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Sample records for hrp type iii

  1. Interplay among Pseudomonas syringae HrpR, HrpS and HrpV proteins for regulation of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Milija; Lawton, Edward; Schumacher, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, a plant pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, employs the type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease in tomato and Arabidopsis and to induce the hypersensitive response in nonhost plants. The expression of T3SS is regulated by the HrpL extracytoplasmic sigma factor. Expression of HrpL is controlled by transcriptional activators HrpR and HrpS and negative regulator HrpV. In this study, we analysed the organization of HrpRS and HrpV regulatory proteins and interplay between them. We identified one key residue I26 in HrpS required for repression by HrpV. Substitution of I26 in HrpS abolishes its interaction with HrpV and impairs interactions between HrpS and HrpR and the self-association of HrpS. We show that HrpS self-associates and can associate simultaneously with HrpR and HrpV. We now propose that HrpS has a central role in the assembly of the regulatory HrpRSV complex. Deletion analysis of HrpR and HrpS proteins showed that C-terminal parts of HrpR and HrpS confer determinants indispensable for their self-assembly. PMID:24863420

  2. HrpG and HrpV proteins from the Type III secretion system of Erwinia amylovora form a stable heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Anastasia D; Charova, Spyridoula; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Panopoulos, Nicholas J; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are specialized multicomponent nanomachines that mediate the transport of proteins either to extracellular locations or directly into eukaryotic host cell cytoplasm. Erwinia amylovora, the main agent of rosaceous plants fireblight disease, employs an Hrp/Hrc1 T3SS to accomplish its pathogenesis. The regulatory network that controls the activation of this T3SS is largely unknown in E. amylovora. However, in Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the HrpG/HrpV complex has been shown to directly regulate the activity of transcription factor HrpS and consequently the upregulation of the Hrp/Hrc1 T3SS related genes. In this work, we report the successful recombinant production and purification of a stable E. amylovora HrpG/HrpV complex, using pPROpET, a bicistronic expression vector. Furthermore, we present the first solution structure of this complex based on small-angle X-ray scattering data.

  3. The Xanthomonas Hrp type III system secretes proteins from plant and mammalian bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, Ombeline; Wengelnik, Kai; Hahn, Karoline; Bonas, Ulla

    1999-01-01

    Studies of essential pathogenicity determinants in Gram-negative bacteria have revealed the conservation of type III protein secretion systems that allow delivery of virulence factors into host cells from plant and animal pathogens. Ten of 21 Hrp proteins of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria have been suggested to be part of a type III machinery. Here, we report the hrp-dependent secretion of two avirulence proteins, AvrBs3 and AvrRxv, by X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strains that constitutively express hrp genes. Secretion occurred without leakage of a cytoplasmic marker in minimal medium containing BSA, at pH 5.4. Secretion was strictly hrp-dependent because a mutant carrying a deletion in hrcV, a conserved hrp gene, did not secrete AvrBs3 and AvrRxv. Moreover, the Hrp system of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was able to secrete proteins from two other plant pathogens: PopA, a protein secreted via the Hrp system in Ralstonia solanacearum, and AvrB, an avirulence protein from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Interestingly, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria also secreted YopE, a type III-secreted cytotoxin of the mammalian pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in a hrp-dependent manner. YerA, a YopE-specific chaperone, was required for YopE stability but not for secretion in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Our results demonstrate the functional conservation of the type III system of X. campestris for secretion of proteins from both plant and mammalian pathogens and imply recognition of their respective secretion signals. PMID:10430949

  4. Use of dominant-negative HrpA mutants to dissect Hrp pilus assembly and type III secretion in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Hoon; Kolade, Olatomirin O; Nomura, Kinya; Arvidson, Dennis N; He, Sheng Yang

    2005-06-03

    The Hrp pilus plays an essential role in the long-distance type III translocation of effector proteins from bacteria into plant cells. HrpA is the structural subunit of the Hrp pilus in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Little is known about the molecular features in the HrpA protein for pilus assembly or for transporting effector proteins. From previous collections of nonfunctional HrpA derivatives that carry random pentapeptide insertions or single amino acid mutations, we identified several dominant-negative mutants that blocked the ability of wild-type Pst DC3000 to elicit host responses. The dominant-negative phenotype was correlated with the disappearance of the Hrp pilus in culture and inhibition of wild-type HrpA protein self-assembly in vitro. Dominant-negative HrpA mutants can be grouped into two functional classes: one class exerted a strong dominant-negative effect on the secretion of effector proteins AvrPto and HopPtoM in culture, and the other did not. The two classes of mutant HrpA proteins carry pentapeptide insertions in discrete regions, which are interrupted by insertions without a dominant-negative effect. These results enable prediction of possible subunit-subunit interaction sites in the assembly of the Hrp pilus and suggest the usefulness of dominant-negative mutants in dissection of the role of the wild-type HrpA protein in various stages of type III translocation: protein exit across the bacterial cell wall, the assembly and/or stabilization of the Hrp pilus in the extracellular space, and Hrp pilus-mediated long-distance transport beyond the bacterial cell wall.

  5. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP)-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL. In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF) recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses. PMID:28119474

  6. Molecular Characterization of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii HrpY, a Conserved Response Regulator of the Hrp Type III Secretion System, and its Interaction with the hrpS Promoter†

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Massimo; Majerczak, Doris R.; Zianni, Michael; Tessanne, Kimberly; Coplin, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii is a bacterial pathogen of corn. Its pathogenicity depends on the translocation of effector proteins into host cells by the Hrp type III secretion system. We previously showed by genetic analysis that the HrpX sensor kinase and the HrpY response regulator are at the head of a complex cascade of regulators controlling hrp/hrc secretion and wts effector genes. This cascade also includes the HrpS response regulator and the HrpL alternative sigma factor. These regulators are shared among many important plant pathogens in the genera Pantoea, Erwinia, and Pseudomonas. In this study, we dissect the regulatory elements in the hrpS promoter region, using genetic and biochemical approaches, and show how it integrates various environmental signals, only some of which are dependent on phosphorylation of HrpY. Primer extension located the transcriptional start site of hrpS at a σ70 promoter 601 bp upstream of the open reading frame. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting analysis demonstrated that HrpY binds to conserved regulatory elements immediately adjacent to this promoter, and its binding affinity was increased by phosphorylation at D57. A consensus sequence for the two direct repeats bound by HrpY is proposed. Deletion analysis of the promoter region revealed that both the HrpY binding site and additional sequences farther upstream, including a putative integration host factor binding site, are required for hrpS expression. This finding suggests that other unknown regulatory proteins may act cooperatively with HrpY. PMID:16816181

  7. Derivative of plant phenolic compound inhibits the type III secretion system of Dickeya dadantii via HrpX/HrpY two-component signal transduction and Rsm systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hutchins, William; Wu, Xiaogang; Liang, Cuirong; Zhang, Chengfang; Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Chen, Xin; Che, Yizhou; Wang, Qi; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-02-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence factor in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and represents a particularly appealing target for antimicrobial agents. Previous studies have shown that the plant phenolic compound p-coumaric acid (PCA) plays a role in the inhibition of T3SS expression of the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii 3937. This study screened a series of derivatives of plant phenolic compounds and identified that trans-4-hydroxycinnamohydroxamic acid (TS103) has an eight-fold higher inhibitory potency than PCA on the T3SS of D. dadantii. The effect of TS103 on regulatory components of the T3SS was further elucidated. Our results suggest that TS103 inhibits HrpY phosphorylation and leads to reduced levels of hrpS and hrpL transcripts. In addition, through a reduction in the RNA levels of the regulatory small RNA RsmB, TS103 also inhibits hrpL at the post-transcriptional level via the rsmB-RsmA regulatory pathway. Finally, TS103 inhibits hrpL transcription and mRNA stability, which leads to reduced expression of HrpL regulon genes, such as hrpA and hrpN. To our knowledge, this is the first inhibitor to affect the T3SS through both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways in the soft-rot phytopathogen D. dadantii 3937. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  8. The type III-dependent Hrp pilus is required for productive interaction of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria with pepper host plants.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ernst; Ojanen-Reuhs, Tuula; Huguet, Elisabeth; Hause, Gerd; Romantschuk, Martin; Korhonen, Timo K; Bonas, Ulla; Koebnik, Ralf

    2005-04-01

    The plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria expresses a type III secretion system that is necessary for both pathogenicity in susceptible hosts and the induction of the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. This specialized protein transport system is encoded by a 23-kb hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene cluster. Here we show that X. campestris pv. vesicatoria produces filamentous structures, the Hrp pili, at the cell surface under hrp-inducing conditions. Analysis of purified Hrp pili and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the major component of the Hrp pilus is the HrpE protein which is encoded in the hrp gene cluster. Sequence homologues of hrpE are only found in other xanthomonads. However, hrpE is syntenic to the hrpY gene from another plant pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that all major Hrp pilus subunits from gram-negative plant pathogens may share the same structural organization, i.e., a predominant alpha-helical structure. Analysis of nonpolar mutants in hrpE demonstrated that the Hrp pilus is essential for the productive interaction of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria with pepper host plants. Furthermore, a functional Hrp pilus is required for type III-dependent protein secretion. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that type III-secreted proteins, such as HrpF and AvrBs3, are in close contact with the Hrp pilus during and/or after their secretion. By systematic analysis of nonpolar hrp/hrc (hrp conserved) and hpa (hrp associated) mutants, we found that Hpa proteins as well as the translocon protein HrpF are dispensable for pilus assembly, while all other Hrp and Hrc proteins are required. Hence, there are no other conserved Hrp or Hrc proteins that act downstream of HrpE during type III-dependent protein translocation.

  9. HrcT is a key component of the type III secretion system in Xanthomonas spp. and also regulates the expression of the key hrp transcriptional activator HrpX.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yang; Zou, Li-Fang; Xue, Xiao-Bo; Cai, Lu-Lu; Ma, Wen-Xiu; Xiong, Li; Ji, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Gong-You

    2014-07-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS), encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes in Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria, delivers repertoires of T3SS effectors (T3SEs) into plant cells to trigger the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost or resistant-host plants and promote pathogenicity in susceptible plants. The expression of hrp genes in Xanthomonas is regulated by two key regulatory proteins, HrpG and HrpX. However, the interactions between hrp gene products in directing T3SE secretion are largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that HrcT of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola functions as a T3SS component and positively regulates the expression of hrpX. Transcription of hrcT occurs via two distinct promoters; one (T1) is with the hrpB operon and the second (T3) within hrpB7 Via either promoter T1 or T3, the defect in Hrp phenotype by hrcT deletion was corrected in the presence of hrcT only from Xanthomonas species but not from other phytopathogenic bacteria. An N-terminally truncated HrcT was able to bind the hrpX promoter and activate the expression of hrpX, supporting that HrcT is a positive regulator of hrpX. A revised model showing the regulatory interactions between HrcT, HrpX, and HrpG is proposed.

  10. Identification of 17 HrpX-regulated proteins including two novel type III effectors, XOC_3956 and XOC_1550, in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-bo; Zou, Li-fang; Ma, Wen-xiu; Liu, Zhi-yang; Chen, Gong-you

    2014-01-01

    The function of some hypothetical proteins, possibly regulated by key hrp regulators, in the pathogenicity of phytopathogenic bacteria remains largely unknown. In the present study, in silicon microarray data demonstrated that the expression of 17 HrpX-regulated protein (Xrp) genes of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc), which causes bacterial leaf streak in rice, were either positively or negatively regulated by HrpX or/and HrpG. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that five Xrps possess a putative type III secretion (T3S) signal in the first 50 N-terminal amino acids, six xrp genes contain a PIP-box-like sequence (TTCGB-NX-TTCGB, 9 ≤ X ≤ 25) in the promoter regions, and two Xrps have both motifs. Twelve Xrps are widely conserved in Xanthomonas spp., whereas four are specific for X. oryzae (Xrp6) or Xoc (Xrp8, Xrp14 and Xrp17). In addition to the regulation by HrpG/HrpX, some of the 17 genes were also modulated by another hrp regulator HrpD6. Mutagenesis of these 17 genes indicated that five Xrps (Xrp1, Xrp2, Xrp5, Xrp8 and Xrp14) were required for full virulence and bacterial growth in planta. Immunoblotting assays and fusion with N-terminally truncated AvrXa10 indicated that Xrp3 and Xrp5 were secreted and translocated into rice cells through the type-III secretion system (T3S), suggesting they are novel T3S effectors. Our results suggest that Xoc exploits an orchestra of proteins that are regulated by HrpG, HrpX and HrpD6, and these proteins facilitate both infection and metabolism.

  11. Structure-Function Analysis of the HrpB2-HrcU Interaction in the Xanthomonas citri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Paola A.; dos Santos, Rafael Freitas; do Amaral, Alexandre M.; Homem, Rafael Augusto; dos Santos Souza, Thaís; Machado, Marcos A.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion systems deliver protein virulence factors to host cells. Here we characterize the interaction between HrpB2, a small protein secreted by the Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type III secretion system, and the cytosolic domain of the inner membrane protein HrcU, a paralog of the flagellar protein FlhB. We show that a recombinant fragment corresponding to the C-terminal cytosolic domain of HrcU produced in E. coli suffers cleavage within a conserved Asn264-Pro265-Thr266-His267 (NPTH) sequence. A recombinant HrcU cytosolic domain with N264A, P265A, T266A mutations at the cleavage site (HrcUAAAH) was not cleaved and interacted with HrpB2. Furthermore, a polypeptide corresponding to the sequence following the NPTH cleavage site also interacted with HrpB2 indicating that the site for interaction is located after the NPTH site. Non-polar deletion mutants of the hrcU and hrpB2 genes resulted in a total loss of pathogenicity in susceptible citrus plants and disease symptoms could be recovered by expression of HrpB2 and HrcU from extrachromossomal plasmids. Complementation of the ΔhrcU mutant with HrcUAAAH produced canker lesions similar to those observed when complemented with wild-type HrcU. HrpB2 secretion however, was significantly reduced in the ΔhrcU mutant complemented with HrcUAAAH, suggesting that an intact and cleavable NPTH site in HrcU is necessary for total functionally of T3SS in X. citri subsp. citri. Complementation of the ΔhrpB2 X. citri subsp. citri strain with a series of hrpB2 gene mutants revealed that the highly conserved HrpB2 C-terminus is essential for T3SS-dependent development of citrus canker symptoms in planta. PMID:21408079

  12. Characterization of HrpB2 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria identifies protein regions that are essential for type III secretion pilus formation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nadine; Schulz, Steve; Lorenz, Christian; Fraas, Simone; Hause, Gerd; Büttner, Daniela

    2012-05-01

    The Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria employs a type III secretion (T3S) system to translocate effector proteins into plant cells. T3S depends on HrpB2, which is essential for assembly of the extracellular T3S pilus and is itself weakly secreted. To characterize the role of HrpB2, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach, which led to the insertion of pentapeptide-encoding sequences into hrpB2. Complementation studies with HrpB2 mutant derivatives revealed that the N-terminal region of HrpB2 tolerates pentapeptide insertions, whereas insertions in the regions spanning amino acids 60-74 and 93-130, respectively, resulted in a loss of bacterial pathogenicity and T3S, including secretion of HrpB2 itself. The C-terminal region (amino acids 93-130) of HrpB2 contains a conserved VxTLxK amino acid motif that is also present in predicted inner rod proteins from animal-pathogenic bacteria and is required for the contribution of HrpB2 to pilus assembly and T3S. Electron microscopy and fractionation studies revealed that HrpB2 is not a component of the extracellular pilus structure but localizes to the bacterial periplasm and the outer membrane. We therefore propose that the essential contribution of HrpB2 to T3S and pilus assembly is linked to its possible function as a periplasmic component of the T3S system at the base of the pilus.

  13. Pseudomonas syringae strains naturally lacking the classical P. syringae hrp/hrc Locus are common leaf colonizers equipped with an atypical type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Cai, Rongman; Studholme, David J; Guttman, David S; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is best known as a plant pathogen that causes disease by translocating immune-suppressing effector proteins into plant cells through a type III secretion system (T3SS). However, P. syringae strains belonging to a newly described phylogenetic subgroup (group 2c) are missing the canonical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster coding for a T3SS, flanking effector loci, and any close orthologue of known P. syringae effectors. Nonetheless, P. syringae group 2c strains are common leaf colonizers and grow on some tested plant species to population densities higher than those obtained by other P. syringae strains on nonhost species. Moreover, group 2c strains have genes necessary for the production of phytotoxins, have an ice nucleation gene, and, most interestingly, contain a novel hrp/hrc cluster, which is only distantly related to the canonical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster. This hrp/hrc cluster appears to encode a functional T3SS although the genes hrpK and hrpS, present in the classical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster, are missing. The genome sequence of a representative group 2c strain also revealed distant orthologues of the P. syringae effector genes avrE1 and hopM1 and the P. aeruginosa effector genes exoU and exoY. A putative life cycle for group 2c P. syringae is discussed.

  14. Type III-Dependent Translocation of HrpB2 by a Nonpathogenic hpaABC Mutant of the Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Scheibner, Felix; Schulz, Steve; Hausner, Jens; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria employs a type III secretion (T3S) system to translocate effector proteins into plant cells. The T3S apparatus spans both bacterial membranes and is associated with an extracellular pilus and a channel-like translocon in the host plasma membrane. T3S is controlled by the switch protein HpaC, which suppresses secretion and translocation of the predicted inner rod protein HrpB2 and promotes secretion of translocon and effector proteins. We previously reported that HrpB2 interacts with HpaC and the cytoplasmic domain of the inner membrane protein HrcU (C. Lorenz, S. Schulz, T. Wolsch, O. Rossier, U. Bonas, and D. Büttner, PLoS Pathog 4:e1000094, 2008, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000094). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the control of HrpB2 secretion are not yet understood. Here, we located a T3S and translocation signal in the N-terminal 40 amino acids of HrpB2. The results of complementation experiments with HrpB2 deletion derivatives revealed that the T3S signal of HrpB2 is essential for protein function. Furthermore, interaction studies showed that the N-terminal region of HrpB2 interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of HrcU, suggesting that the T3S signal of HrpB2 contributes to substrate docking. Translocation of HrpB2 is suppressed not only by HpaC but also by the T3S chaperone HpaB and its secreted regulator, HpaA. Deletion of hpaA, hpaB, and hpaC leads to a loss of pathogenicity but allows the translocation of fusion proteins between the HrpB2 T3S signal and effector proteins into leaves of host and non-host plants. IMPORTANCE The T3S system of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria is essential for pathogenicity and delivers effector proteins into plant cells. T3S depends on HrpB2, which is a component of the predicted periplasmic inner rod structure of the secretion apparatus. HrpB2 is secreted during the early stages of the

  15. HrcU and HrpP are pathogenicity factors in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora required for the type III secretion of DspA/E.

    PubMed

    McNally, R Ryan; Zeng, Quan; Sundin, George W

    2016-05-20

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens mediate host-microbe interactions via utilization of the type III secretion (T3S) system. The T3S system is a complex molecular machine consisting of more than 20 proteins. Collectively, these proteins translocate effectors across extracellular space and into the host cytoplasm. Successful translocation requires timely synthesis and allocation of both structural and secreted T3S proteins. Based on amino acid conservation in animal pathogenic bacteria, HrcU and HrpP were examined for their roles in regulation of T3S hierarchy. Both HrcU and HrpP were shown to be required for disease development in an immature pear infection model and respective mutants were unable to induce a hypersensitive response in tobacco. Using in vitro western blot analyses, both proteins were also shown to be required for the secretion of DspA/E, a type 3 effector and an important pathogenicity factor. Via yeast-two hybridization (Y2H), HrpP and HrcU were revealed to exhibit protein-protein binding. Finally, all HrcU and HrpP phenotypes identified were shown to be dependent on a conserved amino acid motif in the cytoplasmic tail of HrcU. Collectively, these data demonstrate roles for HrcU and HrpP in regulating T3S and represent the first attempt in understanding T3S heirarchy in E. amylovora.

  16. GamR, the LysR-Type Galactose Metabolism Regulator, Regulates hrp Gene Expression via Transcriptional Activation of Two Key hrp Regulators, HrpG and HrpX, in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, M. Mamunur; Ikawa, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight of rice. For the virulence of the bacterium, the hrp genes, encoding components of the type III secretion system, are indispensable. The expression of hrp genes is regulated by two key hrp regulators, HrpG and HrpX: HrpG regulates hrpX, and HrpX regulates other hrp genes. Several other regulators have been shown to be involved in the regulation of hrp genes. Here, we found that a LysR-type transcriptional regulator that we named GamR, encoded by XOO_2767 of X. oryzae pv. oryzae strain MAFF311018, positively regulated the transcription of both hrpG and hrpX, which are adjacent to each other but have opposite orientations, with an intergenic upstream region in common. In a gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay, GamR bound directly to the middle of the upstream region common to hrpG and hrpX. The loss of either GamR or its binding sites decreased hrpG and hrpX expression. Also, GamR bound to the upstream region of either a galactose metabolism-related gene (XOO_2768) or a galactose metabolism-related operon (XOO_2768 to XOO_2771) located next to gamR itself and positively regulated the genes. The deletion of the regulator gene resulted in less bacterial growth in a synthetic medium with galactose as a sole sugar source. Interestingly, induction of the galactose metabolism-related gene was dependent on galactose, while that of the hrp regulator genes was galactose independent. Our results indicate that the LysR-type transcriptional regulator that regulates the galactose metabolism-related gene(s) also acts in positive regulation of two key hrp regulators and the following hrp genes in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. IMPORTANCE The expression of hrp genes encoding components of the type III secretion system is essential for the virulence of many plant-pathogenic bacteria, including Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. It is specifically induced during infection. Research has revealed that in this

  17. Elucidation of the Regulon and cis-Acting Regulatory Element of HrpB, the AraC-Type Regulator of a Plant Pathogen-Like Type III Secretion System in Burkholderia pseudomallei▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Lyla; Schell, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei possesses multiple type III secretion system (T3SS) gene clusters. One of these, the B. pseudomallei T3SS2 (T3SS2bp) gene cluster, which apparently plays no role in animal virulence, is also found in six additional Burkholderia spp. and is very similar to T3SSs found in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas spp. and Ralstonia solanacearum. The T3SS2bp gene cluster also encodes an AraC-type regulatory protein (HrpBbp) that is an ortholog of HrpB, the master regulator of the R. solanacearum T3SS (T3SSrso) and its secreted effectors. Transcriptome analysis showed that HrpBbp activates the expression of T3SS2bp genes, as well as their orthologs in R. solanacearum. In addition to activating T3SS2bp, HrpBbp also upregulates the expression of ∼30 additional B. pseudomallei genes, including some that may confer production of adhesive pili, a polyketide toxin, several putative T3SS2bp-secreted effectors, and components of a regulatory cascade. T3SS2bp promoter regions were found to contain a conserved DNA motif (p2bp box) identical in sequence and position to the hrpII box required for HrpB-dependent T3SSrso transcription activation. The p2bp box is also present in the promoter regions of the essentially identical T3SS found in the very closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis (T3SS2bt). Analysis of p2bp box mutants showed that it is essential for HrpBbp-mediated transcription activation in both species. Although it has been suggested that T3SS2bp and T3SS2bt may function in phytopathogenicity, we were unable to demonstrate a phytopathogenic phenotype for B. thailandensis in three different plant hosts. PMID:21335458

  18. Specific Binding of the Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria AraC-Type Transcriptional Activator HrpX to Plant-Inducible Promoter Boxes▿

    PubMed Central

    Koebnik, Ralf; Krüger, Antje; Thieme, Frank; Urban, Alexander; Bonas, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenicity of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria depends on a type III secretion system which is encoded by the 23-kb hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene cluster. Expression of the hrp operons is strongly induced in planta and in a special minimal medium and depends on two regulatory proteins, HrpG and HrpX. In this study, DNA affinity enrichment was used to demonstrate that the AraC-type transcriptional activator HrpX binds to a conserved cis-regulatory element, the plant-inducible promoter (PIP) box (TTCGC-N15-TTCGC), present in the promoter regions of four hrp operons. No binding of HrpX was observed when DNA fragments lacking a PIP box were used. HrpX also bound to a DNA fragment containing an imperfect PIP box (TTCGC-N8-TTCGT). Dinucleotide replacements in each half-site of the PIP box strongly decreased binding of HrpX, while simultaneous dinucleotide replacements in both half-sites completely abolished binding. Based on the complete genome sequence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, putative plant-inducible promoters consisting of a PIP box and a −10 promoter motif were identified in the promoter regions of almost all HrpX-activated genes. Bioinformatic analyses and reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed novel HrpX-dependent genes, among them a NUDIX hydrolase gene and several genes with a predicted role in the degradation of the plant cell wall. We conclude that HrpX is the most downstream component of the hrp regulatory cascade, which is proposed to directly activate most genes of the hrpX regulon via binding to corresponding PIP boxes. PMID:16936021

  19. Drosophila hnRNP A1 homologs Hrp36/Hrp38 enhance U2-type versus U12-type splicing to regulate alternative splicing of the prospero twintron.

    PubMed

    Borah, Sumit; Wong, Anthony C; Steitz, Joan A

    2009-02-24

    During Drosophila embryogenesis, the transcription factor Prospero is critical for neuronal differentiation and axonal outgrowth. The prospero pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing, but is unique in that it harbors a rare twintron whereby one intron lies embedded within another. The innermost intron is excised by the major U2-type spliceosome and the outermost is excised by the minor U12-type spliceosome. Previously, an intronic purine-rich element (PRE) was identified as an enhancer of both U2- and U12-type splicing, with a greater effect on the U2-type pathway. We find that the PRE binds Drosophila homologs of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1, Hrp38 and Hrp36. RNAi-mediated knockdown of these proteins in S2 cells specifically decreases U2-type splicing of the twintron, which is surprising because hnRNPs usually are repressive. Conversely, tethering Hrp38 to the twintron increases U2-type splicing. Thus, developmentally regulated alternative splicing of the prospero twintron can be explained by documented changes in the abundance of these hnRNP A1-like proteins during embryogenesis.

  20. HrpG and HrpX play global roles in coordinating different virulence traits of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinping; Figueiredo, Francisco; Jones, Jeffery; Wang, Nian

    2011-06-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is the causal agent of citrus canker, which is one of the most serious diseases of citrus. To understand the virulence mechanisms of X. axonopodis pv. citri, we designed and conducted genome-wide microarray analyses to characterize the HrpG and HrpX regulons, which are critical for the pathogenicity of X. axonopodis pv. citri. Our analyses revealed that 232 and 181 genes belonged to the HrpG and HrpX regulons, respectively. In total, 123 genes were overlapped in the two regulons at any of the three selected timepoints representing three growth stages of X. axonopodis pv. citri in XVM2 medium. Our results showed that HrpG and HrpX regulated all 24 type III secretion system genes, 23 type III secretion system effector genes, and 29 type II secretion system substrate genes. Our data revealed that X. axonopodis pv. citri regulates multiple cellular activities responding to the host environment, such as amino acid biosynthesis; oxidative phosphorylation; pentose-phosphate pathway; transport of sugar, iron, and potassium; and phenolic catabolism, through HrpX and HrpG. We found that 124 and 90 unknown genes were controlled by HrpG and HrpX, respectively. Our results suggest that HrpG and HrpX interplay with a global signaling network and co-ordinate the expression of multiple virulence factors for modification and adaption of host environment during X. axonopodis pv. citri infection.

  1. Domain structure of HrpE, the Hrp pilus subunit of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ernst; Koebnik, Ralf

    2005-09-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria possesses a type III secretion (TTS) system necessary for pathogenicity in susceptible hosts and induction of the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. This specialized protein transport system is encoded by a 23-kb hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene cluster. X. campestris pv. vesicatoria produces filamentous structures, Hrp pili, at the cell surface under hrp-inducing conditions. The Hrp pilus acts as a cell surface appendage of the TTS system and serves as a conduit for the transfer of bacterial effector proteins into the plant cell cytosol. The major pilus component, the HrpE pilin, is unique to xanthomonads and is encoded within the hrp gene cluster. In this study, functional domains of HrpE were mapped by linker-scanning mutagenesis and by reporter protein fusions to an N-terminally truncated avirulence protein (AvrBs3Delta2). Thirteen five-amino-acid peptide insertion mutants were obtained and could be grouped into six phenotypic classes. Three permissive mutations were mapped in the N-terminal half of HrpE, which is weakly conserved within the HrpE protein family. Four dominant-negative peptide insertions in the strongly conserved C-terminal region suggest that this domain is critical for oligomerization of the pilus subunits. Reporter protein fusions revealed that the N-terminal 17 amino acid residues act as an efficient TTS signal. From these results, we postulate a three-domain structure of HrpE with an N-terminal secretion signal, a surface-exposed variable region of the N-terminal half, and a C-terminal polymerization domain. Comparisons with a mutant study of HrpA, the Hrp pilin from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and hydrophobicity plot analyses of several nonhomologous Hrp pilins suggest a common architecture of Hrp pilins of different plant-pathogenic bacteria.

  2. A novel regulatory role of HrpD6 in regulating hrp-hrc-hpa genes in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Rong; Zou, Hua-Song; Che, Yi-Zhou; Cui, Yi-Ping; Guo, Wei; Zou, Li-Fang; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Biddle, Eulandria M; Yang, Ching-Hong; Chen, Gong-You

    2011-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, the causal agent of bacterial leaf streak in the model plant rice, possesses a hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp), hrp-conserved (hrc), hrp-associated (hpa) cluster (hrp-hrc-hpa) that encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) through which T3SS effectors are injected into host cells to cause disease or trigger plant defenses. Mutations in this cluster usually abolish the bacterial ability to cause hypersensitive response in nonhost tobacco and pathogenicity in host rice. In Xanthomonas spp., these genes are generally assumed to be regulated by the key master regulators HrpG and HrpX. However, we present evidence that, apart from HrpG and HrpX, HrpD6 is also involved in regulating the expression of hrp genes. Interestingly, the expression of hpa2, hpa1, hpaB, hrcC, and hrcT is positively controlled by HrpD6. Transcriptional expression assays demonstrated that the expression of the hrcC, hrpD5, hrpE, and hpa3 genes was not completely abolished by hrpG and hrpX mutations. As observed in analysis of their corresponding mutants, HrpG and HrpX exhibit contrasting gene regulation, particularly for hpa2 and hrcT. Other two-component system regulators (Zur, LrpX, ColR/S, and Trh) did not completely inhibit the expression of hrcC, hrpD5, hrpE, and hpa3. Immunoblotting assays showed that the secretion of HrpF, which is an HpaB-independent translocator, is not affected by the mutation in hrpD6. However, the mutation in hrpD6 affects the secretion of an HpaB-dependent TAL effector, AvrXa27. These novel findings suggest that, apart from HrpG and HrpX, HrpD6 plays important roles not only in the regulation of hrp genes but also in the secretion of TAL effectors.

  3. [Establishment of the hrp-inducing systems for the expression of the hrp genes of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola].

    PubMed

    Xiao, You-lun; Li, Yu-rong; Liu, Zhi-yang; Xiang, Yong; Chen, Gong-you

    2007-06-01

    The hrp genes of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xooc), which is the causal agent of bacterial leaf streak in rice, possesses the ability to elicit hypersensitive response on nonhost plants and the pathogenicity in host rice. In order to analyze the function of the hrp genes, we developed hrp-inducing systems using transcriptional hrp: :gfp fusions with the promoters of hrpX and hpa 1 of Xooc. The levels of GFP protein expression indicated that the hrp gene expression in Xooc was not efficiently induced in NB medium, but efficiently in XOM3 medium. Using the hrpG and hrpX mutants of Xooc as the controls, the results by RT-PCR demonstrated that in wild type strain the expression of the hpa1 gene was suppressed in NB medium, but was increased in XOM3 medium. When incubated in XOM3, the expression of the hpa1 gene was abolished in hrpX mutant, while the level of the hpa1 gene expression was lower in the hrpG mutant than that in wild-type strain. More importantly, it was found that the induction of the hrp gene expression was strongly increased in response to rice suspension cells and callus in this study. This suggests that the hrp-inducing systems, XOM3 or rice suspension cells or rice callus, for the induction of the hrp genes expression be useful for functionally analyzing the hrp genes, mining effectors secreted by the type III secretion apparatus and understanding pathogenicity determinats of Xooc.

  4. Molecular analysis of the hrp gene cluster in Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae KACC10859.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Jung; Park, Young-Jin; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Yeong-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Song, Eun-Sung; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Moo

    2008-06-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae is the causal agent of rice bacterial blight. The plant pathogenic bacterium X. oryzae pv. oryzae expresses a type III secretion system that is necessary for both the pathogenicity in susceptible hosts and the induction of the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. This specialized protein transport system is encoded by a 32.18kb hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene cluster. The hrp gene cluster is composed of nine hrp, nine hrc (hrp conserved) and eight hpa (hrp-associated) genes and is controlled by HrpG and HrpX, which are known as regulators of the hrp gene cluster. Before mutational analysis of these hrp genes, the transcriptional linkages of the core region of the hrp gene cluster from hpaB to hrcC of the X. oryzae pv. oryzae KACC10859 was determined and the non-polarity of EZTn5 insertional mutagenesis was demonstrated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Pathogenicity assays of these non-polar hrp mutants were carried out on the susceptible rice cultivar, Milyang-23. According to the results of these assays, all hrp-hrc, except hrpF, and hpaB mutants lost their pathogenicity, which indicates that most hrp-hrc genes encode essential pathogenicity factors. On the other hand, most hpa mutants showed decreased virulence in a different pattern, i.e., hpa genes are not essential but are important for pathogenicity.

  5. Characterization of the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines Hrp pathogenicity island.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Gun; Park, Byoung Keun; Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jeon, Eunkyung; Oh, Jonghee; Hwang, Ingyu

    2003-05-01

    We sequenced an approximately 29-kb region from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines that contained the Hrp type III secretion system, and we characterized the genes in this region by Tn3-gus mutagenesis and gene expression analyses. From the region, hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) and hrc (hrp and conserved) genes, which encode type III secretion systems, and hpa (hrp-associated) genes were identified. The characteristics of the region, such as the presence of many virulence genes, low G+C content, and bordering tRNA genes, satisfied the criteria for a pathogenicity island (PAI) in a bacterium. The PAI was composed of nine hrp, nine hrc, and eight hpa genes with seven plant-inducible promoter boxes. The hrp and hrc mutants failed to elicit hypersensitive responses in pepper plants but induced hypersensitive responses in all tomato plants tested. The Hrp PAI of X. axonopodis pv. glycines resembled the Hrp PAIs of other Xanthomonas species, and the Hrp PAI core region was highly conserved. However, in contrast to the PAI of Pseudomonas syringae, the regions upstream and downstream from the Hrp PAI core region showed variability in the xanthomonads. In addition, we demonstrate that HpaG, which is located in the Hrp PAI region of X. axonopodis pv. glycines, is a response elicitor. Purified HpaG elicited hypersensitive responses at a concentration of 1.0 micro M in pepper, tobacco, and Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Cvi-0 by acting as a type III secreted effector protein. However, HpaG failed to elicit hypersensitive responses in tomato, Chinese cabbage, and A. thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Ler. This is the first report to show that the harpin-like effector protein of Xanthomonas species exhibits elicitor activity.

  6. Characterization of the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines Hrp Pathogenicity Island

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Gun; Park, Byoung Keun; Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jeon, Eunkyung; Oh, Jonghee; Hwang, Ingyu

    2003-01-01

    We sequenced an approximately 29-kb region from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines that contained the Hrp type III secretion system, and we characterized the genes in this region by Tn3-gus mutagenesis and gene expression analyses. From the region, hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) and hrc (hrp and conserved) genes, which encode type III secretion systems, and hpa (hrp-associated) genes were identified. The characteristics of the region, such as the presence of many virulence genes, low G+C content, and bordering tRNA genes, satisfied the criteria for a pathogenicity island (PAI) in a bacterium. The PAI was composed of nine hrp, nine hrc, and eight hpa genes with seven plant-inducible promoter boxes. The hrp and hrc mutants failed to elicit hypersensitive responses in pepper plants but induced hypersensitive responses in all tomato plants tested. The Hrp PAI of X. axonopodis pv. glycines resembled the Hrp PAIs of other Xanthomonas species, and the Hrp PAI core region was highly conserved. However, in contrast to the PAI of Pseudomonas syringae, the regions upstream and downstream from the Hrp PAI core region showed variability in the xanthomonads. In addition, we demonstrate that HpaG, which is located in the Hrp PAI region of X. axonopodis pv. glycines, is a response elicitor. Purified HpaG elicited hypersensitive responses at a concentration of 1.0 μM in pepper, tobacco, and Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Cvi-0 by acting as a type III secreted effector protein. However, HpaG failed to elicit hypersensitive responses in tomato, Chinese cabbage, and A. thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Ler. This is the first report to show that the harpin-like effector protein of Xanthomonas species exhibits elicitor activity. PMID:12730176

  7. Characterization of the hrpF pathogenicity peninsula of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Akiko; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F

    2005-06-01

    The hrp gene cluster of Xanthomonas spp. contains genes for the assembly and function of a type III secretion system (TTSS). The hrpF genes reside in a region between hpaB and the right end of the hrp cluster. The region of the hrpF gene of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is bounded by two IS elements and also contains a homolog of hpaF of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria and two newly identified genes, hpa3 and hpa4. A comparison of the hrp gene clusters of different species of Xanthomonas revealed that the hrpF region is a constant yet more variable peninsula of the hrp pathogenicity island. Mutations in hpaF, hpa3, and hpa4 had no effect on virulence, whereas hrpF mutants were severely reduced in virulence on susceptible rice cultivars. The hrpF genes from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, X. campestris pv. campestris, and X. axonopodis pv. citri each were capable of restoring virulence to the hrpF mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Correspondingly, none of the Xanthomonas pathovars with hrpF from X. oryzae pv. oryzae elicited a hypersensitive reaction in their respective hosts. Therefore, no evidence was found for hrpF as a host-specialization factor. In contrast to the loss of Bs3-dependent reactions by hrpF mutants of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, hrpF mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae with either avrXa10 or avrXa7 elicited hypersensitive reactions in rice cultivars with the corresponding R genes. A double hrpFxoo-hpa1 mutant also elicited an Xa10-dependent resistance reaction. Thus, loss of hrpF, hpal, or both may reduce delivery or effectiveness of type III effectors. However, the mutations did not completely prevent the delivery of effectors from X. oryzae pv. oryzae into the host cells.

  8. Genetic characterization of the HrpL regulon of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora reveals novel virulence factors.

    PubMed

    McNally, R Ryan; Toth, Ian K; Cock, Peter J A; Pritchard, Leighton; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny A; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2012-02-01

    The bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, an economically significant disease of apple and pear. Disease initiation by E. amylovora requires the translocation of effector proteins into host cells via the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS). The alternative sigma factor HrpL positively regulates the transcription of structural and translocated components of the T3SS via hrp promoter elements. To characterize genome-wide HrpL-dependent gene expression in E. amylovora Ea1189, wild-type and Ea1189ΔhrpL strains were cultured in hrp-inducing minimal medium, and total RNA was compared using a custom microarray designed to represent the annotated genes of E. amylovora ATCC 49946. The results revealed 24 genes differentially regulated in Ea1189ΔhrpL relative to Ea1189 with fold-change expression ratios greater than 1.5; of these, 19 genes exhibited decreased transcript abundance and five genes showed increased transcript abundance relative to Ea1189. To expand our understanding of the HrpL regulon and to elucidate direct versus indirect HrpL-mediated effects on gene expression, the genome of E. amylovora ATCC 49946 was examined in silico using a hidden Markov model assembled from known Erwinia spp. hrp promoters. This technique identified 15 putative type III novel hrp promoters, seven of which were validated with quantitative polymerase chain reaction based on expression analyses. It was found that HrpL-regulated genes encode all known components of the hrp T3SS, as well as five putative type III effectors. Eight genes displayed apparent indirect HrpL regulation, suggesting that the HrpL regulon is connected to downstream signalling networks. The construction of deletion mutants of three novel HrpL-regulated genes resulted in the identification of additional virulence factors as well as mutants displaying abnormal motility and biofilm phenotypes.

  9. Sequence and expression analysis of the hrpB pathogenicity operon of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria which encodes eight proteins with similarity to components of the Hrp, Ysc, Spa, and Fli secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Fenselau, S; Bonas, U

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we describe the molecular characterization of hrpB, the largest operon in the Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria hrp cluster. The hrpB region encompasses 6 kb and encodes eight putative proteins, seven of which were expressed in Escherichia coli. The HrpB3 protein is the only one carrying a signal peptide sequence at the N-terminus and is a putative lipoprotein localized in the outer membrane of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The HrpB4 and HrpB8 proteins contain one and five putative transmembrane domains, respectively, and are most likely associated with the inner membrane. The HrpB3, HrpB5, HrpB6, and HrpB8 proteins show sequence similarity to putative components of different type III protein secretion pathways in bacteria. Examples include Hrp proteins from other plant pathogens, YscJ, YscN, YscL, and YscT of Yersinia spp., and MxiJ, Spa47, adn Spa29 of Shigella flexneri. The transcription start site and the hrpB promoter was identified. The minimal hrpB promoter region of 90 bp contains a novel sequence motif, the PIP-box, which might play a role in transcription activation of the hrpB operon and possibly other plant-induced genes of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria.

  10. Functional analysis of Ralstonia solanacearum PrhG regulating the hrp regulon in host plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Li; Yoshimochi, Takeshi; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2013-08-01

    Genes in the hrp regulon encode component proteins of the type III secretion system and are essential for the pathogenicity of Ralstonia solanacearum. The hrp regulon is controlled by HrpB. We isolated several genes regulating hrpB expression from the Japanese strain OE1-1 using minitransposon mutagenesis. Among them, we mainly focused on two genes, hrpG and prhG, which are the positive regulators of hrpB. Although the global virulence regulator PhcA negatively regulated hrpG expression via prhIR, it positively regulated prhG expression. We further investigated the contrasting regulation of hrpG and prhG by PhcA and speculated that R. solanacearum may switch from HrpG to PrhG for hrpB activation in a cell density-dependent manner. Although the prhG mutant proliferated similarly to the wild-type in leaf intercellular spaces and in xylem vessels of the host plants, it was less virulent than the wild-type. The expression of the popA operon, which belongs to the hrp regulon, was significantly reduced in the prhG mutant by more than half in the leaf intercellular spaces and more than two-thirds in the xylem vessels when compared with the wild-type.

  11. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Florencia A; Garofalo, Cecilia G; Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR family's response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction.

  12. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR family’s response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction. PMID:25961560

  13. 10 CFR 712.12 - HRP implementation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the HRP process: supervisory review, medical assessment, management evaluation (which includes random drug and alcohol testing), and a DOE personnel security determination; and (iii) Include the HRP... purpose of limiting access) the appropriate HRP management official of a personnel security action that...

  14. New protein-protein interactions identified for the regulatory and structural components and substrates of the type III Secretion system of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis Pathovar citri.

    PubMed

    Alegria, Marcos C; Docena, Cassia; Khater, Leticia; Ramos, Carlos H I; da Silva, Ana C R; Farah, Chuck S

    2004-09-01

    We have initiated a project to identify protein-protein interactions involved in the pathogenicity of the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. Using a yeast two-hybrid system based on Gal4 DNA-binding and activation domains, we have focused on identifying interactions involving subunits, regulators, and substrates of the type III secretion system coded by the hrp (for hypersensitive response and pathogenicity), hrc (for hrp conserved), and hpa (for hrp associated) genes. We have identified several previously uncharacterized interactions involving (i) HrpG, a two-component system response regulator responsible for the expression of X. axonopodis pv. citri hrp operons, and XAC0095, a previously uncharacterized protein encountered only in Xanthomonas spp.; (ii) HpaA, a protein secreted by the type III secretion system, HpaB, and the C-terminal domain of HrcV; (iii) HrpB1, HrpD6, and HrpW; and (iv) HrpB2 and HrcU. Homotropic interactions were also identified for the ATPase HrcN. These newly identified protein-protein interactions increase our understanding of the functional integration of phytopathogen-specific type III secretion system components and suggest new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying Xanthomonas pathogenicity.

  15. New Protein-Protein Interactions Identified for the Regulatory and Structural Components and Substrates of the Type III Secretion System of the Phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis Pathovar citri

    PubMed Central

    Alegria, Marcos C.; Docena, Cassia; Khater, Leticia; Ramos, Carlos H. I.; da Silva, Ana C. R.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2004-01-01

    We have initiated a project to identify protein-protein interactions involved in the pathogenicity of the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. Using a yeast two-hybrid system based on Gal4 DNA-binding and activation domains, we have focused on identifying interactions involving subunits, regulators, and substrates of the type III secretion system coded by the hrp (for hypersensitive response and pathogenicity), hrc (for hrp conserved), and hpa (for hrp associated) genes. We have identified several previously uncharacterized interactions involving (i) HrpG, a two-component system response regulator responsible for the expression of X. axonopodis pv. citri hrp operons, and XAC0095, a previously uncharacterized protein encountered only in Xanthomonas spp.; (ii) HpaA, a protein secreted by the type III secretion system, HpaB, and the C-terminal domain of HrcV; (iii) HrpB1, HrpD6, and HrpW; and (iv) HrpB2 and HrcU. Homotropic interactions were also identified for the ATPase HrcN. These newly identified protein-protein interactions increase our understanding of the functional integration of phytopathogen-specific type III secretion system components and suggest new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying Xanthomonas pathogenicity. PMID:15342589

  16. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  17. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  18. Proteomic analysis of the proteins regulated by HrpB from the plant pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia glumae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yongsung; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Hongsup; Lim, Jae Yun; Kim, Minkyun; Kwak, Jangyul; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu

    2008-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria transfer effector proteins into plant cells via the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III protein secretion system (T3SS) during infection. The genes encoding the Hrp T3SS are expressed only under plant apoplast-mimicking conditions in an AraC-type transcriptional activator HrpB-dependent manner. To identify the proteins controlled by HrpB in Burkholderia glumae in vitro, we constitutively expressed hrpB and analyzed the proteins showing altered expression using 2-DE and ESI-MS/MS. Among 46 proteins exhibiting consistently altered expression, which were encoded by 34 different genes, 34 were secretory proteins and 12 were cytoplasmic. Twenty-eight of the secreted proteins showed increased accumulation, whereas the other six showed decreased accumulation. None of the HrpB-dependent proteins had significant homology to known T3SS-dependent proteins, except for HrpK from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and two T3SS-associated cytoplasmic proteins from Ralstonia solanacearum. Twenty-one of the 34 genes had putative HrpB-binding sequences in their upstream regulatory regions. Secretion of all 34 extracellular proteins was independent of the Hrp T3SS, and 16 were secreted via a type II protein secretion system (T2SS). Mutants lacking the T2SS or Hrp T3SS produced toxoflavin but were less virulent to rice panicles, indicating the importance of these proteins in pathogenicity.

  19. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  20. HrpN of Erwinia amylovora functions in the translocation of DspA/E into plant cells.

    PubMed

    Bocsanczy, Ana M; Nissinen, Riitta M; Oh, Chang-Sik; Beer, Steven V

    2008-07-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is required by plant pathogenic bacteria for the translocation of certain bacterial proteins to the cytoplasm of plant cells or secretion of some proteins to the apoplast. The T3SS of Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight of pear, apple and other rosaceous plants, secretes DspA/E, which is an indispensable pathogenicity factor. Several other proteins, including HrpN, a critical virulence factor, are also secreted by the T3SS. Using a CyaA reporter system, we demonstrated that DspA/E is translocated into the cells of Nicotiana tabacum'Xanthi'. To determine if other T3-secreted proteins are needed for translocation of DspA/E, we examined its translocation in several mutants of E. amylovora strain Ea321. DspA/E was translocated by both hrpW and hrpK mutants, although with some delay, indicating that these two proteins are dispensable in the translocation of DspA/E. Remarkably, translocation of DspA/E was essentially abolished in both hrpN and hrpJ mutants; however, secretion of DspA/E into medium was not affected in any of the mentioned mutants. In contrast to the more virulent strain Ea273, secretion of HrpN was abolished in a hrpJ mutant of strain Ea321. In addition, HrpN was weakly translocated into plant cytoplasm. These results suggest that HrpN plays a significant role in the translocation of DspA/E, and HrpJ affects the translocation of DspA/E by affecting secretion or stability of HrpN. Taken together, these results explain the critical importance of HrpN and HrpJ to the development of fire blight.

  1. Genomics and transcriptomics of Xanthomonas campestris species challenge the concept of core type III effectome.

    PubMed

    Roux, Brice; Bolot, Stéphanie; Guy, Endrick; Denancé, Nicolas; Lautier, Martine; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Portier, Perrine; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Gagnevin, Lionel; Pruvost, Olivier; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu; Carrère, Sébastien; Koebnik, Ralf; Noël, Laurent D

    2015-11-18

    The bacterial species Xanthomonas campestris infects a wide range of Brassicaceae. Specific pathovars of this species cause black rot (pv. campestris), bacterial blight of stock (pv. incanae) or bacterial leaf spot (pv. raphani). In this study, we extended the genomic coverage of the species by sequencing and annotating the genomes of strains from pathovar incanae (CFBP 1606R and CFBP 2527R), pathovar raphani (CFBP 5828R) and a pathovar formerly named barbareae (CFBP 5825R). While comparative analyses identified a large core ORFeome at the species level, the core type III effectome was limited to only three putative type III effectors (XopP, XopF1 and XopAL1). In Xanthomonas, these effector proteins are injected inside the plant cells by the type III secretion system and contribute collectively to virulence. A deep and strand-specific RNA sequencing strategy was adopted in order to experimentally refine genome annotation for strain CFBP 5828R. This approach also allowed the experimental definition of novel ORFs and non-coding RNA transcripts. Using a constitutively active allele of hrpG, a master regulator of the type III secretion system, a HrpG-dependent regulon of 141 genes co-regulated with the type III secretion system was identified. Importantly, all these genes but seven are positively regulated by HrpG and 56 of those encode components of the Hrp type III secretion system and putative effector proteins. This dataset is an important resource to mine for novel type III effector proteins as well as for bacterial genes which could contribute to pathogenicity of X. campestris.

  2. Global analysis of the HrpL regulon in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 reveals new regulon members with diverse functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is required for virulence in the gram-negative plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The alternative sigma factor HrpL directly regulates expression of T3SS genes via a consensus promoter sequence, often designated as the “hrp promoter.” Although...

  3. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  4. An H-NS-like protein involved in the negative regulation of hrp genes in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kametani-Ikawa, Yumi; Tsuge, Seiji; Furutani, Ayako; Ochiai, Hirokazu

    2011-06-01

    hrp genes encode components of a type III secretion (T3S) system and play crucial roles in the pathogenicity of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). A histone-like nucleoid-structuring (H-NS) protein binds DNA and acts as a global transcriptional repressor. Here, we investigated the involvement of an h-ns-like gene, named xrvB, in the expression of hrp genes in Xoo. Under the hrp-inducing culture condition, the expression of a key hrp regulator HrpG increased in the XrvB mutant, followed by activation of the downstream gene expression. Also, in planta, the secretion of a T3S protein (XopR) was activated by the mutation in xrvB. Gel retardation assay indicated that XrvB has DNA-binding activity, but without a preference for the promoter region of hrpG. The results suggest that XrvB negatively regulates hrp gene expression and that an unknown factor(s) mediates the regulation of hrpG expression by XrvB.

  5. prhKLM genes of Ralstonia solanacearum encode novel activators of hrp regulon and are required for pathogenesis in tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2011-04-01

    The genes in the hrp regulon encode the proteins composing type III secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum. The hrp regulon is positively controlled by HrpB, and hrpB expression is activated by both HrpG and PrhG. We have identified three genes, prhK, prhL, and prhM, which positively control the hrp regulon in strain OE1-1. These genes are likely to form an operon, and this operon is well conserved in the genera Ralstonia and Burkholderia. This indicates that the operon is not specific to the plant pathogens. Mutations in each of these three genes abolished hrpB and prhG expression. prhK, prhL, and prhM mutant strains lost pathogenicity toward tomato completely, and they were less virulent toward tobacco. PrhK and PrhL share sequence similarity with allophanate hydrolase and PrhM with LamB. This suggests that the three gene products are not transcriptional regulators in the strict sense, but regulate hrp regulon indirectly. This novel class of virulence-related genes will mark the beginning of new findings regarding the overall infection mode of R. solanacearum.

  6. Review of HRP Positions

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Reliability Studies

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Human Reliability Program (HRP), published as 10 CFR Part 712, is currently being reviewed and revised to address concerns identified during its implementation. Although these ''page changes'' primarily incorporate clarification of terms and language, the following discussion relates to broadening the definition of positions that require HRP certification that is found in {section}712.10.

  7. Erwinia amylovora Expresses Fast and Simultaneously hrp/dsp Virulence Genes during Flower Infection on Apple Trees

    PubMed Central

    Pester, Doris; Milčevičová, Renáta; Schaffer, Johann; Wilhelm, Eva; Blümel, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Background Pathogen entry through host blossoms is the predominant infection pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora leading to manifestation of the disease fire blight. Like in other economically important plant pathogens, E. amylovora pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system encoded by hrp genes. However, timing and transcriptional order of hrp gene expression during flower infections are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using quantitative real-time PCR analyses, we addressed the questions of how fast, strong and uniform key hrp virulence genes and the effector dspA/E are expressed when bacteria enter flowers provided with the full defense mechanism of the apple plant. In non-invasive bacterial inoculations of apple flowers still attached to the tree, E. amylovora activated expression of key type III secretion genes in a narrow time window, mounting in a single expression peak of all investigated hrp/dspA/E genes around 24–48 h post inoculation (hpi). This single expression peak coincided with a single depression in the plant PR-1 expression at 24 hpi indicating transient manipulation of the salicylic acid pathway as one target of E. amylovora type III effectors. Expression of hrp/dspA/E genes was highly correlated to expression of the regulator hrpL and relative transcript abundances followed the ratio: hrpA>hrpN>hrpL>dspA/E. Acidic conditions (pH 4) in flower infections led to reduced virulence/effector gene expression without the typical expression peak observed under natural conditions (pH 7). Conclusion/Significance The simultaneous expression of hrpL, hrpA, hrpN, and the effector dspA/E during early floral infection indicates that speed and immediate effector transmission is important for successful plant invasion. When this delicate balance is disturbed, e.g., by acidic pH during infection, virulence gene expression is reduced, thus partly explaining the efficacy of acidification in fire blight control on a molecular

  8. Jovian type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    Radio bursts have been observed in the Voyager plasma wave data from Jupiter that bear a striking resemblance to solar type III radio bursts. The emissions lie in the frequency range near 10 kHz, have durations of a minute or so, and occur in a set of periodically spaced bursts. The spacing between primary bursts is typically 15 min, but the bursts may have additional components which recur on time scales of about 3 min. The similarity with solar type III radio bursts suggests a source mechanism involving the movement of energetic electrons through a density gradient in the plasma surrounding Jupiter. The periodicity of bursts suggests Io may be involved in the generation of waves, since the timing is similar to the Alfven wave travel time from one hemisphere to the other through the Io torus.

  9. A novel sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor based on GR-3D Au and aptamer-AuNPs-HRP for sensitive detection of oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wei; Leng, Xueqi; Wang, Hongzhi; Guo, Yuna; Huang, Jiadong

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, a novel sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor has been fabricated and applied for sensitive and selective detection of antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC). This sensor was based on graphene-three dimensional nanostructure gold nanocomposite (GR-3D Au) and aptamer-AuNPs-horseradish peroxidase (aptamer-AuNPs-HRP) nanoprobes as signal amplification. Firstly, GR-3D Au film was modified on glassy carbon electrode only by one-step electrochemical coreduction with graphite oxide (GO) and HAuCl4 at cathodic potentials, which enhanced the electron transfer and loading capacity of biomolecules. Then the aptamer and HRP modified Au nanoparticles provide high affinity and ultrasensitive electrochemical probe with excellent specificity for OTC. Under the optimized conditions, the peak current was linearly proportional to the concentration of OTC in the range of 5×10(-10)-2×10(-3)gL(-1), with a detection limit of 4.98×10(-10)gL(-1). Additionally, this aptasensor had the advantages in high sensitivity, superb specificity and showed good recovery in synthetic samples. Hence, the developed sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor might provide a useful and practical tool for OTC determination and related food safety analysis and clinical diagnosis.

  10. Identification of six type III effector genes with the PIP box in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris and five of them contribute individually to full pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Jiang, Bo-Le; Xu, Rong-Qi; Huang, Jun-Ding; Wei, Hong-Yu; Jiang, Guo-Feng; Cen, Wei-Jian; Liu, Jiao; Ge, Ying-Ying; Li, Guang-Hua; Su, Li-Li; Hang, Xiao-Hong; Tang, Dong-Jie; Lu, Guang-Tao; Feng, Jia-Xun; He, Yong-Qiang; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2009-11-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is the pathogen of black rot of cruciferous plants. The pathogenicity of the pathogen depends on the type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates directly effector proteins into plant cells, where they play important roles in the molecular interaction between the pathogen and its hosts. The T3SS of Xanthomonas spp. is encoded by a cluster of hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes. It has been demonstrated that the expression of hrp genes and some type III secreted (T3S)-effector genes is coactivated by the key hrp regulatory protein HrpX. The regulation by HrpX can be mediated by the binding of HrpX protein to a cis-regulatory element named the plant-inducible promoter (PIP) box present in the promoter region of HrpX-regulated genes. A genome screen revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris 8004 possesses 56 predicted genes with the PIP box. Nine of these genes have been shown to encode T3S effectors, Hrp, and Hrp-associated proteins. In this study, we employed an established T3S effector translocation assay with the hypersensitive-reaction-inducing domain of X. campestris pv. campestris AvrBs1 as a reporter to characterize the remaining 47 genes with the PIP box and showed that 6 of them, designated as XopXccE1, XopXccP, XopXccQ, XopXccR1, XopXccLR, and AvrXccB, harbor a functional translocation signal in their N-terminal regions, indicating that they are T3S effectors of X. campestris pv. campestris. We provided evidence to demonstrate that all these effectors are expressed in an HrpX-dependent manner and their translocation into plant cells relies on the translocon protein HrpF and the chaperone HpaB. Mutational analyses demonstrated that all these effectors, except AvrXccB, are individually required for full virulence and growth of X. campestris pv. campestris in the host plant Chinese radish.

  11. Identification of novel type III secretion effectors in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Ayako; Takaoka, Minako; Sanada, Harumi; Noguchi, Yukari; Oku, Takashi; Tsuno, Kazunori; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Tsuge, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria secrete so-called effector proteins via a type III secretion (T3S) system. Through genome screening for genes encoding potential T3S effectors, 60 candidates were selected from rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae MAFF311018 using these criteria: i) homologs of known T3S effectors in plant-pathogenic bacteria, ii) genes with expression regulated by hrp regulatory protein HrpX, or iii) proteins with N-terminal amino acid patterns associated with T3S substrates of Pseudomonas syringae. Of effector candidates tested with the Bordetella pertussis calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter for translocation into plant cells, 16 proteins were translocated in a T3S system-dependent manner. Of these 16 proteins, nine were homologs of known effectors in other plant-pathogenic bacteria and seven were not. Most of the effectors were widely conserved in Xanthomonas spp.; however, some were specific to X. oryzae. Interestingly, all these effectors were expressed in an HrpX-dependent manner, suggesting coregulation of effectors and the T3S system. In X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, HpaB and HpaC (HpaP in X. oryzae pv. oryzae) have a central role in recruiting T3S substrates to the secretion apparatus. Secretion of all but one effector was reduced in both HpaB() and HpaP() mutant strains, indicating that HpaB and HpaP are widely involved in efficient secretion of the effectors.

  12. Genetic organization of the hrp genes cluster in Erwinia pyrifoliae and characterization of HR active domains in HrpNEp protein by mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rosemary; Park, Duck Hwan; Cho, Jun Mo; Cho, Saeyoull; Wilson, Calum; Hwang, Ingyu; Hur, Jang Hyun; Lim, Chun Keun

    2008-02-29

    The disease-specific (dsp) region and the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes, including the hrpW, hrpNEp, and hrpC operons have previously been sequenced in Erwinia pyrifoliae WT3 [Shrestha et al. (2005a)]. In this study, the remaining hrp genes, including the hrpC, hrpA, hrpS, hrpXY, hrpL and hrpJ operons, were determined. The hrp genes cluster (ca. 38 kb) was comprised of eight transcriptional units and contained nine hrc (hrp conserved) genes. The genetic organization of the hrp/hrc genes and their orientation for the transcriptions were also similar to and collinear with those of E. amylovora, showing > or = 80% homologies. However, ORFU1 and ORFU2 of unknown functions, present between the hrpA and hrpS operons of E. amylovora, were absent in E. pyrifoliae. To determine the HR active domains, several proteins were prepared from truncated fragments of the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions of HrpN(Ep) protein of E. pyrifoliae. The proteins prepared from the N-terminal region elicited HR, but not from those of the C-terminal region indicating that HR active domains are located in only N-terminal region of the HrpN(Ep) protein. Two synthetic oligopeptides produced HR on tobacco confirming presence of two HR active domains in the HrpN(Ep). The HR positive N-terminal fragment (HN delta C187) was further narrowed down by deleting C-terminal amino acids and internal amino acids to investigate whether amino acid insertion region have role in faster and stronger HR activity in HrpN(Ep) than HrpN(Ea). The HrpN(Ep) mutant proteins HN delta C187 (D1AIR), HN delta C187 (D2AIR) and HN delta C187 (DM41) retained similar HR activation to that of wild-type HrpN(Ep). However, the HrpN(Ep) mutant protein HN delta C187 (D3AIR) lacking third amino acid insertion region (102 to 113 aa) reduced HR when compared to that of wild-type HrpN(Ep). Reduction in HR elicitation could not be observed when single amino acids at different positions were substituted at third

  13. Global regulatory networks control the hrp regulon of the gall-forming bacterium Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Panijel, Mary; Chalupowicz, Laura; Sessa, Guido; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Barash, Isaac

    2013-09-01

    Gall formation by Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae is dependent on the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system. Previous studies demonstrated that PagR and PagI, regulators of the quorum-sensing system, induce expression of the hrp regulatory cascade (i.e., hrpXY, hrpS, and hrpL) that activates the HrpL regulon. Here, we isolated the genes of the Gac/Rsm global regulatory pathway (i.e., gacS, gacA, rsmB, and csrD) and of the post-transcriptional regulator rsmA. Our results demonstrate that PagR and PagI also upregulate expression of the Gac/Rsm pathway. PagR acts as a transcriptional activator of each of the hrp regulatory genes and gacA in a N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone-dependent manner as shown by gel shift experiments. Mutants of the Gac/Rsm genes or overexpression of rsmA significantly reduced Pantoea agglomerans virulence and colonization of gypsophila. Overexpression of rsmB sRNA abolished gall formation, colonization, and hypersensitive reaction on nonhost plants and prevented transcription of the hrp regulatory cascade, indicating a lack of functional type III secretion system. Expression of rsmB sRNA in the background of the csrD null mutant suggests that CsrD may act as a safeguard for preventing excessive production of rsmB sRNA. Results presented indicate that the hrp regulatory cascade is controlled directly by PagR and indirectly by RsmA, whereas deficiency in RsmA activity is epistatic to PagR induction.

  14. The Type III secretion system of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans is involved in the phyllosphere colonization process and in transmission to seeds of susceptible beans.

    PubMed

    Darsonval, A; Darrasse, A; Meyer, D; Demarty, M; Durand, K; Bureau, C; Manceau, C; Jacques, M-A

    2008-05-01

    Understanding the survival, multiplication, and transmission to seeds of plant pathogenic bacteria is central to study their pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the type III secretion system (T3SS), encoded by hrp genes, could have a role in host colonization by plant pathogenic bacteria. The seed-borne pathogen Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans causes common bacterial blight of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Directed mutagenesis in strain CFBP4834-R of X. fuscans subsp. fuscans and bacterial population density monitoring on bean leaves showed that strains with mutations in the hrp regulatory genes, hrpG and hrpX, were impaired in their phyllospheric growth, as in the null interaction with Escherichia coli C600 and bean. In the compatible interaction, CFBP4834-R reached high phyllospheric population densities and was transmitted to seeds at high frequencies with high densities. Strains with mutations in structural hrp genes maintained the same constant epiphytic population densities (1 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) of fresh weight) as in the incompatible interaction with Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 and the bean. Low frequencies of transmission to seeds and low bacterial concentrations were recorded for CFBP4834-R hrp mutants and for ATCC 33913, whereas E. coli C600 was not transmitted. Moreover, unlike the wild-type strain, strains with mutations in hrp genes were not transmitted to seeds by vascular pathway. Transmission to seeds by floral structures remained possible for both. This study revealed the involvement of the X. fuscans subsp. fuscans T3SS in phyllospheric multiplication and systemic colonization of bean, leading to transmission to seeds. Our findings suggest a major contribution of hrp regulatory genes in host colonization processes.

  15. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis is essential for HrpZ harpin secretion in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Min; Long, Deliang; He, Huoguang; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall is important phytopathogenic bacterium of stone fruit trees, and able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants. The HrpZ, secreted via type III secretion system (T3SS) to the extracellular space of the plant, is a T3SS-dependent protein and a sole T3SS effector able to induce the host defense response outside host cells. We deleted the phosphatidylcholine synthase gene (pcs) of P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336, and found that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to synthesize phosphatidylcholine and elicit a typical HR in soybean. Further studies showed that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin but could express HrpZ protein in cytoplasm as effectively as the wild type. To confirm if phosphatidylcholine affects HrpZ harpin secretion, we introduced the hrpZ gene into the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593 and the 593 pcs(-) mutant, which were unable to express HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in tobacco or soybean. Western blotting and HR assay showed that the 593H not only secreted HrpZ harpin but also caused a strong HR in tobacco and soybean. In contrast, the 593 pcs(-)H only expressed HrpZ protein in its cytoplasm at the wild type level, but did not secrete HrpZ harpin or elicit HR reaction. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine is essential for the secretion of HrpZ harpin in P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall and other Pseudomonas strains.

  16. Type III secretion chaperones of Pseudomonas syringae protect effectors from Lon-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana C; Hutcheson, Steven W

    2005-02-01

    The hrp type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae translocates effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Proteolysis of HrpR by Lon has been shown to negatively regulate the hrp TTSS. The inability to bypass Lon-associated effects on the regulatory system by ectopic expression of the known regulators suggested a second site of action for Lon in TTSS-dependent effector secretion. In this study we report that TTSS-dependent effectors are subject to the proteolytic degradation that appears to be rate-limiting to secretion. The half-lives of the effectors AvrPto, AvrRpt2, HopPsyA, HopPsyB1, HopPtoB2, HopPsyV1, HopPtoG and HopPtoM were substantially higher in bacteria lacking Lon. TTSS-dependent secretion of several effectors was enhanced from Lon mutants. A primary role for chaperones appears to be protection of effectors from Lon-associated degradation prior to secretion. When coexpressed with their cognate chaperone, HopPsyB1, HopPsyV1 and HopPtoM were at least 10 times more stable in strains expressing Lon. Distinct Lon-targeting and chaperone-binding domains were identified in HopPtoM. The results imply that Lon is involved at two distinct levels in the regulation of the P. syringae TTSS: regulation of assembly of the secreton and modulation of effector secretion.

  17. Decameter Type III-Like Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

  18. Cyanoacrylate glue for type iii lad perforation.

    PubMed

    Trehan, V K; Nigam, Arima

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery perforation especially type III is a rare and catastrophic complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. It mandates emergency open heart surgery if hemostasis is not achieved promptly. We report a case of type III left anterior descending artery (LAD) perforation which was managed successfully with cyanoacrylate glue.

  19. Type III Secretion in the Melioidosis Pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Vander Broek, Charles W.; Stevens, Joanne M.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of both humans and animals. Melioidosis is an emerging disease which is predicted to be vastly under-reported. Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are critical virulence factors in Gram negative pathogens of plants and animals. The genome of B. pseudomallei encodes three T3SSs. T3SS-1 and -2, of which little is known, are homologous to Hrp2 secretion systems of the plant pathogens Ralstonia and Xanthomonas. T3SS-3 is better characterized and is homologous to the Inv/Mxi-Spa secretion systems of Salmonella spp. and Shigella flexneri, respectively. Upon entry into the host cell, B. pseudomallei requires T3SS-3 for efficient escape from the endosome. T3SS-3 is also required for full virulence in both hamster and murine models of infection. The regulatory cascade which controls T3SS-3 expression and the secretome of T3SS-3 have been described, as well as the effect of mutations of some of the structural proteins. Yet only a few effector proteins have been functionally characterized to date and very little work has been carried out to understand the hierarchy of assembly, secretion and temporal regulation of T3SS-3. This review aims to frame current knowledge of B. pseudomallei T3SSs in the context of other well characterized model T3SSs, particularly those of Salmonella and Shigella. PMID:28664152

  20. Specific maceration and induction of PR-3 gene in potato tuber tissue by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum type III secretion system mutants.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorgy, Sohrab; Niakan, Mohammad

    2009-12-15

    The exact function of type III secretion system in some phytopathogenes including Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum (Pca) is not understood and is a matter of debate. The aim of this study were to determine specific effect of type III secretion system on potato tubers and to reveal the connection of this system with potato resistant genes such as PR-3. A Pca hrpW fragment was subcloned into a low-copy-number cloning vector (pZH448). The resulting plasmid (pAS19) was then conjugated into the wild-type and mutant strains of Pca by type III secretion system. The virulence property of different Pca strains was studied and the influence of over expression of hrpW on maceration activity was also investigated. Furthermore, the effect of mentioned mutation on the maceration of carrot-root was evaluated. Finally, using real-time PCR, the copy-number of PR-3 gene in potato tuber tissue was assessed. In conclusion, for type III secretion system mutant strains, in contrast with the wild-type, the maceration amount of potato tuber tissue decreased after over expression of hrpW while inoculation of tubers by mutants, increased this amount. In the case of potato, HrpN and DspE proteins appeared to be avirulent factors. Compared with the wild-type strains, Pca nominated mutants significantly reduced potato PR-3 expression thus, PR-3 expression level in potato tuber tissue in answer to infiltration by Pca, depends on functional type III secretion system in the bacterium.

  1. Type III polyketide synthases in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Yohei; Ohnishi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) are simple homodimers of ketosynthases which catalyze the condensation of one to several molecules of extender substrate onto a starter substrate through iterative decarboxylative Claisen condensation reactions. Type III PKSs have been found in bacteria and fungi, as well as plants. Microbial type III PKSs, which are involved in the biosynthesis of some lipidic compounds and various secondary metabolites, have several interesting characteristics that are not shared by plant type III PKSs. Further, many compounds produced by microbial type III PKSs have significant biological functions and/or important pharmaceutical activities. Thus, studies on this class of enzymes will expand our knowledge of the biosynthetic machineries that generate natural products and generate new findings about microbial physiology. The recent development of next-generation DNA sequencing has allowed for an increase in the number of microbial genomes sequenced and the discovery of many microbial type III PKS genes. Here, we describe basic methods to study microbial type III PKSs whose genes are easy to clone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  3. A HRP study of the relation between cell size and motor unit type in cat ankle extensor motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Dum, R P; Fleshman, J W; Glenn, L L; Lev-Tov, A; O'Donovan, M J; Pinter, M J

    1982-07-20

    The dimensions of the somata and stem dendrites of 57 alpha- and three gamma-motoneurons, identified as to motor unit type and labeled by intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase, were measured in the triceps surae and plantaris motor pools. The somata of type S motoneurons tended to be smaller (mean diameter 47.9 micrometers) than those of FF and FR units (52.5 and 53.1 micrometer, respectively) but these mean values were not significantly different and the data distributions showed considerable overlap between the unit types. The mean numbers and diameters of stem dendrites exhibited somewhat larger differences related to motor unit type and some of these were statistically significant. The total membrane area (AN) of each cell was estimated from measurements of the soma and stem dendrites, by using recent data and Ulfhake and Kellerth ('81) to calculate the membrane area of a dendritic tree from stem dendrite diameter. Mean AN varied with motor unit type in the sequence FF greater than FR greater than S (average values: 369 X 100(3) micrometers 2, 323 X 100(3) micrometers 2, and 250 X 100(3) micrometers 2, respectively). There was covariation between AN and the conduction velocity of the motor axon as well as with the force output from the muscle unit. Comparison of AN and motoneuron input resistance (RN) in 19 alpha-motoneurons suggested that the specific resistivity of the cell membrane in type S motoneurons was systematically higher than that characteristic of type FF or FR motoneurons.

  4. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  5. Cloning and molecular characterization of hrpX from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, M; Oku, T

    2000-01-01

    The hrpX gene of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species is essential for pathogenicity on host plants and to cause hypersensitive reaction on non-host plants. We cloned and analyzed a hrpX homologue, designated hrpXct, of X. axonopodis pv. citri, a pathogen of citrus canker. The open reading frame of hrpXct has 1431 bp in nucleotides which has a coding capacity of 476 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 52.4 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence of HrpXct has 90% identity to the AraC family type transcriptional activator protein HrpXc of X. campestris pv. campestris, 95% to HrpXo of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and 97% to X. vesicatoria. These findings clearly indicate and confirm that the structure of the hrpX genes in plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species is highly conserved.

  6. A Boolean Model of the Pseudomonas syringae hrp Regulon Predicts a Tightly Regulated System

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Daniel; Studholme, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The Type III secretion system (TTSS) is a protein secretion machinery used by certain gram-negative bacterial pathogens of plants and animals to deliver effector molecules to the host and is at the core of the ability to cause disease. Extensive molecular and biochemical study has revealed the components and their interactions within this system but reductive approaches do not consider the dynamical properties of the system as a whole. In order to gain a better understanding of these dynamical behaviours and to create a basis for the refinement of the experimentally derived knowledge we created a Boolean model of the regulatory interactions within the hrp regulon of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 Pseudomonas syringae. We compared simulations of the model with experimental data and found them to be largely in accordance, though the hrpV node shows some differences in state changes to that expected. Our simulations also revealed interesting dynamical properties not previously predicted. The model predicts that the hrp regulon is a biologically stable two-state system, with each of the stable states being strongly attractive, a feature indicative of selection for a tightly regulated and responsive system. The model predicts that the state of the GacS/GacA node confers control, a prediction that is consistent with experimental observations that the protein has a role as master regulator. Simulated gene “knock out” experiments with the model predict that HrpL is a central information processing point within the network. PMID:20169167

  7. Evidence for two types of GABA-containing interneurons in the A-laminae of the cat lateral geniculate nucleus: a double-label HRP and GABA-immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Montero, V M; Zempel, J

    1985-01-01

    Neurons containing GABA immunoreactivity were analyzed in the A-laminae of normal cat LGN and of LGN retrogradely labeled with HRP from the visual cortex. In contrast to retrograde labeling of relay cells, GABA+ cells were devoid of HRP label, providing additional evidence for the interneuronal nature of GABAergic cells in the cat LGN. Cell body area measurements showed that the population of GABA+ cells is composed of a large proportion of small (beta) cells and a smaller proportion of medium size (alpha) cells. The proportion of alpha GABA+ cells increases from medial to lateral parts of the A-laminae, resembling a similar medio-lateral increase of physiologically defined Y cells and of morphologically defined type 1 cells in these laminae. This suggests that the alpha and beta GABAergic cells are related to the Y and X geniculo-cortical relay cells, respectively.

  8. Solidity of Type III Bernoulli Crossed Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrakchi, Amine

    2017-03-01

    We generalize a theorem of Chifan and Ioana by proving that for any, possibly type III, amenable von Neumann algebra A 0, any faithful normal state φ_0 and any discrete group {Γ}, the associated Bernoulli crossed product von Neumann algebra {M=(A_0,φ_0)^{overline{⊗} Γ} rtimes Γ} is solid relatively to L(Γ). In particular, if L(Γ) is solid then M is solid and if {Γ} is non-amenable and {A_0 ≠ C then M is a full prime factor. This gives many new examples of solid or prime type III factors. Following Chifan and Ioana, we also obtain the first examples of solid non-amenable type III equivalence relations.

  9. Human Research Program (HRP) Overview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Human Research Program (HRP) is a major part of the Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD). ...

  10. [Identification of a new type III effector XC3176 in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichao; Su, Hua; Yang, Feng; Jian, Huahua; Zhou, Min; Jiang, Wei; Jiang, Bole

    2015-10-04

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for many phytopathogenic bacteria to cause disease in susceptible host plants and to elicit a hypersensitive response in resistant host and non-host plants. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) uses T3SS to deliver T3SS effectors (T3SEs) directly into host cells, where they play important roles in pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify a new T3SE in Xcc. To validate if XC3176 is a T3S effector translocated into plant cells, the promoter and signal region of XC3176 were fused to the plasmid pLJB of harboring HR-inducing AvrBs1 C-terminal domain lack of 58 N-terminal amino acid residues. The recombinant plasmid pLJB3176 was introduced by triparental conjugation into ΔavrBs1 and ΔhrcV. Hypersensitive response induced by the obtained strains ΔavrBs1/pLJB3176 and ΔhrcV/pLJB3176 were examined on the pepper ECW-10R. To determine transcription of XC3176, GUS fusion report strains were constructed. The virulence of Xcc strains was investigated on the Chinese radish by the leaf-clipping method. Hypersensitive response was elicited on the pepper ECW-10R by the strain ΔavrBs1/pLJB3176, but not ΔhrcV/pLJB3176. The GUS activities in the mutant strains ΔhrpX and ΔhrpG were significantly lower than that in the wild type Xcc strain. The mutant of XC3176 reduced virulence significantly and the complementary strain C3176 could restore the virulence as the wild-type strain. XC3176 is a T3SS-dependent effector of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The expression of XC3176 is regulated by hrpG and hrpX. XC3176 is required for the full virulence of Xcc 8004.

  11. [Putative promoter region of type III effector gene avrAC(Xcc8004) in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guofeng; Wu, Qiuju; Liang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Lichao; Yang, Liyan; Wang, Lin; Wu, Xiaojian; Jiang, Bole

    2014-02-04

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the cause agent of black rot of crucifers. Xcc uses type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver T3SS effectors (T3SEs) directly into host cells, where they play important roles in pathogenesis. Many identified T3SEs genes contain plant-inducible promoter(PIP) box and -10 box in their promoter regions. However, the relation among PIP-box, -10 box and -10 region, -35 region of the classic promoter is unclear, and the conservative characteristic of -10 box sequence is hardly reported. The aim of this study was to analyze the putative promoter region of T3SE gene avrAC(Xcc8004). Through 5' RACE, the transcriptional start site of avrAC(Xcc8004) was identified. Fusion PCR was introduced to generate the site-mutagenesis of -10 box for constructing the GUS fusion report strains. The 5' RACE results indicate that the transcription start site was A. After analysis, we found that -35 region was located 8 bp downstream of PIP-box, and -10 box was exactly overlapped with -10 region. The whole motif of PIP-box, -35 region, and -10 box was then counted as: TTCAC-N15-TTCGC-N8-TTGATG-N18-TACGTT. The GUS assay results demonstrate that the site-mutagenesis of -10 box caused a higher expression of avrAC(Xcc8004). The GUS activities in the mutant strains delta hrpX and delta hrpG were significantly lower than that in the wild type Xcc strains. PIP-box is tandem with -35 region, -10 box is just the same as -10 region, -10 box is important for the transcription of avrAC(Xcc8004), and HrpG and HrpX activate the expression of avrAC(X8004), despite of -10 box site-mutagenesis.

  12. Type III functional response in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Sarnelle, Orlando; Wilson, Alan E

    2008-06-01

    The functional response of Daphnia, a common pelagic herbivore in lakes, was assessed with a combination of secondary and meta-analyses of published data and new data from an experiment conducted using very low food levels. Secondary analyses of literature data (28 studies, n = 239-393) revealed a significant positive influence of food concentration on Daphnia clearance rate at low food levels, i.e., evidence of an overall Type III functional response. This result was not an artifact of including data from Daphnia that were exhausted from prolonged food deprivation (more than three hours at very low food). Meta-analysis of Daphnia clearance rate vs. food concentration across a range of low food concentrations (eight studies) showed a significantly positive slope across studies, which also supports the presence of a Type III response. Congruent with these analyses of published data, the feeding experiment showed clear evidence of a Type III functional response for D. pulicaria feeding on Ankistrodesmus falcatus. Food levels at which Daphnia clearance rate declined with decreasing food were near the minimum resource requirement for Daphnia population maintenance at steady state (R*). We suggest that Type III responses are more common than previously believed, perhaps because of the relative paucity of observations at low food levels, and that reduced prey mortality at low phytoplankton densities could be a stabilizing mechanism for Daphnia-phytoplankton systems under resource scarcity.

  13. Supramolecular Structure and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Qun; Liu, Xingzhong; Wei, Hai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in non-pathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus, and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homolog protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS. PMID:26779224

  14. Discriminating the reaction types of plant type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yugo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Goto, Susumu

    2017-07-01

    Functional prediction of paralogs is challenging in bioinformatics because of rapid functional diversification after gene duplication events combined with parallel acquisitions of similar functions by different paralogs. Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), producing various secondary metabolites, represent a paralogous family that has undergone gene duplication and functional alteration. Currently, there is no computational method available for the functional prediction of type III PKSs. We developed a plant type III PKS reaction predictor, pPAP, based on the recently proposed classification of type III PKSs. pPAP combines two kinds of similarity measures: one calculated by profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs) built from functionally and structurally important partial sequence regions, and the other based on mutual information between residue positions. pPAP targets PKSs acting on ring-type starter substrates, and classifies their functions into four reaction types. The pHMM approach discriminated two reaction types with high accuracy (97.5%, 39/40), but its accuracy decreased when discriminating three reaction types (87.8%, 43/49). When combined with a correlation-based approach, all 49 PKSs were correctly discriminated, and pPAP was still highly accurate (91.4%, 64/70) even after adding other reaction types. These results suggest pPAP, which is based on linear discriminant analyses of similarity measures, is effective for plant type III PKS function prediction. pPAP is freely available at ftp://ftp.genome.jp/pub/tools/ppap/. goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. A catalog of interplanetary type III storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S. E.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    A catalog describing the characteristics of all the interplanetary type III storms observed at kilometric wavelengths by the radio astronomy experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft between September 1978 and October 1982 is presented. Three-dimensional trajectories have been determined for about one-third of these storms using radio techniques. Solar coordinate and solar wind parameters derived from the trajectories are also tabulated. A statistical summary of the data is included.

  16. Type III-B rotaxane dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Watson K-W; Lee, Siu-Fung; Wong, Chi-Hin; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Kwan, Chak-Shing; Chak, Chun-Pong; Mendes, Paula M; Cheng, Christopher H K; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai

    2013-11-28

    Type III-B first generation [3]rotaxane and second generation [4]rotaxane dendrimers have been synthesized via (1) a modified copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC), (2) Glaser-Hay's acetylenic oxidative homo-coupling, and (3) amide formation. The dendron does not reveal obvious cytotoxicities in L929 fibroblast cells. The rotaxane dendrimers can capture ammonia and are switchable both in solution and on surfaces.

  17. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Context. Type III bursts and hard X-rays are both produced by flare energetic electron beams. The link between both emissions has been investigated in many previous studies, but no statistical studies have compared both coronal and interplanetary type III bursts with X-ray flares. Aims: Using events where the coronal radio emission above 100 MHz is exclusively from type III bursts, we revisited some long-standing questions regarding the relation between type III bursts and X-ray flares: Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts? What correlation, if any, occurs between radio and X-ray intensities? What X-ray and radio signatures above 100 MHz occur in connection with interplanetary type III bursts below 14 MHz? Methods: We analysed ten years of data from 2002 to 2011 starting with a selection of coronal type III bursts above 100 MHz. We used X-ray flare information from RHESSI >6 keV to make a list of 321 events that have associated type III bursts and X-ray flares, encompassing at least 28% of the initial sample of type III events. We then examined the timings, intensities, associated GOES class, and whether there was an associated interplanetary radio signature in both radio and X-rays. Results: For our 321 events with radio and X-ray signatures, the X-ray emission at 6 keV usually lasted much longer than the groups of type III bursts at frequencies >100 MHz. The selected events were mostly associated with GOES B and C class flares. A weak correlation was found between the type III radio flux at frequencies below 327 MHz and the X-ray intensity at 25-50 keV, with an absence of events at high X-ray intensity and low type III radio flux. The weakness of the correlation is related to the coherent emission mechanism of radio type IIIs which can produce high radio fluxes by low density electron beams. Interplanetary type III bursts (<4 MHz) were observed for 54% of the events. The percentage of association increased when events were observed with 25-50 ke

  18. HopX1 in Erwinia amylovora functions as an avirulence protein in apple and is regulated by HrpL.

    PubMed

    Bocsanczy, A M; Schneider, D J; DeClerck, G A; Cartinhour, S; Beer, S V

    2012-02-01

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora. This pathogen delivers virulence proteins into host cells utilizing the type III secretion system (T3SS). Expression of the T3SS and of translocated and secreted substrates is activated by the alternative sigma factor HrpL, which recognizes hrp box promoters upstream of regulated genes. A collection of hidden Markov model (HMM) profiles was used to identify putative hrp boxes in the genome sequence of Ea273, a highly virulent strain of E. amylovora. Among potential virulence factors preceded by putative hrp boxes, two genes previously known as Eop3 and Eop2 were characterized. The presence of functionally active hrp boxes upstream of these two genes was confirmed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) assays. Deletion mutants of the latter candidate genes, renamed hopX1(Ea) and hopAK1(Ea), respectively, did not differ in virulence from the wild-type strain when assayed in pear fruit and apple shoots. The hopX1(Ea) deletion mutant of Ea273, complemented with a plasmid overexpressing hopX1(E)(a), suppressed the development of the hypersensitivity response (HR) when inoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana; however, it contributed to HR in Nicotiana tabacum and significantly reduced the progress of disease in apple shoots, suggesting that HopX1(Ea) may act as an avirulence protein in apple shoots.

  19. The role of cell wall-based defences in the early restriction of non-pathogenic hrp mutant bacteria in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kathy; Brown, Ian; Knox, Paul; Mansfield, John

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the cause of the restricted multiplication of hrp mutant bacteria in leaves of Arabidopsis. Our focus was on early interactions leading to differentiation between virulent wild-type and non-pathogenic hrpA mutant strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. An initial drop in recoverable bacteria detected 0-4 h after inoculation with either strain was dependent on a functional FLS2 receptor and H2O2 accumulation in challenged leaves. Wild-type bacteria subsequently multiplied rapidly whereas the hrpA mutant was restricted within 6 h. Despite the early restriction, the hrpA mutant was still viable several days after inoculation. Analysis of intercellular washing fluids (IWFs), showed that high levels of nutrients were readily available to bacteria in the apoplast and that no diffusible inhibitors were produced in response to bacterial challenge. Histochemical and immunocytochemical methods were used to detect changes in polysaccharides (callose, two forms of cellulose, and pectin), arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), H2O2 and peroxidase. Quantitative analysis showed very similar changes in localisation of AGPs, cellulose epitopes and callose 2 and 4 h after inoculation with either strain. However from 6 to 12 h after inoculation papillae expanded only next to the hrp mutant. In contrast to the similar patterns of secretory activity recorded from mesophyll cells, accumulation of H2O2 and peroxidase was significantly greater around the hrpA mutant within the first 4h after inoculation. A striking differential accumulation of H2O2 was also found in chloroplasts in cells next to the mutant. Ascorbate levels were lower in the IWFs recovered from sites inoculated with the hrp mutant than with wild-type bacteria. The critical response, observed at the right time and place to explain the observed differential behaviour of wild-type and hrpA mutant bacteria was the accumulation of H2O2, probably generated through Type III peroxidase activity and in

  20. The quantitative regulation of the hrp regulator HrpX is involved in sugar-source-dependent hrp gene expression in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Yumi; Tsuge, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    In Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the pathogen of bacterial leaf blight of rice, hrp gene expression is regulated by the key hrp regulators HrpG and HrpX. HrpG regulates hrpX and hrpA, and HrpX regulates the other hrp genes on hrpB-hrpF operons. We previously examined the expression of the HrpX-regulated hrp gene hrcU and demonstrated that hrp gene expression is highly induced in a certain nutrient-poor medium containing xylose. In the present study, we found that the induction level of HrpX-regulated hrp genes was higher in medium with xylose than in media with any other sugar sources (glucose, sucrose and fructose), but that expression of hrpG, hrpX and hrpA was independent of the sugar sources. In western blot analysis, the accumulation of HrpX was reduced in media with a sugar other than xylose, probably as a result of proteolysis, but the addition of xylose canceled this reduced accumulation of the protein. The results suggest that proteolysis of HrpX is an important hrp regulatory mechanism and that xylose specifically suppresses this proteolysis, resulting in active hrp gene expression in X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  1. The Predicted Lytic Transglycosylase HpaH from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Associates with the Type III Secretion System and Promotes Effector Protein Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Hausner, Jens; Hartmann, Nadine; Jordan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenicity of the Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria depends on a type III secretion (T3S) system, which spans both bacterial membranes and translocates effector proteins into plant cells. The assembly of the T3S system presumably involves the predicted lytic transglycosylase (LT) HpaH, which is encoded adjacent to the T3S gene cluster. Bacterial LTs degrade peptidoglycan and often promote the formation of membrane-spanning macromolecular protein complexes. In the present study, we show that HpaH localizes to the bacterial periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan as well as to components of the T3S system, including the predicted periplasmic inner rod proteins HrpB1 and HrpB2 as well as the pilus protein HrpE. In vivo translocation assays revealed that HpaH promotes the translocation of various effector proteins and of early substrates of the T3S system, suggesting a general contribution of HpaH to type III-dependent protein export. Mutant studies and the analysis of reporter fusions showed that the N-terminal region of HpaH contributes to protein function and is proteolytically cleaved. The N-terminally truncated HpaH cleavage product is secreted into the extracellular milieu by a yet-unknown transport pathway, which is independent of the T3S system. PMID:27895129

  2. The Predicted Lytic Transglycosylase HpaH from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Associates with the Type III Secretion System and Promotes Effector Protein Translocation.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Jens; Hartmann, Nadine; Jordan, Michael; Büttner, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    The pathogenicity of the Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria depends on a type III secretion (T3S) system, which spans both bacterial membranes and translocates effector proteins into plant cells. The assembly of the T3S system presumably involves the predicted lytic transglycosylase (LT) HpaH, which is encoded adjacent to the T3S gene cluster. Bacterial LTs degrade peptidoglycan and often promote the formation of membrane-spanning macromolecular protein complexes. In the present study, we show that HpaH localizes to the bacterial periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan as well as to components of the T3S system, including the predicted periplasmic inner rod proteins HrpB1 and HrpB2 as well as the pilus protein HrpE. In vivo translocation assays revealed that HpaH promotes the translocation of various effector proteins and of early substrates of the T3S system, suggesting a general contribution of HpaH to type III-dependent protein export. Mutant studies and the analysis of reporter fusions showed that the N-terminal region of HpaH contributes to protein function and is proteolytically cleaved. The N-terminally truncated HpaH cleavage product is secreted into the extracellular milieu by a yet-unknown transport pathway, which is independent of the T3S system. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Exposure to Umbelliferone Reduces Ralstonia solanacearum Biofilm Formation, Transcription of Type III Secretion System Regulators and Effectors and Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Li, Shili; Qin, Xiyun; Jiang, Gaofei; Chen, Juanni; Li, Bide; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yong; Ding, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating phytopathogens and causes bacterial wilt, which leads to severe economic loss due to its worldwide distribution and broad host range. Certain plant-derived compounds (PDCs) can impair bacterial virulence by suppressing pathogenic factors of R. solanacearum. However, the inhibitory mechanisms of PDCs in bacterial virulence remain largely unknown. In this study, we screened a library of coumarins and derivatives, natural PDCs with fused benzene and α-pyrone rings, for their effects on expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS) of R. solanacearum. Here, we show that umbelliferone (UM), a 7-hydroxycoumarin, suppressed T3SS regulator gene expression through HrpG–HrpB and PrhG–HrpB pathways. UM decreased gene expression of six type III effectors (RipX, RipD, RipP1, RipR, RipTAL, and RipW) of 10 representative effector genes but did not alter T2SS expression. In addition, biofilm formation of R. solanacearum was significantly reduced by UM, though swimming activity was not affected. We then observed that UM suppressed the wilting disease process by reducing colonization and proliferation in tobacco roots and stems. In summary, the findings reveal that UM may serve as a plant-derived inhibitor to manipulate R. solanacearum T3SS and biofilm formation, providing proof of concept that these key virulence factors are potential targets for the integrated control of bacterial wilt. PMID:28713361

  4. Identification of novel Xanthomonas euvesicatoria type III effector proteins by a machine-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Teper, Doron; Burstein, David; Salomon, Dor; Gershovitz, Michael; Pupko, Tal; Sessa, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease in pepper and tomato. Xcv pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion (T3S) system that delivers effector proteins into host cells to suppress plant immunity and promote disease. The pool of known Xcv effectors includes approximately 30 proteins, most identified in the 85-10 strain by various experimental and computational techniques. To identify additional Xcv 85-10 effectors, we applied a genome-wide machine-learning approach, in which all open reading frames (ORFs) were scored according to their propensity to encode effectors. Scoring was based on a large set of features, including genomic organization, taxonomic dispersion, hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp)-dependent expression, 5' regulatory sequences, amino acid composition bias and GC content. Thirty-six predicted effectors were tested for translocation into plant cells using the hypersensitive response (HR)-inducing domain of AvrBs2 as a reporter. Seven proteins (XopAU, XopAV, XopAW, XopAP, XopAX, XopAK and XopAD) harboured a functional translocation signal and their translocation relied on the HrpF translocon, indicating that they are bona fide T3S effectors. Remarkably, four belong to novel effector families. Inactivation of the xopAP gene reduced the severity of disease symptoms in infected plants. A decrease in cell death and chlorophyll content was observed in pepper leaves inoculated with the xopAP mutant when compared with the wild-type strain. However, populations of the xopAP mutant in infected leaves were similar in size to those of wild-type bacteria, suggesting that the reduction in virulence was not caused by impaired bacterial growth.

  5. Concepts to Support HRP Integration Using Publications and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, J.; Lumpkins, S.; Shelhamer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Initial efforts are underway to enhance the Human Research Program (HRP)'s identification and support of potential cross-disciplinary scientific collaborations. To increase the emphasis on integration in HRP's science portfolio management, concepts are being explored through the development of a set of tools. These tools are intended to enable modeling, analysis, and visualization of the state of the human system in the spaceflight environment; HRP's current understanding of that state with an indication of uncertainties; and how that state changes due to HRP programmatic progress and design reference mission definitions. In this talk, we will discuss proof-of-concept work performed using a subset of publications captured in the HRP publications database. The publications were tagged in the database with words representing factors influencing health and performance in spaceflight, as well as with words representing the risks HRP research is reducing. Analysis was performed on the publication tag data to identify relationships between factors and between risks. Network representations were then created as one type of visualization of these relationships. This enables future analyses of the structure of the networks based on results from network theory. Such analyses can provide insights into HRP's current human system knowledge state as informed by the publication data. The network structure analyses can also elucidate potential improvements by identifying network connections to establish or strengthen for maximized information flow. The relationships identified in the publication data were subsequently used as inputs to a model captured in the Systems Modeling Language (SysML), which functions as a repository for relationship information to be gleaned from multiple sources. Example network visualization outputs from a simple SysML model were then also created to compare to the visualizations based on the publication data only. We will also discuss ideas for

  6. The type III effectors of Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    White, Frank F; Potnis, Neha; Jones, Jeffrey B; Koebnik, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    A review of type III effectors (T3 effectors) from strains of Xanthomonas reveals a growing list of candidate and known effectors based on functional assays and sequence and structural similarity searches of genomic data. We propose that the effectors and suspected effectors should be distributed into 39 so-called Xop groups reflecting sequence similarity. Some groups have structural motifs for putative enzymatic functions, and recent studies have provided considerable insight into the interaction with host factors in their function as mediators of virulence and elicitors of resistance for a few specific T3 effectors. Many groups are related to T3 effectors of plant and animal pathogenic bacteria, and several groups appear to have been exploited primarily by Xanthomonas species based on available data. At the same time, a relatively large number of candidate effectors remain to be examined in more detail with regard to their function within host cells.

  7. DECIMETRIC TYPE III BURSTS: GENERATION AND PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Yan, Y. H.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations are presented for decimetric type III radio bursts at 2f{sub p} , where f{sub p} is the local electron plasma frequency. The simulations show that 2f{sub p} radiation can be observed at Earth in two scenarios for the radiation's generation and propagation. In Scenario A, radiation is produced and propagates in warm plasmas in the lower corona that are caused by previous magnetic reconnection outflows and/or chromospheric evaporation. In Scenario B radiation is generated in normal plasmas, then due to its natural directivity pattern and refraction, radiation partly propagates into nearby regions, which are hot because of previous reconnection/evaporation. The profiles of plasma density n{sub e} (r) and electron temperature T{sub e} (r) in the lower corona (r - R{sub sun} {approx}< 100 Mm) are found to be crucial to whether radiation can be produced and escape at observable levels against the effects of free-free absorption, where r is the heliocentric distance. Significantly, the observed wide ranges of radiation properties (e.g., drift rates) require n{sub e} (r) with a large range of scale heights h{sub s} , consistent nonetheless for Scenario B with short observed EUV loops. This is relevant to problems with large h{sub s} inferred from tall EUV loops. The simulations suggest: (1) n{sub e} (r) with small h{sub s} , such as n{sub e} (r){proportional_to}(r - R{sub sun}){sup -2.38} for flaring regions, are unexpectedly common deep in the corona. This result is consistent with recent work on n{sub e} (r) for r {approx} (1.05-2)R{sub sun} extracted from observed metric type IIIs. (2) The dominance of reverse-slope bursts over normal bursts sometimes observed may originate from asymmetric reconnection/acceleration, which favors downgoing beams.

  8. Arabidopsis CYP86A2 represses Pseudomonas syringae type III genes and is required for cuticle development

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fangming; Mark Goodwin, S; Xiao, Yanmei; Sun, Zhaoyu; Baker, Douglas; Tang, Xiaoyan; Jenks, Matthew A; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae relies on type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into the host cell for parasitism. Type III genes are induced in planta, but host factors affecting the induction are poorly understood. Here we report on the identification of an Arabidopsis mutant, att1 (for aberrant induction of type three genes), that greatly enhances the expression of bacterial type III genes avrPto and hrpL. att1 plants display enhanced disease severity to a virulent strain of P. syringae, suggesting a role of ATT1 in disease resistance. ATT1 encodes CYP86A2, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzing fatty acid oxidation. The cutin content is reduced to 30% in att1, indicating that CYP86A2 plays a major role in the biosynthesis of extracellular lipids. att1 has a loose cuticle membrane ultrastructure and shows increased permeability to water vapor, demonstrating the importance of the cuticle membrane in controlling water loss. The enhanced avrPto-luc expression is specific to att1, but not another cuticle mutant, wax2. The results suggest that certain cutin-related fatty acids synthesized by CYP86A2 may repress bacterial type III gene expression in the intercellular spaces. PMID:15241470

  9. Glomerular Collagen V Codeposition and Hepatic Perisinusoidal Collagen III Accumulation in Canine Collagen Type III Glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Rørtveit, R; Reiten, M R; Lingaas, F; Sveri, S B; Brech, A; Espenes, A; Jansen, J H

    2015-11-01

    Collagen type III glomerulopathy, also known as collagenofibrotic glomerulopathy, is a rare renal disease of unknown pathogenesis. The disease occurs in humans and animals and is characterized by massive glomerular accumulations of collagen type III. In the present study, we describe a Drever dog litter affected by an early onset variant of this glomerular disease, where 4 of 9 puppies developed renal failure within 50 days of age. Necropsy specimens of kidney from the 4 affected cases were studied by light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry, and characteristic lesions compatible with a diagnosis of collagen type III glomerulopathy were found. In addition, 2 cases showed atypical epithelium in the collecting ducts of the medulla, so-called adenomatoid change. Immunohistochemistry of renal specimens from collagen type III glomerulopathy-affected dogs (n = 10) originating from two different dog strains, the Drever dogs and a mixed-breed strain, demonstrated that the deposited glomerular collagen is composed of a mixture of collagen III and collagen V. The distribution of the collagen V corresponded to the localization of collagen III; however, differences in staining intensity showed that collagen type III is the dominating component. Immunohistochemistry for collagen III (n = 9) and a transmission electron microscopic study (n = 1) showed hepatic perisinusoidal collagen type III deposition in affected cases from both dog strains. This is the first report documenting glomerular accumulations of collagen type V and perisinusoidal liver collagen III deposition in canine collagen type III glomerulopathy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Novel type III effectors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Burstein, David; Satanower, Shirley; Simovitch, Michal; Belnik, Yana; Zehavi, Meital; Yerushalmi, Gal; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Pupko, Tal; Banin, Ehud

    2015-03-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic and acute infections in immunocompromised patients. Most P. aeruginosa strains encode an active type III secretion system (T3SS), utilized by the bacteria to deliver effector proteins from the bacterial cell directly into the cytoplasm of the host cell. Four T3SS effectors have been discovered and extensively studied in P. aeruginosa: ExoT, ExoS, ExoU, and ExoY. This is especially intriguing in light of P. aeruginosa's ability to infect a wide range of hosts. We therefore hypothesized that additional T3SS effectors that have not yet been discovered are encoded in the genome of P. aeruginosa. Here, we applied a machine learning classification algorithm to identify novel P. aeruginosa effectors. In this approach, various types of data are integrated to differentiate effectors from the rest of the open reading frames of the bacterial genome. Due to the lack of a sufficient learning set of positive effectors, our machine learning algorithm integrated genomic information from another Pseudomonas species and utilized dozens of features accounting for various aspects of the effector coding genes and their products. Twelve top-ranking predictions were experimentally tested for T3SS-specific translocation, leading to the discovery of two novel T3SS effectors. We demonstrate that these effectors are not part of the injection structural complex and report initial efforts toward their characterization. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete toxic proteins, termed effectors, directly into the cytoplasm of the host cell. The activation of this secretion system is correlated with disease severity and patient death. Compared with many other T3SS-utilizing pathogenic bacteria, P. aeruginosa has a fairly limited arsenal of effectors that have been identified. This is in sharp contrast with the wide range of hosts that this bacterium can infect. The discovery of

  11. HpaP modulates type III effector secretion in Ralstonia solanacearum and harbours a substrate specificity switch domain essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Turner, Marie; Lonjon, Fabien; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved a type III secretion system (T3SS) to successfully invade their host. This extracellular apparatus allows the translocation of proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), directly into the host cells. T3Es are virulence factors that have been shown to interfere with the host's immunity or to provide nutrients from the host to the bacteria. The Gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is a worldwide major crop pest whose virulence strongly relies on the T3SS. In R. solanacearum, transcriptional regulation has been extensively studied. However, very few data are available concerning the role played by type III-associated regulators, such as type III chaperones and T3SS control proteins. Here, we characterized HpaP, a putative type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) protein of R. solanacearum which is not secreted by the bacterium or translocated in the plant cells. HpaP self-interacts and interacts with the PopP1 T3E. HpaP modulates the secretion of early (HrpY pilin) and late (AvrA and PopP1 T3Es) type III substrates. HpaP is dispensable for the translocation of T3Es into the host cells. Finally, we identified two regions of five amino acids in the T3S4 domain that are essential for efficient PopP1 secretion and for HpaP's role in virulence on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, but not required for HpaP-HpaP and HpaP-PopP1 interactions. Taken together, our results indicate that HpaP is a putative R. solanacearum T3S4 protein important for full pathogenicity on several hosts, acting as a helper for PopP1 secretion, and repressing AvrA and HrpY secretion. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Type III Hypersensitivity Reaction in Mushroom Growers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byoung-Whui; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Moon, Hee-Bom; Chang, Suk-II; Kang, Seock-Young; Kim, Sang-Jae; Kim, Sin-Ok

    1991-01-01

    Some respiratory symptoms in mushroom growers such as mushroom worker’s lung develop by inhalation of certain agents arising from the environment of mushroom cultivation. Recently we observed mushroom workers who had respiratory symptoms which might be type III hypersensitivity reaction to the antigen of Pleurotus floridae. We gave questionaires to all the mushroom growers at one of the biggest cultivation areas of mushrooms, Pleurotus floridae in Pocheon, Kyunggi Province. Those with respiratory symptoms were subjects for the study. CBC, chest X-ray, pulmonary function test, skin test with Pleurotus floridae extract, and precipitin antibody test to Pleurotus floridae were performed in the study subjects. Out of a total 308 mushroom workers, 23 workers (14 males, 9 females) had respiratory symptoms. Their mean age was 45 years, and their mean duration of engagement was 3.4 years. Their main symptoms were cough (100%), sputum (82.6%), dyspnea (43.5%), and fever with chills (13.0%). Two cases showed increased interstitial lung markings on chest X-ray films. Sixteen cases (73.9%) showed precipitin antibodies against P. floridae extract by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Antibodies against Micropolyspora faeni and Thermoactinomyces vulgaris were not detected in any subject. PMID:1742253

  13. Type III Radio Bursts and Microflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Krucker, S.; Arzner, K.; Lin, R. P.

    2003-05-01

    We present recent observations of microflares observed simultaneously in EUV (TRACE), radio (Nancay, Phoenix-2), and X-rays (RHESSI). During a period of 15 min on 19 July 2002 14:23-14:35 UT, RHESSI observed microflares approximately every 2 minutes. Each microflare was accompagnied by a radio Type III burst. The largest flare (14:29:25 UT) was also accompagnied by a cluster of decimetric radio spikes in the frequency range 1 to 2 GHz. In addition, FeXII (195 Å) images provided by TRACE show two jets-like emissions originating from a complex double arche structure. The centroid of the jets were found to travel at apparent speeds of ˜ 100 km s-1, consistent with observations by Shimojo et al. (1996). X-ray images show non-thermal emission (9-30 keV) from the footpoints of the TRACE arches. Strong correlation in flux amplitude is found between emissions in the radio ( ˜1340 MHz) and non-thermal X-ray (9-30 keV integrated). The event is interpreted as an anemone-jet in the model by Shibata et al. (1994). This research is supported by NASA contract NAS 5-98033.

  14. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (<14 MHz) type III radio bursts have been reported to be indicative of solar energetic particle events. We measured the durations of type III bursts associated with large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  15. The alternative sigma factor HrpL negatively modulates the flagellar system in the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora under hrp-inducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Cesbron, Sophie; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Tharaud, Michel; Barny, Marie-Anne; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2006-04-01

    In this work we present evidence of an opposite regulation in the phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora between the virulence-associated Type III secretion system (TTSS) and the flagellar system. Using loss-of-function mutants we show that motility enhanced the virulence of wild-type bacteria relative to a nonmotile mutant when sprayed on apple seedlings with unwounded leaves. Then we demonstrated through analyses of motility, flagellin export and visualization of flagellar filament that HrpL, the positive key regulator of the TTSS, also down-regulates the flagellar system. Such a dual regulation mediated by an alternative sigma factor of the TTSS appears to be a level of regulation between virulence and motility not yet described among Proteobacteria.

  16. [Regulation of rsc1285 gene in type III secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum].

    PubMed

    Li, Muyuan; Xu, Pengxia; Zhang, Weiqi; Zhang, Yong

    2015-08-04

    Rsc1285 is one of the putative T3SS-regulated factors in Ralstonia solanacearum, and the regulation of Rsc1285 on T3SS and pathogenicity was characterized. The rsc1285 deletion mutants were constructed by homologous recombination and characterized by complementation. The rsc1285 mutant was significantly less virulent than the wild-type strain to infect tomato plants. Rsc1285 controls the expression of hrpB and HrpB-regulating genes, but it is dispensable for the expression of hrpG and prhG. R. solanacearum uses Rsc1285 to control the T3SS and pathogenicity via a novel pathway, and this finding provides insights into overall infection mode of R. solanacearum.

  17. Ralstonia solanacearum type III secretion system effector Rip36 induces a hypersensitive response in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Matsumoto, Iyo; Taguchi, Fumiko; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki; Mukaihara, Takafumi

    2014-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a Gram-negative soil-borne bacterium that causes bacterial wilt disease in more than 200 plant species, including economically important Solanaceae species. In R. solanacearum, the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system is required for both the ability to induce the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants and pathogenicity in host plants. Recently, 72 effector genes, called rip (Ralstonia protein injected into plant cells), have been identified in R. solanacearum RS1000. RS1002, a spontaneous nalixidic acid-resistant derivative of RS1000, induced strong HR in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum in an Hrp-dependent manner. An Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system revealed that Rip36, a putative Zn-dependent protease effector of R. solanacearum, induced HR in S. torvum. A mutation in the putative Zn-binding motif (E149A) completely abolished the ability to induce HR. In agreement with this result, the RS1002-derived Δrip36 and rip36E149A mutants lost the ability to induce HR in S. torvum. An E149A mutation had no effect on the translocation of Rip36 into plant cells. These results indicate that Rip36 is an avirulent factor that induces HR in S. torvum and that a putative Zn-dependent protease motif is essential for this activity.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  19. The bacterium Pantoea stewartii uses two different type III secretion systems to colonize its plant host and insect vector.

    PubMed

    Correa, Valdir R; Majerczak, Doris R; Ammar, El-Desouky; Merighi, Massimo; Pratt, Richard C; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Coplin, David L; Redinbaugh, Margaret G

    2012-09-01

    Plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (herein referred to as P. stewartii), the causative agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize, carries phylogenetically distinct T3SSs. In addition to an Hrc-Hrp T3SS, known to be essential for maize pathogenesis, P. stewartii has a second T3SS (Pantoea secretion island 2 [PSI-2]) that is required for persistence in its flea beetle vector, Chaetocnema pulicaria (Melsh). PSI-2 belongs to the Inv-Mxi-Spa T3SS family, typically found in animal pathogens. Mutagenesis of the PSI-2 psaN gene, which encodes an ATPase essential for secretion of T3SS effectors by the injectisome, greatly reduces both the persistence of P. stewartii in flea beetle guts and the beetle's ability to transmit P. stewartii to maize. Ectopic expression of the psaN gene complements these phenotypes. In addition, the PSI-2 psaN gene is not required for P. stewartii pathogenesis of maize and is transcriptionally upregulated in insects compared to maize tissues. Thus, the Hrp and PSI-2 T3SSs play different roles in the life cycle of P. stewartii as it alternates between its insect vector and plant host.

  20. The Bacterium Pantoea stewartii Uses Two Different Type III Secretion Systems To Colonize Its Plant Host and Insect Vector

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Valdir R.; Majerczak, Doris R.; Ammar, El-Desouky; Merighi, Massimo; Pratt, Richard C.; Hogenhout, Saskia A.; Coplin, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (herein referred to as P. stewartii), the causative agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize, carries phylogenetically distinct T3SSs. In addition to an Hrc-Hrp T3SS, known to be essential for maize pathogenesis, P. stewartii has a second T3SS (Pantoea secretion island 2 [PSI-2]) that is required for persistence in its flea beetle vector, Chaetocnema pulicaria (Melsh). PSI-2 belongs to the Inv-Mxi-Spa T3SS family, typically found in animal pathogens. Mutagenesis of the PSI-2 psaN gene, which encodes an ATPase essential for secretion of T3SS effectors by the injectisome, greatly reduces both the persistence of P. stewartii in flea beetle guts and the beetle's ability to transmit P. stewartii to maize. Ectopic expression of the psaN gene complements these phenotypes. In addition, the PSI-2 psaN gene is not required for P. stewartii pathogenesis of maize and is transcriptionally upregulated in insects compared to maize tissues. Thus, the Hrp and PSI-2 T3SSs play different roles in the life cycle of P. stewartii as it alternates between its insect vector and plant host. PMID:22773631

  1. 10 CFR 712.18 - Transferring HRP certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transferring HRP certification. 712.18 Section 712.18... Reliability Program Procedures § 712.18 Transferring HRP certification. (a) For HRP certification to be transferred, the individual must currently be certified in the HRP. (b) Transferring the HRP...

  2. 10 CFR 712.18 - Transferring HRP certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transferring HRP certification. 712.18 Section 712.18... Reliability Program Procedures § 712.18 Transferring HRP certification. (a) For HRP certification to be transferred, the individual must currently be certified in the HRP. (b) Transferring the HRP...

  3. 10 CFR 712.18 - Transferring HRP certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transferring HRP certification. 712.18 Section 712.18... Reliability Program Procedures § 712.18 Transferring HRP certification. (a) For HRP certification to be transferred, the individual must currently be certified in the HRP. (b) Transferring the HRP...

  4. Integration Host Factor Is Required for RpoN-Dependent hrpL Gene Expression and Controls Motility by Positively Regulating rsmB sRNA in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora requires an hrp-type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease. It has been reported that HrpL, the master regulator of T3SS, is transcriptionally regulated by sigma factor 54 (RpoN), YhbH, and HrpS. In this study, the role of integration host factor (IHF) in regulating hrpL and T3SS gene expression was investigated. IHF is a nucleoid-associated protein that regulates gene expression by influencing nucleoid structure and DNA bending. Our results showed that both ihfA and ihfB mutants of E. amylovora did not induce necrotic lesions on pear fruits. Growth of both mutants was greatly reduced, and expression of the hrpL and T3SS genes was significantly down-regulated as compared with those of the wild type. In addition, expression of the ihfA, but not the ihfB gene, was under auto-suppression by IHF. Furthermore, both ihfA and ihfB mutants were hypermotile, due to significantly reduced expression of small RNA (sRNA) rsmB. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay further confirmed that IHF binds to the promoters of the hrpL and ihfA genes, as well as the rsmB sRNA gene. These results indicate that IHF is required for RpoN-dependent hrpL gene expression and virulence, and controls motility by positively regulating the rsmB sRNA in E. amylovora.

  5. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  6. The YscU/FlhB homologue HrcU from Xanthomonas controls type III secretion and translocation of early and late substrates.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Jens; Büttner, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    The majority of Gram-negative plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria employ a type III secretion (T3S) system to deliver effector proteins to eukaryotic cells. Members of the YscU protein family are essential components of the T3S system and consist of a transmembrane and a cytoplasmic region that is autocatalytically cleaved at a conserved NPTH motif. YscU homologues interact with T3S substrate specificity switch (T3S4) proteins that alter the substrate specificity of the T3S system after assembly of the secretion apparatus. We previously showed that the YscU homologue HrcU from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria interacts with the T3S4 protein HpaC and is required for the secretion of translocon and effector proteins. In the present study, analysis of HrcU deletion, insertion and point mutant derivatives led to the identification of amino acid residues in the cytoplasmic region of HrcU (HrcUC) that control T3S and translocation of the predicted inner rod protein HrpB2, the translocon protein HrpF and the effector protein AvrBs3. Mutations in the vicinity of the NPTH motif interfered with HrcU cleavage and/or the interaction of HrcUC with HrpB2 and the T3S4 protein HpaC. However, HrcU function was not completely abolished, suggesting that HrcU cleavage is not crucial for pathogenicity and T3S. Given that mutations in HrcU differentially affected T3S and translocation of HrpB2 and effector proteins, we propose that HrcU controls the secretion of different T3S substrate classes by independent mechanisms.

  7. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  8. Comparison of Type I, Type III, and Type VI Collagen Binding Assays in Diagnosis of VWD

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Veronica H.; Gill, Joan Cox; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Wren, Jeffrey S.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Von Willebrand factor (VWF) plays a key role in coagulation by tethering platelets to injured subendothelium through binding sites for collagen and platelet GPIb. Collagen binding assays (VWF:CB), however, are not part of the routine workup for von Willebrand disease (VWD). Objectives This study presents data on collagen binding for healthy controls and VWD subjects to compare three different collagens. Patients/Methods VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity, and VWF:CB with types I, III, and VI collagen were examined for samples obtained from the Zimmerman Program. Results Mean VWF:CB in healthy controls was similar and highly correlated for types I, III, and VI collagen. The mean VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratios for types I, III, and VI collagen were 1.31, 1.19, and 1.21 respectively. In type 1 VWD subjects, VWF:CB was similar to VWF:Ag with mean VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratios for types I, III, and VI collagen of 1.32, 1.08, and 1.1 respectively. For type 2A and 2B subjects, VWF:CB was uniformly low, with mean ratios of 0.62 and 0.7 for type I collagen, 0.38 and 0.4 for type III collagen, and 0.5 and 0.47 for type VI collagen. Conclusions Normal ranges for type I, III, and VI collagen are correlated, but higher values were obtained with type I collagen as compared to types III and VI. The low VWF:CB in type 2A and 2B subjects suggests that VWF:CB may also supplement analysis of multimer distribution. However, these results reflect only one set of assay conditions per collagen type and therefore may not be generalizable to all collagen assays. PMID:22507643

  9. 46 CFR 171.075 - Subdivision requirements-Type III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subdivision requirements-Type III. 171.075 Section 171...—Type III. (a) Each vessel must be shown by design calculations to comply with the requirements of... Organization (IMO). (b) International Maritime Organization Resolution A.265 (VIII) is incorporated...

  10. Comparative analysis of the Hrp pathogenicity island of Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting Erwinia amylovora strains identifies the IT region as a remnant of an integrative conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rachel A; Blom, Jochen; Bühlmann, Andreas; Plummer, Kim M; Beer, Steven V; Luck, Joanne E; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Rodoni, Brendan C; Duffy, Brion; Smits, Theo H M

    2012-08-01

    The Hrp pathogenicity island (hrpPAI) of Erwinia amylovora not only encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) and other genes required for pathogenesis on host plants, but also includes the so-called island transfer (IT) region, a region that originates from an integrative conjugative element (ICE). Comparative genomic analysis of the IT regions of two Spiraeoideae- and three Rubus-infecting strains revealed that the regions in Spiraeoideae-infecting strains were syntenic and highly conserved in length and genetic information, but that the IT regions of the Rubus-infecting strains varied in gene content and length, showing a mosaic structure. None of the ICEs in E. amylovora strains were complete, as conserved ICE genes and the left border were missing, probably due to reductive genome evolution. Comparison of the hrpPAI region of E. amylovora strains to syntenic regions from other Erwinia spp. indicates that the hrpPAI and the IT regions are the result of several insertion and deletion events that have occurred within the ICE. It also suggests that the T3SS was present in a common ancestor of the pathoadapted Erwinia spp. and that insertion and deletion events in the IT region occurred during speciation.

  11. Structure-function analyses of plant type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Noel, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) form a superfamily of biosynthetic enzymes involved in the production of a plethora of polyketide-derived natural products important for ecological adaptations and the fitness of land plants. Moreover, tremendous interest in bioengineering of type III PKSs to produce high-value compounds is increasing. Compared to type I and type II PKSs, which form either large modular protein complexes or dissociable molecular assemblies, type III PKSs exist as smaller homodimeric proteins, technically more amenable for detailed quantitative biochemical and phylogenetic analyses. In this chapter, we summarize a collection of approaches, including bioinformatics, genetics, protein crystallography, in vitro biochemistry, and mutagenesis, together affording a comprehensive interrogation of the structure-function-evolutionary relationships in the plant type III PKS family.

  12. Bioconjugation of Antibodies to Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross-linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and convenient means to maintain antibody affinity while imparting a functional reporter used for antigen detection. In this chapter, we describe a process by which Sulfo-SMCC is used to generate a stable maleimide-activated HRP that is reactive with sulfhydryl groups generated in antibodies by SATA-mediated thiolation.

  13. Fine structures of type III radio bursts observed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalenic, Jasmina; Marque, Christophe; Fallows, Richard; Mann, Gottfried; Vocks, Christian

    2017-04-01

    On August 25, 2014, NOAA AR 2146 produced the M2.0 class flare (peaked at 15:11 UT). The flare was associated with a coronal dimming, a EUV wave, a halo CME and a radio event observed by LOFAR (the LOw-Frequency Array). The radio event consisted of a type II, type III and type IV radio emissions. In this study, we focus on LOFAR observations of the type III bursts, generally considered to be radio signatures of fast electron beams propagating along open or quasi open field lines. The group of type III bursts was, as usually, observed during the impulsive phase of the flare. At first hand, type III bursts show no peculiarity, but the high frequency/time resolution LOFAR observations reveal that only few of these type III bursts have a smooth emission profile. The majority of bursts is strongly fragmented. Some show a structuring similar to type IIIb bursts, but on a smaller frequency scale, and others show a non-organized patchy structure which gives indication on the possibly related turbulence processes. Although fine structures of type III bursts were already reported, the wealth of fine structures, and the fragmentation of the radio emission observed in this August 25 event is unprecedented. We show that these LOFAR observations bring completely new insight and pose a new challenge for the physics of the acceleration of electron beams and associated emission processes.

  14. Extrapyramidal Symptoms and Medication Use in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchan, Michel C.; Sillence, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: We report the case of a 16-year-old male with Mucopolysaccharidosis III type A (Sanfilippo syndrome) who was commenced on risperidone for behaviour management. He rapidly developed extrapyramidal symptoms that have not resolved. Method: The medication histories of 20 patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis III seen at a Lysosomal Storage…

  15. Extrapyramidal Symptoms and Medication Use in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchan, Michel C.; Sillence, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: We report the case of a 16-year-old male with Mucopolysaccharidosis III type A (Sanfilippo syndrome) who was commenced on risperidone for behaviour management. He rapidly developed extrapyramidal symptoms that have not resolved. Method: The medication histories of 20 patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis III seen at a Lysosomal Storage…

  16. Glycogen storage disease type III diagnosis and management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Austin, Stephanie L; Arn, Pamela; Bali, Deeksha S; Boney, Anne; Case, Laura E; Chung, Wendy K; Desai, Dev M; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Haller, Ronald; Smit, G Peter A; Smith, Alastair D; Hobson-Webb, Lisa D; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Weinstein, David A; Watson, Michael S

    2010-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is a rare disease of variable clinical severity affecting primarily the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. It is caused by deficient activity of glycogen debranching enzyme, which is a key enzyme in glycogen degradation. Glycogen storage disease type III manifests a wide clinical spectrum. Individuals with glycogen storage disease type III present with hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and growth retardation. Those with type IIIa have symptoms related to liver disease and progressive muscle (cardiac and skeletal) involvement that varies in age of onset, rate of disease progression, and severity. Those with type IIIb primarily have symptoms related to liver disease. This guideline for the management of glycogen storage disease type III was developed as an educational resource for health care providers to facilitate prompt and accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients. An international group of experts in various aspects of glycogen storage disease type III met to review the evidence base from the scientific literature and provided their expert opinions. Consensus was developed in each area of diagnosis, treatment, and management. This management guideline specifically addresses evaluation and diagnosis across multiple organ systems (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal/nutrition, hepatic, musculoskeletal, and neuromuscular) involved in glycogen storage disease type III. Conditions to consider in a differential diagnosis stemming from presenting features and diagnostic algorithms are discussed. Aspects of diagnostic evaluation and nutritional and medical management, including care coordination, genetic counseling, hepatic transplantation, and prenatal diagnosis, are addressed. A guideline that will facilitate the accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of individuals with glycogen storage disease type III was developed. This guideline will help health care providers recognize patients with all forms of

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Propagation of Type III Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkevych, B. P.; Melnik, V. N.

    Recently solar Type III bursts with fine time structure have been observed by radio telescope UTR-2 at frequencies 10 - 30 MHz. For the first time Type III-like bursts with high frequency drift rates were observed at these frequencies too. All this became possible due to both high sensitivity and high time resolution of UTR-2. The properties of decameter Type III bursts can be understood if we take into account the spatial dependence of the electromagnetic wave group velocity as well as the fine spatial structure of the cloud of fast electrons responsible for Type III bursts. These effects are considered numerically in this paper. The fine time structure of Type III bursts is shown to be observed in the days when the associated active region is situated near the central meridian. In other days such structures disappeared. The Type III-like bursts with frequency drift rates of 10 - 20 MHz/s should also be observed, when the associated active region is near the central meridian. These peculiarities are confirmed by observations.

  18. [Review on hrp genes of plant pathogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Yin, Qi-Sheng; Song, Ji-Zhen; Hou, Ming-Sheng

    2005-09-01

    The hrp genes exist in 4 kinds of Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria and are responsible for the pathogenicity of bacteria. They can induce hypersensitive response on non-host and resistant plants. In the present paper, we summarized the hrp genes clusters, the relationship between hrp and avr genes, harpin proteins encoded by hrp genes, modulation and function of hrp genes, and plant-bacteria interactions mediated by hrp genes in more details. Moreover, trends in future research of plant pathogenic bacteria hrp genes have also been analyzed.

  19. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  20. hrpL activates Erwinia amylovora hrp gene transcription and is a member of the ECF subfamily of sigma factors.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z M; Beer, S V

    1995-01-01

    hrpL of Erwinia amylovora Ea321 encodes a 21.7-kDa regulatory protein, similar to members of the ECF (extra cytoplasmic functions) subfamily of eubacterial RNA polymerase sigma factors. hrpL is a single-gene operon in complementation group VI of the E. amylovora hrp gene cluster. Its product is required by Ea321 to elicit the hypersensitive response (HR) and to cause disease. HrpL controls the expression of five independent hrp loci, including hrpN, which encodes harpin, a proteinaceous elicitor of the HR. hrpL is environmentally regulated, and its expression is affected by hrpS, another regulatory gene of the hrp gene cluster of E. amylovora. pCPP1078, a multicopy plasmid carrying hrpL, is able to restore HR-eliciting ability to hrpS mutants. A conserved motif was identified upstream of the hrpI and hrpN operons, which are transcriptionally regulated by hrpL. This conserved motif shares a high degree of similarity with other biochemically defined or putative ECF-dependent promoter sequences, including sequences upstream of Streptomyces coelicolor dagA P2, Pseudomonas aeruginosa algD, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 hrpZ, and P. syringae pv. tomato avrD. In spite of the similarity between the hrpL genes of E. amylovora and P. syringae 61, no functional cross-complementation was observed. PMID:7592386

  1. The expression of type III hyperlipoproteinemia: involvement of lipolysis genes

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Peter; van der Sman-de Beer, Femke; Moghaddam, Payman Hanifi; Huijts, Petra; Stalenhoef, Anton FH; Kastelein, John JP; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Havekes, Louis M; Frants, Rune R; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Smelt, Augustinus HM

    2009-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) is mainly found in homozygous apolipoprotein (APO) E2 (R158C) carriers. Genetic factors contributing to the expression of type III HLP were investigated in 113 hyper- and 52 normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, by testing for polymorphisms in APOC3, APOA5, HL (hepatic lipase) and LPL (lipoprotein lipase) genes. In addition, 188 normolipidemic Dutch control panels (NDCP) and 141 hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) patients were genotyped as well. No associations were found for four HL gene polymorphisms and two LPL gene polymorphisms and type III HLP. The frequency of the rare allele of APOC3 3238 G>C and APOA5 −1131 T>C (in linkage disequilibrium) was significantly higher in type III HLP patients when compared with normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, 15.6 vs 6.9% and 15.1 vs 5.8%, respectively, (P<0.05). Furthermore, the frequencies of the APOA5 c.56 G>C polymorphism and LPL c.27 G>A mutation were higher in type III HLP patients, though not significant. Some 58% of the type III HLP patients carried either the APOA5 −1131 T>C, c.56 G>C and/or LPL c.27 G>A mutation as compared to 27% of the normolipidemic APOE2/2 subjects (odds ratio 3.7, 95% confidence interval=1.8–7.5, P<0.0001). The HTG patients showed similar allele frequencies of the APOA5, APOC3 and LPL polymorphisms, whereas the NDCP showed similar allele frequencies as the normolipidemic APOE2/2. Patients with the APOC3 3238 G>C/APOA5 −1131 T>C polymorphism showed a more severe hyperlipidemia than patients without this polymorphism. Polymorphisms in lipolysis genes associate with the expression and severity of type III HLP in APOE2/2. PMID:19034316

  2. Type III CRISPR complexes from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Szychowska, Marta; Siwek, Wojciech; Pawolski, Damian; Kazrani, Asgar Abbas; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Bochtler, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-specific acquired immunity in bacteria is mediated by the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas systems. Thermus thermophilus strain HB8 contains CRISPR systems of several major subtypes (type I, IIIA and IIIB), and has become a widely studied model for CRISPR biology. We have selected two highly expressed CRISPR spacers, crRNA 2.1 and crRNA 2.2, and have enriched endogenous T. thermophilus proteins that co-purify with these crRNAs. Mass spectroscopy indicates that the chromatography protocol enriches predominantly Csm complex subunits, but also Cmr subunits. After several chromatographic steps, size exclusion chromatography indicated a molecular mass of the crRNA associated complex of 265±69 kDa. In agreement with earlier work, crRNAs of different lengths (containing the selected spacers) were observed. Most of these were completely lost when several T. thermophilus csm genes were ablated.

  3. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Ibanez, Selena Gimenez; MacLean, Daniel; Dangl, Jeffery L; Chang, Jeff H; Rathjen, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72%) had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the continued development of P

  4. ApoHRP-based Assay to Measure Intracellular Regulatory Heme

    PubMed Central

    Atamna, Hani; Brahmbhatt, Marmik; Atamna, Wafa; Shanower, Gregory A.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the heme-binding proteins possess a “heme-pocket” that stably binds with heme. Usually known as housekeeping heme-proteins, they participate in a variety of metabolic reactions (e.g., catalase). Heme also binds with lower affinity to the “Heme-Regulatory Motifs” (HRM) in specific regulatory proteins. This type of heme binding is known as exchangeable or regulatory heme (RH). Heme binding to HRM proteins regulates their function (e.g., Bach1). Although there are well-established methods for assaying total cellular heme (e.g., heme-proteins plus RH), currently there is no method available for measuring RH independently from the total heme (TH). The current study describes and validates a new method to measure intracellular RH. The method is based on the reconstitution of apo-horseradish peroxidase (apoHRP) with heme to form holoHRP. The resulting holoHRP activity is then measured with a colorimetric substrate. The results show that apoHRP specifically binds RH but not with heme from housekeeping heme-proteins. The RH assay detects intracellular RH. Furthermore, using conditions that create positive (hemin) or negative (N-methyl protoporphyrin IX) controls for heme in normal human fibroblasts (IMR90), the RH assay shows that RH is dynamic and independent from TH. We also demonstrated that short-term exposure to subcytotoxic concentrations of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), or amyloid-β(Aβ) significantly alters intracellular RH with little effect on TH. In conclusion the RH assay is an effective assay to investigate intracellular RH concentration and demonstrates that RH represents ~6% of total heme in IMR90 cells. PMID:25525887

  5. The Dickeya dadantii biofilm matrix consists of cellulose nanofibres, and is an emergent property dependent upon the type III secretion system and the cellulose synthesis operon.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Courtney E; Selimi, Dija A; Barak, Jeri D; Charkowski, Amy O

    2011-10-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that produces cellulose-containing biofilms, called pellicles, at the air-liquid interface of liquid cultures. D. dadantii pellicle formation appears to be an emergent property dependent upon at least three gene clusters, including cellulose synthesis, type III secretion system (T3SS) and flagellar genes. The D. dadantii cellulose synthesis operon is homologous to that of Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which is used for industrial cellulose production, and the cellulose nanofibres produced by D. dadantii were similar in diameter and branching pattern to those produced by G. xylinus. Salmonella enterica, an enterobacterium closely related to D. dadantii, encodes a second type of cellulose synthesis operon, and it produced biofilm strands that differed in width and branching pattern from those of D. dadantii and G. xylinus. Unlike any previously described cellulose fibre, the D. dadantii cellulose nanofibres were decorated with bead-like structures. Mutation of the cellulose synthesis operon genes resulted in loss of cellulose synthesis and production of a cellulase-resistant biofilm. Mutation of other genes required for pellicle formation, including those encoding FliA (a sigma factor that regulates flagella production), HrpL (a sigma factor that regulates the T3SS), and AdrA, a GGDEF protein, affected both biofilm and cell morphology. Mutation of the cellulose synthase bcsA or of bcsC resulted in decreased accumulation of the T3SS-secreted protein HrpN.

  6. Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romantsova, T. V.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Skalsky, A. A.; Hanasz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous wave observations onboard the ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 spacecraft show that onsets of the Auroral Kilometric Radiation frequently coincide with an arrival of type III solar burst (Calvert, 1981). It was supposed that solar burst stimulates maser instability in auroral region and AKR consequently . We present statistical and case studies of events when both type III solar radio bursts and Auroral Kilometric Radiation are recorded simultaneously. AKR was observed onboard the INTERBALL-2 spacecraft orbiting around the Earth by the POLRAD experiment. Wave measurements carried out onboard the Wind, INTEBALL-TAIL and Geotail spacecraft are used to identify unambiguously the type III solar radio bursts. The origin of close relation between onsets of both solar radiation and AKR is discussed and interpreted. Acknowledgements. This work is supported by grant RFBR 06-02-72560.

  7. Type III source locations as inferred from stereoscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Al-Haddad, Eimad; Hammoud, Muhamed; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2017-04-01

    We study the Type III solar bursts simultaneously recorded by radio experiments onboard Cassini, Ulysses and Wind. Those radio bursts cover a large frequency range from about 14 MHz to a few kHz. The corresponding source locations are mainly in the solar corona and the interplanetary medium. The empirical electron density models provide different distances depending on the emission mode, fundamental or harmonic. A real trouble arises due to the distance discrepancies, as inferred from the models. Also the Archimedean spiral trajectories of the electrons, at the origin of the Type III bursts, are another difficulty to correctly estimate the source locations. We show in our analysis that the stereoscopic observations are essential to reduce the source location inaccuracy. We finally discuss the relationship between the Type III beams, the emission modes and the source locations.

  8. [Reconstructive surgery of Blauth type III hypoplasia of the thumb].

    PubMed

    Foucher, G; Gazarian, A; Pajardi, G

    1999-01-01

    Thumb hypoplasia type III according to Blauth remains a rare congenital malformation. Recently Manske has promoted reconstruction versus pollicization in the sub-type IIIA where a first carpometacarpal joint is present. However we felt that pollicization is the solution for sub-type IIB where the basal joint is absent. We have reviewed 14 cases of thumb hypoplasia type III, four of them being type IIIB. After performing a first step with a free vascularized second metatarso-phalangeal joint transfer, the secondary steps were identical in both sub-groups. After a mean follow up of five years, no great difference was found in the two sub-groups and basal stability was even better in type IIIB. However the results were functionally and cosmetically inferior to the ones observed after pollicization. When the relatives refuse pollicization or the patient consults late for functional improvement, reconstruction remains worthwhile.

  9. The general solution of Bianchi type III vacuum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulakis, T.; Terzis, Petros A.

    2007-02-01

    The second-order ordinary differential equation which describes the unknown part of the solution space of some vacuum Bianchi cosmologies is completely integrated for type III, thus obtaining the general solution to Einstein's field equations for this case, with the aid of the sixth Painlevé transcendent PVI. For particular representations of PVI we obtain the known Kinnersley two-parameter spacetime and a solution of Euclidean signature. The imposition of the spacetime generalization of a 'hidden' symmetry of the generic type III spatial slice enables us to retrieve the two-parameter subfamily without considering the Painlevé transcendent.

  10. Orthopaedic management in four cases of mucolipidosis type III.

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington, C; Harris, N J; Smith, T W

    1999-01-01

    Four patients with mucolipidosis type III, three of them brothers, were seen initially in the first two decades of life. Their main symptoms were carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger fingers and generalized joint stiffness. Radiographs showed spinal deformities and hip dysplasia, but these were not causing pain. Carpal tunnel syndrome was treated surgically but joint stiffness and hip and knee contractures were managed by physiotherapy. Up to the age of 24 none of these patients has had pelvic osteotomy for hip dysplasia; this operation, not yet reported in mucolipidosis type III, may eventually be necessary. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10472261

  11. Identification of a putative cognate sensor kinase for the two-component response regulator HrpG, a key regulator controlling the expression of the hrp genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Guang-Tao; Li, Lei; Su, Hui-Zhao; Feng, Guo-fang; Chen, Ya; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    The bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) relies on the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes to cause disease and induce hypersensitive response (HR). The hrp genes of bacterial phytopathogens are divided into two groups. Xcc hrp genes belong to group II. It has long been known that the group II hrp genes are activated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator whose expression is controlled by a two-component system (TCS) response regulator (named HrpG in Xcc). However, no cognate sensor kinase has yet been identified. Here, we present evidence showing that the Xcc open-reading frame XC_3670 encodes a TCS sensor kinase (named HpaS). Mutation of hpaS almost completely abolished the HR induction and virulence. Bacterial two-hybrid and protein pull-down assays revealed that HpaS physically interacted with HrpG. Phos-tag™ SDS-PAGE analysis showed that mutation in hpaS reduced markedly the phosphorylation of HrpG in vivo. These data suggest that HpaS and HrpG are most likely to form a TCS. We also showed that XC_3669 (named hpaR2), which is adjacent to hpaS and encodes a putative TCS response regulator, is required for full virulence but not HR induction. HpaR2 also physically interacted with HpaS, suggesting that HpaS may also form another TCS with HpaR2.

  12. The C-terminal extension of PrhG impairs its activation of hrp expression and virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Yasuo, Igarashi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the second most destructive bacterial plant pathogens worldwide and HrpG is the master regulator of its pathogenicity. PrhG is a close paralogue of HrpG and both belong to OmpR/PhoB family of two-component response regulators. Despite a high similarity (72% global identity and 96% similarity in helix-loop-helix domain), they display distinct roles in pathogenicity. HrpG is necessary for the bacterial growth in planta and pathogenicity, while PrhG is dispensable for bacterial growth in planta and contributes little to pathogenicity. The main difference between HrpG and PrhG is the 50-amino-acid-long C-terminal extension in PrhG (amino-acid residues 230-283), which is absent in HrpG. When this extension is deleted, truncated PrhGs (under the control of its native promoter) allowed complete recovery of bacterial growth in planta and wild-type virulence of hrpG mutant. This novel finding demonstrates that the extension region in PrhG is responsible for the functional difference between HrpG and PrhG, which may block the binding of PrhG to target promoters and result in impaired activation of hrp expression by PrhG and reduced virulence of R. solanacearum. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. 46 CFR 153.232 - Type III system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type III system. 153.232 Section 153.232 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment...

  14. Case series of type III hyperlipoproteinemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Michelle; Hill, John; Cook, Donald; Frohlich, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (type III HLP) rarely manifests in childhood. Long-term follow-up (37 years) of the first patient revealed hypothyroidism at diagnosis requiring thyroxine replacement, palmar xanthomas requiring surgical removal, splenomegaly requiring splenectomy, 18 episodes of pancreatitis and premature coronary artery disease. Investigation revealed an apolipoprotein E phenotype of E2/E2 and partial lipoprotein lipase deficiency. Investigation of the second patient revealed a combination of apoE2/E2 phenotype and heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. The third patient had a complete deficiency of lipoprotein lipase activity, an abnormal thyroid stimulating hormone on diagnosis (with subsequent normalisation without treatment), and apoE2/E2 phenotype. Type III HLP is a serious disorder with lifelong consequences of premature vascular disease and recurrent pancreatitis. Early presentation of disease in our patients was associated with additional precipitating factors. Drug treatment of paediatric type III HLP is indicated if dietary modifications alone are insufficient in managing the dyslipidaemia. PMID:22691586

  15. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  16. [Central motor conduction evaluation in glycogenosis type III].

    PubMed

    Alaejos Fuentes, J A; López-Alburquerque, T; De Portugal Alvarez, J

    1997-05-01

    We report a 20-year-old man affected by glycogenosis type III with distal muscle weakness, more severe in distal leg muscles. The electromyogram showed myopathic features. Nerve conduction studies and central motor conduction after magnetic stimulation of the brain were normal. Our results suggest that there is no involvement of central motor pathways in this disease.

  17. Computational prediction shines light on type III secretion origins

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard; Bromberg, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion system is a key bacterial symbiosis and pathogenicity mechanism responsible for a variety of infectious diseases, ranging from food-borne illnesses to the bubonic plague. In many Gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system transports effector proteins into host cells, converting resources to bacterial advantage. Here we introduce a computational method that identifies type III effectors by combining homology-based inference with de novo predictions, reaching up to 3-fold higher performance than existing tools. Our work reveals that signals for recognition and transport of effectors are distributed over the entire protein sequence instead of being confined to the N-terminus, as was previously thought. Our scan of hundreds of prokaryotic genomes identified previously unknown effectors, suggesting that type III secretion may have evolved prior to the archaea/bacteria split. Crucially, our method performs well for short sequence fragments, facilitating evaluation of microbial communities and rapid identification of bacterial pathogenicity – no genome assembly required. pEffect and its data sets are available at http://services.bromberglab.org/peffect. PMID:27713481

  18. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  19. The type III secretion system of biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens KD targets the phytopathogenic Chromista Pythium ultimum and promotes cucumber protection.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Binder, Christian; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2005-09-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is used by Proteobacteria for pathogenic or symbiotic interaction with plant and animal hosts. Recently, TTSS genes thought to originate from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were evidenced in Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, which protects cucumber from the oomycete Pythium ultimum (kingdom Chromista/Stramenopila). However, it is not known whether the TTSS contributes to plant protection by the bacterium and, if so, whether it targets the plant or the phytopathogen. Inactivation of TTSS gene hrcV following the insertion of an omega cassette strongly reduced the biocontrol activity of the pseudomonad against P. ultimum on cucumber when compared with the wild type, but had no effect on its root-colonization ability. Analysis of a plasmid-based transcriptional hrpJ'-inaZ reporter fusion revealed that expression in strain KD of the operon containing hrcV was strongly stimulated in vitro and in situ by the oomycete and not by the plant. In vitro, both strain KD and its hrcV mutant reduced the activity level of the pectinase polygalacturonase (a key pathogenicity factor) from P. ultimum, but the reduction was much stronger with the wild type. Together, these results show that the target range of bacterial TTSS is not restricted to plants and animals but also can include members of Chromista/Stramenopila, and suggest that virulence genes acquired horizontally from phytopathogenic bacteria were functionally recycled in biocontrol saprophytic Pseudomonas spp., resulting in enhanced plant protection by the latter.

  20. 10 CFR 712.12 - HRP implementation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability...) Report any observed or reported behavior or condition of another HRP-certified individual that could indicate a reliability concern, including those behaviors and conditions listed in § 712.13(c), to a...

  1. 10 CFR 712.12 - HRP implementation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability...) Report any observed or reported behavior or condition of another HRP-certified individual that could indicate a reliability concern, including those behaviors and conditions listed in § 712.13(c), to a...

  2. Discovery of Plant Phenolic Compounds That Act as Type III Secretion System Inhibitors or Inducers of the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23770912

  3. Discovery of plant phenolic compounds that act as type III secretion system inhibitors or inducers of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xin; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2013-09-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens.

  4. 10 CFR 712.18 - Transferring HRP certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... into a designated HRP position; (2) Incorporate the individual into the new site's alcohol and drug-testing program; (3) Ensure that the 12-month time period for HRP requirements that was established at the...

  5. 10 CFR 712.18 - Transferring HRP certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... into a designated HRP position; (2) Incorporate the individual into the new site's alcohol and drug-testing program; (3) Ensure that the 12-month time period for HRP requirements that was established at the...

  6. Evolutionary and functional analysis of mulberry type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Liang, Jiubo; Chen, Hu; Ding, Guangyu; Ma, Bi; He, Ningjia

    2016-08-04

    Type III polyketide synthases are important for the biosynthesis of flavonoids and various plant polyphenols. Mulberry plants have abundant polyphenols, but very little is known about the mulberry type III polyketide synthase genes. An analysis of these genes may provide new targets for genetic improvement to increase relevant secondary metabolites and enhance the plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Eighteen genes encoding type III polyketide synthases were identified, including six chalcone synthases (CHS), ten stilbene synthases (STS), and two polyketide synthases (PKS). Functional characterization of four genes representing most of the MnCHS and MnSTS genes by coexpression with 4-Coumaroyl-CoA ligase in Escherichia coli indicated that their products were able to catalyze p-coumaroyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to generate naringenin and resveratrol, respectively. Microsynteny analysis within mulberry indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events contributed to the expansion of the MnCHS family, while tandem duplications were mainly responsible for the generation of the MnSTS genes. Combining the evolution and expression analysis results of the mulberry type III PKS genes indicated that MnCHS and MnSTS genes evolved mainly under purifying selection to maintain their original functions, but transcriptional subfunctionalization occurred during long-term species evolution. Moreover, mulberry leaves can rapidly accumulated oxyresveratrol after UV-C irradiation, suggesting that resveratrol was converted to oxyresveratrol. Characterizing the functions and evolution of mulberry type III PKS genes is crucial for advancing our understanding of these genes and providing the basis for further studies on the biosynthesis of relevant secondary metabolites in mulberry plants.

  7. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  8. Type I/type III collagen ratio associated with diverticulitis of the colon in young patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shaun R; Cleveland, Elane M; Deeken, Corey R; Huitron, Sonni S; Aluka, Kanayochukwu J; Davis, Kurt G

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of diverticulitis in young patients is rising, whereas the type I:III collagen ratio of the colon decreases with age. Perhaps a lower type I:III collagen ratio in younger patients may predispose these patients to the development of the disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the collagen content and type I:III collagen ratio in patients with diverticulitis versus a control group. Patients who underwent a colon resection were identified. Three groups of patients were created for analysis: those with diverticulitis aged <50 y, >50 y, and a control group. Tissue samples were stained with Sirius red/fast green and photographed. Photos analysis was performed to quantify the amount of type I collagen and type III collagen. The type I:III collagen ratio was calculated for each patient and compared. The quantity of type I collagen and type III collagen was higher in patients with diverticulitis aged >50 y (P = 0.04 and P < 0.0001, respectively); however, the collagen ratio was greatest in those patients with diverticulitis aged <50 y (P = 0.01). Further analysis demonstrated a significant higher type I:III ratio in all patients aged less than 50 y compared with all patients aged over 50 y (P = 0.04). Our study demonstrated that diverticulitis in the younger patient was not associated with a lower type I:III collagen ratio. It appears that the decrease in collagen ratio of the colon with age is associated with an increase in type III collagen deposition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. 10 CFR 712.10 - Designation of HRP positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Designation of HRP positions. 712.10 Section 712.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability Program Procedures § 712.10 Designation of HRP positions. (a) HRP certification is required for...

  10. 10 CFR 712.10 - Designation of HRP positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Designation of HRP positions. 712.10 Section 712.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability Program Procedures § 712.10 Designation of HRP positions. (a) HRP certification is required for...

  11. 10 CFR 712.10 - Designation of HRP positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Designation of HRP positions. 712.10 Section 712.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability Program Procedures § 712.10 Designation of HRP positions. (a) HRP certification is required for...

  12. 10 CFR 712.10 - Designation of HRP positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Designation of HRP positions. 712.10 Section 712.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability Program Procedures § 712.10 Designation of HRP positions. (a) HRP certification is required for...

  13. 10 CFR 712.10 - Designation of HRP positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designation of HRP positions. 712.10 Section 712.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Establishment of and Procedures for the Human Reliability Program Procedures § 712.10 Designation of HRP positions. (a) HRP certification is required for...

  14. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  15. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  16. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Removal from HRP. 712.19 Section 712.19 Energy DEPARTMENT... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an HRP-certified individual is not reliable, based on either a safety or security concern,...

  17. THE SPECIFIC POLYSACCHARIDES OF TYPES I, II, AND III PNEUMOCOCCUS

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberger, Michael; Kendall, Forrest E.; Scherp, Henry W.

    1936-01-01

    1. The thermolability of the specific polysaccharides of Types I, II, and III pneumococcus has been shown by three independent methods: (a) diminution of the viscosity of solutions on heating; (b) decrease in the amount of antibody precipitated from homologous rabbit antisera; and (c) increased tendency (S III) to pass through a collodion membrane. 2. These effects may be explained most simply as a partial depolymerization under the influence of heat. In air, particularly in the presence of broth, oxidation also appears to be involved. 3. Improved and simpler methods of preparation based on these findings, are given for S I, S II, and S III. The resulting products precipitate more anti-S from homologous rabbit antisera than do the earlier preparations. 4. The methyl glycoside of methyl galacturonate has been isolated from the hydrolytic products of S I, and evidence of the ultimate structural unit obtained. PMID:19870553

  18. The role of type III factors in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yngvason, Jakob

    2005-02-01

    One of von Neumann's motivations for developing the theory of operator algebras and his and Murray's 1936 classification of factors was the question of possible decompositions of quantum systems into independent parts. For quantum systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom the simplest possibility, i.e. factors of type I in the terminology of Murray and von Neumann, are perfectly adequate. In relativistic quantum field theory (RQFT), on the other hand, factors of type III occur naturally. The same holds true in quantum statistical mechanics of infinite systems. In this brief review some physical consequences of the type III property of the von Neumann algebras corresponding to localized observables in RQFT and their difference from the type I case will be discussed. The cumulative effort of many people over more than 30 years has established a remarkable uniqueness result: The local algebras in RQFT are generically isomorphic to the unique, hyperfinite type III, factor in Connes' classification of 1973. Specific theories are characterized by the net structure of the collection of these isomorphic algebras for different space-time regions, i.e. the way they are embedded into each other

  19. Cognitive development in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the degradation of heparan sulfate. MPS III is characterized by progressive mental deterioration resulting in severe dementia. A number of potentially disease-modifying therapies are studied. As preservation of cognitive function is the ultimate goal of treatment, assessment of cognitive development will be essential in order to evaluate treatment efficacy. However, no large scale studies on cognitive levels in MPS III patients, using formal psychometric tests, have been reported. Methods We aimed to assess cognitive development in all 73 living patients with MPS III in the Netherlands. Results Cognitive development could be assessed in 69 patients. In 39 of them developmental level was estimated > 3 months and formal psychometric testing was attempted. A remarkable variation in the intellectual disability was detected. Conclusions Despite special challenges encountered, testing failed in only three patients. The observed broad variation in intellectual disability, should be taken into account when designing therapeutic trials. PMID:21689409

  20. A tiny event producing an interplanetary type III burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Nindos, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Tsitsipis, P.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the conditions under which small-scale energy release events in the low corona gave rise to strong interplanetary (IP) type III bursts. Methods: We analyzed observations of three tiny events, detected by the Nançay Radio Heliograph (NRH), two of which produced IP type III bursts. We took advantage of the NRH positioning information and of the high cadence of AIA/SDO data to identify the associated extreme-UV (EUV) emissions. We measured positions and time profiles of the metric and EUV sources. Results: We found that the EUV events that produced IP type III bursts were located near a coronal hole boundary, while the one that did not was located in a closed magnetic field region. In all three cases tiny flaring loops were involved, without any associated mass eruption. In the best observed case, the radio emission at the highest frequency (435 MHz) was displaced by ~55'' with respect to the small flaring loop. The metric type III emission shows a complex structure in space and in time, indicative of multiple electron beams, despite the low intensity of the events. From the combined analysis of dynamic spectra and NRH images, we derived the electron beam velocity as well as the height, ambient plasma temperature, and density at the level of formation of the 160 MHz emission. From the analysis of the differential emission measure derived from the AIA images, we found that the first evidence of energy release was at the footpoints, and this was followed by the development of flaring loops and subsequent cooling. Conclusions: Even small energy release events can accelerate enough electrons to give rise to powerful IP type III bursts. The proximity of the electron acceleration site to open magnetic field lines facilitates the escape of the electrons into the interplanetary space. The offset between the site of energy release and the metric type III location warrants further investigation. The movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Type II and Type III Radio Emissions and Their Association with Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that CME-driven shocks are a major source of solar energetic particles (SEPs). The solar phenomena associated with high energy SEP increases nearly always include type II radio emissions indicative of the presence of shocks. However, there is also a clear link between particles accelerated in the low corona and type III radio bursts. For the most energetic events the type III emissions extend into or occur after, the flare impulsive phase. Such emission has been named type III-l mainly because the emission is "late". In our work, we have found an excellent correlation between the pattern of radio emissions and the associated particle events. However, various other studies have investigated type III-l emissions and found the association with SEP events to be less compelling. We explore the results of these studies in order to determine why this is the case.

  2. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  3. Spatial trends in Pearson Type III statistical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichty, R.W.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Spatial trends in the statistical parameters (mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient) of a Pearson Type III distribution of the logarithms of annual flood peaks for small rural basins (less than 90 km2) are delineated using a climate factor CT, (T=2-, 25-, and 100-yr recurrence intervals), which quantifies the effects of long-term climatic data (rainfall and pan evaporation) on observed T-yr floods. Maps showing trends in average parameter values demonstrate the geographically varying influence of climate on the magnitude of Pearson Type III statistical parameters. The spatial trends in variability of the parameter values characterize the sensitivity of statistical parameters to the interaction of basin-runoff characteristics (hydrology) and climate. -from Authors

  4. Substrate recognition by the Yersinia type III protein secretion machinery.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthi, Kumaran S; Schneewind, Olaf

    2003-11-01

    Type III secretion is the designation given to those protein secretion pathways, primarily in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, whose secretion machinery components share an amino acid sequence homology to components of the flagellar basal body. In Yersinia spp., these secretion machineries inject virulence proteins called Yops into the cytosol of target macrophages in an effort to evade phagocytic killing. To date, a clear mechanism by which Yops are recognized by the type III secretion machinery has not been elucidated. Unlike most, if not all, previously characterized protein sorting pathways, the information that identifies Yops as substrates for secretion seems not to be wholly encoded within the Yop peptide sequence. In fact, it appears that at least some of this information is contained within yop mRNAs. This review summarizes recent observations that have been made in this unusual field and proposes models by which proteins may be initiated into this pathway.

  5. Structural Insights into Fibronectin Type III Domain Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Cui, Cai Bin; Siddiqui, Adnan; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Sondek, John; Zuobi-Hasona, Kheir; Aukhil, Ikramuddin

    2007-01-01

    The alternatively spliced type-III extradomain B (EIIIB) of Fibronectin (FN) is only expressed during embryogenesis, wound healing and tumorigenesis. The biological function of this domain remains unclear. We describe here the first crystal structure of the interface between alternatively-spliced domain EIIIB and its adjacent FN type-III domain 8 (FN B-8). The opened CC′ loop of EIIIB and the rotation and tilt of EIIIB domain allows good access to the FG loop of FN-8 which is normally hindered by the CC′ loop of FN-7. In addition, the AGEGIP sequence of the CC′ loop of EIIIB replaces the NGQQGN sequence of the CC′ loop of FN-7. Finally, the CC” loop of EIIIB forms an acidic groove with FN-8. These structural findings warrant future studies directed at identifying potential binding partners for FN B-8 interface, linking EIIIB to skeletal and cartilagenous development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, respectively. PMID:17261313

  6. Type III effector-mediated processes in Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joris; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-06-01

    Salmonella is one of the most successful bacterial pathogens that infect humans in both developed and developing countries. In order to cause infection, Salmonella uses type III secretion systems to inject bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In the age of antibiotic resistance, researchers have been looking for new strategies to reduce Salmonella infection. To understand infection and to analyze type III secretion as a potential therapeutic target, research has focused on identification of effectors, characterization of effector functions and how they contribute to disease. Many effector-mediated processes have been identified that contribute to infection but thus far no specific treatment has been found. In this perspective we discuss our current understanding of effector-mediated processes and discuss new techniques and approaches that may help us to find a solution to this worldwide problem.

  7. Identification of novel type III effectors using latent Dirichlet allocation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Among the six secretion systems identified in Gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS) plays important roles in the disease development of pathogens. T3SS has attracted a great deal of research interests. However, the secretion mechanism has not been fully understood yet. Especially, the identification of effectors (secreted proteins) is an important and challenging task. This paper adopts machine learning methods to identify type III secreted effectors (T3SEs). We extract features from amino acid sequences and conduct feature reduction based on latent semantic information by using latent Dirichlet allocation model. The experimental results on Pseudomonas syringae data set demonstrate the good performance of the new methods.

  8. Identification of type II and type III pyoverdine receptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    de Chial, Magaly; Ghysels, Bart; Beatson, Scott A; Geoffroy, Valérie; Meyer, Jean Marie; Pattery, Theresa; Baysse, Christine; Chablain, Patrice; Parsons, Yasmin N; Winstanley, Craig; Cordwell, Stuart J; Cornelis, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces, under conditions of iron limitation, a high-affinity siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD), which is recognized at the level of the outer membrane by a specific TonB-dependent receptor, FpvA. So far, for P. aeruginosa, three different PVDs, differing in their peptide chain, have been described (types I-III), but only the FpvA receptor for type I is known. Two PVD-producing P. aeruginosa strains, one type II and one type III, were mutagenized by a mini-TnphoA3 transposon. In each case, one mutant unable to grow in the presence of the strong iron chelator ethylenediaminedihydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and the cognate PVD was selected. The first mutant, which had an insertion in the pvdE gene, upstream of fpvA, was unable to take up type II PVD and showed resistance to pyocin S3, which is known to use type II FpvA as receptor. The second mutant was unable to take up type III PVD and had the transposon insertion in fpvA. Cosmid libraries of the respective type II and type III PVD wild-type strains were constructed and screened for clones restoring the capacity to grow in the presence of PVD. From the respective complementing genomic fragments, type II and type III fpvA sequences were determined. When in trans, type II and type III fpvA restored PVD production, uptake, growth in the presence of EDDHA and, in the case of type II fpvA, pyocin S3 sensitivity. Complementation of fpvA mutants obtained by allelic exchange was achieved by the presence of cognate fpvA in trans. All three receptors posses an N-terminal extension of about 70 amino acids, similar to FecA of Escherichia coli, but only FpvAI has a TAT export sequence at its N-terminal end.

  9. On the theory of the type III burst exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1976-01-01

    In situ satellite observations of type III burst exciters at 1 AU show that the beam does not evolve into a plateau in velocity space, contrary to the prediction of quasilinear theory. The observations can be explained by a theory that includes mode coupling effects due to excitation of the parametric oscillating two-stream instability and its saturation by anomalous resistivity. The time evolution of the beam velocity distribution is included in the analysis.

  10. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu

    2012-02-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft R{sub j} = I{sub j} /{Sigma}I{sub j} (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of {approx}2 Degree-Sign and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from {approx} - 100 Degree-Sign to {approx}100 Degree-Sign . The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  11. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  12. Fuel of the Bacterial Flagellar Type III Protein Export Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Kinoshita, Miki; Namba, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    The flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) across the cytoplasmic membrane as the energy sources and transports flagellar component proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal growing end of the growing structure to construct the bacterial flagellum beyond the cellular membranes. The flagellar type III export apparatus coordinates flagellar protein export with assembly by ordered export of substrates to parallel with their order of the assembly. The export apparatus is composed of a PMF-driven transmembrane export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Since the ATPase complex is dispensable for flagellar protein export, PMF is the primary fuel for protein unfolding and translocation. Interestingly, the export gate complex can also use sodium motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane in addition to PMF when the ATPase complex does not work properly. Here, we describe experimental protocols, which have allowed us to identify the export substrate class and the primary fuel of the flagellar type III protein export apparatus in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of two-component system RhpRS regulating type III secretion system in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Chen, Kai; He, Chuan; Lan, Lefu; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae uses the two-component system RhpRS to regulate the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS) genes and bacterial virulence. However, the molecular mechanisms and the regulons of RhpRS have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that RhpS functions as a kinase and a phosphatase on RhpR and as an autokinase upon itself. RhpR is phosphorylated by the small phosphodonor acetyl phosphate. A specific RhpR-binding site containing the inverted repeat (IR) motif GTATC-N6-GATAC, was mapped to its own promoter by a DNase I footprint analysis. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that P-RhpR has a higher binding affinity to the IR motif than RhpR. To identify additional RhpR targets in P. syringae, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and detected 167 enriched loci including the hrpR promoter, suggesting the direct regulation of T3SS cascade genes by RhpR. A genome-wide microarray analysis showed that, in addition to the T3SS cascade genes, RhpR differentially regulates a large set of genes with various functions in response to different growth conditions. Together, these results suggested that RhpRS is a global regulator that allows P. syringae to sense and respond to environmental changes by coordinating T3SS expression and many other biological processes. PMID:25249629

  14. A Qualitative Study of Recovery from Type III-B and III-C Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa S.; Aravind, Maya S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction following type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and/or outcomes. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes. PMID:20948418

  15. Inhibition mechanism of Tb(III) on horseradish peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaofen; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-10-01

    The inhibition mechanism of Tb(III) on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in vitro was discussed. The results from MALDI-TOF/MS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that Tb(III) mainly interacts with the O-containing groups of the amides in the polypeptide chains of the HRP molecules and forms the complex of Tb(III)-HRP, and, in the complex, the molar ratio Tb(III)/HRP is 2 : 1. The results from CD and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the coordination effect between Tb(III) and HRP can lead to the conformation change in the HRP molecule, in which the contents of alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformation in the peptide of the HRP molecules is decreased, and the content of the random coil conformation is increased. Meanwhile, the coordination effect also leads to the decrease in the content of inter- and intrapeptide-chain H-bonds in the HRP molecules, resulting in the HRP molecular looseness and/or aggregation. Thus, the conformation change in the HRP molecules can significantly decrease the electrochemical reaction of HRP and its electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H2O2.

  16. Glycogen storage disease type III in the Irish population.

    PubMed

    Crushell, Ellen; Treacy, Eileen P; Dawe, J; Durkie, M; Beauchamp, Nicholas J

    2010-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) results from mutations of the AGL gene encoding the glycogen debrancher enzyme. The disease has clinical and biochemical heterogeneity reflecting the severity of the AGL mutations. We sought to characterise the molecular defects in our cohort of Irish patients with GSD III. Fifteen patients from eight unrelated Irish families were identified: six males and nine females. The age ranged from 2-39 years old, and all presented in the first 3 years of life. Four patients (of three families) had mild disease with hepatomegaly, mild hypoglycaemia and normal creatine kinase (CK) levels. Five families had more severe disease, with liver and skeletal muscle involvement and elevated CK. Eleven different mutations were identified amongst the eight families. Of the 11, six were novel: p.T512fs, p.S736fs, p.A1400fs, p.K1407fs, p.Y519X and p.D627Y. The family homozygous for p.A1400fs had the most severe phenotype (early-onset hypoglycaemia, massive hepatomegaly, myopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy before age 2 years), which was not halted by aggressive carbohydrate and protein supplementation. Conversely, the only missense mutation identified in the cohort, p.D627Y, was associated with a mild phenotype. The phenotypic diversity in our GSD III cohort is mirrored by the allelic heterogeneity. We describe two novel null mutations in exon 32 in two families with severe GSD III resistant to current treatment modalities. Knowledge of the specific mutations segregating in this cohort may allow for the development of new therapeutic interventions.

  17. Signal amplification for DNA detection based on the HRP-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Ya; Mi, Xiao-Na; Wang, Bo; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2011-04-15

    An electrochemical approach for the sensitive detection of sequence-specific DNA has been developed. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) assembled on the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (NPs) were utilized as signal amplification sources. High-content HRP was adsorbed on the Fe(3)O(4) NPs via layer-by-layer (LbL) technique to prepare HRP-functionalized Fe(3)O(4) NPs. Signal probe and diluting probe were then immobilized on the HRP-functionalized Fe(3)O(4) NPs through the bridge of Au NPs. Thereafter, the resulting DNA-Au-HRP-Fe(3)O(4) (DAHF) bioconjugates were successfully anchored to the gold nanofilm (GNF) modified electrode surface for the construction of sandwich-type electrochemical DNA biosensor. The electrochemical behaviors of the prepared biosensor had been investigated by the cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (i-t), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimal conditions, the proposed strategy could detect the target DNA down to the level of 0.7 fmol with a dynamic range spanning 4 orders of magnitude and exhibited excellent discrimination to two-base mismatched DNA and non-complementary DNA sequences.

  18. Comparison of type I, type III and type VI collagen binding assays in diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Flood, V H; Gill, J C; Christopherson, P A; Wren, J S; Friedman, K D; Haberichter, S L; Hoffmann, R G; Montgomery, R R

    2012-07-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) plays a key role in coagulation by tethering platelets to injured subendothelium through binding sites for collagen and platelet GPIb. Collagen binding assays (VWF:CB), however, are not part of the routine work-up for von Willebrand disease (VWD). This study presents data on collagen binding for healthy controls and VWD subjects to compare three different collagens. VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity and VWF:CB with types I, III and VI collagen were examined for samples obtained from the Zimmerman Program. Mean VWF:CB in healthy controls was similar and highly correlated for types I, III and VI collagen. The mean VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratios for types I, III and VI collagen were 1.31, 1.19 and 1.21, respectively. In type 1 VWD subjects, VWF:CB was similar to VWF:Ag with mean VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratios for types I, III and VI collagen of 1.32, 1.08 and 1.1, respectively. For type 2A and 2B subjects, VWF:CB was uniformly low, with mean ratios of 0.62 and 0.7 for type I collagen, 0.38 and 0.4 for type III collagen, and 0.5 and 0.47 for type VI collagen. Normal ranges for type I, III and VI collagen are correlated, but higher values were obtained with type I collagen as compared with types III and VI. The low VWF:CB in type 2A and 2B subjects suggests that VWF:CB may also supplement analysis of multimer distribution. However, these results reflect only one set of assay conditions per collagen type and therefore may not be generalizable to all collagen assays. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection, type III cryoglobulinemia, and necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Isaac; Fangman, William

    2007-01-27

    A 53-year-old man with chronic hepatitis-C virus infection presented with livedo reticularis, purpura, and leg ulcers. A skin biopsy specimen showed a necrotizing vasculitis. The skin biopsy specimen and serology confirmed the diagnosis of type-III cryoglobulinemia. Bone marrow and peripheral blood showed proliferation of atypical CD5-positive B cells that included a monoclonal population. There is growing evidence that chronic hepatitis-C infection can result in immune dysregulation and expansion of autoimmune B cells that produce cryoglobulins.

  20. Numerical simulations of type-III solar radio bursts.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Robinson, P A; Cairns, I H

    2006-04-14

    The first numerical simulations are presented for type-III solar radio bursts in the inhomogeneous solar corona and interplanetary space, that include microscale quasilinear and nonlinear processes, intermediate-scale driven ambient density fluctuations, and large scale evolution of electron beams, Langmuir and ion sound waves, and fundamental and harmonic electromagnetic emission. Bidirectional coronal emission is asymmetric between the upward and downward directions, and harmonic emission dominates fundamental emission. In interplanetary space, fundamental and/or harmonic emission can be important. Langmuir and ion sound waves are bursty and the statistics of Langmuir wave energy agree well with the predictions of stochastic growth theory.

  1. Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndromes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ben-Skowronek, Iwona; Michalczyk, Aneta; Piekarski, Robert; Wysocka-Łukasik, Beata; Banecka, Bożena

    2013-01-01

    Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome (PAS III) is composed of autoimmune thyroid diseases associated with endocrinopathy other than adrenal insufficiency. This syndrome is associated with organ-specific and organ-nonspecific or systemic autoimmune diseases. The frequency of PAS syndromes in diabetic children is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of PAS III in children with diabetes mellitus type 1. The study consisted of 461 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1(T1DM), who were 1-19 years of age. TSH, free thyroxin, TPO autoantibodies, and thyroglobulin autoantibodies were determined annually. Autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in children with positive tests for TPO Ab and Tg Ab and thyroid parenchymal hypogenicity in the ultrasound investigation. Elevated TSI antibodies were used to diagnose Graves' disease. Additionally, Anti-Endomysial Antibodies IgA class were determined every year as screening for celiac disease. During clinical control, other autoimmune diseases were diagnosed. Adrenal function was examined by the diurnal rhythm of cortisol. PAS III was diagnosed in 14.5% children: PAS IIIA (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis) was recognized in 11.1 % and PAS III C (T1DM and other autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, and JIA, psoriasis and vitiligo) in 3.5% children. PAS IIIA was more prevalent in girls than in boys - 78.4% versus 21.6% (p<0.05). PAS III was observed between 1-5 years of life in 66.6% children; the frequency decreased in consecutive years and successively increased in the adolescence period to 22.7%. PAS III occurs in 14.5% of children with DM type1 and the incidence is positively correlated with patients' age and female gender. Children with PAS III should be carefully monitored as a group at risk for the development of other autoimmune diseases.

  2. Characteristics of type I and type III ELM precursors in ASDEX upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, T.; Günter, S.; Maraschek, M.; Suttrop, W.; Zohm, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    1998-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the edge electron pressure gradient during the development of a type I ELM shows that proximity of ∇pedge to the ideal ballooning limit is not sufficient to trigger a type I ELM. Thus, the MHD structure of ELMs is investigated further. The present discussion focuses on the phenomenology of type I and type III ELM precursors. The ELM precursor types are well distinguished by their frequency behaviour and mode structure. The type I ELM precursor oscillation originates from a thin layer close to the plasma edge. For type III ELMs, on the contrary, ∇pedge has a much stronger influence as indicated by their occurrence during L mode.

  3. Structure of type I and type III heterotypic collagen fibrils: an X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Cameron, G J; Alberts, I L; Laing, J H; Wess, T J

    2002-01-01

    The molecular packing arrangement within collagen fibrils has a significant effect on the tensile properties of tissues. To date, most studies have focused on homotypic fibrils composed of type I collagen. This study investigates the packing of type I/III collagen molecules in heterotypic fibrils of colonic submucosa using a combination of X-ray diffraction data, molecular model building, and simulated X-ray diffraction fibre diagrams. A model comprising a 70-nm-diameter D- (approximately 65 nm) axial periodic structure containing type I and type III collagen chains was constructed from amino acid scattering factors organised in a liquid-like lateral packing arrangement simulated using a classical Lennard-Jones potential. The models that gave the most accurate correspondence with diffraction data revealed that the structure of the fibril involves liquid-like lateral packing combined with a constant helical inclination angle for molecules throughout the fibril. Combinations of type I:type III scattering factors in a ratio of 4:1 gave a reasonable correspondence with the meridional diffraction series. The attenuation of the meridional intensities may be explained by a blurring of the electron density profile of the D period caused by nonspecific or random interactions between collagen types I and III in the heterotypic fibril. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  4. Fundamental and harmonic radiation in type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    1994-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts are investigated by modeling the propagation of the electron beam and the generation and subsequent propagation of waves to the observer. Predictions from this model are compared in detail with particle, Langmuir wave, and radio data from the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 (ISSE-3) spacecraft and with other observations to clarify the roles of fundamental and harmonic emission in type III radio bursts. Langmuir waves are seen only after the arrival of the beam, in accord with the standard theory. These waves persist after a positive beam slope is last resolved, implying that sporadic positive slopes persist for some time, unresolved but in accord with the predictions of stochastic growth theory. Local electromagnetic emission sets in only after Langmuir waves are seen, in accord with the standard theory, which relies on nonlinear processes involving Langmuir waves. In the events investigated here, fundamental radiation appears to dominate early in the event, followed and/or accompanied by harmonic radiation after the peak, with a long-lived tail of multiply scattered fundamental or harmonic emission extending long afterwards. These results are largely independent of, but generally consistent with, the conclusions of earlier works.

  5. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  6. Radio frequency interference affecting type III solar burst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anim, N. M.; Hamidi, Z. S.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Monstein, C.; Rohizat, N. S.

    2013-05-01

    The solar burst extinguish from the Sun's corona atmosphere and it dynamical structure of the magnetic field in radio wavelength are studied. Observation of solar radio burst with Compact Astronomical Low cost Low frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory (CALLISTO) from ETH, Zurich in frequency range of 45 until 870 MHz. Observation done at Pusat Angkasa Negara, Banting, Selangor and successfully detected the solar burst type III on 9th March 2012 from 4:22:00 UT until 4:28:00 UT. The solar burst emission is associated with M6.3 solar flare which occurred at sunspot AR1429 at 03:58UT were observed by NOAA. Frequency ranges chosen as the best ranges for solar monitoring in Malaysia is 150 MHz until 400 MHz. The highest signal amplitude within this frequency ranges is 1.7619 dB at 153.188 MHz (Government Use) have potential to influence the detection of solar radio burst type III within 20 until 400 MHz.

  7. A Novel Type III Endosome Transmembrane Protein, TEMP

    PubMed Central

    Aturaliya, Rajith N.; Kerr, Markus C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a high-throughput subcellular localisation project, the protein encoded by the RIKEN mouse cDNA 2610528J11 was expressed and identified to be associated with both endosomes and the plasma membrane. Based on this, we have assigned the name TEMP for Type III Endosome Membrane Protein. TEMP encodes a short protein of 111 amino acids with a single, alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Experimental analysis of its membrane topology demonstrated it is a Type III membrane protein with the amino-terminus in the lumenal, or extracellular region, and the carboxy-terminus in the cytoplasm. In addition to the plasma membrane TEMP was localized to Rab5 positive early endosomes, Rab5/Rab11 positive recycling endosomes but not Rab7 positive late endosomes. Video microscopy in living cells confirmed TEMP’s plasma membrane localization and identified the intracellular endosome compartments to be tubulovesicular. Overexpression of TEMP resulted in the early/recycling endosomes clustering at the cell periphery that was dependent on the presence of intact microtubules. The cellular function of TEMP cannot be inferred based on bioinformatics comparison, but its cellular distribution between early/recycling endosomes and the plasma membrane suggests a role in membrane transport. PMID:24710541

  8. Immobilization of HRP in Mesoporous Silica and Its Application for the Construction of Polyaniline Modified Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Do, Jing-Shan; Gu, Yesong

    2009-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI), an attractive conductive polymer, has been successfully applied in fabricating various types of enzyme-based biosensors. In this study, we have employed mesoporous silica SBA-15 to stably entrap horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and then deposited the loaded SBA-15 on the PANI modified platinum electrode to construct a GA/SBA-15(HRP)/PANI/Pt biosensor. The mesoporous structures and morphologies of SBA-15 with or without HRP were characterized. Enzymatic protein assays were employed to evaluate HRP immobilization efficiency. Our results demonstrated that the constructed biosensor displayed a fine linear correlation between cathodic response and H2O2 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 18.5 mM, with enhanced sensitivity. In particular, the current approach provided the PANI modified biosensor with improved stability for multiple measurements. PMID:22408546

  9. 77 FR 76426 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... organizations that are not functionally integrated. The withdrawal affects Type III supporting organizations... ``Type III Supporting Organizations''). Those regulations reflect changes to the law made by the Pension... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG 155929-06] RIN 1545-BL44 Payout Requirements for Type III...

  10. [The production of hydroxyl radical in HRP-NADH-H2O/O2 systems and its application in chlorobenzene removal].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-tao; Li, Yu-ping; Cao, Hong-bin; Li, Xin-gang; Xue, Zhan-qiang

    2010-11-01

    The mechanism of radical generation in HRP-NADH-O2/H2O2 systems and state-change of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was investigated by using ESR and UV measurements, and the novel enzyme-coenzymatic systems were performed to degrade chlorobenzene as a non-phenolic persistent organic pollutants. The UV results showed that compound III was produced from HRP oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with the catalysis of NADH, which would generate hydroxyl radical. The ESR results demonstrated the production of *OH and O2-. in enzyme-coenzymatic system in the presence of O2 or H2O2 with DMPO and POBN as spin-trappers, respectively. In HRP-NADH-H2O2 system, compound III was the main state of HRP in the initial 10 min, and then converted to HRP with generating hydroxyl radical; and after the addition of oxygen, the production of hydroxyl radical was promoted rapidly, as 4 times as that of the system in absence of oxygen. The addition of SOD(Zn-Cu) decreased the production of hydroxyl radical significantly, resulting from that SOD eliminated O2 reduction to O2-. by NADH and then inhibited *OH formation. The results showed that NADH could improve by about 20% enzyme activity of HRP for phenol removal. The removal of chlorobenzene with HRP-NADH-H2O2 and HRP-NADH-H2O2-O2 systems reached 24.6% and 48.2%, respectively, which was much higher than that with traditional enzymatic system (1.42%), showing a promising prospect in proposal

  11. The post-transcriptional regulator rsmA/csrA activates T3SS by stabilizing the 5' UTR of hrpG, the master regulator of hrp/hrc genes, in Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Maxuel O; Farah, Chuck S; Wang, Nian

    2014-02-01

    The RsmA/CsrA family of the post-transcriptional regulators of bacteria is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that rsmA not only is required for the full virulence of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XCC) but also contributes to triggering the hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host plants. Deletion of rsmA resulted in significantly reduced virulence in the host plant sweet orange and a delayed and weakened HR in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Microarray, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, western-blotting, and GUS assays indicated that RsmA regulates the expression of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The regulation of T3SS by RsmA is a universal phenomenon in T3SS-containing bacteria, but the specific mechanism seems to depend on the interaction between a particular bacterium and its hosts. For Xanthomonads, the mechanism by which RsmA activates T3SS remains unknown. Here, we show that RsmA activates the expression of T3SS-encoding hrp/hrc genes by directly binding to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of hrpG, the master regulator of the hrp/hrc genes in XCC. RsmA stabilizes hrpG mRNA, leading to increased accumulation of HrpG proteins and subsequently, the activation of hrp/hrc genes. The activation of the hrp/hrc genes by RsmA via HrpG was further supported by the observation that ectopic overexpression of hrpG in an rsmA mutant restored its ability to cause disease in host plants and trigger HR in non-host plants. RsmA also stabilizes the transcripts of another T3SS-associated hrpD operon by directly binding to the 5' UTR region. Taken together, these data revealed that RsmA primarily activates T3SS by acting as a positive regulator of hrpG and that this regulation is critical to the pathogenicity of XCC.

  12. The Post-transcriptional Regulator rsmA/csrA Activates T3SS by Stabilizing the 5′ UTR of hrpG, the Master Regulator of hrp/hrc Genes, in Xanthomonas

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Maxuel O.; Farah, Chuck S.; Wang, Nian

    2014-01-01

    The RsmA/CsrA family of the post-transcriptional regulators of bacteria is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that rsmA not only is required for the full virulence of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XCC) but also contributes to triggering the hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host plants. Deletion of rsmA resulted in significantly reduced virulence in the host plant sweet orange and a delayed and weakened HR in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Microarray, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, western-blotting, and GUS assays indicated that RsmA regulates the expression of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The regulation of T3SS by RsmA is a universal phenomenon in T3SS-containing bacteria, but the specific mechanism seems to depend on the interaction between a particular bacterium and its hosts. For Xanthomonads, the mechanism by which RsmA activates T3SS remains unknown. Here, we show that RsmA activates the expression of T3SS-encoding hrp/hrc genes by directly binding to the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of hrpG, the master regulator of the hrp/hrc genes in XCC. RsmA stabilizes hrpG mRNA, leading to increased accumulation of HrpG proteins and subsequently, the activation of hrp/hrc genes. The activation of the hrp/hrc genes by RsmA via HrpG was further supported by the observation that ectopic overexpression of hrpG in an rsmA mutant restored its ability to cause disease in host plants and trigger HR in non-host plants. RsmA also stabilizes the transcripts of another T3SS-associated hrpD operon by directly binding to the 5′ UTR region. Taken together, these data revealed that RsmA primarily activates T3SS by acting as a positive regulator of hrpG and that this regulation is critical to the pathogenicity of XCC. PMID:24586158

  13. Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master Regulator LcrF

    PubMed Central

    Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens express a type III secretion (T3SS) system to enable growth and survival within a host. The three human-pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, encode the Ysc T3SS, whose expression is controlled by an AraC-like master regulator called LcrF. In this review, we discuss LcrF structure and function as well as the environmental cues and pathways known to regulate LcrF expression. Similarities and differences in binding motifs and modes of action between LcrF and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog ExsA are summarized. In addition, we present a new bioinformatics analysis that identifies putative LcrF binding sites within Yersinia target gene promoters. PMID:26644429

  14. Prevalence of type III secretion system in effective biocontrol pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Almario, Juliana; Gobbin, Davide; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Rezzonico, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Functional type III secretion system (T3SS) genes are needed for effective biocontrol of Pythium damping-off of cucumber by Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, but whether biocontrol Pseudomonas strains with T3SS genes display overall a higher plant-protecting activity is unknown. The assessment of 198 biocontrol fluorescent pseudomonads originating from 60 soils worldwide indicated that 32% harbour the ATPase-encoding T3SS gene hrcN, which was most often found in tomato isolates. The hrcN(+) biocontrol strains (and especially those also producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and displaying 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity) displayed higher plant-protecting ability in comparison with hrcN(-) biocontrol strains, both in the Pythium/cucumber and Fusarium/cucumber pathosystems. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Notti, Ryan Q; Stebbins, C Erec

    2016-02-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) afford Gram-negative bacteria an intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts--the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe "injectisomes," which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer, and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the posttranslational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS.

  16. Type III secretion systems shape up as they ship out.

    PubMed

    Marlovits, Thomas C; Stebbins, C Erec

    2010-02-01

    Virulence associated protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are intricately structured organic nanosyringes that achieve the translocation of bacterial proteins from the prokaryotic cytoplasm across three membranes into the host cytosol. The substrates for these systems number in the hundreds, with remarkably diverse biological activities, modulating host cell biology for the benefit of the pathogen. Although there has been tremendous progress on the structure and function of the T3SS substrates, there has been comparatively little progress on the much more highly conserved secretion apparatus itself. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of structural microbiology that have begun to address this shortcoming, finally bringing to bear the power of structural biology to this central virulence system of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Type III Secretion: Building and Operating a Remarkable Nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Portaliou, Athina G; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Loos, Maria S; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-02-01

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein export pathway that is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and delivers effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. At its core lie the injectisome (a sophisticated transmembrane secretion apparatus) and a complex network of specialized chaperones that target secretory proteins to the antechamber of the injectisome. The assembly of the system, and the subsequent secretion of proteins through it, undergo fine-tuned, hierarchical regulation. Here, we present the current understanding of the injectisome assembly process, secretion hierarchy, and the role of chaperones. We discuss these events in light of available structural and biochemical dissection and propose future directions essential to revealing mechanistic insight into this fascinating nanomachine.

  18. Symbiotic implications of type III protein secretion machinery in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Viprey, V; Del Greco, A; Golinowski, W; Broughton, W J; Perret, X

    1998-06-01

    The symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium sp. NGR234 carries a cluster of genes that encodes components of a bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS). In both animal and plant pathogens, the TTSS is an essential component of pathogenicity. Here, we show that secretion of at least two proteins (y4xL and NolX) is controlled by the TTSS of NGR234 and occurs after the induction with flavonoids. Polar mutations in two TTSS genes, rhcN and the nod-box controlled regulator of transcription y4xl, block the secretion of both proteins and strongly affect the ability of NGR234 to nodulate a variety of tropical legumes including Pachyrhizus tuberosus and Tephrosia vogelii.

  19. Type III secretion systems: the bacterial flagellum and the injectisome

    PubMed Central

    Diepold, Andreas; Armitage, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum and the injectisome are two of the most complex and fascinating bacterial nanomachines. At their core, they share a type III secretion system (T3SS), a transmembrane export complex that forms the extracellular appendages, the flagellar filament and the injectisome needle. Recent advances, combining structural biology, cryo-electron tomography, molecular genetics, in vivo imaging, bioinformatics and biophysics, have greatly increased our understanding of the T3SS, especially the structure of its transmembrane and cytosolic components, the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and functional regulation and the remarkable adaptivity of the system. This review aims to integrate these new findings into our current knowledge of the evolution, function, regulation and dynamics of the T3SS, and to highlight commonalities and differences between the two systems, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26370933

  20. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  1. Clark Lake microbursts - On a lower limit to type III burst brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Szabo, A.

    1987-01-01

    Further observations of solar microbursts by the Clark Lake radioheliograph are reported. The microbursts have properties consistent with weak type III bursts, with the implication that type III's can have brightness temperatures as low as 1 million K. The importance of this result is explored. A single model to explain the stronger type III bursts and the weaker microbursts is sought. It is shown that none of the models for stabilizing the strongest type III electron streams can explain the observed microbursts: these models have threshold levels of Langmuir waves which imply emission (due to spontaneous scattering off ions) with brightness temperatures in excess of those observed. It appears that either some vital physics is still missing from models for type III bursts, or that microbursts should have properties significantly different from those of type III bursts. In the latter case further observations should allow important tests of type III models.

  2. Response of a Type III waste tank to hydrogen deflagration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Chung; Jerrell, J.W.; Pelfrey, J.R.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1992-01-01

    The type III waste tank is built with ASTM A516 Grade 70 steel shells in the shape of a torus with a central concrete core. The tank is buried underground and covered with a four foot thick reinforced concrete slab. The tank is enriched by 2.5 foot thick reinforced concrete wall. Between the tank surface and the wall there is a 2.5 foot annular space. The tank itself is called the primary liner.'' The interior surface of the concrete wall is line with steel plates, called the secondary liner.'' The base of the tank rests on a concrete mat. Underneath the mat the secondary liner extends from the wall to the central column surfaces. The bottom liner is attached to the reinforced concrete foundation. Based on the conditions that the tank is filled with liquid wastes to 50% of the design capacity, and that the accumulation of hydrogen becomes 20% inside its free board, the resulting deflagration would cause an overpressure of 100 psig in the tank (Wallace and Yau, 1986). The task of this analysis is to simulate the hydrogen deflagration'' scenario in the Type III Waste Tank complex. During the deflagration, the stresses in the steel tank would be expected to exceed the elastic limit of the steel and the tank would then undergo large deformation. The concrete roof slab could be fractured by the expansion of the tank. The central concrete column would start to exhibit large deformation first. All the structural members in the system are expected to interact drastically during the deflagration.

  3. Response of a Type III waste tank to hydrogen deflagration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Chung; Jerrell, J.W.; Pelfrey, J.R.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1992-05-01

    The type III waste tank is built with ASTM A516 Grade 70 steel shells in the shape of a torus with a central concrete core. The tank is buried underground and covered with a four foot thick reinforced concrete slab. The tank is enriched by 2.5 foot thick reinforced concrete wall. Between the tank surface and the wall there is a 2.5 foot annular space. The tank itself is called the ``primary liner.`` The interior surface of the concrete wall is line with steel plates, called the ``secondary liner.`` The base of the tank rests on a concrete mat. Underneath the mat the secondary liner extends from the wall to the central column surfaces. The bottom liner is attached to the reinforced concrete foundation. Based on the conditions that the tank is filled with liquid wastes to 50% of the design capacity, and that the accumulation of hydrogen becomes 20% inside its free board, the resulting deflagration would cause an overpressure of 100 psig in the tank [Wallace and Yau, 1986]. The task of this analysis is to simulate the ``hydrogen deflagration`` scenario in the Type III Waste Tank complex. During the deflagration, the stresses in the steel tank would be expected to exceed the elastic limit of the steel and the tank would then undergo large deformation. The concrete roof slab could be fractured by the expansion of the tank. The central concrete column would start to exhibit large deformation first. All the structural members in the system are expected to interact drastically during the deflagration.

  4. Radiative type III seesaw model and its collider phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Pahlen, Federico; Palacio, Guillermo; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the present bounds of a scotogenic model, the radiative type III seesaw, in which an additional scalar doublet and at least two fermion triplets of S U (2 )L are added to the Standard Model. In the radiative type III seesaw, the new physics (NP) sector is odd under an exact global Z2 symmetry. This symmetry guaranties that the lightest NP neutral particle is stable, providing a natural dark matter candidate, and leads to naturally suppressed neutrino masses generated by a one-loop realization of an effective Weinberg operator. We focus on the region with the highest sensitivity in present and future LHC searches, with light scalar dark matter and at least one NP fermion triplet at the sub-TeV scale. This region allows for significant production cross sections of NP fermion pairs at the LHC. We reinterpret a set of searches for supersymmetric particles at the LHC obtained using the package CheckMATE, to set limits on our model as a function of the masses of the NP particles and their Yukawa interactions. The most sensitive search channel is found to be dileptons plus missing transverse energy. In order to target the case of tau enhanced decays and the case of compressed spectra, we reinterpret the recent slepton and chargino search bounds by ATLAS. For a lightest NP fermion triplet with a maximal branching ratio to either electrons or muons, we exclude NP fermion masses of up to 650 GeV, while this bound is reduced to approximately 400 GeV in the tau-philic case. Allowing for a general flavor structure, we set limits on the Yukawa couplings, which are directly related to the neutrino flavor structure.

  5. Near-Relativistic Solar Electrons and Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    Recently it has been found that the inferred injection times of greater than 25 keV electrons are up to 30 minutes later than the start times of the associated type III radio bursts at the Sun. Thus it has been suggested that the electrons that produce type III bursts do not belong to the same population as those observed above 25 keV. This paper examines the characteristics and circumstances of 79 solar electron beam events measured on the ACE spacecraft. Particular attention is paid to the very low frequency emissions of the associated radio bursts and the ambient conditions at the arrival times of the electrons at the spacecraft. It is found that the inferred greater than 25 keV electron injection delays are correlated with the times required for the associated radio bursts to drift to the lowest frequencies. This suggests that the electrons responsible for the radio emission and those observed above 25 keV are part of a single population, and that the electrons both above and below 25 keV are delayed in the interplanetary medium. Further evidence for a single population is the general correspondence between electron and local radio intensities and temporal profiles. It is found that the delays increase with the ambient solar wind density consistent with the propagation times of the electrons being determined by the characteristics of the interplanetary medium. However it is known that particle arrival times at 1 AU are a linear function of inverse particle speed. Conventionally such a relationship is taken to indicate scatter-free propagation when inferred path lengths lie close to 1.2 AU, as they do for the electron events studied here. These conflicting interpretations require further investigation.

  6. Kinetic Differences and Synergistic Antiviral Effects Between Type I and Type III Interferon Signaling Indicate Pathway Independence

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of acute respiratory viral infections is controlled by type I and III interferon (IFN) signaling. While the mechanisms of type I IFN signaling have been studied in detail, features that distinguish type III IFN signaling remain poorly understood. Type III IFNs play an essential role in limiting infections of intestinal and respiratory epithelial surfaces; however, type III IFNs have been shown to activate similar genes to type I IFNs, raising the question of how these IFNs differ and their signals interact. We measured the kinetics of type I and III IFN activation, functional stability, and downstream antiviral responses on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Similar kinetics were found for transcriptional upregulation and secretion of type I and III IFNs in response to infection by an RNA virus, peaking at 12 h postinfection, and both protein types had similar stabilities with functional half-lives extending beyond 2 days. Both IFNs activated potent cellular antiviral responses; however, responses to type III IFNs were delayed by 2–6 h relative to type I IFN responses. Combined treatments with type I and III IFNs produced enhanced antiviral effects, and quantitative analysis of these data with a Bliss interaction model provides evidence for independence of type I and III IFN downstream signaling pathways. This novel synergistic interaction has therapeutic implications for treatment of respiratory virus infections. PMID:25938799

  7. Noncanonical Effects of IRF9 in Intestinal Inflammation: More than Type I and Type III Interferons.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Isabella; Rosebrock, Felix; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Majoros, Andrea; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Strobl, Birgit; Stockinger, Silvia; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription factor with its Stat1, Stat2, and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits is employed for transcriptional responses downstream of receptors for type I interferons (IFN-I) that include IFN-α and IFN-β and type III interferons (IFN-III), also called IFN-λ. Here, we show in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that IRF9 deficiency protects animals, whereas the combined loss of IFN-I and IFN-III receptors worsens their condition. We explain the different phenotypes by demonstrating a function of IRF9 in a noncanonical transcriptional complex with Stat1, apart from IFN-I and IFN-III signaling. Together, Stat1 and IRF9 produce a proinflammatory activity that overrides the benefits of the IFN-III response on intestinal epithelial cells. Our results further suggest that the CXCL10 chemokine gene is an important mediator of this proinflammatory activity. We thus establish IFN-λ as a potentially anticolitogenic cytokine and propose an important role for IRF9 as a component of noncanonical Stat complexes in the development of colitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaofen; Cao, Rui; Lu, Aihua; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Li, Chaojun; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III) was investigated using some biophysical and biochemical methods. Firstly, it was found that a large amount of Tb(III) can be distributed on the cell wall, that some Tb(III) can enter into the horseradish cell, indicating that peroxidase was mainly distributed on cell wall, and thus that Tb(III) would interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the plant. In addition, peroxidase bioactivity was decreased in the presence of Tb(III). Secondly, a new peroxidase-containing Tb(III) complex (Tb-HRP) was obtained from horseradish after treatment with Tb(III); the molecular mass of Tb-HRP is near 44 kDa and the pI is about 8.80. Thirdly, the electrocatalytic activity of Tb-HRP is much lower than that of HRP obtained from horseradish without treatment with Tb(III). The decrease in the activity of Tb-HRP is due to the destruction (unfolding) of the conformation in Tb-HRP. The planarity of the heme active center in the Tb-HRP molecule was increased and the extent of exposure of Fe(III) in heme was decreased, leading to inhibition of the electron transfer. The microstructure change in Tb-HRP might be the result of the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish.

  9. Type III-L Solar Radio Bursts and Their Associations with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, Robert T.; White, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2010-05-01

    Type III-L bursts are a sub-class of type III solar radio bursts that tend to occur after the impulsive phase of flares; are longer in duration than individual type IIIs and tend to be low-frequency. There has been a proposal that type III-Ls are connected to solar energetic proton (SEP) events. Most work on this connection has started from samples of SEP events, but if type III-Ls are to be useful for prediction of SEP events, then we need to understand the properties of samples of type III-L bursts. This talk reports preliminary results from such a study. An operating definition based on previous work is used to identify type III-L events amongst M- and X-class flares from 2001; and then associations with other properties of these events are investigated, including association with SEP events. If there is an association with SEP events, one important factor that these bursts allow us to address is the question of whether acceleration takes place at an associated CME, or closer to the flare site well below the CME. Work has been developed on a type III fitting tool. A Template is chosen from a representative individual type III burst and fit to individual type III bursts and components of Complex type III bursts in order to help analyze and distinguish these bursts. This type III fitting tool can also be used to fit and distinguish Impulsive type III and type III-L bursts and help analyze various characteristics of the components of these bursts such as drift-rate and change in the duration of their intensity-time profiles with frequency. Funding for this research came from the Naval Research Laboratory where basic research in radio astronomy is funded by the Office of Naval Research, and from NASA LWS Grant FRS 526249.

  10. [Quantitative polarization microscopy demonstration of collagen type I and type III in histologic paraffin sections].

    PubMed

    Ogbuihi, S; Müller, Z; Zink, P

    1988-01-01

    The industrial dye Solophenyl Red 3 BL (Ciba-Geigy) dissolved in a saturated aquaeous solution of picric acid has proved suitable for differentiating between collagen types I and III in histological sections. When examined under polarization microscopy, type I fibers are radiant orange while type III fibers are green. Using 5 micron paraffin sections, an optimal staining procedure was determined: sections were first stained with Resorcin Fuchsin for elastic fibers and with Celestin Blue/Mayer's Hematoxylin for nuclear structures. The staining was then completed with 0.1 g Solophenyl Red/100 ml saturated aqueous solution of picric acid for 60 min at a pH value of 1.25. It was shown that the dye stained collagen selectively. With the aid of a photomultiplier, the spectral distribution of a series of lung sections adequately stained according to the optimized procedure was carried out using a monochromator and an interference filter, respectively. Both methods yielded identical peaks at 590 nm for the orange colored light of collagen type I and 490 nm for the green light of collagen type III. Application of appropriate filters permitted the intensity of the orange and green light at 590 nm and 490 nm to be measured. Long postmortem intervals did not affect the measured values. Quantitative inferences on the ratio of collagen I to collagen III could then be deduced from the ratio of the intensity of orange to green light. This index I/III is often applied in the diagnosis of discrete fibrotic changes in various organs.

  11. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (HAE type III).

    PubMed

    Riedl, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), also known as HAE type III, is a familial condition only clinically recognized within the past three decades. Similar to HAE from C1-INH deficiency (HAE types I and II), affected individuals experience unpredictable angioedema episodes of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and airway. Unique clinical features of HAE with normal C1-INH include the predominance of affected women, frequent exacerbation by estrogen, and a prominence of angioedema that involves the face and oropharynx. The underlying pathophysiology of HAE with normal C1-INH is poorly understood, but indirect evidence points to contact pathway dysregulation with bradykinin-mediated angioedema. Currently, evaluation is complicated by a lack of confirmatory laboratory testing such that clinical criteria must often be used to make the diagnosis of HAE with normal C1-INH. Factor XII mutations have been identified in only a minority of persons affected by HAE with normal C1-INH, limiting the utility of such analysis. To date, no controlled clinical studies have examined the efficacy of therapeutic agents for HAE with normal C1-INH, although published evidence supports frequent clinical benefit with medications shown effective in HAE due to C1-INH deficiency.

  12. The effect of K2SO4 solution on type III gypsum surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillary, N.; Triaminingsih, S.; Indrani, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    The working model of type III gypsum is commonly used as working model for removable dentures. K2SO4 is well known as an effective accelerator to accelerate the gypsum setting time. This study aimed to identify the effect of K2SO4 1.5% solution on type III gypsum surface roughness. Surface roughness tests were performed using a Surface Roughness Tester at 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days after manipulation the gypsum. The results showed that type III gypsum surface roughness varied until the 7-day test. Moreover, the surface roughness of type III gypsum and K2SO4 1.5% solution is lower than type III gypsum surface roughness and equal to type IV gypsum surface roughness. It is concluded that the addition of K2SO4 1.5% solution decreased type III gypsum surface roughness.

  13. Mouse model of glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Ming; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2014-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is caused by a deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), which is encoded by the Agl gene. GDE deficiency leads to the pathogenic accumulation of phosphorylase limit dextrin (PLD), an abnormal glycogen, in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. To further investigate the pathological mechanisms behind this disease and develop novel therapies to treat this disease, we generated a GDE-deficient mouse model by removing exons after exon 5 in the Agl gene. GDE reduction was confirmed by western blot and enzymatic activity assay. Histology revealed massive glycogen accumulation in the liver, muscle, and heart of the homozygous affected mice. Interestingly, we did not find any differences in the general appearance, growth rate, and life span between the wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous affected mice with ad libitum feeding, except reduced motor activity after 50 weeks of age, and muscle weakness in both the forelimb and hind legs of homozygous affected mice by using the grip strength test at 62 weeks of age. However, repeated fasting resulted in decreased survival of the knockout mice. Hepatomegaly and progressive liver fibrosis were also found in the homozygous affected mice. Blood chemistry revealed that alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were significantly higher in the homozygous affected mice than in both wild-type and heterozygous mice and the activity of these enzymes further increased with fasting. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity was normal in young and adult homozygous affected mice. However, the activity was significantly elevated after fasting. Hypoglycemia appeared only at a young age (3 weeks) and hyperlipidemia was not observed in our model. In conclusion, with the exception of normal lipidemia, these mice recapitulate human GSD IIIa; moreover, we found that repeated fasting was detrimental to these mice. This mouse model will

  14. STUDIES ON NATURAL IMMUNITY TO PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III

    PubMed Central

    Enders, John F.; Shaffer, Morris F.; Wu, Chao-Jen

    1936-01-01

    Among the experimental findings reported in this paper to which we wish to give particular emphasis are the following: 1. The results which follow the intravenous injection into rabbits of two strains of Pneumococcus Type III of different degrees of virulence vary with the state of the capsule. Thus when this structure is completely developed both remain in the blood. A culture of either strain begins to become susceptible to the blood-clearing mechanism contemporaneously with the onset of capsular degeneration and the initiation of other concomitant changes at the surface of the organism (cf Paper II), which occur much earlier with the less virulent strain. 2. When, in either case, removal from the blood stream occurs, this is effected by the phagocytic cells of the body. There is no suggestion that a new or unknown mechanism is involved. The greatest share of the burden is borne by the fixed phagocytic cells of the liver and spleen, and to a less extent by those of the lung and bone marrow. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes may also participate. 3. Phagocytosis by the leucocytes of the normal animal either in intro or in vivo has been observed only at such a time as the capsule has become impaired. Ingestion of the organisms by the fixed tissue cells appears also to be effective only under the same condition and is accordingly observed with much younger cultures of the less virulent strain. 4. Following their removal from the blood and their accumulation within the fixed phagocytes of the organs, destruction of most of the cocci proceeds within 2 to 4 hours. Both strains are destroyed provided they are in the state favorable to phagocytic attack. 5. Evidence has been presented which indicates that just as in vitro, so in a local area of inflammation within the body, aging with attendant capsular loss and increasing susceptibility to phagocytosis may take place. 6. With organisms from either strain a variable period of

  15. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  16. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway. PMID:23503326

  17. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION OF MICE WITH THE POLYSACCHARIDES OF PNEUMOCOCCI TYPES I, II AND III

    PubMed Central

    Zozaya, José; Clark, Janet

    1933-01-01

    1. Pneumococcus polysaccharides Types I, II and III adsorbed on collodion particles, and Types I and III adsorbed on carbon (norit) are antigenic in mice. 2. Unadsorbed pneumococcus polysaccharide of Type I is antigenic in mice in proper dilution. One preparation of Type II polysaccharide was not antigenic, while another one immunized against Types I and II. Type III polysaccharide was only slightly antigenic against Type III but immunized against Type I. 3. The antigenicity of pneumococcus polysaccharide in optimal dosage is tentatively explained by an adsorption phenomenon taking place in the body in instances in which the polysaccharides had not been adsorbed before injection. 4. The aggressin-like action of large doses of pneumococcus polysaccharides Types I, II and III is further established. PMID:19870119

  18. Translocation of surface-localized effectors in type III secretion

    PubMed Central

    Edgren, Tomas; Wang-Edgren, Helen; Rosqvist, Roland; Fahlgren, Anna; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Fallman, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species suppress the host immune response by using a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate virulence proteins into the cytosol of the target cells. T3SS-dependent protein translocation is believed to occur in one step from the bacterial cytosol to the target-cell cytoplasm through a conduit created by the T3SS upon target cell contact. Here, we report that T3SS substrates on the surface of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are translocated into target cells. Upon host cell contact, purified YopH coated on Y. pseudotuberculosis was specifically and rapidly translocated across the target-cell membrane, which led to a physiological response in the infected cell. In addition, translocation of externally added YopH required a functional T3SS and a specific translocation domain in the effector protein. Efficient, T3SS-dependent translocation of purified YopH added in vitro was also observed when using coated Salmonella typhimurium strains, which implies that T3SS-mediated translocation of extracellular effector proteins is conserved among T3SS-dependent pathogens. Our results demonstrate that polarized T3SS-dependent translocation of proteins can be achieved through an intermediate extracellular step that can be reconstituted in vitro. These results indicate that translocation can occur by a different mechanism from the assumed single-step conduit model. PMID:21220342

  19. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  20. Characterization of resistant starch type III from banana (Musa acuminata).

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Undine; Jacobasch, Gisela; Schmiedl, Detlef

    2002-08-28

    Banana starch (Musa acuminata var. Nandigobe) was evaluated for its use in generating resistant starch (RS) type III. Structural, physicochemical, and biological properties of these products were analyzed. The investigated process includes debranching of the native starch and retrogradation under different storage temperatures and starch concentrations. After enzymatic debranching, a high amount of low-molecular-weight polymers with a degree of polymerization between 10 and 35 glucose units beside a higher molecular weight fraction were found. The resulting products comprised RS contents of about 50%. After heat-moisture treatment, the RS yield increased up to 84%. Peak temperatures of about 145 degrees C found in DSC measurements pointed to a high thermal stability of the RS products. In vitro fermentations of the RS products, carried out with intestinal microflora of healthy humans, resulted in a molar ratio of acetate:propionate:butyrate of about 49:17:34. The established method allowed the production of a high-quality RS with prebiotic properties for health preventing applications.

  1. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  2. GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe Life Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was built as a life test unit for the loop heat pipes on the GOES N-Q series satellites. This propylene LHP was built by Dynatherm Corporation in 2000 and tested continuously for approximately 14 months. It was then put into storage for 3 years. Following the storage period, the LHP was tested at Swales Aerospace to verify that the loop performance hadn t changed. Most test results were consistent with earlier results. At the conclusion of testing at Swales, the LHP was transferred to NASA/GSFC for continued periodic testing. The LHP has been set up for testing in the Thermal Lab at GSFC since 2006. A group of tests consisting of start-ups, power cycles, and a heat transport limit test have been performed every six to nine months since March 2006. Tests results have shown no change in the loop performance over the five years of testing. This presentation will discuss the test hardware, test set-up, and tests performed. Test results to be presented include sample plots from individual tests, along with conductance measurements for all tests performed.

  3. Identification of type II and III DDR2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Richters, André; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Simard, Jeffrey R; Grütter, Christian; Engel, Julian; Rauh, Daniel

    2014-05-22

    Discoidin domain-containing receptors (DDRs) exhibit a unique mechanism of action among the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) because their catalytic activity is induced by extracellular collagen binding. Moreover, they are essential components in the assimilation of extracellular signals. Recently, DDRs were reported to be significantly linked to tumor progression in breast cancer by facilitating the processes of invasion, migration, and metastasis. Here, we report the successful development of a fluorescence-based, direct binding assay for the detection of type II and III DFG-out binders for DDR2. Using sequence alignments and homology modeling, we designed a DDR2 construct appropriate for fluorescent labeling. Successful assay development was validated by sensitive detection of a reference DFG-out binder. Subsequent downscaling led to convenient application to high-throughput screening formats. Screening of a representative compound library identified high-affinity DDR2 ligands validated by orthogonal activity-based assays, and a subset of identified compounds was further investigated with respect to DDR1 inhibition.

  4. Lubrication studies of some type III deep eutectic solvents (DESs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Essa. I.; Abbott, Andrew. P.; Ryder, Karl S.

    2017-09-01

    It has previously been shown that eutectic mixtures of quaternary ammonium salts and hydrogen bond donors form liquids with properties similar to ionic liquids [1; 2]. These so-called deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been shown to have physical properties which would make them useful as base lubricants. The base lubricant needs to show specific properties, including high viscosity index (VI), low friction coefficient (μ), low pour point and corrosivity. To determine the applicability of DESs as base lubricants, physical properties, corrosion and lubrication properties for four type III DESs have been studied and the results have been compared with mineral base oil. The data show that the lubrication properties of DESs are superior to mineral base oil for short distances. All DESs assessed here have higher VI (191, 147, 121 for Ethaline, Glyceline and Reline respectively compared with 100 for mineral base oil), lower pour points than mineral base oil and most of the liquids studied have shown very low corrosion rates (< 3 µm year-1 for mild steel).

  5. Type-III secretion filaments as scaffolds for inorganic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Anum; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials exhibit unique magnetic, electrical and catalytic properties. These characteristics are determined by the chemical composition, size and shape of the nanostructured components, which are challenging to modulate on such small size scales and to interface with living cells. To address this problem, we are using a self-assembling filament protein, PrgI, as a scaffold for bottom-up inorganic nanostructure synthesis. PrgI is a small protein (80 amino acids) that oligomerizes to form the type-III secretion system needle of Salmonella enterica. We demonstrate that purified PrgI monomers also spontaneously self-assemble into long filaments and that high-affinity peptide tags specific for attachment to functionalized particles can be integrated into the N-terminal region of PrgI. The resulting filaments selectively bind to gold, whether the filaments are assembled in vitro, sheared from cells or remain attached to live S. enterica cell membranes. Chemical reduction of the gold-modified PrgI variants results in structures that are several micrometres in length and which incorporate a contiguous gold surface. Mutant strains with genomically incorporated metal-binding tags retain the secretion phenotype. We anticipate that self-assembled, cell-tethered protein/metal filamentous structures have applications in sensing and energy transduction in vivo. PMID:26763334

  6. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-01-01

    ARTICLE SUMMARY Type III secretion systems (T3SS) afford gram-negative bacteria a most intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts — the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe “injectisomes,” which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the post-translational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS. PMID:26999392

  7. Comparisons of interplanetary type III storm footpoints with solar features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, Susan E.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Fainberg, Joseph; Stone, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    The trajectories of 38 type III storms in the interplanetary medium have been deduced from ISEE-3 radio observations and extrapolated back to the sun to determine the Carrington coordinates of their footpoints. The analysis assumes radial motion of the solar wind, and the trajectories are projected radially back toward the surface for the last few solar radii. To identify the storm sources, the footpoints were compared to a variety of solar features: to the large-scale neutral line at the base of the current sheet, to active regions, to the small-scale neutral lines and H-alpha filaments which trace out active regions, and to coronal holes. Most of the footpoints were found to lie near active regions, in agreement with metric storm locations. There is a weak correlation with H-alpha filaments, no apparent association with the current sheet, and an anticorrelation with coronal holes. There is a small excess of storms in the leading half of magnetic sectors.

  8. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, CMEs, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been well known since the earliest observations that solar energetic particle events are well associated with solar flares it is often considered that the association is not physically significant. Instead, in large events, the particles are considered to be only accelerated at a shock driven by the coronal mass ejection (CME) that is also always present. If particles are accelerated in the associated flare, it is claimed that such particles do not find access to open field lines and therefore do not escape from the low corona. However recent work has established that long lasting type III radio bursts extending to low frequencies are associated with all prompt solar particle events. Such bursts establish the presence of open field lines. Furthermore, tracing the radio bursts to the lowest frequencies, generated near the observer, shows that the radio producing electrons gain access to a region of large angular extent. It is likely that the electrons undergo cross field transport and it seems reasonable that ions do also. Such observations indicate that particle propagation in the inner heliosphere is not yet fully understood. They also imply that the contribution of flare particles in major particle events needs to be properly addressed.

  9. Remote flare brightenings and type III reverse slope bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.; Moore, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations are presented on two large (H-alpha class 2) flares that each produced an extensive chain of discrete H-alpha brightenings spanning 370,000-470,000 km in length in remote quiet regions more than 100,000 km from the main flare site. A large group of Type III RS bursts was also observed accompanying each flare. The onset of about half the remote H-alpha emission patches were nearly simultaneous with the RS bursts. One flare was observed in hard X-rays, and it is noted that the RS bursts occurred during hard X-ray spikes. For the other flare, soft X-ray filtergrams indicate coronal loops connecting from the main flare site to the remote H-alpha brightenings. Observations indicate that the RS burst electrons were generated in the flares, and it is proposed that the remote H-alpha brightenings were initiated by direct heating of the chromosphere by RS burst electrons traveling in closed magnetic loops connecting the flare site to the remote patches. It is also suggested that after onset, the brightenings were heated by thermal conduction by slower thermal electrons.

  10. Polarization and position measurements of Type III bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.; Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The positional and polarization characteristics of Type III bursts in the range 24-220 MHz as measured by the Culgoora radioheliograph, spectrograph and spectropolarimeter are reported. The study includes 997 bursts which are of two classes: fundamental-harmonic (F-H) pairs and 'structureless' bursts with no visible F-H structure, and concentrates on the polarization of the bursts and the variation of polarization from centre to limb. The observed centre-to-limb decrease in polarization approximately follows a cosine law. This decrease is not as predicted by simple theory but is consistent with other observations which imply that open field lines from an active region diverge strongly. The observed o-mode polarization of harmonic radiation implies that the wave vectors of Langmuir waves are always parallel, within about 20 deg, to the magnetic field, while the constancy of H polarization with frequency implies that the ratio of gyromagnetic to plasma frequency, the Alfven speed and the plasma beta are constant with height on the open field lines above an active region. Finally, it is inferred that some factor, in addition to the magnetic field strength, controls the polarization of F radiation.

  11. Assembly, structure, function and regulation of type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyin; Marshall, Natalie C; Rowland, Jennifer L; McCoy, James M; Worrall, Liam J; Santos, Andrew S; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Finlay, B Brett

    2017-04-10

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are protein transport nanomachines that are found in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and symbionts. Resembling molecular syringes, T3SSs form channels that cross the bacterial envelope and the host cell membrane, which enable bacteria to inject numerous effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm and establish trans-kingdom interactions with diverse hosts. Recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy and integrative imaging have provided unprecedented views of the architecture and structure of T3SSs. Furthermore, genetic and molecular analyses have elucidated the functions of many effectors and key regulators of T3SS assembly and secretion hierarchy, which is the sequential order by which the protein substrates are secreted. As essential virulence factors, T3SSs are attractive targets for vaccines and therapeutics. This Review summarizes our current knowledge of the structure and function of this important protein secretion machinery. A greater understanding of T3SSs should aid mechanism-based drug design and facilitate their manipulation for biotechnological applications.

  12. Type III Interferons in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Maude; Shoukry, Naglaa H.

    2016-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-λ family of type III cytokines includes the closely related interleukin (IL)-28A (IFN-λ2), IL-28B (IFN-λ3), and IL-29 (IFN-λ1). They signal through the Janus kinases (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription pathway and promote an antiviral state by the induction of expression of several interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Contrary to type I IFNs, the effect of IFN-λ cytokines is largely limited to epithelial cells due to the restricted pattern of expression of their specific receptor. Several genome-wide association studies have established a strong correlation between polymorphism in the region of IL-28B gene (encoding for IFN-λ3) and both spontaneous and therapeutic IFN-mediated clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the mechanism(s) underlying this enhanced viral clearance are not fully understood. IFN-λ3 directly inhibits HCV replication, and in vitro studies suggest that polymorphism in the IFN-λ3 and its recently identified overlapping IFN-λ4 govern the pattern of ISGs induced upon HCV infection of hepatocytes. IFN-λ can also be produced by dendritic cells, and apart from its antiviral action on hepatocytes, it can regulate the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages, thus acting at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review the current state of knowledge about the role of IFN-λ cytokines in mediating and regulating the immune response during acute and chronic HCV infections. PMID:28066437

  13. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo Syndrome): emerging treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    de Ruijter, J; Valstar, M J; Wijburg, F A

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharosis III (MPS III) is a lysosomal storage disorder and belongs to the group of mucopolysaccharidoses. MPS III is caused by a deficiency of one of the four enzymes catalyzing the degradation of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate. MPS III is clinically characterized by progressive dementia with distinct behavioral disturbances and relatively mild somatic disease. This review will summarize and discuss the available and potential future therapeutic options for patients with MPS III. This includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), substrate reduction therapy (SRT), chaperone-mediated therapy, and gene therapy. Although clinical efficacy has not yet been fully demonstrated for any of these therapies, it is likely that future developments will lead to disease-modifying treatment for this devastating disease.

  14. Low molecular weight plant extract induces metabolic changes and the secretion of extracellular enzymes, but has a negative effect on the expression of the type-III secretion system in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Watt, Tony Francis; Vucur, Mihael; Baumgarth, Birgit; Watt, Steven Alexander; Niehaus, Karsten

    2009-03-10

    Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc) is a plant pathogenic bacterium and as such has to adapt to a variety of environments. During the course of disease, Xcc colonizes the surface of its host, infects the xylem in the early stages, and develops a fully saprophytic life-style, aided by secreted degradative enzymes, in the late stages. To get some insight into this complex regulation, Xcc was cultivated in the presence of low molecular weight host plant extract (<10 kDa). From this experiments it could be observed, that malate and sucrose are taken up preferably in such an environment. Furthermore, it was demonstrated, that the plant extract has a negative effect on the gene expression of the hrp-gene cluster, although the activator hrpG was induced. Also, the secretion of degradative enzymes was shown to be upregulated. These observations indicate, that a low molecular weight plant extract (<10 kDa) is a sufficient signal to regulate metabolic pathways and the secretion of enzymes relevant for the development of virulence in Xanthomonas, but has a negative effect on the expression of genes involved in type-III secretion.

  15. STUDIES ON NATURAL IMMUNITY TO PNEUMOCOCCUS TYPE III

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Morris F.; Enders, John F.; Wu, Chao-Jen

    1936-01-01

    The results which have been presented show that under the conditions of artificial cultivation at 37°C. definite differences exist between two smooth strains of Pneumococcus Type III both of which are highly virulent for mice by the intraperitoneal route, but which may be sharply distinguished in their virulence for rabbits. These differences consist in the size of the fully developed intact capsule and the interval of time required for its loss. The somewhat smaller capsule of the avirulent strain, well formed and easily demonstrable during the early period of growth, diminishes quickly, while the large capsule of the strain virulent for rabbits is retained for a considerably longer period. Closely correlated with the time at which this reduction of capsule occurs is the appearance of changes in the surface properties of the bacteria which are revealed by a shifting of the range of acid agglutination, susceptibility to clumping in anti-R serum and ingestion by normal adult human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and serum. Since it has been shown that these alterations as growth continues, result in a loss of characteristics which distinguish the strictly type specific, fully capsulated pneumococcus and ultimately lead to a state temporarily approximating that of the completely avirulent R form, and since under the experimental conditions they are inaugurated sooner, advance more rapidly and are more complete in the rabbit avirulent organism, we believe that they may partly account for difference in rabbit virulence of the two strains. In the following paper an attempt has therefore been made to correlate this behavior in vitro with the events attendant upon inoculation into the animal body. The studies of Clark and Ruehl (16), Henrici (17), Bayne-Jones and Adolph (18) and others have demonstrated a marked increase in the size of the bacterial cell associated with the early phases of growth. These authors have dealt chiefly with noncapsulated rod forms and even Clark

  16. RIEGER-TYPE PERIODICITY IN THE OCCURRENCE OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents the first observations of a Rieger-type periodicity with the period of 156{sub -9}{sup +19} days in the occurrence rate of solar coronal type III radio bursts. The periodicity was detected during the time interval from 2000 June 22 to 2003 December 31. This interval partially contains the maximum and the declining phase of solar cycle 23. The radio spectra were provided by the Learmonth Solar Radio Observatory in Western Australia, part of the USAF Radio Solar Telescope Network.

  17. Cross-link analysis of the C-telopeptide domain from type III collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, W

    1996-01-01

    Several peptides were isolated from tryptic digests of insoluble calf aorta matrix by chromatography. Reductive pyridylethylation of a tryptic 15 kDa pool released fragments deriving from the C-terminus of type III collagen. A 50-residue peptide Tc(III) was shown by sequence analysis to be the C-terminal peptide from the alpha 1(III)-chain, containing a helical and non-helical region of equal sizes. The peptide was further digested with collagenase to give Colc(III), comprising the complete C-terminal non-helical region of alpha 1(III) including a hydroxylysine in position 16c. The peptide Tc(III) x TN(III) was isolated, demonstrating covalent cross-linking between the C-terminal non-helical region of one type III molecule and the N-terminal helical cross-linking region of another. Its digestion with cyanogen bromide yielded the small fragments alpha 1(III)CB3B* and alpha 1(III)CB3C, confirming TN(III) as an N-terminal helical crosslink site. Sequence analysis of both Tc(III) x TN(III) and its collagenase-derived cross-linked peptide Colc(III) x TN(III) established the 4D-staggered alignment of adjacent collagen III molecules. The cross-link structure of both peptides was mainly dihydroxylysinonorleucine with a small amount of hydroxylysinonorleucine, indicating that the lysine residues involved in formation of the cross-links are both hydroxylated. No pyridinoline or histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine cross-links were found within the non-reduced C-telopeptide region of type III collagen. PMID:8809038

  18. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  19. Regulation of the Yersinia type III secretion system: traffic control

    PubMed Central

    Dewoody, Rebecca S.; Merritt, Peter M.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia species, as well as many other Gram-negative pathogens, use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cytosol. This T3SS resembles a molecular syringe, with a needle-like shaft connected to a basal body structure, which spans the inner and outer bacterial membranes. The basal body of the injectisome shares a high degree of homology with the bacterial flagellum. Extending from the T3SS basal body is the needle, which is a polymer of a single protein, YscF. The distal end of the needle serves as a platform for the assembly of a tip complex composed of LcrV. Though never directly observed, prevailing models assume that LcrV assists in the insertion of the pore-forming proteins YopB and YopD into the host cell membrane. This completes a bridge between the bacterium and host cell to provide a continuous channel through which effectors are delivered. Significant effort has gone into understanding how the T3SS is assembled, how its substrates are recognized and how substrate delivery is controlled. Arguably the latter topic is the least understood; however, recent advances have provided new insight, and therefore, this review will focus primarily on summarizing the current state of knowledge regarding the control of substrate delivery by the T3SS. Specifically, we will discuss the roles of YopK, as well as YopN and YopE, which have long been linked to regulation of translocation. We also propose models whereby the YopK regulator communicates with the basal body of the T3SS to control translocation. PMID:23390616

  20. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-11-28

    Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, which are compromised in patients with glycogenosis IIIa. Administration of carbohydrates may elicit reactive hyperinsulinism, resulting in suppression of lipolysis, ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, heart and skeletal muscle are depleted of energy substrates. Modified Atkins diet leads to increased blood levels of ketone bodies and fatty acids. We hypothesize that this health care intervention improves the energetic balance of muscles. We treated 2 boys with glycogenosis IIIa aged 9 and 11 years with a modified Atkins diet (10 g carbohydrate per day, protein and fatty acids ad libitum) over a period of 32 and 26 months, respectively. In both patients, creatine kinase levels in blood dropped in response to Atkins diet. When diet was withdrawn in one of the patients he complained of chest pain, reduced physical strength and creatine kinase levels rapidly increased. This was reversed when Atkins diet was reintroduced. One patient suffered from severe cardiomyopathy which significantly improved under diet. Patients with glycogenosis IIIa benefit from an improved energetic state of heart and skeletal muscle by introduction of Atkins diet both on a biochemical and clinical level. Apart from transient hypoglycaemia no serious adverse effects were observed.

  1. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey.

  2. 10 CFR 712.19 - Removal from HRP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures § 712.19 Removal from HRP. (a) Immediate removal. A supervisor who has a reasonable belief that an... portions thereof, may be exempt from access by the employee under the Privacy Act or the Freedom of...

  3. A note on tilted Bianchi type VIh models: the type III bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Hervik, S.

    2008-10-01

    In this note we complete the analysis of Hervik, van den Hoogen, Lim and Coley (2007 Class. Quantum Grav. 24 3859) of the late-time behaviour of tilted perfect fluid Bianchi type III models. We consider models with dust, and perfect fluids stiffer than dust, and eludicate the late-time behaviour by studying the centre manifold which dominates the behaviour of the model at late times. In the dust case, this centre manifold is three-dimensional and can be considered a double bifurcation as the two parameters (h and γ) of the type VIh model are varied. We therefore complete the analysis of the late-time behaviour of tilted ever-expanding Bianchi models of types I VIII.

  4. 46 CFR 170.135 - Operating information for a vessel with Type III subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating information for a vessel with Type III... Operating Personnel § 170.135 Operating information for a vessel with Type III subdivision. (a) In addition to the information required in 46 CFR 170.110, the stability booklet of a passenger vessel with...

  5. 78 FR 9802 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... requirements to qualify as a Type III supporting organization that is operated in connection with one or more... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG31; 1545-BL38 Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS),...

  6. 46 CFR 171.082 - Damage stability standards for vessels with Type III subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage stability standards for vessels with Type III... Damage stability standards for vessels with Type III subdivision. (a) Each vessel must be shown by design... the International Maritime Organization (IMO). (b) International Maritime Organization Resolution...

  7. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ Type III Effector Family in Aribidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE) proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found i...

  8. The Effects of Non-Normality on Type III Error for Comparing Independent Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the effects of non-normality on Type III error rates for ANOVA F its three commonly recommended parametric counterparts namely Welch, Brown-Forsythe, and Alexander-Govern test. Therefore these tests were compared in terms of Type III error rates across the variety of population distributions,…

  9. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Type III effectors also interfere with additional plant cellular processes including proteasome-dependent protein degradation, phytohormone signaling, the formation of the cytoskeleton, vesicle transport and gene expression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular functions of type III effector proteins with known plant target molecules. Furthermore, plant defense strategies for the detection of effector protein activities or effector-triggered alterations in plant targets are discussed. PMID:28201715

  10. Diagnosis of type III hyperlipoproteinemia by chromatography of plasma lipoproteins on columns containing agarose.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J; Packard, C J; Dryburgh, F J; Third, J L

    1975-12-01

    Agarose column chromatography has been used to separate plasma lipoproteins into very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Applied to the diagnosis of primary type III hyperlipoproteinemia, the procedure is capable of demonstrating three characteristic and specific changes from normality in the elution pattern of lipoproteins from patients with this condition. In the type III profile there is (a) incomplete separation of VLDL from putative LDL material, (b) early elution of the type III LDL with respect to a normal LDL marker, and (c) relative deficiency of type III LDL with elution characteristics of normal LDL. We advocate the use of this method in the diagnosis of type III hyperlipoproteinemia.

  11. Fructose-bisphophate aldolase exhibits functional roles between carbon metabolism and the hrp system in rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zou, Li-fang; Li, Yu-rong; Cui, Yi-ping; Ji, Zhi-yuan; Cai, Lu-lu; Zou, Hua-song; Hutchins, William C; Yang, Ching-hong; Chen, Gong-you

    2012-01-01

    Fructose-bisphophate aldolase (FbaB), is an enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in living organisms. The mutagenesis in a unique fbaB gene of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, the causal agent of rice bacterial leaf streak, led the pathogen not only unable to use pyruvate and malate for growth and delayed its growth when fructose was used as the sole carbon source, but also reduced extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and impaired bacterial virulence and growth in rice. Intriguingly, the fbaB promoter contains an imperfect PIP-box (plant-inducible promoter) (TTCGT-N(9)-TTCGT). The expression of fbaB was negatively regulated by a key hrp regulatory HrpG and HrpX cascade. Base substitution in the PIP-box altered the regulation of fbaB with the cascade. Furthermore, the expression of fbaB in X. oryzae pv. oryzicola RS105 strain was inducible in planta rather than in a nutrient-rich medium. Except other hrp-hrc-hpa genes, the expression of hrpG and hrpX was repressed and the transcripts of hrcC, hrpE and hpa3 were enhanced when fbaB was deleted. The mutation in hrcC, hrpE or hpa3 reduced the ability of the pathogen to acquire pyruvate and malate. In addition, bacterial virulence and growth in planta and EPS production in RΔfbaB mutant were completely restored to the wild-type level by the presence of fbaB in trans. This is the first report to demonstrate that carbohydrates, assimilated by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, play critical roles in coordinating hrp gene expression through a yet unknown regulator.

  12. Harnessing Type I and Type III CRISPR-Cas systems for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjun; Pan, Saifu; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Min; Feng, Mingxia; Peng, Nan; Chen, Lanming; Liang, Yun Xiang; She, Qunxin

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are widespread in archaea and bacteria, and research on their molecular mechanisms has led to the development of genome-editing techniques based on a few Type II systems. However, there has not been any report on harnessing a Type I or Type III system for genome editing. Here, a method was developed to repurpose both CRISPR-Cas systems for genetic manipulation in Sulfolobus islandicus, a thermophilic archaeon. A novel type of genome-editing plasmid (pGE) was constructed, carrying an artificial mini-CRISPR array and a donor DNA containing a non-target sequence. Transformation of a pGE plasmid would yield two alternative fates to transformed cells: wild-type cells are to be targeted for chromosomal DNA degradation, leading to cell death, whereas those carrying the mutant gene would survive the cell killing and selectively retained as transformants. Using this strategy, different types of mutation were generated, including deletion, insertion and point mutations. We envision this method is readily applicable to different bacteria and archaea that carry an active CRISPR-Cas system of DNA interference provided the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) of an uncharacterized PAM-dependent CRISPR-Cas system can be predicted by bioinformatic analysis. PMID:26467477

  13. Distinct Roles of Type I and Type III Interferons in Intestinal Immunity to Homologous and Heterologous Rotavirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Da; Feng, Ningguo; Sen, Adrish; Balan, Murugabaskar; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; McElrath, Constance; Smirnov, Sergey V; Peng, Jianya; Yasukawa, Linda L; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E; Greenberg, Harry B; Kotenko, Sergei V

    2016-04-01

    Type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons (IFNs) exert shared antiviral activities through distinct receptors. However, their relative importance for antiviral protection of different organ systems against specific viruses remains to be fully explored. We used mouse strains deficient in type-specific IFN signaling, STAT1 and Rag2 to dissect distinct and overlapping contributions of type I and type III IFNs to protection against homologous murine (EW-RV strain) and heterologous (non-murine) simian (RRV strain) rotavirus infections in suckling mice. Experiments demonstrated that murine EW-RV is insensitive to the action of both types of IFNs, and that timely viral clearance depends upon adaptive immune responses. In contrast, both type I and type III IFNs can control replication of the heterologous simian RRV in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and they cooperate to limit extra-intestinal simian RRV replication. Surprisingly, intestinal epithelial cells were sensitive to both IFN types in neonatal mice, although their responsiveness to type I, but not type III IFNs, diminished in adult mice, revealing an unexpected age-dependent change in specific contribution of type I versus type III IFNs to antiviral defenses in the GI tract. Transcriptional analysis revealed that intestinal antiviral responses to RV are triggered through either type of IFN receptor, and are greatly diminished when receptors for both IFN types are lacking. These results also demonstrate a murine host-specific resistance to IFN-mediated antiviral effects by murine EW-RV, but the retention of host efficacy through the cooperative action by type I and type III IFNs in restricting heterologous simian RRV growth and systemic replication in suckling mice. Collectively, our findings revealed a well-orchestrated spatial and temporal tuning of innate antiviral responses in the intestinal tract where two types of IFNs through distinct patterns of their expression and distinct but overlapping sets

  14. The unique regulation and functions of type III interferons in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2015-06-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) were long considered to be the sole IFN species produced by virus-infected cells until the discovery of type III IFNs (IFNλs), decades later. Like type I IFNs, type III IFNs are induced by and protect against viral infections, leading to the initial conclusion that the two IFN species are identical in regulation and biological functions. However, the two systems differ in the tissue expression of their receptor, resulting in different roles in vivo. The unique nature of IFNλs has been further demonstrated by recent studies revealing differences in the regulation of type I and III IFN expression, and how these proteins elicit specific cellular responses. This review focuses on the distinctive features of type III IFNs in antiviral innate immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hueck, Christoph J.

    1998-01-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  16. Type III protein secretion systems in bacterial pathogens of animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Hueck, C J

    1998-06-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  17. Low-Frequency Type III Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Makela, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type 11 radio bursts associated with a set of six low frequency (<14 MHz) extended type III bursts from active region 10588. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using high resolution data from Wind/WAVES and were within the range (>15 min) normally used to define these bursts. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type 11 burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type 11 burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 min) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event.

  18. Type III intermediate filament peripherin inhibits neuritogenesis in type II spiral ganglion neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Meagan; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Peripherin, a type III intermediate filament protein, forms part of the cytoskeleton in a subset of neurons, most of which have peripheral fibre projections. Studies suggest a role for peripherin in axon outgrowth and regeneration, but evidence for this in sensory and brain tissues is limited. The exclusive expression of peripherin in a sub-population of primary auditory neurons, the type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) prompted our investigation of the effect of peripherin gene deletion (pphKO) on these neurons. We used confocal immunofluorescence to examine the establishment of the innervation of the cochlear outer hair cells by the type II SGN neurites in vivo and in vitro, in wildtype (WT) and pphKO mice, in the first postnatal week. The distribution of the type II SGN nerve fibres was normal in pphKO cochleae. However, using P1 spiral ganglion explants under culture conditions where the majority of neurites were derived from type II SGN, pphKO resulted in increased numbers of neurites/explant compared WT controls. Type II SGN neurites from pphKO explants extended ~ double the distance of WT neurites, and had reduced complexity based on greater distance between turning points. Addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to the culture media increased neurite number in WT and KO explants ~30-fold, but did not affect neurite length or distance between turning. These results indicate that peripherin may interact with other cytoskeletal elements to regulate outgrowth of the peripheral neurites of type II SGN, distinguishing these neurons from the type I SGN innervating the inner hair cells. PMID:20132868

  19. Molecular and cellular mechanism of the effect of La(III) on horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-09-01

    Horseradish is an important economic crop. It contains horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lots of nutrients, and has specific pungency. Lanthanum is one of the heavy metals in the environment. It can transfer through the food chain to humans. In this paper, the molecular and cellular mechanism of the toxic effects of La(III) on HRP in vivo was investigated with an optimized combination of biophysical, biochemical, and cytobiological methods. It was found that La(III) could interact with O and/or N atoms in the backbone/side chains of the HRP molecule in the cell membrane of horseradish treated with 80 microM La(III), leading to the formation of a new complex of La and HRP (La-HRP). The formation of the La-HRP complex causes the redistribution of the electron densities of atoms in the HRP molecule, especially the decrease in the electron density of the active center, Fe(III), in the heme group of the La-HRP molecule compared with the native HRP molecule in vivo. Therefore, the electron transfer and the activity of HRP in horseradish treated with 80 microM La(III) are obviously decreased compared with those of the native HRP in vivo. This is a possible molecular and cellular mechanism for the toxic effect of La(III) on HRP in vivo. It is suggested that the accumulation of La in the environment, especially the formation of the La-HRP complex in vivo, is harmful to organisms.

  20. Do Type III-associated Escaping Electron Beams Cool The Corona?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Wang, L.; Christe, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Kerdraon, A.; Lin, R. P.

    2012-05-01

    A recent study of decimetric Type III radio burst emission from data from the Nancay Radio Heliograph (NRH) will be presented. It examined sizes, locations, and fluxes of close to 10'000 decimetric Type III bursts. The flux study suggests that electron beams related to Type III emission could be responsible for carrying energy away from the corona in a proportion similar to that of EUV nanoflare heating. This tentative conclusion was reached from comparing Type III dN/dS distributions to the dN/dS of EUV/SXR nano-/micro-flares. The biggest uncertainty is the radiative efficiency, i.e. the ratio of radiated energy in decimetric Type III bursts and the energy of the electrons in the beams associated with them. We will constrain this value through other, new observations: we have already computed the amount of Type III radiated energy from NRH observations, and we will now compare them with the amount of energy in the corresponding beam electron detected in-situ by the Wind spacecraft. Given our sample of close to 10'000 decimetric Type IIIs, we expect a decent amount of in-situ beam energy estimates from magnetically connected events. Moreover, we will compare with X-ray-derived energies from corresponding RHESSI (micro)flares, when such an association exists.

  1. Type III-L Solar Radio Bursts and their Associations with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, R. T.; White, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    Type III-L bursts are a sub-class of type III solar radio bursts that tend to occur after the impulsive phase of flares; are longer in duration than individual type IIIs and tend to be low-frequency. There has been a proposal that type III-Ls are connected to solar energetic proton (SEP) events. Most work on this connection has started from samples of SEP events, but if type III-Ls are to be useful for prediction of SEP events, then we need to understand the properties of samples of type III-L bursts. This talk reports preliminary results from such a study. An operating definition based on previous work is used to identify type III-L events amongst M- and X-class flares from 2001; and then associations with other properties of these events are investigated, including association with SEP events. If there is an association with SEP events, one important factor that these bursts allow us to address is the question of whether acceleration takes place at an associated CME, or closer to the flare site well below the CME.

  2. "Do Type III-associated escaping electron beams cool the corona?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, P.; Wang, L.; Vilmer, N.; Kerdraon, A.

    2012-12-01

    A recent study of decimetric Type III radio burst emission from data from the Nancay Radio Heliograph will be presented. It examined sizes, locations, and fluxes of close to 10'000 decimetric Type III bursts. The flux study suggests that electron beams related to Type III emission could be responsible for carrying energy away from the corona in a proportion similar to EUV nanoflares. This tentative conclusion was reached from comparing Type III dN/dS distributions to the dN/dS of EUV/SXR nano-/micro-flares. The biggest uncertainty is the radiative efficiency, i.e. the ratio of radiated energy in decimetric Type III bursts and the energy of the electrons in the beams associated with them. We will constrain this value through other, new observations: we have already computed the amount of Type III radiated energy from NRH observations, and we will now compare them with the amount of energy in the corresponding beam electron detected in-situ by the Wind spacecraft. Given our sample of close to 10'000 decimetric Type IIIs, we expect a decent amount of in-situ beam energy estimates from magnetically connected events. Moreover, we will compare with X-ray-derived energies from corresponding RHESSI (micro)flares, when such an association exists.

  3. Revealing the anti-HRP epitope in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Rendić, Dubravko; Wilson, Iain B H

    2009-04-01

    Antibodies are very often used as specific cell and/or tissue markers. An example of this is anti-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), an antibody raised against a plant glycoprotein, which was shown some twenty-five years ago to specifically stain neural tissue in an animal, Drosophila melanogaster. This peculiar finding was later expanded to other invertebrate species including Caenorhabditis elegans, which were also shown to bear anti-HRP epitopes. Initial experiments indicated that the epitopes recognised by anti-HRP in invertebrates are of carbohydrate nature. Indeed, more recent experiments have characterised relevant core alpha1-3-fucosylated N-glycan structures that act as epitopes in various model and parasitic organisms. Moreover, a number of enzymes required for the synthesis of such structures have been identified. Over the years, medically-relevant roles of these structures have become apparent as regards allergenicity and immunoregulation. Although major advances have been made in understanding of the underlying mechanisms and structures related to the anti-HRP epitope, the in vivo role of the relevant epitopes in neural and other tissues is yet to be resolved. Current understanding of the anti-HRP epitopes synthesis and their relevance is discussed and elaborated.

  4. HRP and prorenin: focus on the (pro)renin receptor and vacuolar H+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xifeng; Danser, Alexander H J; Meima, Marcel E

    2011-06-01

    The function of prorenin, the precursor of renin, remained unknown until the discovery of the (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR). (Pro)renin binding to this receptor allows angiotensin generation and induces signaling. Thus, (P)RR blockade will exert effects beyond angiotensin suppression. Recently, the (P)RR has been identified as an accessory protein of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase, with important roles in Wnt signaling. In addition, transgenic animals overexpressing prorenin display the consequences of angiotensin generation, whereas transgenic animals overexpressing the (P)RR display an angiotensin-independent phenotype. Finally, both beneficial and deleterious effects have been described following treatment with the (P)RR antagonist 'handle region peptide' (HRP), while a (P)RR knockout in cardiomyocytes is lethal. This review highlights the latest findings in the (P)RR area, focusing on cardiovascular and renal pathology. It critically addresses the possibility that (pro)renin acts as an agonist of this receptor in vivo, and discusses the efficacy of HRP. Conclusions are that convincing evidence for (pro)renin-(P)RR interaction in vivo is currently lacking and, thus, that the concept of HRP exerting beneficial effects by blocking such interaction remains to be proven.

  5. Spectroscopic identification of type 2 quasars at z < 1 in SDSS-III/BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sihan; Strauss, Michael A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-10-01

    The physics and demographics of type 2 quasars remain poorly understood, and new samples of such objects selected in a variety of ways can give insight into their physical properties, evolution, and relationship to their host galaxies. We present a sample of 2758 type 2 quasars at z ≲ 1 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III)/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectroscopic data base, selected on the basis of their emission-line properties. We probe the luminous end of the population by requiring the rest-frame equivalent width of [O III] to be >100 Å. We distinguish our objects from star-forming galaxies and type 1 quasars using line widths, standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams at z < 0.52 and detection of [Ne V]λ3426 Å at z > 0.52. The majority of our objects have [O III] luminosities in the range 1.2 × 1042-3.8 × 1043 erg s-1 and redshifts between 0.4 and 0.65. Our sample includes over 400 type 2 quasars with incorrectly measured redshifts in the BOSS data base; such objects often show kinematic substructure or outflows in the [O III] line. The majority of the sample has counterparts in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, with median infrared luminosity νLν[12 μm] = 4.2 × 1044 erg s- 1. Only 34 per cent of the newly identified type 2 quasars would be selected by infrared colour cuts designed to identify obscured active nuclei, highlighting the difficulty of identifying complete samples of type 2 quasars. We make public the multi-Gaussian decompositions of all [O III] profiles for the new sample and for 568 type 2 quasars from SDSS I/II, together with non-parametric measures of the [O III] line profile shapes. We also identify over 600 candidate double-peaked [O III] profiles.

  6. Second harmonic generation microscopy differentiates collagen type I and type III in COPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masaru; Kayra, Damian; Elliott, W. Mark; Hogg, James C.; Abraham, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The structural remodeling of extracellular matrix proteins in peripheral lung region is an important feature in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multiphoton microscopy is capable of inducing specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal from non-centrosymmetric structural proteins such as fibrillar collagens. In this study, SHG microscopy was used to examine structural remodeling of the fibrillar collagens in human lungs undergoing emphysematous destruction (n=2). The SHG signals originating from these diseased lung thin sections from base to apex (n=16) were captured simultaneously in both forward and backward directions. We found that the SHG images detected in the forward direction showed well-developed and well-structured thick collagen fibers while the SHG images detected in the backward direction showed striking different morphological features which included the diffused pattern of forward detected structures plus other forms of collagen structures. Comparison of these images with the wellestablished immunohistochemical staining indicated that the structures detected in the forward direction are primarily the thick collagen type I fibers and the structures identified in the backward direction are diffusive structures of forward detected collagen type I plus collagen type III. In conclusion, we here demonstrate the feasibility of SHG microscopy in differentiating fibrillar collagen subtypes and understanding their remodeling in diseased lung tissues.

  7. The stimulation of auroral kilometric radiation by type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) frequently coincides with the arrival of type III solar radio bursts. Although the AKR onsets are usually abrupt and appear to be spontaneous, they sometimes develop from a discrete frequency near the leading edge of a type III burst or sometimes occur at progressively lower frequencies following that edge. From this, and the absence of the related solar electrons in specific cases, it was concluded that the incoming type III waves were sometimes responsible for stimulating auroral kilometric radiation. It was estimated that intense, isolated type III bursts were capable of stimulating AKR roughly one third of the time, and that at least ten percent of the observed AKR onsets could be attributed to these and weaker bursts, including some barely detectable by the ISEE plasma wave receivers.

  8. The stimulation of auroral kilometric radiation by type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) frequently coincides with the arrival of type III solar radio bursts. Although the AKR onsets are usually abrupt and appear to be spontaneous, they sometimes develop from a discrete frequency near the leading edge of a type III burst or sometimes occur at progressively lower frequencies following that edge. From this, and the absence of the related solar electrons in specific cases, it was concluded that the incoming type III waves were sometimes responsible for stimulating auroral kilometric radiation. It was estimated that intense, isolated type III bursts were capable of stimulating AKR roughly one third of the time, and that at least ten percent of the observed AKR onsets could be attributed to these and weaker bursts, including some barely detectable by the ISEE plasma wave receivers.

  9. Decameter type III bursts with positive and negative frequency drift rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantzusenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2013-09-01

    We report about observations of decameter type III bursts whose frequency drift rates vary their signs from negative to positive. Moreover drift rates of some bursts vary the sign some times. Positive drift rates for some bursts are changed from 0.44 MHz/s to 12 MHz/s. At the same time the negative drift rates of these bursts are standard values for decameter type III bursts. A possible interpretation of such phenomenon on the base of plasma mechanism of type III burst generation is discussed. The sense of this interpretation is that group velocity of type III electromagnetic waves generated by fast electrons at some conditions can be smaller than velocity of these electrons.

  10. Salter-Harris Type III and Type IV Combined Fracture of the Distal Femoral Epiphysis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ali; Topal, Murat; Tuncer, Kutsi; Şenocak, Eyüp

    2012-01-01

    Distal femoral physeal fractures are not common but have a high rate of complications. They generally follow one of the patterns described in the Salter-Harris classification. We present a case of combination of Salter-Harris type III and type IV injury. Our case was a 15-year-old boy who had a motor vehicle accident. There was swelling, ecchymosis, severe pain, and valgus deformity, because of medial proximal fracture fragment, on the left knee. We deemed that Salter-Harris type III and type IV combination fracture in our case has not been previously reported. We prepared this paper in consideration of its contribution to the literature. PMID:22666265

  11. Salter-Harris Type III and Type IV Combined Fracture of the Distal Femoral Epiphysis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ali; Topal, Murat; Tuncer, Kutsi; Senocak, Eyüp

    2012-01-01

    Distal femoral physeal fractures are not common but have a high rate of complications. They generally follow one of the patterns described in the Salter-Harris classification. We present a case of combination of Salter-Harris type III and type IV injury. Our case was a 15-year-old boy who had a motor vehicle accident. There was swelling, ecchymosis, severe pain, and valgus deformity, because of medial proximal fracture fragment, on the left knee. We deemed that Salter-Harris type III and type IV combination fracture in our case has not been previously reported. We prepared this paper in consideration of its contribution to the literature.

  12. A New Look at Type-III Bursts and Their Use as Coronal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun Beltran, Samuel D.; Cutchin, S.; White, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present meter-wave solar radio spectra of the highest spectro-temporal resolution achieved to date. The observations, obtained with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), show unprecedented detail of solar emissions across a wide bandwidth during a Type-III/IIIb storm. Our flux calibration demonstrates that the LWA1 can detect Type-III bursts much weaker than 1 SFU, much lower than previous observations, and that the distribution of fluxes in these bursts varies with frequency. The high sensitivity and low noise in the data provide strong constraints to models of this type of plasma emission, providing evidence against the idea that Type-IIIb striae are generated from electrons trapped in Langmuir-wave sidebands. The continuous generation of electron beams in the corona revealed by the high density Type-III storm is evidence for ubiquitous magnetic reconnection in the lower corona. Such an abundance of reconnection events not only contributes to the total coronal energy budget, but also provides an engine by which to form the populations of seed particles responsible for proton-rich solar energetic-particle events. An active region (AR) with such levels of reconnection and the accompanying Type-III/IIIb storms is proposed here to be associated with an increase of SEP production if a CME erupts. The data's constraints on existing theories of Type-IIIb production are used to make an association of the observed Type-IIIb storm to specific electron-beam paths with increased inhomogeneities in density, temperature, and/or turbulence. This scenario ties in the observed timing of Type-III and -IIIb storms, constrained theories of Type-III and -IIIb emission, and the ability of the emitting AR to produce a strong SEP event. The result requires but a single observable to cement these ideas, the statistical correlation of Type-III/IIIb activity with SEP-productive AR.

  13. Infectious Complications of Open Type III Tibial Fractures among Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-15

    Infection of Combat-Related Fractures • CID 2007:45 (15 August) • 409 M A J O R A R T I C L E Infectious Complications of Open Type III Tibial...associated with high-energy explosive injuries, often resulting in open tibial fractures complicated by nonunion and infection . We characterize the... infections seen in conjunction with combat-associated type III tibial fractures. Methods. We performed a retrospective medical records review to identify US

  14. Critical scaling and type-III intermittent chaos in isolated rabbit resistance arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, T. M.; Parthimos, D.; Crombie, J.; Edwards, D. H.

    1997-12-01

    We have shown that spontaneous oscillations in flow in rabbit ear resistance arteries may sometimes exhibit behavior typical of type-III Pomeau-Manneville intermittency. The average number of oscillations per laminar length was related to a bifurcation parameter ɛ according to power-law scaling of the form ~ɛ-β. The critical exponent β was estimated as ~0.80, which is within the range reported for type-III intermittent chaos in nonbiological systems.

  15. Joint position sense and vibratory perception sense in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III (hypermobility type).

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Cools, Ann; Calders, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    Neurophysiological deficits could make patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type III (hypermobility type) more vulnerable to musculoskeletal problems, particularly to joint instability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether joint position sense (JPS) and vibratory perception sense (VPS) in EDS type III patients in the knee and shoulder joints are impaired. Thirty-two female EDS type III patients as defined by the Villefranche criteria and 32 individually gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects were included in the study. Range of motion was determined using a goniometer, passive and active JPS were assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer system, and the VPS was measured by a biothesiometer. Daily physical activity was evaluated by the Baecke questionnaire. The EDS type III group showed significantly larger ranges of movement (P < 0.05) and lower levels of sport physical activity (SPA) compared to the control group (P = 0.023). Considering SPA as covariate, the EDS type III group demonstrated a significant impairment in knee joint reposition compared to the control group (P = 0.018). No significant differences were found for shoulder JPS. The VPS was not significantly different in the EDS type III group compared to the control group. In addition, no significant correlation was found between JPS and VPS, neither at the knee nor at the shoulder joint. This is the first study examining proprioception deficits in EDS type III patients as defined by the Villefranche criteria. Further research on the neurophysiological dysfunctions and mechanisms in this pathologic entity is needed.

  16. KdgR, an IClR family transcriptional regulator, inhibits virulence mainly by repression of hrp genes in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Rashidul, Islam M; Hirata, Hisae; Tsuyumu, Shinji

    2011-12-01

    KdgR has been reported to negatively regulate the genes involved in degradation and metabolization of pectic acid and other extracellular enzymes in soft-rotting Erwinia spp. through direct binding to their promoters. The possible involvement of a KdgR orthologue in virulence by affecting the expression of extracellular enzymes in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of rice blight disease, was examined by comparing virulence and regulation of extracellular enzymes between the wild type (WT) and a strain carrying a mutation in putative kdgR (ΔXoo0310 mutant). This putative kdgR mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae showed increased pathogenicity on rice without affecting the regulation of extracellular enzymes, such as amylase, cellulase, xylanase, and protease. However, the mutant carrying a mutation in an ortholog of xpsL, which encodes the functional secretion machinery for the extracellular enzymes, showed a dramatic decrease in pathogenicity on rice. Both mutants of kdgR and of xpsL orthologs showed higher expression of two major hrp regulatory genes, hrpG and hrpX, and the genes in the hrp operons when grown in hrp-inducing medium. Thus, both genes were shown to be involved in repression of hrp genes. The kdgR ortholog was thought to suppress virulence mainly by repressing the expression of hrp genes without affecting the expression of extracellular enzymes, unlike findings for the kdgR gene in soft-rotting Erwinia spp. On the other hand, xpsL was confirmed to be involved in virulence by promoting the secretion of extracellular enzymes in spite of repressing the expression of the hrp genes.

  17. Structural Basis for Substrate Binding and the Catalytic Mechanism of Type III Pantothenate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kun; Strauss, Erick; Huerta, Carlos; Zhang, Hong

    2008-07-15

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the first step of the universal five-step coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway. The recently characterized type III PanK (PanK-III, encoded by the coaX gene) is distinct in sequence, structure and enzymatic properties from both the long-known bacterial type I PanK (PanK-I, exemplified by the Escherichia coli CoaA protein) and the predominantly eukaryotic type II PanK (PanK-II). PanK-III enzymes have an unusually high K{sub m} for ATP, are resistant to feedback inhibition by CoA, and are unable to utilize the N-alkylpantothenamide family of pantothenate analogues as alternative substrates, thus making type III PanK ineffective in generating CoA analogues as antimetabolites in vivo. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of the PanK-III from Thermotoga maritima and identified it as a member of the 'acetate and sugar kinase/heat shock protein 70/actin' (ASKHA) superfamily. Here we report the crystal structures of the same PanK-III in complex with one of its substrates (pantothenate), its product (phosphopantothenate) as well as a ternary complex structure of PanK-III with pantothenate and ADP. These results are combined with isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to present a detailed structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interactions between PanK-III and its substrates ATP and pantothenate. Comparison of substrate binding and catalytic sites of PanK-III with that of eukaryotic PanK-II revealed drastic differences in the binding modes for both ATP and pantothenate substrates, and suggests that these differences may be exploited in the development of new inhibitors specifically targeting PanK-III.

  18. Immobilization induces carbonic anhydrase III in type II fibers of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Laurila, A L; Jeffery, S; Savolainen, J; Takala, T E; Carter, N D; Väänänen, H K

    1991-05-01

    The amount and fiber distribution of carbonic anhydrase III (CA III), a major soluble protein in Type I muscle fibers, were studied during cast immobilization of rat hindlimb with the ankle in plantar or dorsiflexion. The concentration of CA III increased two- (p less than 0.05) and three- (p less than 0.01) fold in the shortened and lengthened tibialis anterior muscle during a 3-weeks immobilization period, respectively. After 6 weeks of immobilization the increase was even greater (p less than 0.001). Concomitantly, the number of CA III positive fibers in the lengthened muscle increased so that almost all fibers were positive. In the soleus muscle no significant change in the CA III concentration was seen. On the basis of actomyosin ATPase staining, the transition of Type IIb fibers towards Type IIa occurred in the tibialis anterior muscle, whereas in the soleus muscle a transformation of Type I fibers towards Type IIa fibers occurred. Therefore, the increase in the muscle CA III concentration seems to be associated with a cell transformation of the muscle towards a more oxidative type.

  19. SOLAR MICRO-TYPE III BURST STORMS AND LONG DIPOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE OUTER CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.; Obara, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Masuda, S.; Iwai, K.; Kasaba, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Solar micro-type III radio bursts are elements of the so-called type III storms and are characterized by short-lived, continuous, and weak emissions. Their frequency of occurrence with respect to radiation power is quite different from that of ordinary type III bursts, suggesting that the generation process is not flare-related, but due to some recurrent acceleration processes around the active region. We examine the relationship of micro-type III radio bursts with coronal streamers. We also explore the propagation channel of bursts in the outer corona, the acceleration process, and the escape route of electron beams. It is observationally confirmed that micro-type III bursts occur near the edge of coronal streamers. The magnetic field line of the escaping electron beams is tracked on the basis of the frequency drift rate of micro-type III bursts and the electron density distribution model. The results demonstrate that electron beams are trapped along closed dipolar field lines in the outer coronal region, which arise from the interface region between the active region and the coronal hole. A 22 year statistical study reveals that the apex altitude of the magnetic loop ranges from 15 to 50 R{sub S}. The distribution of the apex altitude has a sharp upper limit around 50 R{sub S} suggesting that an unknown but universal condition regulates the upper boundary of the streamer dipolar field.

  20. Solar Micro-Type III Burst Storms and Long Dipolar Magnetic Field in the Outer Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Iwai, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Masuda, S.; Misawa, H.; Obara, T.

    2015-08-01

    Solar micro-type III radio bursts are elements of the so-called type III storms and are characterized by short-lived, continuous, and weak emissions. Their frequency of occurrence with respect to radiation power is quite different from that of ordinary type III bursts, suggesting that the generation process is not flare-related, but due to some recurrent acceleration processes around the active region. We examine the relationship of micro-type III radio bursts with coronal streamers. We also explore the propagation channel of bursts in the outer corona, the acceleration process, and the escape route of electron beams. It is observationally confirmed that micro-type III bursts occur near the edge of coronal streamers. The magnetic field line of the escaping electron beams is tracked on the basis of the frequency drift rate of micro-type III bursts and the electron density distribution model. The results demonstrate that electron beams are trapped along closed dipolar field lines in the outer coronal region, which arise from the interface region between the active region and the coronal hole. A 22 year statistical study reveals that the apex altitude of the magnetic loop ranges from 15 to 50 RS. The distribution of the apex altitude has a sharp upper limit around 50 RS suggesting that an unknown but universal condition regulates the upper boundary of the streamer dipolar field.

  1. Impassable YscP substrates and their impact on the Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Kelly E; Sorg, Joseph A; Berube, Bryan J; Schneewind, Olaf

    2008-09-01

    Yersinia type III machines secrete protein substrates across the bacterial envelope and, following assembly of their secretion needles, transport effector Yops into host cells. According to their destination during type III secretion, early, middle, and late secretion substrates can be distinguished; however, the signals and mechanisms whereby these proteins are recognized and transported by the secretion machine are not understood. Here, we examine several hybrids between secretion substrates and the impassable reporter protein glutathione S-transferase (GST). YscP-GST and YopR-GST blocked type III secretion; however, YscF-, YopD-, YopN-, and LcrV-GST did not. Unlike YopR-GST, which can block type III machines only during their assembly, expression of YscP-GST led to an immediate and complete block of all secretion. The secretion signal of YscP was mapped to its first 10 codons or amino acids; however, YscP(Delta 2-15)-GST, lacking this secretion signal, imposed a partial blockade. YscP-GST copurified with the type III ATPase complex (YscN, YscL, and YscQ) and with YscO, suggesting that the association of specific machine components with the impassable substrate may cause the block in type III secretion.

  2. EM algorithm in estimating the 2- and 3-parameter Burr Type III distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nor Hidayah Binti; Khalid, Zarina Binti Mohd

    2014-07-01

    The Burr Type III distribution has been applied in the study of income, wage and wealth. It is suitable to fit lifetime data since it has flexible shape and controllable scale parameters. The popularity of Burr Type III distribution increases because it has included the characteristics of other distributions such as logistic and exponential. Burr Type III distribution has two categories: First a two-parameter distribution which has two shape parameters and second a three-parameter distribution which has a scale and two shape parameters. Expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm method is selected in this paper to estimate the two- and three-parameter Burr Type III distributions. Complete and censored data are simulated based on the derivation of pdf and cdf in parametric form of Burr Type III distributions. Then, the EM estimates are compared with estimates from maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach through mean square error. The best approach results in estimates with a higher approximation to the true parameters are determined. The result shows that the EM algorithm estimates perform better than the MLE estimates for two- and three-parameter Burr Type III distributions in the presence of complete and censored data.

  3. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, Hilary V.; Erickson, W. C.; Prestage, N. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this correlative study between greater than 20 MeV solar proton events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and radio bursts it is found that essentially all of the proton events are preceded by groups of type III bursts and all are preceded by CMEs. These type III bursts (that are a flare phenomenon) usually are long-lasting, intense bursts seen in the low-frequency observations made from space. They are caused by streams of electrons traveling from close to the solar surface out to 1 AU. In most events the type III emissions extend into, or originate at, the time when type II and type IV bursts are reported (some 5 to 10 minutes after the start of the associated soft X-ray flare) and have starting frequencies in the 500 to approximately 100 MHz range that often get lower as a function of time. These later type III emissions are often not reported by ground-based observers, probably because of undue attention to type II bursts. It is suggested to call them type III-1. Type III-1 bursts have previously been called shock accelerated (SA) events, but an examination of radio dynamic spectra over an extended frequency range shows that the type III-1 bursts usually start at frequencies above any type II burst that may be present. The bursts sometimes continue beyond the time when type II emission is seen and, furthermore, sometimes occur in the absence of any type II emission. Thus the causative electrons are unlikely to be shock accelerated and probably originate in the reconnection regions below fast CMEs. A search did not find any type III-1 bursts that were not associated with CMEs. The existence of low-frequency type III bursts proves that open field lines extend from within 0.5 radius of the Sun into the interplanetary medium (the bursts start above 100 MHz, and such emission originates within 0.5 solar radius of the solar surface). Thus it is not valid to assume that only closed field lines exist in the flaring regions associated with CMEs and some

  4. Avoiding type III, IV, and V errors through collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Yamatani, Hide; Mann, Aaron; Feit, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Major types of empirical errors reviewed by a number of leading research textbooks include discussions of Type I and Type II errors. However, applied human service researchers can commit other types of errors that should be avoided. The potential benefits of the applied, collaborative research (in contrast to traditional participatory research) include an assurance that the study begins with the "right" questions that are important for community residents. Such research practice also helps generate useful research findings for decisions regarding redistribution of resources and resolving community issues. The aim of collaborative research is not merely to advance scientific understanding, but also to produce empirical findings that are usable for addressing priority needs and problems of distressed communities. A review of a case example (Garfield Community Assessment Study) illustrates the principles and practices of collaborative research.

  5. Type III CRISPR-Cas systems can provide redundancy to counteract viral escape from type I systems

    PubMed Central

    Silas, Sukrit; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Jackson, Simon A; Aroca-Crevillén, Alejandra; Hansen, Loren L; Fineran, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas-mediated defense utilizes information stored as spacers in CRISPR arrays to defend against genetic invaders. We define the mode of target interference and role in antiviral defense for two CRISPR-Cas systems in Marinomonas mediterranea. One system (type I-F) targets DNA. A second system (type III-B) is broadly capable of acquiring spacers in either orientation from RNA and DNA, and exhibits transcription-dependent DNA interference. Examining resistance to phages isolated from Mediterranean seagrass meadows, we found that the type III-B machinery co-opts type I-F CRISPR-RNAs. Sequencing and infectivity assessments of related bacterial and phage strains suggests an ‘arms race’ in which phage escape from the type I-F system can be overcome through use of type I-F spacers by a horizontally-acquired type III-B system. We propose that the phage-host arms race can drive selection for horizontal uptake and maintenance of promiscuous type III interference modules that supplement existing host type I CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:28826484

  6. Type III CRISPR-Cas systems can provide redundancy to counteract viral escape from type I systems.

    PubMed

    Silas, Sukrit; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Jackson, Simon A; Aroca-Crevillén, Alejandra; Hansen, Loren L; Fineran, Peter C; Fire, Andrew Z; Sánchez-Amat, Antonio

    2017-08-17

    CRISPR-Cas-mediated defense utilizes information stored as spacers in CRISPR arrays to defend against genetic invaders. We define the mode of target interference and role in antiviral defense for two CRISPR-Cas systems in Marinomonas mediterranea. One system (type I-F) targets DNA. A second system (type III-B) is broadly capable of acquiring spacers in either orientation from RNA and DNA, and exhibits transcription-dependent DNA interference. Examining resistance to phages isolated from Mediterranean seagrass meadows, we found that the type III-B machinery co-opts type I-F CRISPR-RNAs. Sequencing and infectivity assessments of related bacterial and phage strains suggests an 'arms race' in which phage escape from the type I-F system can be overcome through use of type I-F spacers by a horizontally-acquired type III-B system. We propose that the phage-host arms race can drive selection for horizontal uptake and maintenance of promiscuous type III interference modules that supplement existing host type I CRISPR-Cas systems.

  7. Increased activity of coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) causes hereditary angioedema type III.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Sven; Martin, Ludovic; Hennies, Hans Christian; Müller, Felicitas; Van Driessche, Karen; Karpushova, Anna; Stevens, Wim; Colombo, Roberto; Renné, Thomas; Drouet, Christian; Bork, Konrad; Nöthen, Markus M

    2006-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is characterized clinically by recurrent acute skin swelling, abdominal pain, and potentially life-threatening laryngeal edema. Three forms of HAE have been described. The classic forms, HAE types I and II, occur as a consequence of mutations in the C1-inhibitor gene. In contrast to HAE types I and II, HAE type III has been observed exclusively in women, where it appears to be correlated with conditions of high estrogen levels--for example, pregnancy or the use of oral contraceptives. A recent report proposed two missense mutations (c.1032C-->A and c.1032C-->G) in F12, the gene encoding human coagulation factor XII (FXII, or Hageman factor) as a possible cause of HAE type III. Here, we report the occurrence of the c.1032C-->A (p.Thr328Lys) mutation in an HAE type III-affected family of French origin. Investigation of the F12 gene in a large German family did not reveal a coding mutation. Haplotype analysis with use of microsatellite markers is compatible with locus heterogeneity in HAE type III. To shed more light on the pathogenic relevance of the HAE type III-associated p.Thr328Lys mutation, we compared FXII activity and plasma levels in patients carrying the mutation with that of healthy control individuals. Our data strongly suggest that p.Thr328Lys is a gain-of-function mutation that markedly increases FXII amidolytic activity but that does not alter FXII plasma levels. We conclude that enhanced FXII enzymatic plasma activity in female mutation carriers leads to enhanced kinin production, which results in angioedema. Transcription of F12 is positively regulated by estrogens, which may explain why only women are affected with HAE type III. The results of our study represent an important step toward an understanding of the molecular processes involved in HAE type III and provide diagnostic and possibly new therapeutic opportunities.

  8. Contribution of Type III Interferons to Antiviral Immunity; Location, Location, Location.

    PubMed

    Kotenko, Sergei V; Durbin, Joan E

    2017-03-13

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) and the more recently identified type III IFNs (IFN-λ) function as the first line of defense against virus infection, and regulate the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Type III IFNs were originally identified as a novel ligand-receptor system acting in parallel with type I IFNs, but subsequent studies have provided increasing evidence for distinct roles for each IFN family. In addition to their compartmentalized antiviral actions, these two systems appear to have multiple levels of cross-regulation, and act coordinately to achieve effective anti-microbial protection with minimal collateral damage to the host.

  9. Specific cleavage of human type III and IV collagens by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Heck, L W; Morihara, K; McRae, W B; Miller, E J

    1986-01-01

    Purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaved human type III and IV collagens with the formation of specific cleavage products. Furthermore, type I collagen appeared to be slowly cleaved by both P. aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease. These cleavage fragments from type III and IV collagens were separated from the intact collagen chains by SDS polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis run under reducing conditions, and they were detected by their characteristic Coomassie blue staining pattern. The results of these studies suggest that the pathogenesis of tissue invasion and hemorrhagic tissue necrosis observed in P. aeruginosa infections may be related to the degradation of these collagen types by bacterial extracellular proteases. Images PMID:3079727

  10. Solar noise storms - The polarization of storm Type III and related bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral and polarization characteristics of 19 noise storms that occurred during 1976-1982 are reported. All components of the storms - Type I bursts and continuum, storm Type III bursts, and fine structures such as reverse drift pairs - are found to have the same sense of circular polarization. While the degree of polarization p of Type I bursts and continuum is generally greater than or approximately equal to 0.5, that of storm Type III bursts is almost always less than 0.5. Two set of storm Type III bursts stand out: one with less than or approximately equal to 0.2 and another with greater than or approximately equal to 0.3. Because these sets respectively have degrees of polarization so similar to those of fundamental (F) the harmonic (H) components of non-storm F - H pairs, it is deduced that storm Type III bursts are due sometimes to fundamental plasma radiation and sometimes to harmonic. However, F - H pairs are extremely rare among storm Type III bursts.

  11. Immunochemical characterization of the "native" type III polysaccharide of group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The type III polysaccharide of -roup B Streptococcus has been isolated and purified by a method that employs washing of intact cells at neutral pH. That the polysaccharide prepared by this procedure is the "native" type III antigen is suggested by its molecular size in excess of 10(6) daltons, its degradation by acid and heat treatment to a fragment with immunologic characteristics of the classical HCl antigen, and its type-specific serologic activity. The type III polysaccharide in native form contains sialic acid, galactose, glucose, glucosamine, heptose, and mannose. It is acidic in nature, is resistant to neuramindiase degradation, contains no O-acetyl groups, and does not share antigenic determinants with capsular type K1 antigen of Escherichia coli or Group B polysaccharide antigen of Neiserria meningitidis. PMID:55450

  12. Distinct Roles of Type I and Type III Interferons in Intestinal Immunity to Homologous and Heterologous Rotavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; McElrath, Constance; Smirnov, Sergey V.; Peng, Jianya; Yasukawa, Linda L.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Kotenko, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    Type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons (IFNs) exert shared antiviral activities through distinct receptors. However, their relative importance for antiviral protection of different organ systems against specific viruses remains to be fully explored. We used mouse strains deficient in type-specific IFN signaling, STAT1 and Rag2 to dissect distinct and overlapping contributions of type I and type III IFNs to protection against homologous murine (EW-RV strain) and heterologous (non-murine) simian (RRV strain) rotavirus infections in suckling mice. Experiments demonstrated that murine EW-RV is insensitive to the action of both types of IFNs, and that timely viral clearance depends upon adaptive immune responses. In contrast, both type I and type III IFNs can control replication of the heterologous simian RRV in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and they cooperate to limit extra-intestinal simian RRV replication. Surprisingly, intestinal epithelial cells were sensitive to both IFN types in neonatal mice, although their responsiveness to type I, but not type III IFNs, diminished in adult mice, revealing an unexpected age-dependent change in specific contribution of type I versus type III IFNs to antiviral defenses in the GI tract. Transcriptional analysis revealed that intestinal antiviral responses to RV are triggered through either type of IFN receptor, and are greatly diminished when receptors for both IFN types are lacking. These results also demonstrate a murine host-specific resistance to IFN-mediated antiviral effects by murine EW-RV, but the retention of host efficacy through the cooperative action by type I and type III IFNs in restricting heterologous simian RRV growth and systemic replication in suckling mice. Collectively, our findings revealed a well-orchestrated spatial and temporal tuning of innate antiviral responses in the intestinal tract where two types of IFNs through distinct patterns of their expression and distinct but overlapping sets

  13. Analysis of the role of the type III effector inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a in interaction with the plant.

    PubMed

    Zumaquero, Adela; Macho, Alberto P; Rufián, José S; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2010-09-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae, the type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for disease in compatible hosts and for eliciting the hypersensitive response in incompatible hosts. P. syringae pathovars secrete a variable number of type III effectors that form their secretomes. The secretome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a (Pph1448a) currently includes 22 experimentally validated effectors, one HrpL-regulated candidate for which translocation results have been inconsistent, two translocated candidates for which in planta expression has not been established, one bioinformatically identified candidate, and six candidates that have been experimentally discarded. We analyzed the translocation and/or expression of these and other candidates to complete the Pph1448a effector inventory, bringing this inventory to 27 bona fide effectors, including a new one that does not belong to any of the previously described effector families. We developed a simple process for rapidly making single and double knockout mutants and apply it to the generation of an effector mutant collection that includes single knockouts for the majority of the Pph1448a effector inventory. We also generated two double mutant strains containing effectors with potentially redundant functions and analyzed the virulence of the single and double mutant strains as well as strains expressing each of the effectors from a plasmid. We demonstrate that AvrB4-1 and AvrB4-2, as well as HopW1-1 and HopW1-2, are fully redundant and contribute to virulence in bean plants, thus validating this approach for dissecting the contribution of the Pph1448a type III effector inventory to virulence. We also analyzed the effect that the expression of these four effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) has during its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana, establishing that AvrB4-1, but not the others, determines a restriction of bacterial growth that takes place mostly independently of the

  14. Analysis of the Role of the Type III Effector Inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a in Interaction with the Plant ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zumaquero, Adela; Macho, Alberto P.; Rufián, José S.; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2010-01-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae, the type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for disease in compatible hosts and for eliciting the hypersensitive response in incompatible hosts. P. syringae pathovars secrete a variable number of type III effectors that form their secretomes. The secretome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448a (Pph1448a) currently includes 22 experimentally validated effectors, one HrpL-regulated candidate for which translocation results have been inconsistent, two translocated candidates for which in planta expression has not been established, one bioinformatically identified candidate, and six candidates that have been experimentally discarded. We analyzed the translocation and/or expression of these and other candidates to complete the Pph1448a effector inventory, bringing this inventory to 27 bona fide effectors, including a new one that does not belong to any of the previously described effector families. We developed a simple process for rapidly making single and double knockout mutants and apply it to the generation of an effector mutant collection that includes single knockouts for the majority of the Pph1448a effector inventory. We also generated two double mutant strains containing effectors with potentially redundant functions and analyzed the virulence of the single and double mutant strains as well as strains expressing each of the effectors from a plasmid. We demonstrate that AvrB4-1 and AvrB4-2, as well as HopW1-1 and HopW1-2, are fully redundant and contribute to virulence in bean plants, thus validating this approach for dissecting the contribution of the Pph1448a type III effector inventory to virulence. We also analyzed the effect that the expression of these four effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) has during its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana, establishing that AvrB4-1, but not the others, determines a restriction of bacterial growth that takes place mostly independently of the

  15. Skin as marker for collagen type I/III ratio in abdominal wall fascia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, E; De Hertogh, G; Junge, K; Klinge, U; Miserez, M

    2014-08-01

    An altered collagen metabolism could play an important role in hernia development. This study compared collagen type I/III ratio and organisation between hernia and control patients, and analysed the correlation in collagen type I/III ratio between skin and abdominal wall fascia. Collagen organisation was analysed in Haematoxylin-Eosin sections of anterior rectus sheath fascia, and collagen type I/III ratio, by crosspolarisation microscopy, in Sirius-Red sections of skin and anterior rectus sheath fascia, of 19 control, 10 primary inguinal, 10 recurrent inguinal, 13 primary incisional and 8 recurrent incisional hernia patients. Compared to control patients [7.2 (IQR = 6.8-7.7) and 7.2 (IQR = 5.8-7.9)], collagen type I/III ratio was significantly lower in skin and anterior rectus sheath fascia of primary inguinal [5.2 (IQR = 3.8-6.3) and 4.2 (IQR = 3.8-4.7)], recurrent inguinal [3.2 (IQR = 3.1-3.6) and 3.3 (IQR = 3-3.7)], primary incisional [3.5 (IQR = 3-3.9) and 3.4 (IQR = 3.3-3.6)] and recurrent incisional hernia [3.2 (IQR = 3.1-3.9) and 3.2 (IQR = 2.9-3.2)] patients; also incisional and recurrent inguinal hernia had lower ratio than primary inguinal hernia patients. Furthermore, collagen type I/III ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.81; P < 0.001) between skin and anterior rectus sheath fascia. Finally, collagen organisation was comparable between hernia and control patients. Furthermore, in both skin and abdominal wall fascia of hernia patients, collagen type I/III ratio was lower compared to control patients, with more pronounced abnormalities in incisional and recurrent inguinal hernia patients. Importantly, collagen type I/III ratio in skin was representative for that in abdominal wall fascia.

  16. TYPE III RADIO BURSTS IN CORONAL PLASMAS WITH KAPPA PARTICLE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2013-02-01

    We present the first simulations of type III bursts produced in the corona with suprathermal non-Maxwellian background particles, as inferred from solar wind data and proposed by theories for the corona and solar wind. The coronal background particles are assumed to follow kappa ({kappa}) distributions. The predicted f{sub p} emission of type III bursts is sensitive via the {kappa} index to the presence of suprathermal background particles, where f{sub p} is the local plasma frequency. The simulations show that (1) the speeds v{sub b} of type III beams are much larger (e.g., v{sub b} Almost-Equal-To 0.58c for {kappa} = 5) and so type III bursts drift much faster for low {kappa} ({<=}5) background plasmas than for Maxwellian backgrounds (producing v{sub b} < 0.3c), and (2) f{sub p} emission generated in a {kappa}-distributed background corona has a larger total bandwidth than in a Maxwellian background, for similar onset frequencies. Type III beams are thus more persistent, i.e., extending over larger distances, in {kappa}-distributed corona. Consequently, observations of fast-drifting coronal type III bursts and associated fast electron beams suggest that the ambient electrons in the corona are {kappa}-distributed, at least when such bursts are observed. These results support, from the new viewpoint of nonthermal radio emission, the occasional presence of suprathermal background electrons in the corona and the associated mechanisms (e.g., 'velocity filtration') for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. The new results also help resolve longstanding issues regarding the speeds and persistence of type III beams, and the production of remotely observable levels of f{sub p} emission despite severe losses during propagation.

  17. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-loaded silica-poly(acrylic acid) brushes for protein biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Yiqun; Kong, Rongmei; Xia, Lian; Qu, Fengli

    2016-01-15

    We report an ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor designed for the detection of protein biomarkers using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-loaded silica-poly(acrylic acid) brushes (SiO2-SPAABs) as labels. HRP could be efficiently and stably accommodated in the three-dimensional architecture of the SiO2-SPAABs and the SiO2-SPAABs-HRP exhibited high catalytic performance towards o-phenylenediamine (OPD) oxidation in the presence of H2O2, which resulted in significant differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) response change and color change. Using human IgG (HIgG) as a model analyte, a sandwich-type immunosensor was constructed. In particular, graphene oxide (GO) and SiO2-SPAABs-HRP were used to immobilize capture antibody (Ab1) and bind a layer of detection antibody (Ab2), respectively. The current biosensor exhibited a good linear response of HIgG from 100pg/mL to 100μg/mL with a detection limit of 50pg/mL (S/N=5). The sensitivity was 6.70-fold higher than the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The immunosensor results were validated through the detection of HIgG in serum samples.

  18. Incidence, etiology, and management of type III endoleak after endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Maleux, Geert; Poorteman, Lien; Laenen, Annouschka; Saint-Lèbes, Bertrand; Houthoofd, Sabrina; Fourneau, Inge; Rousseau, Hervé

    2017-04-20

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the incidence, etiology, and management of type III endoleaks in a large cohort of patients treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in two European university centers. From 1995 until 2014, 965 EVAR procedures were performed with use of first- and second-generation (n = 79) or third-generation (n = 886) endografts. Radiologic follow-up was performed with computed tomography and abdominal plain film examinations in accordance with the European Collaborators on Stent/graft Techniques for aortic Aneurysm Repair (EUROSTAR) scheme. The potential relationship between the type of endograft and the incidence of type III endoleak and the time interval between initial EVAR and diagnosis of type III endoleak were calculated. Twenty patients (2.1%) were identified with 25 type III endoleaks (n = 10/79 [12.7%] for first- and second-generation endografts and n = 10/886 [1.2%] for third-generation endografts; P < .001). Disconnection was found in 14 of 25 endoleaks (56%) and a fabric defect in 11 of 25 (44%) endoleaks, both without any difference between first- and second- vs third-generation endografts (P = .216). The time interval between initial EVAR and type III endoleak was 3.87 and 5.92 years, respectively, for first- or second-generation and third-generation endografts (P = .148). Twenty-five type III endoleaks were treated using endovascular techniques (n = 22 [88%]) or by open surgical conversion (n = 3 [12%]). Type III endoleak rarely (2.1%) occurs after EVAR, with a higher incidence in first- and second-generation endografts. In the majority of cases, the underlying mechanism is disconnection of the stent graft components. Type III endoleaks may occur early or late after initial EVAR and can, in most cases, be managed endovascularly, although type III endoleak may recur. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro growth characteristics of simian T-lymphotropic virus type III.

    PubMed Central

    Kannagi, M; Yetz, J M; Letvin, N L

    1985-01-01

    The type C retrovirus simian T-lymphotropic virus type III (STLV-III) has been isolated recently from immunodeficient macaque monkeys at the New England Regional Primate Research Center. The present studies were done to define the in vitro growth characteristics of this agent. STLV-III replicates efficiently in interleukin 2-dependent T-cell cultures of macaque peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), less efficiently in such cultures of human and gibbon PBL, and inefficiently in baboon PBL. No replication, as assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase activity in these culture supernatants, could be detected in similarly maintained cultures of chimpanzee, squirrel monkey, and cotton-top tamarin PBL. Like the human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), STLV-III replicates in T4+ but not T8+ lymphocytes and its infection of macaque and human lymphocytes can be blocked with monoclonal anti-T4 antibodies. STLV-III differs from the human AIDS virus, however, in its apparent inability to grow in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes tested, the differing range of nonhuman primate T-cell populations that support its growth, and its less striking toxicity for T lymphocytes. These studies provide further characterization of an agent that will be extremely important in facilitating the development of vaccines and antiviral therapy for AIDS. PMID:2996002

  20. [Prophylactic use of icatibant before tracheal intubation of a patient with hereditary angioedema type III. (A literature review of perioperative management of patients with hereditary angioedema type III)].

    PubMed

    Iturri Clavero, F; González Uriarte, A; Tamayo Medel, G; Gamboa Setién, P M

    2014-01-01

    Type III hereditary angioedema is a rare familial disorder that has recently been described as a separate condition. Triggers for episodes of angioedema include surgery, dental procedures, and tracheal intubation maneuvers. Since episodes affecting the upper airway are potentially life-threatening, prophylactic treatment is recommended in these situations. The use of icatibant (Firazyr(®)), for prevention of angioedema prior to tracheal intubation, is reported in a patient with type iii hereditary angioedema. A literature review on the anesthetic management of this condition was conducted. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  2. Methods for enhancing P-type doping in III-V semiconductor films

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Feng; Stringfellow, Gerald; Zhu, Junyi

    2017-08-01

    Methods of doping a semiconductor film are provided. The methods comprise epitaxially growing the III-V semiconductor film in the presence of a dopant, a surfactant capable of acting as an electron reservoir, and hydrogen, under conditions that promote the formation of a III-V semiconductor film doped with the p-type dopant. In some embodiments of the methods, the epitaxial growth of the doped III-V semiconductor film is initiated at a first hydrogen partial pressure which is increased to a second hydrogen partial pressure during the epitaxial growth process.

  3. Alglucosidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy as a therapeutic approach for glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Fredrickson, Keri; Austin, Stephanie; Tolun, Adviye A; Thurberg, Beth L; Kraus, William E; Bali, Deeksha; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Kishnani, Priya S

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using recombinant human acid-α glucosidase (rhGAA, Alglucosidase alfa), an FDA approved therapy for Pompe disease, as a treatment approach for glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III). An in vitro disease model was established by isolating primary myoblasts from skeletal muscle biopsies of patients with GSD IIIa. We demonstrated that rhGAA significantly reduced glycogen levels in the two GSD IIIa patients' muscle cells (by 17% and 48%, respectively) suggesting that rhGAA could be a novel therapy for GSD III. This conclusion needs to be confirmed in other in vivo models.

  4. On the three harmonics of solar type III bursts at the decameter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, Anatolii; Pylaev, Oleg; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexandr; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Rucker, Helmut; Frantsuzenko, Anatolii; Dorovskyy, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Harmonic structure of type III bursts are explained in terms of plasma emission mechanism. The second harmonic emission is well known. But there are theoretical papers about the third harmonic of type III bursts. And there were observations of the third harmonic of such types of bursts as U, J, V, II. We observed triple type III bursts where frequency ratio is close to 1:2:3. They are structures where type III emission is repeated at the double and triple frequencies. Incidentally, components of triple type III bursts are not only standard type III but also type IIIb bursts. We registered 30 triple bursts during 2011 and 2012 years. Observations were made by radio telescope URAN-2, Poltava, Ukraine. It enables polarization measurements at the frequencies 8 - 32 MHz. URAN-2 allows registration of radio emission with time and frequency resolution 10 ms and 4 kHz correspondingly. We analyze properties of the components of triple bursts and their dependencies on frequency, type of burst and on the position of the component within the triplet. The main properties of the components of triple bursts such as duration and drift rate are similar to those of standard type III and IIIb bursts. We find usual for type III bursts dependencies such as follow: duration decreases with frequency, the type IIIb bursts have always smaller duration at the same frequencies, all bursts drift from high to low frequencies. But we also find the linear dependence of drift rate on frequency. All components of a trio have the same sign of polarization. Polarization of the first component is always the highest in triple bursts. It corresponds to the generally accepted viewpoint about the first harmonic emission. The second and the third components of trio have low polarization. It is typical for the second and the third harmonics according to the plasma radiation mechanism. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and theoretical aspects of observed dependencies. The most of detected regularities

  5. Timing is everything: the regulation of type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Deane, Janet E; Abrusci, Patrizia; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M

    2010-04-01

    Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria. The T3SS is an injection device that can transfer bacterial virulence proteins directly into host cells. The apparatus is made up of a basal body that spans both bacterial membranes and an extracellular needle that possesses a channel that is thought to act as a conduit for protein secretion. Contact with a host-cell membrane triggers the insertion of a pore into the target membrane, and effectors are translocated through this pore into the host cell. To assemble a functional T3SS, specific substrates must be targeted to the apparatus in the correct order. Recently, there have been many developments in our structural and functional understanding of the proteins involved in the regulation of secretion. Here we review the current understanding of protein components of the system thought to be involved in switching between different stages of secretion.

  6. Type III-L Solar Radio Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, R. T.; White, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    A radio-selected sample of fast drift radio bursts with complex structure occurring after the impulsive phase of the associated flare (“Type III-L bursts”) is identified by inspection of radio dynamic spectra from 1 to 180 MHz for over 300 large flares in 2001. An operational definition that takes into account previous work on these radio bursts starting from samples of solar energetic particle (SEP) events is applied to the data, and 66 Type III-L bursts are found in the sample. In order to determine whether the presence of these radio bursts can be used to predict the occurrence of SEP events, we also develop a catalog of all SEP proton events in 2001 using data from the ERNE detector on the SOHO satellite. 68 SEP events are found, for 48 of which we can identify a solar source and hence look for associated Type III-L emission. We confirm previous work that found that most (76% in our sample) of the solar sources of SEP events exhibit radio emission of this type. However, the correlation in the opposite direction is not as strong: starting from a radio-selected sample of Type III-L events, around 64% of the bursts that occur at longitudes magnetically well-connected to the Earth, and hence favorable for detection of SEPs, are associated with SEP events. The degree of association increases when the events have durations over 10 minutes at 1 MHz, but in general Type III-L bursts do not perform any better than Type II bursts in our sample as predictors of SEP events. A comparison of Type III-L timing with the arrival of near-relativistic electrons at the ACE spacecraft is not inconsistent with a common source for the accelerated electrons in both phenomena.

  7. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  8. Flare fragmentation and type III productivity in the 1980 June 27 flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Benz, A. O.; Lin, R. P.; Pelling, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the solar flare on June 27, 1980 were presented, 16:14-16:33 UT, which was observed by a balloon-borne 300 sq cm phoswich hard X-ray detector and by the IKARUS radio spectrometer. This flare shows intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission and an extreme productivity of (at least 754) type III bursts at 200-400 MHz. A linear correlation was found between the type III burst rate and the HXR fluence. The occurrence of about 10 type III bursts/second, and also the even higher rate of millisecond spikes, suggests a high degree of fragmentation in the acceleration region. This high quantization of injected beams, assuming the thick-target model, shows up in a linear relationship between hard X-ray fluence and the type III rate, but not as fine structures in the HXR time profile. The generation of a superhot isothermal HXR component in the decay phase of the flare coincides with the fade-out of type III production.

  9. Electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio emissions and solar electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an extensive search for electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio noise bursts are presented which were obtained by analyzing 87 type III bursts detected in plasma-wave and charged-particle measurements carried out by IMP 6, 7, and 8. Only one case is found for which plasma oscillations were associated with electrons of solar origin; at least eight events are identified in which no plasma oscillations were detected even though electrons from solar flares were clearly evident. The type III emissions are compared with similar radiation coming from upstream of earth's bow shock at the harmonic of the local electron plasma frequency, and quantitative calculations of the rate of conversion from plasma oscillatory energy to electromagnetic radiation are performed. The results show that electron plasma oscillations are seldom observed in association with solar electron events and type III radio bursts at 1.0 AU and that neither the type III emissions nor the radiation from upstream of the bow shock can be adequately explained by a current model for the coupling of electron plasma oscillations to electromagnetic radiation. Several possible explanations are considered for this discrepancy between theory and observations.

  10. Type III chaperones & Co in bacterial plant pathogens: a set of specialized bodyguards mediating effector delivery.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Lonjon, Fabien; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2013-11-22

    Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria possess a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject bacterial proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), into host cells through a specialized syringe structure. T3Es are virulence factors that can suppress plant immunity but they can also conversely be recognized by the plant and trigger specific resistance mechanisms. The T3SS and injected T3Es play a central role in determining the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Still little is known in plant pathogens on the assembly of the T3SS and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the temporal control of its biosynthesis and T3E translocation. However, recent insights point out the role of several proteins as prime candidates in the role of regulators of the type III secretion (T3S) process. In this review we report on the most recent advances on the regulation of the T3S by focusing on protein players involved in secretion/translocation regulations, including type III chaperones (T3Cs), type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) proteins and other T3S orchestrators.

  11. Flare fragmentation and type III productivity in the 1980 June 27 flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Benz, A. O.; Lin, R. P.; Pelling, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the solar flare on June 27, 1980 were presented, 16:14-16:33 UT, which was observed by a balloon-borne 300 sq cm phoswich hard X-ray detector and by the IKARUS radio spectrometer. This flare shows intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission and an extreme productivity of (at least 754) type III bursts at 200-400 MHz. A linear correlation was found between the type III burst rate and the HXR fluence. The occurrence of about 10 type III bursts/second, and also the even higher rate of millisecond spikes, suggests a high degree of fragmentation in the acceleration region. This high quantization of injected beams, assuming the thick-target model, shows up in a linear relationship between hard X-ray fluence and the type III rate, but not as fine structures in the HXR time profile. The generation of a superhot isothermal HXR component in the decay phase of the flare coincides with the fade-out of type III production.

  12. Characterization of the Type III restriction endonuclease PstII from Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Sears, Alice; Peakman, Luke J; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    A new Type III restriction endonuclease designated PstII has been purified from Providencia stuartii. PstII recognizes the hexanucleotide sequence 5'-CTGATG(N)(25-26/27-28)-3'. Endonuclease activity requires a substrate with two copies of the recognition site in head-to-head repeat and is dependent on a low level of ATP hydrolysis ( approximately 40 ATP/site/min). Cleavage occurs at just one of the two sites and results in a staggered cut 25-26 nt downstream of the top strand sequence to generate a two base 5'-protruding end. Methylation of the site occurs on one strand only at the first adenine of 5'-CATCAG-3'. Therefore, PstII has characteristic Type III restriction enzyme activity as exemplified by EcoPI or EcoP15I. Moreover, sequence asymmetry of the PstII recognition site in the T7 genome acts as an historical imprint of Type III restriction activity in vivo. In contrast to other Type I and III enzymes, PstII has a more relaxed nucleotide specificity and can cut DNA with GTP and CTP (but not UTP). We also demonstrate that PstII and EcoP15I cannot interact and cleave a DNA substrate suggesting that Type III enzymes must make specific protein-protein contacts to activate endonuclease activity.

  13. Linking insulin with Alzheimer's disease: emergence as type III diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sara; Mahmood, Zahra; Zahid, Saadia

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has characteristic neuropathological abnormalities including regionalized neurodegeneration, neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition, activation of pro-apoptotic genes, and oxidative stress. As the brain functions continue to disintegrate, there is a decline in person's cognitive abilities, memory, mood, spontaneity, and socializing behavior. A framework that sequentially interlinks all these phenomenons under one event is lacking. Accumulating evidence has indicated the role of insulin deficiency and insulin resistance as mediators of AD neurodegeneration. Herein, we reviewed the evidence stemming from the development of diabetes agent-induced AD animal model. Striking evidence has attributed loss of insulin receptor-bearing neurons to precede or accompany initial stage of AD. This state seems to progress with AD such that, in the terminal stages, it worsens and becomes global. Oxidative stress, tau hyperphosphorylation, APP-Aβ deposition, and impaired glucose and energy metabolism have all been linked to perturbation in insulin/IGF signaling. We conclude that AD could be referred to as "type 3 diabetes". Moreover, owing to common pathophysiology with diabetes common therapeutic regime could be effective for AD patients.

  14. Type I and III Interferon in the Gut: Tight Balance between Host Protection and Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Stockinger, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms an active interface to the outside word, facilitating nutrient and water uptake and at the same time acts as a barrier toward the highly colonized intestinal lumen. A tight balance of the mucosal immune system is essential to tolerate harmless antigens derived from food or commensals and to effectively defend against potentially dangerous pathogens. Interferons (IFN) provide a first line of host defense when cells detect an invading organism. Whereas type I IFN were discovered almost 60 years ago, type III IFN were only identified in the early 2000s. It was initially thought that type I IFN and type III IFN performed largely redundant functions. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that type III IFN exert distinct and non-redundant functions compared to type I IFN, especially in mucosal tissues. Here, we review recent progress made in unraveling the role of type I/III IFN in intestinal mucosal tissue in the steady state, in response to mucosal pathogens and during inflammation. PMID:28352268

  15. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  16. An immunohistochemical and serum ELISA study of type I and III procollagen aminopropeptides in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B. H.; Madri, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    By means of ELISA methodology, the aminopropeptides of Type I and Type III procollagen were measured in the serum of a group of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The corresponding liver biopsies were graded blindly for degrees of fibrosis and inflammation. When available, paraffin-embedded liver specimens underwent immunoperoxidase staining for mature Type I and III collagen as well as the aminopropeptides of Type I and III procollagen. Regardless of the degree of fibrosis or inflammation, serum levels of the aminopropeptide of Type I remained within normal limits. In contrast, serum levels of the aminopropeptide of Type III procollagen were elevated uniformly. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the aminopropeptide of Type III procollagen persists extracellularly. This finding may explain the previously reported relationship between levels of inflammation and serum levels of the Type III aminopropeptide. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3303951

  17. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  18. Critical Fluctuations in Beam-Plasma Systems and Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    It is shown that the Langmuir waves are excited similar to critical fluctuations during phase transitions when the negative absorption due to electron beam traveling radially outward in the solar atmosphere is balanced by the positive absorption due to collisions in the corona and due to scattering on electron density inhomogeneities in the interplanetary medium. The effective temperature of the Langmuir fluctuations range from 1011 to 1013 K, explaining the majority of the type III bursts. The Rayleigh scattering and direct coupling due to density gradient as well as due to density inhomogeneities are discussed in the context of fundamental radiation and the combination scattering for second harmonic. The number density of electrons in type III beams is estimated and compared with observations. It is also shown that the stabilization of type III beams is achieved automatically since the instability does not develop in the case of critical fluctuations.

  19. Translational regulation of Yersinia enterocolitica mRNA encoding a type III secretion substrate.

    PubMed

    Kopaskie, Karyl S; Ligtenberg, Katherine Given; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-12-06

    Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion machines transport YopQ and other Yop effectors into host immune cells. YopD and its chaperone LcrH are essential components of the Yersinia type III pathway, enabling effector translocation into host cells. YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 also regulate yop expression post-transcriptionally in response to environmental signals; however, the molecular mechanisms for this regulation and Yop secretion are unknown. We show here that YopD associates with 30 S ribosomal particles in a manner requiring LcrH. When added to ribosomes, YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 block the translation of yopQ mRNA. We propose a model whereby LcrH-dependent association of YopD with 30 S ribosomal particles enables YscM1 to block yopQ translation unless type III machines are induced to secrete the effector.

  20. Laparoscopic Treatment of Type III Mirizzi Syndrome by T-Tube Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yetışır, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer; Polat, Yılmaz; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Aygar, Muhittin; Ciftciler, A. Erdinc; Parlak, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct. We would like to report laparoscopic treatment of type III MS. A 75-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain and jaundice. The patient was accepted as MS type III according to radiological imaging and intraoperative view. Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy, extraction of impacted stone by opening anterior surface of dilated cystic duct and choledochus, and repair of this opening by using the remaining part of gallbladder over the T-tube drainage were performed in a patient with type III MS. Application of reinforcement suture over stump was done in light of the checking with oliclinomel N4 injection trough the T-tube. At the 18-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. PMID:27293947

  1. Studying the evolution of a type III radio from the Sun up to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Breitling, Frank; Vocks, Christian; Fallows, Richard; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    On March 16, 2016, a type III burst was observed with the ground-based radio telescopes LOFAR and URAN-2 as well as with the radiospectrometer aboard the spacecraft WIND.It started at 80 MHz at 06:37 UT and reached 50 kHz after 23 minutes. A type III burst are considered as the radio signature of an electron beam travelling from the corona into the interplanetary space. The energetic electrons carrying the beam excites Langmuir waves, which convert into radio waves by wave-particle interaction. The relationship between the drift rate and the frequency as derived from the dynamic radio spectra reveals that the velocity of the electrons generating the radio waves of the type III burst is increasing with increasing distance from the center of the Sun.

  2. Increased Activity of Coagulation Factor XII (Hageman Factor) Causes Hereditary Angioedema Type III

    PubMed Central

    Cichon, Sven ; Martin, Ludovic ; Hennies, Hans Christian ; Müller, Felicitas ; Van Driessche, Karen ; Karpushova, Anna ; Stevens, Wim ; Colombo, Roberto ; Renné, Thomas ; Drouet, Christian ; Bork, Konrad ; Nöthen, Markus M. 

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is characterized clinically by recurrent acute skin swelling, abdominal pain, and potentially life-threatening laryngeal edema. Three forms of HAE have been described. The classic forms, HAE types I and II, occur as a consequence of mutations in the C1-inhibitor gene. In contrast to HAE types I and II, HAE type III has been observed exclusively in women, where it appears to be correlated with conditions of high estrogen levels—for example, pregnancy or the use of oral contraceptives. A recent report proposed two missense mutations (c.1032C→A and c.1032C→G) in F12, the gene encoding human coagulation factor XII (FXII, or Hageman factor) as a possible cause of HAE type III. Here, we report the occurrence of the c.1032C→A (p.Thr328Lys) mutation in an HAE type III–affected family of French origin. Investigation of the F12 gene in a large German family did not reveal a coding mutation. Haplotype analysis with use of microsatellite markers is compatible with locus heterogeneity in HAE type III. To shed more light on the pathogenic relevance of the HAE type III–associated p.Thr328Lys mutation, we compared FXII activity and plasma levels in patients carrying the mutation with that of healthy control individuals. Our data strongly suggest that p.Thr328Lys is a gain-of-function mutation that markedly increases FXII amidolytic activity but that does not alter FXII plasma levels. We conclude that enhanced FXII enzymatic plasma activity in female mutation carriers leads to enhanced kinin production, which results in angioedema. Transcription of F12 is positively regulated by estrogens, which may explain why only women are affected with HAE type III. The results of our study represent an important step toward an understanding of the molecular processes involved in HAE type III and provide diagnostic and possibly new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:17186468

  3. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Bipul Kumar; Saiki, Uma Kaimal; Sarm, Dipti; Choudhury, Bikash Narayan; Choudhury, Sarojini Dutta; Saharia, Dhiren; Saikia, Mihir

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS) comprise a wide clinical spectrum of autoimmune disorders. APS is divided into Type I, Type II, Type I and Type IV depending upon the pattern of disease combination. Ghronic diarrhoea is one of the many manifestations of APS and many aetiological factors have been suggested for it. Apart from the established aetiological factors, intestinal lymphangiectasia may be responsible for chronic diarrhea in some cases.Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported in Type I APS. We report a case of Type III APS with hypocalcaemia and hypothyroidism who had chronic diarrhea of long duration and was finally diagnosed to have intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  4. Structure and interactions of fish type III antifreeze protein in solution.

    PubMed

    Salvay, Andrés G; Gabel, Frank; Pucci, Bernard; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I; Ebel, Christine

    2010-07-21

    It has been suggested that above a critical protein concentration, fish Type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) self-assembles to form micelle-like structures that may play a key role in antifreeze activity. To understand the complex activity of AFP III, a comprehensive description of its association state and structural organization in solution is necessary. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the interactions and homogeneity of AFP III in solution. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the low-resolution structure in solution. Our results clearly show that at concentrations up to 20 mg mL(-1) and at temperatures of 20 degrees C, 6 degrees C, and 4 degrees C, AFP III is monomeric in solution and adopts a structure compatible with that determined by crystallography. Surface tension measurements show a propensity of AFP III to localize at the air/water interface, but this surface activity is not correlated with any aggregation in the bulk. These results support the hypothesis that each AFP III molecule acts independently of the others, and that specific intermolecular interactions between monomers are not required for binding to ice. The lack of attractive interactions between monomers may be functionally important, allowing for more efficient binding and covering of the ice surface.

  5. Structure and Interactions of Fish Type III Antifreeze Protein in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Salvay, Andrés G.; Gabel, Frank; Pucci, Bernard; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I.; Ebel, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that above a critical protein concentration, fish Type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) self-assembles to form micelle-like structures that may play a key role in antifreeze activity. To understand the complex activity of AFP III, a comprehensive description of its association state and structural organization in solution is necessary. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the interactions and homogeneity of AFP III in solution. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the low-resolution structure in solution. Our results clearly show that at concentrations up to 20 mg mL−1 and at temperatures of 20°C, 6°C, and 4°C, AFP III is monomeric in solution and adopts a structure compatible with that determined by crystallography. Surface tension measurements show a propensity of AFP III to localize at the air/water interface, but this surface activity is not correlated with any aggregation in the bulk. These results support the hypothesis that each AFP III molecule acts independently of the others, and that specific intermolecular interactions between monomers are not required for binding to ice. The lack of attractive interactions between monomers may be functionally important, allowing for more efficient binding and covering of the ice surface. PMID:20643081

  6. Restoration of pathogenicity of avirulent Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. campestris pathovars by reciprocal complementation with the hrpXo and hrpXc genes and identification of HrpX function by sequence analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, H V; Kamoun, S; Kado, C I

    1993-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogenesis by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has been partly elucidated by the identification of a gene, hrpXo, required for bacterial blight on rice. A mutation in hrpXo results in the loss of pathogenicity on rice and the loss of hypersensitivity on nonhosts such as Datura stramonium and radishes. Pathogenicity and its ability to cause the hypersensitive reaction is restored by complementing the mutant with the heterologous hrpXc gene derived from X. campestris pv. campestris. Conversely, hrpXo complements nonpathogenic mutants of X. campestris pv. campestris and X. campetstris pv, armoraciae. Mutants bearing the heterologous hrpX gene are restored in their abilities to cause diseases typical of their chromosomal background and not the hypersensitive reaction on their respective hosts. The hrpXo and hrpXc genes are therefore functionally equivalent, and this functional equivalence extends into X. campestris pv. armoraciae and possibly into other X. campestris pathovars, since this gene is highly conserved among eight other pathovars tested. Sequence analyses of hrpXo revealed an open reading frame of 1,452 bp with a coding capacity for a protein of 52.3 kDa. The protein contains a consensus domain for possible protein myristoylation whose consequence may result in a loss of recognition by host defense and surveillance systems. Images PMID:8458844

  7. Cardiac function in types II and III spinal muscular atrophy: should we change standards of care?

    PubMed

    Bianco, Flaviana; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana; Soraru, Gianni; Pera, Maria Carmela; Mongini, Tiziana; Politano, Luisa; Baranello, Giovanni; Vita, Gianluca; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Morandi, Lucia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    In the last years, there has been increasing evidence of cardiac involvement in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Autonomic dysfunction has been reported in animal models and in several patients with types I and III SMA, these findings raising the question whether heart rate should be routinely investigated in all SMA patients. The aim of our study was to detect possible signs of autonomic dysfunction and, more generally, of cardiac involvement in types II and III SMA. We retrospectively reviewed 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) in 157 types II and III SMA patients (age range, 2-74 years). Of them, 82 also had echocardiography. None of the patients had signs of bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, or the other previously reported rhythm disturbances regardless of the age at examination or the type of SMA. Echocardiography was also normal. There were no signs of congenital cardiac defects with the exception of one patient with a history of ventricular septal defects. Our results suggest that cardiac abnormalities are not common in type II and type III SMA. These findings provide no evidence to support a more accurate cardiac surveillance or changes in the existing standards of care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction Type III: New studies suggest new approaches are needed.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C Mel

    2015-05-21

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) has been classified into three types based upon the presence or absence of objective findings including liver test abnormalities and bile duct dilatation. Type III is the most controversial and is classified as biliary type pain in the absence of any these objective findings. Many prior studies have shown that the clinical response to endoscopic therapy is higher based upon the presence of these objective criteria. However, there has been variable correlation of the manometry findings to outcome after endoscopic therapy. Nevertheless, manometry and sphincterotomy has been recommended for Type III patients given the overall response rate of 33%, although the reported response rates are highly variable. However, all of the prior data was non-blinded and non-randomized with variable follow-up. The evaluating predictors in SOD study - a prospective randomized blinded sham controlled one year outcome study showed no correlation between manometric findings and outcome after sphincterotomy. Furthermore, patients receiving sham therapy had a statistically significantly better outcome than those undergoing biliary or dual sphincterotomy. This study calls into question the whole concept of SOD Type III and, based upon prior physiologic studies, one can suggest that SOD Type III likely represents a right upper quadrant functional abdominal pain syndrome and should be treated as such.

  9. Hepatocellular Adenomas and Carcinoma in Asymptomatic, Non-Cirrhotic Type III Glycogen Storage Disease.

    PubMed

    Oterdoom, Leendert H; Verweij, K Evelyne; Biermann, Katharina; Langeveld, Mirjam; van Buuren, Henk R

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders characterized by accumulation of abnormal glycogen in muscle or liver or both. Specific hepatic complications include liver adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatocellular carcinomas described in GSD type I are often due to the degeneration of liver adenomas. Hepatocellular carcinoma in GSD type III, however, is rare and is thought to be associated with underlying cirrhosis.We present the case of a 63-year old male who was admitted for assessment of suitability for liver transplantation because of development of recurrent HCC in the presence of multiple liver adenomas. A diagnosis of GSD type III was made in this patient without underlying cirrhosis or metabolic disturbances resembling GSD. This case report is the first documentation of HCC development in an asymptomatic, non-cirrhotic patient with GSD type III. This raises the possibility that in GSD type III, the adenoma - carcinoma sequence can occur as it is also seen in GSD type I. Physicians taking care of GSD patients should be aware of this and some form of surveillance for cirrhosis and HCC should be considered. Also male patients with adenomas should have a thorough workup to reveal any underlying disease such as GSD.

  10. Intron-containing type I and type III IFN coexist in amphibians: refuting the concept that a retroposition event gave rise to type I IFNs.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhitao; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Chris J; Zou, Jun

    2010-05-01

    Type I and III IFNs are structurally related cytokines with similar antiviral functions. They have different genomic organizations and bind to distinct receptor complexes. It has been vigorously debated whether the recently identified intron containing IFN genes in fish and amphibians belong to the type I or III IFN family or diverged from a common ancestral gene, that subsequently gave rise to both types. In this report, we have identified intron containing type III IFN genes that are tandemly linked in the Xenopus tropicalis genome and hence demonstrate for the first time that intron containing type I and III genes diverged relatively early in vertebrate evolution, and at least by the appearance of early tetrapods, a transition period when vertebrates migrated from an aquatic environment to land. Our data also suggest that the intronless type I IFN genes seen in reptiles, birds, and mammals have originated from a type I IFN transcript via a retroposition event that led to the disappearance of intron-containing type I IFN genes in modern vertebrates. In vivo and in vitro studies in this paper show that the Xenopus type III IFNs and their cognate receptor are ubiquitously expressed in tissues and primary splenocytes and can be upregulated by stimulation with synthetic double-stranded RNA, suggesting they are involved in antiviral defense in amphibians.

  11. Inactivation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III by heat, chemicals, and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinnan, G.V. Jr.; Wells, M.A.; Wittek, A.E.; Phelan, M.A.; Mayner, R.E.; Feinstone, S.; Purcell, R.H.; Epstein, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    Infectivity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, Type III (HTLV-III) was inactivated by heat more rapidly if in liquid medium than if lyophilized and more rapidly at 60 than 56/sup 0/C. When HTLV-III was added to factor VIII suspension, then lyophilized and heated at 60/sup 0/C for 2 hours or longer there was elimination of 1 X 10(6) in vitro infectious units (IVIU) of virus. Much of the viral inactivation appeared to result from lyophilization. The application of water-saturated chloroform to the lyophilized material containing virus also resulted in elimination of infectivity. HTLV-III was efficiently inactivated by formalin, beta-propiolactone, ethyl ether, detergent, and ultraviolet light plus psoralen. The results are reassuring regarding the potential safety of various biological products.

  12. Type III Radio Bursts and the Structure of the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    Type III solar radio bursts provide important information on the origin, acceleration, and propagation of particles associated with solar flares and coronal shocks. Since these radio emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism, observations of these solar radio transients also provide remote sensing of the plasma conditions in the corona and of the magnetic and plasma structure of the inner heliosphere. In this talk I will review the progress of type III research from their discovery in the late 40s to the most recent advances from low-frequency spacecraft observations, primarily from ISEE-3, Wind and Ulysses.

  13. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Zanichelli, A.; Caballero, T.; Bouillet, L.; Aberer, W.; Maurer, M.; Fain, O.; Fabien, V.; Andresen, I.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1‐INH‐AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1‐INH‐AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6‐month intervals during patient follow‐up visits. In the icatibant‐treated population, 16 patients with C1‐INH‐AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1‐INH‐AAE versus C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33–64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70–15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1‐INH‐AAE versus C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1‐INH‐AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II versus C1‐INH‐AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P < 0·001). Median total attack duration was 5·0 h and 9·0 h for patients with C1‐INH‐AAE versus C1‐INH‐HAE types I/II, respectively. PMID:27936514

  14. Crystal structure of the Yersinia type III secretion protein YscE

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-12-06

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a contact-dependent (type III) secretion system (T3SS) to transport virulence factors from the bacterial cytosol directly into the interior of mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. The type III secretion apparatus is composed of 20-25 different Yersinia secretion (Ysc) proteins. We report here the structure of YscE, the smallest Ysc protein, which is a dimer in solution. The probable mode of oligomerization is discussed.

  15. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P < 0·001). Median total attack duration was 5·0 h and 9·0 h for patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  16. [Advances in studies of the type III secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum--A review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Muyuan; Luo, Feng

    2015-06-04

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. The syringe-like type III secretion system (T3SS) plays a crucial role in its pathogenicity. R. solanacearum uses the T3SS to inject effector proteins (Type III effectors) into the cytoplasm of host cells, causing diseases in susceptible plants or triggering the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. In this article we review recent advances in studies of R. solanacearum T3SS and highlight their unique features.

  17. Vlasov simulations of Langmuir Electrostatic Decay and consequences for Type III observations

    SciTech Connect

    Henri, P.; Califano, F.; Briand, C.; Mangeney, A.

    2010-03-25

    The electrostatic decay enables energy transfer from a finite amplitude Langmuir to a backscattered daughter Langmuir wave and ion acoustic density fluctuations. This mechanism is thought to be a first step for the generation of type III solar radio emissions at twice the plasma frequency. The electrostatic decay is here investigated through Vlasov-Poisson simulations by considering Langmuir localized wave packets in the case T{sub e} = T{sub p}. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with recently reported observations from the STEREO mission of the electrostatic decay of beam-driven Langmuir waves during a type III burst.

  18. Conservative Management of Type III Dens in Dente Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, K; Charlie, M; Kuttappa, M A; Rao, Prasana Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Dens in dente, also known as dens invaginatus, dilated composite odontoma, or deep foramen caecum, is a developmental malformation that usually affects maxillary incisor teeth, particularly lateral incisors. It may occur in teeth anywhere within the jaws, other locations are comparatively rare. It can occur within both the crown and the root, although crown invaginations are more common. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is very helpful in endodontic diagnosis of complex anatomic variations. In this case we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and endodontic management of a Type III dens in dente (Oehler's Type III).

  19. Cooxidation of styrene by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 4-methylphenol

    SciTech Connect

    Grab, L.A.; Ortiz, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Styrene is cooxidized to styrene oxide in a system containing HRP/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and 4-methylphenol. Styrene oxide is not formed in the absence of any of these components, or if the reaction is run under anaerobic conditions. Styrene oxide formation is inhibited by ascorbic acid and catalase but not mannitol or superoxide dismutase. Incubation with /sup 18/O/sub 2/ resulted in more than 90% incorporation of label into styrene oxide. The epoxidation of trans-(1-/sup 2/H)styrene occurred with partial loss of stereochemistry. The products expected from addition of the phenoxy radical to styrene were synthesized and shown not to be formed. Finally, EPR evidence was obtained for formation of 4-methyl catechol in the presence, but not absence, of styrene. The results imply that a peroxy radical is formed by addition of oxygen to the HRP-generated 4-methylphenoxy radical, and that this peroxy radical then cooxidizes styrene.

  20. Scaling up the predator functional response in heterogeneous environment: when Holling type III can emerge?

    PubMed

    Cordoleani, Flora; Nerini, David; Morozov, Andrey; Gauduchon, Mathias; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-11-07

    Accurate parametrization of functional terms in model equations is of great importance for reproducing the dynamics of real food webs. Constructing models over large spatial and temporal scales using mathematical expressions obtained based on microcosm experiments can be erroneous. Here, using a generic spatial predator-prey model, we show that scaling up the microscale functional response of a predator can result in qualitative alterations of functional response on macroscales. In particular, a global functional response of sigmoid type (Holling type III) can emerge as a result of non-linear averaging of non-sigmoid local responses (Holling type I or II). We demonstrate that alteration between the local and the global response in the model is a result of the interplay between density-dependent dispersal of the predator across the habitat and heterogeneity of the environment. Using the method of aggregation of variables, we analytically derive the mathematical formulation of the global functional response as a function of the total amount of prey in the system, and reveal the key parameters which control the emergence of a Holling type III global response. We argue that this mechanism by which a global Holling type III emerges from a local Holling type II response has not been reported in the literature yet: in particular, Holling type III can emerge in the case of a fixed gradient of resource distribution across the habitat, which would be impossible in priorly suggested mechanisms. As a case study, we consider the interaction between phytoplankton and zooplankton grazers in the water column; and we show that the emergence of a Holling type III global response can allow for the efficient top-down regulation of primary producers and stabilization of planktonic ecosystems under eutrophic conditions.

  1. Type III Secretion System and Virulence Markers Highlight Similarities and Differences between Human- and Plant-Associated Pseudomonads Related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida

    PubMed Central

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. PMID:25636837

  2. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Ojeda, María Pilar; Moreno-Pérez, Alba; Ramos, Cayo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E) in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts. PMID:28529516

  3. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Ojeda, María Pilar; Moreno-Pérez, Alba; Ramos, Cayo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E) in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts.

  4. Neuronal migration disorders in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I/III.

    PubMed

    Juric-Sekhar, Gordana; Kapur, Raj P; Glass, Ian A; Murray, Mitzi L; Parnell, Shawn E; Hevner, Robert F

    2011-04-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism (MOPD) is a rare microlissencephaly syndrome, with at least two distinct phenotypic and genetic types. MOPD type II is caused by pericentrin mutations, while types I and III appear to represent a distinct entity (MOPD I/III) with variably penetrant phenotypes and unknown genetic basis. The neuropathology of MOPD I/III is little understood, especially in comparison to other forms of lissencephaly. Here, we report postmortem brain findings in an 11-month-old female infant with MOPD I/III. The cerebral cortex was diffusely pachygyric, with a right parietal porencephalic lesion. Histologically, the cortex was abnormally thick and disorganized. Distinct malformations were observed in different cerebral lobes, as characterized using layer-specific neuronal markers. Frontal cortex was severely disorganized and coated with extensive leptomeningeal glioneuronal heterotopia. Temporal cortex had a relatively normal 6-layered pattern, despite cortical thickening. Occipital cortex was variably affected. The corpus callosum was extremely hypoplastic. Brainstem and cerebellar malformations were also present, as well as old necrotic foci. Findings in this case suggest that the cortical malformation in MOPD I/III is distinct from other forms of pachygyria-lissencephaly.

  5. The effects of K2SO4 solution on the compressive strength of dental gypsum type III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeilina, T.; Triaminingsih, S.; Indrani, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    Dental gypsum type III is used as a material for manufacturing working models of dentures. The aim of this study was to identify the effects of the addition of a K2SO4 solution on the compressive strength of gypsum type III. A compressive strength test was performed using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. The results showed that the compressive strength of gypsum type III with a 1.5% K2SO4 solution added was higher than for gypsum type III alone but lower than the compressive strength of gypsum type IV.

  6. Group B Streptococcal Type II and III Conjugate Vaccines: Physicochemical Properties That Influence Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Michon, Francis; Uitz, Catherine; Sarkar, Arun; D'Ambra, Anello J.; Laude-Sharp, Maryline; Moore, Samuel; Fusco, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent efforts toward developing vaccines against group B streptococci (GBS) have focused on increasing the immunogenicity of GBS polysaccharides by conjugation to carrier proteins. However, partial depolymerization of GBS polysaccharides for the production of vaccines is a difficult task because of their acid-labile, antigenically critical sialic acids. Here we report a method for the partial depolymerization of type II and III polysaccharides by mild deaminative cleavage to antigenic fragments with reducing-terminal 2,5-anhydro-d-mannose residues. Through the free aldehydes of their newly formed end groups, the fragments were conjugated to tetanus toxoid by reductive amination. The resulting conjugates stimulated the production in animals of high-titer type II- and III-specific antibodies which induced opsonophagocytic killing of type II and III strains of group B streptococci. For the type II conjugates, immunogenicity increased as oligosaccharide size decreased, whereas for type III conjugates, the size of the oligosaccharides did not significantly influence immunogenicity. When oligosaccharides of defined size were conjugated through sialic acid residues, the resulting cross-linkages were shown to affect immunogenicity. When oligosaccharides were conjugated through terminal aldehyde groups generated by deamination, modification of the exocyclic chain of sialic acid did not influence immunogenicity. PMID:16893995

  7. Structure, Evolution, and Functions of Bacterial Type III Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goeders, Nathalie; Chai, Ray; Chen, Bihe; Day, Andrew; Salmond, George P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that encode a toxin (that targets an essential cellular process) and an antitoxin that neutralises or suppresses the deleterious effect of the toxin. Based on the molecular nature of the toxin and antitoxin components, TA systems are categorised into different types. Type III TA systems, the focus of this review, are composed of a toxic endoribonuclease neutralised by a non-coding RNA antitoxin in a pseudoknotted configuration. Bioinformatic analysis shows that the Type III systems can be classified into subtypes. These TA systems were originally discovered through a phage resistance phenotype arising due to a process akin to an altruistic suicide; the phenomenon of abortive infection. Some Type III TA systems are bifunctional and can stabilise plasmids during vegetative growth and sporulation. Features particular to Type III systems are explored here, emphasising some of the characteristics of the RNA antitoxin and how these may affect the co-evolutionary relationship between toxins and cognate antitoxins in their quaternary structures. Finally, an updated analysis of the distribution and diversity of these systems are presented and discussed. PMID:27690100

  8. Novel findings in patients with primary hyperoxaluria type III and implications for advanced molecular testing strategies

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Bodo B; Baasner, Anne; Buescher, Anja; Habbig, Sandra; Reintjes, Nadine; Kemper, Markus J; Sikora, Przemyslaw; Mache, Christoph; Pohl, Martin; Stahl, Mirjam; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Pape, Lars; Fehrenbach, Henry; Jacob, Dorrit E; Grohe, Bernd; Wolf, Matthias T; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Yigit, Gökhan; Salido, Eduardo C; Hoppe, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Identification of mutations in the HOGA1 gene as the cause of autosomal recessive primary hyperoxaluria (PH) type III has revitalized research in the field of PH and related stone disease. In contrast to the well-characterized entities of PH type I and type II, the pathophysiology and prevalence of type III is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed a large cohort of subjects previously tested negative for type I/II by complete HOGA1 sequencing. Seven distinct mutations, among them four novel, were found in 15 patients. In patients of non-consanguineous European descent the previously reported c.700+5G>T splice-site mutation was predominant and represents a potential founder mutation, while in consanguineous families private homozygous mutations were identified throughout the gene. Furthermore, we identified a family where a homozygous mutation in HOGA1 (p.P190L) segregated in two siblings with an additional AGXT mutation (p.D201E). The two girls exhibiting triallelic inheritance presented a more severe phenotype than their only mildly affected p.P190L homozygous father. In silico analysis of five mutations reveals that HOGA1 deficiency is causing type III, yet reduced HOGA1 expression or aberrant subcellular protein targeting is unlikely to be the responsible pathomechanism. Our results strongly suggest HOGA1 as a major cause of PH, indicate a greater genetic heterogeneity of hyperoxaluria, and point to a favorable outcome of type III in the context of PH despite incomplete or absent biochemical remission. Multiallelic inheritance could have implications for genetic testing strategies and might represent an unrecognized mechanism for phenotype variability in PH. PMID:22781098

  9. Novel findings in patients with primary hyperoxaluria type III and implications for advanced molecular testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Beck, Bodo B; Baasner, Anne; Buescher, Anja; Habbig, Sandra; Reintjes, Nadine; Kemper, Markus J; Sikora, Przemyslaw; Mache, Christoph; Pohl, Martin; Stahl, Mirjam; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Pape, Lars; Fehrenbach, Henry; Jacob, Dorrit E; Grohe, Bernd; Wolf, Matthias T; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Yigit, Gökhan; Salido, Eduardo C; Hoppe, Bernd

    2013-02-01

    Identification of mutations in the HOGA1 gene as the cause of autosomal recessive primary hyperoxaluria (PH) type III has revitalized research in the field of PH and related stone disease. In contrast to the well-characterized entities of PH type I and type II, the pathophysiology and prevalence of type III is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed a large cohort of subjects previously tested negative for type I/II by complete HOGA1 sequencing. Seven distinct mutations, among them four novel, were found in 15 patients. In patients of non-consanguineous European descent the previously reported c.700+5G>T splice-site mutation was predominant and represents a potential founder mutation, while in consanguineous families private homozygous mutations were identified throughout the gene. Furthermore, we identified a family where a homozygous mutation in HOGA1 (p.P190L) segregated in two siblings with an additional AGXT mutation (p.D201E). The two girls exhibiting triallelic inheritance presented a more severe phenotype than their only mildly affected p.P190L homozygous father. In silico analysis of five mutations reveals that HOGA1 deficiency is causing type III, yet reduced HOGA1 expression or aberrant subcellular protein targeting is unlikely to be the responsible pathomechanism. Our results strongly suggest HOGA1 as a major cause of PH, indicate a greater genetic heterogeneity of hyperoxaluria, and point to a favorable outcome of type III in the context of PH despite incomplete or absent biochemical remission. Multiallelic inheritance could have implications for genetic testing strategies and might represent an unrecognized mechanism for phenotype variability in PH.

  10. Type-specific capsular antigen is associated with virulence in late-onset group B Streptococcal type III disease.

    PubMed Central

    Klegerman, M E; Boyer, K M; Papierniak, C K; Levine, L; Gotoff, S P

    1984-01-01

    Strain differences have been postulated to explain the observation that group B Streptococcus type III (GBS III) late-onset disease occurs in only a fraction of colonized infants. To determine the distribution of type-specific polysaccharide antigen (Ag) in GBS III, Ag was measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis in both supernatant fluids and EDTA extracts and by radial immunodiffusion in multiple HCl extracts of the pellet from cultures of 10 strains of GBS III. Capsular Ag was defined as the sum of Ag in EDTA extracts + Ag in multiple HCl extracts. Both Ag in EDTA extracts and Ag in supernatant fluids correlated with capsular Ag (r = 0.94). GBS III strains were obtained from the blood of 19 infants with late-onset sepsis, from the cerebrospinal fluid or blood of 22 infants with late-onset meningitis, and from mucosal surfaces of both 18 infants and 12 mothers of infants with low levels of type-specific antibody and asymptomatic colonization. Mean values of Ag in supernatant fluids in strains from infants with late-onset sepsis (1.50 +/- 0.08 micrograms/ml) and late-onset meningitis (1.67 +/- 0.09 micrograms/ml) were significantly greater than those in asymptomatic colonization strains (1.14 +/- 0.05 micrograms/ml; P less than 0.001). The number of organisms required for a 50% lethal dose in the chick embryo, determined in 29 strains, was inversely related to Ag in supernatant fluids (r = -0.60). The demonstration that the quantity of capsular Ag produced by GBS III strains is related to their virulence in chick embryos and to their invasiveness in susceptible infants supports the hypothesis that Ag is a virulence factor in humans. Images PMID:6423540

  11. Tracking Type III Radio Burst Sources in the Solar Corona by Heliographic Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.

    We present the preliminary results of heliographic measurements of solar type III radio bursts in the low-frequency range (16.5-33 MHz) using the UTR-2 radio heliograph. The radio astronomy tools permit us to obtain two-dimensional spatial structures of burst sources in dependence of frequency and time. Each heliogram consists of 40 pixels (beams) as a result of the serial sweep in UV-plane wherein signals of each beam are recorded in a dynamic spectrum with both high temporal (˜ 2.482 ms) and top spectral (˜ 4 kHz) resolutions. The rate of output heliograph is one image per 3 seconds. Over a session in April, 2013 many type III radio and IIIb-III bursts were observed. On the heliograms the source motion direction in the upper corona is clearly detectable. The heliogram features are discussed.

  12. Plasma apolipoprotein C-III levels, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Arman; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Khera, Amit V; Qasim, Atif; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P

    2015-08-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins have emerged as causal risk factors for developing coronary heart disease independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) modulates triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism through inhibition of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Mutations causing loss-of-function of ApoC-III lower triglycerides and reduce coronary heart disease risk, suggestive of a causal role for ApoC-III. Little data exist about the relationship of ApoC-III, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here, we examined the relationships between plasma ApoC-III, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in patients with T2DM. Plasma ApoC-III levels were measured in a cross-sectional study of 1422 subjects with T2DM but without clinically manifest coronary heart disease. ApoC-III levels were positively associated with total cholesterol (Spearman r=0.36), triglycerides (r=0.59), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.16), fasting glucose (r=0.16), and glycosylated hemoglobin (r=0.12; P<0.0001 for all). In age, sex, and race-adjusted analysis, ApoC-III levels were positively associated with coronary artery calcification (Tobit regression ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.50 per SD increase in ApoC-III; P<0.001). As expected for an intermediate mediator, these findings were attenuated when adjusted for both triglycerides (Tobit regression ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-2.18; P=0.086) and separately for very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Tobit regression ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.71; P=0.53). In persons with T2DM, increased plasma ApoC-III is associated with higher triglycerides, less favorable cardiometabolic phenotypes, and higher coronary artery calcification, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. Therapeutic inhibition of ApoC-III may thus be a novel strategy for reducing plasma

  13. Angular Study of the III Type Solar Bursts by Ukrainian Decameter Heliograph of UTR-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, Artem; Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Konovalenko, Aleksander

    2014-05-01

    Solar radio bursts are attractive manifestations of solar activity. They contain useful information about physical processes in solar corona. The type III radio bursts are the most frequent events among many different types of solar bursts studied since middle of the last century. The type III bursts are generated by beams of fast electrons (beams velocity ~ 0.3c) ejected into the corona and propagated through coronal plasma to interplanetary medium. It is assumed that such an electron beam passing coronal plasma generates plasma waves that converse to electromagnetic waves registered as type III radio bursts. They are observed in a wide frequency range from 1 GHz to tens kHz. In particular, the decameter emission (10-30 MHz) of III type bursts arises at heights about 2-3 solar radii from the center of the Sun. In the last decades the various ground-based, satellite and spacecraft observations have provided detailed information about features of the bursts. Due to non-thermal emission mechanism their intensity can be very high that allows ones to record the bursts even by amateur radio astronomers with help of elementary antennas (for example, half-wave dipole) and simple radio equipment. At dynamic spectra the type III radio bursts are characterized by very fast frequency drifts. Usually, the analysis of such two-dimensional spectrograms reveals also duration and intensity of the events in time and frequency; if the antenna facilities permit, as well as degree of polarization. It should be noticed that the observations of angular three-dimensional structure of the burst source are also of great interest. Our knowledge about angular structure of type III radio bursts in decameter wavelengths was very restricted because of the absence of appropriate radio astronomy instruments. Recently, the difficulty has been overcome by means of the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkiv, Ukraine) in heliographic modes. It was successfully used for heliographic observations of solar

  14. Domain III regulates N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channel closing kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z.

    2012-01-01

    CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV1.2 (L-type) calcium channels gate differently in response to membrane depolarization, which is critical to the unique physiological functions mediated by these channels. We wondered if the source for these differences could be identified. As a first step, we examined the effect of domain exchange between N-type and L-type channels on activation-deactivation kinetics, which were significantly different between these channels. Kinetic analysis of chimeric channels revealed N-channel-like deactivation for all chimeric channels containing N-channel domain III, while activation appeared to be a more distributed function across domains. This led us to hypothesize that domain III was an important regulator of N-channel closing. This idea was further examined with R-roscovitine, which is a trisubstituted purine that slows N-channel deactivation by exclusively binding to activated N-channels. L-channels lack this response to roscovitine, which allowed us to use N-L chimeras to test the role of domain III in roscovitine modulation of N-channel deactivation. In support of our hypothesis, all chimeric channels containing the N-channel domain III responded to roscovitine with slowed deactivation, while those chimeric channels with L-channel domain III did not. Thus a combination of kinetic and pharmacological evidence supports the hypothesis that domain III is an important regulator of N-channel closing. Our results support specialization of gating functions among calcium channel domains. PMID:22205645

  15. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G.; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V.; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A.; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G.; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F.; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum. PMID:25147829

  16. Pregnancy differentially regulates the collagens types I and III in left ventricle from rat heart.

    PubMed

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum.

  17. Programmable RNA shredding by the type III-A CRISPR-Cas system of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Kazlauskiene, Migle; Manakova, Elena; Venclovas, Česlovas; Nwokeoji, Alison O; Dickman, Mark J; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-11-20

    Immunity against viruses and plasmids provided by CRISPR-Cas systems relies on a ribonucleoprotein effector complex that triggers the degradation of invasive nucleic acids (NA). Effector complexes of type I (Cascade) and II (Cas9-dual RNA) target foreign DNA. Intriguingly, the genetic evidence suggests that the type III-A Csm complex targets DNA, whereas biochemical data show that the type III-B Cmr complex cleaves RNA. Here we aimed to investigate NA specificity and mechanism of CRISPR interference for the Streptococcus thermophilus Csm (III-A) complex (StCsm). When expressed in Escherichia coli, two complexes of different stoichiometry copurified with 40 and 72 nt crRNA species, respectively. Both complexes targeted RNA and generated multiple cuts at 6 nt intervals. The Csm3 protein, present in multiple copies in both Csm complexes, acts as endoribonuclease. In the heterologous E. coli host, StCsm restricts MS2 RNA phage in a Csm3 nuclease-dependent manner. Thus, our results demonstrate that the type III-A StCsm complex guided by crRNA targets RNA and not DNA.

  18. Hypervirulent Clone of Group B Streptococcus Serotype III Sequence Type 283, Hong Kong, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Irene; Fung, Kitty; Liyanapathirana, Veranja; Luo, Ming Jing; Lai, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We describe a hypervirulent clone of group B Streptococcus serotype III, subtype 4, sequence type 283, that caused invasive disease with a predilection for meningitis in Hong Kong during 1993–2012. The organism is associated with high mortality and increased summer prevalence and is linked to diseased fish from freshwater fish farms. PMID:27648702

  19. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  20. Contribution of Bordetella bronchiseptica Type III secretion system to respiratory disease in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: The type III secretion system (TTSS) of gram negative bacteria allows injection of effector proteins directly into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the B. bronchiseptica TTSS plays a role in the persistent bacterial colonization of the trachea of m...

  1. Hypervirulent Clone of Group B Streptococcus Serotype III Sequence Type 283, Hong Kong, 1993-2012.

    PubMed

    Ip, Margaret; Ang, Irene; Fung, Kitty; Liyanapathirana, Veranja; Luo, Ming Jing; Lai, Raymond

    2016-10-01

    We describe a hypervirulent clone of group B Streptococcus serotype III, subtype 4, sequence type 283, that caused invasive disease with a predilection for meningitis in Hong Kong during 1993-2012. The organism is associated with high mortality and increased summer prevalence and is linked to diseased fish from freshwater fish farms.

  2. Solid-state NMR on a type III antifreeze protein in the presence of ice.

    PubMed

    Siemer, Ansgar B; McDermott, Ann E

    2008-12-24

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in fish, insects, plants, and a variety of other organisms where they serve to prevent the growth of ice at subzero temperatures. Type III AFPs cloned from polar fishes have been studied extensively with X-ray crystallography, liquid-state NMR, and site directed mutagenesis and are, therefore, among the best characterized AFPs. A flat surface on the protein has previously been proposed to be the ice-binding site of type III AFP. The detailed nature of the ice binding remains controversial since it is not clear whether only polar or also hydrophobic residues are involved in ice binding and there is no structural information available of a type III AFP bound to ice. Here we present a high-resolution solid-state NMR study of a type III AFP (HPLC-12 isoform) in the presence of ice. The chemical-shift differences we detected between the frozen and the nonfrozen state agree well with the proposed ice-binding site. Furthermore, we found that the (1)H T(1) of HPLC-12 in frozen solution is very long compared to typical (1)H of proteins in the solid state as for example of ubiquitin in frozen solution.

  3. Inside the Chamber of Secrets of the Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Cascales, Eric

    2017-03-09

    The bacterial type III secretion system is a specialized machine that injects effectors into eukaryotic cells to manipulate the host cell physiology. In this issue of Cell, Hu et al. use cryo-electron tomography to reveal an unprecedented level of details regarding the architecture of this machine and the conformational changes that occur during its assembly.

  4. Decameter Type III Bursts with Changing Frequency Drift-Rate Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Denis, L.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss properties of type III bursts that change the sign of their drift rate from negative to positive and vice versa. Moreover, these bursts may change the sign of their drift rates more than once. These particular type III bursts were observed simultaneously by the radio telescopes UTR-2 ( Ukrainian T-shaped Radio telescope, Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 ( Ukrainian Radio telescope of the Academy of Sciences, Poltava, Ukraine), and by the NDA ( Nançay Decametric Array, Nancay, France) in the frequency range 8 - 41 MHz. The negative drift rates of these bursts are similar to those of previously reported decameter type III bursts and vary from -0.7 MHz s-1 to -1.7 MHz s-1, but their positive drift rates vary in a wider range from 0.44 MHz s-1 to 6 MHz s-1. Unlike inverted U-bursts, the tracks of these type III bursts have C- or inverted C-shapes.

  5. Mutualistic Co-evolution of Type III Effector Genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Creason, Allison L.; Thireault, Caitlin A.; Sachs, Joel L.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2013-01-01

    Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved. PMID:23468637

  6. The role of the magnetic field intensity and geometry in the type III burst generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobec, P.; Messerotti, M.; Ruzdjak, V.; Vrsnak, B.; Karlicky, M.

    1990-12-01

    The association of type III bursts related to H-alpha flares in different magnetic environments were studied in the period 1970-1981. Special attention is paid to flares which partly cover a major spot umbra (Z-flares). In particular, the location of the spots in the active regions and the magnetic field intensities of spots covered by a ribbon are considered. The association rate with type III bursts decreases to 17 percent when the flare is located inside the bipolar pattern of a large active region, compared with an association rate of 54 percent when the flare is situated outside it. The association rate increases with the magnetic field intensity of the spot covered by H-alpha emission; this is most clearly revealed for the flares occurring outside the bipolar pattern of active regions. Ninety-three percent of the flare-associated type III burst were accompanied by 10 cm radio bursts. For the most general case, in which a flare is developing anywhere in an active region, the association with type III bursts generation increases with the increasing magnetic field intensity of the main spot of the group.

  7. On the speed and acceleration of electron beams triggering interplanetary type III radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupar, V.; Kontar, E. P.; Soucek, J.; Santolik, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Kruparova, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Type III radio bursts are intense radio emissions triggered by beams of energetic electrons often associated with solar flares. These exciter beams propagate outwards from the Sun along an open magnetic field line in the corona and in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Methods: We performed a statistical survey of 29 simple and isolated IP type III bursts observed by STEREO/Waves instruments between January 2013 and September 2014. We investigated their time-frequency profiles in order to derive the speed and acceleration of exciter electron beams. Results: We show these beams noticeably decelerate in the IP medium. Obtained speeds range from ~0.02c up to ~0.35c depending on initial assumptions. It corresponds to electron energies between tens of eV and hundreds of keV, and in order to explain the characteristic energies or speeds of type III electrons (~0.1c) observed simultaneously with Langmuir waves at 1 au, the emission of type III bursts near the peak should be predominately at double plasma frequency. Derived properties of electron beams can be used as input parameters for computer simulations of interactions between the beam and the plasma in the IP medium. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. A Program of Yersinia enterocolitica Type III Secretion Reactions Is Activated by Specific Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vincent T.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2001-01-01

    Successful establishment of Yersinia infections requires the type III machinery, a protein transporter that injects virulence factors (Yops) into macrophages. It is reported here that the Yersinia type III pathway responds to environmental signals by transporting proteins to distinct locations. Yersinia enterocolitica cells sense an increase in extracellular amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and asparagine) that results in the activation of the type III pathway. Another signal, provided by serum proteins such as albumin, triggers the secretion of YopD into the extracellular medium. The third signal, a decrease in calcium concentration, appears to be provided by host cells and causes Y. enterocolitica to transport YopE and presumably other virulence factors across the eukaryotic plasma membrane. Mutations in several genes encoding regulatory molecules (lcrG, lcrH, tyeA, yopD, yopN, yscM1, and yscM2) bypass the signal requirement of the type III pathway. Together these results suggest that yersiniae may have evolved distinct secretion reactions in response to environmental signals. PMID:11489848

  9. Diagnosis of type III endoleak and endovascular treatment with aortouniiliac stent-graft.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Wacław

    2009-01-01

    The present report describes a case of type III endoleak from a tear in the fabric of a Zenith bifurcated stent-graft approximately 6 months after implantation. The reason of the fabric tear was unknown. The complication was successfully treated by aortouniiliac stent-graft implantation followed by creation of a femorofemoral bypass.

  10. Group B Streptococcus Serotype III Sequence Type 283 Bacteremia Associated with Consumption of Raw Fish, Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yijun; Foo, Kelly; Koh, Han Fang; Tow, Charlene; Zhang, Yiwen; Ang, Li Wei; Cui, Lin; Badaruddin, Hishamuddin; Ooi, Peng Lim; Lin, Raymond Tzer Pin; Cutter, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of 40 case-patients and 58 controls as part of a nationwide investigation of a group B Streptococcus outbreak in Singapore in 2015. Eating a Chinese-style raw fish dish (yusheng) was a major risk factor for bacteremia, particularly caused by serotype III sequence type 283. PMID:27767904

  11. A diverse family of Type III polyketide synthases in Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B; Luo, Yunzi; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-08-01

    Eucalyptus species synthesize a wealth of polyketide natural products, but no relevant biosynthetic enzyme has been identified. Degenerate primers designed from conserved regions of fourteen chalcone synthase superfamily enzymes were used to isolate gene fragments from at least five different Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) in E. camaldulensis and E. robusta.

  12. A Bacterial Pathogen uses Distinct Type III Secretion Systems to Alternate between Host Kingdom

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of eukaryotes often secrete proteins directly into host cells via a needle-like protein channel called a ‘type III secretion system’ (T3SS). Bacteria that are adapted to either animal or plant hosts use phylogenetically distinct T3SSs for secreting proteins. Here, ...

  13. Erratum: Spectroscopic identification of type 2 quasars at z < 1 in SDSS-III/BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sihan; Strauss, Michael A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2017-06-01

    The paper 'Spectroscopic Identification of Type 2 Quasars at z < 1 in SDSS-III/BOSS' was published in MNRAS, 462, 1603-1615 (2016). The data files in the supporting section are not successfully linked. The actual data files can be found at http://zakamska.johnshopkins.edu/data.htm.

  14. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  15. Search for the Third Harmonic of Type III Bursts Radio Emission at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Pylaev, O. S.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    The results of observations of trio bursts consisting of type III bursts are presented in this paper. The instantaneous frequency ratio of trio components is near 1:2:3. We analyze flow, duration, frequency drift rate and polarization of trio components as well as dependencies of these characteristics on frequency.

  16. A bacterial pathogen uses distinct type III secretion systems to alternate between host kingdoms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), the causative agent of Stewart’s bacterial wilt and...

  17. 33 CFR 159.12a - Certification of certain Type III devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of certain Type III devices. 159.12a Section 159.12a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.12a...

  18. 33 CFR 159.12a - Certification of certain Type III devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of certain Type III devices. 159.12a Section 159.12a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.12a...

  19. 33 CFR 159.12a - Certification of certain Type III devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of certain Type III devices. 159.12a Section 159.12a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.12a...

  20. 33 CFR 159.12a - Certification of certain Type III devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of certain Type III devices. 159.12a Section 159.12a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.12a...

  1. 33 CFR 159.12a - Certification of certain Type III devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of certain Type III devices. 159.12a Section 159.12a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.12a...

  2. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III.

    PubMed

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian; Heinz, Andrea; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2010-04-01

    Collagens of either soft connective or mineralized tissues are subject to continuous remodeling and turnover. Undesired cleavage can be the result of an imbalance between proteases and their inhibitors. Owing to their superhelical structure, collagens are resistant to many proteases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required to initiate further degradation by other enzymes. Several MMPs are known to degrade collagens, but the action of MMP-12 has not yet been studied in detail. In this work, the potential of MMP-12 in recognizing sites in human skin collagen types I and III has been investigated. The catalytic domain of MMP-12 binds to the triple helix and cleaves the typical sites -Gly(775)-Leu(776)- in alpha-2 type I collagen and -Gly(775)-Ile(776)- in alpha-1 type I and type III collagens and at multiple other sites in both collagen types. Moreover, it was observed that the region around these typical sites contains comparatively less prolines, of which some have been proven to be only partially hydroxylated. This is of relevance since partial hydroxylation in the vicinity of a potential scissile bond may have a local effect on the conformational thermodynamics with probable consequences on the collagenolysis process. Taken together, the results of the present work confirm that the catalytic domain of MMP-12 alone binds and degrades collagens I and III. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Signal amplification in immunohistochemistry: loose-jointed deformable heteropolymeric HRP conjugates vs. linear polymer backbone HRP conjugates.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, Igor; Boecker, Werner; Wolf, Eduard; Samoilova, Vera; Tiemann, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Improvements in reagents and protocols for immunohistochemistry have led to increased sensitivity of detection systems. A significant level of signal amplification was achieved by the chain-polymer conjugate technology utilizing enzyme-labeled inert "backbone" molecule of dextran (Dako). However, the relatively large size of the dextran molecule in aqueous phase appears to create spatial hindrance compromising the penetrative ability of the detection reagent. Novel AmpliStain™ detection systems (SDT GmbH, Baesweiler, Germany) seem to overcome these constraints offering a more compact and deformable conjugate design that facilitates agile penetration through the narrowest diffusion pathways in tissue sections. Here, we compared the level of signal amplification achievable with AmpliStain™-HRP (SDT) and EnVision™+-HRP (Dako). Our results show that the AmpliStain™-HRP systems allow higher dilutions of primary antibodies in both immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Compared with EnVision™+, anti-mouse AmpliStain™ enables at least three times more sensitive detection of mouse antibodies, whereas anti-rabbit AmpliStain™ is ten times more sensitive than anti-rabbit EnVision™+.

  4. Induction of oxidative stress in Prototheca zopfii by indole-3-acetic acid/HRP or 2,4-pentanedione/HRP systems and their oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Cunha, L T; Pugine, S M P; Lins, P G; Brunetti, I L; De Melo, M P

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the toxic effects on Prototheca zopfii of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 2,4-pentanedione (PD) combined with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) alongside the oxidation products of 3-methyl-2-oxindole (MOI) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C) from the IAA/HRP system and methylglyoxal (MGO) from the PD/HRP system. The microorganism was incubated in the absence (control) or presence of IAA, PD, IAA/HRP, PD/HRP, MOI, I3C and MGO and determined: (1) cytotoxicity by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium) assay; (2) growth inhibitory concentration by resazurin assay and (3) antioxidant enzymes activities of: catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). P. zopfii was more susceptible to IAA at 40 mM than PD at the same concentration, which seems to indicate that IAA was more effective at initiating cell death. These data corroborate results from the resazurin assay. Concentrations of 40 mM of IAA, IAA/HRP and PD/HRP, 20 mM of PD/HRP, 10 mM of MOI, 2 mM of I3C and 8 mM of MGO inhibited the growth of P. zopfii. With sub-inhibitory concentrations of IAA and IAA/HRP at 30 mM, MOI at 8 mM and I3C at 1 mM, the activities of CAT and GR increased, whereas no statistical difference was observed for CAT activity with IAA/HRP. Thus, PD at 30 mM and MGO at 6 mM increased the activities of CAT and GR, whereas PD/HRP system at 15 mM decreased CAT activity and PD/HRP and MGO showed no statistical difference for SOD activity. In conclusion, IAA/HRP or PD/HRP systems and their oxidation products exert cytotoxic effects on P. zopffi; however, I3C and MGO appear to exert greater microbicidal effect on P. zopfii.

  5. Synthesis and immunological properties of conjugates composed of group B streptococcus type III capsular polysaccharide covalently bound to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed Central

    Lagergard, T; Shiloach, J; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R

    1990-01-01

    A synthetic scheme for covalently binding group B streptococcus type III to tetanus toxoid (TT), using adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer, is described. Type III alone or as a conjugate with TT was injected subcutaneously into laboratory mice, and the type-specific and TT antibody responses elicited by these immunogens were assayed. Type III-TT elicited significantly higher levels of type-specific antibodies after each immunization than did the type III alone. These levels were related to the dosage of the conjugate, enhanced by Freund adjuvant, and exhibited booster responses. Type III alone elicited only immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in Swiss albino mice and mostly IgM and low levels of IgG antibodies of the IgG3 subclass in BALB/c mice. Type III-TT conjugates, in contrast, elicited mostly IgG antibodies in both strains of mice. IgA type III antibodies were not detected. The first two immunizations with the conjugates elicited type III antibodies in the IgG1 and in the IgG3 subclasses. Low levels of IgG2a type III antibodies were detected after a third injection of type III-TT. Conjugate-induced antibodies facilitated opsonization of group B streptococcus type III organisms and did not react with the structurally related pneumococcus type 14. TT alone or as a component of type III-TT induced mostly antibodies of the IgG class: IgG1 levels were the highest of the four subclasses. No IgA TT antibodies were detected. The conjugation procedure, therefore, enhanced the immunogenicity of and conferred T-cell dependent properties to the type III while preserving the immunogenicity of the TT component. The T-cell dependent properties of the conjugates were responsible for stimulating IgG type III antibodies which could be boosted. Evaluation of type III-TT conjugates in antibody-negative women of child-bearing age is planned. PMID:2407652

  6. Structural characterization of CFA/III and Longus type IVb pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Roos, Justin; Yuen, Alex S W; Pierce, Owen M; Craig, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    The type IV pili are helical filaments found on many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, with multiple diverse roles in pathogenesis, including microcolony formation, adhesion, and twitching motility. Many pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates express one of two type IV pili belonging to the type IVb subclass: CFA/III or Longus. Here we show a direct correlation between CFA/III expression and ETEC aggregation, suggesting that these pili, like the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), mediate microcolony formation. We report a 1.26-Å resolution crystal structure of CofA, the major pilin subunit from CFA/III. CofA is very similar in structure to V. cholerae TcpA but possesses a 10-amino-acid insertion that replaces part of the α2-helix with an irregular loop containing a 3(10)-helix. Homology modeling suggests a very similar structure for the Longus LngA pilin. A model for the CFA/III pilus filament was generated using the TCP electron microscopy reconstruction as a template. The unique 3(10)-helix insert fits perfectly within the gap between CofA globular domains. This insert, together with differences in surface-exposed residues, produces a filament that is smoother and more negatively charged than TCP. To explore the specificity of the type IV pilus assembly apparatus, CofA was expressed heterologously in V. cholerae by replacing the tcpA gene with that of cofA within the tcp operon. Although CofA was synthesized and processed by V. cholerae, no CFA/III filaments were detected, suggesting that the components of the type IVb pilus assembly system are highly specific to their pilin substrates.

  7. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How to bend galaxy disc profiles - II. Stars surfing the bar in Type-III discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpich, J.; Stinson, G. S.; Rix, H.-W.; Martig, M.; Dutton, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The radial profiles of stars in disc galaxies are observed to be either purely exponential (Type-I), truncated (Type-II) or antitruncated (Type-III) exponentials. Controlled formation simulations of isolated galaxies can reproduce all of these profile types by varying a single parameter, the initial halo spin. In this paper, we examine these simulations in more detail in an effort to identify the physical mechanism that leads to the formation of Type-III profiles. The stars in the antitruncated outskirts of such discs are now on eccentric orbits, but were born on near-circular orbits at much smaller radii. We show that, and explain how, they were driven to the outskirts via non-linear interactions with a strong and long-lived central bar, which greatly boosted their semimajor axis but also their eccentricity. While bars have been known to cause radial heating and outward migration to stellar orbits, we link this effect to the formation of Type-III profiles. This predicts that the antitruncated parts of galaxies have unusual kinematics for disc-like stellar configurations: high radial velocity dispersions and slow net rotation. Whether such discs exist in nature, can be tested by future observations.

  9. The hrpZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola enhances resistance to rhizomania disease in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Ourania I; Kelaidi, Georgia I; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Skaracis, George N

    2011-03-04

    To explore possible sources of transgenic resistance to the rhizomania-causing Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), Nicotiana benthamiana plants were constructed to express the harpin of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (HrpZ(Psph)). The HrpZ protein was expressed as an N-terminal fusion to the PR1 signal peptide (SP/HrpZ) to direct harpin accumulation to the plant apoplast. Transgene integration was verified by mPCR in all primary transformants (T0), while immunoblot analysis confirmed that the protein HrpZ(Psph) was produced and the signal peptide was properly processed. Neither T0 plants nor selfed progeny (T1) showed macroscopically visible necrosis or any other macroscopic phenotypes. However, plants expressing the SP/HrpZ(Psph) showed increased vigor and grew faster in comparison with non-transgenic control plants. Transgenic resistance was assessed after challenge inoculation with BNYVV on T1 progeny by scoring of disease symptoms and by DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic and control lines showed significant differences in terms of the number of plants that became infected, the timing of infection and the disease symptoms displayed. Plants expressing the SP/HrpZ(Psph) developed localized leaf necrosis in the infection area and had enhanced resistance upon challenge with BNYVV. In order to evaluate the SP/HrpZ-based resistance in the sugar beet host, A. rhizogenes-mediated root transformation was exploited as a transgene expression platform. Upon BNYVV inoculation, transgenic sugar beet hairy roots showed high level of BNYVV resistance. In contrast, the aerial non-transgenic parts of the same seedlings had virus titers that were comparable to those of the seedlings that were untransformed or transformed with wild type R1000 cells. These findings indicate that the transgenically expressed SP/HrpZ protein results in enhanced rhizomania resistance both in a model plant and sugar beet, the natural host of BNYVV. Possible molecular mechanisms

  10. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome mutations in type III collagen differently stall the triple helical folding.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kazunori; Boudko, Sergei; Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-06-28

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is the most severe form of EDS. In many cases the disease is caused by a point mutation of Gly in type III collagen. A slower folding of the collagen helix is a potential cause for over-modifications. However, little is known about the rate of folding of type III collagen in patients with EDS. To understand the molecular mechanism of the effect of mutations, a system was developed for bacterial production of homotrimeric model polypeptides. The C-terminal quarter, 252 residues, of the natural human type III collagen was attached to (GPP)7 with the type XIX collagen trimerization domain (NC2). The natural collagen domain forms a triple helical structure without 4-hydroxylation of proline at a low temperature. At 33 °C, the natural collagenous part is denatured, but the C-terminal (GPP)7-NC2 remains intact. Switching to a low temperature triggers the folding of the type III collagen domain in a zipper-like fashion that resembles the natural process. We used this system for the two known EDS mutations (Gly-to-Val) in the middle at Gly-910 and at the C terminus at Gly-1018. In addition, wild-type and Gly-to-Ala mutants were made. The mutations significantly slow down the overall rate of triple helix formation. The effect of the Gly-to-Val mutation is much more severe compared with Gly-to-Ala. This is the first report on the folding of collagen with EDS mutations, which demonstrates local delays in the triple helix propagation around the mutated residue.

  11. Folding of beta-sandwich proteins: three-state transition of a fibronectin type III module.

    PubMed Central

    Cota, E.; Clarke, J.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the folding of the 94 residue tenth fibronectin type III (fnIII) domain of human fibronectin (FNfn10) is presented. Use of guanidine isothiocyanate as a denaturant allows us to obtain equilibrium and kinetic data across a broad range of denaturant concentrations that are unavailable in guanidine hydrochloride. Equilibrium unfolding experiments show that FNfn10 is significantly more stable than has been reported previously. Comparison of equilibrium and kinetic parameters reveals the presence of an intermediate that accumulates at low denaturant concentrations. This is the first demonstration of three-state folding kinetics for a fnIII domain. We have previously shown that a homologous domain from human tenascin (TNfn3) folds by a two-state mechanism, but this does not necessarily indicate that the two proteins fold by different folding pathways. PMID:10739253

  12. Dietary management in glycogen storage disease type III: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Derks, Terry G J; Smit, G Peter A

    2015-05-01

    In childhood, GSD type III causes relatively severe fasting intolerance, classically associated with ketotic hypoglycaemia. During follow up, history of (documented) hypoglycaemia, clinical parameters (growth, liver size, motor development, neuromuscular parameters), laboratory parameters (glucose, lactate, ALAT, cholesterol, triglycerides, creatine kinase and ketones) and cardiac parameters all need to be integrated in order to titrate dietary management, for which age-dependent requirements need to be taken into account. Evidence from case studies and small cohort studies in both children and adults with GSD III demonstrate that prevention of hypoglycaemia and maintenance of euglycemia is not sufficient to prevent complications. Moreover, over-treatment with carbohydrates may even be harmful. The ageing cohort of GSD III patients, including the non-traditional clinical presentations in adulthood, raises ‬‬‬new questions.

  13. Complete amino acid sequence of the N-terminal extension of calf skin type III procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, A; Glanville, R W; Hörlein, D; Bruckner, P; Timpl, R; Fietzek, P P; Kühn, K

    1984-01-01

    The N-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen, isolated from foetal-calf skin, contains 130 amino acid residues. To determine its amino acid sequence, the peptide was reduced and carboxymethylated or aminoethylated and fragmented with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and bacterial collagenase. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase was used to deblock the N-terminal collagenase fragment to enable amino acid sequencing. The type III collagen extension peptide is homologous to that of the alpha 1 chain of type I procollagen with respect to a three-domain structure. The N-terminal 79 amino acids, which contain ten of the 12 cysteine residues, form a compact globular domain. The next 39 amino acids are in a collagenase triplet sequence (Gly- Xaa - Yaa )n with a high hydroxyproline content. Finally, another short non-collagenous domain of 12 amino acids ends at the cleavage site for procollagen aminopeptidase, which cleaves a proline-glutamine bond. In contrast with type I procollagen, the type III procollagen extension peptides contain interchain disulphide bridges located at the C-terminus of the triple-helical domain. PMID:6331392

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of Tunisian patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Mili, Amira; Ben Charfeddine, Ilhem; Mamaï, Ons; Abdelhak, Sonia; Adala, Labiba; Amara, Abdelbasset; Pagliarani, Serena; Lucchiarri, Sabrina; Lucchiari, Sabrina; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Tebib, Neji; Harbi, Abdelaziz; Bouguila, Jihene; H'Mida, Dorra; Saad, Ali; Limem, Khalifa; Comi, G P; Gribaa, Moez

    2012-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-1,6-glucosidase gene, which is located on chromosome 1p21.2. GSD III is characterized by the storage of structurally abnormal glycogen, termed limit dextrin, in both skeletal and cardiac muscle and/or liver, with great variability in resultant organ dysfunction. The spectrum of AGL gene mutations in GSD III patients depends on ethnic group. The most prevalent mutations have been reported in the North African Jewish population and in an isolate such as the Faroe Islands. Here, we present the molecular and biochemical analyses of 22 Tunisian GSD III patients. Molecular analysis revealed three novel mutations: nonsense (Tyr1148X) and two deletions (3033_3036del AATT and 3216_3217del GA) and five known mutations: three nonsense (R864X, W1327X and W255X), a missense (R524H) and an acceptor splice-site mutation (IVS32-12A>G). Each mutation is associated to a specific haplotype. This is the first report of screening for mutations of AGL gene in the Tunisian population.

  15. Biochemical and molecular investigation of two Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sue-Hyun; Park, Hyung-Doo; Ki, Chang-Seok; Choe, Yon-Ho; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2008-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD-III) is an inborn error of glycogen metabolism caused by a deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme, amylo-1,6-glucosidase,4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL). Here, we describe two unrelated Korean patients with GSD-III and review their clinical and laboratory findings. The patients were 18- and 11-month-old girls. They presented with hepatosplenomegaly, developmental delay and hypotonia. The routine laboratory findings showed an elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase and triglyceride levels. The blood lactate and uric acid levels were within normal limits. PCR and direct sequencing were performed to determine genetic findings. Glycogen quantitation was markedly increased and AGL activity was undetectable in both patients. Sequence analysis of the AGL gene showed that both patients were compound heterozygotes for c.853C>T (p.R285X) and c.1735+1G>T in one patient, and c.2894_2896delGGAinsTG and c.4090G>C (p.D1364H) in the other patient. The c.2894_2896delGGAinsTG and c.4090G>C (p.D1364H) mutation was a novel finding. GSD-III should be ruled out when a patient presents with hepatic abnormalities, hypoglycemia, myopathy and hyperlipidemia. This is the first report of confirmation of GSD-III in Korean patients by biochemical and genetic findings.

  16. Genetic variation of pfhrp2 in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Yemen and the performance of HRP2-based malaria rapid diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Jasari, Adel; Sady, Hany; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Nasr, Nabil A; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik; Surin, Johari

    2015-07-22

    The genetic variation in the Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (pfhrp2) gene that may compromise the use of pfhrp2-based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for the diagnosis of malaria was assessed in P. falciparum isolates from Yemen. This study was conducted in Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit governorates, Yemen. A total of 622 individuals with fever were examined for malaria by CareStart malaria HRP2-RDT and Giemsa-stained thin and thick blood films. The Pfhrp2 gene was amplified and sequenced from 180 isolates, and subjected to amino acid repeat types analysis. A total of 188 (30.2%) participants were found positive for P. falciparum by the RDT. Overall, 12 different amino acid repeat types were identified in Yemeni isolates. Six repeat types were detected in all the isolates (100%) namely types 1, 2, 6, 7, 10 and 12 while types 9 and 11 were not detected in any of the isolates. Moreover, the sensitivity and specificity of the used PfHRP2-based RDTs were high (90.5% and 96.1%, respectively). The present study provides data on the genetic variation within the pfhrp2 gene, and its potential impact on the PfHRP2-based RDTs commonly used in Yemen. CareStart Malaria HRP2-based RDT showed high sensitivity and specificity in endemic areas of Yemen.

  17. How to proteins move along DNA? Lessons from type-I and type-III restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Szczelkun, M D

    2000-01-01

    Protein-mediated communications on DNA are universally important. The translocation of DNA driven by a high-energy phosphoryl potential allows long stretches of DNA to be traversed without dissociation. Type-I and type-III enzymes both use a common DNA-tracking mechanism to move along DNA, dependent on the hydrolysis of ATP. Type-I enzymes cleave DNA at distant DNA sites (and in some cases close to the site), due to a stall in enzyme motion. This can be due to collision with another translocating type-I enzyme or, on circular DNA, due to an increased topological load. ATP hydrolysis is considerable, and continues after DNA cleavage. Type-III enzymes only cleave DNA proximal to their sites due to collision between two endonucleases tracking with defined polarity. ATP hydrolysis is less than with the type-I enzymes. Homology to DNA helicases has been found within the HsdR and Res subunits. Mutagenesis of the DEAD-box motifs affects both ATP hydrolysis and DNA cleavage. This demonstrates a tight link between ATPase and endonuclease activities. A strand-separation mechanism akin to the DNA helicases is a possibility. The DNA-based motor proteins are mechanistically ill-defined. Further study using some of the techniques pioneered with classical motor proteins will be needed to reveal more detail.

  18. Glycogen storage disease type III presenting with secondary diabetes and managed with insulin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba

    2009-06-17

    Reports of secondary diabetes in glycogen storage disease type III have been very limited, where the pathogenesis and management have not been clear. Here we report on a rare case of secondary diabetes in glycogen storage disease type III that has been successfully managed with insulin. This is a 19-year-old female of Egyptian ethnicity, born of a consanguineous marriage and known to have glycogen storage disease type III since the age of 2(1/2) years. She presented to us with a history of polyuria, polydipsia, and loss of weight of a few days duration. Physical exam showed stunted growth, hepatomegaly, myopathy and mild dehydration. Emergency labs revealed a fasting blood glucose of 276 mg/dl, but with no ketonuria and arterial blood gases were essentially normal. Her liver transaminases were mildly elevated at the time. Review of her records revealed that the diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type III was made at the age of 2(1/2) when the mother reported repeated attacks of afebrile (hypoglycemic) convulsions, increasing abdominal girth and failure to thrive. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstration of debrancher enzyme deficiency on enzymatic assay. Over the years she developed liver dysfunction along with other complications and subsequently her hypoglycemic attacks disappeared a few years prior to her current presentation. After careful consideration of different treatment options, and considering she had been free of hypoglycemic attacks for a few years and had liver dysfunction, we chose to cautiously initiate the patient on insulin therapy. She was still poorly controlled and we gradually increased her total daily dose to 0.8 u/kg. She continued to be free of hypoglycemic attacks and her average daily blood glucose is about 160 mg/dl. We report a rare case of secondary diabetes mellitus in a patient with glycogen storage disease type III managed with insulin. We recommend insulin therapy over oral hypoglycemics to avoid further hepatotoxicity

  19. Salter-Harris type III fractures of the distal humerus in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Hayes, G M; Radke, H; Langley-Hobbs, S J

    2011-01-01

    Salter-Harris type III fractures of the distal humerus in a four-month-old male Labrador Retriever and a male crossbreed dog (estimated to be 3.5-months-old) are reported. Both fractures were treated with open reduction and interfragmentary compression by lag screw fixation. Both fractures healed and full limb use was regained at four weeks postoperatively. The occurrence of this unusual fracture type may be related to the physeal closure pattern of the distal humeral physis, and a different mechanism of injury compared to the more common Salter-Harris type IV fracture seen in this region.

  20. The Class of Type III-L Solar Radio Bursts and Their Associations with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, Robert Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The source protons of Solar Energetic particle Proton events (defined as "SEP" events for this research) not associated with the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) shock front are thought to come from either the flare site or the reconnection region beneath the CME. The Type III-L, a new class of solar radio burst has been defined by Cane et al. (2002) and MacDowall et al. (2003) as a sub-set of the Type III burst, beginning after the onset of the soft X-ray (SXR) flare, is long lasting and extends down to at least 1 MHz. The emission source region of Type III-Ls is believed to be at the reconnection region beneath the CME or on the flanks of the CME. Past association studies between SEP events and Type III-Ls began with a biased SEP-selected sample set to see if there can be found support for the emission source region of Type III-Ls and SEPs to come from the same accelerator site at the reconnection region beneath the CME. Unlike previous studies using an SEP-selected sample, I find that when using a radio-selected sample for well-connected SEP events with a solar source in the western hemisphere, the majority of the Type III-L events are associated with SEP events, but not all, and that Type III-L events associated with M- and X- class SXR flares, do not appear to be better predictors of SEP events than do Type II bursts which are associated with the CME shock. Also, I find that the occurrence of Type II events in the radio spectra of SEPs is just as common as the occurrence of Type III-Ls. This indicates that Type III-Ls should not be used as a predictor for SEP events, that the emission source region of Type III-Ls might not be at the reconnection region beneath the CME and reduces the strength of the support found by previous SEP-Type III-L association studies, that the source protons for SEP events necessarily come from the reconnection region beneath the CME. I found that Type III-L events have no strong longitude preference, but SEP events do have a 60

  1. Esophagus or stomach? The seventh TNM classification for Siewert type II/III junctional adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Shinichi; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Aoyama, Toru; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takanobu; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Cho, Haruhiko; Oshima, Takashi; Yukawa, Norio; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Tsuburaya, Akira

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify whether TNM-EC or TNM-GC is better for classifying patients with AEG types II/III. The patients who had AEG types II/III and received D1 or more radical lymphadenectomy were selected. The patients were staged both by seventh edition of TNM-EC and TNM-GC. The distribution of the patients, the hazard ratio (HR) of each stage, and the separation of the survival were compared. A total of 163 patients were enrolled in this study. TNM-EC and TNM-GC classified 25 (20 and 5) and 32 (20 and 12) patients to stage I (IA and IB), 15 (4 and 11), and 33 (11 and 22) to stage II (IIA and IIB), 88 (24, 3, and 61) and 63 (14, 26, and 23) to stage III (IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC), and 35 and 35 to stage IV, respectively. The distribution of the patients was substantially deviated to stage IIIC in TNM-EC but was almost even in TNM-GC. A stepwise increase of HR was observed in TNM-GC, but not in TNM-EC. The survival curves between stages II and III were significantly separated in TNM-GC (P = 0.019), but not in TNM-EC (P = 0.204). The 5-year survival rates of stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC were 69.0, 100, and 38.9% in TNM-EC and were 52.0, 43.4, and 33.9% in TNM-GC, respectively. TNM-GC is better for classifying patients with AEG types II/III than TNM-EC is. These results could impact the next TNM revision for AEG.

  2. Visualization of the type III secretion sorting platform of Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Morado, Dustin R.; Margolin, William; Rohde, John R.; Arizmendi, Olivia; Picking, Wendy L.; Picking, William D.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion machines are widely used to inject virulence proteins into eukaryotic host cells. These secretion machines are evolutionarily related to bacterial flagella and consist of a large cytoplasmic complex, a transmembrane basal body, and an extracellular needle. The cytoplasmic complex forms a sorting platform essential for effector selection and needle assembly, but it remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use high-throughput cryoelectron tomography (cryo-ET) to visualize intact machines in a virulent Shigella flexneri strain genetically modified to produce minicells capable of interaction with host cells. A high-resolution in situ structure of the intact machine determined by subtomogram averaging reveals the cytoplasmic sorting platform, which consists of a central hub and six spokes, with a pod-like structure at the terminus of each spoke. Molecular modeling of wild-type and mutant machines allowed us to propose a model of the sorting platform in which the hub consists mainly of a hexamer of the Spa47 ATPase, whereas the MxiN protein comprises the spokes and the Spa33 protein forms the pods. Multiple contacts among those components are essential to align the Spa47 ATPase with the central channel of the MxiA protein export gate to form a unique nanomachine. The molecular architecture of the Shigella type III secretion machine and its sorting platform provide the structural foundation for further dissecting the mechanisms underlying type III secretion and pathogenesis and also highlight the major structural distinctions from bacterial flagella. PMID:25583506

  3. Phenotype of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Ser351Cys mutation: Pfeiffer syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Gripp, K W; Stolle, C A; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Markowitz, R I; Bartlett, S P; Katowitz, J A; Muenke, M; Zackai, E H

    1998-07-24

    We present a patient with pansynostosis, hydrocephalus, seizures, extreme proptosis with luxation of the eyes out of the lids, apnea and airway obstruction, intestinal non-rotation, and severe developmental delay. His skeletal abnormalities include bilateral elbow ankylosis, radial head dislocation, and unilateral broad and deviated first toe. The phenotype of this patient is consistent with that previously reported in Pfeiffer syndrome type III, but is unusual for the lack of broad thumbs. Our patient most closely resembles the case described by Kerr et al. [1996: Am J Med Genet 66:138-143] as Pfeiffer syndrome type III with normal thumbs. Mutations in the genes for fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) 1 and 2 have previously been seen in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome type I. The mutation identified in our patient, Ser351Cys in FGFR2, represents the first reported cause of Pfeiffer syndrome type III. An identical mutation was described once previously by Pulleyn et al., in a patient whose brief clinical description included cloverleaf skull, significant developmental delay, and normal hands and feet [Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 4: 283-291, 1996]. In our patient, previously performed single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis failed to detect a band shift; the mutation was identified only after independent sequence analysis.

  4. Propionibacterium Acnes Phylogenetic Type III is Associated with Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Rolf L. W.; Scholz, Christian F. P.; Jensen, Anders; Brüggemann, Holger; Lomholt, Hans B.

    2017-01-01

    Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a skin disorder that is characterized by hypopigmented macules and usually seen in young adults. The skin microbiota, in particular the bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, is suggested to play a role. Here, we compared the P. acnes population of 24 PMH lesions from eight patients with corresponding nonlesional skin of the patients and matching control samples from eight healthy individuals using an unbiased, culture-independent next-generation sequencing approach. We also compared the P. acnes population before and after treatment with a combination of lymecycline and benzoylperoxide. We found an association of one subtype of P. acnes, type III, with PMH. This type was predominant in all PMH lesions (73.9% of reads in average) but only detected as a minor proportion in matching control samples of healthy individuals (14.2% of reads in average). Strikingly, successful PMH treatment is able to alter the composition of the P. acnes population by substantially diminishing the proportion of P. acnes type III. Our study suggests that P. acnes type III may play a role in the formation of PMH. Furthermore, it sheds light on substantial differences in the P. acnes phylotype distribution between the upper and lower back and abdomen in healthy individuals. PMID:28386469

  5. Propionibacterium Acnes Phylogenetic Type III is Associated with Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Rolf L W; Scholz, Christian F P; Jensen, Anders; Brüggemann, Holger; Lomholt, Hans B

    2017-03-01

    Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a skin disorder that is characterized by hypopigmented macules and usually seen in young adults. The skin microbiota, in particular the bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, is suggested to play a role. Here, we compared the P. acnes population of 24 PMH lesions from eight patients with corresponding nonlesional skin of the patients and matching control samples from eight healthy individuals using an unbiased, culture-independent next-generation sequencing approach. We also compared the P. acnes population before and after treatment with a combination of lymecycline and benzoylperoxide. We found an association of one subtype of P. acnes, type III, with PMH. This type was predominant in all PMH lesions (73.9% of reads in average) but only detected as a minor proportion in matching control samples of healthy individuals (14.2% of reads in average). Strikingly, successful PMH treatment is able to alter the composition of the P. acnes population by substantially diminishing the proportion of P. acnes type III. Our study suggests that P. acnes type III may play a role in the formation of PMH. Furthermore, it sheds light on substantial differences in the P. acnes phylotype distribution between the upper and lower back and abdomen in healthy individuals.

  6. Tibial spine fractures: an analysis of outcome in surgically treated type III injuries.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, K J; Dowdall, J; Grannell, M; McCabe, J P

    1999-05-01

    We analysed the outcome of open reduction and internal fixation of type III tibial spine fractures, assessing treatment and determining a treatment protocol. A total of 10 patients presented over 3 years to our institution with a mean age of 15 years (range 10-21), a male-to-female ratio of 8:2. left to right 6:4 and anterior to posterior spine fracture 9:1. Only one patient had associated meniscal injury noted at arthroscopy (no treatment required). The mode of injury was road traffic accidents four, sports injuries three and falls three. The mean follow-up was 9 months. There were seven excellent results and three good results. Those patients with good results exhibited either minimal quadriceps weakness, extensor lag (< 10 degrees) or antero-posterior laxity. This reflects the experience of other authors in dealing with these injuries in younger patients. There is widespread agreement that types I and II should be treated by plaster cast alone and that is also the policy at our institution. We recommend a routine treatment protocol in type III injuries of (1) examination under anaesthesia, (2) arthroscopy (evaluating the fracture, cruciate integrity and other associated injuries), (3) open reduction and screw fixation and (4) vigorous physiotherapy/rehabilitation of all type III fractures, as we feel this provides the best possible outcome in these injuries.

  7. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy S.; Rangel, Stephanie M.; Almblad, Henrik; Kierbel, Arlinet; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Hauser, Alan R.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a deadly Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, often involve the formation of antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Although biofilm formation has been extensively studied in vitro on glass or plastic surfaces, much less is known about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates exhibit key characteristics of biofilms, including the presence of extracellular matrix and increased resistance to antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria. Using isogenic mutants in the type III secretion system, we found that the translocon, but not the effectors themselves, were required for cell-associated aggregation on the surface of polarized epithelial cells and at early time points in a murine model of acute pneumonia. In contrast, the translocon was not required for aggregation on abiotic surfaces, suggesting a novel function for the type III secretion system during cell-associated aggregation. Supernatants from epithelial cells infected with wild-type bacteria or from cells treated with the pore-forming toxin streptolysin O could rescue aggregate formation in a type III secretion mutant, indicating that cell-associated aggregation requires one or more host cell factors. Our results suggest a previously unappreciated function for the type III translocon in the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms at the epithelial barrier and demonstrate that biofilms may form at early time points of infection. PMID:25375398

  8. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III translocon is required for biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cindy S; Rangel, Stephanie M; Almblad, Henrik; Kierbel, Arlinet; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Hauser, Alan R; Engel, Joanne N

    2014-11-01

    Clinical infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a deadly Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, often involve the formation of antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Although biofilm formation has been extensively studied in vitro on glass or plastic surfaces, much less is known about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates exhibit key characteristics of biofilms, including the presence of extracellular matrix and increased resistance to antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria. Using isogenic mutants in the type III secretion system, we found that the translocon, but not the effectors themselves, were required for cell-associated aggregation on the surface of polarized epithelial cells and at early time points in a murine model of acute pneumonia. In contrast, the translocon was not required for aggregation on abiotic surfaces, suggesting a novel function for the type III secretion system during cell-associated aggregation. Supernatants from epithelial cells infected with wild-type bacteria or from cells treated with the pore-forming toxin streptolysin O could rescue aggregate formation in a type III secretion mutant, indicating that cell-associated aggregation requires one or more host cell factors. Our results suggest a previously unappreciated function for the type III translocon in the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms at the epithelial barrier and demonstrate that biofilms may form at early time points of infection.

  9. LcrV Mutants That Abolish Yersinia Type III Injectisome Function

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Katherine Given; Miller, Nathan C.; Mitchell, Anthony; Plano, Gregory V.

    2013-01-01

    LcrV, the type III needle cap protein of pathogenic Yersinia, has been proposed to function as a tether between YscF, the needle protein, and YopB-YopD to constitute the injectisome, a conduit for the translocation of effector proteins into host cells. Further, insertion of LcrV-capped needles from a calcium-rich environment into host cells may trigger the low-calcium signal for effector translocation. Here, we used a genetic approach to test the hypothesis that the needle cap responds to the low-calcium signal by promoting injectisome assembly. Growth restriction of Yersinia pestis in the absence of calcium (low-calcium response [LCR+] phenotype) was exploited to isolate dominant negative lcrV alleles with missense mutations in its amber stop codon (lcrV*327). The addition of at least four amino acids or the eight-residue Strep tag to the C terminus was sufficient to generate an LCR− phenotype, with variant LcrV capping type III needles that cannot assemble the YopD injectisome component. The C-terminal Strep tag appears buried within the cap structure, blocking effector transport even in Y. pestis yscF variants that are otherwise calcium blind, a constitutive type III secretion phenotype. Thus, LcrV*327 mutants arrest the needle cap in a state in which it cannot respond to the low-calcium signal with either injectisome assembly or the activation of type III secretion. Insertion of the Strep tag at other positions of LcrV produced variants with wild-type LCR+, LCR−, or dominant negative LCR− phenotypes, thereby allowing us to identify discrete sites within LcrV as essential for its attributes as a secretion substrate, needle cap, and injectisome assembly factor. PMID:23222719

  10. In Situ Detection of Strong Langmuir Turbulence Processes in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golla, Thejappa; Macdowall, Robert J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The high time resolution observations obtained by the WAVES experiment of the STEREO spacecraft in solar type III radio bursts show that Langmuir waves often occur as intense localized wave packets. These wave packets are characterized by short durations of only a few ms and peak intensities, which well exceed the supersonic modulational instability (MI) thresholds. These timescales and peak intensities satisfy the criterion of the solitons collapsed to spatial scales of a few hundred Debye lengths. The spectra of these wave packets consist of primary spectral peaks corresponding to beam-resonant Langmuir waves, two or more sidebands corresponding to down-shifted and up-shifted daughter Langmuir waves, and low frequency enhancements below a few hundred Hz corresponding to daughter ion sound waves. The frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the modulational instability (MI). Moreover, the tricoherences, computed using trispectral analysis techniques show that these spectral components are coupled to each other with a high degree of coherency as expected of the MI type of four wave interactions. The high intensities, short scale lengths, sideband spectral structures and low frequency spectral enhancements and, high levels of tricoherences amongst the spectral components of these wave packets provide unambiguous evidence for the supersonic MI and related strong turbulence processes in type III radio bursts. The implication of these observations include: (1) the MI and related strong turbulence processes often occur in type III source regions, (2) the strong turbulence processes probably play very important roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency, fpe, and (3) the Langmuir collapse probably follows the route of MI in type III radio bursts.

  11. Subcellular location of horseradish peroxidase in horseradish leaves treated with La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaxin; Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Zhou, Qing; Guo, Shaofen

    2008-11-01

    The agricultural application of rare-earth elements (REEs) would promote REEs inevitably to enter in the environment and then to threaten the environmental safety and human health. Therefore, the distribution of the REEs ion, (141)Ce(III) and effects of La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III) on the distribution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in horseradish mesophyll cells were investigated with electron microscopic radioautography and transmission electron microscopic cytochemistry. It was found for the first time that REEs ions can enter into the mesophyll cells, deposit in both extra and intra-cellular. Compared to the normal condition, after the horseradish leaves treated with La(III) or Tb(III), HRP located on the tonoplast is decreased and HRP is mainly located on the cell wall, while HRP is mainly located on the plasma membrane after the horseradish leaves were treated with Ce(III). This also indicated that REEs ions may regulate the plant growth through changing the distribution of enzymes.

  12. Evidence for halo-like radio sources from kilometric type III burst observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The radio azimuths for many kilometric type III bursts that originate near or behind the limb of the sun are observed to drift far to the east or far to the west of the spacecraft-sun line. It is shown that the behavior of the observed burst parameters for these events corresponds to the response of a spinning dipole antenna to halolike sources of radiation around the sun. These results provide evidence for a previous suggestion that behind-the-limb type III events should appear as halolike sources of radiation to an observer on the opposite side of the sun, due to scattering of the radiation from the primary source back around the sun.

  13. Visualization and characterization of individual type III protein secretion machines in live bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongdeng; Lara-Tejero, María; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Galán, Jorge E

    2017-06-06

    Type III protein secretion machines have evolved to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. Although electron microscopy has provided a detailed view of these machines in isolation or fixed samples, little is known about their organization in live bacteria. Here we report the visualization and characterization of the Salmonella type III secretion machine in live bacteria by 2D and 3D single-molecule switching superresolution microscopy. This approach provided access to transient components of this machine, which previously could not be analyzed. We determined the subcellular distribution of individual machines, the stoichiometry of the different components of this machine in situ, and the spatial distribution of the substrates of this machine before secretion. Furthermore, by visualizing this machine in Salmonella mutants we obtained major insights into the machine's assembly. This study bridges a major resolution gap in the visualization of this nanomachine and may serve as a paradigm for the examination of other bacterially encoded molecular machines.

  14. Type III Guyon Syndrome in 'B Boy' Break-Dancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hu, Soo-Young; Choi, Jin-Gyu; Son, Byung-Chul

    2015-10-01

    Although the musculoskeletal injuries associated with break-dancing which is gaining more popularity among adolescent and young people has been reported, the report regarding a peripheral nerve injury associated with breakdance is scarce. We report a rare case of a young amateur break-dancer, 'b-boy' who suffered from a painful paresthesia in his left hand, later diagnosed as type III Guyon's canal syndrome. A 23-year-old, right handed college man presented with a tenderness over the left hypothenar eminence and painful paresthesia over the ring and little fingers of 3 months duration. He trained himself as an amateur 'b boy' break-dancer for the last 10 months. Conservative management under the diagnosis of wrist sprain before presentation did not improve his hand pain. An magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed that painful paresthesia was caused by type III Guyon's canal syndrome, and 4 weeks of corticosteroid treatment was given with resolution of pain and paresthesia.

  15. Type-III Bifurcation to Chaos in Self-Oscillating States of Squid Giant Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, Kazuro; Hanyu, Yoshiro; Matsumoto, Gen

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes detailed bifurcation characteristics of firing (time sequence of action potentials) observed in squid giant axons as a function of temperature.The firing is spontaneously induced when the axon is immersed in Ca-reduced ASW (Artificial seawater) without any electrical stimulation.The firing observed above a critical temperature (high-temperature phase firing) is periodic, while the one below the critical temperature (low-temperature) is aperiodic.Our present analysis on the firing shows that aperiodic firing is chaotic, and bifurcation from periodic oscillation to chaos occurs through the type-III intermittency.The type-III bifurcation to chaos should take place through some temperature-dependent properties of the axonal membrane in itself.One of the most probable candidates underlying chaos and bifurcation mechanisms in this experiment could be temperature-dependednt spatial interaction along the longitudinal direction of the squid giant axon.

  16. RNA-activated DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR–Cas effector complex

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michael A.; Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bailey, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) system is an RNA-guided immune system that protects prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. This system represents an inheritable and adaptable immune system that is mediated by multisubunit effector complexes. In the Type III-B system, the Cmr effector complex has been found to cleave ssRNA in vitro. However, in vivo, it has been implicated in transcription-dependent DNA targeting. We show here that the Cmr complex from Thermotoga maritima can cleave an ssRNA target that is complementary to the CRISPR RNA. We also show that binding of a complementary ssRNA target activates an ssDNA-specific nuclease activity in the histidine–aspartate (HD) domain of the Cmr2 subunit of the complex. These data suggest a mechanism for transcription-coupled DNA targeting by the Cmr complex and provide a unifying mechanism for all Type III systems. PMID:26848046

  17. A two-step sulfation in antibiotic biosynthesis requires a type III polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Eitel, Kornelia; Kaysser, Leonard; Kulik, Andreas; Grond, Stephanie; Gust, Bertolt

    2013-10-01

    Caprazamycins (CPZs) belong to a group of liponucleoside antibiotics inhibiting the bacterial MraY translocase, an essential enzyme involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. We have recently identified analogs that are decorated with a sulfate group at the 2″-hydroxy of the aminoribosyl moiety, and we now report an unprecedented two-step sulfation mechanism during the biosynthesis of CPZs. A type III polyketide synthase (PKS) known as Cpz6 is used in the biosynthesis of a group of new triketide pyrones that are subsequently sulfated by an unusual 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS)-dependent sulfotransferase (Cpz8) to yield phenolic sulfate esters, which serve as sulfate donors for a PAPS-independent arylsulfate sulfotransferase (Cpz4) to generate sulfated CPZs. This finding is to our knowledge the first demonstration of genuine sulfate donors for an arylsulfate sulfotransferase and the first report of a type III PKS to generate a chemical reagent in bacterial sulfate metabolism.

  18. Co-transcriptional DNA and RNA cleavage during type III CRISPR-Cas immunity

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Poulami; Goldberg, Gregory W.; Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Marraffini, Luciano A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Immune systems must recognize and destroy different pathogens that threat the host. CRISPR-Cas immune systems protect prokaryotes from viral and plasmid infection utilizing small CRISPR RNAs that are complementary to the invader's genome and specify the targets of RNA-guided Cas nucleases. Type III CRISPR-Cas immunity requires target transcription and whereas genetic studies demonstrated DNA targeting, in vitro data have shown crRNA-guided RNA cleavage. The molecular mechanism behind this disparate activities is not known. Here we show that transcription across the targets of the Staphylococcus epidermidis type III-A CRISPR-Cas system results in the cleavage of the target DNA and its transcripts, mediated by independent active sites within the Cas10-Csm ribonucleoprotein effector complex. Immunity against plasmids and DNA viruses requires DNA but not RNA cleavage activity. Our studies reveal a highly versatile mechanism of CRISPR immunity that can defend microorganisms against diverse DNA and RNA invaders. PMID:25959775

  19. Design and synthesis of type-III mimetics of ShK toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baell, Jonathan B.; Harvey, Andrew J.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2002-04-01

    ShK toxin is a structurally defined, 35-residue polypeptide which blocks the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel in T-lymphocytes and has been identified as a possible immunosuppressant. Our interest lies in the rational design and synthesis of type-III mimetics of protein and polypeptide structure and function. ShK toxin is a challenging target for mimetic design as its binding epitope consists of relatively weakly binding residues, some of which are discontinuous. We discuss here our investigations into the design and synthesis of 1st generation, small molecule mimetics of ShK toxin and highlight any principles relevant to the generic design of type-III mimetics of continuous and discontinuous binding epitopes. We complement our approach with attempted pharmacophore-based database mining.

  20. Antibacterial Flavonoids from Medicinal Plants Covalently Inactivate Type III Protein Secretion Substrates.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Lun K; Lara-Tejero, María; RoseFigura, Jordan; Zhang, Zhenrun J; Wang, Yen-Chih; Yount, Jacob S; Lefebre, Matthew; Dossa, Paul D; Kato, Junya; Guan, Fulan; Lam, Wing; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Galán, Jorge E; Hang, Howard C

    2016-02-24

    Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) have been historically used to treat bacterial infections. However, the molecules responsible for these anti-infective properties and their potential mechanisms of action have remained elusive. Using a high-throughput assay for type III protein secretion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, we discovered that several TCMs can attenuate this key virulence pathway without affecting bacterial growth. Among the active TCMs, we discovered that baicalein, a specific flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis, targets S. Typhimurium pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors and translocases to inhibit bacterial invasion of epithelial cells. Structurally related flavonoids present in other TCMs, such as quercetin, also inactivated the SPI-1 T3SS and attenuated S. Typhimurium invasion. Our results demonstrate that specific plant metabolites from TCMs can directly interfere with key bacterial virulence pathways and reveal a previously unappreciated mechanism of action for anti-infective medicinal plants.

  1. Subversion of plant cellular functions by bacterial type-III effectors: beyond suppression of immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P

    2016-04-01

    Most bacterial plant pathogens employ a type-III secretion system to inject type-III effector (T3E) proteins directly inside plant cells. These T3Es manipulate host cellular processes in order to create a permissive niche for bacterial proliferation, allowing development of the disease. An important role of T3Es in plant pathogenic bacteria is the suppression of plant immune responses. However, in recent years, research has uncovered T3E functions different from direct immune suppression, including the modulation of plant hormone signaling, metabolism or organelle function. This insight article discusses T3E functions other than suppression of immunity, which may contribute to the modulation of plant cells in order to promote bacterial survival, nutrient release, and bacterial replication and dissemination.

  2. Discovery of a novel superfamily of type III polyketide synthases in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Seshime, Yasuyo; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Fujii, Isao; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2005-05-27

    Identification of genes encoding type III polyketide synthase (PKS) superfamily members in the industrially useful filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, revealed that their distribution is not specific to plants or bacteria. Among other Aspergilli (Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus), A. oryzae was unique in possessing four chalcone synthase (CHS)-like genes (csyA, csyB, csyC, and csyD). Expression of csyA, csyB, and csyD genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Comparative genome analyses revealed single putative type III PKS in Neurospora crassa and Fusarium graminearum, two each in Magnaporthe grisea and Podospora anserina, and three in Phenarocheate chrysosporium, with a phylogenic distinction from bacteria and plants. Conservation of catalytic residues in the CHSs across species implicated enzymatically active nature of these newly discovered homologs.

  3. The first plant type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes formation of aromatic heptaketide.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ikuro; Utsumi, Yoriko; Oguro, Satoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2004-03-26

    A cDNA encoding a novel plant type III polyketide synthase (PKS) was cloned from rhubarb (Rheum palmatum). A recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli accepted acetyl-CoA as a starter, carried out six successive condensations with malonyl-CoA and subsequent cyclization to yield an aromatic heptaketide, aloesone. The enzyme shares 60% amino acid sequence identity with chalcone synthases (CHSs), and maintains almost identical CoA binding site and catalytic residues conserved in the CHS superfamily enzymes. Further, homology modeling predicted that the 43-kDa protein has the same overall fold as CHS. This provides new insights into the catalytic functions of type III PKSs, and suggests further involvement in the biosynthesis of plant polyketides.

  4. Stacking fault domains as sources of a-type threading dislocations in III-nitride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Bazioti, C.; Albrecht, M.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    A mechanism for the nucleation of a-type threading dislocation half-loops from basal stacking faults in wurtzite III-nitride heterostructures is presented. Transmission electron microscopy observations, in conjunction with topological and strain analysis, show that there are two possible configurations of closed domains comprising basal stacking faults of I1 type. It is shown that the lattice dislocation may emanate when the sphalerite structural units of the stacking faults in the closed domain are oriented in a parallel manner. The closed domain configurations do not introduce any shift on the basal planes, resulting in zero defect content along the growth direction. The stacking fault domains are hexagonal, with sides along the ⟨ 10 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ directions, and the threading dislocation half loops nucleate at the line nodes. The mechanism was found to be operational in multiple III-nitride systems.

  5. Type III radio bursts in the interplanetary medium - The role of propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.; Lecacheux, A.; Aubier, M. G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Interplanetary type III radio burst observations are analyzed in order to ascertain the role played by propagation effects between the true source and the observer. Large source altitudes are noted, together with an increasing angular size of sources with increasing angular distance from the sun's center. These and other observations furnish strong evidence for the theory that propagation effects, group delays, ducting and/or scattering significantly affect the observed heights, sizes, and brightness temperatures of interplanetary type III bursts. This would be true irrespective of whether the bursts are due to plasma radiation at the fundamental or at the harmonic, and the effects would extend to the arrival times of the radiation to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the path from the source to the observer.

  6. Interaction of HRP-2 isoforms with HDGF: chromatin binding of a specific heteromer.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Ketan; Votteler, Ina; Kelkar, Dipti; Shidore, Teja; Gupta, Shivangi; Kelm, Sørge; Dietz, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth-factor-related protein 2 (HRP-2) belongs to a family with five additional members: hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF); lens epithelium-derived growth factor; and the HDGF-related proteins -1, -3 and -4. Very little is known regarding the function of HRP-2 in particular. This study shows for the first time heteromer formation of different members of the HRP family; HDGF and HRP-2. In addition, we discovered a previously unknown splice variant of HRP-2 mRNA encoding for a protein with a 53-amino acid deletion in its hath region. This HRP-2 isoform c interacts preferentially with a processed form of HDGF probably because of the loss of an α helix of HRP-2. Furthermore, in contrast to other isoforms of HRP-2, isoform c binds to chromatin similar to its most closely related family member lens epithelium-derived growth factor with potential consequences regarding its function in HIV integration. Interestingly, only the new HRP-2 isoform c and a processed form of HDGF are displaced from condensed mitotic metaphase chromatin. In conclusion, these observations provide a new perspective for understanding the biological functions of HDGF and related proteins.

  7. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the presence of type III adenylyl cyclase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Katsel, Pavel L; Tagliente, Thomas M; Schwarz, Todd E; Craddock-Royal, Barbara D; Patel, Nayana D; Maayani, Saul

    2003-02-01

    The isoform(s) of adenylyl cyclase (AC) present in human platelets has not been identified, and evidence supporting a role for AC in platelet aggregation is equivocal. We recently characterized deaggregation as an active component of the platelet aggregation response that may be an important determinant of the extent and duration of aggregation. G(i)-coupled receptors are linked to the inhibition of AC and are targets of antiplatelet drugs. They also affect platelet aggregation by modulating deaggregation, suggesting a role for AC in modulating this response. The purpose of this study was to identify the AC isoform(s) present in human platelets and to identify its physiological modulators. RT-PCR screening of platelet, buffy coat layer cell and bone marrow megakaryocyte cDNA, and Western blot analysis with AC type III (AC-III) antibodies identified AC-III in platelets and in megakaryocytes. Human platelet AC-III was cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells and its characteristics compared to native platelet AC. Both platelet AC and cloned AC-III required Mg(2+) for activity, were insensitive to Ca(2+) and were G(s)- and G(i)-coupled. Zn(2+) and SQ22536 inhibited platelet AC activity. The affinity of SQ22536 was increased with Mg(2+)-related stimulation of AC, while that of Zn(2+) was unchanged, which is consistent with a non-competitive interaction between the two metal ions on AC. The Zn(2+) chelator TPEN reversed the inhibitory effects of Zn(2+). This study identified AC-III as the predominant AC isoform in human platelets, the activity of which may affect the extent and duration of the net aggregation response by modulating deaggregation.

  8. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  9. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Samo, Salih; Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2016-08-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia.

  10. Evaluation of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score in Combat-Related Type III Tibia Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Krueger, MD,* Matthew A. Napierala, MD,* Daniel J. Stinner, MD,* and Joseph R. Hsu, MD,† on behalf of the Skeletal Trauma and Research Consortium (STReC...center. Intervention: Amputation or limb salvage. Main Outcome Measurements: MESS, amputation or limb salvage. Results: Complete data were available...for 155 patients treated for type III open tibia fractures. One hundred ten patients had salvaged limbs , and 45 patients had lower extremity amputations

  11. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia. PMID:28119934

  12. Ultrasonographic prenatal diagnosis of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism types I/III.

    PubMed

    Nadjari, M; Fasouliotis, S J; Ariel, I; Raas-Rothschild, A; Bar-Ziv, J; Elchalal, U

    2000-08-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism is a rare disease characterized by unique clinical appearance and specific radiographic findings, and distinctive brain abnormalities. We describe the prenatal diagnosis of two siblings with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism types I/III at 23 and 26 weeks of gestation, respectively. Early detection by sequential antenatal sonographic evaluation is important for counselling families known to be at risk of this rare disease. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Overactive bladder after female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) type III.

    PubMed

    Abdulcadir, Jasmine; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2013-10-04

    A 27-year-old Somali woman with type III a-b female genital mutilation/cutting, consulted because of slow micturition, voiding efforts, urgency and urge incontinence (overactive bladder). She also referred primary dysmenorrhoea and superficial dyspareunia making complete sexual intercourses impossible. We treated her by defibulation and biofeedback re-educative therapy. We also offered a multidisciplinary counselling. At 5 months follow-up, urgency and urge incontinence had resolved and she became pregnant.

  14. Overactive bladder after female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) type III

    PubMed Central

    Abdulcadir, Jasmine; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A 27-year-old Somali woman with type III a–b female genital mutilation/cutting, consulted because of slow micturition, voiding efforts, urgency and urge incontinence (overactive bladder). She also referred primary dysmenorrhoea and superficial dyspareunia making complete sexual intercourses impossible. We treated her by defibulation and biofeedback re-educative therapy. We also offered a multidisciplinary counselling. At 5 months follow-up, urgency and urge incontinence had resolved and she became pregnant. PMID:24096069

  15. Infection Reduces Return-to-duty Rates for Soldiers with Type III Open Tibia Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Type III open tibia fracture and tabulated the prevalence of infectious complications.We searched the Physical Evaluation Board database to determine...disability among combat casualties, with an average disability rating of 42% based on the Physical Evaluation Board.8 In addition, it has been...redness, warmth , swelling, or purulence that required operative inter- vention. Osteomyelitis was defined as deep infection with positive bone cultures

  16. Lethal familial fetal akinesia sequence (FAS) with distinct neuropathological pattern: type III lissencephaly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Encha Razavi, F; Larroche, J C; Roume, J; Gonzales, M; Kondo, H C; Mulliez, N

    1996-03-01

    We report on a distinct pattern of primary central nervous system (CNS) degeneration affecting neuronal survival in the brain and spinal cord in 5 fetuses with fetal akinesia sequence (FAS). This neuropathological pattern is characteristic of a lethal entity that we propose calling type III lissencephaly syndrome. Parental consanguinity and the recurrence in sibs support a genetic cause. The mechanism of neuronal death is not yet understood; abnormal apoptosis and/or deficiency in neurotropic factors may be considered possible causes.

  17. Measurement of the 3-dimensional positions of type III bursts in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poquerusse, M.; Steinberg, J. L.; Caroubalos, C.; Dulk, G. A.; Macqueen, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The three-dimensional positions of type III sources in the corona are calculated on the basis of ground and spacecraft data. Simultaneous observations of the corona in visible light from Skylab make it possible to relate the apparent radio-source positions to slowly evolving coronal structures. It is found that open magnetic field lines connecting the low coronal levels to the interplanetary medium only exist in a relatively narrow region, and diverge rapidly upwards.

  18. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage.

  19. [Triple-Endobutton technique for the treatment of Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation].

    PubMed

    Sun, Liao-jun; Lu, Di; Chen, Hua

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes and complications of Triple-Endobutton plates in treating Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation. From January 2011 to January 2013,45 patients with Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation were treated with Triple-Endobutton plates. There were 35 males and 10 females with an average age of 30.5 (ranged from 19 to 60) years old. At the final follow-up, VAS, DASH, Constant-Murley criterion were used to evaluate shoulder function. All patients were followed up from 15 to 36 months. No neurovascular injury, wound infection and stress fractures were found,but 3 patients had a re-dislocation. At the final follow-up,the mean VAS score was decreased from (5.7±1.6) preoperatively to postoperative (0.2±0.1); DASH score was significantly decreased from (19.6±4.3) preoperatively to (0.3±0.1) postoperatively; Constant-Murley score was improved from (34.4±4.3) before operation to (94.8± 3.5) after operation. Clinical outcomes of treating Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation with Triple-Endobutton plates is satisfactory. However, re-dislocation is still the most common complication. Careful perioperative management is an important factor in preventing re-dislocation.

  20. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  1. The relationship between chronic type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation and cervical spine pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was aimed at evaluating whether or not patients with chronic type III acromioclavicular dislocation develop cervical spine pain and degenerative changes more frequently than normal subjects. Methods The cervical spine of 34 patients with chronic type III AC dislocation was radiographically evaluated. Osteophytosis presence was registered and the narrowing of the intervertebral disc and cervical lordosis were evaluated. Subjective cervical symptoms were investigated using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). One-hundred healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group. Results The rate and distribution of osteophytosis and narrowed intervertebral disc were similar in both of the groups. Patients with chronic AC dislocation had a lower value of cervical lordosis. NPQ score was 17.3% in patients with AC separation (100% = the worst result) and 2.2% in the control group (p < 0.05). An inverse significant nonparametric correlation was found between the NPQ value and the lordosis degree in the AC dislocation group (p = 0.001) wheras results were not correlated (p = 0.27) in the control group. Conclusions Our study shows that chronic type III AC dislocation does not interfere with osteophytes formation or intervertebral disc narrowing, but that it may predispose cervical hypolordosis. The higher average NPQ values were observed in patients with chronic AC dislocation, especially in those that developed cervical hypolordosis. PMID:20015356

  2. Novel Low Fluence Combination Laser Treatment of Solar Lentigines in Type III Asian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Brian Wei Cheng Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate a novel low fluence combination laser technique [Erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Erb:YAG) and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG)] to effectively treat solar lentigines in type III Asian skin in a single session. Design: A prospective study. Setting: A Singapore-based clinic. Participants: Five patients (all females) were enrolled into the study. The ages ranged 35-60 years; all patients had Fitzpatrick skin type III. Measurements: Photographs were taken at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. These were reviewed by two independent physicians who were blinded to the study. Changes in pigment severity were assessed by a 5-point scale (1: Aggravation of pigment, 2: No change, 3: 25-50% improvement, 4: 51-75% improvement, and 5: 76-100% improvement). Results: All patients received a single treatment session. At 1-month follow-up, a reduction in pigment was observed in all patients. Both physicians’ reports were independently agreeable. All patients scored 5, having >90% improvement in pigment severity. No hypopigmentation, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), or recurrence was seen. Conclusion: Low fluence combination laser is effective and safe for clearance of solar lentigines in type III Asian skin. PMID:26865789

  3. Neuroinflammation, mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla; Hůlková, Helena; Dridi, Larbi; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; Grigoryeva, Lubov; Choi, Yoo; Langford-Smith, Alexander; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; DiCristo, Graziella; Hamel, Edith; Ausseil, Jerôme; Cheillan, David; Moreau, Alain; Svobodová, Eva; Hájková, Zuzana; Tesařová, Markéta; Hansíková, Hana; Bigger, Brian W; Hrebícek, Martin; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2015-02-01

    Severe progressive neurological paediatric disease mucopolysaccharidosis III type C is caused by mutations in the HGSNAT gene leading to deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase involved in the lysosomal catabolism of heparan sulphate. To understand the pathophysiology of the disease we generated a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis III type C by germline inactivation of the Hgsnat gene. At 6-8 months mice showed hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety. Cognitive memory decline was detected at 10 months and at 12-13 months mice showed signs of unbalanced hesitant walk and urinary retention. Lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate was observed in hepatocytes, splenic sinus endothelium, cerebral microglia, liver Kupffer cells, fibroblasts and pericytes. Starting from 5 months, brain neurons showed enlarged, structurally abnormal mitochondria, impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism, and storage of densely packed autofluorescent material, gangliosides, lysozyme, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid-β. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase causes lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate in microglial cells followed by their activation and cytokine release. They also show mitochondrial dysfunction in the neurons and neuronal loss explaining why mucopolysaccharidosis III type C manifests primarily as a neurodegenerative disease.

  4. Evidence for Langmuir Envelope Solitons in Solar Type III Burst Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; Goldstein, M. L.; MacDowall, R. J.; Papadopoulos, K.; Stone, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    We present observational evidence for the generation of Langmuir envelope solitons in the source regions of solar type III radio bursts. The solitons appear to be formed by electron beams which excite either the modulational instability or oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). Millisecond data from the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) show that Langmuir waves associated with type III bursts occur as broad intense peaks with time scales ranging from 15 to 90 milliseconds (6 - 27 km). These broad field structures have the properties expected of Langmuir envelope solitons, viz.: the normalized peak energy densities, W(sub L)/n(sub e)T(sub e) approximately 10(exp -5), are well above the modulational instability threshold; the spatial scales, L, which range from 1 - 5 Langmuir wavelengths, show a high degree of inverse correlation with (W(sub L)/n(sub e)T(sub e))(sup 1/2); and the observed widths of these broad peaks agree well with the predicted widths of envelope solitons. We show that the orientation of the Langmuir field structures is random with respect to the ambient magnetic field, indicating that they are probably isotropic structures that have evolved from initially pancake-like solitons. These observations suggest that strong turbulence processes, such as the modulational instability or the OTSI, stabilize the electron beams that produce type III bursts.

  5. Bacterial type III secretion systems are ancient and evolved by multiple horizontal-transfer events.

    PubMed

    Gophna, Uri; Ron, Eliora Z; Graur, Dan

    2003-07-17

    Type III secretion systems (TTSS) are unique bacterial mechanisms that mediate elaborate interactions with their hosts. The fact that several of the TTSS proteins are closely related to flagellar export proteins has led to the suggestion that TTSS had evolved from flagella. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of four conserved type III secretion proteins and their phylogenetic relationships with flagellar paralogs. Our analysis indicates that the TTSS and the flagellar export mechanism share a common ancestor, but have evolved independently from one another. The suggestion that TTSS genes have evolved from genes encoding flagellar proteins is effectively refuted. A comparison of the species tree, as deduced from 16S rDNA sequences, to the protein phylogenetic trees has led to the identification of several major lateral transfer events involving clusters of TTSS genes. It is hypothesized that horizontal gene transfer has occurred much earlier and more frequently than previously inferred for TTSS genes and is, consequently, a major force shaping the evolution of species that harbor type III secretion systems.

  6. Type III Secretion of ExoU Is Critical during Early Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Heather A.; Logan, Latania K.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system has been associated with poor outcomes in both animal models and human patients. Despite a large number of studies exploring the regulation of type III secretion in vitro, little is known about the timing of secretion during mammalian infection. Here we demonstrate that the exoU gene, which encodes the highly cytotoxic type III effector ExoU, is induced early during acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that the amount of ExoU protein in the lung also increased over time. The importance of early expression was examined using a strain of P. aeruginosa with inducible production of ExoU. Delays in expression as short as 3 h led to reduced bacterial burdens in the lungs of mice and improved survival. Our results demonstrate that early expression of exoU is critical to bacterial survival during pneumonia and suggest that therapeutic interventions that delay ExoU secretion for even short periods of time may be efficacious. PMID:23481600

  7. Direction-finding measurements of type III radio bursts out of the ecliptic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumback, M. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional direction-finding measurements for three type III solar radio bursts is presented which is based on spin-modulation measurements from two satellites (IMP 8 and Hawkeye I) whose spin axes were nearly perpendicular to each other. The two-dimensional direction-finding technique is combined with a model of the solar-wind plasma density in order to provide determinations of type III source locations out of the ecliptic plane as well as information on the three-dimensional structure of the solar magnetic field at radial distances of 0.2 to 1.0 AU from the sun. The direction-finding technique is described in detail, characteristics of the bursts observed by the two satellites are summarized, and the solar-wind model is outlined. The results show that the source locations follow an Archimedean spiral when projected onto the ecliptic plane but usually follow a constant heliocentric latitude perpendicular to that plane. It is also found that measured source sizes are a factor of two larger than the angular sizes of previously reported solar-flare electron emissions, that the spin-modulation factor tends to be largest near the beginning of a type III event, and that the arrival direction of the radiation varies systematically during an event.

  8. Neuroinflammation, mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Carla; Hůlková, Helena; Dridi, Larbi; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; Grigoryeva, Lubov; Choi, Yoo; Langford-Smith, Alexander; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; DiCristo, Graziella; Hamel, Edith; Ausseil, Jerôme; Cheillan, David; Moreau, Alain; Svobodová, Eva; Hájková, Zuzana; Tesařová, Markéta; Hansíková, Hana; Bigger, Brian W.; Hrebícek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Severe progressive neurological paediatric disease mucopolysaccharidosis III type C is caused by mutations in the HGSNAT gene leading to deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase involved in the lysosomal catabolism of heparan sulphate. To understand the pathophysiology of the disease we generated a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis III type C by germline inactivation of the Hgsnat gene. At 6–8 months mice showed hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety. Cognitive memory decline was detected at 10 months and at 12–13 months mice showed signs of unbalanced hesitant walk and urinary retention. Lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate was observed in hepatocytes, splenic sinus endothelium, cerebral microglia, liver Kupffer cells, fibroblasts and pericytes. Starting from 5 months, brain neurons showed enlarged, structurally abnormal mitochondria, impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism, and storage of densely packed autofluorescent material, gangliosides, lysozyme, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid-β. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase causes lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate in microglial cells followed by their activation and cytokine release. They also show mitochondrial dysfunction in the neurons and neuronal loss explaining why mucopolysaccharidosis III type C manifests primarily as a neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25567323

  9. Functional relatedness in the Inv/Mxi-Spa type III secretion system family.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jessica A; Dave, Biren M; Raphenya, Amogelang R; McArthur, Andrew G; Knodler, Leigh A

    2017-03-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are structurally conserved nanomachines that span the inner and outer bacterial membranes, and via a protruding needle complex contact host cell membranes and deliver type III effector proteins. T3SS are phylogenetically divided into several families based on structural basal body components. Here we have studied the evolutionary and functional conservation of four T3SS proteins from the Inv/Mxi-Spa family: a cytosolic chaperone, two hydrophobic translocators that form a plasma membrane-integral pore, and the hydrophilic 'tip complex' translocator that connects the T3SS needle to the translocon pore. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a common cause of food-borne gastroenteritis, possesses two T3SSs, one belonging to the Inv/Mxi-Spa family. We used invasion-deficient S. Typhimurium mutants as surrogates for expression of translocator orthologs identified from an extensive phylogenetic analysis, and type III effector translocation and host cell invasion as a readout for complementation efficiency, and identified several Inv/Mxi-Spa orthologs that can functionally substitute for the S. Typhimurium chaperone and translocator proteins. Functional complementation correlates with amino acid sequence identity between orthologs, but varies considerably between the four proteins. This is the first in-depth survey of the functional interchangeability of Inv/Mxi-Spa T3SS proteins acting directly at the host-pathogen interface. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Connections of the octopus optic lobe: an HRP study.

    PubMed

    Saidel, W M

    1982-04-20

    The major visual centers of the octopus central nervous system are the paired optic lobes. Bidirectional transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used to determine connections of the optic lobe. Cells afferent to the optic lobe were identified by retrograde HRP transport in the following lobes of the central ganglia: anterior basal, median basal, dorsal basal, interbasal, subvertical, precommissural, brachial, and magnocellular. Labeled cells were also observed within the contralateral optic lobe, various optic tract lobes bilaterally, and in photoreceptors of the ipsilateral retina. Additionally, individual fibers, in part originating from cells in the posterior subvertical lobe, were labeled within the central neuropil core of various vertical lobules. Differences in results between superficial and deep optic lobe medulla injections indicate that some afferent projections from central sources may terminate on cell populations at specific depths within the lobe. Efferent optic lobe fibers into the superior frontal and lateral basal lobes were labeled by anterograde transport. Other possible optic lobe efferent projections terminated in supraesophageal lobes and the magnocellular lobe. The many inputs to the optic lobe from higher motor and associative centers in the central ganglia emphasize that the medulla region of the optic lobe is an exceptionally complex integrative area.

  11. Multiplex real-time PCR SYBR Green for detection and typing of group III Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Delibato, Elisabetta; Antonacci, Monia; De Medici, Dario; Fenicia, Lucia

    2012-01-27

    Clostridium botulinum type C and type D belonging to the group III organisms, are mainly responsible for animal botulism outbreaks. Clinical signs alone are often insufficient to make a diagnosis of botulism and a laboratory confirmation is required. Laboratory confirmation can be performed by demonstrating the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in serum, gastrointestinal contents, liver, wound of sick or dead animals, or by demonstrating the presence of C. botulinum in gastrointestinal contents, liver, and wound. Demonstration of spores in gastrointestinal contents or tissue of animals with clinical signs indicative of botulism reinforces the clinical diagnosis. With the aim of detecting and typing C. botulinum group III organisms, a multiplex real-time PCR SYBR Green was developed and in-house validated. Selectivity, limit of detection, relative accuracy, relative specificity, relative sensitivity, and repeatability of the method were investigated. The multiplex real-time PCR SYBR green used showed a 100% selectivity, 100% relative accuracy, 100% relative specificity, 100% relative sensitivity and a limit of detection of 277 and 580 DNA copies for C. botulinum type C and C. botulinum type D, respectively. The method reported here represents a suitable tool for laboratory diagnosis of type C and D botulism and for testing a large number of samples collected during the animal botulism surveillance and prevention activities.

  12. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  13. Outer Membrane c-Type Cytochromes Required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) Oxide Reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, T.; Coppi, M. V.; Childers, S. E.; Lovley, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The potential role of outer membrane proteins in electron transfer to insoluble Fe(III) oxides by Geobacter sulfurreducens was investigated because this organism is closely related to the Fe(III) oxide-reducing organisms that are predominant in many Fe(III)-reducing environments. Two of the most abundant proteins that were easily sheared from the outer surfaces of intact cells were c-type cytochromes. One, designated OmcS, has a molecular mass of ca. 50 kDa and is predicted to be an outer membrane hexaheme c-type cytochrome. Transcripts for omcS could be detected during growth on Fe(III) oxide, but not on soluble Fe(III) citrate. The omcS mRNA consisted primarily of a monocistronic transcript, and to a lesser extent, a longer transcript that also contained the downstream gene omcT, which is predicted to encode a second hexaheme outer membrane cytochrome with 62.6% amino acid sequence identity to OmcS. The other abundant c-type cytochrome sheared from the outer surface of G. sulfurreducens, designated OmcE, has a molecular mass of ca. 30 kDa and is predicted to be an outer membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome. When either omcS or omcE was deleted, G. sulfurreducens could no longer reduce Fe(III) oxide but could still reduce soluble electron acceptors, including Fe(III) citrate. The mutants could reduce Fe(III) in Fe(III) oxide medium only if the Fe(III) chelator, nitrilotriacetic acid, or the electron shuttle, anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonate, was added. Expressing omcS or omcE in trans restored the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. OmcT was not detected among the sheared proteins, and genetic studies indicated that G. sulfurreducens could not reduce Fe(III) oxide when omcT was expressed but OmcS was absent. In contrast, Fe(III) oxide was reduced when omcS was expressed in the absence of OmcT. These results suggest that OmcS and OmcE are involved in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in G. sulfurreducens. They also emphasize the importance of evaluating mechanisms

  14. A mutation analysis of the AGL gene in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae Sung; Moon, Jin Soo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Yang, Hye Ran; Chang, Ju Young; Park, Sung Sup

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by the excessive accumulation of abnormal glycogen in the liver and muscles and is caused by a deficiency in glycogen debranching enzyme (amylo-1,6-glucosidase, 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL)) activity. To investigate the molecular characteristics of GSD III patients in Korea, we have sequenced the AGL gene in eight children with GSD III. All patients were compound heterozygotes. We identified 10 different mutations (five novel and five previously reported). The novel mutations include one nonsense (c.1461G>A, p.W487X), three splicing (c.293+4_293+6delAGT in IVS4, c.460+1G>T in IVS5, c.2682-8A>G in IVS21) and one missense mutation (c.2591G>C, p.R864P). Together, p.R285X, c.1735+1G>T and p.L1139P accounted for 56% of all alleles, while the remaining mutations are heterogeneous. These three mutations can be common in Korea, and further larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  15. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper

  16. Results of Operative and Nonoperative Treatment of Rockwood Types III and V Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Joukainen, Antti; Kröger, Heikki; Niemitukia, Lea; Mäkelä, E. Antero; Väätäinen, Urho

    2014-01-01

    Background: The optimal treatment of acute, complete dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) is still unresolved. Purpose: To determine the difference between operative and nonoperative treatment in acute Rockwood types III and V ACJ dislocation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: In the operative treatment group, the ACJ was reduced and fixed with 2 transarticular Kirschner wires and ACJ ligament suturing. The Kirschner wires were extracted after 6 weeks. Nonoperatively treated patients received a reduction splint for 4 weeks. At the 18- to 20-year follow-up, the Constant, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale (UCLA), Larsen, and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores were obtained, and clinical and radiographic examinations of both shoulders were performed. Results: Twenty-five of 35 potential patients were examined at the 18- to 20-year follow-up. There were 11 patients with Rockwood type III and 14 with type V dislocations. Delayed surgical treatment for ACJ was used in 2 patients during follow-up: 1 in the operatively treated group and 1 in the nonoperatively treated group. Clinically, ACJs were statistically significantly less prominent or unstable in the operative group than in the nonoperative group (normal/prominent/unstable: 9/4/3 and 0/6/3, respectively; P = .02) and in the operative type III (P = .03) but not type V dislocation groups. In operatively and nonoperatively treated patients, the mean Constant scores were 83 and 85, UCLA scores 25 and 27, Larsen scores 11 and 11, and SST scores 11 and 12 at follow-up, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in type III and type V dislocations. In the radiographic analysis, the ACJ was wider in the nonoperative than the operative group (8.3 vs 3.4 mm; P = .004), and in the type V dislocations (nonoperative vs operative: 8.5 vs 2.4 mm; P = .007). There was no statistically significant difference between study groups in

  17. HLA class II haplotypes differentiate between the adult autoimmune polyglandular syndrome types II and III.

    PubMed

    Flesch, B K; Matheis, N; Alt, T; Weinstock, C; Bux, J; Kahaly, G J

    2014-01-01

    Genetics of the adult autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain further insight into the genetics of the adult APS types. SITE: The study was conducted at a university referral center. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes were determined in a large cohort of patients with APS, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and type 1 diabetes and in healthy controls by the consistent application of high-resolution typing at a four-digit level. Comparison of the allele and haplotype frequencies significantly discriminated patients with APS vs AITD and controls. The HLA class II alleles DRB1*03:01 *04:01, DQA1*03:01, *05:01, DQB1*02:01, and *03:02 were observed more frequently (P<.001) in APS than in AITD and controls, whereas the alleles DRB1*15:01, DQB1*03:01, and *06:02 were underrepresented in APS vs AITD (Pc<.001) and controls (Pc<.01), respectively. The DRB1*03:01-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*02:01 (DR3-DQ2) and DRB1*04:01-DQA1*03:01:DQB1*03:02 (DRB1*04:01-DQ8) haplotypes were overrepresented in APS (Pc<.001). Combination of both haplotypes to a genotype was highly prevalent in APS vs AITD and controls (Pc<.001). Dividing the APS collective into those with Addison's disease (APS type II) and those without Addison's disease but including type 1 diabetes and AITD (APS type III) demonstrated DR3-DQ2/DRB1*04:01-DQ8 as a susceptibility genotype in APS III (Pc<.001), whereas the DR3-DQ2/DRB1*04:04-DQ8 genotype correlated with APS II (Pc<.001). The haplotypes DRB1*11:01-DQA1*05:05-DQB1*03:01 and DRB1*15:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 are protective in APS III but not in type II (Pc<.01). HLA class II haplotypes differentiate between the adult APS types II and III. Susceptible haplotypes favor the development of polyglandular autoimmunity in patients with AITD.

  18. NolX of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257, a Type III-Secreted Protein Involved in Host Range Determination, Is Localized in the Infection Threads of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp) and Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Hari B.

    2002-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in a cultivar-specific manner. This strain forms nodules on primitive soybean cultivars but fails to nodulate agronomically improved North American cultivars. Soybean cultivar specificity is regulated by the nolXWBTUV locus, which encodes part of a type III secretion system (TTSS). NolX, a soybean cultivar specificity protein, is secreted by TTSS and shows homology to HrpF of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. It is not known whether NolX functions at the bacterium-plant interface or acts inside the host cell. Antibodies raised against S. fredii USDA257 NolX were used in immunocytochemical studies to investigate the subcellular localization of this protein. Immunostaining of paraffin-embedded sections of developing soybean and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp) nodules revealed localization of NolX in the infection threads. Protein A-gold immunocytochemical localization studies utilizing affinity-purified NolX antibodies revealed specific deposition of gold particles in the fibrillar material inside infection threads. Similar immunogold localization studies failed to detect NolX in thin sections of mature soybean and cowpea nodules. The results from this study indicate that NolX is expressed in planta only during the early stages of nodule development. PMID:11790754

  19. Phosphorylation of HopQ1, a Type III Effector from Pseudomonas syringae, Creates a Binding Site for Host 14-3-3 Proteins1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Giska, Fabian; Lichocka, Małgorzata; Piechocki, Marcin; Dadlez, Michał; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hennig, Jacek; Krzymowska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    HopQ1 (for Hrp outer protein Q), a type III effector secreted by Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola, is widely conserved among diverse genera of plant bacteria. It promotes the development of halo blight in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). However, when this same effector is injected into Nicotiana benthamiana cells, it is recognized by the immune system and prevents infection. Although the ability to synthesize HopQ1 determines host specificity, the role it plays inside plant cells remains unexplored. Following transient expression in planta, HopQ1 was shown to copurify with host 14-3-3 proteins. The physical interaction between HopQ1 and 14-3-3a was confirmed in planta using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy technique. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses detected specific phosphorylation of the canonical 14-3-3 binding site (RSXpSXP, where pS denotes phosphoserine) located in the amino-terminal region of HopQ1. Amino acid substitution within this motif abrogated the association and led to altered subcellular localization of HopQ1. In addition, the mutated HopQ1 protein showed reduced stability in planta. These data suggest that the association between host 14-3-3 proteins and HopQ1 is important for modulating the properties of this bacterial effector. PMID:23396834

  20. Highly strained Esaki tunnel diodes on InP substrate with type-III band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, S.; Sprengel, S.; Amann, M.-C.

    2016-12-01

    The first of a kind InP-based Esaki tunnel diodes with type-III (broken gap) band alignment are presented. This type is expected to have the highest tunneling current densities at equal doping concentration and structure geometry, compared to homo-, type-I or type-II junctions. The broken gap alignment is achieved by highly strained n-Ga0.2In0.8As/p-GaAs0.2Sb0.8 junction layers. Samples were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy, the junction doping was varied between 2 × 1018 cm-3 and 2 × 1019 cm-3. Peak current densities up to 34.0 kA cm-2, for a doping of 2 × 1019 cm-3, are reached. The peak tunneling current shows a low dependence on the doping level for the type-III aligned junction layers. For example, highly strained diodes with a doping concentration of 2 × 1018 cm-3 can reach peak tunnel current densities of 3.6 A cm-2, whereas, with the lattice-matched junction, one order of magnitude higher doping is required.

  1. Neuronal merlin influences ERBB2 receptor expression on Schwann cells through neuregulin 1 type III signalling

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Alexander; Kyselyova, Anna; Baader, Stephan L.; Jung, Marie Juliane; Zoch, Ansgar; Mautner, Victor-Felix

    2014-01-01

    Axonal surface proteins encompass a group of heterogeneous molecules, which exert a variety of different functions in the highly interdependent relationship between axons and Schwann cells. We recently revealed that the tumour suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumour syndrome neurofibromatosis type 2, impacts significantly on axon structure maintenance in the peripheral nervous system. We now report on a role of neuronal merlin in the regulation of the axonal surface protein neuregulin 1 important for modulating Schwann cell differentiation and myelination. Specifically, neuregulin 1 type III expression is reduced in sciatic nerve tissue of neuron-specific knockout animals as well as in biopsies from seven patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. In vitro experiments performed on both the P19 neuronal cell line and primary dorsal root ganglion cells demonstrate the influence of merlin on neuregulin 1 type III expression. Moreover, expression of ERBB2, a Schwann cell receptor for neuregulin 1 ligands is increased in nerve tissue of both neuron-specific merlin knockout animals and patients with neurofibromatosis type 2, demonstrating for the first time that axonal merlin indirectly regulates Schwann cell behaviour. Collectively, we have identified that neuronally expressed merlin can influence Schwann cell activity in a cell-extrinsic manner. PMID:24309211

  2. Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Individuals with Mucopolysaccharide Disease Type III (Sanfilippo Syndrome): A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, C; Wittkowski, A; Hare, D J

    2017-08-30

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in many genetic disorders is well documented but not as yet in Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III). MPS III is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder and evidence suggests that symptoms of ASD present in MPS III. This systematic review examined the extant literature on the symptoms of ASD in MPS III and quality assessed a total of 16 studies. Results indicated that difficulties within speech, language and communication consistent with ASD were present in MPS III, whilst repetitive and restricted behaviours and interests were less widely reported. The presence of ASD-like symptoms can result in late diagnosis or misdiagnosis of MPS III and prevent opportunities for genetic counselling and the provision of treatments.

  3. Molecular and clinical delineation of 12 patients with glycogen storage disease type III in Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Minoru; Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Podskarbi, Teodor; Murase, Toshio; Shin, Yoon S; Coker, Mahmut

    2015-01-15

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III; MIM #232400) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, hepatomegaly, progressive myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. GSD III is caused by deficiency in the glycogen debranching enzyme (gene symbol: AGL). Molecular analyses of AGL have indicated heterogeneity depending on ethnic groups. In Turkey we reported 13 different AGL mutations from GSD III patients in the Eastern region; however, the full spectrum of AGL mutations in Turkish population remains unclear. Here we investigated 12 GSD III patients mostly from Western Turkey. The full coding exons, their relevant exon-intron boundaries, and the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the patients' AGL were sequenced. AGL haplotypes were determined. Splicing mutations were characterized by RNA transcript analysis. Twelve different mutations were identified: 7 novel AGL mutations [69-base pair deletion (c.1056_1082+42del69), 21-base par deletion (c.3940_3949+11del21), two small duplications (c.364_365dupCT and c.1497_1500dupAGAG), and 3 splicing mutations (c.1736-11A>G, c.3259+1G>A and c.3588+2T>G)], along with 5 known mutations (c.1019delA, c.958+1G>A, c.4161+5G>A, p.R864X and p.R1218X). Transcripts of splicing mutations (c.1736-11A>G, c.3588+2T>G and c.4161+5G>A) were shown to cause aberrant splicing. AGL haplotype analyses suggested that c.1019delA and c.958+1G>A are founder mutations in Turkish patients, while p.R864X is a recurrent mutation. Our study broadens the spectrum of AGL mutations and demonstrates that mutations in Western Turkey are different from those in the Eastern region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological effects of chicken type III interferon on expression of interferon-stimulated genes in chickens: comparison with type I and type II interferons.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yasumitsu; Matsuda, Akiko; Usui, Tatsufumi; Sugai, Toru; Asano, Atsushi; Yamano, Yoshiaki

    2012-11-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key mediators that activate host defense mechanisms against viruses. The recently identified mammalian Type III IFN has biological effects similar to type I IFN. However, the biological effects of type III IFN have not yet been characterized in birds. We compared the effects of chicken type III IFN (IFN-λ) with type I (IFN-β) and type II (IFN-γ) IFNs on IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant chicken IFN-λ inhibited influenza virus replication and induced the mRNA expression of the ISGs, Mx and OAS, in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs) in a dose-dependent manner. However, the effective dose of IFN-λ was higher than that of IFN-β and IFN-γ. Furthermore, the effect of IFN-λ on induction of Mx and OAS was lesser than that of IFN-β, but comparable to that of IFN-γ. These results indicate that chicken IFN-λ has the potential to induce ISGs and inhibit viral replication in chicken cells.

  5. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  6. Type III IFNs in Pteropid Bats: Differential Expression Patterns Provide Evidence for Distinct Roles in Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Cowled, Chris; Todd, Shawn; Crameri, Gary; Virtue, Elena R.; Marsh, Glenn A.; Klein, Reuben; Shi, Zhengli; Wang, Lin-Fa; Baker, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Bats are known to harbor a number of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic viruses, many of which are highly pathogenic in other mammals but result in no clinical symptoms in bats. The ability of bats to coexist with viruses may be the result of rapid control of viral replication early in the immune response. IFNs provide the first line of defense against viral infection in vertebrates. Type III IFNs (IFN-λs) are a recently identified IFN family that share similar antiviral activities with type I IFNs. To our knowledge, we demonstrate the first functional analysis of type III IFNs from any species of bat, with the investigation of two IFN-λ genes from the pteropid bat, Pteropus alecto. Our results demonstrate that bat type III IFN has similar antiviral activity to type I and III IFNs from other mammals. In addition, the two bat type III IFNs are differentially induced relative to each other and to type I IFNs after treatment or transfection with synthetic dsRNA. Infection with the bat paramyxovirus, Tioman virus, resulted in no upregulation of type I IFN production in bat splenocytes but was capable of inducing a type III IFN response in three of the four bats tested. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the simultaneous suppression of type I IFN and induction of type III IFN after virus infection. These results may have important implications for the role of type III IFNs in the ability of bats to coexist with viruses. PMID:21278349

  7. Salter-Harris type III fractures of the distal femur: plain radiographs can be deceptive.

    PubMed

    Lippert, William C; Owens, Richard F; Wall, Eric J

    2010-09-01

    Salter-Harris (SH) III fractures of the distal femur, although rare, can have devastating effects. The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the intra-articular fracture displacement measured on plain x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scan and (2) report the outcomes of patients with a SH III fracture of the distal femur. All SH III distal femur fractures treated at a large Children's Hospital with a Level I Pediatric Trauma Center between 1995 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 14 patients (average age: 13 y, 11 mo; range: 7 y, 8 mo to 17 y, 11 mo) with an average follow-up time of 21.50 months (range: 2 to 47 mo) were included in this study. Fracture displacement on plain x-ray was compared with the fracture displacement measured on MRI or CT scan. The average time between the initial plain x-ray and MRI or CT scan was 37.48 days (range: 3 h to 6 mo). Plain x-rays significantly underestimated the displacement of SH III fractures versus MRI or CT scan. Six patients who had both plain x-ray and MRI or CT scan had a measured displacement of 0.42 mm and 2.70 mm, respectively (paired Student t test, P=0.005). Ten of the 14 patients (71%) had no physical limitations and full knee motion at their most recent follow-up visit. The treatment of 4 patients (29%) was changed based on the findings of the additional MRI or CT scan. This study and earlier studies have shown a high rate of poor results with SH III fractures of the distal femur. This type of fracture pattern is extremely unstable and the true displacement is often underestimated by x-rays. Thus, it is strongly recommended that an MRI or CT scan be obtained on every SH III fracture of the distal femur. Moreover, any SH III fracture visible on plain radiographs should be treated with open reduction, internal fixation. Level IV.

  8. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Brisson, J R; Uhrinova, S; Woods, R J; van der Zwan, M; Jarrell, H C; Paoletti, L C; Kasper, D L; Jennings, H J

    1997-03-18

    The conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide (GBSP III) exhibits unique properties which can be ascribed to the presence of sialic acid in its structure and the requirement for an extended binding site. By means of NMR and molecular dynamics studies on GBSP III and its fragments, the extended epitope of GBSP III was further defined. The influence of sialic acid on the conformational properties of GBSP III was examined by performing conformational analysis on desialylated GBSP III, which is identical to the polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14, and also on oxidized and reduced GBSP III. Conformational changes were gauged by 1H and 13C chemical shift analysis, NOE, 1D selective TOCSY-NOESY experiments, J(HH) and J(CH) variations, and NOE of OH resonances. Changes in mobility were examined by 13C T1 and T2 measurements. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water using the AMBER force field and the GLYCAM parameter set were used to assess static and dynamic conformational models, simulate the observable NMR parameters and calculate helical parameters. GBSP III was found to be capable of forming extended helices. Hence, the length dependence of the conformational epitope could be explained by its location on extended helices within the random coil structure of GBSP III. The interaction of sialic acid with the backbone of the PS was also found to be important in defining the conformational epitope of GBSP III.

  9. Decreased type III collagen expression in human uterine cervix of prolapse uteri

    PubMed Central

    IWAHASHI, MASAAKI; MURAGAKI, YASUTERU

    2011-01-01

    The precise mechanism of prolapse uteri is not fully understood. There is evidence to suggest that abnormalities of collagen, the main component of extracellular matrix, or its repair mechanism, may predispose women to prolapse. To investigate the characteristic structure of human uterine cervix of patients with prolapse uteri, various types of collagen expression in the uterine cervix tissues of the prolapse uteri were compared to those of normal uterine cervix. After informed consent, 36 specimens of uterine cervical tissues were obtained at the time of surgery from 16 postmenopausal women with prolapse uteri (stage III–IV by the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination) and 20 postmenopausal women without prolapse uteri (control group). Collagens were extracted from the uterine cervix tissues by salt precipitation methods. The relative levels of various collagens were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The uterine cervix was longer in the patients with prolapse uteri than those of postmenopausal controls without prolapse uteri. The ratios of type III to type I collagen in the uterine cervical tissues were significantly decreased in the prolapse uteri, as compared to those of the postmenopausal uterine cervix without prolapse. These results suggest that decreased type III collagen expression may play an important role in determing the physiology and structure of the uterine cervix tissues of prolapse uteri. PMID:22977496

  10. G-rich, a Drosophila selenoprotein, is a Golgi-resident type III membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chang Lan; Shim, Myoung Sup; Chung, Jiyeol; Yoo, Hyun-Seung; Ha, Ji Min; Kim, Jin Young; Choi, Jinmi; Zang, Shu Liang; Hou, Xiao; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae . E-mail: imbglmg@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2006-10-06

    G-rich is a Drosophila melanogaster selenoprotein, which is a homologue of human and mouse SelK. Subcellular localization analysis using GFP-tagged G-rich showed that G-rich was locali