles (VLPs). Correct folding of VLPs and display of neutralizing epitopes are the major constraint for VLP-based vaccines. Further, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) play a vital role in developing therapeutics and diagnostics. mAbs are also useful for the demonstration of VLP conformation, virus typing and product process assessment as well. In the present study, we have explored the usefulness of mAbs generated against sf-9 expressed HPV 16 VLPs demonstrated as type-specific and conformational dependent against HPV 16 VLPs by ELISA. High affinity and high pseudovirion neutralization titer of mAbs indicated their potential for the development of prophylactic vaccines for HPV. Also, the type-specific and conformational reactivity of the mAbs to HPV 16 VLPs in sf-9 cells by immunofluorescence assay proved their diagnostic potential.

  17. [Prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 45 and 31 in women with cervical lesions].

    PubMed

    Pitta, Denise Rocha; Campos, Elisabete Aparecida; Sarian, Luis Otávio; Rovella, Marcello Silveira; Derchain, Sophie Françoise Mauricette

    2010-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31 and 45 in cervical screening samples of women with cellular changes and/or colposcopy suggestive of persistent high grade or low grade lesion who were submitted to conization. A total of 120 women were included in the study. Histological analysis of the cervical cones revealed 7 cases of cervicitis, 22 of CIN1, 31 of CIN2, 54 of CIN3, and 6 invasive carcinomas. The cervical screening samples were analyzed before conization for the presence of HPV-DNA by PCR using the consensus primers PGMY09/11. HPV-DNA-positive samples were tested for the presence of HPV16, 18, 31 and 45 using type-specific primers for these HPV. HPV-DNA was detected in 67.5% of the studied women. HPV 16 (40%) was the most prevalent type in most ilesions, followed by HPV 31 (13.3%), 45 (13.3%), and 18 (4.1%). Multiple infections occurred in 15% of the cases and infections with other HPV types were detected in 14% of the sample. HPV 16 and 18 infections do not always occur as a single infection, and may be associated with other HPV types on different occasions.

  18. Sustained efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Naud, Paulo S; Roteli-Martins, Cecilia M; De Carvalho, Newton S; Teixeira, Julio C; de Borba, Paola C; Sanchez, Nervo; Zahaf, Toufik; Catteau, Gregory; Geeraerts, Brecht; Descamps, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    HPV-023 (NCT00518336; ClinicalTrial.gov) is a long-term follow-up of an initial double-blind, randomized (1:1), placebo-controlled study (HPV-001, NCT00689741) evaluating the efficacy against human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 infection and associated cyto-histopathological abnormalities, persistence of immunogenicity, and safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Among the women, aged 15–25 years, enrolled in HPV-001 and who participated in the follow-up study HPV-007 (NCT00120848), a subset of 437 women from five Brazilian centers participated in this 36-month long-term follow-up (HPV-023) for a total of 113 months (9.4 years). During HPV-023, anti-HPV-16/18 antibodies were measured annually by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and pseudovirion-based neutralisation assay (PBNA). Cervical samples were tested for HPV DNA every 6 months, and cyto-pathological examinations were performed annually. During HPV-023, no new HPV-16/18-associated infections and cyto-histopathological abnormalities occurred in the vaccine group. Vaccine efficacy (VE) against HPV-16/18 incident infection was 100% (95%CI: 66.1, 100). Over the 113 months (9.4 years), VE was 95.6% (86.2, 99.1; 3/50 cases in vaccine and placebo groups, respectively) against incident infection, 100% (84·1, 100; 0/21) against 6-month persistent infection (PI); 100% (61·4, 100; 0/10) against 12-month PI; 97·1% (82.5, 99.9; 1/30) against ≥ ASC-US; 95·0% (68.0, 99.9; 1/18) against ≥ LSIL; 100% (45.2, 100; 0/8) against CIN1+; and 100% (–128.1, 100; 0/3) against CIN2+ associated with HPV-16/18. All vaccinees remained seropositive to HPV-16/18, with antibody titers remaining several folds above natural infection levels, as measured by ELISA and PBNA. There were no safety concerns. To date, these data represent the longest follow-up reported for a licensed HPV vaccine. PMID:25424918

  19. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2013-09-15

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • Ski oncoprotein levels increase during progression of HPV16-transformed cells. • Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent. • Ski knock-down in HPV16-transformed keratinocytes inhibited cell proliferation. • Cervical cancer samples overexpress Ski.

  20. Six1 Overexpression at Early Stages of HPV16-mediated Transformation of Human Keratinocytes Promotes Differentiation Resistance and EMT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanwen; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. PMID:25463612

  1. Scalable Production of HPV16 L1 Protein and VLPs from Tobacco Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zahin, Maryam; Joh, Joongho; Khanal, Sujita; Husk, Adam; Mason, Hugh; Warzecha, Heribert; Ghim, Shin-je; Miller, Donald M.; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Jenson, Alfred Bennett

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignancy among women particularly in developing countries, with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 causing 50% of invasive cervical cancers. A plant-based HPV vaccine is an alternative to the currently available virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines, and would be much less expensive. We optimized methods to express HPV16 L1 protein and purify VLPs from tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves transfected with the magnICON deconstructed viral vector expression system. L1 proteins were extracted from agro-infiltrated leaves using a series of pH and salt mediated buffers. Expression levels of L1 proteins and VLPs were verified by immunoblot and ELISA, which confirmed the presence of sequential and conformational epitopes, respectively. Among three constructs tested (16L1d22, TPL1d22, and TPL1F), TPL1F, containing a full-length L1 and chloroplast transit peptide, was best. Extraction of HPV16 L1 from leaf tissue was most efficient (> 2.5% of total soluble protein) with a low-salt phosphate buffer. VLPs were purified using both cesium chloride (CsCl) density gradient and size exclusion chromatography. Electron microscopy studies confirmed the presence of assembled forms of HPV16 L1 VLPs. Collectively; our results indicated that chloroplast-targeted transient expression in tobacco plants is promising for the production of a cheap, efficacious HPV16 L1 VLP vaccine. Studies are underway to develop plant VLPs for the production of a cervical cancer vaccine. PMID:27518899

  2. The E6 Oncoprotein from HPV16 Enhances the Canonical Wnt/β-catenin Pathway in Skin Epidermis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla-Delgado, José; Bulut, Gülay; Liu, Xuefeng; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M.; Schlegel, Richard; Flores-Maldonado, Catalina; Contreras, Rubén G.; Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Lambert, Paul F.; Üren, Aykut; Gariglio, Patricio

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of the Wnt signaling pathway to HPV-induced carcinogenesis is poorly understood. In high-grade dysplastic lesions that are caused by high-risk human papilloma viruses (HR-HPVs), β-catenin is often located in the cell nucleus, which suggests that Wnt pathway may be involved in the development of HPV-related carcinomas. Most of the oncogenic potential of HR-HPVs resides on the E6 protein’s PDZ-binding domain. We hypothesized that the PDZ-binding domain of the HPV16-E6 oncoprotein induces the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin due to its capacity to degrade PDZ-containing cellular targets. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the staining pattern of β-catenin in the skin epidermis of transgenic mice expressing the full-length E6 oncoprotein (K14E6 mice) and measured LacZ gene expression in K14E6 mice that were crossed with a strain expressing LacZ that was knocked into the Axin2 locus (Axin2+/LacZ mice). Here, we show that the E6 oncoprotein enhances the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, the accumulation of cellularβ-catenin-responsive genes and the expression of LacZ. None of these effects were observed when a truncated E6 oncoprotein that lacks the PDZ-binding domain was expressed alone (K14E6ΔPDZ mice) or in combination with Axin2+/LacZ. Conversely, co-transfection with either E6 or E6ΔPDZ similarly enhanced canonical Wnt signaling in short-term in vitro assays that utilized a luciferase Wnt/β-catenin/TCF-dependent promoter. We propose that the activation of canonical Wnt signaling could be induced by the HPV16-E6 oncoprotein; however, the participation of the E6 PDZ-binding domain seems to be important in in vivo models only. PMID:22160870

  3. Contribution of gross chromosomal changes to HPV16-induced transformation.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Klein, Shoshana; Safrai, Myriam; Levitzki, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    Cervical cancer is initiated by infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The viral E6 and E7 oncogenes are required for the initiation of cervical epithelial cell immortalization, but do not suffice to cause cervical cancer. Human oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes with altered activity in cervical carcinoma have been recognized, but none of these appears to be an absolute precondition for the development of the cancer. To examine the contribution of chromosomal aberrations to the development of cervical carcinoma, we used an in vitro model system consisting of primary keratinocytes (K) and papillomavirus transformed keratinocytes from early (E) and late (L) passages and from benzo[a]pyrene treated L cells (BP). Using DIGMAP software we compared alterations in gene expression as a function of chromosomal location. SKY chromosomal painting confirmed that the alterations identified by DIGMAP include gross chromosomal aberrations. Nearly half of the transcripts that were significantly reduced or increased in BP cells mapped to chromosomal regions showing coordinate changes in expression. These included transcripts involved in previously characterized phenotypic changes involved in transformation, such as the switch from apoptosis to necrosis and the reduction in cap-dependent translation. The global chromosomal changes that occurred during transformation are highly correlated with the phenotypic changes in HPV transformed keratinocytes. Our data are consistent with the theory that global chromosomal change is a necessary step in the process of cervical transformation.

  4. Inhibition of nuclear entry of HPV16 pseudovirus-packaged DNA by an anti-HPV16 L2 neutralizing antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Keiko; Kondo, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Mori, Seiichiro; Kanda, Tadahito

    2010-10-25

    Rabbit anti-HPV16 L2 serum (anti-P56/75) neutralizes multiple oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs). We inoculated HeLa cells with HPV16 pseudovirus (16PV) and with anti-P56/75-bound 16PV (16PV-Ab). Both 16PV and 16PV-Ab attached equally well to the cell surface. However, the cell-attached L1 protein of 16PV became trypsin-resistant after incubation at 37 {sup o}C, whereas approximately 20% of the cell-attached 16PV-Ab L1 remained trypsin-sensitive. Confocal microscopy of HeLa cells inoculated with 16PV revealed packaged DNA in the nucleus at 22 h after inoculation; however, nuclear DNA was not detected in cells inoculated with 16PV-Ab. Electron microscopy of HeLa cells inoculated with 16PV showed particles located in multivesicular bodies, lamellar bodies, and the cytosol after 4 h; no cytosolic particles were detected after inoculation with 16PV-Ab. These data suggest that anti-P56/75 inhibits HPV infection partly by blocking viral entry and primarily by blocking the transport of the viral genome to the nucleus.

  5. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by keratinocyte growth conditions is overcome by E6 and E7 from HPV16, but not HPV8 and HPV38: Characterization of global transcription profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Chiorino, Giovanna; Scatolini, Maria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2009-06-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth properties of primary human keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7 proteins, which are from either the beta- or alpha-genotypes, under different culture conditions. We demonstrated that keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7, from both HPV8 and 38, irreversibly underwent the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) when grown on plastic with FAD medium (F12/DMEM/5%FBS). Expression of E6/E7 from HPV16 was capable of fully overcoming the FAD-induced EMT. Immortalization was only observed in HPV16-transduced cell lines, while the more proliferating phenotype of both KerHPV8 and 38 was mainly related to FAD-induced EMT. Microarray analysis of exponentially growing cells identified 146 cellular genes that were differentially regulated in HPV16 compared to HPV8- and 38-transduced cells. A large accumulation of transcripts associated with epidermal development and differentiation was observed in HPV16-transduced cells, whereas transcripts of genes involved in the extracellular matrix, multicellular organismal processes, and inflammatory response were affected in HPV8 and 38-transduced cells.

  6. Usage of heparan sulfate, integrins, and FAK in HPV16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Abban, Cynthia Y.; Meneses, Patricio I.

    2010-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16) is the major causative agent of cervical cancer. Studies regarding the early binding and signaling molecules that play a significant role in infection are still lacking. The current study analyses the role of heparan sulfate, integrins, and the signaling molecule FAK in HPV16 infection of human adult keratinocytes cell line (HaCaTs). Our data demonstrate that infection requires the binding of viral particles to heparan sulfate followed by activation of focal adhesion kinase through an integrin. Infections were reduced in the presence of the FAK inhibitor, TAE226. TAE226 was observed to inhibit viral entry to the early endosome a known infectious route. These findings suggest that FAK can serve as a novel target for antiviral therapy. PMID:20441998

  7. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Meric, Dorothée; Dessy, Francis J; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique; Dubin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In this observer-blind study (NCT00423046), women (N = 1,106), stratified by age (18–26, 27–35, 36–45 y), were randomized (1:1) to receive the HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Months 0, 1, 6) or the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (Gardasil® Merck and Co., Inc., Months 0, 2, 6). Month 7 results were previously reported; we now report Month 24 results. In the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative at baseline for HPV type analyzed), seropositivity rates of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) [pseudovirion-based neutralization assay] were, across all age strata, 100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 97.5–100% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-16, and 99.0–100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 72.3–84.4% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-18. Corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2.4–5.8-fold higher for HPV-16 and 7.7–9.4-fold higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine vs. the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine; HPV-16 and HPV-18 GMTs were significantly higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (p < 0.0001) in the total vaccinated cohort (received ≥1 vaccine dose, irrespective of baseline sero/DNA-status). Similar results were obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ). Positivity rates and GMTs of antigen-specific IgG antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions (ELISA) were not significantly different between vaccines. At Month 24, CD4+ T-cell responses for HPV-16 and HPV-18 were higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine; memory B-cell response was higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine and similar between vaccines for HPV-16. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Although an immunological correlate of protection has not been defined, differences in the magnitude of immune response between vaccines may represent determinants of duration of protection. PMID:22048173

  8. HPV16/18 genotyping for the triage of HPV positive women in primary cervical cancer screening in Chile.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Marcela; Van De Wyngard, Vanessa; Poggi, Helena; Cook, Paz; Viviani, Paola; Barriga, María Isabel; Pruyas, Martha; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2015-01-01

    We previously conducted a population-based screening trial of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing and conventional cytology, demonstrating higher sensitivity (92.7 % vs 22.1 % for CIN2+) but lower positive predictive value (10.5 % vs 23.9 %) of hrHPV testing. Here we report the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping to triage the hrHPV positive participants. Women aged 25 years and older received hrHPV (Hybrid Capture 2) and Papanicolaou testing; positives by either test underwent colposcopy and directed biopsy, as did a sample of double-negatives. hrHPV positive women were reflex-tested with HPV16/18 genotyping (Digene HPV Genotyping PS Test). Among the 8,265 participants, 10.7 % were hrHPV positive, 1.7 % had ASCUS+ cytology, 1.2 % had CIN2+; 776 (88 %) hrHPV positive women had complete results, of whom 38.8 % were positive for HPV16 (24.0 %), HPV18 (9.7 %) or both (5.1 %). CIN2+ prevalence in HPV16/18 positive women (16.3 %, 95 % CI 12.3-20.9) was twice that of HPV16/18 negative women (8.0 %, 95 % CI 5.7-10.8). HPV16/18 genotyping identified 40.5 % of CIN2, 66.7 % of CIN3 and 75.0 % of cancers. Compared to hrHPV screening alone, HPV16/18 triage significantly reduced the referral rate (10.7 % vs 3.7 %) and the number of colposcopies required to detect one CIN2+ (9 vs 6). When HPV16/18 negative women with baseline ASCUS+ cytology were also colposcopied, an additional 14 % of CIN2+ was identified; referral increased slightly to 4.2 %. HPV16/18 triage effectively stratified hrHPV positive women by their risk of high-grade lesions. HPV16/18 positive women must be referred immediately; referral could be deferred in HPV16/18 negative women given the slower progression of non-HPV16/18 lesions, however, they will require active follow-up.

  9. Generation of affibody molecules specific for HPV16 E7 recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chanqiong; Song, Yiling; Cai, Yiqi; Cen, Danwei; Wang, Ledan; Xiong, Yirong; Jiang, Pengfei; Zhu, Shanli; Zhao, Kong-Nan; Zhang, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer caused by infection with high-risk human papillomavirus remains to be the most deadly gynecologic malignancy worldwide. It is well documented that persistent expression of two oncogenes (E6/E7) plays the key roles in cervical cancer. Thus, in vivo detection of the oncoproteins is very important for the diagnosis of the cancer. Recently, affibody molecules have been demonstrated to be a powerful targeting probe for tumor–targeted imaging and diagnosis. In this study, four HPV16 E7-binding affibody molecules (ZHPV16 E7127, ZHPV16E7301, ZHPV16E7384 and ZHPV16E7745) were screened from a phage-displayed peptide library and used for molecular imaging in tumor-bearing mice. Biosensor binding analyses showed first that the four affibody molecules bound to HPV16 E7 with very high affinity and specificity. They co-localized with E7 protein only in two HPV16-positive cancer cells (SiHa and CaSki). Furthermore, affibody ZHPV16E7384 was conjugated with Dylight755 and used for in vivo tumor-imaging. Strongly high-contrast tumor retention of this affibody only occurred in HPV16-derived tumors of mice as early as 30 min post-injection, not in HPV-negative and HPV18-derived tumors. The accumulation of Dylight755-conjugated ZHPV16E7384 in tumor was achieved over a longer time period (24 h). The data here provide strong evidence that E7-specific affibody molecules have great potential used for molecular imaging and diagnosis of HPV-induced cancers. PMID:27659535

  10. HPV-16 infection and cervical cancer: modeling the influence of duration of infection and precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Ronco, Guglielmo; Segnan, Nereo; French, Katherine; Vineis, Paolo; Garnett, Geoff P

    2010-03-01

    The patterns of transmission, clearance, and progression of HPV infection and the related precancerous lesions are key to accurately model cervical cancer epidemiology and prevention. We have developed an age-structured dynamic model of the transmission of HPV-16 infection. This mathematical model accounts, for the first time, for the effect of infection and precancerous lesions duration on the natural history of HPV-16 infection and precancerous lesions. The model's output has been fitted to contemporaneous sets of data from Turin, Italy, to estimate parameters that have had been indirectly tested by comparing them with other estimates reported in the literature. The average probability of HPV-16 infection transmission per sexual partnership was about 40%. The HPV-16 clearance and progression rates decreased as the length of time with infection increased, clearance ranging between 1.6 per woman-year (in the first 6 months of infection) and 0.036 (after more than 6 years of infection), and progression between 0.072 and 0.018 per woman-year. The rate of clearance of precancerous lesions (CIN2+) was inversely dependent on age, while the progression of CIN2+ toward invasive cervical cancer increased as the precancerous lesions persisted. The present study also suggests that an exclusive role of women's age in shaping the rate of progression to cancer is unlikely. These results should inform future analyses. Including more accurately the role of the duration of infection and precancerous lesions as determinants of the cervical cancer occurrence in models of cervical cancer control may influence predictors of the effectiveness of intervention strategies.

  11. HPV16 oncoprotein regulates the translocation of β-catenin via activation of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongliang; Müller, Susan; Qian, Guoqin; Xu, Jing; Kim, Sungjin; Chen, Zhengjia; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Hongzheng; Saba, Nabil F.; Shin, Dong M.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Background To understand the mechanism of frequent and early lymph node metastasis in high risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), we investigated whether β-catenin is regulated by HPV oncoprotein and contributes to OPSCC metastasis. Methods Expression levels of p16, β-catenin, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were examined in OPSCC samples (n=208) by immunohistochemistry. Expression and subcellular localization of β-catenin and EGFR activation were also studied in HPV-positive and -negative head and neck SCC cell lines by Western blot analysis. HPV16 E6 siRNA was used to elucidate the effect of HPV oncoprotein on β-catenin translocation. The involvement of EGFR in β-catenin translocation was confirmed by treatment with erlotinib. Moreover, the invasive capacity was evaluated after HPV16 E6/E7 repression. Results Our results showed that membrane weighted index (WI) of β-catenin was inversely correlated with p16 positivity (p<0.001) and lymph node metastasis (p=0.026), while nuclear staining of β-catenin was associated with p16-positive OPSCC (p<0.001). A low level of membrane β-catenin expression was significantly associated with disease free and overall survival (p<0.0001 in both cases). Furthermore, the membrane WI of EGFR was inversely correlated with p16 positivity (p<0.001) and positively correlated with membrane β-catenin (p<0.001). Our in vitro study showed that HPV16 E6 repression led to reductions of phosphoEGFR, and nuclear β-catenin, which were also observed after erlotinib treatment, and inhibition of invasion. Conclusions Our findings suggest that HPV16 E6 mediates the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus, which may be regulated by activated EGFR. PMID:25209444

  12. Increased Serum Antibody Titer against HPV-16 Antigen in Patients with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been reported to be significantly associated with Behçet's disease (BD). However, no reports have described HPV infection as a possible cause for the development of BD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether anti-HPV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titer is increased in BD. Serum samples from 93 Korean BD patients, who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of the International Study Group for BD, were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The clinical activity of BD was evaluated at the time of blood sampling. HPV-16 L1 virus-like particle (VLP) antigen was used in this study for the ELISA. Patients with BD had significantly higher antibody titers against HPV-16 (optical density [OD], 0.210–3.675; mean 0.992) than that of healthy controls (OD, 0.248–0.762; mean 0.517; P < 0.001). Using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, a cut-off value of 0.578 OD for the anti-HPV antibody titer was determined that differentiated BD patients from healthy controls. When we compared the clinical features of BD between the 2 groups, articular involvement of BD was more likely in patients with an anti-HPV-16 antibody titer < 0.578 OD (P = 0.035). In addition, patients with an anti-HPV-16 antibody titer < 0.578 were significantly younger than those with a titer ≥ 0.578 OD. HPV itself may be a possible extrinsic triggering infectious agent causing the development of BD. PMID:28244285

  13. HPV 16 Is Related to the Progression of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Loffredo D'Ottaviano, Maria Gabriela; Andreoli, Maria Antonieta; Costa, Maria Cecília; Rabelo-Santos, Silvia H.; Villa, Luisa Lina; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the acquisition, persistence, and clearance of HPV infection in women with CIN 2 followed up for 12 months. Methods. Thirty-seven women with CIN 2 biopsy, who have proven referral to cervical smear showing low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and tested for HPV, were followed up for one year with cervical smear, colposcopy, and HPV test every three months. HPV DNA was detected by the polymerase chain reaction and genotyping by reverse line blot hybridization assay. Results. CIN 2 regression rate was 49% (18/37), persistence as CIN 1 or CIN 2 was 22% (8/37), and progression to CIN 3 was 29% (11/37). Multiple HPV types were observed at admission in 41% (15/37) of cases. HPV 16 was detected at admission in 58% (11/19) of the cases that persisted/progressed and in 39% (7/18) of the cases that regressed. HPV 16 was considered possibly causal in 67% (10/15) of the cases that persisted or progressed and in 10% (1/10) of the cases that regressed (P = 0.01). Conclusion. Multiple HPV infections were frequently detected among women with CIN 2 at admission and during the followup. The CIN 2 associated with HPV 16 was more likely to persist or to progress to CIN 3. PMID:24369469

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and phylogenetic analysis of HPV-16 E6 variants among infected women from Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main cause of cervical cancer in the world is high risks human papillomavirus infection (mainly represented by HPV-16 and HPV-18), that are associated to the development of malign transformation of the epithelium. HPV prevalence exhibits a wide geographical variability and HPV-16 variants have been related to an increased risk of developing cervical intraepithelial lesion. The aim of this study was to describe DNA-HPV prevalence and HPV-16 variants among a women population from Northern Brazil. Methods One hundred and forty three women, during routine cervical cancer screening, at Juruti Project, fulfilled an epidemiological inquiry and were screened through a molecular HPV test. HPV-16 variants were determined by sequencing the HPV-16 E6 open reading frame. Results Forty two samples were considered HPV positive (29.4%). None of those had abnormal cytology results. HPV prevalence varied between different age groups (Z(U) = 14.62; p = <0.0001) and high-risk HPVs were more frequent among younger ages. The most prevalent type was HPV-16 (14%) and it variants were classified, predominantly, as European (87.5%). Conclusions HPV prevalence in our population was higher than described by others and the most prevalent HPV types were high-risk HPVs. The European HPV-16 variant was the most prevalent among HPV-16 positive samples. Our study reinforces the fact that women with normal cytology and a positive molecular test for high-risk HPVs should be submitted to continuous follow up, in order to verify persistence of infection, promoting an early diagnosis of cervical cancer and/or its precursors. PMID:25143783

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV-16 genotyping by real-time PCR in patients with several cervical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Dinc, Bedia; Rota, Seyyal; Onan, Anil; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Taskiran, Cagatay; Biri, Aydan; Güner, Haldun

    2010-01-01

    this study was planned to evaluate the prevalence of HPV (excepting type 16) and HPV 16 by real-time PCR in colposcopy patients and to interprete the results with age, age of first sexual intercourse (FSI), parity and Pap smear results. one hundred and two colposcopy patients (50 and 52 of the patients were classified as colposcopy positive and negative, respectively) applying to Gynecology clinic were included. HPV (excepting type 16) and HPV 16 were detected by realtime PCR using the L1 region. Real-time nested amplifications of MY09/11 products were done by GP5+/GP6+ primers and Cyanine-5 labeled HPV and HPV 16 DNA specific probe after HPV DNA extraction by phenol chloroform isoamylalcohol. HPV (excepting type 16) and HPV 16 were positive in 12% and 18% of the colposcopy positive patients respectively. HPV (excepting type 16) and HPV 16 were positive in 5.7% and 3.8% of the colposcopy negative patients, respectively. there was a statistically significant difference between colposcopy positive and colposcopy negative patients comparing HPV 16 with total HPV positivity (p = 0.021 for type 16 and p = 0.010 for total HPV) but there was not a statistically significant difference between colposcopy positive and colposcopy negative patients when we compared HPV (excepting type 16) positivity (p = 0.314). In conclusion, HPV detection and typing may be helpful for cervical cancer screening and prevention.

  16. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E

    2013-09-01

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer.

  17. Serum antibody response to Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections detected by a novel ELISA technique based on denatured recombinant HPV16 L1, L2, E4, E6 and E7 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Di Bonito, Paola; Grasso, Felicia; Mochi, Stefania; Accardi, Luisa; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Branca, Margherita; Costa, Silvano; Mariani, Luciano; Agarossi, Alberto; Ciotti, Marco; Syrjänen, Kari; Giorgi, Colomba

    2006-01-01

    Background Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the primary etiological agents of cervical cancer and are also involved in the development of other tumours (skin, head and neck). Serological survey of the HPV infections is important to better elucidate their natural history and to disclose antigen determinants useful for vaccine development. At present, the analysis of the HPV-specific antibodies has not diagnostic value for the viral infections, and new approaches are needed to correlate the antibody response to the disease outcome. The aim of this study is to develop a novel ELISA, based on five denatured recombinant HPV16 proteins, to be used for detection HPV-specific antibodies. Methods The HPV16 L1, L2, E4, E6 and E7 genes were cloned in a prokaryotic expression vector and expressed as histidine-tagged proteins. These proteins, in a denatured form, were used in ELISA as coating antigens. Human sera were collected from women with abnormal PAP smear enrolled during an ongoing multicenter HPV-PathogenISS study in Italy, assessing the HPV-related pathogenetic mechanisms of progression of cervical cancer precursor lesions. Negative human sera were collected from patients affected by other infectious agents. All the HPV-positive sera were also subjected to an avidity test to assess the binding strength in the antigen-antibody complexes. Results Most of the sera showed a positive reactivity to the denatured HPV16 proteins: 82% of the sera from HPV16 infected women and 89% of the sera from women infected by other HPV genotypes recognised at least one of the HPV16 proteins. The percentages of samples showing reactivity to L1, L2 and E7 were similar, but only a few serum samples reacted to E6 and E4. Most sera bound the antigens with medium and high avidity index, suggesting specific antigen-antibody reactions. Conclusion This novel ELISA, based on multiple denatured HPV16 antigens, is able to detect antibodies in women infected by HPV16 and it is not genotype

  18. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  19. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Juan; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Rong; Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-11-29

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10-5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10-8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10-4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk.

  20. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10−5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10−8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10−4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk. PMID:27705943

  1. Metronomic cyclophosphamide enhances HPV16E7 peptide vaccine induced antigen-specific and cytotoxic T-cell mediated antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Weir, Genevieve M; Hrytsenko, Olga; Stanford, Marianne M; Berinstein, Neil L; Karkada, Mohan; Liwski, Robert S; Mansour, Marc

    In clinical trials, metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPA) is increasingly being combined with vaccines to reduce tumor-induced immune suppression. Previous strategies to modulate the immune system during vaccination have involved continuous administration of low dose chemotherapy, studies that have posed unique considerations for clinical trial design. Here, we evaluated metronomic CPA in combination with a peptide vaccine targeting HPV16E7 in an HPV16-induced tumor model, focusing on the cytotoxic T-cell response and timing of low dose metronomic CPA (mCPA) treatment relative to vaccination. Mice bearing C3 tumors were given metronomic CPA on alternating weeks in combination with immunization with a DepoVax vaccine containing HPV16E749-57 peptide antigen every 3 weeks. Only the combination therapy provided significant long-term control of tumor growth. The efficacy of the vaccine was uncompromised if given at the beginning or end of a cycle of metronomic CPA. Metronomic CPA had a pronounced lymphodepletive effect on the vaccine draining lymph node, yet did not reduce the development of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells induced by vaccination. This enrichment correlated with increased cytotoxic activity in the spleen and increased expression of cytotoxic gene signatures in the tumor. Immunity could be passively transferred through CD8(+) T cells isolated from tumor-bearing mice treated with the combinatorial treatment regimen. A comprehensive survey of splenocytes indicated that metronomic CPA, in the absence of vaccination, induced transient lymphodepletion marked by a selective expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These results provide important insights into the multiple mechanisms of metronomic CPA induced immune modulation in the context of a peptide cancer vaccine that may be translated into more effective clinical trial designs.

  2. Gene copy number variation throughout the Plasmodium falciparum genome.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Ian H; Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Carret, Celine K; Ivens, Alasdair; Stewart, Lindsay B; Tetteh, Kevin K A; Conway, David J

    2009-08-04

    Gene copy number variation (CNV) is responsible for several important phenotypes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, including drug resistance, loss of infected erythrocyte cytoadherence and alteration of receptor usage for erythrocyte invasion. Despite the known effects of CNV, little is known about its extent throughout the genome. We performed a whole-genome survey of CNV genes in P. falciparum using comparative genome hybridisation of a diverse set of 16 laboratory culture-adapted isolates to a custom designed high density Affymetrix GeneChip array. Overall, 186 genes showed hybridisation signals consistent with deletion or amplification in one or more isolate. There is a strong association of CNV with gene length, genomic location, and low orthology to genes in other Plasmodium species. Sub-telomeric regions of all chromosomes are strongly associated with CNV genes independent from members of previously described multigene families. However, approximately 40% of CNV genes were located in more central regions of the chromosomes. Among the previously undescribed CNV genes, several that are of potential phenotypic relevance are identified. CNV represents a major form of genetic variation within the P. falciparum genome; the distribution of gene features indicates the involvement of highly non-random mutational and selective processes. Additional studies should be directed at examining CNV in natural parasite populations to extend conclusions to clinical settings.

  3. HPV 16 infection up-regulates Piwil2, which affects cell proliferation and invasion in cervical cancer by regulating MMP-9 via the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Ling, W; Zhigang, H; Tian, H; Bin, Z; Xiaolin, X; Hongxiu, Z

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Piwil2 on proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells. Thirty-two HPV-positive or negative cervical cancer tissues and corresponding normal adjacent cervical tissues were obtained from General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Region. Piwil2 expression in these tissue samples, as well as two cervical cell lines were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical. A specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knockdown the Piwil2 gene in SiHa cells. CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry (FCM) was used to evaluate cell proliferation. Cell invasion was detected by transwell chambers assays. Immunoblotting was used to assess the effect on relevant proteins. In the early stage (I A1-I B1) of curvival, 84.4% (27/32) tumor tissues have a more predominant expression of Piwil2 than the normal adjacent samples. Piwil2 overexpression was correlated with HPV16 infection (p < 0.05). Knockdown of Piwil2 gene in SiHa cells inhibited cell growth and invasion, and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) compared to scrambled shRNA transfected cells. Further analysis revealed that downregulation of Piwil2 gene induced inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway activity. Piwil2, which stimulated by HPV16 infection, plays an important role in regulating proliferation and invasion of cervical cells by regulating MMP-9 expression via alternation of the MAPK signaling pathway.

  4. Identification of the nuclear localization and export signals of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Alixandra A.; McManus, Patrick M.; Bockstall, Katy; Moroianu, Junona

    2009-01-05

    The E7 oncoprotein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins. Our previous studies suggested that HPV16 E7 enters the nucleus via a novel Ran-dependent pathway independent of the nuclear import receptors (Angeline, M., Merle, E., and Moroianu, J. (2003). The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway. Virology 317(1), 13-23.). Here, analysis of the localization of specific E7 mutants revealed that the nuclear localization of E7 is independent of its interaction with pRB or of its phosphorylation by CKII. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and 2xEGFP fusions with E7 and E7 domains in HeLa cells revealed that E7 contains a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal domain (aa 1-37). Interestingly, treatment of transfected HeLa cells with two specific nuclear export inhibitors, Leptomycin B and ratjadone, changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear. These data suggest the presence of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a second NLS in the C-terminal domain of E7 (aa 38-98). Mutagenesis of critical amino acids in the putative NES sequence ({sub 76}IRTLEDLLM{sub 84}) changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear suggesting that this is a functional NES. The presence of both NLSs and an NES suggests that HPV16 E7 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus which is consistent with E7 having functions in both of these cell compartments.

  5. Induction of focal epithelial hyperplasia in tongue of young bk6-E6/E7 HPV16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Marroquin-Chavira, Alberto; Hernandez-Mote, Ruth; Valencia, Concepción; Manjarrez-Zavala, M Eugenia; Covarrubias, Luis; Gariglio, Patricio

    2009-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. During the past 2 decades, the role of high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) has been studied and the data supporting HPV as a one of the causative agents in the development and progression of a sub-set of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) has accumulated. In order to investigate the role of HR-HPV oncogene expression in early epithelial alterations in vivo, we produced transgenic mice expressing HPV16 early region genes from the promoter of the bovine keratin 6 gene (Tg[bK6-E6/E7]). In this article, we demonstrate that E6/E7 transgene was abundantly expressed and cellular proliferation was increased in the middle tongue epithelia of transgenic mice, and that in the same region young (27 weeks old) Tg[bK6-E6/E7] mice spontaneously developed histological alterations, mainly focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH).

  6. MPG-based nanoparticle: An efficient delivery system for enhancing the potency of DNA vaccine expressing HPV16E7.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Tayebeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-06-22

    DNA vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 have not been successful in clinical trials, due to the lack of an appropriate delivery system. In this study, a peptide-based gene delivery system, MPG, which forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with nucleic acids, was used for in vitro and in vivo delivery of HPV16 E7 DNA as a model antigen. The results demonstrated that at Nitrogen/Phosphate (N/P) ratio over 10:1, this peptide can effectively condense plasmid DNA into stable nanoparticles with an average size of 180-210nm and a positive surface charge. The transfection efficiency of MPG-based nanoparticles was shown to be comparable with Polyethyleneimine (PEI). The efficient protein expression detected by western blotting and flow cytometry supports the potential of MPG-based nanoparticles as a potent delivery system in DNA vaccine formulations. Immunization with MPG/E7DNA nanoparticles at an N/P ratio of 10:1 induced a stronger Th1 cellular immune response with a predominant interferon-γ (IFN-γ) profile than those induced by E7DNA alone in a murine tumor model. These findings suggest that MPG peptide as a novel gene delivery system could have promising applications in improving HPV therapeutic vaccines.

  7. Age-stratified performance of the Cervista HPV 16/18 genotyping test in women with ASC-US cytology.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Garcia, Francisco A R; Mitchell, Amy L; Day, Stephen P

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of the Cervista HPV 16/18 genotyping test for detection of human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 in cervical cytology specimens in women stratified by age. In a multicenter, prospective clinical study, ThinPrep specimens were tested for the presence of HPV 16 and 18 using the HPV 16/18 genotyping test. Genotyping results from women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or greater cytology were compared with local colposcopy and/or histology results. Sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values (NPV and PPV) were determined. The prevalence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2(+) in subjects positive for HPV 16/18 was 6.6% and 4.1% for women <30 and ≥30 years of age, respectively. The sensitivity of the test was 70.0% (95% CI: 54.6-81.9) and 66.7% (95% CI: 46.7-82.0) in women <30 and ≥30 years, respectively. The NPV was 95.5% (95% CI: 93.4-97.6) in women <30 years and 96.6% (95% CI: 94.8-98.5) in women ≥30 years. Specificity was higher in women ≥30 years (79.9%; 95% CI: 74.9-84.2) than women <30 years (61.9%; 95% CI: 57.1-66.4). The PPV was 15.2% (95% CI: 12.7-19.1) in women <30 years and 21.9% (95% CI: 17.0-30.7) in women ≥30 years. The performance of the Cervista HPV 16/18 genotyping test for predicting ≥CIN 2 is what would be expected across the key ≥CIN 2 age strata. HPV 16/18 genotyping may help further stratify women with a greater potential to develop cervical cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  8. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of high risk HPV16 E2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, Kristin; Wertz, Mary; Lucchi, John; Leszczynski, Anna; Moroianu, Junona . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2007-03-30

    The E2 protein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) contains an amino-terminal (N) domain, a hinge (H) region and a carboxyl-terminal (C) DNA-binding domain. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusions with full length E2 and E2 domains in transfection assays in HeLa cells, we found that the C domain is responsible for the nuclear localization of E2 in vivo, whereas the N and H domains do not contain additional nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Deletion analysis of EGFP-E2 and EGFP-cE2 determined that the C domain contains an {alpha} helix cNLS that overlaps with the DNA-binding region. Mutational analysis revealed that the arginine and lysine residues in this cNLS are essential for nuclear localization of HPV16 E2. Interestingly, these basic amino acid residues are well conserved among the E2 proteins of BPV-1 and some high risk HPV types but not in the low risk HPV types, suggesting that there are differences between the NLSs and corresponding nuclear import pathways between these E2 proteins.

  9. Direct Identification of an HPV-16 Tumor Antigen from Cervical Cancer Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Derin B.; Reinhold, Bruce; Lee, Sun Young; Zhang, Guanglan; Lank, Simon; O’Connor, David H.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Brusic, Vladimir; Kim, Seung Jo; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV) is the worldwide cause of many cancers, including cervical, anal, vulval, vaginal, penile, and oropharyngeal. Since T cells naturally eliminate the majority of chronic HPV infections by recognizing epitopes displayed on virally altered epithelium, we exploited Poisson detection mass spectrometry (MS3) to identify those epitopes and inform future T cell-based vaccine design. Nine cervical cancer biopsies from HPV-16 positive HLA-A*02 patients were obtained, histopathology determined, and E7 oncogene PCR-amplified from tumor DNA and sequenced. Conservation of E7 oncogene coding segments was found in all tumors. MS3 analysis of HLA-A*02 immunoprecipitates detected E711–19 peptide (YMLDLQPET) in seven of the nine tumor biopsies. The remaining two samples were E711–19 negative and lacked the HLA-A*02 binding GILT thioreductase peptide despite possessing binding-competent HLA-A*02 alleles. Thus, the conserved E711–19 peptide is a dominant HLA-A*02 binding tumor antigen in HPV-16 transformed cervical squamous and adenocarcinomas. Findings that a minority of HLA-A*02:01 tumors lack expression of both E711–19 and a peptide from a thioreductase important in processing of cysteine-rich proteins like E7 underscore the value of physical detection, define a potential additional tumor escape mechanism and have implications for therapeutic cancer vaccine development. PMID:22566864

  10. Elevated Gene Copy Number Does Not Always Explain Elevated Amylase Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Foti, Dolly M; Heras, Joseph; Amerkhanian, Hooree; Lockwood, Brent L

    2016-01-01

    Amylase activity variation in the guts of several model organisms appears to be explained by amylase gene copy number variation. We tested the hypothesis that amylase gene copy number is always elevated in animals with high amylolytic activity. We therefore sequenced the amylase genes and examined amylase gene copy number in prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) with different diets including two species of convergently evolved herbivores with the elevated amylase activity phenotype. We found elevated amylase gene copy number (six haploid copies) with sequence variation among copies in one herbivore (Cebidichthys violaceus) and modest gene copy number (two to three haploid copies) with little sequence variation in the remaining taxa, which included herbivores, omnivores, and a carnivore. Few functional differences in amylase biochemistry were observed, and previous investigations showed similar digestibility among the convergently evolved herbivores with differing amylase genetics. Hence, the phenotype of elevated amylase activity can be achieved by different mechanisms (i.e., elevated expression of fewer genes, increased gene copy number, or expression of more efficient amylase proteins) with similar results. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of available fish amylase genes show mostly lineage-specific duplication events leading to gene copy number variation, although a whole-genome duplication event or chromosomal translocation may have produced multiple amylase copies in the Ostariophysi, again showing multiple routes to the same result.

  11. Copy Number Variants in the Kallikrein Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Pernilla; Säll, Torbjörn; Bjartell, Anders; Johansson, Anna M.; Lilja, Hans; Halldén, Christer

    2013-01-01

    The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15) is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE) repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC), we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy) using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions. PMID:23894413

  12. Age-specific prevalence of HPV16/18 genotypes in cervical cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Anne; Rositch, Anne; Qeadan, Fares; Gravitt, Patti E; Blaakaer, Jan

    2016-06-15

    The prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer has been reported to decline with age in some papers. However, whether this decline in proportion of cancers positive for HPV16/18 is consistently observed across studies remains to be elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify papers reporting data on age-specific prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer and to summarize the results. We employed MEDLINE and Embase for a systematic literature search and thereby identified a total of 644 papers published in the period 1999-2015, of which 15 papers, reporting cross-sectional data, were included for review (11,526 cervical cancers). The prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer declined significantly with age (ρ = -0.83, p = 0.04) from 74.8% (95% CI 67.6-80.8) in women aged 30-39 years to 56.8% (95% CI 43.9-68.8) in women aged ≥70 years. As the HPV16/18 positive cancers are prevented in fully vaccinated cohorts, the age-specific epidemiology of cervical cancer is anticipated to change, with a shift in peak incidence rate to older ages. It will be important for integrated vaccination and screening strategies to consider predicted change in the age-specific epidemiology of cervical cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  13. Investigating Reports of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: An Analysis of HPV-16/18-Adjuvanted Vaccine Post-Licensure Data.

    PubMed

    Huygen, Frank; Verschueren, Kristin; McCabe, Candida; Stegmann, Jens-Ulrich; Zima, Julia; Mahaux, Olivia; Van Holle, Lionel; Angelo, Maria-Genalin

    2015-09-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain disorder that typically follows trauma or surgery. Suspected CRPS reported after vaccination with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines led to temporary suspension of proactive recommendation of HPV vaccination in Japan. We investigated the potential CRPS signal in relation to HPV-16/18-adjuvanted vaccine (Cervarix®) by database review of CRPS cases with independent expert confirmation; a disproportionality analysis and analyses of temporality; an observed versus expected analysis using published background incidence rates; systematic reviews of aggregate safety data, and a literature review. The analysis included 17 case reports of CRPS: 10 from Japan (0.14/100,000 doses distributed) and seven from the United Kingdom (0.08/100,000). Five cases were considered by independent experts to be confirmed CRPS. Quantitative analyses did not suggest an association between CRPS and HPV-16/18-adjuvanted vaccine. Observed CRPS incidence after HPV-16/18 vaccination was statistically significantly below expected rates. Systematic database reviews using search terms varying in specificity and sensitivity did not identify new cases. No CRPS was reported during clinical development and no unexpected results found in the literature. There is not sufficient evidence to suggest an increased risk of developing CRPS following vaccination with HPV-16/18-adjuvanted vaccine. Post-licensure safety surveillance confirms the acceptable benefit-risk of HPV-16/18 vaccination.

  14. Specific Magnetic Isolation of E6 HPV16 Modified Magnetizable Particles Coupled with PCR and Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Jimenez, Ana Maria; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Dostalova, Simona; Krejcova, Ludmila; Michalek, Petr; Richtera, Lukas; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    The majority of carcinomas that were developed due to the infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) are caused by high-risk HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18. These HPV types contain the E6 and E7 oncogenes, so the fast detection of these oncogenes is an important point to avoid the development of cancer. Many different HPV tests are available to detect the presence of HPV in biological samples. The aim of this study was to design a fast and low cost method for HPV identification employing magnetic isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electrochemical detection. These assays were developed to detect the interactions between E6-HPV16 oncogene and magnetizable particles (MPs) using commercial Dynabeads M-280 Streptavidin particles and laboratory-synthesized “homemade” particles called MANs (MAN-37, MAN-127 and MAN-164). The yields of PCR amplification of E6-HPV16 oncogene bound on the particles and after the elution from the particles were compared. A highest yield of E6-HPV16 DNA isolation was obtained with both MPs particles commercial M-280 Streptavidin and MAN-37 due to reducing of the interferents compared with the standard PCR method. A biosensor employing the isolation of E6-HPV16 oncogene with MPs particles followed by its electrochemical detection can be a very effective technique for HPV identification, providing simple, sensitive and cost-effective analysis. PMID:27164078

  15. Human hair follicle and interfollicular keratinocyte reactivity to mouse HPV16-transformed cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Karel; Dvoránková, Barbora; Lacina, Lukás; Cada, Zdenek; Vonka, Vladimír

    2008-07-01

    The role of stem cells in cancer formation and spreading has been established. As with normal tissue, the cancer stem cells need a special microenvironment to support their growth. This microenvironment may be represented by the tumor stroma. One of the possible ways of tumor stromal formation is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor epithelium. Following this mechanism, stromal cells must share the basic genetic alterations with the tumor cells. In an attempt to create a system capable of testing some aspects of the mesenchymal cell-keratinocyte interactions, we studied the effects of the fibroblastoid mouse TC-1 cells that were prepared by the introduction of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genes E6 and E7 to lung epithelial cells on the phenotype of normal human interfollicular and hair follicle keratinocytes. From this point of view, they may resemble stromal cells formed by the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cells from HPV-induced squamous cell carcinoma. In contrast to 3T3 murine embryonic fibroblasts which were used as control cells, TC-1 cells influenced not only the size of the keratinocytes and the shape of their colonies, but also induced the expression of keratins 8 and 19 and vimentin. In conclusion, TC-1 cells exhibited a marked biological activity by influencing the behavior of the normal human follicular and intefollicular keratinocytes. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that stromal cells play an important role in tumor progression and spreading.

  16. Enhanced specificity of HPV16 E6E7 siRNA by RNA-DNA chimera modification.

    PubMed

    Yamato, K; Egawa, N; Endo, S; Ui-Tei, K; Yamada, T; Saigo, K; Hyodo, I; Kiyono, T; Nakagawa, I

    2011-08-01

    Although efforts have been made to develop new drugs for infectious and neoplastic diseases utilizing synthetic small interfering RNA(siRNAs), those intrinsically have undesirable effects, including silencing of unintended genes (off-target effect) and nonspecific cytotoxicity. Off-target effects can be avoided by DNA substitution in the guide strand (GS) seed region of nucleotide positions 1-8 and its complementary part of the passenger strand plus the 3' overhang, which is designated as a double-strand RNA-DNA chimera (dsRDC). In this study, we found that the specificity of potent siRNAs targeting human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 oncogenes, which we previously reported, could be enhanced by short dsRDC modification (first six nucleotides from the 5' end of the GS and its complementary nucleotides of the passenger strand). Such dsRDC modification reduced nonspecific cytotoxicity in two of three siRNAs (497 and 752), although not in the other (573), which correlated with their off-target effects. In addition, silencing activity was marginally impaired in two dsRDCs (497 and 573) and moderately in one (752). Finally, dsRDC-497 induced E6E7-specific growth suppression of cervical cancer cells as well as E6E7-immortalized human keratinocytes. Our results show that dsRDC modification enhances the specificity of E6E7 siRNA, which is required for use in in vivo settings.

  17. Augmentation of cellular and humoral immune responses to HPV16 and HPV18 E6 and E7 antigens by VGX-3100

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Sylvester, Albert J; Shen, Xuefei; Amante, Dinah; Sakata, Lindsay; Parker, Lamar; Yan, Jian; Boyer, Jean; Roh, Christian; Humeau, Laurent; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate; Marcozzi-Pierce, Kathleen; Giffear, Mary; Lee, Jessica; Trimble, Cornelia L; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the immunogenicity of VGX-3100, a multicomponent DNA immunotherapy for the treatment of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)16/18-positive CIN2/3 in a phase 1 clinical trial. Here, we report on the ability to boost immune responses with an additional dose of VGX-3100. Patients completing our initial phase 1 trial were offered enrollment into a follow on trial consisting of a single boost dose of VGX-3100. Data show both cellular and humoral immune responses could be augmented above pre-boost levels, including the induction of interferon (IFN)γ production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α production, CD8+ T cell activation and the synthesis of lytic proteins. Moreover, observation of antigen-specific regulation of immune-related gene transcripts suggests the induction of a proinflammatory response following the boost. Analysis of T cell receptor (TCR) sequencing suggests the localization of putative HPV-specific T cell clones to the cervical mucosa, which underscores the putative mechanism of action of lesion regression and HPV16/18 elimination noted in our double-blind placebo-controlled phase 2B trial. Taken together, these data indicate that VGX-3100 drives the induction of robust cellular and humoral immune responses that can be augmented by a fourth “booster” dose. These data could be important in the scope of increasing the clinical efficacy rate of VGX-3100. PMID:28054033

  18. Convergent gene loss following gene and genome duplications creates single-copy families in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Riet; Adams, Keith L; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Maere, Steven; Van de Peer, Yves

    2013-02-19

    The importance of gene gain through duplication has long been appreciated. In contrast, the importance of gene loss has only recently attracted attention. Indeed, studies in organisms ranging from plants to worms and humans suggest that duplication of some genes might be better tolerated than that of others. Here we have undertaken a large-scale study to investigate the existence of duplication-resistant genes in the sequenced genomes of 20 flowering plants. We demonstrate that there is a large set of genes that is convergently restored to single-copy status following multiple genome-wide and smaller scale duplication events. We rule out the possibility that such a pattern could be explained by random gene loss only and therefore propose that there is selection pressure to preserve such genes as singletons. This is further substantiated by the observation that angiosperm single-copy genes do not comprise a random fraction of the genome, but instead are often involved in essential housekeeping functions that are highly conserved across all eukaryotes. Furthermore, single-copy genes are generally expressed more highly and in more tissues than non-single-copy genes, and they exhibit higher sequence conservation. Finally, we propose different hypotheses to explain their resistance against duplication.

  19. Convergent gene loss following gene and genome duplications creates single-copy families in flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Riet; Adams, Keith L.; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Maere, Steven; Van de Peer, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The importance of gene gain through duplication has long been appreciated. In contrast, the importance of gene loss has only recently attracted attention. Indeed, studies in organisms ranging from plants to worms and humans suggest that duplication of some genes might be better tolerated than that of others. Here we have undertaken a large-scale study to investigate the existence of duplication-resistant genes in the sequenced genomes of 20 flowering plants. We demonstrate that there is a large set of genes that is convergently restored to single-copy status following multiple genome-wide and smaller scale duplication events. We rule out the possibility that such a pattern could be explained by random gene loss only and therefore propose that there is selection pressure to preserve such genes as singletons. This is further substantiated by the observation that angiosperm single-copy genes do not comprise a random fraction of the genome, but instead are often involved in essential housekeeping functions that are highly conserved across all eukaryotes. Furthermore, single-copy genes are generally expressed more highly and in more tissues than non–single-copy genes, and they exhibit higher sequence conservation. Finally, we propose different hypotheses to explain their resistance against duplication. PMID:23382190

  20. Molecular analysis of complement component C4 gene copy number.

    PubMed

    Castley, Alison S L; Martinez, O Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Classical, alternative, or lectin pathways may activate the complement system cascade. The classical pathway includes the C4 protein and functions in the prevention of immune complex precipitation and in clearance of immune complexes.Two isotypes of C4-C4A and C4B-are coded by genes located at two loci within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6. While these isotypes share over 99% amino acid sequence homology, five nucleotide differences located in exon 26 are responsible for major structural and functional differences between the C4 isotypes.C4A and C4B are highly polymorphic with over 40 alleles, gene duplications, and "null alleles". C4 genes may be short (14.6 kb) or long (21 kb), due to the absence or presence of an endogenous retroviral sequence-HERV-K(C4)-in intron 9, respectively. The C4 gene copy number (GCN) can vary from 1-3 per haplotype or 2-6 per diploid genome. The variation in GCN leads to a range of C4 plasma protein concentrations among healthy subjects. In subjects with equal numbers of C4 genes, subjects with short genes have C4 plasma levels relatively higher than subjects with long genes.Variation of the C4 GCN, the gene size (long or short) and the C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B) may also lead to susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Therefore, in subjects with autoimmune disease, a low serum C4 level may be due to ongoing disease activity associated with complement activation and consumption or it may be due to genetic factors. Distinguishing between these will have clinical implications.Exact determination of GCN can be difficult, at least in part due to the high degree of homology between C4A and C4B and a variety of techniques has been described. This chapter describes a quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) copy number assay, based on our laboratory experience using this assay.

  1. Health and economic outcomes of HPV 16,18 vaccination in 72 GAVI-eligible countries.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Sue J; O'Shea, Meredith; Campos, Nicole Gastineau; Diaz, Mireia; Sweet, Steven; Kim, Sun-Young

    2008-07-29

    The risk of dying from cervical cancer is disproportionately borne by women in developing countries. Two new vaccines are highly effective in preventing HPV 16,18 infection, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer, in girls not previously infected. The GAVI Alliance (GAVI) provides technical assistance and financial support for immunization in the world's poorest countries. Using population-based and epidemiologic data for 72 GAVI-eligible countries we estimate averted cervical cancer cases and deaths, disability-adjusted years of life (DALYs) averted and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (I$/DALY averted) associated with HPV 16,18 vaccination of young adolescent girls. In addition to vaccine coverage and efficacy, relative and absolute cancer reduction depended on underlying incidence, proportion attributable to HPV types 16 and 18, population age-structure and competing mortality. With 70% coverage, mean reduction in the lifetime risk of cancer is below 40% in some countries (e.g., Nigeria, Ghana) and above 50% in others (e.g., India, Uganda, Kenya). At I$10 per vaccinated girl (approximately $2.00 per dose assuming three doses, plus wastage, administration, program support) vaccination was cost-effective in all countries using a per capita GDP threshold; for 49 of 72 countries, the cost per DALY averted was less than I$100 and for 59 countries, it was less than I$200. Taking into account country-specific assumptions (per capita GNI, DPT3 coverage, percentage of girls who are enrolled in fifth grade) for the year of introduction, percent coverage achieved in the first year, and years to maximum coverage, a 10-year modeled scenario prevented the future deaths of approximately 2 million women vaccinated as adolescents. Despite favorable cost-effectiveness, assessment of financial costs raised concerns about affordability; as the cost per vaccinated girl was increased from I$10 to I$25 (approximately $2 to $5 per dose), the financial costs for the

  2. Cross-sectional study of HPV-16 infection in a population-based subsample of Hispanic adults

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, A P; Unger, E R; Muñoz, C; Panicker, G; Tortolero-Luna, G; Soto-Salgado, M; Otero, Y; Suárez, E; Pérez, C M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and correlates of seropositivity to human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 in a subsample of adults who participated in the parent study Epidemiology of Hepatitis C in the adult population of Puerto Rico (PR). Setting The parent study was a population-based household survey aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of hepatitis C and other viral infections (hepatitis A, hepatitis B, HIV, and herpes simplex type 2) in PR (n=1654) between 2005 and 2008. Participants A subsample of the last 450 consecutive adults aged 21–64 years, recruited between February 2007 and January 2008, who participated in the parent study and agreed to participate in HPV testing. Primary and secondary outcome measures The samples were tested by ELISA for HPV-16 viral-like particle-specific immunoglobulin G. Information on sociodemographic, health, and lifestyle characteristics was collected. Logistic regression modelling was used to estimate the prevalence odds ratio (POR) to assess factors associated to HPV-16 seropositivity. Results Prevalence of seropositivity to HPV-16 was 11.3%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (15.8%) than men (5.6%; p=0.001). After adjusting for age and sex, ever smokers (POR 2.06, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.92) and participants with at least five lifetime sexual partners (POR 2.91, 95% CI 1.24 to 6.81) were more likely to be HPV-16 seropositive. Conclusions HPV-16 seropositivity is similar to that reported in the USA (10.4%) for NHANES 2003–2004 participants, although different assays were used in these studies. While future studies should evaluate HPV seroprevalence using a larger population-based sample, our results highlight the need to further understand the burden of HPV infection and HPV-related malignancies in PR, population with a low vaccine uptake. PMID:24496698

  3. Immunogenicity to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine among adolescent African students exposed to helminths and malaria.

    PubMed

    Nakalembe, Miriam; Banura, Cecily; Namujju, Proscovia Bazanye; Mirembe, Florence Maureen

    2015-02-19

    Efficacious vaccines that prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the recognized cause of cervical cancer, are now available. However, in sub-Saharan Africa, immune-modulating infections such as helminths and malaria may affect immunogenicity to the HPV vaccine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of helminth infections and exposure to malaria on the immune response to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine. AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 vaccinated students between 10 and 16 years of age from western Uganda, at 18 months-post vaccination were followed up for six months. After consent was obtained, demographic data, blood, and stool samples were collected. Multiplex HPV serology technology was used to determine HPV-16/18 antibody levels expressed as median fluorescent intensity (MFI). The malaria antibody immunoassay test was used to detect antibodies to malaria parasites. The Kato-Katz method was used to detect the presence of helminths. HPV-16/18 antibody levels among students exposed to malaria or helminths were compared with those who were not exposed using the Student's t-test. A total of 211 students participated in the study. There was no difference between MFI levels to HPV-16/18 antibodies at 18- and 24-month follow-ups among students who were positive and negative to malaria or helminth exposure. There was an increase in HPV-18 MFI antibody levels at month 24 among the students who were positive for malaria at enrolment (p = 0.05). Immune-modulating parasites (malaria/helminths) were not associated with reduced immune response to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine. The data may support the use of this vaccine in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Seroepidemiology of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) L2 and Generation of L2-Specific Human Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Jagu, Subhashini; Wu, Wai-Hong; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Fogel, Jessica M.; Kwak, Kihyuck; Daayana, Sai; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter L.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Trimble, Cornelia L.

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the seroprevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid antigen L2-reactive antibody is not well understood, and no serologic standard exists for L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we screened a total of 1,078 serum samples for HPV16 L2 reactivity, and these were obtained from four prior clinical studies: a population-based (n = 880) surveillance study with a high-risk HPV DNA prevalence of 10.8%, a cohort study of women (n = 160) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and two phase II trials in women with high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) receiving imiquimod therapy combined with either photodynamic therapy (PDT) (n = 19) or vaccination with a fusion protein comprising HPV16 L2, E7, and E6 (TA-CIN) (n = 19). Sera were screened sequentially by HPV16 L2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then Western blot. Seven of the 1,078 serum samples tested had L2-specific antibodies, but none were detectably neutralizing for HPV16. To develop a standard, we substituted human IgG1 sequences into conserved regions of two rodent monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for neutralizing epitopes at HPV16 L2 residues 17 to 36 and 58 to 64, creating JWW-1 and JWW-2, respectively. These chimeric MAbs retained neutralizing activity and together reacted with 33/34 clinically relevant HPV types tested. In conclusion, our inability to identify an HPV16 L2-specific neutralizing antibody response even in the sera of patients with active genital HPV disease suggests the subdominance of L2 protective epitopes and the value of the chimeric MAbs JWW-1 and JWW-2 as standards for immunoassays to measure L2-specific human antibodies. PMID:25972404

  5. Gene expression in self-repressing system with multiple gene copies.

    PubMed

    Miekisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-02-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies of binding and unbinding increase to infinity.

  6. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Donna K.; Struble, Craig A.; Tuffnell, Maureen E.; Stamm, Karl D.; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E.; Goetsch, Mary A.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Bick, David P.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N.; Tweddell, James S.; Mitchell, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency “spectra” to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (≥200 kb) and losses (≥100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ≤ 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ≤ 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  7. How to screen for cervical cancer after HPV16/18 vaccination in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Veerle M H; de Melker, H E; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berkhof, Johannes

    2009-08-13

    In The Netherlands, vaccination against HPV16/18 has been recommended for all 12-year-old girls. Because screening of vaccinated women remains important, we evaluated the model-based cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening strategies. We considered cytology and the HPV DNA test as primary screening instrument, varied the number of screening rounds from 7 to 4, and set the screening starting age at 30 and 35 years. Our model predicted reductions in cervical cancer mortality between 60 and 81% (from 199 deaths to 37-79) when adding screening to vaccination (assumptions for vaccination: 95% efficacy, 100% compliance, lifelong protection). Screening 5 times with HPV DNA (euro11,133/QALY) or 7 times with cytology (euro17,627/QALY) were scenarios with comparable costs and effects and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios below the threshold in The Netherlands (euro20,000 per QALY).

  8. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent.

  9. HPV-16 variants' impact on uterine cervical cancer response to radiotherapy: A descriptive pilot study.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Acosta, P; Vallard, A; Molano, M; Huertas, A; Gamboa, Ó; Cotes, M; Romero-Rojas, A; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2017-04-01

    Although the large impact of Human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical cancer is established, its place as a therapeutic target is new and according to the growing literature, could be promising. In the present study, radiosensitivity's difference based on HPV-16 variants is assessed. Variants of Human papilloma virus were identified before the exclusive radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Data were prospectively collected. Fifty-nine patients were screened. Among the 59 screened patients, 34 (57.6%) were identified to be HPV-16 (+), with 13 European and two non-European variants. Of the 34 patients, 15 experienced exclusive radiotherapy. Among them, eight had complete response (seven with European and one with non-European variants), four with European variant had partial response, three with European variant had tumour persistence and one with non-European variant progressed at 3 months. No radiosensitivity difference was established, probably because of the limited population. Non-European variant aggressiveness might be suggested in accordance with the literature, as it was associated with the only tumour progression. Exclusive radiotherapy provides a unique and "pure" model of radioresistance in cervical cancer and could be the missing link between in vitro studies and state of the art chemoradiotherapy studies that probably feature too many parameters to identify radioresistance causes. The present study was a first step, with the future prospects of building a larger cohort study in order to better understand HPV-induced radioresistance and then to be able to propose new made-to-measure treatments. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. DAZ gene copies: evidence of Y chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana Teresa; Fernandes, Susana; Gonçalves, Rita; Sá, Rosália; Costa, Paula; Rosa, Alexandra; Ferrás, Cristina; Sousa, Mário; Brehm, António; Barros, Alberto

    2006-08-01

    The DAZ gene, a contributing factor in infertility, lies on the human Y chromosome's AZFc region, whose deletion is a common cause of spermatogenic failure. Y chromosome binary polymorphisms on the non-recombining Y (NRY) region, believed to be a single occurrence on an evolutionary scale, were typed in a sample of fertile and infertile men with known DAZ backgrounds. The Y single-nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) with low mutation rates are currently well characterized and permit the construction of a unique phylogeny of haplogroups. DAZ haplotypes were defined using single-nucleotide variant (SNV)/sequence tagged-site (STS) markers to distinguish between the four copies of the gene. The variation of 10 Y chromosome short tandem repeat (STRs) was used to determine the coalescence age of DAZ haplotypes in a comparable time frame similar to that of SNP haplogroups. An association between DAZ haplotypes and Y chromosome haplogroups was found, and our data show that the DAZ gene is not under selective constraints and its evolution depends only on the mutation rate. The same variants were common to fertile and infertile men, although partial DAZ deletions occurred only in infertile men, suggesting that those should only be used as a tool for infertility diagnosis when analysed in combination with haplogroup determinations.

  11. Application of droplet digital PCR to determine copy number of endogenous genes and transgenes in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Joyce, Priya Aiyar

    2017-08-28

    Droplet digital PCR combined with the low copy ACT allele as endogenous reference gene, makes accurate and rapid estimation of gene copy number in Q208 (A) and Q240 (A) attainable. Sugarcane is an important cultivated crop with both high polyploidy and aneuploidy in its 10 Gb genome. Without a known copy number reference gene, it is difficult to accurately estimate the copy number of any gene of interest by PCR-based methods in sugarcane. Recently, a new technology, known as droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been developed which can measure the absolute amount of the target DNA in a given sample. In this study, we deduced the true copy number of three endogenous genes, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and actin (ACT) in three Australian sugarcane varieties, using ddPCR by comparing the absolute amounts of the above genes with a transgene of known copy number. A single copy of the ACT allele was detected in Q208 (A) , two copies in Q240 (A) , but was absent in Q117. Copy number variation was also observed for both APRT and ADF, and ranged from 9 to 11 in the three tested varieties. Using this newly developed ddPCR method, transgene copy number was successfully determined in 19 transgenic Q208 (A) and Q240 (A) events using ACT as the reference endogenous gene. Our study demonstrates that ddPCR can be used for high-throughput genetic analysis and is a quick, accurate and reliable alternative method for gene copy number determination in sugarcane. This discovered ACT allele would be a suitable endogenous reference gene for future gene copy number variation and dosage studies of functional genes in Q208 (A) and Q240 (A) .

  12. A novel trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine with anti-HPV 16 and 18 neutralizing antibody responses comparable to those induced by the Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine in rhesus macaque model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Wang, Yajun; Chen, Na; Jiang, Dunquan; Qiu, Yefeng; Wang, Yan; Yan, Mei; Chen, Jianping; Zhang, Haijiang; Liu, Yongjiang

    2017-06-01

    Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a key factor in the development of precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer. Prophylactic vaccines to immunize against HPV are an effective approach to reducing HPV related disease burden. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and dosage effect of a trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine (3vHPV) produced in Escherichia coli (E.coli), with Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine (4vHPV, Merck & Co.) as a positive control. Sera collected from rhesus macaques vaccinated with three dosage formulations of 3vHPV (termed low-, mid-, and high-dosage formulations, respectively), and the 4vHPV vaccine were analyzed by both Pseudovirus-Based Neutralization Assay (PBNA) and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Strong immune responses against HPV 16/18/58 were successfully elicited, and dosage-dependence was observed, with likely occurrence of immune interference between different L1-VLP antigens. HPV 16/18 specific neutralizing antibody (nAb) and total immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses in rhesus macaques receiving 3vHPV at the three dosages tested were generally non-inferior to those observed in rhesus macaques receiving 4vHPV throughout the study period. Particularly, HPV 18 nAb titers induced by the mid-dosage formulation that contained the same amounts of HPV 16/18 L1-VLPs as Gardasil 4vHPV were between 7.3 to 12.7-fold higher compared to the positive control arm from weeks 24-64. The durability of antibody responses specific to HPV 16/18 elicited by 3vHPV vaccines was also shown to be non-inferior to that associated with Gardasil 4vHPV. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Significantly Reduced Genoprevalence of Vaccine-Type HPV-16/18 Infections among Vaccinated Compared to Non-Vaccinated Young Women 5.5 Years after a Bivalent HPV-16/18 Vaccine (Cervarix®) Pilot Project in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Vanja; Wabinga, Henry; Lillsunde-Larsson, Gabriella; Helenius, Gisela; Kaliff, Malin; Karlsson, Mats; Kirimunda, Samuel; Musubika, Caroline; Andersson, Sören

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and some predictors for vaccine and non-vaccine types of HPV infections among bivalent HPV vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda. This was a comparative cross sectional study 5.5 years after a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccination (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) pilot project in western Uganda. Cervical swabs were collected between July 2014-August 2014 and analyzed with a HPV genotyping test, CLART® HPV2 assay (Genomica, Madrid Spain) which is based on PCR followed by microarray for determination of genotype. Blood samples were also tested for HIV and syphilis infections as well as CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte levels. The age range of the participants was 15–24 years and mean age was 18.6(SD 1.4). Vaccine-type HPV-16/18 strains were significantly less prevalent among vaccinated women compared to non-vaccinated women (0.5% vs 5.6%, p 0.006, OR 95% CI 0.08(0.01–0.64). At type-specific level, significant difference was observed for HPV16 only. Other STIs (HIV/syphilis) were important risk factors for HPV infections including both vaccine types and non-vaccine types. In addition, for non-vaccine HPV types, living in an urban area, having a low BMI, low CD4 count and having had a high number of life time sexual partners were also significant risk factors. Our data concurs with the existing literature from other parts of the world regarding the effectiveness of bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine in reducing the prevalence of HPV infections particularly vaccine HPV- 16/18 strains among vaccinated women. This study reinforces the recommendation to vaccinate young girls before sexual debut and integrate other STI particularly HIV and syphilis interventions into HPV vaccination packages. PMID:27482705

  14. Significantly Reduced Genoprevalence of Vaccine-Type HPV-16/18 Infections among Vaccinated Compared to Non-Vaccinated Young Women 5.5 Years after a Bivalent HPV-16/18 Vaccine (Cervarix®) Pilot Project in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kumakech, Edward; Berggren, Vanja; Wabinga, Henry; Lillsunde-Larsson, Gabriella; Helenius, Gisela; Kaliff, Malin; Karlsson, Mats; Kirimunda, Samuel; Musubika, Caroline; Andersson, Sören

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and some predictors for vaccine and non-vaccine types of HPV infections among bivalent HPV vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda. This was a comparative cross sectional study 5.5 years after a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccination (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) pilot project in western Uganda. Cervical swabs were collected between July 2014-August 2014 and analyzed with a HPV genotyping test, CLART® HPV2 assay (Genomica, Madrid Spain) which is based on PCR followed by microarray for determination of genotype. Blood samples were also tested for HIV and syphilis infections as well as CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte levels. The age range of the participants was 15-24 years and mean age was 18.6(SD 1.4). Vaccine-type HPV-16/18 strains were significantly less prevalent among vaccinated women compared to non-vaccinated women (0.5% vs 5.6%, p 0.006, OR 95% CI 0.08(0.01-0.64). At type-specific level, significant difference was observed for HPV16 only. Other STIs (HIV/syphilis) were important risk factors for HPV infections including both vaccine types and non-vaccine types. In addition, for non-vaccine HPV types, living in an urban area, having a low BMI, low CD4 count and having had a high number of life time sexual partners were also significant risk factors. Our data concurs with the existing literature from other parts of the world regarding the effectiveness of bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine in reducing the prevalence of HPV infections particularly vaccine HPV- 16/18 strains among vaccinated women. This study reinforces the recommendation to vaccinate young girls before sexual debut and integrate other STI particularly HIV and syphilis interventions into HPV vaccination packages.

  15. Ptaquiloside from bracken (Pteridium spp.) inhibits tumour-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in HPV-16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Sousa, Hugo; Ribeiro, Joana; Bastos, Margarida M S M; Neto, Tiago; Oliveira, Paula A; Medeiros, Rui; Vilanova, Manuel; Gil da Costa, Rui M

    2016-11-01

    Bracken is a fern with worldwide distribution. Exposure to bracken toxins such as ptaquiloside is hypothesized to increase the risk of papillomavirus-related cancers of the upper digestive tract. Ptaquiloside is thought to be an immunosupressor, thus allowing for the development of viral lesions. We have used a human papillomavirus type 16-transgenic (K14-HPV16) mouse model to study the effects of ptaquiloside on tumour-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes, which are critical players in anti-tumour immunity. HPV16(+/-) mice received ptaquiloside (0.5 mg/mouse/week) for 10 weeks. These were then euthanized at 30 weeks of age, along with age-matched untreated controls. Skin samples were enzymatically digested and CD8(+) T cells analysed for CD107a and CD44 surface expression. Ptaquiloside-exposed HPV16(+/-) mice showed a significantly decreased percentage (P < 0.05) of CD8(+)CD107a(+) and CD8(+)CD44 (+) T cells when compared with untreated HPV16(+/-) animals. Histologically, 100% of ptaquilosidetreated mice showed diffuse epidermal dysplasia, compared with 50% of the untreated mice. These findings suggest that ptaquiloside exerts an immunosuppressive role by decreasing CD8(+) T cell activation and degranulation in HPV-induced lesions. Given the key role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes against HPV-induced lesions, this effect is likely to contribute for viral persistence, tumour progression and increased aggressiveness in patients with HPV-related malignancies.

  16. Immunogenicity assessment of HPV16/18 vaccine using the glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology assay.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Hilary A; Waterboer, Tim; Porras, Carolina; Kemp, Troy J; Pawlita, Michael; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Esser, Mark; Matys, Katie; Poncelet, Sylviane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay has favorable properties for use in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies, including low cost, high throughput capacity, and low serum volume requirement. Therefore, we evaluated the GST-L1 assay as a measure of HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity. Our study population included 65 women selected from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial who received the bivalent HPV16/18 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine at the recommended 0/1/6-month schedule. We tested replicate serum samples from months 0/1/12 (i.e., after 0/1/3 doses) by GST-L1 and 3 other commonly used serology assays, VLP-ELISA, SEAP-NA, and cLIA. We calculated the percentage of women seropositive by GST-L1 by time point and HPV type (14 HPV types), and compared GST-L1 to other assays using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. After 1 vaccine dose, seropositivity by GST-L1 was 40% each for HPV16 and HPV18, increasing to 100% and 98%, respectively, after 3 doses. Seropositivity after 3 doses ranged from 32% to 69% for HPV types 31/33/45, for which partial vaccine efficacy is reported, though increases also occurred for types with no evidence for cross-protection (e.g., HPV77). GST-L1 correlated best after 3 doses with VLP-ELISA (HPV16 and HPV18 each ρ = 0.72) and SEAP-NA (HPV16 ρ = 0.65, HPV18 ρ = 0.71) (all P < 0.001); correlation was lower with cLIA. The GST-L1 is suitable for evaluating HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity after 3 vaccine doses, although in contrast to other assays it may classify some samples as HPV16/18 seronegative. The assay's utility is limited for lower antibody levels such as after receipt of 1 dose.

  17. Immunogenicity assessment of HPV16/18 vaccine using the glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology assay

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A; Waterboer, Tim; Porras, Carolina; Kemp, Troy J; Pawlita, Michael; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Esser, Mark; Matys, Katie; Poncelet, Sylviane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay has favorable properties for use in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies, including low cost, high throughput capacity, and low serum volume requirement. Therefore, we evaluated the GST-L1 assay as a measure of HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity. Our study population included 65 women selected from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial who received the bivalent HPV16/18 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine at the recommended 0/1/6-month schedule. We tested replicate serum samples from months 0/1/12 (i.e., after 0/1/3 doses) by GST-L1 and 3 other commonly used serology assays, VLP-ELISA, SEAP-NA, and cLIA. We calculated the percentage of women seropositive by GST-L1 by time point and HPV type (14 HPV types), and compared GST-L1 to other assays using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. After 1 vaccine dose, seropositivity by GST-L1 was 40% each for HPV16 and HPV18, increasing to 100% and 98%, respectively, after 3 doses. Seropositivity after 3 doses ranged from 32% to 69% for HPV types 31/33/45, for which partial vaccine efficacy is reported, though increases also occurred for types with no evidence for cross-protection (e.g., HPV77). GST-L1 correlated best after 3 doses with VLP-ELISA (HPV16 and HPV18 each ρ = 0.72) and SEAP-NA (HPV16 ρ = 0.65, HPV18 ρ = 0.71) (all P < 0.001); correlation was lower with cLIA. The GST-L1 is suitable for evaluating HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity after 3 vaccine doses, although in contrast to other assays it may classify some samples as HPV16/18 seronegative. The assay's utility is limited for lower antibody levels such as after receipt of 1 dose. PMID:25483632

  18. Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA integration and the ensuing patterns of methylation in HPV-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Takashi; Sano, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hideaki; Hyakusoku, Hiroshi; Isono, Yasuhiro; Shimada, Shoko; Sawakuma, Kae; Takada, Kentaro; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Myers, Jeffrey N; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies showed that human papillomavirus (HPV) integration contributes to the genomic instability seen in HPV-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HPV-HNSCC). However, the epigenetic alterations induced after HPV integration remains unclear. To identify the molecular details of HPV16 DNA integration and the ensuing patterns of methylation in HNSCC, we performed next-generation sequencing using a target-enrichment method for the effective identification of HPV16 integration breakpoints as well as the characterization of genomic sequences adjacent to HPV16 integration breakpoints with three HPV16-related HNSCC cell lines. The DNA methylation levels of the integrated HPV16 genome and that of the adjacent human genome were also analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. We found various integration loci, including novel integration sites. Integration loci were located predominantly in the intergenic region, with a significant enrichment of the microhomologous sequences between the human and HPV16 genomes at the integration breakpoints. Furthermore, various levels of methylation within both the human genome and the integrated HPV genome at the integration breakpoints in each integrant were observed. Allele-specific methylation analysis suggested that the HPV16 integrants remained hypomethylated when the flanking host genome was hypomethylated. After integration into highly methylated human genome regions, however, the HPV16 DNA became methylated. In conclusion, we found novel integration sites and methylation patterns in HPV-HNSCC using our unique method. These findings may provide insights into understanding of viral integration mechanism and virus-associated carcinogenesis of HPV-HNSCC.

  19. Expression of E6, p53 and p21 proteins and physical state of HPV16 in cervical cytologies with and without low grade lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tagle, Diana K Jiménez; Sotelo, Daniel Hernández; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Leyva-Vazquez, Marco A; Alfaro, Eugenia Flores; Coronel, Yaneth Castro; Hernández, Oscar del Moral; Romero, Luz del Carmen Alarcón

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between expression of HPV16 E6, p53 and p21 proteins and the physical state of HPV16 in cervical cytologies without squamous intraepithelial lesions (Non-SIL) and with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), both with HPV16 infection. 101 liquid-based cytological samples were analyzed. 50 samples were without squamous intraepithelial lesions (Non-IL) and 51 samples of low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), both with HPV16 infection. HPV16 infection was determined by PCR-RFLP, and the physical state of HPV16 by in situ hybridization with tyramide-amplification. The expression of E6, p53 and p21 proteins was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. The expression of HPV16 E6 protein was significantly higher in LSIL that in Non-SIL samples (p=0.006). We found a significant correlation between E6 expression and the physical state of HPV16 in Non-SIL (p=0.049). Our results suggest that high expression of E6 in LSIL is an early event of cervical carcinogenesis and perhaps can be used as an early marker. PMID:24482706

  20. Expression of E6, p53 and p21 proteins and physical state of HPV16 in cervical cytologies with and without low grade lesions.

    PubMed

    Tagle, Diana K Jiménez; Sotelo, Daniel Hernández; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Leyva-Vazquez, Marco A; Alfaro, Eugenia Flores; Coronel, Yaneth Castro; Hernández, Oscar Del Moral; Romero, Luz Del Carmen Alarcón

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between expression of HPV16 E6, p53 and p21 proteins and the physical state of HPV16 in cervical cytologies without squamous intraepithelial lesions (Non-SIL) and with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), both with HPV16 infection. 101 liquid-based cytological samples were analyzed. 50 samples were without squamous intraepithelial lesions (Non-IL) and 51 samples of low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), both with HPV16 infection. HPV16 infection was determined by PCR-RFLP, and the physical state of HPV16 by in situ hybridization with tyramide-amplification. The expression of E6, p53 and p21 proteins was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. The expression of HPV16 E6 protein was significantly higher in LSIL that in Non-SIL samples (p=0.006). We found a significant correlation between E6 expression and the physical state of HPV16 in Non-SIL (p=0.049). Our results suggest that high expression of E6 in LSIL is an early event of cervical carcinogenesis and perhaps can be used as an early marker.

  1. Influence of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant on the immunogenicity of HPV-16 L1VLP vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison with other bacterial LPS. It is a toll-like receptor 4 agonist and has been shown to have the potential use as a vaccine adjuvant. In this study, the immunostimulatory properties of LPS from smooth and rough strains of B. abortus (S19 and RB51) as adjuvants were investigated for the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 virus-like particles (L1VLPs) vaccines. C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times either with HPV-16 L1VLPs alone, or in combination with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (R-LPS), aluminum hydroxide or a mixture of them as adjuvant. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific and total IgG levels, and also the T-cell immune response of mice was evaluated by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Results showed that serum anti-HPV16 L1VLP IgG antibody titers was significantly higher in mice immunized with a combination of VLPs and R-LPS or S-LPS compared with other immunized groups. Co-administration of HPV-16 L1VLPs with R-LPS elicited the highest levels of splenocytes cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-α) and also effectively induced improvement of a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10. The data indicate that B. abortus LPS particularly RB51-LPS enhances the immune responses to HPV-16 L1VLPs and suggests its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine and other candidate vaccines.

  2. Gene copy number effects in the mer operon of plasmid NR1.

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, H; Kinscherf, T G; Silver, S; Miki, T; Easton, A M; Rownd, R H

    1979-01-01

    The level of resistance to Hg2+ determined by the inducible mer operon of plasmid NR1 was essentially the same for three gene copy number variants in Escherichia coli, less in Proteus mirabilis, and intermediate in P. mirabilis "transitioned" to a high r-determinant gene copy number. Cell-free volatilization rates of radioactive mercury indicated increasing levels of intracellular mercuric reductase enzyme from low- to high-gene copy number forms in P. mirabilis and from low- to high-copy number forms in E. coli, but the additional enzyme in E. coli was effectively cryptic. PMID:374374

  3. Effects of reduced chloroplast gene copy number on chloroplast gene expression in maize.

    PubMed

    Udy, Dylan B; Belcher, Susan; Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Gualberto, José M; Barkan, Alice

    2012-11-01

    Chloroplasts and other members of the plastid organelle family contain a small genome of bacterial ancestry. Young chloroplasts contain hundreds of genome copies, but the functional significance of this high genome copy number has been unclear. We describe molecular phenotypes associated with mutations in a nuclear gene in maize (Zea mays), white2 (w2), encoding a predicted organellar DNA polymerase. Weak and strong mutant alleles cause a moderate (approximately 5-fold) and severe (approximately 100-fold) decrease in plastid DNA copy number, respectively, as assayed by quantitative PCR and Southern-blot hybridization of leaf DNA. Both alleles condition a decrease in most chloroplast RNAs, with the magnitude of the RNA deficiencies roughly paralleling that of the DNA deficiency. However, some RNAs are more sensitive to a decrease in genome copy number than others. The rpoB messenger RNA (mRNA) exhibited a unique response, accumulating to dramatically elevated levels in response to a moderate reduction in plastid DNA. Subunits of photosynthetic enzyme complexes were reduced more severely than were plastid mRNAs, possibly because of impaired translation resulting from limiting ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, and ribosomal protein mRNA. These results indicate that chloroplast genome copy number is a limiting factor for the expression of a subset of chloroplast genes in maize. Whereas in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) a pair of orthologous genes function redundantly to catalyze DNA replication in both mitochondria and chloroplasts, the w2 gene is responsible for virtually all chloroplast DNA replication in maize. Mitochondrial DNA copy number was reduced approximately 2-fold in mutants harboring strong w2 alleles, suggesting that w2 also contributes to mitochondrial DNA replication.

  4. Droplet digital PCR-aided screening and characterization of Pichia pastoris multiple gene copy strains.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Elena; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-07-01

    Pichia (syn. Komagataella) pastoris is a widely used yeast platform for heterologous protein production. Expression cassettes are usually stably integrated into the genome of this host via homologous recombination. Although increasing gene dosage is a powerful strategy to improve recombinant protein production, an excess in the number of gene copies often leads to decreased product yields and increased metabolic burden, particularly for secreted proteins. We have constructed a series of strains harboring different copy numbers of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase gene (ROL), aiming to find the optimum gene dosage for secreted Rol production. In order to accurately determine ROL gene dosage, we implemented a novel protocol based on droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and cross validated it with conventional real-time PCR. Gene copy number determination based on ddPCR allowed for an accurate ranking of transformants according to their ROL gene dosage. Results indicated that ddPCR was particularly superior at lower gene dosages (one to five copies) over quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). This facilitated the determination of the optimal ROL gene dosage as low as two copies. The ranking of ROL gene dosage versus Rol yield was consistent at both small scale and bioreactor chemostat cultures, thereby easing clone characterization in terms of gene dosage dependent physiological effects, which could be discriminated even among strains differing by only one ROL copy. A selected two-copy strain showed twofold increase in Rol specific production in a chemostat culture over the single copy strain. Conversely, strains harboring more than two copies of the ROL gene showed decreased product and biomass yields, as well as altered substrate consumption specific rates, compared to the reference (one-copy) strain. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1542-1551. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Engineered outer membrane vesicle is potent to elicit HPV16E7-specific cellular immunity in a mouse model of TC-1 graft tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijie; Huang, Weiwei; Li, Kui; Yao, Yufeng; Yang, Xu; Bai, Hongmei; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Ma, Yanbing

    2017-01-01

    Currently, therapeutic tumor vaccines under development generally lack significant effects in human clinical trials. Exploring a powerful antigen delivery system is a potential approach to improve vaccine efficacy. We sought to explore engineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a new vaccine carrier for efficiently delivering tumor antigens and provoking robust antitumor immune responses. First, the tumoral antigen human papillomavirus type 16 early protein E7 (HPV16E7) was presented on Escherichia coli-derived OMVs by genetic engineering methods, acquiring the recombinant OMV vaccine. Second, the ability of recombinant OMVs delivering their components and the model antigen green fluorescent protein to antigen-presenting cells was investigated in the macrophage Raw264.7 cells and in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro. Third, it was evaluated in TC-1 graft tumor model in mice that the recombinant OMVs displaying HPV16E7 stimulated specific cellular immune response and intervened the growth of established tumor. E. coli DH5α-derived OMVs could be taken up rapidly by dendritic cells, for which vesicle structure has been proven to be important. OMVs significantly stimulated the expression of dendritic cellmaturation markers CD80, CD86, CD83 and CD40. The HPV16E7 was successfully embedded in engineered OMVs through gene recombinant techniques. Subcutaneous immunization with the engineered OMVs induced E7 antigen-specific cellular immune responses, as shown by the increased numbers of interferon-gamma-expressing splenocytes by enzyme-linked immunospot assay and interferon-gamma-expressing CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells by flow cytometry analyses. Furthermore, the growth of grafted TC-1 tumors in mice was significantly suppressed by therapeutic vaccination. The recombinant E7 proteins presented by OMVs were more potent than those mixed with wild-type OMVs or administered alone for inducing specific cellular immunity and suppressing tumor growth. The

  6. A phase I trial of a human papillomavirus (HPV) peptide vaccine for women with high-grade cervical and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia who are HPV 16 positive.

    PubMed

    Muderspach, L; Wilczynski, S; Roman, L; Bade, L; Felix, J; Small, L A; Kast, W M; Fascio, G; Marty, V; Weber, J

    2000-09-01

    Eighteen women with high-grade cervical or vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia who were positive for human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and were HLA-A2 positive were treated with escalating doses of a vaccine consisting of a 9-amino acid peptide from amino acids 12-20 encoded by the E7 gene emulsified with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Starting with the eleventh patient, an 8-amino acid peptide 86-93 linked to a helper T-cell epitope peptide with a covalently linked lipid tail was added. Patients with colposcopically and biopsy-proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia/vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia II/III received four immunizations of increasing doses of the vaccine each 3 weeks apart, followed by a repeat colposcopy and definitive removal of dysplastic tissue 3 weeks after the fourth immunization. Patients were skin tested with the E7 12-20 peptide as well as control candida, mumps, and saline prior to and after the series of immunizations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained by leucopheresis prior to and after the series of immunizations for analyses of CTL reactivity to the E7 12-20 and 86-93 epitope sequences. The presence of HPV 16 was assessed by DNA PCR on cervical scrapings and the biopsy specimens after vaccination. Pathology specimens were analyzed before and after vaccination for the presence of dysplasia, and the intralesional infiltrate of CD4/CD8 T-cells and dendritic cells was measured by immunohistochemical staining. Only 3 of 18 patients cleared their dysplasia after vaccine, but an increased S100+ dendritic cell infiltrate was observed in 6 of 6 patients tested. Cytokine release and cytolysis assays to measure E7-specific reactivity revealed increases in 10 of 16 patients tested. No positive delayed type hypersensitivity skin test reactivity was shown in any patient to HPV E7 12-20 before or after vaccinations. Virological assays showed that 12 of 18 patients cleared the virus from cervical scrapings by the fourth vaccine injection, but

  7. Folate and vitamin B12 may play a critical role in lowering the HPV 16 methylation-associated risk of developing higher grades of CIN.

    PubMed

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Chambers, Michelle M; Badiga, Suguna; Siddiqui, Nuzhat R; Bell, Walter C; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Partridge, Edward E; Alvarez, Ronald D; Johanning, Gary L

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported that a higher degree of methylation of CpG sites in the promoter (positions 31, 37, 43, 52, and 58) and enhancer site 7862 of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 was associated with a lower likelihood of being diagnosed with HPV 16-associated CIN 2+. The purpose of this study was to replicate our previous findings and, in addition, to evaluate the influence of plasma concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 on the degree of HPV 16 methylation (HPV 16m). The study included 315 HPV 16-positive women diagnosed with either CIN 2+ or ≤CIN 1. Pyrosequencing technology was used to quantify the degree of HPV 16m. We reproduced the previously reported inverse association between HPV 16m and risk of being diagnosed with CIN 2+. In addition, we observed that women with higher plasma folate and HPV 16m or those with higher plasma vitamin B12 and HPV 16m were 75% (P < 0.01) and 60% (P = 0.02) less likely to be diagnosed with CIN 2+, respectively. With a tertile increase in the plasma folate or vitamin B12, there was a 50% (P = 0.03) and 40% (P = 0.07) increase in the odds of having a higher degree of HPV 16m, respectively. This study provides initial evidence that methyl donor micronutrients, folate and vitamin B12, may play an important role in maintaining a desirably high degree of methylation at specific CpG sites in the HPV E6 promoter and enhancer that are associated with the likelihood of being diagnosed with CIN 2+.

  8. HPV 16 E7 inhibits OSCC cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis by upregulating the expression of miR-20a.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Ge, Weili; Xu, Junfeng

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study how HPV-16 E7 affects the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells by upregulating the expression of miR-20a. A total of 60 OSCC patients were included in this study. SiRNA-198 was used to inhibit HPV-16 E7, and the constructed plasmid of HPV-16 E7 was transfected into Cal27 cells. Then, HPV-16 E7 protein was detected by Western blot and RT-PCR was performed to measure miR-20a expression in OSCC cells. Either HPV-16 E7 or the combination of HPV-16 E7 and miR-20a inhibitors was transfected into Cal27 cells separately. And then, the effect of miR-20a on OSCC cells proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8. Moreover, transwell assay and wound healing assay were used to assess the impact of miR-20a on OSCC cell invasion migration. MiR-20a was significantly higher in OSCC tissues compared with para-carcinoma tissues. RT-PCR results indicated that miR-20a was downregulated after silencing HPV-16 E7. By contrast, miR-20a was upregulated after the overexpression of HPV-16 E7. Upregulation of miR-20a by transfected plasmid HPV-16 E7 can significantly inhibit Cal27 cell proliferation, invasion, and migration. The expression of MiR-20a upregulated by HPV-16 E7 inhibits the proliferation, invasion, and migration of OSCC cells.

  9. mTOR inhibition prevents rapid-onset of carcinogen-induced malignancies in a novel inducible HPV-16 E6/E7 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Palacios-Garcia, Julia; Martin, Daniel; Califano, Joseph A; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-10-01

    The rising incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated malignancies, especially for oropharyngeal cancers, has highlighted the urgent need to understand how the interplay between high-risk HPV oncogenes and carcinogenic exposure results in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. Here, we describe an inducible mouse model expressing high risk HPV-16 E6/E7 oncoproteins in adults, bypassing the impact of these viral genes during development. HPV-16 E6/E7 genes were targeted to the basal squamous epithelia in transgenic mice using a doxycycline inducible cytokeratin 5 promoter (cK5-rtTA) system. After doxycycline induction, both E6 and E7 were highly expressed, resulting in rapid epidermal hyperplasia with a remarkable expansion of the proliferative cell compartment to the suprabasal layers. Surprisingly, in spite of the massive growth of epithelial cells and their stem cell progenitors, HPV-E6/E7 expression was not sufficient to trigger mTOR activation, a key oncogenic driver in HPV-associated malignancies, and malignant progression to SCC. However, these mice develop SCC rapidly after a single exposure to a skin carcinogen, DMBA, which was increased by the prolonged exposure to a tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Thus, only few oncogenic hits may be sufficient to induce cancer in E6/E7 expressing cells. All HPV-E6/E7 expressing SCC lesions exhibited increased mTOR activation. Remarkably, rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, abolished tumor development when administered to HPV-E6/E7 mice prior to DMBA exposure. Our findings revealed that mTOR inhibition protects HPV-E6/E7 expressing tissues form SCC development upon carcinogen exposure, thus supporting the potential clinical use of mTOR inhibitors as a molecular targeted approach for prevention of HPV-associated malignancies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Interferon gamma prevents infectious entry of HPV16 via an L2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Day, Patricia M; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we report that IFN-γ, but not IFN α, β or λ treatment, dramatically decreased infection of HPV16 pseudovirus (PsV). In a survey of 20 additional HPV and animal papillomavirus type, we found that many, but not all, PsV types were also inhibited by IFN-γ. Microscopic and biochemical analyses of HPV16 PsV determined that the antiviral effect was exerted at the level of endosomal processing of the incoming capsid and depended on the JAK2/STAT1 pathway. In contrast to infection in the absence of IFN-γ, where L1 proteolytic products are produced during endosomal capsid processing and L2/DNA complexes segregate from L1 in the late endosome and travel to the nucleus, IFN-γ treatment led to decreased L1 proteolysis and retention of L2 and the viral genome in the late endosome/lysosome. PsV sensitivity or resistance to IFN-γ treatment was mapped to the L2 protein, as determined with infectious hybrid PsV in which the L1 protein was derived from an IFN-γ-sensitive HPV type and the L2 protein from an IFN-γ-insensitive type, or vice versa.Importance: A subset of human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of many human cancers, most notably cervical cancer. This manuscript describes the inhibition of infection of multiple HPV types, including oncogenic types, by treatment with interferon-γ, an antiviral cytokine that is released from stimulated immune cells. Exposure of cells to IFN-γ has been shown to trigger the expression of proteins with broad antiviral effector functions, most of which act to prevent viral transcription or translation. Interestingly, in this study, we show that infection is blocked at the early step of virus entry into the host cell by retention of the minor capsid protein, L2, and the viral genome, instead of trafficking into the nucleus. Thus, a novel antiviral mechanism for interferon-γ has been revealed.

  11. Interactions of Two Large Antiviral Polyamides with the Long Control Region of HPV16

    PubMed Central

    Vasilieva, Elena; Niederschulte, Jacquelyn; Song, Yang; Harris, George Davis; Koeller, Kevin J.; Liao, Puhong; Bashkin, James K.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    PA1 and PA25 are large hairpin polyamides that are effective in nearly eliminating HPV16 episomes (DNA) in cell culture, and PA25 has broad spectrum activity against three cancer-causing forms of HPV (Edwards, T. G., Koeller, K. J., Slomczynska, U., Fok, K., Helmus, M., Bashkin, J. K., Fisher, C., Antiviral Res. 91 (2011) 177-186). Described here are the interactions of these PAs with sequences in the long control region (LCR) of HPV16 (7348-122). Using an FeEDTA conjugate of PA1 (designed to recognize 5’-W2GW7-3’; W = A or T), 34 affinity cleavage (AC) patterns were detected for this fragment. These sites can be rationalized with sequences featuring perfect, single, double, triple and quadruple mismatches. Quantitative DNase I footprinting analysis indicates that perfect sites bind PA1 with Kds between 0.7-2.2 nM. Kds for single, double, triple and quadruple mismatch sites range from 1-3 nM to 20 nM. Using AC and EDTA conjugates, we report that unlike smaller 8-ring hairpin PAs, introduction of a chiral turn in this large polyamide has no effect on binding orientation (forward vs. reverse). Despite its design to recognize 5’-W2GW5GW4-3’ via two Im residues, a motif not represented in this HPV sequence, a PA25-EDTA conjugate yielded 31 affinity cleavage sites on the region. Low nM Kds for PA25 without EDTA indicate a high tolerance for triple and quadruple mismatches. While there is extensive coverage of the sequence examined, AC cleavage patterns for the two PAs show discrete binding events and do not overlap significantly. This indicates that within the context of A/T rich sequences, these PAs do not recognize a simple shared sequence-related feature of the DNA. These insights continue to inform the complex nature of large hairpin PA-DNA interactions and antiviral behavior. PMID:27155361

  12. Difluoromethylornithine chemoprevention of epidermal carcinogenesis in K14-HPV16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Arbeit, J M; Riley, R R; Huey, B; Porter, C; Kelloff, G; Lubet, R; Ward, J M; Pinkel, D

    1999-08-01

    To be informative for chemoprevention, animal models must both closely emulate human disease and possess surrogate endpoint biomarkers that facilitate rapid drug screening. This study elucidated site-specific histopathological and biochemical surrogate endpoint biomarkers of spontaneous epidermal carcinogenesis in K14-HPV16 transgenic mice and demonstrated that the incidence and severity of these markers were decreased by the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). The cumulative incidence of visible epidermal cancers in 127 untreated transgenic mice was 42% by 52 weeks of age, most frequently affecting the chest as flat lesions in association with chronic ulcers, or in the ear as protuberant masses. Microscopic malignancies were detected in 39% of 32-week-old transgenic mice and were found to emerge from precursor lesions that were of two distinct types: dysplastic sessile ear papillomas and hyperproliferative follicular/interfollicular chest dysplasias. ODC activity and tissue polyamine contents were differentially elevated in ear and chest skin during carcinogenesis, such that there was a marked elevation of both parameters of polyamine metabolism as early as 4 weeks of age in the ear, whereas in the chest, polyamine metabolism was increased significantly only in the late stages of neoplastic progression and in epidermal cancers. Administration of 1.0% DFMO in the drinking water from 4 to 32 weeks of age prevented both visible and microscopic malignancies and significantly decreased the incidence of chest and ear precursor lesions. ODC activity and tissue putrescine content were markedly diminished by DFMO chemoprevention in ear skin, whereas there was a more modest decline of these parameters in chest skin. DFMO treatment of transgenic mice from 28 to 32 weeks of age was associated with an absence of ear cancer and a marked regression of dysplastic papillomas. In contrast, the results in chest skin were complex in that the

  13. A rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Fan; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Direct optimization of the metabolic pathways on the chromosome requires tools that can fine tune the overexpression of a desired gene or optimize the combination of multiple genes. Although plasmid-dependent overexpression has been used for this task, fundamental issues concerning its genetic stability and operational repeatability have not been addressed. Here, we describe a rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies (CIGMC), which uses the flippase from the yeast 2-μm plasmid. Using green fluorescence protein as a model, we verified that the fluorescent intensity was in accordance with the integration copy number of the target gene. When a narrow-host-range replicon, R6K, was used in the integrative plasmid, the maximum integrated copy number of Escherichia coli reached 15. Applying the CIGMC method to optimize the overexpression of single or multiple genes in amino acid biosynthesis, we successfully improved the product yield and stability of the production. As a flexible strategy, CIGMC can be used in various microorganisms other than E. coli. PMID:25851494

  14. Clinical Significance of MET Gene Copy Number in Patients with Curatively Resected Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Woog; Park, Heyoung; Park, Bo Eun; Jeon, Seong Woo; Bae, Han Ik; Kwon, Oh-kyoung; Chung, Ho Young; Yu, Wansik

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzed the prognostic impact of MET gene copy number in patients with curatively resected gastric cancer who received a combination regimen of cisplatin and S-1. The MET gene copy number was analyzed by use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. From January 2006 to July 2010, 70 tumor samples from 74 patients enrolled in a pilot study were analyzed. According to a cutoff MET gene copy number of ≥2 copies, a high MET gene copy number was observed in 38 patients (54.3%). The characteristics of the 2 groups divided according to MET gene copy number were similar. With a median follow-up duration of 26.4 months (range, 2.6-73.2 months), the estimated 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival rates were 54.3% and 77.4%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the MET gene copy number and survival in a multivariate analysis. The MET gene copy number investigated in this study was not found to be associated with prognosis in patients with curatively resected gastric cancer. PMID:26306302

  15. Abundant copy-number loss of CYCLOPS and STOP genes in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cutcutache, Ioana; Wu, Alice Yingting; Suzuki, Yuka; McPherson, John Richard; Lei, Zhengdeng; Deng, Niantao; Zhang, Shenli; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ooi, London Lucien; Welsch, Roy; Tan, Patrick; Rozen, Steven G

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer, a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, has been little studied compared with other cancers that impose similar health burdens. Our goal is to assess genomic copy-number loss and the possible functional consequences and therapeutic implications thereof across a large series of gastric adenocarcinomas. We used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays to determine patterns of copy-number loss and allelic imbalance in 74 gastric adenocarcinomas. We investigated whether suppressor of tumorigenesis and/or proliferation (STOP) genes are associated with genomic copy-number loss. We also analyzed the extent to which copy-number loss affects Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS (CYCLOPS) genes-genes that may be attractive targets for therapeutic inhibition when partially deleted. The proportion of the genome subject to copy-number loss varies considerably from tumor to tumor, with a median of 5.5 %, and a mean of 12 % (range 0-58.5 %). On average, 91 STOP genes were subject to copy-number loss per tumor (median 35, range 0-452), and STOP genes tended to have lower copy-number compared with the rest of the genes. Furthermore, on average, 1.6 CYCLOPS genes per tumor were both subject to copy-number loss and downregulated, and 51.4 % of the tumors had at least one such gene. The enrichment of STOP genes in regions of copy-number loss indicates that their deletion may contribute to gastric carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the presence of several deleted and downregulated CYCLOPS genes in some tumors suggests potential therapeutic targets in these tumors.

  16. Cervarix™: a vaccine for the prevention of HPV 16, 18-associated cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monie, Archana; Hung, Chien-Fu; Roden, Richard; Wu, T-C

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be the second largest cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Thus, prophylactic vaccination against HPV is an attractive strategy to prevent cervical cancer. Current strategies for the development of safe and effective preventive vaccines are based on the induction of neutralizing antibodies against the major capsid protein, L1 of HPV. Cervarix™ is one of the preventive HPV vaccines that has been approved in the Europe and Australia and is currently under review by the US Food and Drug Administration. Cervarix is composed of HPV16 and HPV18 L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) formulated in ASO4 adjuvant. Vaccination with Cervarix has been shown to protect women against a high proportion of precursor lesions of cervical cancer caused by these two HPV types. This review explores the various features of this new vaccine candidate and discusses the future directions in the field of HPV vaccine development. PMID:19707432

  17. Different Isoforms of HPV-16 E7 Protein are Present in Cytoplasm and Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Valdovinos-Torres, H; Orozco-Morales, M; Pedroza-Saavedra, A; Padilla-Noriega, L; Esquivel-Guadarrama, F; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, L

    2008-01-01

    The E7 protein of high risk HPV types has been found with different molecular weights, mainly because of phosphorylation, an event that changes protein charge and mobility in SDS-PAGE. Distribution of E7 protein in the cellular compartments has also been subject of debate as some groups report the protein in nucleus and others in cytoplasm. The different subcellular distribution and molecular weights reported for the E7 protein suggest the presence of isoforms. We examined this possibility by using several antibodies that recognize different epitopes on the HPV-16 E7 protein. We showed that E7 is processed in 3 isoforms with different molecular weights and isoelectric points (IEP), and described as E7a1 (17.5 kDa, IEP 4.68), E7a (17 kDa, IEP 6.18) and E7b (16 kDa, IEP 6.96). The immunofluorescense results also showed that E7 is distributed into different compartments (ER, Golgi and nucleus), which suggest the presence of other posttranslational modifications, besides phosphorylation. PMID:19440460

  18. Unimpeded skin carcinogenesis in K14-HPV16 transgenic mice deficient for plasminogen activator inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Masset, A.; Maillard, C.; Sounni, NE.; Jacobs, N.; Bruyère, F.; Delvenne, P.; Tacke, M.; Reinheckel, T.; Foidart, J-M.; Coussens, LM.; Noël, A.

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling and cell migration are associated with cancer progression and involve at least, the plasminogen activating system and its main physiological inhibitor, the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Considering the recognized importance of PAI-1 in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and invasion in murine models of skin tumor transplantation, we explored the functional significance of PAI-1 during early stages of neoplastic progression in the transgenic mouse model of multistage epithelial carcinogenesis (K14-HPV16 mice). We have studied the effect of genetic deletion of PAI-1 on inflammation, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, as well as tumor progression. In this model, PAI-1 deficiency neither impaired keratinocyte hyperproliferation or tumor development, nor affected the infiltration of inflammatory cells and development of angiogenic or lymphangiogenic vasculature. We are reporting evidence for concomitant lymphangiogenic and angiogenic switches independent to PAI-1 status. Taken together, these data indicate that PAI-1 is not rate limiting for neoplastic progression and vascularization during premalignant progression, or that there is a functional redundancy between PAI-1 and other tumor regulators, masking the effect of PAI-1 deficiency in this long-term model of multi-stage epithelial carcinogenesis. PMID:20232379

  19. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Brenton R; Gibson, William J; Urbanski, Laura M; Alberta, John A; Zack, Travis I; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Nichols, Caitlin A; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Brown, Meredith S; Lamothe, Rebecca; Yu, Yong; Choi, Peter S; Obeng, Esther A; Heckl, Dirk; Wei, Guo; Wang, Belinda; Tsherniak, Aviad; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Root, David E; Cowley, Glenn S; Buhrlage, Sara J; Stiles, Charles D; Ebert, Benjamin L; Hahn, William C; Reed, Robin; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2017-02-08

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent. One of these, the pre-mRNA splicing factor SF3B1, is also frequently mutated in cancer. We validated SF3B1 as a CYCLOPS gene and found that human cancer cells harboring partial SF3B1 copy-loss lack a reservoir of SF3b complex that protects cells with normal SF3B1 copy number from cell death upon partial SF3B1 suppression. These data provide a catalog of copy-number associated gene dependencies and identify partial copy-loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel, non-driver cancer gene dependency.

  20. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Brenton R; Gibson, William J; Urbanski, Laura M; Alberta, John A; Zack, Travis I; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Nichols, Caitlin A; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Brown, Meredith S; Lamothe, Rebecca; Yu, Yong; Choi, Peter S; Obeng, Esther A; Heckl, Dirk; Wei, Guo; Wang, Belinda; Tsherniak, Aviad; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Root, David E; Cowley, Glenn S; Buhrlage, Sara J; Stiles, Charles D; Ebert, Benjamin L; Hahn, William C; Reed, Robin; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent. One of these, the pre-mRNA splicing factor SF3B1, is also frequently mutated in cancer. We validated SF3B1 as a CYCLOPS gene and found that human cancer cells harboring partial SF3B1 copy-loss lack a reservoir of SF3b complex that protects cells with normal SF3B1 copy number from cell death upon partial SF3B1 suppression. These data provide a catalog of copy-number associated gene dependencies and identify partial copy-loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel, non-driver cancer gene dependency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23268.001 PMID:28177281

  1. Reduced prevalence of vulvar HPV16/18 infection among women who received the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Chen, Sabrina; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R; Porras, Carolina; DelVecchio, Corey; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John T; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2014-12-15

    Vaccine efficacy (VE) against vulvar human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has not been reported and data regarding its epidemiology are sparse. Women (n = 5404) age 22-29 present at the 4-year study visit of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial provided vulvar and cervical samples. A subset (n = 1044) was tested for HPV DNA (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1). VE against 1-time detection of vulvar HPV16/18 among HPV vaccinated versus unvaccinated women was calculated and compared to the cervix. Prevalence of and risk factors for HPV were evaluated in the control arm (n = 536). Vulvar HPV16/18 VE (54.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9%-79.1%) was comparable to cervix (45.8%; 95% CI, 6.4%-69.4%). Vulvar and cervical HPV16 prevalence within the control arm was 3.0% and 4.7%, respectively. Independent risk factors for vulvar HPV were similar to cervix and included: age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.5 [95% CI, .3-.9] ≥28 vs 22-23]); marital status (aOR 2.3 [95% CI, 1.5-3.5] single vs married/living-as-married); and number of sexual partners (aOR 3.6 [95% CI, 1.9-7.0] ≥6 vs 1). In this intention-to-treat analysis, VE against vulvar and cervical HPV16/18 were comparable 4 years following vaccination. Risk factors for HPV were similar by anatomic site. NCT00128661. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Reduced Prevalence of Vulvar HPV16/18 Infection Among Women Who Received the HPV16/18 Bivalent Vaccine: A Nested Analysis Within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Chen, Sabrina; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; DelVecchio, Corey; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John T.; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine efficacy (VE) against vulvar human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has not been reported and data regarding its epidemiology are sparse. Methods Women (n = 5404) age 22–29 present at the 4-year study visit of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial provided vulvar and cervical samples. A subset (n = 1044) was tested for HPV DNA (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1). VE against 1-time detection of vulvar HPV16/18 among HPV vaccinated versus unvaccinated women was calculated and compared to the cervix. Prevalence of and risk factors for HPV were evaluated in the control arm (n = 536). Results Vulvar HPV16/18 VE (54.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9%–79.1%) was comparable to cervix (45.8%; 95% CI, 6.4%–69.4%). Vulvar and cervical HPV16 prevalence within the control arm was 3.0% and 4.7%, respectively. Independent risk factors for vulvar HPV were similar to cervix and included: age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.5 [95% CI, .3–.9] ≥28 vs 22–23]); marital status (aOR 2.3 [95% CI, 1.5–3.5] single vs married/living-as-married); and number of sexual partners (aOR 3.6 [95% CI, 1.9–7.0] ≥6 vs 1). Conclusions In this intention-to-treat analysis, VE against vulvar and cervical HPV16/18 were comparable 4 years following vaccination. Risk factors for HPV were similar by anatomic site. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00128661. PMID:24958910

  3. Nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via hydrophobic interactions with Nup62

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, Jeremy; Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona

    2013-11-15

    We previously discovered that nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 is mediated by a cNLS located within the zinc-binding domain via a pathway that is independent of karyopherins/importins (Angeline et al., 2003; Knapp et al., 2009). In this study we continued our characterization of the cNLS and nuclear import pathway of HPV16 E7. We find that an intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the cNLS function in mediating nuclear import of HPV16 E7. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues to alanine in each of the two CysXXCys motifs involved in zinc-binding changes the nuclear localization of the EGFP-16E7 and 2xEGFP-16E7 mutants. We further discover that a patch of hydrophobic residues, {sub 65}LRLCV{sub 69}, within the zinc-binding domain of HPV16 E7 mediates its nuclear import via hydrophobic interactions with the FG domain of the central channel nucleoporin Nup62. - Highlights: • An intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the nuclear localization of HPV16 E7. • Identification of a hydrophobic patch that is critical for the nuclear import of HPV16 E7. • HPV16 E7 interacts via its zinc-binding domain with the FG domain of Nup62.

  4. ERK Signaling Pathway Is Involved in HPV-16 E6 but not E7 Oncoprotein-Induced HIF-1α Protein Accumulation in NSCLC Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Lin, Bihua; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Wenzhang; Zhang, Erying; Hu, Liang; Ma, Yuefan; Li, Xiangyong; Tang, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. Our previous studies have demonstrated that HPV-16 oncoproteins enhanced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, thus contributing to angiogenesis. In this study, we further investigated the role of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis in NSCLC cells. Our results showed that HPV-16 E6 and HPV-16 E7 oncoproteins promoted the activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Moreover, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2, blocked in vitro angiogenesis stimulated by HPV-16 E6 but not E7 oncoprotein. Additionally, HIF-1α protein accumulation and VEGF and IL-8 expression in NSCLC cells induced by HPV-16 E6 but not E7 oncoprotein were significantly inhibited by PD98059. Taken together, our results suggest that ERK1/2 signaling pathway is involved in HPV-16 E6 but not E7 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression in NSCLC cells, leading to the enhanced angiogenesis in vitro.

  5. GeneBreak: detection of recurrent DNA copy number aberration-associated chromosomal breakpoints within genes.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Evert; van Lieshout, Stef; Rausch, Christian; Ylstra, Bauke; van de Wiel, Mark A; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    Development of cancer is driven by somatic alterations, including numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations. Currently, several computational methods are available and are widely applied to detect numerical copy number aberrations (CNAs) of chromosomal segments in tumor genomes. However, there is lack of computational methods that systematically detect structural chromosomal aberrations by virtue of the genomic location of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks and identify genes that appear non-randomly affected by chromosomal breakpoints across (large) series of tumor samples. 'GeneBreak' is developed to systematically identify genes recurrently affected by the genomic location of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks by a genome-wide approach, which can be applied to DNA copy number data obtained by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) or by (low-pass) whole genome sequencing (WGS). First, 'GeneBreak' collects the genomic locations of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks that were previously pinpointed by the segmentation algorithm that was applied to obtain CNA profiles. Next, a tailored annotation approach for breakpoint-to-gene mapping is implemented. Finally, dedicated cohort-based statistics is incorporated with correction for covariates that influence the probability to be a breakpoint gene. In addition, multiple testing correction is integrated to reveal recurrent breakpoint events. This easy-to-use algorithm, 'GeneBreak', is implemented in R ( www.cran.r-project.org) and is available from Bioconductor ( www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GeneBreak.html).

  6. Importance of rare gene copy number alterations for personalized tumor characterization and survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Michael; Friedrich, Betty; Beyer, Andreas

    2016-10-03

    It has proven exceedingly difficult to ascertain rare copy number alterations (CNAs) that may have strong effects in individual tumors. We show that a regulatory network inferred from gene expression and gene copy number data of 768 human cancer cell lines can be used to quantify the impact of patient-specific CNAs on survival signature genes. A focused analysis of tumors from six tissues reveals that rare patient-specific gene CNAs often have stronger effects on signature genes than frequent gene CNAs. Further comparison to a related network-based approach shows that the integration of indirectly acting gene CNAs significantly improves the survival analysis.

  7. HPV16/18 L1 VLP Vaccine Induces Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies that May Mediate Cross-Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Troy J.; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Dauner, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP-based vaccines are protective against HPV vaccine-related types; however, the correlates of protection have not been defined. We observed that vaccination with Cervarix™ induced cross-neutralizing antibodies for HPV types for which evidence of vaccine efficacy has been demonstrated (HPV31/45) but not for other types (HPV52/58). In addition, HPV31/45 cross-neutralizing titers showed a significant increase with number of doses (HPV31, p<0.001; HPV45, p<0.001) and correlated with HPV16/18 neutralizing titers, respectively. These findings raise the possibility that cross-neutralizing antibodies are effectors of cross-protection observed for the HPV16/18 vaccine. PMID:21241731

  8. Results on exposure during pregnancy from a pregnancy registry for AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine.

    PubMed

    López-Fauqued, Marta; Zima, Julia; Angelo, Maria-Genalin; Stegmann, Jens-Ulrich

    2017-09-25

    To assess pregnancy outcomes after exposure to AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix, GSK, Belgium) prior to, or during pregnancy, as reported to a pregnancy registry. A pregnancy exposure registry was established to collect data in the United Kingdom and the United States. Exposure was defined as vaccination with AS04-HPV-16/18 within 60days before the estimated conception date and delivery. Reporting was voluntary. Between September 2007 and November 2015, 306 pregnancy exposure reports were received of which 181 were prospective, evaluable reports. From these 181 reports, 154 (85.1%) pregnancies resulted in a live birth, 14 (7.7%) in spontaneous abortion, one (0.5%) in stillbirth, and 12 (6.6%) were electively terminated. There was no clustering of outcomes with respect to the timing of exposure. There were 18 infants born with a congenital anomaly of which nine were minor structural defects, seven were major structural defects, one was a hereditary disorder and one was likely the result of a congenital infection. In three cases of structural defect (two minor and one major), there was a temporal association to vaccination during the critical developmental period of gestation. There was no cluster or constellation of congenital anomalies suggestive of possible teratogenesis. The pharmacovigilance plan to investigate the effects of inadvertent exposure to AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine during pregnancy included assessment of pregnancy outcomes among women enrolled in clinical trials, evaluation of pregnancy exposure reports from all countries as part of routine passive safety surveillance, a large, well conducted post-authorization observational study, and the pregnancy registry. These registry data complement other data from clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance showing no evidence that vaccination with AS04-HPV-16/18 during the defined exposure period (within 60days before conception until delivery) increases the risk of teratogenicity. Copyright © 2017 Glaxo

  9. A Phase I Trial of a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Vaccine for HPV16+ Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 2/3

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Cornelia L.; Peng, Shiwen; Kos, Ferdynand; Gravitt, Patti; Viscidi, Raphael; Sugar, Elizabeth; Pardoll, Drew; Wu, TC

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a therapeutic HPV16 DNA vaccine administered to women with HPV16+CIN2/3. Experimental Design: This phase I trial incorporated the standard ‘3+3” dose escalation design with an additional 6 patients allocated to the maximally tolerated dose (MTD). Healthy adult women with colposcopically-directed biopsy-proven HPV16+ CIN2/3 received three intramuscular (IM) vaccinations (0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 3mg) of a plasmid expressing a Sig-E7(detox)-HSP70 fusion protein on days 0, 28 and 56, and underwent standard therapeutic resection of the cervical squamocolumnar junction at day 105 (week 15). Safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine and histologic outcome based on resection at week 15 were assessed. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable (3 each at 0.5 mg and 1mg, 9 at 3mg). The vaccine was well tolerated: most adverse events were mild transient injection-site discomfort; no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Although HPVE7-specific T-cell responses to E7 detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assays (IFNγ) were of low frequency and magnitude, detectable increases in response subsequent to vaccination were identified in subjects in the second and third cohorts. Complete histologic regression occurred in 3/9 (33%, CI: 7%-70%)) individuals in the highest dose cohort, Although the difference is not significant, it is slightly higher than would be expected in an unvaccinated cohort (25%). Conclusions: This HPV16 DNA vaccine was safe and well tolerated. While it appears possible to elicit HPV-specific T cell responses in patients with established dysplastic lesions, other factors are likely to play a role in lesion regression. PMID:19118066

  10. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-γ ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease. PMID:26381401

  11. Copy number variations in IL22 gene are associated with Psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Traks, Tanel; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2013-06-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) is a frequent, chronically relapsing, immune-mediated systemic disease with characteristic skin changes. IL22 is a cytokine of IL10 family, with significant proliferative effect on different cell lines. Copy number variations (CNV) have been discovered to have phenotypic consequences and are associated with various types of diseases. In the work presented here we analyzed the copy number variations in IL22 gene of exon1 and exon5. Our results showed that the IL22 gene exon1 was significantly associated with psoriasis severity (P<0.0001). However, the association between IL22 gene exon5 copy numbers and psoriasis was not detected.

  12. Susceptibility of HPV16 and 18 to high level disinfectants indicated for semi‐critical ultrasound probes

    PubMed Central

    Ryndock, Eric; Robison, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound probes used in endocavitary procedures have been shown to be contaminated with high‐risk HPV after routine use and HPV is also known to be resistant to some high level disinfectants (HLDs). This study compared efficacy of two leading ultrasound probe HLD methods; liquid ortho‐phthalaldehyde (Cidex® OPA) and an automated device using sonicated hydrogen peroxide (trophon® EPR) against HPV16 and HPV18 in a hard‐surface carrier test. Native HPV16 and HPV18 virions were generated in organotypic epithelial raft cultures. Viral lysates were dried onto carriers with a 5% (v/v) protein soil. Efficacy tests were performed against the automated device at 35% and 31.5% H2O2 and 0.55% OPA in quadruplicate with matched input, neutralization, and cytotoxicity controls. Hypochlorite was included as a positive control. Infectivity was determined by the abundance (qRT‐PCR) of the spliced E1^E4 transcript in infected recipient cells. The automated HLD device showed excellent efficacy against HPV16 and HPV18 (>5 log10 reductions in infectivity) whereas OPA showed minimal efficacy (<0.6 log10 reductions). While HPV is highly resistant to OPA, sonicated hydrogen peroxide offers an effective disinfection solution for ultrasound probes. Disinfection methods that are effective against HPV should be adopted where possible. J. Med. Virol. 88:1076–1080, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26519866

  13. Prevalent Serum Antibody Is Not a Marker of Immune Protection against Acquisition of Oncogenic HPV16 in Men

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Beibei; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Wu, Yougui; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Nyitray, Alan G.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Carvalho da Silva, Roberto J.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmeron, Jorge; Smith, Danelle C.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Stockwell, Heather G.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2012-01-01

    In women, naturally induced anti–human papilloma virus (HPV) serum antibodies are a likely marker of host immune protection against subsequent HPV acquisition and progression to precancerous lesions and cancers. However, it is unclear whether the same is the case in men. In this study, we assessed the risk of incident genital infection and 6-month persistent genital infection with HPV16 in relation to baseline serostatus in a cohort of 2,187 men over a 48-month period. Genital swabs were collected every 6 months and tested for HPV presence. Incidence proportions by serostatus were calculated at each study visit to examine whether potential immune protection attenuated over time. Overall, incidence proportions did not differ statistically between baseline seropositive and seronegative men at any study visit or over the follow-up period. The risk of incident and 6-month persistent infection was not associated with baseline serostatus or baseline serum antibody levels in the cohort. Our findings suggest that baseline HPV seropositivity in men is not associated with reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 acquisition. Thus, prevalent serum antibodies induced by prior infection may not be a suitable marker for subsequent immune protection against genital HPV16 acquisition in men. PMID:22123925

  14. PCR based detection of HPV 16 and 18 genotypes in normal oral mucosa of tobacco users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, S; Kotrashetti, V S; Nayak, R; Bhat, K; Somannavar, P; Babji, D

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of a causal association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Several studies have shown that HPV is associated with increased risk of oral cancer independent of exposure to tobacco and alcohol. The association is valid for HPVs 16 and 18, which generally are considered high risk types, because they have been detected in oral dysplastic lesions and cancers. We determined the baseline prevalence of HPVs 16 and 18 in normal oral mucosa of individuals with and without tobacco habit. PCR was used for DNA collected by oral smears to detect HPV 16/18 DNA in normal oral mucosa of 60 healthy individuals who were assigned to two groups of 30 subjects each. One group had a tobacco habit, the other did not. The tobacco user group comprised individuals who were tobacco chewers only. Sixty-five percent of individuals were positive for HPV 16/18 DNA, but HPV 16/18 positivity was less in individuals with tobacco habit than in those without tobacco habit. No significant association was found between the presence of HPVs and gender, age or duration of chewing habit, or between groups with and without a tobacco habit. We propose that HPVs16 and 18 commonly are present in normal oral mucosa and emphasize the importance of distinguishing clinical, subclinical and latent HPV infections when investigating HPVs and OSCC.

  15. E1^E4-mediated keratin phosphorylation and ubiquitylation: a mechanism for keratin depletion in HPV16-infected epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Pauline B.; Laskey, Peter; Sullivan, Kate; Davy, Clare; Wang, Qian; Jackson, Deborah J.; Griffin, Heather M.; Doorbar, John

    2010-01-01

    The keratin IF network of epidermal keratinocytes provides a protective barrier against mechanical insult, it is also a major player in absorbing stress in these cells. The human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16 E1^E4 protein accumulates in the upper layers of HPV16-infected epithelium and is known to associate with and reorganise the keratin IF network in cells in culture. Here, we show that this function is conserved amongst a number of HPV alpha-group E1^E4 proteins and that the differentiation-dependent keratins are also targeted. Using time-lapse microscopy, HPV16 E1^E4 was found to effect a dramatic cessation of keratin IF network dynamics by associating with both soluble and insoluble keratin. Network disruption was accompanied by keratin hyperphosphorylation at several sites, including K8 S73, which is typically phosphorylated in response to stress stimuli. Keratin immunoprecipitated from E1^E4-expressing cells was also found to be ubiquitylated, indicating that it is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated, ubiquitylated E1^E4-keratin structures was found to result in an impairment of proteasomal function. These observations shed new light on the mechanism of keratin IF network reorganisation mediated by HPV16 E1^E4 and provide an insight into the depletion of keratin co-incident with E1^E4 accumulation observed in HPV-infected epithelium. PMID:20663917

  16. The high risk HPV16 L2 minor capsid protein has multiple transport signals that mediate its nucleocytoplasmic traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoor, Shahan; Onder, Zeynep; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Kwak, Kihyuck; Bordeaux, Jennifer; Crosby, Lauren; Roden, Richard B.S.; Moroianu, Junona

    2012-01-20

    In this study we examined the transport signals contributing to HPV16 L2 nucleocytoplasmic traffic using confocal microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein-L2 (EGFP-L2) fusions expressed in HeLa cells. We confirmed that both nuclear localization signals (NLSs), the nNLS (1MRHKRSAKRTKR12) and cNLS (456RKRRKR461), previously characterized in vitro (Darshan et al., 2004), function independently in vivo. We discovered that a middle region rich in arginine residues (296SRRTGIRYSRIGNKQTLRTRS316) functions as a nuclear retention sequence (NRS), as mutagenesis of critical arginine residues within this NRS reduced the fraction of L2 in the nucleus despite the presence of both NLSs. Significantly, the infectivity of HPV16 pseudoviruses containing either RR297AA or RR297EE within the L2 NRS was strongly reduced both in HaCaT cells and in a murine challenge model. Experiments using Ratjadone A nuclear export inhibitor and mutation-localization analysis lead to the discovery of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal ({sub 462}LPYFFSDVSL) mediating 16L2 nuclear export. These data indicate that HPV16 L2 nucleocytoplasmic traffic is dependent on multiple functional transport signals.

  17. HPV16-E7 Expression in skin induces TSLP secretion, type 2 ILC infiltration and atopic dermatitis-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Monnet, Nastasia; Tran, Le Son; Mittal, Deepak; Al-Kouba, Jane; Steptoe, Raymond J.; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Frazer, Ian H.; Wells, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common pruritic and inflammatory skin disorder with unknown etiology. Most commonly occurring during early childhood, atopic dermatitis is associated with eczematous lesions and lichenification, in which the epidermis becomes hypertrophied resulting in thickening of the skin. In this study, we report an atopic dermatitis-like pathophysiology results in a murine model following the expression of the high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 oncoprotein E7 in keratinocytes under the Keratin 14 promoter. We show that HPV 16 E7 expression in the skin is associated with skin thickening, acanthosis and light spongiosis. Locally, HPV 16 E7 expressing skin secreted high levels of TSLP and contained increased numbers of ILCs. High levels of circulating IgE were associated with increased susceptibility to skin allergy in a model of cutaneous challenge, and to airway bronchiolar inflammation, enhanced airway goblet cell metaplasia and mucus production in a model of atopic march. Surprisingly, skin pathology occurred independently of T-cells and mast cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the expression of a single HPV oncogene in the skin can drive the onset of atopic dermatitis-like pathology through the induction of TSLP and type 2 ILC infiltration. PMID:25601274

  18. HPV16 induces a wasting syndrome in transgenic mice: Amelioration by dietary polyphenols via NF-κB inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, Rui M; Aragão, Sofia; Moutinho, Magda; Alvarado, Antonieta; Carmo, Diogo; Casaca, Fátima; Silva, Sandra; Ribeiro, Joana; Sousa, Hugo; Ferreira, Rita; Nogueira-Ferreira, Rita; Pires, Maria João; Colaço, Bruno; Medeiros, Rui; Venâncio, Carlos; Oliveira, Maria Manuel; Bastos, Margarida M S M; Lopes, Carlos; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-01-15

    Cancer patients often show a wasting syndrome for which there are little therapeutic options. Dietary polyphenols have been proposed for treating this syndrome, but their usefulness in cases associated with human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancers is unknown. We characterized HPV16-transgenic mice as a model of cancer cachexia and tested the efficacy of long-term oral supplementation with polyphenols curcumin and rutin. Both compounds were orally administered to six weeks-old HPV16-transgenic mice showing characteristic multi-step skin carcinogenesis, for 24weeks. Skin lesions and blood, liver and spleen inflammatory changes were characterized histologically and hematologically. Hepatic oxidative stress, skeletal muscle mass and the levels of muscle pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB were also assessed. Skin carcinogenesis was associated with progressive, severe, systemic inflammation (leukocytosis, hepatitis, splenitis), significant mortality and cachexia. Curcumin and rutin totally suppressed mortality while reducing white blood cells and the incidence of splenitis and hepatitis. Rutin prevented muscle wasting more effectively than curcumin. Preservation of muscle mass and reduced hepatic inflammation were associated with down-regulation of the NF-κB canonical pathway and with reduced oxidative stress, respectively. These results point out HPV16-transgenic mice as a useful model for studying the wasting syndrome associated with HPV-induced cancers. Dietary NF-κB inhibitors may be useful resources for treating this syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Susceptibility of HPV16 and 18 to high level disinfectants indicated for semi-critical ultrasound probes.

    PubMed

    Ryndock, Eric; Robison, Richard; Meyers, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound probes used in endocavitary procedures have been shown to be contaminated with high-risk HPV after routine use and HPV is also known to be resistant to some high level disinfectants (HLDs). This study compared efficacy of two leading ultrasound probe HLD methods; liquid ortho-phthalaldehyde (Cidex® OPA) and an automated device using sonicated hydrogen peroxide (trophon® EPR) against HPV16 and HPV18 in a hard-surface carrier test. Native HPV16 and HPV18 virions were generated in organotypic epithelial raft cultures. Viral lysates were dried onto carriers with a 5% (v/v) protein soil. Efficacy tests were performed against the automated device at 35% and 31.5% H2 O2 and 0.55% OPA in quadruplicate with matched input, neutralization, and cytotoxicity controls. Hypochlorite was included as a positive control. Infectivity was determined by the abundance (qRT-PCR) of the spliced E1^E4 transcript in infected recipient cells. The automated HLD device showed excellent efficacy against HPV16 and HPV18 (>5 log10 reductions in infectivity) whereas OPA showed minimal efficacy (<0.6 log10 reductions). While HPV is highly resistant to OPA, sonicated hydrogen peroxide offers an effective disinfection solution for ultrasound probes. Disinfection methods that are effective against HPV should be adopted where possible. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Virology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HPV16 and 18 genome amplification show different E4-dependence, with 16E4 enhancing E1 nuclear accumulation and replicative efficiency via its cell cycle arrest and kinase activation functions

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Deborah; Mahmood, Radma

    2017-01-01

    To clarify E1^E4’s role during high-risk HPV infection, the E4 proteins of HPV16 and 18 were compared side by side using an isogenic keratinocyte differentiation model. While no effect on cell proliferation or viral genome copy number was observed during the early phase of either virus life cycle, time-course experiments showed that viral genome amplification and L1 expression were differently affected upon differentiation, with HPV16 showing a much clearer E4 dependency. Although E4 loss never completely abolished genome amplification, its more obvious contribution in HPV16 focused our efforts on 16E4. As previously suggested, in the context of the virus life cycle, 16E4s G2-arrest capability was found to contribute to both genome amplification success and L1 accumulation. Loss of 16E4 also lead to a reduced maintenance of ERK, JNK and p38MAPK activity throughout the genome amplifying cell layers, with 16E4 (but not 18E4) co-localizing precisely with activated cytoplasmic JNK in both wild type raft tissue, and HPV16-induced patient biopsy tissue. When 16E1 was co-expressed with E4, as occurs during genome amplification in vivo, the E1 replication helicase accumulated preferentially in the nucleus, and in transient replication assays, E4 stimulated viral genome amplification. Interestingly, a 16E1 mutant deficient in its regulatory phosphorylation sites no longer accumulated in the nucleus following E4 co-expression. E4-mediated stabilisation of 16E2 was also apparent, with E2 levels declining in organotypic raft culture when 16E4 was absent. These results suggest that 16E4-mediated enhancement of genome amplification involves its cell cycle inhibition and cellular kinase activation functions, with E4 modifying the activity and function of viral replication proteins including E1. These activities of 16E4, and the different kinase patterns seen here with HPV18, 31 and 45, may reflect natural differences in the biology and tropisms of these viruses, as well as

  1. HPV16 and 18 genome amplification show different E4-dependence, with 16E4 enhancing E1 nuclear accumulation and replicative efficiency via its cell cycle arrest and kinase activation functions.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Wang, Qian; Griffin, Heather M; Murakami, Isao; Jackson, Deborah; Mahmood, Radma; Doorbar, John

    2017-03-17

    To clarify E1^E4's role during high-risk HPV infection, the E4 proteins of HPV16 and 18 were compared side by side using an isogenic keratinocyte differentiation model. While no effect on cell proliferation or viral genome copy number was observed during the early phase of either virus life cycle, time-course experiments showed that viral genome amplification and L1 expression were differently affected upon differentiation, with HPV16 showing a much clearer E4 dependency. Although E4 loss never completely abolished genome amplification, its more obvious contribution in HPV16 focused our efforts on 16E4. As previously suggested, in the context of the virus life cycle, 16E4s G2-arrest capability was found to contribute to both genome amplification success and L1 accumulation. Loss of 16E4 also lead to a reduced maintenance of ERK, JNK and p38MAPK activity throughout the genome amplifying cell layers, with 16E4 (but not 18E4) co-localizing precisely with activated cytoplasmic JNK in both wild type raft tissue, and HPV16-induced patient biopsy tissue. When 16E1 was co-expressed with E4, as occurs during genome amplification in vivo, the E1 replication helicase accumulated preferentially in the nucleus, and in transient replication assays, E4 stimulated viral genome amplification. Interestingly, a 16E1 mutant deficient in its regulatory phosphorylation sites no longer accumulated in the nucleus following E4 co-expression. E4-mediated stabilisation of 16E2 was also apparent, with E2 levels declining in organotypic raft culture when 16E4 was absent. These results suggest that 16E4-mediated enhancement of genome amplification involves its cell cycle inhibition and cellular kinase activation functions, with E4 modifying the activity and function of viral replication proteins including E1. These activities of 16E4, and the different kinase patterns seen here with HPV18, 31 and 45, may reflect natural differences in the biology and tropisms of these viruses, as well as

  2. Tandemly Integrated HPV16 Can Form a Brd4-Dependent Super-Enhancer-Like Element That Drives Transcription of Viral Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Katharine E.; Warburton, Alix

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In cancer cells associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, the viral genome is very often found integrated into the cellular genome. The viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are transcribed from the viral promoter, and integration events that alter transcriptional regulation of this promoter contribute to carcinogenic progression. In this study, we detected highly enriched binding of the super-enhancer markers Brd4, MED1, and H3K27ac, visible as a prominent nuclear focus by immunofluorescence, at the tandemly integrated copies of HPV16 in cells of the cervical neoplasia cell line W12 subclone 20861. Tumor cells are often addicted to super-enhancer-driven oncogenes and are particularly sensitive to disruption of transcription factor binding to the enhancers. Treatment of 20861 cells with bromodomain inhibitors displaced Brd4 from the HPV integration site, greatly decreased E6/E7 transcription, and inhibited cellular proliferation. Thus, Brd4 activates viral transcription at this integration site, and strong selection for E6/E7 expression can drive the formation of a super-enhancer-like element to promote oncogenesis. PMID:27624132

  3. Copy number loss or silencing of apoptosis-effector genes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauro, James A; Butler, Shanitra N; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo a variety of DNA copy number gains and losses (CNV), raising two important questions related to cancer development: (i) Which genes are affected? (ii) And how do CNVs, that do not represent complete deletions but do represent gene-dosage alterations, impact cancer cell functions? Recent studies have indicated that CNVs in cancer can impact genes for regulatory proteins long known to be associated with cancer development, but less is understood about CNVs affecting effector genes. Also, we have recently indicated the likely importance of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) copies in effector genes, in regulating the transition from a proliferative to an apoptotic state. Here we report data-mining analyses that indicate that copies of apoptosis-effector genes are commonly lost in cancer development, in comparison to proliferation-effector genes, and when not, apoptosis effector genes have silenced chromatin structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High EGFR gene copy number predicts poor outcome in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Heae Surng; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hee Jin; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, In Ah; Park, So Yeon

    2014-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in triple-negative breast cancer and is emerging as a therapeutic target. EGFR gene copy number alteration and mutation are highly variable and scientists have been challenged to define their prognostic significance in triple-negative breast cancer. We examined EGFR protein expression, EGFR gene copy number alteration and mutation of exon 18 to 21 in 151 cases of triple-negative breast cancer and correlated these findings with clinical outcomes. In addition, intratumoral agreement of EGFR protein overexpression and gene copy number alteration was evaluated. EGFR overexpression was found in 97 of 151 cases (64%) and high EGFR gene copy number was detected in 50 cases (33%), including 3 gene amplification (2%) and 47 high polysomy (31%). Five EGFR mutations were detected in 4 of 151 cases (3%) and included G719A in exon 18 (n=1), V786M in exon 20 (n=1), and L858R in exon 21 (n=3). One case had two mutations (G719A and L858R). High EGFR copy number, but not EGFR mutation, correlated with EGFR protein overexpression. Intratumoral heterogeneity of EGFR protein overexpression and EGFR copy number alteration was not significant. In survival analyses, high EGFR copy number was found to be an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-free survival in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Our findings showed that EGFR mutation was a rare event, but high EGFR copy number was relatively frequent and correlated with EGFR overexpression in triple-negative breast cancer. Moreover, high EGFR copy number was associated with poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer, suggesting that evaluation of EGFR copy number may be useful for predicting outcomes in patients with triple-negative breast cancer and for selecting patients for anti-EGFR-targeted therapy.

  5. mRNA sequencing of novel cell lines from human papillomavirus type-16 related vulval intraepithelial neoplasia: consequences of expression of HPV16 E4 and E5.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Dean; Onions, Tiffany; Raybould, Rachel; Flynn, Áine; Tristram, Amanda; Meyrick, Sian; Giles, Peter; Ashelford, Kevin; Hibbitts, Samantha; Fiander, Alison; Powell, Ned

    2014-09-01

    Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia is a precursor of vulval cancer and is commonly caused by infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Development of topical treatments for vulval intraepithelial neoplasia requires appropriate in vitro models. This study evaluated the feasibility of primary culture of vulval intraepithelial neoplasia biopsy tissue to produce cell lines for use as in vitro models. A potentially immortal cell line was produced which gave rise to three monoclonal lines. These lines were characterized for HPV genomic integration and for viral gene expression using ligation-mediated PCR and quantitative PCR. Distinct patterns of viral integration and gene expression were observed among the three lines. Integration and expression data were validated using deep sequencing of mRNA. Gene ontology analyses of these data also demonstrated that expression of the HPV16 E4 and E5 proteins resulted in substantial changes in the composition of the cell membrane and extracellular space, associated with alterations in cell adhesion and differentiation. These data illustrate the diverse patterns of HPV gene expression potentially present within a single lesion. The derived cell lines provide useful models to investigate the biology of vulval intraepithelial neoplasia and the interactions between different HPV gene products and potential therapeutic agents.

  6. Transgenic tobacco expressed HPV16-L1 and LT-B combined immunization induces strong mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hongli, Liu; Xukui, Li; Ting, Lei; Wensheng, Li; Lusheng, Si; Jin, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although there are two HPV vaccines have been used to prevent cervical cancer, the cost limits their application in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of plant-based HPV16L1 and LTB proteins as a high-efficiency, low-cost and easy-to-use HPV16L1 oral vaccine. Results: Transgenic plant-derived HPV16L1 and LTB were identified, which display potent immunogenicity and biologic activity. Higher levels of specific IgG and IgA levels of HPV16L1 were induced when mice were immunized with L1 combined with LTB by the oral route. The stimulation index (SI) of spleen cells from the L1/LTB-immunized group was significantly higher than that in the L1-immunized group (p < 0.05). The percentage of IFN-γ+/IL-4+ CD4+ T cells from the L1/LTB group was clearly increased compared with that in the L1 and control groups (p < 0.05). Methods: Plant-expressed HPV16L1 and LTB proteins were extracted from transgenic tobacco leaves, and their biologic characteristics and activity were examined with electron microscopy and GM1-binding assays respectively. Mice were immunized orally with either HPV16L1 or LTB alone or in combination. Induced mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected by ELISA, Hemagglutination inhibition (HAI), lymphocyte proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis. Conclusion: Strong mucosal and systemic immune responses were induced by transgenic tobacco derived HPV16-L1 and LTB combined immunization. This study will lay the foundation for the development of a new type of vaccine to decrease HPV16 infections, which may lead to the prevention of cervical cancer. PMID:23108357

  7. Associations between oral HPV16 infection and cytopathology: evaluation of an oropharyngeal “Pap-test equivalent” in high-risk populations

    PubMed Central

    Fakhry, Carole; Rosenthal, Barbara T.; Clark, Douglas P.; Gillison, Maura L.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for the rising incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell cancers (OSCC) in the United States (U.S.), and yet, no screening strategies have been evaluated. Secondary prevention by means of HPV detection and cervical cytology has led to a decline in cervical cancer incidence in the U.S. Here, we explored an analogous strategy by evaluating associations between HPV16 infection, cytopathology and histopathology in two populations at elevated risk for OSCC. In the first, a cross-sectional study population (PAP1), cytology specimens were collected by means of brush biopsy from patients presenting with oropharyngeal abnormalities. In the second (PAP2), a nested case-control study, bilateral tonsillar cytology samples were collected at 12-month intervals from HIV-infected individuals. The presence of cytopathological abnormality in HPV16-positive tonsil brush biopsies (cases) was compared to HPV16-negative samples (controls) matched on age and gender. HPV16 was detected in samples by consensus primer PCR and/or type-specific PCR. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate associations. In PAP1, HPV16 alone (OR 6.1, 95%CI 1.6–22.7) or in combination with abnormal cytology (OR 20, 95%CI 4.2–95.4) was associated with OSCC. In PAP2, 4.7% (72 of 1524) of tonsillar cytology specimens from HIV-infected individuals without oropharyngeal abnormalities were HPV16-positive. Tonsillar HPV16 infection was not associated with atypical squamous cells of unknown significance (ASCUS), the only cytological abnormality identified. Therefore, HPV16 was associated with OSCC among individuals with accessible oropharyngeal lesions, but not with cytological evidence of dysplasia among high-risk individuals without such lesions. An oropharyngeal Pap-test equivalent may not be feasible, likely due to limitations in sampling the relevant tonsillar crypt epithelium. PMID:21836021

  8. Long-term persistence of systemic and mucosal immune response to HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in preteen/adolescent girls and young women.

    PubMed

    Petäjä, Tiina; Pedersen, Court; Poder, Airi; Strauss, Gitte; Catteau, Gregory; Thomas, Florence; Lehtinen, Matti; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-11-01

    Vaccination against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is one key intervention for cervical cancer prevention. This follow-up study assessed the persistence of the systemic and mucosal immune responses together with the safety profile of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to young women aged 10-25 years. Serum and cervicovaginal secretion (CVS) samples were collected at prespecified time-points during the 48-month follow-up period. Anti-HPV-16/18 antibody levels in serum and CVS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). At Month 48, all subjects remained seropositive for serum anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies. As previously observed, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies levels (ELISA Units/mL) were higher in subjects vaccinated at the age of 10-14 years (2862.2 and 940.8) compared to subjects vaccinated at the age of 15-25 years (1186.2 and 469.8). Moreover, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies in CVS were still detectable for subjects aged 15-25 years (84.1% and 69.7%, respectively). There was a strong correlation between serum and CVS anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies levels (correlation coefficients = 0.84 and 0.90 at Month 48, respectively) supporting the hypothesis of transudation or exudation of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies through the cervical epithelium. The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile. In conclusion, this follow-up study shows that the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to preteen/adolescents girls and young women induces long-term systemic and mucosal immune response and has a clinically acceptable safety profile up to 4 years after the first vaccine dose.

  9. Identification of candidate growth promoting genes in ovarian cancer through integrated copy number and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Manasa; Williams, Louise H; Boyle, Samantha E; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Sridhar, Anita; Speed, Terence P; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2010-04-08

    Ovarian cancer is a disease characterised by complex genomic rearrangements but the majority of the genes that are the target of these alterations remain unidentified. Cataloguing these target genes will provide useful insights into the disease etiology and may provide an opportunity to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. High resolution genome wide copy number and matching expression data from 68 primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas of various histotypes was integrated to identify genes in regions of most frequent amplification with the strongest correlation with expression and copy number. Regions on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 20 were most frequently increased in copy number (> 40% of samples). Within these regions, 703/1370 (51%) unique gene expression probesets were differentially expressed when samples with gain were compared to samples without gain. 30% of these differentially expressed probesets also showed a strong positive correlation (r > or =0.6) between expression and copy number. We also identified 21 regions of high amplitude copy number gain, in which 32 known protein coding genes showed a strong positive correlation between expression and copy number. Overall, our data validates previously known ovarian cancer genes, such as ERBB2, and also identified novel potential drivers such as MYNN, PUF60 and TPX2.

  10. Identification of Candidate Growth Promoting Genes in Ovarian Cancer through Integrated Copy Number and Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Manasa; Williams, Louise H.; Boyle, Samantha E.; Bearfoot, Jennifer L.; Sridhar, Anita; Speed, Terence P.; Gorringe, Kylie L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease characterised by complex genomic rearrangements but the majority of the genes that are the target of these alterations remain unidentified. Cataloguing these target genes will provide useful insights into the disease etiology and may provide an opportunity to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. High resolution genome wide copy number and matching expression data from 68 primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas of various histotypes was integrated to identify genes in regions of most frequent amplification with the strongest correlation with expression and copy number. Regions on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 20 were most frequently increased in copy number (>40% of samples). Within these regions, 703/1370 (51%) unique gene expression probesets were differentially expressed when samples with gain were compared to samples without gain. 30% of these differentially expressed probesets also showed a strong positive correlation (r≥0.6) between expression and copy number. We also identified 21 regions of high amplitude copy number gain, in which 32 known protein coding genes showed a strong positive correlation between expression and copy number. Overall, our data validates previously known ovarian cancer genes, such as ERBB2, and also identified novel potential drivers such as MYNN, PUF60 and TPX2. PMID:20386695

  11. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for relative copy number detection in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-05-19

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential "single copy" genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3--high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1--medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2--low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane.

  12. Viral load of HPV 16/18 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in three ethnic groups living in Xinjiang Autonomous Region, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Qing; Liang, Meng; Zheng, Shutao; Li, Xiu Ling; Lu, Xiaomei; Sheyhidin, Ilyar

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the viral load of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients from three ethnic groups in Xinjiang. Using Gp5+/Gp6+ consensus primers, the prevalence of HPV DNA was examined in 253 paraffin-embedded ESCC samples. The presence and viral load of HPV 16 and HPV 18 were detected in Kazakhs, Uygurs and Hans using type-specific primers by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Among the 253 ESCC samples, 52 cases were positive for HPV DNA, all the 52 positive cases displayed HPV 16 infection, and six of the 52 cases were co-infected by HPV 16 and 18. HPV 16-positive rate and viral load were higher in lesions, and was inversely correlated with differentiation grades. However, there was no statistic significance among different differentiation grades. Also, there were no significant difference between detection rates of HPV types, viral load and age, gender, ethnic group, and lymph node metastasis. HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotypes could simultaneously be detected in ESCC specimens in three main ethnic groups in Xinjiang. The viral load of HPV 16 is higher in the ESCC lesions, and is inversely correlated with the differentiation grades. These observations reinforce the suggestion that HPV infection may involved in ESCC carcinogenesis; however, high prevalence or viral load of HPV infection does not seem to be related with high incidence of ESCC in Kazakhs, which may be the one element among the multiple risk factors contributing to ESCC.

  13. Impact of vaccination with Cervarix (trade mark) on subsequent HPV-16/18 infection and cervical disease in women 15-25 years of age.

    PubMed

    Harper, Diane M

    2008-09-01

    Cervical cancer of both squamous and adenocarcinoma types is considered virtually 100% attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV-16 and -18 are the predominant types worldwide accounting for over 70% of all cervical cancer. Persistent oncogenic HPV infection has been confirmed as one key determinant in the development of cervical precancer (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] 2+) and cervical cancer. The impact of prophylactic HPV vaccination on the reduction of virological and cytohistological outcomes related to HPV-16 and -18 has been evaluated in clinical trials with the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted cervical cancer vaccine (Cervarixtrade mark) through a Phase IIb study with a long-term follow-up of efficacy up to 5.5 years, and a large Phase III trial in women 15-25 years of age. These individual studies include populations with different underlying risk factors, each of which shows high efficacy against both HPV-16/18 persistent infections and CIN2+. When the two studies are combined and the respective populations are evaluated, vaccine efficacy against HPV-16 and -18-related CIN2+ remains at 100%. As this vaccine is used over time in universal prophylactic HPV-16/18 vaccination of girls and women, reductions in cervical cancers at both the individual and public health levels will be appreciated.

  14. HPV-16 E7 reveals a link between DNA replication stress, fanconi anemia D2 protein, and alternative lengthening of telomere-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Nicole; Duensing, Anette; Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Wells, Susanne I; Duensing, Stefan

    2008-12-01

    Expression of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV-16) E7 oncoprotein extends the life span of primary human keratinocytes and partially restores telomere length in the absence of telomerase. The molecular basis of this activity is incompletely understood. Here, we show that HPV-16 E7 induces an increased formation of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT)-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies (APBs) in early passage primary human keratinocytes as well as HPV-negative tumor cells. This activity was found to require sequences of HPV-16 E7 involved in degradation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein as well as regions in the COOH terminus. HPV-16 E7-induced APBs contained ssDNA and several proteins that are involved in the response to DNA replication stress, most notably the Fanconi anemia D2 protein (FANCD2) as well as BRCA2 and MUS81. In line with these results, we found that FANCD2-containing APBs form in an ATR-dependent manner in HPV-16 E7-expressing cells. To directly show a role of FANCD2 in ALT, we provide evidence that knockdown of FANCD2 rapidly causes telomere dysfunction in cells that rely on ALT to maintain telomeres. Taken together, our results suggest a novel link between replication stress and recombination-based telomere maintenance that may play a role in HPV-16 E7-mediated extension of host cell life span and immortalization.

  15. Inducible Amplification of Gene Copy Number and Heterologous Protein Production in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Morlino, Giovanni B.; Tizzani, Lorenza; Fleer, Reinhard; Frontali, Laura; Bianchi, Michele M.

    1999-01-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1β, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system. PMID:10543790

  16. Inducible amplification of gene copy number and heterologous protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Morlino, G B; Tizzani, L; Fleer, R; Frontali, L; Bianchi, M M

    1999-11-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1beta, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system.

  17. New ideas in epilepsy genetics: novel epilepsy genes, copy number alterations, and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, Christina A; Hedera, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The majority of genes associated with epilepsy syndromes to date are ion channel genes. Selection bias may have allowed us to establish their role in epilepsy based on a priori knowledge of the significance of these proteins in regulating neuronal excitability. There are, however, more than 3000 genes expressed at the synapse, as well as many other genes expressed nearby in supporting cells and glia that can likewise regulate excitability. Identification of new genes involved in epilepsy may arise from studying the targets of anticonvulsant medications, ascertainment of an epileptic phenotype in mice, or as a result of positional cloning efforts. There are several loci for idiopathic focal and generalized epilepsies that lie in chromosomal regions that are devoid of known ion channels; therefore, the number of novel genes involved in epilepsy is likely to increase. Establishing the role of these novel genes in the pathogenesis of epilepsy has not been an easy task compared with the relative ease with which ion channel mutations can be studied. This review will describe several novel epilepsy genes and will then discuss other genetic causes of epilepsy, including alterations of chromosomal copy number and gene regulatory elements.

  18. On the origins of tandemly repeated genes: does histone gene copy number in Drosophila reflect chromosomal location?

    PubMed

    Fitch, D H; Strausbaugh, L D; Barrett, V

    1990-04-01

    Widely regarded beliefs about Drosophila histone gene copy numbers and developmental requirements have been generalized from fairly limited data since studies on histone gene arrangements and copy numbers have been largely confined to a single species, D. melanogaster. Histone gene copy numbers and chromosomal locations were examined in three species: D. melangaster, D. hydei and D. hawaiiensis. Quantitative whole genome blot analysis of DNA from diploid tissues revealed a tenfold variability in histone gene copy numbers for these three species. In situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes showed that the histone DNA (hDNA) chromosomal location is different in all three species. These observations lead us to propose a relationship between histone gene reiteration and chromosomal position.

  19. Aluminum tolerance in maize is associated with higher MATE1 gene copy number

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Lyza G.; Guimarães, Claudia T.; Kirst, Matias; Albert, Patrice S.; Birchler, James A.; Bradbury, Peter J.; Buckler, Edward S.; Coluccio, Alison E.; Danilova, Tatiana V.; Kudrna, David; Magalhaes, Jurandir V.; Piñeros, Miguel A.; Schatz, Michael C.; Wing, Rod A.; Kochian, Leon V.

    2013-01-01

    Genome structure variation, including copy number variation and presence/absence variation, comprises a large extent of maize genetic diversity; however, its effect on phenotypes remains largely unexplored. Here, we describe how copy number variation underlies a rare allele that contributes to maize aluminum (Al) tolerance. Al toxicity is the primary limitation for crop production on acid soils, which make up 50% of the world’s potentially arable lands. In a recombinant inbred line mapping population, copy number variation of the Al tolerance gene multidrug and toxic compound extrusion 1 (MATE1) is the basis for the quantitative trait locus of largest effect on phenotypic variation. This expansion in MATE1 copy number is associated with higher MATE1 expression, which in turn results in superior Al tolerance. The three MATE1 copies are identical and are part of a tandem triplication. Only three maize inbred lines carrying the three-copy allele were identified from maize and teosinte diversity panels, indicating that copy number variation for MATE1 is a rare, and quite likely recent, event. These maize lines with higher MATE1 copy number are also Al-tolerant, have high MATE1 expression, and originate from regions of highly acidic soils. Our findings show a role for copy number variation in the adaptation of maize to acidic soils in the tropics and suggest that genome structural changes may be a rapid evolutionary response to new environments. PMID:23479633

  20. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-03-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes.

  1. Pyruvate Kinase and Fcγ Receptor Gene Copy Numbers Associated With Malaria Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Faik, Imad; van Tong, Hoang; Lell, Bertrand; Meyer, Christian G; Kremsner, Peter G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-07-15

    Genetic factors are associated with susceptibility to many infectious diseases and may be determinants of clinical progression. Gene copy number variation (CNV) has been shown to be associated with phenotypes of numerous diseases, including malaria. We quantified gene copy numbers of the pyruvate kinase, liver, and red blood cell (PKLR) gene as well as of the Fcγ receptor 2A and Fcγ receptor 2C (FCGR2A, FCGR2C) and Fcγ receptor 3 (FCGR3) genes using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays in Gabonese children with severe (n = 184) or and mild (n = 189) malaria and in healthy Gabonese and white individuals (n = 76 each). The means of PKLR, FCGR2A, FCGR2C, and FCGR3 copy numbers were significantly higher among children with severe malaria compared to those with mild malaria (P < .002), indicating that a surplus of copies of those genes is significantly associated with malaria severity. Copy numbers of the FCGR2A and FCGR2C genes were significantly lower (P = .005) in Gabonese individuals compared with white individuals. In conclusion, CNV of the PKLR, FCGR2A, FCGR2C, and FCGR3 genes is associated with malaria severity, and our results provide evidence for a role of CNV in host responses to malaria. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The Characterisation of Three Types of Genes that Overlie Copy Number Variable Regions

    PubMed Central

    Woodwark, Cara; Bateman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the increased accuracy of Copy Number Variable region (CNV) break point mapping, it is now possible to say with a reasonable degree of confidence whether a gene (i) falls entirely within a CNV; (ii) overlaps the CNV or (iii) actually contains the CNV. We classify these as type I, II and III CNV genes respectively. Principal Findings Here we show that although type I genes vary in copy number along with the CNV, most of these type I genes have the same expression levels as wild type copy numbers of the gene. These genes must, therefore, be under homeostatic dosage compensation control. Looking into possible mechanisms for the regulation of gene expression we found that type I genes have a significant paucity of genes regulated by miRNAs and are not significantly enriched for monoallelically expressed genes. Type III genes, on the other hand, have a significant excess of genes regulated by miRNAs and are enriched for genes that are monoallelically expressed. Significance Many diseases and genomic disorders are associated with CNVs so a better understanding of the different ways genes are associated with normal CNVs will help focus on candidate genes in genome wide association studies. PMID:21637334

  3. Selection of Suitable Endogenous Reference Genes for Relative Copy Number Detection in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential “single copy” genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3—high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1—medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2—low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane. PMID:24857916

  4. QUANTITATIVE SCREENING OF SINGLE COPIES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRAL DNA WITHOUT AMPLIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangwei; Lee, Ji-Young; Yeung, Edward S.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel quantitative viral screening method based on single-molecule detection that does not require amplification. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV), the major etiological agent of cervical cancer, served as the screening target in this study. Eight 100-nucleotide (nt) single-stranded (ss)-DNA probes were designed complementary to the E6-E7 gene of HPV-16 DNA. The probes were covalently stained with Alexa Fluor 532 and hybridized to the target in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell, and had a linear dynamic range of over six orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, we employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and added YOYO-3 dye as the acceptor. The two colors from Alexa Fluor 532 and YOYO-3 were dispersed by a transmission grating located in front of the ICCD. With this reinforced criteria for identifying the hybridized molecules, zero false-positive count was achieved. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the measurements. PMID:16970325

  5. Virus transcript levels and cell growth rates after naturally occurring HPV16 integration events in basal cervical keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Pett, Mark R; Ward, Dawn; Coleman, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    Cervical carcinogenesis is characterized by a clonal selection process in which the high-risk human papillomavirus (HRHPV) genome usually changes from the extra-chromosomal (episomal) state seen in productive infections to DNA that is integrated into host chromosomes. However, it is not clear whether all HRHPV integration events provide cells with a selective growth advantage compared with the episome-containing cells from which they originate. It is also unclear whether selection of cells containing a particular integrant from a mixed population simply reflects the highest levels of virus oncogene expression or has additional determinants. These early events in cervical carcinogenesis cannot readily be addressed by cross-sectional studies of clinical samples. We used the W12 model system to generate a panel of cervical squamous cell clones that were derived from an identical background under non-competitive conditions and differed only by the genomic site of HPV16 integration. Compared with the 'baseline' episome-containing cells from which they were isolated, only 9/17 clones (53%) showed significantly greater growth rates and only 7/17 (41%) showed significantly greater expression of the major virus oncogenes E7/E6. There were significant variations in levels of HPV16 transcription per DNA template, changes that were associated with histone modifications in the integrated virus chromatin. Cell growth rates showed only weak and non-significant associations with protein and mRNA levels for E7, E6, and the mean E7/E6 values. We conclude that HPV16 integration in basal cervical cells does not necessarily lead to increased levels of virus oncogenes, or to a competitive growth advantage, when compared with the initiating episome-containing cells.

  6. HPV16 methyl-haplotypes determined by a novel next-generation sequencing method are associated with cervical precancer

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Frimer, Marina; Harari, Ariana; McAndrew, Thomas; Smith, Benjamin; Chen, Zigui; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Castle, Philip E.; Raine-Bennett, Tina; Schiffman, Mark; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a next-generation bisulfite sequencing (NGS) assay to distinguish HPV16 cervical precancer (CIN2-3; N=59) from HPV16-positive transient infections (N=40). Cervical DNA was isolated and treated with bisulfite and HPV16 methylation was quantified by (1) amplification with barcoded primers and massively parallel single molecule sequencing and (2) site-specific pyrosequencing. Assays were evaluated for agreement using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Odds ratios (OR) for high methylation vs. low methylation were calculated. Single site pyrosequencing and NGS data were correlated (ICC=0.61) and both indicated hypermethylation was associated with precancer (ORs of 2-37). Concordant NGS and pyrosequencing results yieled ORs that were stronger when compared to using either assay separately. Within the L1 region, the ORs for CIN2-3 were 14.3 and 22.4 using pyrosequencing and NGS assays, respectively; when both methods agreed the OR was 153. NGS assays provide methylation haplotypes, termed methyl-haplotypes from single molecule reads: cases had increased methyl-haplotypes with ≥ 1 methylated CpG site(s) per fragment compared to controls, particularly in L1 (P=3.0×10−8). The maximum discrimination of cases from controls for a L1 methyl-haplotype had an AUC of 0.89 corresponding to a sensitivity of 92.5% and a specificity of 73.1%. The strengthening of the OR when the two assays were concordant suggests the true association of CpG methylation with precancer is stronger than with either assay. As cervical cancer prevention moves to DNA testing methods, DNA based biomarkers, such as HPV methylation could serve as a reflex strategy to identify women at high risk for cervix cancer. PMID:25081507

  7. Single-Copy Genes as Molecular Markers for Phylogenomic Studies in Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; De La Torre, Amanda R; Sterck, Lieven; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción; Merino, Irene; Cabezas, José Antonio; Cervera, María Teresa; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Van de Peer, Yves

    2017-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among seed plant taxa, especially within the gymnosperms, remain contested. In contrast to angiosperms, for which several genomic, transcriptomic and phylogenetic resources are available, there are few, if any, molecular markers that allow broad comparisons among gymnosperm species. With few gymnosperm genomes available, recently obtained transcriptomes in gymnosperms are a great addition to identifying single-copy gene families as molecular markers for phylogenomic analysis in seed plants. Taking advantage of an increasing number of available genomes and transcriptomes, we identified single-copy genes in a broad collection of seed plants and used these to infer phylogenetic relationships between major seed plant taxa. This study aims at extending the current phylogenetic toolkit for seed plants, assessing its ability for resolving seed plant phylogeny, and discussing potential factors affecting phylogenetic reconstruction. In total, we identified 3,072 single-copy genes in 31 gymnosperms and 2,156 single-copy genes in 34 angiosperms. All studied seed plants shared 1,469 single-copy genes, which are generally involved in functions like DNA metabolism, cell cycle, and photosynthesis. A selected set of 106 single-copy genes provided good resolution for the seed plant phylogeny except for gnetophytes. Although some of our analyses support a sister relationship between gnetophytes and other gymnosperms, phylogenetic trees from concatenated alignments without 3rd codon positions and amino acid alignments under the CAT + GTR model, support gnetophytes as a sister group to Pinaceae. Our phylogenomic analyses demonstrate that, in general, single-copy genes can uncover both recent and deep divergences of seed plant phylogeny. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Unique LCR variations among lineages of HPV16, 18 and 45 isolates from women with normal cervical cytology in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Awua, Adolf K; Adanu, Richard M K; Wiredu, Edwin K; Afari, Edwin A; Zubuch, Vanessa A; Asmah, Richard H; Severini, Alberto

    2017-04-21

    In addition to being useful for classification, sequence variations of human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes have been implicated in differential oncogenic potential and a differential association with the different histological forms of invasive cervical cancer. These associations have also been indicated for HPV genotype lineages and sub-lineages. In order to better understand the potential implications of lineage variation in the occurrence of cervical cancers in Ghana, we studied the lineages of the three most prevalent HPV genotypes among women with normal cytology as baseline to further studies. Of previously collected self- and health personnel-collected cervical specimen, 54, which were positive for HPV16, 18 and 45, were selected and the long control region (LCR) of each HPV genotype was separately amplified by a nested PCR. DNA sequences of 41 isolates obtained with the forward and reverse primers by Sanger sequencing were analysed. Nucleotide sequence variations of the HPV16 genotypes were observed at 30 positions within the LCR (7460 - 7840). Of these, 19 were the known variations for the lineages B and C (African lineages), while the other 11 positions had variations unique to the HPV16 isolates of this study. For the HPV18 isolates, the variations were at 35 positions, 22 of which were known variations of Africa lineages and the other 13 were unique variations observed for the isolates obtained in this study (at positions 7799 and 7813). HPV45 isolates had variations at 35 positions and 2 (positions 7114 and 97) were unique to the isolates of this study. This study provides the first data on the lineages of HPV 16, 18 and 45 isolates from Ghana. Although the study did not obtain full genome sequence data for a comprehensive comparison with known lineages, these genotypes were predominately of the Africa lineages and had some unique sequence variations at positions that suggest potential oncogenic implications. These data will be useful for comparison

  9. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J.; Fasel, David A.; Zwijnenburg, Petra J.G.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J.P.; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Schreuder, Michiel F.; Gharavi, Ali G.; van Wijk, Joanna A.E.; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO-study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large dataset of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations. PMID:26352300

  10. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J; Fasel, David A; Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J P; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D'Agati, Vivette D; Schreuder, Michiel F; Gharavi, Ali G; van Wijk, Joanna A E; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large data set of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations.

  11. Comparison of Copy Number of HSF Genes in Two Buffalo Genomes.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shardul Vikram; Mukherjee, Ayan; Brahma, Biswajit; Gohain, Moloya; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Saini, Sushil Kumar; Mishra, Purushottam; Ahlawat, Sonika; Upadhyaya, Ramesh C; Datta, Tirtha K; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    The copy number variation (CNV) is the number of copies of a particular gene in the genotype of an individual. Recent evidences show that the CNVs can vary in frequency and occurrence between breeds. These variations reportedly allowed different breeds to adapt to different environments. As copy number variations follow Mendelian pattern of inheritance, identification and distribution of these variants between populations can be used to infer the evolutionary history of the species. In this study, we have examined the absolute copy number of four Heat shock factor genes viz. HSF-1, 2, 4, and 5 in two different breeds of buffalo species using real-time PCR. Here, we report that the absolute copy number of HSF2 varies between the two breeds. In contrast no significant difference was observed in the copy number for HSF-1, 4, and 5 between the two breeds. Our results provide evidence for the presence of breed specific differences in HSF2 genomic copy number. This seems to be the first step in delineating the genetic factors underlying environmental adaptation between the two breeds. Nevertheless, a more detailed study is needed to characterize the functional consequence of this variation.

  12. RUBIC identifies driver genes by detecting recurrent DNA copy number breaks

    PubMed Central

    van Dyk, Ewald; Hoogstraat, Marlous; ten Hoeve, Jelle; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The frequent recurrence of copy number aberrations across tumour samples is a reliable hallmark of certain cancer driver genes. However, state-of-the-art algorithms for detecting recurrent aberrations fail to detect several known drivers. In this study, we propose RUBIC, an approach that detects recurrent copy number breaks, rather than recurrently amplified or deleted regions. This change of perspective allows for a simplified approach as recursive peak splitting procedures and repeated re-estimation of the background model are avoided. Furthermore, we control the false discovery rate on the level of called regions, rather than at the probe level, as in competing algorithms. We benchmark RUBIC against GISTIC2 (a state-of-the-art approach) and RAIG (a recently proposed approach) on simulated copy number data and on three SNP6 and NGS copy number data sets from TCGA. We show that RUBIC calls more focal recurrent regions and identifies a much larger fraction of known cancer genes. PMID:27396759

  13. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Todd A; Barker, Abigail L; Patterson, Eric L; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P; Wilson, Robert G; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan; Kniss, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number.

  14. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Barker, Abigail L.; Patterson, Eric L.; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P.; Wilson, Robert G.; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number. PMID:27992501

  15. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  16. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  17. Variable rRNA gene copies in extreme halobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, J.L.; Marin, I.; Ramirez, L.; Amils, R. ); Abad, J.P.; Smith, C.L. )

    1988-08-25

    Using PFG electrophoresis techniques, the authors have examined the organization of rRNA gene in halobacterium species. The results show that the organization of rRNA genes among closely related halobacteria is quite heterogeneous. This contrasts with the high degree of conservation of rRNA sequence. The possible mechanism of such rRNA gene amplification and its evolutionary implications are discussed.

  18. Low AMY1 Gene Copy Number Is Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Prepubertal Boys.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Florio, Rosalba; Verginelli, Fabio; De Lellis, Laura; Capelli, Cristian; Verzilli, Delfina; Chiarelli, Francesco; Mohn, Angelika; Cama, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Body Mass Index (BMI). Additional genetic variants, such as copy number variations (CNV), have also been investigated in relation to BMI. Recently, the highly polymorphic CNV in the salivary amylase (AMY1) gene, encoding an enzyme implicated in the first step of starch digestion, has been associated with obesity in adults and children. We assessed the potential association between AMY1 copy number and a wide range of BMI in a population of Italian school-children. 744 children (354 boys, 390 girls, mean age (±SD): 8.4±1.4years) underwent anthropometric assessments (height, weight) and collection of saliva samples for DNA extraction. AMY1 copies were evaluated by quantitative PCR. A significant increase of BMI z-score by decreasing AMY1 copy number was observed in boys (β: -0.117, p = 0.033), but not in girls. Similarly, waist circumference (β: -0.155, p = 0.003, adjusted for age) was negatively influenced by AMY1 copy number in boys. Boys with 8 or more AMY1 copy numbers presented a significant lower BMI z-score (p = 0.04) and waist circumference (p = 0.01) when compared to boys with less than 8 copy numbers. In this pediatric-only, population-based study, a lower AMY1 copy number emerged to be associated with increased BMI in boys. These data confirm previous findings from adult studies and support a potential role of a higher copy number of the salivary AMY1 gene in protecting from excess weight gain.

  19. Correcting Transcription Factor Gene Sets for Copy Number and Promoter Methylation Variations

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Komal S.; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Hennesey, Patrick; Califano, Joseph A.; Ochs, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Gene set analysis provides a method to generate statistical inferences across sets of linked genes, primarily using high-throughput expression data. Common gene sets include biological pathways, operons, and targets of transcriptional regulators. In higher eukaryotes, especially when dealing with diseases with strong genetic and epigenetic components such as cancer, copy number loss and gene silencing through promoter methylation can eliminate the possibility that a gene is transcribed. This, in turn, can adversely affect the estimation of transcription factor or pathway activity from a set of target genes, since some of the targets may not be responsive to transcriptional regulation. Here we introduce a simple filtering approach that removes genes from consideration if they show copy number loss or promoter methylation and demonstrate the improvement in inference of transcription factor activity in a simulated data set based on the background expression observed in normal head and neck tissue. PMID:25195578

  20. Correcting transcription factor gene sets for copy number and promoter methylation variations.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Komal S; Gaykalova, Daria A; Hennessey, Patrick; Califano, Joseph A; Ochs, Michael F

    2014-09-01

    Gene set analysis provides a method to generate statistical inferences across sets of linked genes, primarily using high-throughput expression data. Common gene sets include biological pathways, operons, and targets of transcriptional regulators. In higher eukaryotes, especially when dealing with diseases with strong genetic and epigenetic components such as cancer, copy number loss and gene silencing through promoter methylation can eliminate the possibility that a gene is transcribed. This, in turn, can adversely affect the estimation of transcription factor or pathway activity from a set of target genes, as some of the targets may not be responsive to transcriptional regulation. Here we introduce a simple filtering approach that removes genes from consideration if they show copy number loss or promoter methylation, and demonstrate the improvement in inference of transcription factor activity in a simulated dataset based on the background expression observed in normal head and neck tissue.

  1. Declining Genital Warts in Young Women in England Associated With HPV 16/18 Vaccination: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Soldan, Kate; Wetten, Sally; Mesher, David; Williams, Tim; Gill, O. Noel; Hughes, Gwenda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Diagnoses of genital warts (GW) in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics have been increasing in England for many years. In 2008, an HPV immunization program began with a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix). This was expected to markedly reduce infections and disease due to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 but not HPV 6/11 infections or disease. However, from 2009 to 2011 there were decreases in reported diagnoses of GW in young females at GUM clinics. Methods. Using data from GUM clinics and a sample of general practices (GPs) throughout England, we analyzed rates of GW diagnoses by age, year of diagnosis, and estimated immunization coverage. Results. The overall reduction in GW diagnoses at GUM clinics between 2008 and 2011 was 13.3% among 16- to 19-year-old females, with the greatest decline of 20.8% in 17-year-olds. Declines were positively associated with estimated immunization coverage. A similar pattern was seen in GP diagnoses, but not among older women, and for other GUM consultations. Conclusions. Several factors might contribute to declines in GW. However, the size and pattern of the declines strongly suggest that we are observing an unexpected, moderately protective effect of HPV 16/18 vaccination against GW. PMID:24092908

  2. HPV-16 Detected in One-Fourth Eyes With Retinoblastoma: A Prospective Case-control Study From North India.

    PubMed

    Naru, Jasmine; Aggarwal, Ritu; Singh, Usha; Kakkar, Nandita; Bansal, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of nonfamilial retinoblastoma (RB) is believed to be higher in developing countries. The reports on association of human papillomavirus (HPV) with RB are limited and contradictory. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of HPV in RB tumor tissue. In the prospective study, consecutive eyes enucleated for RB from patients lacking a family history of RB were enrolled as cases over a 3-year period. Controls included donor eyes obtained from the eye bank. Normal retinal tissue from the donor eyes and tumor tissue from eyes with RB was subjected to DNA isolation. Polymerase chain reaction followed by dot-blot hybridization was performed to detect 21 HPV genotypes. The study cohort included 39 RB and 42 normal retinal tissues. A positive result for HPV-polymerase chain reaction was obtained in 10 (25.6%) tumor tissues and none of the control eyes. HPV-16 was the only subtype detected. Socioeconomic status (P=0.58) or maternal age (P=0.58) was not associated with presence of HPV. All HPV-positive patients had undergone a vaginal delivery (P=0.60). HPV-16 was detected in one-fourth cases of nonfamilial RB. None of the control cases (donor eyes) tested positive. Implication of the presence of HPV in RB tissue and role in carcinogenesis needs further elucidation.

  3. Design, Immune Responses and Anti-Tumor Potential of an HPV16 E6E7 Multi-Epitope Vaccine.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Maria Fernandes; Morale, Mirian Galliote; Chaves, Agatha A Muniz; Cavalher, Aline Marques; Lopes, Aline Soriano; Diniz, Mariana de Oliveira; Schanoski, Alessandra Soares; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; de Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Demasi, Marilene; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common type of cancer among women worldwide and infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPVs) types represents the major risk factor for the etiopathogenesis of the disease. HPV-16 is the most frequently identified HPV type in cervical lesions and expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins is required for the uncontrolled cellular proliferation. In the present study we report the design and experimental testing of a recombinant multi-epitope protein containing immunogenic epitopes of HPV-16 E6 and E7. Tumor preventive assays, based on the engraftment of TC-1 cells in mice, showed that the E6E7 multi-epitope protein induced a full preventive anti-tumor protection in wild-type mice, as well as in mice deficient in expression of CD4+ T cells and TLR4 receptor. Nonetheless, no anti-tumor protection was observed in mice deficient in CD8+ T cells. Also, the vaccine promoted high activation of E6/E7-specific T cells and in a therapeutic-approach, E6E7 protein conferred full anti-tumor protection in mice. These results show a potential use of this E6E7 multi-epitope antigen as a new and promising antigen for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against tumors induced by HPV.

  4. Increased Growth of a Newly Established Mouse Epithelial Cell Line Transformed with HPV-16 E7 in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Law, Priscilla T. Y.; Boon, Siaw Shi; Zhang, Chuqing; Ho, Wendy C. S.; Banks, Lawrence; Wong, C. K.; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Chan, Paul K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports that infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) can interact with host and environmental risk factors to contribute to the development of cervical, oropharyngeal, and other anogenital cancers. In this study, we established a mouse epithelial cancer cell line, designated as Chinese University Papillomavirus-1 (CUP-1), from C57BL/KsJ mice through persistent expression of HPV-16 E7 oncogene. After continuous culturing of up to 200 days with over 60 passages, we showed that CUP-1 became an immortalized and transformed epithelial cell line with continuous E7 expression and persistent reduction of retinoblastoma protein (a known target of E7). This model allowed in-vivo study of interaction between HPV and co-factors of tumorigenesis in syngeneic mice. Diabetes has been shown to increase HPV pathogenicity in different pathological context. Herein, with this newly-established cell line, we uncovered that diabetes promoted CUP-1 xenograft growth in syngeneic db/db mice. In sum, we successfully established a HPV-16 E7 transformed mouse epithelial cell line, which allowed subsequent studies of co-factors in multistep HPV carcinogenesis in an immunocompetent host. More importantly, this study is the very first to demonstrate the promoting effect of diabetes on HPV-associated carcinogenesis in vivo, implicating the importance of cancer surveillance in diabetic environment. PMID:27749912

  5. Increased Growth of a Newly Established Mouse Epithelial Cell Line Transformed with HPV-16 E7 in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Law, Priscilla T Y; Boon, Siaw Shi; Zhang, Chuqing; Ho, Wendy C S; Banks, Lawrence; Wong, C K; Chan, Juliana C N; Chan, Paul K S

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports that infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) can interact with host and environmental risk factors to contribute to the development of cervical, oropharyngeal, and other anogenital cancers. In this study, we established a mouse epithelial cancer cell line, designated as Chinese University Papillomavirus-1 (CUP-1), from C57BL/KsJ mice through persistent expression of HPV-16 E7 oncogene. After continuous culturing of up to 200 days with over 60 passages, we showed that CUP-1 became an immortalized and transformed epithelial cell line with continuous E7 expression and persistent reduction of retinoblastoma protein (a known target of E7). This model allowed in-vivo study of interaction between HPV and co-factors of tumorigenesis in syngeneic mice. Diabetes has been shown to increase HPV pathogenicity in different pathological context. Herein, with this newly-established cell line, we uncovered that diabetes promoted CUP-1 xenograft growth in syngeneic db/db mice. In sum, we successfully established a HPV-16 E7 transformed mouse epithelial cell line, which allowed subsequent studies of co-factors in multistep HPV carcinogenesis in an immunocompetent host. More importantly, this study is the very first to demonstrate the promoting effect of diabetes on HPV-associated carcinogenesis in vivo, implicating the importance of cancer surveillance in diabetic environment.

  6. Copy number polymorphism of the salivary amylase gene: implications in human nutrition research.

    PubMed

    Santos, J L; Saus, E; Smalley, S V; Cataldo, L R; Alberti, G; Parada, J; Gratacòs, M; Estivill, X

    2012-01-01

    The salivary α-amylase is a calcium-binding enzyme that initiates starch digestion in the oral cavity. The α-amylase genes are located in a cluster on the chromosome that includes salivary amylase genes (AMY1), two pancreatic α-amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B) and a related pseudogene. The AMY1 genes show extensive copy number variation which is directly proportional to the salivary α-amylase content in saliva. The α-amylase amount in saliva is also influenced by other factors, such as hydration status, psychosocial stress level, and short-term dietary habits. It has been shown that the average copy number of AMY1 gene is higher in populations that evolved under high-starch diets versus low-starch diets, reflecting an intense positive selection imposed by diet on amylase copy number during evolution. In this context, a number of different aspects can be considered in evaluating the possible impact of copy number variation of the AMY1 gene on nutrition research, such as issues related to human diet gene evolution, action on starch digestion, effect on glycemic response after starch consumption, modulation of the action of α-amylases inhibitors, effect on taste perception and satiety, influence on psychosocial stress and relation to oral health.

  7. Extensive Copy-Number Variation of Young Genes across Stickleback Populations

    PubMed Central

    Eizaguirre, Christophe; Samonte, Irene E.; Kalbe, Martin; Lenz, Tobias L.; Stoll, Monika; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Milinski, Manfred; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Duplicate genes emerge as copy-number variations (CNVs) at the population level, and remain copy-number polymorphic until they are fixed or lost. The successful establishment of such structural polymorphisms in the genome plays an important role in evolution by promoting genetic diversity, complexity and innovation. To characterize the early evolutionary stages of duplicate genes and their potential adaptive benefits, we combine comparative genomics with population genomics analyses to evaluate the distribution and impact of CNVs across natural populations of an eco-genomic model, the three-spined stickleback. With whole genome sequences of 66 individuals from populations inhabiting three distinct habitats, we find that CNVs generally occur at low frequencies and are often only found in one of the 11 populations surveyed. A subset of CNVs, however, displays copy-number differentiation between populations, showing elevated within-population frequencies consistent with local adaptation. By comparing teleost genomes to identify lineage-specific genes and duplications in sticklebacks, we highlight rampant gene content differences among individuals in which over 30% of young duplicate genes are CNVs. These CNV genes are evolving rapidly at the molecular level and are enriched with functional categories associated with environmental interactions, depicting the dynamic early copy-number polymorphic stage of genes during population differentiation. PMID:25474574

  8. Accelerated evolution after gene duplication: a time-dependent process affecting just one copy.

    PubMed

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Laurie, Steve; Albà, M Mar

    2013-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely regarded as a major mechanism modeling genome evolution and function. However, the mechanisms that drive the evolution of the two, initially redundant, gene copies are still ill defined. Many gene duplicates experience evolutionary rate acceleration, but the relative contribution of positive selection and random drift to the retention and subsequent evolution of gene duplicates, and for how long the molecular clock may be distorted by these processes, remains unclear. Focusing on rodent genes that duplicated before and after the mouse and rat split, we find significantly increased sequence divergence after duplication in only one of the copies, which in nearly all cases corresponds to the novel daughter copy, independent of the mechanism of duplication. We observe that the evolutionary rate of the accelerated copy, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, is on average 5-fold higher in the period spanning 4-12 My after the duplication than it was before the duplication. This increase can be explained, at least in part, by the action of positive selection according to the results of the maximum likelihood-based branch-site test. Subsequently, the rate decelerates until purifying selection completely returns to preduplication levels. Reversion to the original rates has already been accomplished 40.5 My after the duplication event, corresponding to a genetic distance of about 0.28 synonymous substitutions per site. Differences in tissue gene expression patterns parallel those of substitution rates, reinforcing the role of neofunctionalization in explaining the evolution of young gene duplicates.

  9. Efficacy of fewer than three doses of an HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine: combined analysis of data from the Costa Rica Vaccine and PATRICIA Trials.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Aimée R; Struyf, Frank; Del Rosario-Raymundo, Maria Rowena; Hildesheim, Allan; Skinner, S Rachel; Wacholder, Sholom; Garland, Suzanne M; Herrero, Rolando; David, Marie-Pierre; Wheeler, Cosette M; González, Paula; Jiménez, Silvia; Lowy, Douglas R; Pinto, Ligia A; Porras, Caroline; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T; Schussler, John; Sherman, Mark E; Bosch, F Xavier; Castellsague, Xavier; Chatterjee, Archana; Chow, Song-Nan; Descamps, Dominique; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Dubin, Gary; Germar, Maria Julieta; Harper, Diane M; Lewis, David J M; Limson, Genara; Naud, Paulo; Peters, Klaus; Poppe, Willy A J; Ramjattan, Brian; Romanowski, Barbara; Salmeron, Jorge; Schwarz, Tino F; Teixeira, Julio C; Tjalma, Wiebren A A

    2015-07-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that one or two doses of the HPV vaccine provides similar protection to the three-dose regimen. The main aim of the study was to ascertain HPV-16/18 vaccine efficacy in both full and naive cohorts and to explore protection conferred against non-vaccine HPV types, by number of doses received. Summary data from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT; NCT00128661) and ~the PATRICIA trial (NCT001226810), two phase 3, double-blind, randomised controlled clinical trials of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in young women, were combined in a post-hoc analysis (GlaxoSmithKline [GSK] e-track number 202142) to investigate the efficacy of fewer than three doses of the HPV-16/18 vaccine after 4 years of follow-up. Women were randomly assigned to receive three doses of the HPV-16/18 vaccine or to a control vaccine; yet, some received fewer doses. After exclusion of women with less than 12 months of follow-up or those who were HPV-16/18 DNA-positive at enrolment (for the HPV-16/18 endpoint), we calculated vaccine efficacy against one-time detection of incident HPV infections after three, two, and one dose(s). The primary study endpoint was one-time detection of first incident HPV-16/18 infections accumulated during the follow-up phase. We assessed vaccine efficacy against incident HPV-16/18 infection in the modified total vaccinated cohort (22 327 received three doses, 1185 two doses, 543 one dose). Vaccine efficacy against incident HPV-16/18 infections for three doses was 77·0% (95% CI 74·7-79·1), two doses was 76·0% (62·0-85·3), and one dose was 85·7% (70·7-93·7). Vaccine efficacy against incident HPV-31/33/45 infections for three doses was 59·7% (56·0-63·0), two doses was 37·7% (12·4-55·9), and one dose was 36·6% (-5·4 to 62·2). Vaccine efficacy against incident HPV-16/18 infection for two-dose women who received their second dose at 1 month was 75·3% (54·2-87·5) and 82·6% (42·3-96·1) for those who received the second

  10. Attack rates of human papillomavirus type 16 and cervical neoplasia in primiparous women and field trial designs for HPV16 vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kibur, M; Geijerstamm, V; Pukkala, E; Koskela, P; Luostarinen, T; Paavonen, J; Schiller, J; Wang, Z; Dillner, J; Lehtinen, M

    2000-01-01

    Background: Identification of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) as the major risk factor for cervical neoplasia, and mass production of DNA free HPV capsids have paved the way to preventive vaccination trials. Design of such trials requires reliable attack rate data. Objective: Determination of (1) HPV16 and (2) cervical neoplasia attack rates in primiparous women. Estimation of actuarial sample sizes for HPV16 vaccination phase IV trials. Design: A longitudinal cohort study. Methods: Population based Finnish Maternity Cohort (FMC) and Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) were linked for the identification of two cohorts of primiparous women: (1) a random subsample of the FMC: 1656 women with two pregnancies between 1983–9 or 1990–6 and living in the Helsinki metropolitan area, and (2) all 72 791 primiparous women living in the same area during 1983–94. Attack rate for persistent HPV16 infection (1) was estimated in 1279 seronegative women by proportion of seroconversions between the first and the second pregnancy. Comparable 10 year cumulative incidence rate (CR) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III and cervical cancer (CIN III+) (2) was estimated based on cases registered at the FCR during 1991–4. Results: The HPV16 attack rates were 13.8% (<18 years), 7.0% (18–19 years), 2.3% (21 years), 2.4% (23 years), and 4.5% (<25 years). Number of vaccinees required for a 5 year efficacy trial with persistent HPV16 infection as the end point ranged between 1000 and 3900, assuming 80% power, 90%–70% vaccine efficacy (VE), and misclassification. The CRs of CIN III+ were 0.33% (<18 years), 0.44% (18–19 years), 0.21% (20–24 years), and 0.28% (<25 years). Number of vaccinees required for a 10 year efficacy trial with HPV16 positive CIN III+ as the end point was 15 000 assuming 80% power, 90% VE, and 75% aetiological fraction of CIN III+ for HPV16. Conclusions: The attack rates of HPV16 and CIN III+ identify primiparous women under 25 years of age among

  11. ALK gene copy number in lung cancer: Unspecific polyploidy versus specific amplification visible as double minutes.

    PubMed

    Caliò, Anna; Bria, Emilio; Pilotto, Sara; Gilioli, Eliana; Nottegar, Alessia; Eccher, Albino; Cima, Luca; Santo, Antonio; Pedron, Serena; Turri, Giona; Knuutila, Sakari; Chilosi, Marco; Vanzo, Francesca; Bogina, Giuseppe; Terzi, Alberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Loda, Massimo; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Gains of a gene due to DNA polyploidy versus amplification of the specific locus are distinct molecular alterations in tumors. We quantified copy number gains of ALK gene due to unspecific polyploidy versus amplifications of the specific locus in a series of non-small cell lung cancers. The locus specific ALK copy (LSI) number status was evaluated in 205 cases by FISH. Ratio LSI ALK copy number corrected for control probes CEP2, CEP3 and CEP17 (CEPs) was scored. Amplification of the specific ALK locus was defined when ratio set to ≥ 2 while polyploidy was interpreted when the increase in gene copy resulted < 2 in ratio (LSI/control CEPs). Twenty one cases (10.2%) showed ≥ 8 ALK signals, 68 cases (33.2%) 3-7 signals and 116 cases (56.6%) a mean of 2 signals. Only 2/21 cases of the cohort harboring ≥ 8 signals showed a ratio ≥ 2 after CEPs correction interpretable as amplified, showing numerous doubled fluorescent spots. All the remaining cases showed a mirrored number of fluorescent spots per each CEPs, interpretable as polyploidy. We detected a high prevalence of ALK gene copy number usually due to polyploidy rather than ALK locus amplification, the latter visible prevalently as double minutes.

  12. Copy number alterations of the polycomb gene BMI1 in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Häyry, Valtteri; Tanner, Minna; Blom, Tea; Tynninen, Olli; Roselli, Annariikka; Ollikainen, Miina; Sariola, Hannu; Wartiovaara, Kirmo; Nupponen, Nina N

    2008-07-01

    Gliomas are heterogeneous tumours that grow in an uninhibited fashion, and these brain tumour cells share numerous characteristics with neural stem cells. The BMI1 gene encodes a component of the polycomb protein complex regulating epigenetically gene activity via histone modification. It functions for instance during the development of the central nervous system and maturation of neural cells. BMI-1 protein expression is deregulated in several forms of cancer and gene amplification has been identified in mantle cell lymphomas. Since BMI1 is located at chromosome 10p, a region implicated frequently in brain tumourigenesis, we investigated the genetic status and the corresponding expression patterns of BMI1 in a series of 100 low- and high-grade primary and recurrent gliomas. Chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) with probes directed against BMI1 at 10p13 and the centromere of chromosome 10 was used in the analyses. Of all gliomas, 59% demonstrated aberrant copy numbers of BMI1. Deletions of the BMI1 locus were found in most types of tumours, and in a univariate survival analysis these cases had poor prognosis. Increased copy numbers of the BMI1 locus (3-5 copies) were found in all histological types, especially in high-grade astrocytomas. No difference in prognosis between cases with normal copy numbers and cases with increased copy numbers could be observed. This data suggests that BMI1 gene is aberrant at the chromosomal level in a subset of gliomas, and possibly contributes to brain tumour pathogenesis.

  13. Variation in topoisomerase I gene copy number as a mechanism for intrinsic drug sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, H. L.; Keith, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is the principle target for camptothecin and its derivatives such as SN38. Levels of topo I expression vary widely between and within tumour types and the basis for this is poorly understood. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to detect the topo I locus in a panel of breast and colon cancer cell lines. This approach has identified a range of topo I gene copies from 1 to 6 between the cell lines as a result of DNA amplification, polysomy and isochromosome formation. Topo I gene copy number was highly correlated with topo I expression, (rs = 0.92), and inversely correlated to sensitivity to a 1 h exposure to SN38 (rs = -0.904). This illustrates the significant impact of altered topo I gene copy number on intrinsic drug sensitivity and influences potential mechanisms for acquisition of drug resistance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8761363

  14. Prevention of Persistent Human Papillomavirus Infection by an HPV16/18 Vaccine: A Community-Based Randomized Clinical Trial in Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Rodríguez, Ana C.; Solomon, Diane; González, Paula; Kreimer, Aimee R.; Porras, Carolina; Schussler, John; Jiménez, Silvia; Sherman, Mark E.; Quint, Wim; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Target groups for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination are controversial. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) against 1-year persistent infection, stratified by age and sexual behavior, among young women in Costa Rica. We randomized 7,466 healthy women 18 to 25 years of age to HPV16/18 or hepatitis A vaccine (follow-up, 50.4 months). According-to-protocol (ATP) cohorts included compliant HPV-negative women; intention-to-treat (ITT) included all randomized women. ATP VE was 90.9% (95% CI, 82.0–95.9) against HPV16/18 infections, 44.5% against HPV31/33/45 (95% CI, 17.5–63.1), and 12.4% (95% CI, −3.2 to 25.6) against any oncogenic infection. Overall ITT VE against HPV16/18 infections was 49.0%, but ATP and ITT VE almost reached 100% in year 4 of follow-up. ATP efficacy against HPV16/18 was similar by age, but ITT VE was greatest among youngest women (68.9% among those 18–19 years of age; 21.8% among those 24–25 years of age) and 79.8% among virgins. Among previously unexposed women, vaccination is highly efficacious against HPV16/18 and partially against HPV31/33/45. Vaccination is most effective in women and girls before they initiate sexual activity, with programmatic and individual decision implications. PMID:22586631

  15. Prevention of persistent human papillomavirus infection by an HPV16/18 vaccine: a community-based randomized clinical trial in Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Rodríguez, Ana C; Solomon, Diane; González, Paula; Kreimer, Aimee R; Porras, Carolina; Schussler, John; Jiménez, Silvia; Sherman, Mark E; Quint, Wim; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan

    2011-10-01

    Target groups for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination are controversial. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) against 1-year persistent infection, stratified by age and sexual behavior, among young women in Costa Rica. We randomized 7,466 healthy women 18 to 25 years of age to HPV16/18 or hepatitis A vaccine (follow-up, 50.4 months). According-to-protocol (ATP) cohorts included compliant HPV-negative women; intention-to-treat (ITT) included all randomized women. ATP VE was 90.9% (95% CI, 82.0-95.9) against HPV16/18 infections, 44.5% against HPV31/33/45 (95% CI, 17.5-63.1), and 12.4% (95% CI, -3.2 to 25.6) against any oncogenic infection. Overall ITT VE against HPV16/18 infections was 49.0%, but ATP and ITT VE almost reached 100% in year 4 of follow-up. ATP efficacy against HPV16/18 was similar by age, but ITT VE was greatest among youngest women (68.9% among those 18-19 years of age; 21.8% among those 24-25 years of age) and 79.8% among virgins. Among previously unexposed women, vaccination is highly efficacious against HPV16/18 and partially against HPV31/33/45. Vaccination is most effective in women and girls before they initiate sexual activity, with programmatic and individual decision implications.

  16. Cellular immune responses to HPV-18, -31, and -53 in healthy volunteers immunized with recombinant HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Harro, Clayton D.; Kemp, Troy J.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Hildesheim, Allan

    2006-09-30

    Human papillomavirus-like particles (HPV VLP) are candidate vaccines that have shown to be efficacious in reducing infection and inducing robust antiviral immunity. Neutralizing antibodies generated by vaccination are largely type-specific, but little is known about the type-specificity of cellular immune responses to VLP vaccination. To determine whether vaccination with HPV-16 L1VLP induces cellular immunity to heterologous HPV types (HPV-18, HPV-31, and HPV-53), we examined proliferative and cytokine responses in vaccine (n = 11) and placebo (n = 5) recipients. Increased proliferative and cytokine responses to heterologous types were observed postvaccination in some individuals. The proportion of women responding to heterologous types postvaccination (36%-55%) was lower than that observed in response to HPV-16 (73%). Response to HPV-16 VLP predicted response to other types. The strongest correlations in response were observed between HPV-16 and HPV-31, consistent with their phylogenetic relatedness. In summary, PBMC from HPV-16 VLP vaccine recipients can respond to L1VLP from heterologous HPV types, suggesting the presence of conserved T cell epitopes.

  17. Risk of progression of early cervical lesions is associated with integration and persistence of HPV-16 and expression of E6, Ki-67, and telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Peña, Arianna; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; López-Bayghen, Esther; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are the earliest lesions of the uterine cervix, the persistence and integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) as type 16, which promotes the development of more aggressive lesions. Aim: To select more aggressive lesions with tendency to progress to invasive cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 cytological specimens in liquid base (Liqui-PREP) were analyzed: 25 specimens were with no signs of SIL (NSIL) and without HPV; 25 NSIL with HPV-16, and 25 with both LSIL and HPV-16. The expression of Ki-67, telomerase, and viral E6 was evaluated by immunocytochemistry; and the detection of viral DNA was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs) for genotyping or sequencing of HPV-16. The physical state of HPV-16 was evaluated by in situ hybridization with amplification with tyramide. Results: Of the total group, 58.6% had LSIL associated with persistence and of these 59.3% was associated with integrated state of HPV as intense expression of E6, Ki-67 (P = 0.013, P = 0.055) has except for the expression of telomerase present a non-significant association (P<0.341). Conclusions: Overexpression of E6 and Ki-67 is associated with the integration of HPV-16, favoring viral persistence, and increasing the risk of progression in women with NSIL and LSIL. PMID:24648664

  18. High levels of p105 (NFKB1) and p100 (NFKB2) proteins in HPV16-transformed keratinocytes: role of E6 and E7 oncoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Havard, L.; Rahmouni, S.; Boniver, J.; Delvenne, P. . E-mail: P.Delvenne@ulg.ac.be

    2005-01-20

    We have previously shown that functional components of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway are up-regulated and sequestered in the cytoplasm of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-transformed cell lines leading to a reduced activity of NF-{kappa}B. In this study, we examined the expression of the NF-{kappa}B precursors p100 and p105 in keratinocytes transformed or not by HPV16. Western immunoblotting experiments demonstrated high levels of p100 and p105 proteins not only in HPV16{sup +} cervical carcinoma-derived keratinocytes but also in keratinocytes stably transfected by HPV16 E6 or E7 oncogenes. Moreover, p100 and p105 proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and nuclear in keratinocytes expressing E7 and E6, respectively. A predominantly cytoplasmic localization of E7 protein was also detected in all keratinocytes expressing E7. Our results suggest that HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins modulate the expression and the subcellular localization of p100 and p105 NF-{kappa}B precursors.

  19. Hypoxia drives transient site-specific copy gain and drug-resistant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joshua C.; Atabakhsh, Elnaz; Kim, Jaegil; Biette, Kelly M.; Van Rechem, Capucine; Ladd, Brendon; Burrowes, Paul d.; Donado, Carlos; Mattoo, Hamid; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Song, Bing; Andriani, Grasiella; Joung, J. Keith; Iliopoulos, Othon; Montagna, Cristina; Pillai, Shiv; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Copy number heterogeneity is a prominent feature within tumors. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia induces transient site-specific copy gains (TSSGs) in primary, nontransformed, and transformed human cells. Hypoxia-driven copy gains are not dependent on HIF1α or HIF2α; however, they are dependent on the KDM4A histone demethylase and are blocked by inhibition of KDM4A with a small molecule or the natural metabolite succinate. Furthermore, this response is conserved at a syntenic region in zebrafish cells. Regions with site-specific copy gain are also enriched for amplifications in hypoxic primary tumors. These tumors exhibited amplification and overexpression of the drug resistance gene CKS1B, which we recapitulated in hypoxic breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia provides a biological stimulus to create transient site-specific copy alterations that could result in heterogeneity within tumors and cell populations. These findings have major implications in our understanding of copy number heterogeneity and the emergence of drug resistance genes in cancer. PMID:25995187

  20. Hypoxia drives transient site-specific copy gain and drug-resistant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Black, Joshua C; Atabakhsh, Elnaz; Kim, Jaegil; Biette, Kelly M; Van Rechem, Capucine; Ladd, Brendon; Burrowes, Paul D; Donado, Carlos; Mattoo, Hamid; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Song, Bing; Andriani, Grasiella; Joung, J Keith; Iliopoulos, Othon; Montagna, Cristina; Pillai, Shiv; Getz, Gad; Whetstine, Johnathan R

    2015-05-15

    Copy number heterogeneity is a prominent feature within tumors. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia induces transient site-specific copy gains (TSSGs) in primary, nontransformed, and transformed human cells. Hypoxia-driven copy gains are not dependent on HIF1α or HIF2α; however, they are dependent on the KDM4A histone demethylase and are blocked by inhibition of KDM4A with a small molecule or the natural metabolite succinate. Furthermore, this response is conserved at a syntenic region in zebrafish cells. Regions with site-specific copy gain are also enriched for amplifications in hypoxic primary tumors. These tumors exhibited amplification and overexpression of the drug resistance gene CKS1B, which we recapitulated in hypoxic breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia provides a biological stimulus to create transient site-specific copy alterations that could result in heterogeneity within tumors and cell populations. These findings have major implications in our understanding of copy number heterogeneity and the emergence of drug resistance genes in cancer. © 2015 Black et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Identification and validation of immunogenic potential of India specific HPV-16 variant constructs: In-silico & in-vivo insight to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anoop; Hussain, Showket; Sharma, Gagan; Mehrotra, Ravi; Gissmann, Lutz; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological cancers in the world but in India, it is the top most cancer among women. Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) is the most important risk factor. The sequence variation(s) in the most common HR-HPV i.e. HPV type 16 leads to altered biological functions with possible clinical significance in the different geographical locations. Sixteen major variants (V1-V16) in full length L1 gene of HPV-16 were identified following analysis of 250 prospectively collected cervical cancer tissue biopsies and their effect on immunogenicity was studied. The effect of these major variations on the epitopes were predicted by in silico methods and the immunogenicity of variants and respective reference DNA vaccine constructs were evaluated by administration of prepared DNA vaccine constructs in female BALB/c mice to evaluate antibody titer. In the present study, L500F (V16) variation showed a significant ~2.7 fold (p < 0.002) increase in antibody titer, whereas T379P (V8) showed ~0.4 fold (p < 0.328) decrease after final injection. These results showed a promising roadmap for the development of DNA based vaccine and for the generation of effective response, though there is a need to study more prevalent variants of HPV in the Indian population. PMID:26507515

  2. Human HSP70 and modified HPV16 E7 fusion DNA vaccine induces enhanced specific CD8+ T cell responses and anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jinbao; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Qingyong; Zhang, Ting; Fan, Dongsheng; Xu, Xuemei

    2009-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and persistent infection with human papilloma virus (HPV)s is considered to be the major risk factor. Millions of women are currently infected with high risk genotypes. Therefore, it is imperative to develop therapeutic vaccines to eliminate established infection or HPV-related disease. In the current study, we generated two potential therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines, SigmE7/MtHSP70 and SigmE7/HuHSP70, using human and mycobacterium tuberculosis HSP70 linked, respectively, to HPV16 mE7 and the signal peptide gene of human CD33. Our comparative evaluation of these two vaccines found that vaccination with the SigmE7/HuHSP70 DNA vaccine induced a stronger E7-specific CD8+ T cell immune response and resulted in a more significant therapeutic effect against E7 expressing tumor cells. Our study may serve as an important foundation and significant reference for future clinical applications.

  3. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections.

  4. ALK gene copy number gain and immunohistochemical expression status using three antibodies in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2016-03-17

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies (p= < 0.001 and 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  5. ALK Gene Copy Number Gain and Immunohistochemical Expression Status Using Three Antibodies in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC-positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  6. Gyrase activity and number of copies of the gyrase B subunit gene in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Juárez, E; Setlow, J K

    1985-01-01

    Gyrase activities in extracts of various strains of Haemophilus influenzae can differ by more than an order of magnitude (J. K. Setlow, E. Cabrera-Juárez, W. L. Albritton, D. Spikes, and A. Mutschler, J. Bacteriol. 164:525-534, 1985). Measurements of in vitro activity and copy number indicated that most of these differences arose from variations in the number of copies of the gene for the gyrase B subunit, with some strains containing multicopy plasmids coding for that subunit. The quantitative relationship between gyrase and copy number depended on the mutations in the plasmids and in the host. The gyrase and copy number were considerably lower in plasmid-bearing strains carrying the prophage HP1c1. Two mutations affecting gyrase that are apparently regulatory caused an increase in gyrase without a concomitant increase in copy number. The possibility that the in vivo gyrase activity did not reflect the in vitro data was explored by measurement of alkaline phosphatase and ATPase activity in the extracts. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with increasing gyrase activity measured in vitro, but ATPase activity did not. We conclude that extra supercoiling enhanced transcription of the alkaline phosphatase gene but not the ATPase gene and that it is unlikely that there is much discrepancy between gyrase activity assayed in vitro and the activity in the cell. PMID:2997116

  7. The nuclear retention signal of HPV16 L2 protein is essential for incoming viral genome to transverse the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Hilbig, Lydia; Sapp, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The Human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. Infectious entry requires a complex series of conformational changes in both proteins that lead to uptake and allow uncoating to occur. During entry, the capsid is disassembled and host cyclophilins dissociate L1 protein from the L2/DNA complex. Herein, we describe a mutant HPV16 L2 protein (HPV16 L2-R302/5A) that traffics pseudogenome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but fails to egress. Our data provide further evidence that HPV16 traffics through the TGN and demonstrates that L2 is essential for TGN egress. Furthermore, we show that cyclophilin activity is required for the L2/DNA complex to be transported to the TGN which is accompanied by a reduced L1 protein levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The nuclear retention signal of HPV16 L2 protein is essential for incoming viral genome to transverse the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Hilbig, Lydia; Sapp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. Infectious entry requires a complex series of conformational changes in both proteins that lead to uptake and allow uncoating to occur. During entry, the capsid is disassembled and host cyclophilins dissociate L1 protein from the L2/DNA complex. Herein, we describe a mutant HPV16 L2 protein (HPV16 L2-R302/5A) that traffics pseudogenome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but fails to egress. Our data provide further evidence that HPV16 traffics through the TGN and demonstrates that L2 is essential for TGN egress. Furthermore, we show that cyclophilin activity is required for the L2/DNA complex to be transported to the TGN which is accompanied by a reduced L1 protein levels. PMID:24928042

  9. Bacterial expression system with tightly regulated gene expression and plasmid copy number.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Lisa M; Lapoint, Kathleen; Anthony, Larry; Pluciennik, Anna; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2004-09-29

    A new Escherichia coli host/vector system has been engineered to allow tight and uniform modulation of gene expression and gamma origin (ori) plasmid copy number. Regulation of gamma ori plasmid copy number is achieved through arabinose-inducible expression of the necessary Rep protein, pi, whose gene was integrated into the chromosome of the host strain under control of the P(BAD) promoter. gamma ori replication can be uniformly modulated over 100-fold by changing the concentration of l-arabinose in the growth medium. This strain avoids the problem of all-or-nothing induction of P(BAD) because it is deficient in both arabinose uptake and degradation genes. Arabinose enters the cell by a mutant LacY transporter, LacYA177C, which is expressed from the host chromosome. Although this strain could be compatible with any gamma ori plasmid, we describe the utility of a gamma ori expression vector that allows especially tight regulation of gene expression. With this host/vector system, it is possible to independently modulate gene expression and gene dosage, facilitating the cloning and overproduction of toxic gene products. We describe the successful use of this system for cloning a highly potent toxin, Colicin E3, in the absence of its cognate immunity protein. This system could be useful for cloning genes encoding other potent toxins, screening libraries for potential toxins, and maintaining any gamma ori vector at precise copy levels in a cell.

  10. Universally distributed single-copy genes indicate a constant rate of horizontal transfer.

    PubMed

    Creevey, Christopher J; Doerks, Tobias; Fitzpatrick, David A; Raes, Jeroen; Bork, Peer

    2011-01-01

    Single copy genes, universally distributed across the three domains of life and encoding mostly ancient parts of the translation machinery, are thought to be only rarely subjected to horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Indeed it has been proposed to have occurred in only a few genes and implies a rare, probably not advantageous event in which an ortholog displaces the original gene and has to function in a foreign context (orthologous gene displacement, OGD). Here, we have utilised an automatic method to identify HGT based on a conservative statistical approach capable of robustly assigning both donors and acceptors. Applied to 40 universally single copy genes we found that as many as 68 HGTs (implying OGDs) have occurred in these genes with a rate of 1.7 per family since the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). We examined a number of factors that have been claimed to be fundamental to HGT in general and tested their validity in the subset of universally distributed single copy genes. We found that differing functional constraints impact rates of OGD and the more evolutionarily distant the donor and acceptor, the less likely an OGD is to occur. Furthermore, species with larger genomes are more likely to be subjected to OGD. Most importantly, regardless of the trends above, the number of OGDs increases linearly with time, indicating a neutral, constant rate. This suggests that levels of HGT above this rate may be indicative of positively selected transfers that may allow niche adaptation or bestow other benefits to the recipient organism.

  11. Gene copy number variation spanning 60 million years of human and primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Laura; Kim, Young H.; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Cox, Michael; Hopkins, Janet; Pollack, Jonathan R.; Sikela, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Given the evolutionary importance of gene duplication to the emergence of species-specific traits, we have extended the application of cDNA array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to survey gene duplications and losses genome-wide across 10 primate species, including human. Using human cDNA arrays that contained 41,126 cDNAs, corresponding to 24,473 unique human genes, we identified 4159 genes that likely represent most of the major lineage-specific gene copy number gains and losses that have occurred in these species over the past 60 million years. We analyzed 1,233,780 gene-to-gene data points and found that gene gains typically outnumbered losses (ratio of gains/losses = 2.34) and these frequently cluster in complex and dynamic genomic regions that are likely to serve as gene nurseries. Almost one-third of all human genes (6696) exhibit an aCGH- predicted change in copy number in one or more of these species, and within-species gene amplification is also evident. Many of the genes identified here are likely to be important to lineage-specific traits including, for example, human-specific duplications of the AQP7 gene, which represent intriguing candidates to underlie the key physiological adaptations in thermoregulation and energy utilization that permitted human endurance running. PMID:17666543

  12. A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN MODEL FOR INFERENCE OF COPY NUMBER VARIANTS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION TO GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Cassese, Alberto; Guindani, Michele; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Falciani, Francesco; Vannucci, Marina

    2014-01-01

    A number of statistical models have been successfully developed for the analysis of high-throughput data from a single source, but few methods are available for integrating data from different sources. Here we focus on integrating gene expression levels with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array measurements collected on the same subjects. We specify a measurement error model that relates the gene expression levels to latent copy number states which, in turn, are related to the observed surrogate CGH measurements via a hidden Markov model. We employ selection priors that exploit the dependencies across adjacent copy number states and investigate MCMC stochastic search techniques for posterior inference. Our approach results in a unified modeling framework for simultaneously inferring copy number variants (CNV) and identifying their significant associations with mRNA transcripts abundance. We show performance on simulated data and illustrate an application to data from a genomic study on human cancer cell lines. PMID:24834139

  13. Immune response to the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule up to 4 years after vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda M; Ferguson, Murdo; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Schulze, Karin; Ramjattan, Brian; Hillemanns, Peter; Behre, Ulrich; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, partially-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT00541970) evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of 2-dose (2D) schedules of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Results to month (M) 24 have been reported previously and we now report data to M48 focusing on the licensed vaccine formulation (20 μg each of HPV-16 and -18 antigens) administered at M0,6 compared with the standard 3-dose (3D) schedule (M0,1,6). Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 years) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (n = 240) or 3D at M0,1,6 (n = 239). In the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort, all initially seronegative subjects seroconverted for HPV-16 and -18 antibodies and remained seropositive up to M48. For both HPV-16 and -18, geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) ratios (3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years divided by 2D schedule in girls aged 9–14 years) at M36 and M48 were close to 1, as they were at M7 when non-inferiority was demonstrated. The kinetics of HPV-16, -18, -31, and -45 antibody responses were similar for both groups and HPV-16 and -18 GMTs were substantially higher than natural infection titers. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In summary, antibody responses to a 2D M0,6 schedule of the licensed vaccine formulation in girls aged 9–14 years appeared comparable to the standard 3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years up to 4 years after first vaccination. A 2D schedule could facilitate implementation of HPV vaccination programs and improve vaccine coverage and series completion rates. PMID:24576907

  14. Comparison of cytology, HPV DNA testing and HPV 16/18 genotyping alone or combined targeting to the more balanced methodology for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Chatzistamatiou, Kimon; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Moschaki, Viktoria; Panteleris, Nikolaos; Agorastos, Theodoros

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify the most effective cervical cancer screening algorithm incorporating different combinations of cytology, HPV testing and genotyping. Women 25-55years old recruited for the "HERMES" (HEllenic Real life Multicentric cErvical Screening) study were screened in terms of cytology and high-risk (hr) HPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping. Women positive for cytology or/and hrHPV were referred for colposcopy, biopsy and treatment. Ten screening algorithms based on different combinations of cytology, HPV testing and HPV 16/18 genotyping were investigated in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Three clusters of algorithms were formed according to the balance between effectiveness and harm caused by screening. The cluster showing the best balance included two algorithms based on co-testing and two based on HPV primary screening with HPV 16/18 genotyping. Among these, hrHPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping and reflex cytology (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance - ASCUS threshold) presented the optimal combination of sensitivity (82.9%) and specificity relative to cytology alone (0.99) with 1.26 false positive rate relative to cytology alone. HPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping, referring HPV 16/18 positive women directly to colposcopy, and hrHPV (non 16/18) positive women to reflex cytology (ASCUS threshold), as a triage method to colposcopy, reflects the best equilibrium between screening effectiveness and harm. Algorithms, based on cytology as initial screening method, on co-testing or HPV primary without genotyping, and on HPV primary with genotyping but without cytology triage, are not supported according to the present analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proof-of-Principle Evaluation of the Efficacy of Fewer Than Three Doses of a Bivalent HPV16/18 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; González, Paula; Solomon, Diane; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Quint, Wim; Sherman, Mark E.; Schussler, John; Wacholder, Sholom

    2011-01-01

    Background Three-dose regimens for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are expensive and difficult to complete, especially in settings where the need for cervical cancer prevention is greatest. Methods We evaluated the vaccine efficacy of fewer than three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine Cervarix in our Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. Women were randomly assigned to receive three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine or to a control vaccine and were followed for incident HPV16 or HPV18 infection that persisted in visits that were 10 or more months apart (median follow-up 4.2 years). After excluding women who had no follow-up or who were HPV16 and HPV18 DNA positive at enrollment, 5967 women received three vaccine doses (2957 HPV vaccine vs 3010 control vaccine), 802 received two doses (422 HPV vs 380 control), and 384 received one dose (196 HPV vs 188 control). Reasons for receiving fewer doses and other pre- and post-randomization characteristics were balanced within each dosage group between women receiving the HPV and control vaccines. Results Incident HPV16 or HPV18 infections that persisted for 1 year were unrelated to dosage of the control vaccine. Vaccine efficacy was 80.9% for three doses of the HPV vaccine (95% confidence interval [CI] = 71.1% to 87.7%; 25 and 133 events in the HPV and control arms, respectively), 84.1% for two doses (95% CI = 50.2% to 96.3%; 3 and 17 events), and 100% for one dose (95% CI = 66.5% to 100%; 0 and 10 events). Conclusion Four years after vaccination of women who appeared to be uninfected, this nonrandomized analysis suggests that two doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine, and maybe even one dose, are as protective as three doses. PMID:21908768

  16. Proof-of-principle evaluation of the efficacy of fewer than three doses of a bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Aimée R; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; González, Paula; Solomon, Diane; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Quint, Wim; Sherman, Mark E; Schussler, John; Wacholder, Sholom

    2011-10-05

    Three-dose regimens for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are expensive and difficult to complete, especially in settings where the need for cervical cancer prevention is greatest. We evaluated the vaccine efficacy of fewer than three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine Cervarix in our Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. Women were randomly assigned to receive three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine or to a control vaccine and were followed for incident HPV16 or HPV18 infection that persisted in visits that were 10 or more months apart (median follow-up 4.2 years). After excluding women who had no follow-up or who were HPV16 and HPV18 DNA positive at enrollment, 5967 women received three vaccine doses (2957 HPV vaccine vs 3010 control vaccine), 802 received two doses (422 HPV vs. 380 control), and 384 received one dose (196 HPV vs. 188 control). Reasons for receiving fewer doses and other pre- and post-randomization characteristics were balanced within each dosage group between women receiving the HPV and control vaccines. Incident HPV16 or HPV18 infections that persisted for 1 year were unrelated to dosage of the control vaccine. Vaccine efficacy was 80.9% for three doses of the HPV vaccine (95% confidence interval [CI] = 71.1% to 87.7%; 25 and 133 events in the HPV and control arms, respectively), 84.1% for two doses (95% CI = 50.2% to 96.3%; 3 and 17 events), and 100% for one dose (95% CI = 66.5% to 100%; 0 and 10 events). Four years after vaccination of women who appeared to be uninfected, this nonrandomized analysis suggests that two doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine, and maybe even one dose, are as protective as three doses.

  17. Maize haplotype with a helitron-amplified cytidine deaminase gene copy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Messing, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Background Genetic maps are based on recombination of orthologous gene sequences between different strains of the same species. Therefore, it was unexpected to find extensive non-collinearity of genes between different inbred strains of maize. Interestingly, disruption of gene collinearity can be caused among others by a rolling circle-type copy and paste mechanism facilitated by Helitrons. However, understanding the role of this type of gene amplification has been hampered by the lack of finding intact gene sequences within Helitrons. Results By aligning two haplotypes of the z1C1 locus of maize we found a Helitron that contains two genes, one encoding a putative cytidine deaminase and one a hypothetical protein with part of a 40S ribosomal protein. The cytidine deaminase gene, called ZmCDA3, has been copied from the ZmCDA1 gene on maize chromosome 7 about 4.5 million years ago (mya) after maize was formed by whole-genome duplication from two progenitors. Inbred lines contain gene copies of both progenitors, the ZmCDA1 and ZmCDA2 genes. Both genes diverged when the progenitors of maize split and are derived from the same progenitor as the rice OsCDA1 gene. The ZmCDA1 and ZmCDA2 genes are both transcribed in leaf and seed tissue, but transcripts of the paralogous ZmCDA3 gene have not been found yet. Based on their protein structure the maize CDA genes encode a nucleoside deaminase that is found in bacterial systems and is distinct from the mammalian RNA and/or DNA modifying enzymes. Conclusion The conservation of a paralogous gene sequence encoding a cytidine deaminase gene over 4.5 million years suggests that Helitrons could add functional gene sequences to new chromosomal positions and thereby create new haplotypes. However, the function of such paralogous gene copies cannot be essential because they are not present in all maize strains. However, it is interesting to note that maize hybrids can outperform their inbred parents. Therefore, certain haplotypes may

  18. Quantitative role of the human papillomavirus type 16 E5 gene during the productive stage of the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Genther, Sybil M; Sterling, Stephanie; Duensing, Stefan; Münger, Karl; Sattler, Carol; Lambert, Paul F

    2003-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small circular DNA viruses that cause warts. Infection with high-risk anogenital HPVs, such as HPV type 16 (HPV16), is associated with human cancers, specifically cervical cancer. The life cycle of HPVs is intimately tied to the differentiation status of the host epithelium and has two distinct stages: the nonproductive stage and the productive stage. In the nonproductive stage, which arises in the poorly differentiated basal epithelial compartment of a wart, the virus maintains itself as a low-copy-number nuclear plasmid. In the productive stage, which arises as the host cell undergoes terminal differentiation, viral DNA is amplified; the capsid genes, L1 and L2, are expressed; and progeny virions are produced. This stage of the viral life cycle relies on the ability of the virus to reprogram the differentiated cells to support DNA synthesis. Papillomaviruses encode multiple oncoproteins, E5, E6, and E7. In the present study, we analyze the role of one of these viral oncogenes, E5, in the viral life cycle. To assess the role of E5 in the HPV16 life cycle, we introduced wild-type (WT) or E5 mutant HPV16 genomes into NIKS, a keratinocyte cell line that supports the papillomavirus life cycle. By culturing these cells under conditions that allow them to remain undifferentiated, a state similar to that of basal epithelial cells, we determined that E5 does not play an essential role in the nonproductive stage of the HPV16 life cycle. To determine if E5 plays a role in the productive stage of the viral life cycle, we cultured keratinocyte populations in organotypic raft cultures, which promote the differentiation and stratification of epithelial cells. We found that cells harboring E5 mutant genomes displayed a quantitative reduction in the percentage of suprabasal cells undergoing DNA synthesis, compared to cells containing WT HPV16 DNA. This reduction in DNA synthesis, however, did not prevent amplification of viral DNA in the

  19. Evolution of ribosomal RNA gene copy number on the sex chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1991-07-01

    A diverse array of cellular and evolutionary forces--including unequal crossing-over, magnification, compensation, and natural selection--is at play modulating the number of copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes on the X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila. Accurate estimates of naturally occurring distributions of copy numbers on both the X and Y chromosomes are needed in order to explore the evolutionary end result of these forces. Estimates of relative copy numbers of the ribosomal DNA repeat, as well as of the type I and type II inserts, were obtained for a series of 96 X chromosomes and 144 Y chromosomes by using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult D. melanogaster bearing appropriate deficiencies that reveal chromosome-specific copy numbers. Estimates of copy number were put on an absolute scale with slot blots having serial dilutions both of the repeat and of genomic DNA from nonpolytene larval brain and imaginal discs. The distributions of rRNA copy number are decidedly skewed, with a long tail toward higher copy numbers. These distributions were fitted by a population genetic model that posits three different types of exchange events--sister-chromatid exchange, intrachromatid exchange, and interchromosomal crossing-over. In addition, the model incorporates natural selection, because experimental evidence shows that there is a minimum number of functional elements necessary for survival. Adequate fits of the model were found, indicating that either natural selection also eliminates chromosomes with high copy number or that the rate of intrachromatid exchange exceeds the rate of interchromosomal exchange.

  20. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs. PMID:26863414

  1. Low-level copy number changes of MYC genes have a prognostic impact in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zitterbart, Karel; Filkova, Hana; Tomasikova, Lenka; Necesalova, Eva; Zambo, Iva; Kantorova, Dagmar; Slamova, Iva; Vranova, Vladimira; Zezulkova, Dita; Pesakova, Martina; Pavelka, Zdenek; Veselska, Renata; Kuglik, Petr; Sterba, Jaroslav

    2011-03-01

    High-level amplifications of MYC genes are associated with poor outcomes in childhood medulloblastoma (MB). However, the occurrence of MYCN and MYCC copy number increases below the intense amplification pattern is rarely reported, and its clinical impact has not yet been determined. Here, we describe this phenomenon and its prognostic significance in a cohort of 29 MB patients. Using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH), low-level copy number alterations, i.e. gain of MYCN, were shown in 5/27 (19%) samples, whereas amplification was revealed in only 1/27 (4%) samples. MYCC gain was revealed in 6/29 (21%) MB, while amplification was disclosed in only 2/29 (7%). Hyperploidy and co-incidence of gains in both MYC loci were frequently observed in samples with copy number aberrations. Survival analysis has clearly shown that MYC copy number increases are associated with lowered event-free survival and overall survival in MB. In the case of MYCN, this negative correlation was statistically significant. We conclude that limited numerical alterations in loci 2p24 (MYCN) and 8q24 (MYCC), as assessed by I-FISH, are present in MB with a higher frequency than high-level amplifications. Poor prognoses were observed in patients with copy number increases in MYC genes. Our data illustrate the importance of further investigations in multicenter trials to better refine the emerging genomic-based prognostic stratification in MB.

  2. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs.

  3. Diet and the evolution of human amylase gene copy number variation

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Claw, Katrina G.; Lee, Arthur S.; Fiegler, Heike; Redon, Richard; Werner, John; Villanea, Fernando A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Misra, Rajeev; Carter, Nigel P.; Lee, Charles; Stone, Anne C.

    2008-01-01

    Starch consumption is a prominent characteristic of agricultural societies and hunter-gatherers in arid environments. In contrast, rainforest and circum-arctic hunter-gatherers and some pastoralists consume much less starch1-3. This behavioral variation raises the possibility that different selective pressures have acted on amylase, the enzyme responsible for starch hydrolysis4. We found that salivary amylase gene (AMY1) copy number is correlated positively with salivary amylase protein levels, and that individuals from populations with high-starch diets have on average more AMY1 copies than those with traditionally low-starch diets. Comparisons with other loci in a subset of these populations suggest that the level of AMY1 copy number differentiation is unusual. This example of positive selection on a copy number variable gene is one of the first in the human genome. Higher AMY1 copy numbers and protein levels likely improve the digestion of starchy foods, and may buffer against the fitness-reducing effects of intestinal disease. PMID:17828263

  4. MAP kinase pathway gene copy alterations in NRAS/BRAF wild-type advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Orouji, Elias; Orouji, Azadeh; Gaiser, Timo; Larribère, Lionel; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Recent therapeutic advances have improved melanoma patientś clinical outcome. Novel therapeutics targeting BRAF, NRAS and cKit mutant melanomas are widely used in clinical practice. However therapeutic options in NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) /cKit(wild-type) melanoma patients are limited. Our study shows that gene copy numbers of members of the MAPK signaling pathway vary in different melanoma subgroups. NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) melanoma metastases are characterized by significant gains of MAP2K1 (MEK1) and MAPK3 (ERK1) gene loci. These additional gene copies could lead to an activation of the MAPK signaling pathway via a gene-dosage effect. Our results suggest that downstream analyses of the pMEK and pERK expression status in NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) melanoma patients identify patients that could benefit from targeted therapies with MEK and ERK inhibitors.

  5. HPV16 infection of HaCaTs is dependent on β4 integrin, and α6 integrin processing.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Pınar; Abban, Cynthia Y; Kiyashka, Elizabeth; Qiang, Weitao; Meneses, Patricio I

    2014-01-20

    Our understanding of human papillomavirus (HPV) is still evolving. To further study the field, our laboratory has focused on determining the role of integrins in the initial steps of viral endocytosis into HaCaT cells. Our and others' previous findings have shown that α6 is necessary for infection. Here we show that α3 and β1 were dispensable, and we identified integrin α6β4 complex as necessary for infection in HaCaTs. β4 knock down resulted in a significant decrease in HPV16 PsV infection and perhaps most importantly resulted in defective post-translational α6 processing. We showed that the unprocessed α6 does not localize to the cell surface. We propose that the α6β4 complex is necessary for the formation of an endocytic complex that results in the signaling transduction events necessary for initial endocytosis.

  6. Evaluation of a new biocompatible poly(N-(morpholino ethyl methacrylate)-based copolymer for the delivery of ruthenium oligonucleotides, targeting HPV16 E6 oncogene.

    PubMed

    Reschner, Anca; Shim, Yong Ho; Dubois, Philippe; Delvenne, Philippe; Evrard, Brigitte; Marcélis, Lionel; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Defrancq, Eric; Raes, Martine; Piette, Jacques; Collard, Laurence; Piel, Géraldine

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the use of a new biocompatible block copolymer poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-N-(morpholino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA) for the delivery of a particular antisense oligonucleotide targeting E6 gene from human papilloma virus. This antisense oligonucleotide was derivatized with a polyazaaromatic Ru(II) complex which, under visible illumination, is able to produce an irreversible crosslink with the complementary targeted sequence. The purpose of this study is to determine whether by the use of a suitable transfection agent, it is possible to increase the efficiency of the antisense oligonucleotide targeting E6 gene, named Ru-P-4. In a recent study, we showed that Oligofectamine transfected Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide failed to inhibit efficiently the growth of cervical cancer cell line SiHa, contrarily to the Ru-P-6 antisense oligonucleotide, another sequence also targeting the E6 gene. The ability of PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA to form polyplexes with optimal physicochemical characteristics was investigated first. Then the ability of the PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA/Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide polyplexes to transfect two keratinocyte cell lines (SiHa and HaCat) and the capacity of polyplexes to inhibit HPV16+ cervical cancer cell growth was evaluated. PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA base polyplexes at the optimal molar ratio of polymer nitrogen atoms to DNA phosphates (N/P), were able to deliver Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide and to induce a higher growth inhibition in human cervical cancer SiHa cells, compared to other formulations based on Oligofectamine.

  7. Development of a simple and quick immunochromatography method for detection of anti-HPV-16/-18 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Fumiko; Tabata, Tsutomu; Sadato, Daichi; Kawamura, Machiko; Ando, Noriyuki; Ukaji, Masako; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2017-01-01

    Immunochromatography (IC) is widely used to detect target molecules in biological fluids. Since this method can be performed without a special technique or device, IC is a convenient way to assess the existence of antibodies or pathogens such as viruses and bacteria, simply and quickly. In this study, we established an IC method to detect serum antibodies against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 and HPV-18 L1 proteins using recombinant L1 proteins produced by silkworms as antigens. Infection of oncogenic HPVs is a major risk factor of cervical cancer, which is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. We first measured blood sera of two groups by magnetic beads enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MB-ELISA). For the first group, sera were collected prospectively from young women who planned to receive HPV vaccination. The second group consisted of children under 20 years of age, non-vaccinated healthy women, vaccinated healthy women, dysplasia, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III, and cervical cancer patients. We confirmed that standard vaccination doses significantly increased serum HPV antibody concentrations, and the level was sustained at least more than 30 months after vaccination. In contrast, an increase in antibody concentration was not observed in patients with precancerous cervical changes and cervical cancer. We next measured the samples in both groups using the IC method we originally developed, and found that the measurement values of IC highly correlated with those of MB-ELISA. The simple and quick IC method would be a useful tool for rapid monitoring of L1 specific antibody levels in a non-laboratory environment. With less than one drop of serum, our IC can easily detect serum HPV-16/-18 antibodies within 15 minutes, without the need for electronic devices or techniques. PMID:28158224

  8. Prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 and attitudes toward HPV vaccination trials in patients with cervical cancer in Mali.

    PubMed

    Téguété, Ibrahima; Dolo, Amadou; Sangare, Kotou; Sissoko, Abdoulaye; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Tounkara, Karamoko; Yekta, Shahla; De Groot, Anne S; Koita, Ousmane A

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in West Africa. Even though vaccines that protect against the most common Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains, 16 and 18, are currently in use in developed countries, the implementation of these vaccines in developing countries has been painfully slow, considering the pre-eminence of HPV-associated cervical cancer among women in those countries. We performed serological and PCR-based assessment of blood and tissue specimens obtained from women undergoing cervical cancer-related surgery at a major urban hospital in Bamako. Since several therapeutic HPV vaccines are currently in clinical trials, we also assessed willingness to participate in HPV cancer vaccine trials. Blood and biopsy samples of 240 women were evaluated for HPV types 16 and 18 by serology and PCR. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine and autonomy to decide to vaccinate their own child was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. HPV 16 and 18 were identified in 137/166 (82.5%) cervical cancer biopsy samples by PCR. Co-infection with both HPV 16 and 18 was significantly more frequent in women over 50 years of age than in younger women (63.0% vs. 37.0%). 44% of study participants said they would be willing to vaccinate their child with HPV vaccine. Only 39% of women participating in this study reported that they would be able to make an autonomous decision to receive HPV vaccination. Permission from a male spouse or head of household was identified as important for participation by 59% of the women. This study provides strong support for the introduction of currently available HPV vaccines in Mali, and also provides key information about conditions for obtaining informed consent for HPV vaccine trials and HPV vaccination in Mali.

  9. HPV16 Oncoproteins Induce MMPs/RECK-TIMP-2 Imbalance in Primary Keratinocytes: Possible Implications in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cardeal, Laura Beatriz da Silva; Boccardo, Enrique; Termini, Lara; Rabachini, Tatiana; Andreoli, Maria Antonieta; di Loreto, Celso; Filho, Adhemar Longatto; Villa, Luisa Lina; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV types, principally HPV16 and 18 is the main risk factor for the development of this malignancy. However, the onset of invasive tumor occurs many years after initial exposure in a minority of infected women. This suggests that other factors beyond viral infection are necessary for tumor establishment and progression. Tumor progression is characterized by an increase in secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by either the tumor cells themselves or tumor-associated fibroblasts or macrophages. Increased MMPs expression, including MMP-2, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP, has been observed during cervical carcinoma progression. These proteins have been associated with degradation of ECM components, tumor invasion, metastasis and recurrence. However, few studies have evaluated the interplay between HPV infection and the expression and activity of MMPs and their regulators in cervical cancer. We analyzed the effect of HPV16 oncoproteins on the expression and activity of MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, and their inhibitors TIMP-2 and RECK in cultures of human keratinocytes. We observed that E7 expression is associated with increased pro-MMP-9 activity in the epithelial component of organotypic cultures, while E6 and E7 oncoproteins co-expression down-regulates RECK and TIMP-2 levels in organotypic and monolayers cultures. Finally, a study conducted in human cervical tissues showed a decrease in RECK expression levels in precancer and cancer lesions. Our results indicate that HPV oncoproteins promote MMPs/RECK-TIMP-2 imbalance which may be involved in HPV-associated lesions outcome. PMID:22438955

  10. Prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 and attitudes toward HPV vaccination trials in patients with cervical cancer in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Téguété, Ibrahima; Dolo, Amadou; Sangare, Kotou; Sissoko, Abdoulaye; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Tounkara, Karamoko; Yekta, Shahla; De Groot, Anne S.; Koita, Ousmane A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in West Africa. Even though vaccines that protect against the most common Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains, 16 and 18, are currently in use in developed countries, the implementation of these vaccines in developing countries has been painfully slow, considering the pre-eminence of HPV-associated cervical cancer among women in those countries. Aim We performed serological and PCR-based assessment of blood and tissue specimens obtained from women undergoing cervical cancer-related surgery at a major urban hospital in Bamako. Since several therapeutic HPV vaccines are currently in clinical trials, we also assessed willingness to participate in HPV cancer vaccine trials. Methods Blood and biopsy samples of 240 women were evaluated for HPV types 16 and 18 by serology and PCR. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine and autonomy to decide to vaccinate their own child was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results HPV 16 and 18 were identified in 137/166 (82.5%) cervical cancer biopsy samples by PCR. Co-infection with both HPV 16 and 18 was significantly more frequent in women over 50 years of age than in younger women (63.0% vs. 37.0%). 44% of study participants said they would be willing to vaccinate their child with HPV vaccine. Only 39% of women participating in this study reported that they would be able to make an autonomous decision to receive HPV vaccination. Permission from a male spouse or head of household was identified as important for participation by 59% of the women. Conclusion This study provides strong support for the introduction of currently available HPV vaccines in Mali, and also provides key information about conditions for obtaining informed consent for HPV vaccine trials and HPV vaccination in Mali. PMID:28231334

  11. Enhancement of Ad-CRT/E7-mediated antitumor effect by preimmunization with L. lactis expressing HPV-16 E7.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Colmenero, Blanca R; Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Villatoro-Hernández, Julio; Zavala-Flores, Laura M; Quistián-Martínez, Deyanira; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Arce-Mendoza, Alma Y; Guzmán-López, Santos; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila

    2014-11-01

    Although current polyvalent vaccines can prevent development of cervical cancer, they cannot be used to treat patients who already have the disease. Adenovirus expressing calreticulin-E7 (Ad-CRT-E7) has shown promising results in the cervical cancer murine model. We also demonstrated that immunization with Lactococcus lactis encoding HPV-16 E7 (Ll-E7) anchored to its surface induces significant HPV-16 E7-specific immune response. Here, we assessed the combination of both approaches in the treatment of a cervical cancer animal model. Intranasal preimmunization of Ll-E7, followed by a single Ad-CRT/E7 application, induced ∼80% of tumor suppression in comparison with controls. Mice treated with a combination of Ll-E7 and Ad-CRT/E7 resulted in a 70% survival rate 300 days post-treatment, whereas 100% of the mice in the control groups died by 50 days. Significant CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes infiltration was detected in the tumors of mice treated with Ll-E7+Ad-CRT/E7. Tumors with regression showed a greater number of positive cells for in situ TUNEL staining than controls. Our results suggest that preimmunization with Ll-E7 enhances the Ad-CRT/E7-mediated antitumor effect. This treatment provides an enormous advantage over repeated applications of Ad-CRT/E7 by maintaining the effectiveness of the three-dose application of Ad-CRT/E7, but avoiding the high systemic toxicities associated with such repeat treatments.

  12. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  13. Incorporating 16S gene copy number information improves estimates of microbial diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Kembel, Steven W; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Green, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of different SSU rRNA ("16S") gene sequences in environmental samples is widely used in studies of microbial ecology as a measure of microbial community structure and diversity. However, the genomic copy number of the 16S gene varies greatly - from one in many species to up to 15 in some bacteria and to hundreds in some microbial eukaryotes. As a result of this variation the relative abundance of 16S genes in environmental samples can be attributed both to variation in the relative abundance of different organisms, and to variation in genomic 16S copy number among those organisms. Despite this fact, many studies assume that the abundance of 16S gene sequences is a surrogate measure of the relative abundance of the organisms containing those sequences. Here we present a method that uses data on sequences and genomic copy number of 16S genes along with phylogenetic placement and ancestral state estimation to estimate organismal abundances from environmental DNA sequence data. We use theory and simulations to demonstrate that 16S genomic copy number can be accurately estimated from the short reads typically obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing of the 16S gene, and that organismal abundances in microbial communities are more strongly correlated with estimated abundances obtained from our method than with gene abundances. We re-analyze several published empirical data sets and demonstrate that the use of gene abundance versus estimated organismal abundance can lead to different inferences about community diversity and structure and the identity of the dominant taxa in microbial communities. Our approach will allow microbial ecologists to make more accurate inferences about microbial diversity and abundance based on 16S sequence data.

  14. Incorporating 16S Gene Copy Number Information Improves Estimates of Microbial Diversity and Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Kembel, Steven W.; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Green, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of different SSU rRNA (“16S”) gene sequences in environmental samples is widely used in studies of microbial ecology as a measure of microbial community structure and diversity. However, the genomic copy number of the 16S gene varies greatly – from one in many species to up to 15 in some bacteria and to hundreds in some microbial eukaryotes. As a result of this variation the relative abundance of 16S genes in environmental samples can be attributed both to variation in the relative abundance of different organisms, and to variation in genomic 16S copy number among those organisms. Despite this fact, many studies assume that the abundance of 16S gene sequences is a surrogate measure of the relative abundance of the organisms containing those sequences. Here we present a method that uses data on sequences and genomic copy number of 16S genes along with phylogenetic placement and ancestral state estimation to estimate organismal abundances from environmental DNA sequence data. We use theory and simulations to demonstrate that 16S genomic copy number can be accurately estimated from the short reads typically obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing of the 16S gene, and that organismal abundances in microbial communities are more strongly correlated with estimated abundances obtained from our method than with gene abundances. We re-analyze several published empirical data sets and demonstrate that the use of gene abundance versus estimated organismal abundance can lead to different inferences about community diversity and structure and the identity of the dominant taxa in microbial communities. Our approach will allow microbial ecologists to make more accurate inferences about microbial diversity and abundance based on 16S sequence data. PMID:23133348

  15. Chromosome and gene copy number variation allow major structural change between species and strains of Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew B; Hilley, James D; Dickens, Nicholas J; Wilkes, Jon; Bates, Paul A; Depledge, Daniel P; Harris, David; Her, Yerim; Herzyk, Pawel; Imamura, Hideo; Otto, Thomas D; Sanders, Mandy; Seeger, Kathy; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Berriman, Matthew; Smith, Deborah F; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2011-12-01

    Leishmania parasites cause a spectrum of clinical pathology in humans ranging from disfiguring cutaneous lesions to fatal visceral leishmaniasis. We have generated a reference genome for Leishmania mexicana and refined the reference genomes for Leishmania major, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania braziliensis. This has allowed the identification of a remarkably low number of genes or paralog groups (2, 14, 19, and 67, respectively) unique to one species. These were found to be conserved in additional isolates of the same species. We have predicted allelic variation and find that in these isolates, L. major and L. infantum have a surprisingly low number of predicted heterozygous SNPs compared with L. braziliensis and L. mexicana. We used short read coverage to infer ploidy and gene copy numbers, identifying large copy number variations between species, with 200 tandem gene arrays in L. major and 132 in L. mexicana. Chromosome copy number also varied significantly between species, with nine supernumerary chromosomes in L. infantum, four in L. mexicana, two in L. braziliensis, and one in L. major. A significant bias against gene arrays on supernumerary chromosomes was shown to exist, indicating that duplication events occur more frequently on disomic chromosomes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that there is little variation in unique gene content across Leishmania species, but large-scale genetic heterogeneity can result through gene amplification on disomic chromosomes and variation in chromosome number. Increased gene copy number due to chromosome amplification may contribute to alterations in gene expression in response to environmental conditions in the host, providing a genetic basis for disease tropism.

  16. Discovery of MicroRNA169 Gene Copies in Genomes of Flowering Plants through Positional Information

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  17. Systematic Inference of Copy-Number Genotypes from Personal Genome Sequencing Data Reveals Extensive Olfactory Receptor Gene Content Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Waszak, Sebastian M.; Hasin, Yehudit; Zichner, Thomas; Olender, Tsviya; Keydar, Ifat; Khen, Miriam; Stütz, Adrian M.; Schlattl, Andreas; Lancet, Doron; Korbel, Jan O.

    2010-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNVs) are widespread in the human genome, but comprehensive assignments of integer locus copy-numbers (i.e., copy-number genotypes) that, for example, enable discrimination of homozygous from heterozygous CNVs, have remained challenging. Here we present CopySeq, a novel computational approach with an underlying statistical framework that analyzes the depth-of-coverage of high-throughput DNA sequencing reads, and can incorporate paired-end and breakpoint junction analysis based CNV-analysis approaches, to infer locus copy-number genotypes. We benchmarked CopySeq by genotyping 500 chromosome 1 CNV regions in 150 personal genomes sequenced at low-coverage. The assessed copy-number genotypes were highly concordant with our performed qPCR experiments (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.94), and with the published results of two microarray platforms (95–99% concordance). We further demonstrated the utility of CopySeq for analyzing gene regions enriched for segmental duplications by comprehensively inferring copy-number genotypes in the CNV-enriched >800 olfactory receptor (OR) human gene and pseudogene loci. CopySeq revealed that OR loci display an extensive range of locus copy-numbers across individuals, with zero to two copies in some OR loci, and two to nine copies in others. Among genetic variants affecting OR loci we identified deleterious variants including CNVs and SNPs affecting ∼15% and ∼20% of the human OR gene repertoire, respectively, implying that genetic variants with a possible impact on smell perception are widespread. Finally, we found that for several OR loci the reference genome appears to represent a minor-frequency variant, implying a necessary revision of the OR repertoire for future functional studies. CopySeq can ascertain genomic structural variation in specific gene families as well as at a genome-wide scale, where it may enable the quantitative evaluation of CNVs in genome-wide association studies involving high

  18. Genes and small RNA transcripts exhibit dosage-dependent expression pattern in maize copy-number alterations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes that tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplica...

  19. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  20. [Detection of the exogenous gene copy number of the transgenic tomato anti-caries vaccine].

    PubMed

    Bai, Guo-hui; Liu, Jian-guo; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Bai, Peng-yuan; Han, Qi; Gu, Yu; Guan, Xiao-yan; Wang, Hai-hui

    2013-12-01

    To detect the exogenous gene copy number of the transgenic tomato anti-caries vaccine by using the SYBR Green real-time PCR. Recombinant plasmid pEAC10 and pEPC10 were used as standard to detect genome samples of exogenous gene pacA-ctxB and pacP-ctxB by SYBR green fluorescent quantitation, then the average value was calculated as gene copy number. The copy number of the transgenic tomato carrying pacA-ctxB was 1.3 and the pacP-ctxB was 3.2. The transgenic tomato plants which have high stability are low-copy transgenic plants. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (30160086, 81260164), Science and Technical Fund of Guizhou Province (LKZ[2011]41), Project of Technology Innovation Team in Guizhou Province, Leading Academic Discipline Construction Project in Guizhou Province and Excellent Scientific Research Team Cultivation Project in Zunyi Medical College ([2012]12).

  1. Highly dynamic temporal changes of TSPY gene copy number in aging bulls.

    PubMed

    Oluwole, Olutobi A; Mahboubi, Kiana; Favetta, Laura A; Revay, Tamas; Kroetsch, Tom; King, William Allan

    2017-01-01

    The Y-chromosomal TSPY gene is one of the highest copy number mammalian protein coding gene and represents a unique biological model to study various aspects of genomic copy number variations. This study investigated the age-related copy number variability of the bovine TSPY gene, a new and unstudied aspect of the biology of TSPY that has been shown to vary among cattle breeds, individual bulls and somatic tissues. The subjects of this prospective 30-month long study were 25 Holstein bulls, sampled every six months. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to determine the relative TSPY copy number (rTSPY CN) and telomere length in the DNA samples extracted from blood. Twenty bulls showed an altered rTSPY CN after 30 months, although only 9 bulls showed a significant change (4 significant increase while 5 significant decrease, P<0.01). The sequential sampling provided the flow of rTSPY CN over six observations in 30 months and wide-spread variation of rTSPY CN was detected. Although a clear trend of the direction of change was not identifiable, the highly dynamic changes of individual rTSPY CN in aging bulls were observed here for the first time. In summary we have observed a highly variable rTSPY CN in bulls over a short period of time. Our results suggest the importance of further long term studies of the dynamics of rTSPY CN variablility.

  2. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  3. Evolution of Three Parent Genes and Their Retrogene Copies in Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Ryan S.; Clark, Denise V.

    2013-01-01

    Retrogenes form a class of gene duplicate lacking the regulatory sequences found outside of the mRNA-coding regions of the parent gene. It is not clear how a retrogene's lack of parental regulatory sequences affects the evolution of the gene pair. To explore the evolution of parent genes and retrogenes, we investigated three such gene pairs in the family Drosophilidae; in Drosophila melanogaster, these gene pairs are CG8331 and CG4960, CG17734 and CG11825, and Sep2 and Sep5. We investigated the embryonic expression patterns of these gene pairs across multiple Drosophila species. Expression patterns of the parent genes and their single copy orthologs are relatively conserved across species, whether or not a species has a retrogene copy, although there is some variation in CG8331 and CG17734. In contrast, expression patterns of the retrogene orthologs have diversified. We used the genome sequences of 20 Drosophila species to investigate coding sequence evolution. The coding sequences of the three gene pairs appear to be evolving predominantly under negative selection; however, the parent genes and retrogenes show some distinct differences in amino acid sequence. Therefore, in general, retrogene expression patterns and coding sequences are distinct compared to their parents and, in some cases, retrogene expression patterns diversify. PMID:23841016

  4. The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease gene (Pkd1) is a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.G.; Loehning, C.; Frischauf, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene (PKD1) was mapped to chromosome 17 using somatic cell hybrid, BXD recombinant inbred strains, and FISH. The gene is located within a previously defined conserved synteny group that includes the mouse homologue of tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and is linked to the {alpha} globin pseudogene Hba-ps4. Although the human genome contains multiple copies of genes related to PKD1, there is no evidence for more than one copy in the mouse genome. Like their human counterparts, the mouse Tsc2 and Pkd1 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation with a distance of only 63 bp between the polyadenylation signals of the two genes. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  5. African infants’ CCL3 gene copies influence perinatal HIV transmission in the absence of maternal nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Schramm, Diana B.; Donninger, Samantha; Meddows-Taylor, Stephen; Coovadia, Ashraf H.; Sherman, Gayle G.; Gray, Glenda E.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2008-01-01

    Background Individuals with more copies of CCL3L1 (CCR5 ligand) than their population median have been found to be less susceptible to HIV infection. We investigated whether maternal or infant CCL3L1 gene copy numbers are associated with perinatal HIV transmission when single-dose nevirapine is given for prevention. Method A nested case–control study was undertaken combining data from four cohorts including 849 HIV-infected mothers and their infants followed prospectively in Johannesburg, South Africa. Access to antiretroviral drugs for the prevention of perinatal transmission differed across the cohorts. Maternal and infant CCL3L1 gene copy numbers per diploid genome (pdg) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction for 79 out of 83 transmitting pairs (~10% transmission rate) and 235 randomly selected non-transmitting pairs. Results Higher numbers of infant, but not maternal, CCL3L1 gene copies were associated with reduced HIV transmission (P=0.004) overall, but the association was attenuated if mothers took single-dose nevirapine or if the maternal viral load was low. Maternal nevirapine was also associated with reduced spontaneously released CCL3 (P=0.007) and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CCL3 (P=0.005) production in cord blood mononuclear cells from uninfected infants. Conclusion We observed a strong association between higher infant CCL3L1 gene copies and reduced susceptibility to HIV in the absence of maternal nevirapine. We also observed a reduction in newborn CCL3 production with nevirapine exposure. Taken together, we hypothesize that nevirapine may have direct or indirect effects that partly modify the role of the CCR5 ligand CCL3 in HIV transmission, obscuring the relationship between this genetic marker and perinatal HIV transmission. PMID:17690574

  6. Copy Number Deletion Has Little Impact on Gene Expression Levels in Racehorses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Do; Kim, Hyeongmin; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Do, Kyoung-Tag; Kim, Heui-Soo; Yang, Young-Mok; Kwon, Young-jun; Kim, Jaemin; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Song, Ki-Duk; Oh, Jae-Don; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Byung-Wook; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs), important genetic factors for study of human diseases, may have as large of an effect on phenotype as do single nucleotide polymorphisms. Indeed, it is widely accepted that CNVs are associated with differential disease susceptibility. However, the relationships between CNVs and gene expression have not been characterized in the horse. In this study, we investigated the effects of copy number deletion in the blood and muscle transcriptomes of Thoroughbred racing horses. We identified a total of 1,246 CNVs of deletion polymorphisms using DNA re-sequencing data from 18 Thoroughbred racing horses. To discover the tendencies between CNV status and gene expression levels, we extracted CNVs of four Thoroughbred racing horses of which RNA sequencing was available. We found that 252 pairs of CNVs and genes were associated in the four horse samples. We did not observe a clear and consistent relationship between the deletion status of CNVs and gene expression levels before and after exercise in blood and muscle. However, we found some pairs of CNVs and associated genes that indicated relationships with gene expression levels: a positive relationship with genes responsible for membrane structure or cytoskeleton and a negative relationship with genes involved in disease. This study will lead to conceptual advances in understanding the relationship between CNVs and global gene expression in the horse. PMID:25178379

  7. Highly conserved low-copy nuclear genes as effective markers for phylogenetic analyses in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Zeng, Liping; Shan, Hongyan; Ma, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Organismal phylogeny provides a crucial evolutionary framework for many studies and the angiosperm phylogeny has been greatly improved recently, largely using organellar and rDNA genes. However, low-copy protein-coding nuclear genes have not been widely used on a large scale in spite of the advantages of their biparental inheritance and vast number of choices. Here, we identified 1083 highly conserved low-copy nuclear genes by genome comparison. Furthermore, we demonstrated the use of five nuclear genes in 91 angiosperms representing 46 orders (73% of orders) and three gymnosperms as outgroups for a highly resolved phylogeny. These nuclear genes are easy to clone and align, and more phylogenetically informative than widely used organellar genes. The angiosperm phylogeny reconstructed using these genes was largely congruent with previous ones mainly inferred from organellar genes. Intriguingly, several new placements were uncovered for some groups, including those among the rosids, the asterids, and between the eudicots and several basal angiosperm groups. These conserved universal nuclear genes have several inherent qualities enabling them to be good markers for reconstructing angiosperm phylogeny, even eukaryotic relationships, further providing new insights into the evolutionary history of angiosperms.

  8. The nuclear retention signal of HPV16 L2 protein is essential for incoming viral genome to transverse the trans-Golgi network

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Hilbig, Lydia; Sapp, Martin

    2014-06-15

    The Human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. Infectious entry requires a complex series of conformational changes in both proteins that lead to uptake and allow uncoating to occur. During entry, the capsid is disassembled and host cyclophilins dissociate L1 protein from the L2/DNA complex. Herein, we describe a mutant HPV16 L2 protein (HPV16 L2-R302/5A) that traffics pseudogenome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but fails to egress. Our data provide further evidence that HPV16 traffics through the TGN and demonstrates that L2 is essential for TGN egress. Furthermore, we show that cyclophilin activity is required for the L2/DNA complex to be transported to the TGN which is accompanied by a reduced L1 protein levels. - Highlights: • mNLS mutant HPV16 L2 protein traffics pseudogenome to the TGN but fails to egress. • Cyclophilin activity is required for trafficking of the L2/DNA complex to the TGN. • Majority of L1 protein is shed from the L2/DNA complex prior to reaching the TGN.

  9. Nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via hydrophobic interactions with Nup62.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Jeremy; Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona

    2013-11-01

    We previously discovered that nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 is mediated by a cNLS located within the zinc-binding domain via a pathway that is independent of karyopherins/importins (Angeline et al., 2003; Knapp et al., 2009). In this study we continued our characterization of the cNLS and nuclear import pathway of HPV16 E7. We find that an intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the cNLS function in mediating nuclear import of HPV16 E7. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues to alanine in each of the two CysXXCys motifs involved in zinc-binding changes the nuclear localization of the EGFP-16E7 and 2xEGFP-16E7 mutants. We further discover that a patch of hydrophobic residues, 65LRLCV69, within the zinc-binding domain of HPV16 E7 mediates its nuclear import via hydrophobic interactions with the FG domain of the central channel nucleoporin Nup62. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Small Molecules on β-Catenin and E-Cadherin Expression in HPV16-positive and -negative Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Benedikt; Hock, Clemens; Schultz, Johannes David; Lammert, Anne; Kuhlin, Beatrice; Birk, Richard; Hörmann, Karl; Aderhold, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    The validation of potential molecular targets in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is mandatory. β-Catenin and E-cadherin are crucial for cancer progression through epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We analyzed the effect of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib and gefitinib on β-catenin and E-cadherin expression in SCC with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) status. Expression of β-catenin and E-cadherin in cell lines UMSCC 11A, UMSCC 14C and CERV196 under the influence of tyrosine kinase inhibitors were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All agents reduced β-catenin and E-cadherin expression of HPV16-negative cells. Increased E-cadherin expression was observed after treatment with gefitinib and dasatinib in HPV16-positive cells. All substances, nilotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib and gefitinib have a significant impact on β-catenin and E-cadherin expression in both HPV16-positive and HPV16-negative cells in vitro. Alterations of β-catenin and E-cadherin could provide novel insights for future targeted therapies of head and neck SCC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via hydrophobic interactions with Nup62

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Jeremy; Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona

    2013-01-01

    We previously discovered that nuclear import of high risk HPV16 E7 is mediated by a cNLS located within the zinc-binding domain via a pathway that is independent of karyopherins/importins (Angeline et al., 2003; Knapp et al., 2009). In this study we continued our characterization of the cNLS and nuclear import pathway of HPV16 E7. We find that an intact zinc-binding domain is essential for the cNLS function in mediating nuclear import of HPV16 E7. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues to alanine in each of the two CysXXCys motifs involved in zinc-binding changes the nuclear localization of the EGFP-16E7 and 2xEGFP-16E7 mutants. We further discover that a patch of hydrophobic residues, 65LRLCV69, within the zinc-binding domain of HPV16 E7 mediates its nuclear import via hydrophobic interactions with the FG domain of the central channel nucleoporin Nup62. PMID:24074597

  12. HPV-16/18 detection does not affect the prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in younger and older patients

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Silva, Luciano; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; de Oliveira, Marcos Vinícius Macedo; Cardos, Cláudio Marcelo; Fonseca-Silva, Thiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; De-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Recently, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) has emerged as a possible agent associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in younger patients. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of age on the distribution of HPV-16/18 in HNSCC, together with the impact of the virus on patient prognosis. A longitudinal prospective study was used adjusted for age, gender, TNM staging, smoking status and alcohol consumption. HPV was detected by PCR with consensus primers. Results showed there was no difference in the frequency of HPV-16/18 positivity when younger patients were compared to the older patients. No association was found among high-risk HPV positivity, gender, smoking habit and anatomical site. High-risk HPV was associated with advanced TNM in bivariate analyses; however, it did not impact on survival. Only TNM staging was associated with risk of mortality. Our study supports the theory that age does not affect the presence of HPV-16/18 in HNSCC and has no impact on patient prognosis. The incidence of HNSCC among patients under the age of 45 years is reportedly on the increase worldwide. The factors associated with HNSCC in younger adults are not well established. Findings of this study indicate that HPV-16/18 may not play a role in HNSCC patients under the age of 45 years. PMID:22741024

  13. Loss of Keratin 17 induces tissue-specific cytokine polarization and cellular differentiation in HPV16-driven cervical tumorigenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, RP; Batazzi, AS; Han, MC; Coulombe, PA

    2017-01-01

    Despite preventive human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination efforts, cervical cancer remains a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Development of therapeutic approaches for cervical cancer are hampered by a lack of mechanistic insight during tumorigenesis. The cytoskeletal protein Keratin 17 (KRT17;K17) is robustly expressed in a broad array of carcinomas, including in cervical tumors, where it has both diagnostic and prognostic value. In this study, we have established multiple functional roles for K17 in the promotion of cervical tumorigenesis in vivo using the established HPV16tg mouse model for cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In HPV16tg/+;Krt17−/−relative to HPV16tg/+ reference female mice, onset of cervical lesions is delayed and closely paralleled by marked reductions in hyperplasia, dysplasia and vascularization. In addition, loss of Krt17 is associated with a cytokine polarization and recruitment of effector immune cells to lesion-prone cervical epithelia. Further, we observed marked enhancement of terminal differentiation in HPV16tg/+;Krt17−/−cervical epithelium accompanied by a stimulation and expansion in the expression of p63, a known basal/reserve cell marker in this tissue. Altogether, the data suggest that the loss of Krt17 may foster an overall protective environment for lesion-prone cervical tissue. In addition to providing new insights into the immunomodulatory and cellular mechanisms of cervical tumorigenesis, these findings may help guide the development of future therapies including vaccines. PMID:27065324

  14. A comprehensive natural history model of HPV infection and cervical cancer to estimate the clinical impact of a prophylactic HPV-16/18 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Sue J; Grima, Daniel; Kohli, Michele; Wright, Thomas C; Weinstein, Milton; Franco, Eduardo

    2003-10-10

    The object of our study is to project the impact of a prophylactic vaccine against persistent human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 infection on age-specific incidence of invasive cervical cancer. We developed a computer-based mathematical model of the natural history of cervical carcinogenesis to incorporate the underlying type-specific HPV distribution within precancerous lesions and invasive cancer. After defining plausible ranges for each parameter based on a comprehensive literature review, the model was calibrated to the best available population-based data. We projected the age-specific reduction in cervical cancer that would occur with a vaccine that reduced the probability of acquiring persistent infection with HPV 16/18, and explored the impact of alternative assumptions about vaccine efficacy and coverage, waning immunity and competing risks associated with non-16/18 HPV types in vaccinated women. The model predicted a peak age-specific cancer incidence of 90 per 100,000 in the 6th decade, a lifetime cancer risk of 3.7% and a reproducible representation of type-specific HPV within low and high-grade cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer. A vaccine that prevented 98% of persistent HPV 16/18 was associated with an approximate equivalent reduction in 16/18-associated cancer and a 51% reduction in total cervical cancer; the effect on total cancer was attenuated due to the competing risks associated with other oncogenic non-16/18 types. A vaccine that prevented 75% of persistent HPV 16/18 was associated with a 70% to 83% reduction in HPV-16/18 cancer cases. Similar effects were observed with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) although the impact of vaccination on the overall prevalence of HPV and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) was minimal. In conclusion, a prophylactic vaccine that prevents persistent HPV-16/18 infection can be expected to significantly reduce HPV-16/18-associated LSIL, HSIL and cervical cancer. The

  15. HPV16 E6-E7 induces cancer stem-like cells phenotypes in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xi, Ruxing; Pan, Shupei; Chen, Xin; Hui, Beina; Zhang, Li; Fu, Shenbo; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xuanwei; Gong, Tuotuo; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Che, Shaomin

    2016-08-30

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16, correlates with cancerogenesis of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and we have reported that HPV16 related with a poor prognosis of ESCC patients in China. We aim to investigate the potential role and mechanism of HPV16 in ESCC development and progress. Our following researches demonstrated that ESCC cells which were stably transfected by HPV16 E6-E7 lentiviral vector showed a remarkable cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) phenotype, such as: migration, invasion, spherogenesis, high expression of CSCs marker in ESCC---p75NTR, chemoresistance, radioresistance, anti-apoptosis ability in vitro and cancerogenesis in vivo. HPV16 E6-E7 induced PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation and this affect could be effectively inhibited by LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor. It was also indicated that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by PI3K and Akt siRNA reverse the effect which induced by HPV16 E6-E7 in ESCC cells. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that HPV16 E6-E7 promotes CSCs phenotype in ESCC cells through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Targeting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HPV16 positive tissues is an available therapeutic for ESCC patients.

  16. HPV16 E6-E7 induces cancer stem-like cells phenotypes in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Ruxing; Pan, Shupei; Chen, Xin; Hui, Beina; Zhang, Li; Fu, Shenbo; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xuanwei; Gong, Tuotuo; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Che, Shaomin

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16, correlates with cancerogenesis of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and we have reported that HPV16 related with a poor prognosis of ESCC patients in China. We aim to investigate the potential role and mechanism of HPV16 in ESCC development and progress. Our following researches demonstrated that ESCC cells which were stably transfected by HPV16 E6-E7 lentiviral vector showed a remarkable cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) phenotype, such as: migration, invasion, spherogenesis, high expression of CSCs marker in ESCC---p75NTR, chemoresistance, radioresistance, anti-apoptosis ability in vitro and cancerogenesis in vivo. HPV16 E6-E7 induced PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation and this affect could be effectively inhibited by LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor. It was also indicated that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by PI3K and Akt siRNA reverse the effect which induced by HPV16 E6-E7 in ESCC cells. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that HPV16 E6-E7 promotes CSCs phenotype in ESCC cells through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Targeting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HPV16 positive tissues is an available therapeutic for ESCC patients. PMID:27489353

  17. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Nélida; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Yee, Emily N; Liswi, Saif W; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2009-01-01

    Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh), blue-sensitive (BRh), and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh) opsins,EF-1α and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total). Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya) was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya), and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya). Our family-level results are congruent with recent estimates found in

  18. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nélida; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Yee, Emily N; Liswi, Saif W; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2009-05-13

    The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh), blue-sensitive (BRh), and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh) opsins,EF-1 and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total). Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3-35.6 Mya) was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7-13.6 Mya), and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5-26.1 Mya). Our family-level results are congruent with recent estimates found in the literature and indicate

  19. HPV-16 E6 promotes cell growth of esophageal cancer via downregulation of miR-125b and activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zang, Bao; Huang, Guojin; Wang, Xiaowei; Zheng, Shiying

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a possible cause of esophageal cancer. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HPV-infected esophageal cancer remains unclear. The expression levels of some microRNAs including miR-125b have been negatively correlated with HPV infection, and miR-125b downregulation is associated with tumorigenesis. In addition, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been suggested to play an important role in esophageal cancer (EC). We examined miR-125b and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HPV-16 E6 promoted tumor progression in EC. HPV-16 E6 transfection decreased markedly the expression levels of miR-125b and promoted the colony formation in the Eca 109 and Kyse 150 cell lines, and restoration of miR-125b expression level antagonized the increased colony formation in HPV-16 E6 transfected cell lines. We also demonstrated that overexpression of E6 upregulated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity via modulating the multiple regulators including TLE1, GSK3β, and sFRP4. Overexpression of miR-125b restored the expression levels of these proteins. Expression of miR-125b was lower in HPV-16 E6 positive esophageal cancer tissues, and was negatively correlated with E6 mRNA levels. Our results indicate that HPV-16 E6 promotes tumorigenesis in EC via down-regulation of miR-125b, and this underlying mechanism may be involved in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. Human papillomavirus proteins are found in peripheral blood and semen Cd20+ and Cd56+ cells during Hpv-16 semen infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) currently represents an important risk factor for cancer development and infertility in humans. Whilst binding of HPV to spermatozoa has been associated with male infertility, an investigation about the presence of HPV-DNA in non-spermatozoal semen cells is lacking. Previous findings documented the presence of HPV in peripheral blood leukocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of HPV markers in semen and blood leukocytes during HPV-16 infection. Methods A total of 32 subjects, 16 patients affected by HPV-16 semen infection and 16 controls, were evaluated in our andrological centre and enrolled in the study. Semen non-spermatozoal cells from all subjects were isolated and evaluated for the expression of HPV-16 markers (DNA and L1, E6 proteins) and further characterized for their molecular phenotype. Analogue determination was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results The presence of HPV-DNA by FISH analysis in a round cell population from semen, confirmed to be CD45+ leukocytes, was observed. These HPV-DNA containing-cells also displayed HPV-16-E6 and HPV-16-L1 viral proteins and, upon further investigation, were found to be CD20+ and CD56+, likely phenotypes of B cells and natural killer cells (NK) respectively. In 25% of the patient group, a very small population of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was found to be positive for HPV-DNA via FISH. These cells displayed the CD20+ and CD56+ phenotype alike. None of the control subjects displayed HPV-DNA in either semen or peripheral blood. Conclusion Considering the role of CD20+ and CD56+ cell populations in the antiviral immune response, the detection of HPV markers on leukocytes may reflect the presence of virus particles within the endosomal compartment. However, the presence of HPV markers in circulating mononuclear cells raise concerns about the risk of developing cancers to distal organs. PMID:24341689

  1. Overexpression of HPV16 E6/E7 mediated HIF-1α upregulation of GLUT1 expression in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Hou, Wei-Jian; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Liu, Shu-Li; Qiu, Xue-Shan; Wang, En-Hua; Wu, Guang-Ping

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may play an important role in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) development. However, some recent studies have proved that it was not directly associated with lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanism that HPV16 regulate the expression of GLUT1 and may promote the development of lung cancer. HPV16, HIF-1α, and GLUT1 were detected in pleural effusions of patients with lung cancer (n = 95) and with benign lung disease (n = 55) by immunocytochemistry. Western blotting and qRT-PCR were used to detect the expression chances of HPV16 E6/E7, HIF-1α, and GLUT1 in lung cancer cells. HPV16, HIF-1α, and GLUT1 were significantly more likely to be expressed in the malignant group than in the benign group as detected by immunocytochemistry (ICC), and HIF-1α was significantly correlated with HPV16 or GLUT1 in the malignant group (P < 0.01). Expression changes of E6 and E7 significantly promoted the protein expression of HIF-1α, the expression of both protein and mRNA of GLUT1, but had no effect on the expression of HIF-1α mRNA in lung cancer cells. After inhibition of HIF-1α, it obviously downregulated the expression of both protein and mRNA of GLUT1 in lung cancer cells. E6 and E7 regulated the expression of GLUT1 may be due to the mediation of HIF-1α in lung cancer cells. These results suggest that both E6 and E7 play the important role in the regulation of Warburg effect and may be a valuable therapeutic target for HPV-related cancer.

  2. Evaluation of the detection of 14 high-risk human papillomaviruses with HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotyping for cervical cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, MEI-LU; CHENG, JIAO-YING; MA, LI; CONG, XIAO; LIU, JUN; CHEN, YING; CHEN, XI

    2013-01-01

    The American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) suggests that women ≥30 years old, with a negative cytopathological test but a positive high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) test should undergo HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotyping. If this test is positive, immediate cervical pathology is required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and clinical value of testing for 14 HR HPVs with HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotyping for cervical cancer (CC) screening. A total of 424 females from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups (A and B). All participants underwent two different testing methods: the liquid-based cytology test (LCT) and a HPV DNA test. For the HPV DNA test, participants in group A underwent the hybrid capture II (HC-II) testing method while participants in group B were tested using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; HBRT-H14) method. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade II or greater using HBRT-H14 were 96.30, 78.17, 23.21 and 99.68%, respectively. In Group B, compared with other HR HPV types, HPV 16 and HPV 18 infection led to the increased possibility of cervical lesions graded CIN II or higher (8.11 and 51.28%, respectively). A significant difference in the rates of CC and CIN II or higher was observed among women who were i) infected with HPV 16 and/or HPV 18, ii) infected with other HR HPV types and iii) diagnosed as negative for HR HPV infection (χ2=93.976, P=0.0001). In conclusion, HBRT-H14 is applicable for CC screening with the advantage of genotyping for HPV 16 and HPV 18, which may help to improve triage management for women with negative cytology. PMID:24223668

  3. Integrated genomic, transcriptomic, and RNA-interference analysis of genes in somatic copy number gains in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Sayad, Azin; Wilson, Gavin; Lemire, Mathieu; Brown, Kevin R; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Hudson, Thomas J; Moffat, Jason

    2013-08-01

    This study used an integrated analysis of copy number, gene expression, and RNA interference screens for identification of putative driver genes harbored in somatic copy number gains in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Somatic copy number gain data on 60 PDAC genomes were extracted from public data sets to identify genomic loci that are recurrently gained. Array-based data from a panel of 29 human PDAC cell lines were used to quantify associations between copy number and gene expression for the set of genes found in somatic copy number gains. The most highly correlated genes were assessed in a compendium of pooled short hairpin RNA screens on 27 of the same human PDAC cell lines. A catalog of 710 protein-coding and 46 RNA genes mapping to 20 recurrently gained genomic loci were identified. The gene set was further refined through stringent integration of copy number, gene expression, and RNA interference screening data to uncover 34 candidate driver genes. Among the candidate genes from the integrative analysis, ECT2 was found to have significantly higher essentiality in specific PDAC cell lines with genomic gains at the 3q26.3 locus, which harbors this gene, suggesting that ECT2 may play an oncogenic role in the PDAC neoplastic process.

  4. SA-4-1BBL as the immunomodulatory component of a HPV-16 E7 protein based vaccine shows robust therapeutic efficacy in a mouse cervical cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajesh K.; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Yolcu, Esma S.; MacLeod, Kathryn J.; Schabowsky, Rich-Henry; Madireddi, Shravan; Shirwan, Haval

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. Current prophylactic vaccines based on HPV (Human papillomavirus) late gene protein, L1 are ineffective in therapeutic settings. Therefore, there is an acute need for the development of therapeutic vaccines for HPV associated cancers. The HPV E7 oncoprotein is expressed in cervical cancer and has been associated with the cellular transformation and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. As such, E7 protein represents an ideal target for the development of therapeutic subunit vaccines against cervical cancer. However, the low antigenicity of this protein may require potent adjuvants for therapeutic efficacy. We recently generated a novel chimeric form of the 4-1BBL costimulatory molecule engineered with core streptavidin (SA-4-1BBL) and demonstrated its safe and pleiotropic effects on various cells of the immune system. We herein tested the utility of SA-4-1BBL as the immunomodulatory component of HPV-16 E7 recombinant protein based therapeutic vaccine in the E7 expressing TC-1 tumor as a model of cervical cancer in mice. A single subcutaneous vaccination was effective in eradicating established tumors in approximately 70% of mice. The therapeutic efficacy of the vaccine was associated with robust primary and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, Th1 cytokine response, infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into the tumor, and enhanced NK cell killing. Importantly, NK cells played an important role in vaccine mediated therapy since their physical depletion compromised vaccine efficacy. Collectively, these data demonstrate the utility of SA-4-1BBL as a new class of multifunctional immunomodulator for the development of therapeutic vaccines against cancer and chronic infections. PMID:20603135

  5. LALF32-51 -E7, a HPV-16 therapeutic vaccine candidate, forms protein body-like structures when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Romana J R; Lamprecht, Renate; Granadillo, Milaid; Torrens, Isis; Arcalís, Elsa; Stöger, Eva; Rybicki, Edward P; Hitzeroth, Inga I

    2017-07-22

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer, and while there are good prophylactic vaccines on the market, these are ineffective against established infections, creating a clear need for therapeutic vaccines. The HPV E7 protein is one of the essential oncoproteins for the onset and maintenance of malignancy and is therefore an ideal therapeutic vaccine target. We fused the HPV-16 E7 protein to the Limulus polyphemus antilipopolysaccharide factor (LALF32-51 ), a small hydrophobic peptide that can penetrate cell membranes and that has immunomodulatory properties. LALF32-51 -E7 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and we previously determined that it accumulated better when targeted to chloroplasts compared to being localized in the cytoplasm. Subsequently, we aimed to prove whether LALF32-51 -E7 was indeed associated with the chloroplasts by determining its subcellular localization. The LALF32-51 -E7 gene was fused to one encoding enhanced GFP to generate a LG fusion protein, and localization was determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluorescence observed from chloroplast-targeted LG was distinctively different from that of the cytoplasmic LG. Small spherical structures resembling protein bodies (PBs) were seen that clearly localized with the chloroplasts. Larger but less abundant PB-like structures were also seen for the cytoplasmic LG. PB-like structure formation was confirmed for both LG and LALF32-51 -E7 by TEM. LALF32-51 -E7 was indeed targeted to the chloroplasts by the chloroplast transit peptide used in this study, and it formed aggregated PB-like structures. This study could open a new avenue for the use of LALF32-51 as a PB-inducing peptide. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The HPV16 E6 oncoprotein and UVB irradiation inhibit the tumor suppressor TGFβ pathway in the epidermis of the K14E6 transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Popoca-Cuaya, Marco; Diaz-Chavez, Jose; Hernandez-Monge, Jesus; Alvarez-Rios, Elizabeth; Lambert, Paul F; Gariglio, Patricio

    2015-06-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer, and they are also associated with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In addition, HPVs have also been postulated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). In these cancers, the oncogene E6 is best known for its ability to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 protein. Interestingly, in transgenic mice for HPV16 E6 (K14E6), it was reported that E6 alone induced epithelial hyperplasia and delay in differentiation in skin epidermis independently of p53 inactivation. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is an important regulator of cell growth/differentiation and apoptosis, and this pathway is often lost during tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) exposure activates diverse cellular responses, including DNA damage and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated whether the E6 oncogene alone or in combination with UVB dysregulate some components of the TGFβ pathway in the epidermis of K14E6 mice. We used 8-day-old K14E6 and non-transgenic mice irradiated and unirradiated with a single dose of UVB. We found that the E6 oncogene and UVB irradiation impair the TGFβ pathway in epidermis of K14E6 mice by downregulation of the TGFβ type II receptor (TβRII). This loss of TβRII prevents downstream activation of Smad2 and target genes as p15, an important regulator of cell cycle progression. In summary, the TGFβ signalling in cells of the epidermis is downregulated in our mouse model by both the E6 oncoprotein and the UVB irradiation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. High-Copy Overexpression Screening Reveals PDR5 as the Main Doxorubicin Resistance Gene in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ayse Banu; Koc, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most potent anticancer drugs used in the treatment of various cancer types. The efficacy of doxorubicin is influenced by the drug resistance mechanisms and its cytotoxicity. In this study, we performed a high-copy screening analysis to find genes that play a role in doxorubicin resistance and found several genes (CUE5, AKL1, CAN1, YHR177W and PDR5) that provide resistance. Among these genes, overexpression of PDR5 provided a remarkable resistance, and deletion of it significantly rendered the tolerance level for the drug. Q-PCR analyses suggested that transcriptional regulation of these genes was not dependent on doxorubicin treatment. Additionally, we profiled the global expression pattern of cells in response to doxorubicin treatment and highlighted the genes and pathways that are important in doxorubicin tolerance/toxicity. Our results suggest that many efflux pumps and DNA metabolism genes are upregulated by the drug and required for doxorubicin tolerance. PMID:26690737

  8. The TGV transgenic vectors for single-copy gene expression from the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gumbiner-Russo, L M; Lombardo, M J; Ponder, R G; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-07-25

    Plasmid-based cloning and expression of genes in Escherichia coli can have several problems: plasmid destabilization; toxicity of gene products; inability to achieve complete repression of gene expression; non-physiological overexpression of the cloned gene; titration of regulatory proteins; and the requirement for antibiotic selection. We describe a simple system for cloning and expression of genes in single copy in the E. coli chromosome, using a non-antibiotic selection for transgene insertion. The transgene is inserted into a vector containing homology to the chromosomal region flanking the attachment site for phage lambda. This vector is then linearized and introduced into a recombination-proficient E. coli strain carrying a temperature-sensitive lambda prophage. Selection for replacement of the prophage with the transgene is performed at high temperature. Once in the chromosome, transgenes can be moved into other lysogenic E. coli strains using standard phage-mediated transduction techniques, selecting against a resident prophage. Additional vector constructs provide an arabinose-inducible promoter (P(BAD)), P(BAD) plus a translation-initiation sequence, and optional chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, or kanamycin-resistance cassettes. These Transgenic E. coli Vectors (TGV) allow drug-free, single-copy expression of genes from the E. coli chromosome, and are useful for genetic studies of gene function.

  9. iGC-an integrated analysis package of gene expression and copy number alteration.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Pin; Wang, Liang-Bo; Wang, Wei-An; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chuang, Eric Y

    2017-01-14

    With the advancement in high-throughput technologies, researchers can simultaneously investigate gene expression and copy number alteration (CNA) data from individual patients at a lower cost. Traditional analysis methods analyze each type of data individually and integrate their results using Venn diagrams. Challenges arise, however, when the results are irreproducible and inconsistent across multiple platforms. To address these issues, one possible approach is to concurrently analyze both gene expression profiling and CNAs in the same individual. We have developed an open-source R/Bioconductor package (iGC). Multiple input formats are supported and users can define their own criteria for identifying differentially expressed genes driven by CNAs. The analysis of two real microarray datasets demonstrated that the CNA-driven genes identified by the iGC package showed significantly higher Pearson correlation coefficients with their gene expression levels and copy numbers than those genes located in a genomic region with CNA. Compared with the Venn diagram approach, the iGC package showed better performance. The iGC package is effective and useful for identifying CNA-driven genes. By simultaneously considering both comparative genomic and transcriptomic data, it can provide better understanding of biological and medical questions. The iGC package's source code and manual are freely available at https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/iGC.html .

  10. Human papillomavirus DNA in plasma of patients with HPV16 DNA-positive uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takako; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Nishida, Noriyuki; Yamasaki, Kentaro; Miura, Kiyonori; Katamine, Shigeru; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2010-05-01

    The squamous cell carcinoma antigen is considered the most accurate serologic tumor marker for uterine cervical carcinoma. However, serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels were found to correlate significantly with clinical severity of atopic dermatitis and chronic renal failure. The present study was conducted in patients with human papillomavirus 16 DNA-positive uterine cervical cancer to determine the plasma level of human papillomavirus 16 DNA and the diagnostic values of plasma human papillomavirus DNA in these patients. Forty-three human papillomavirus 16-positive patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma were recruited in this study. The diagnosis was cervical cancer in 20 patients, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in 21, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in 1 and negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy in 3 patients. Before any treatment, blood samples were collected from all patients. For analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in plasma of patients with cervical cancer, quantitative polymerase chain reaction fluorescent assay for human papillomavirus 16 was performed using human papillomavirus 16 primers and SYBR Green dye using the LightCycler 480 SW1.5 apparatus. Plasma human papillomavirus 16 DNA was detected in only 30.0% of the patients with human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer and in none of normal controls. The copy number of plasma human papillomavirus 16 DNA was higher in patients with invasive cancer than in those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN3), micro-invasive cancer and in normal individuals. These results indicated that the plasma human papillomavirus DNA level could be potentially used as a marker of low-invasive cervical cancer tumors in patients with normal squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels before treatment.

  11. Inference of plasmid-copy-number mean and noise from single-cell gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghozzi, Stéphane; Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    Plasmids are extrachromosomal DNA molecules which code for their own replication. We previously reported a setup using genes coding for fluorescent proteins of two colors that allowed us, using a simple model, to extract the plasmid-copy-number noise in a monoclonal population of bacteria [J. Wong Ng , Phys. Rev. E 81, 011909 (2010)10.1103/PhysRevE.81.011909]. Here we present a detailed calculation relating this noise to the measured levels of fluorescence, taking into account all sources of fluorescence fluctuations: not only the fluctuation of gene expression as in the simple model but also the growth and division of bacteria, the nonuniform distribution of their ages, the random partition of proteins at divisions, and the replication and partition of plasmids and chromosome. We show how to use the chromosome as a reference, which helps extracting the plasmid-copy-number noise in a self-consistent manner.

  12. HLA-DRB1*1501 and HLA-DQB1*0301 alleles are positively associated with HPV16 infection-related Kazakh esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Xinjiang China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianming; Li, Ling; Pang, Lijuan; Chen, Yunzhao; Yang, Lan; Liu, Chunxia; Zhao, Jin; Chang, Bing; Qi, Yan; Liang, Weihua; Li, Feng

    2012-11-01

    Multiple determinant factors are involved in the occurrence and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Human papillomavirus (HPV) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism were identified as important factors. This study examined the associations between the development of Kazakh ESCC and the determinant factors including HLA-DRB1*0901, 1501; DQB1*0301, 0602; high-risk HPV infection in the area of Xinjiang, China. 200 Kazakh patients with ESCC and 150 controls were recruited, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect HLA-DRB1*0901, 1501 and DQB1*0301,0602 using sequence-specific primers (SSPs). HPV16 was detected in esophageal specimens using PCR. HPV16 infection rate in Kazakh ESCC case group was 41 %, significantly higher than that of control group 14 % (OR = 3.62; 95 % CI, 2.15-6.09; P < 0.001). A positive association between ESCC and HLA-DRB1*1501 (OR = 2.46, P < 0.0125) or HLA-DQB1*0301 (OR = 3.34, P < 0.0125) alleles was observed. Similar tendencies were observed for HLA-DRB1*1501 (OR = 3.095, P < 0.0125) and HLA-DQB1*0301 (OR = 2.410, P < 0.0125) alleles with HPV16-positive ESCC. HLA-DRB1*1501, HLA-DQB1*0301 and DQB1*0602 were significantly associated with ESCC when the age was ≥55 years (P < 0.0125 for all), whereas only HLA-DQB1*0301 was significantly associated with ESCC when the age was <55 years (P < 0.0125). HLA-DRB1*1501 and HLA-DQB1*0301 were significantly associated with an increase in ESCC occurrence in females (P < 0.0125), whereas only HLA-DQB1*0301 was significantly associated with ESCC in males. Moreover, the occurrence of HLA-DQB1*0602 gene in poorly differentiated ESCC group (68.8 %) was slightly higher than that of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma group (31.2 %). The difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.0125). The study suggests that HLA-DRB1*1501 and HLA-DQB1*0301 may influence the immune response to specific tumor and HPV-encoded epitopes and affect the risk of Kazakh

  13. Divergent gene copies in the asexual class Bdelloidea (Rotifera) separated before the bdelloid radiation or within bdelloid families.

    PubMed

    Mark Welch, David B; Cummings, Michael P; Hillis, David M; Meselson, Matthew

    2004-02-10

    Rotifers of the asexual class Bdelloidea are unusual in possessing two or more divergent copies of every gene that has been examined. Phylogenetic analysis of the heat-shock gene hsp82 and the TATA-box-binding protein gene tbp in multiple bdelloid species suggested that for each gene, each copy belonged to one of two lineages that began to diverge before the bdelloid radiation. Such gene trees are consistent with the two lineages having descended from former alleles that began to diverge after meiotic segregation ceased or from subgenomes of an alloploid ancestor of the bdelloids. However, the original analyses of bdelloid gene-copy divergence used only a single outgroup species and were based on parsimony and neighbor joining. We have now used maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods and, for hsp82, multiple outgroups in an attempt to produce more robust gene trees. Here we report that the available data do not unambiguously discriminate between gene trees that root the origin of hsp82 and tbp copy divergence before the bdelloid radiation and those which indicate that the gene copies began to diverge within bdelloid families. The remarkable presence of multiple diverged gene copies in individual genomes is nevertheless consistent with the loss of sex in an ancient ancestor of bdelloids.

  14. Divergent gene copies in the asexual class Bdelloidea (Rotifera) separated before the bdelloid radiation or within bdelloid families

    PubMed Central

    Welch, David B. Mark; Cummings, Michael P.; Hillis, David M.; Meselson, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Rotifers of the asexual class Bdelloidea are unusual in possessing two or more divergent copies of every gene that has been examined. Phylogenetic analysis of the heat-shock gene hsp82 and the TATA-box-binding protein gene tbp in multiple bdelloid species suggested that for each gene, each copy belonged to one of two lineages that began to diverge before the bdelloid radiation. Such gene trees are consistent with the two lineages having descended from former alleles that began to diverge after meiotic segregation ceased or from subgenomes of an alloploid ancestor of the bdelloids. However, the original analyses of bdelloid gene-copy divergence used only a single outgroup species and were based on parsimony and neighbor joining. We have now used maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods and, for hsp82, multiple outgroups in an attempt to produce more robust gene trees. Here we report that the available data do not unambiguously discriminate between gene trees that root the origin of hsp82 and tbp copy divergence before the bdelloid radiation and those which indicate that the gene copies began to diverge within bdelloid families. The remarkable presence of multiple diverged gene copies in individual genomes is nevertheless consistent with the loss of sex in an ancient ancestor of bdelloids. PMID:14747660

  15. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  16. Compensation for differences in gene copy number among yeast ribosomal proteins is encoded within their promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Lubling, Yaniv; Shipony, Zohar; Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Keren, Leeat; Levo, Michal; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes is key for controlling cell growth. In yeast, it is unclear how this regulation achieves the required equimolar amounts of the different RP components, given that some RP genes exist in duplicate copies, while others have only one copy. Here, we tested whether the solution to this challenge is partly encoded within the DNA sequence of the RP promoters, by fusing 110 different RP promoters to a fluorescent gene reporter, allowing us to robustly detect differences in their promoter activities that are as small as ∼10%. We found that single-copy RP promoters have significantly higher activities, suggesting that proper RP stoichiometry is indeed partly encoded within the RP promoters. Notably, we also partially uncovered how this regulation is encoded by finding that RP promoters with higher activity have more nucleosome-disfavoring sequences and characteristic spatial organizations of these sequences and of binding sites for key RP regulators. Mutations in these elements result in a significant decrease of RP promoter activity. Thus, our results suggest that intrinsic (DNA-dependent) nucleosome organization may be a key mechanism by which genomes encode biologically meaningful promoter activities. Our approach can readily be applied to uncover how transcriptional programs of other promoters are encoded. PMID:22009988

  17. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-08-08

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine's effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery