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  1. Glucocorticoid regulation of amino acid transport in anucleate rat hepatoma (HTC) cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The transport of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) by rat hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids. To investigate the role of the nucleus in the regulation of transport and to determine whether steroid hormones or steroid-receptor complexes may have direct effects on cytoplasmic or membrane functions, we have examined the regulation of transport by dexamethasone in anucleate HTC cells. Cytoplasts prepared from suspension cultures of HTC cells fully retain active transport of AIB with the same kinetic properties as intact cells. However, the uptake of AIB is not inhibited by dexamethasone or other corticosteroids. Neither is the inhibited rate of transport, manifested by cytoplasts prepared from dexamethasone-treated cells, restored to normal upon removal of the hormone. Anucleate cells exhibit specific, saturable binding of [3H]dexamethasone; however, the binding is reduced compared with that of intact cells. The nucleus is thus required for the glucocorticoid regulation of amino acid transport in HTC cells. PMID:7217203

  2. Activation of H2O2-induced VSOR Cl- currents in HTC cells require phospholipase Cgamma1 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilisation.

    PubMed

    Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe; Olivero, Pablo; Armisén, Ricardo; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Jørgensen, Finn; Sala, Francisco; Stutzin, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl(-) channels participate in several physiological processes such as regulatory volume decrease, cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. Recent evidence points to a significant role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in VSOR Cl(-) channel activation. The aim of this study was to determine the signalling pathways responsible for H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) channel activation. In rat hepatoma (HTC) cells, H(2)O(2) elicited a transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) that was blocked by PP2, a Src-family protein kinases inhibitor. Also, H(2)O(2) triggered an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] that paralleled the time course of PLCgamma1 phosphorylation. The H(2)O(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise was prevented by the generic phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-receptor (IP(3)R) blocker 2-APB. In line with these results, manoeuvres that prevented PLCgamma1 activation and/or [Ca(2+)](i) rise, abolished H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) currents. Furthermore, in cells that overexpress a phosphorylation-defective dominant mutant of PLCgamma1, H(2)O(2) did not induce activation of VSOR Cl(-) currents. All these H(2)O(2)-induced effects were independent of extracellular Ca(2+). Our findings suggest that activation of PLCgamma1 and subsequent Ca(2+)(i) mobilisation mediate H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) currents, indicating that H(2)O(2) operates via redox-sensitive signalling pathways akin to those activated by osmotic challenges.

  3. Activation of H2O2-induced VSOR Cl- currents in HTC cells require phospholipase Cgamma1 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilisation.

    PubMed

    Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe; Olivero, Pablo; Armisén, Ricardo; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Jørgensen, Finn; Sala, Francisco; Stutzin, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl(-) channels participate in several physiological processes such as regulatory volume decrease, cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. Recent evidence points to a significant role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in VSOR Cl(-) channel activation. The aim of this study was to determine the signalling pathways responsible for H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) channel activation. In rat hepatoma (HTC) cells, H(2)O(2) elicited a transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) that was blocked by PP2, a Src-family protein kinases inhibitor. Also, H(2)O(2) triggered an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] that paralleled the time course of PLCgamma1 phosphorylation. The H(2)O(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise was prevented by the generic phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-receptor (IP(3)R) blocker 2-APB. In line with these results, manoeuvres that prevented PLCgamma1 activation and/or [Ca(2+)](i) rise, abolished H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) currents. Furthermore, in cells that overexpress a phosphorylation-defective dominant mutant of PLCgamma1, H(2)O(2) did not induce activation of VSOR Cl(-) currents. All these H(2)O(2)-induced effects were independent of extracellular Ca(2+). Our findings suggest that activation of PLCgamma1 and subsequent Ca(2+)(i) mobilisation mediate H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) currents, indicating that H(2)O(2) operates via redox-sensitive signalling pathways akin to those activated by osmotic challenges. PMID:17982259

  4. Effect of Processing, Post-Harvest Irradiation, and Production System on the Cytotoxicity and Mutagenicity of Vitis labrusca L. Juices in HTC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Düsman, Elisângela; de Almeida, Igor Vivian; Lucchetta, Luciano; Vicentini, Veronica Elisa Pimenta

    2014-01-01

    The juices of grapes (Vitis labrusca L.) are similar to the fruit itself because the main constituents of the fruit are present in the juice. However, their quality characteristics may be modified by the harsh technological processes used for the production of integral food, such as production systems of raw materials and post-harvest treatment of grapes with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Therefore, the present study analyzed juices produced naturally (by liquefying the fruit) or by the technological process of extraction by steam distillation (90°C) of grapes from organic and conventional production systems that were untreated or treated with UV type C (65.6 J/m2 for 10 minutes). Using cultures of Rattus norvegicus hepatoma cells (HTC) in vitro, cytotoxic effects were assayed by the MTT test and by calculating the cytokinesis blocked proliferation index (CBPI), and mutagenic effects were measured by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. The results of the MTT assay and the CBPIs indicated that none of the juices were cytotoxic, including those that induced cell proliferation. The results of the micronucleus assay showed that none of the juices were mutagenic. However, the average number of micronuclei was lower in the juices produced from organic grapes, and cell proliferation, soluble acids and phenolic compounds were significantly higher. Compared with the natural juices, the integral juices of conventional grapes showed a higher average number of micronuclei as well as lower stimulation of cell proliferation and lower levels of bioactive compounds. The results demonstrate a beneficial effect of UV-C irradiation of post-harvest grapes in stimulating the synthesis of nutraceutical compounds without generating cytotoxic or mutagenic substances. Taken together, our findings support the consumption of grape juice and the application of food production techniques that enhance its nutritional value and promote its production, marketing and consumption. PMID

  5. Novel in situ evaluation of the role minerals play in the development of the hard-to-cook (HTC) defect of cowpeas and its effect on the in vitro mineral bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Johanita; Minnis-Ndimba, Roya; Mtshali, Christopher; Minnaar, Amanda

    2015-05-01

    Cowpea is a nutritionally important drought-resistant legume in sub-Saharan Africa. It is, however, underutilised, in part due to the hard-to-cook (HTC) defect caused by adverse storage conditions resulting in seeds not softening during cooking. This study introduced a novel evaluation of the potential role that minerals play in the development of the HTC defect. The mineral distribution in the cotyledons of normal and HTC cowpeas were analysed by Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The phytate, tannin and total phenolic contents were analysed together with in vitro mineral bioaccessibility. In HTC cowpeas, Ca and Mg were more concentrated in the cell wall-middle lamella area of the parenchyma cells. This, together with the reduction in phytate content, confirmed the 'phytase-phytate-mineral' hypothesis as a mechanism for development of the HTC defect. Despite the phytate reduction in stored cowpeas, the HTC defect decreased the bioaccessibility of Ca, Fe and Zn in cowpeas.

  6. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of waters impacted by domestic and industrial effluents of a highly industrialized region of São Paulo State, Brazil, by the comet assay in HTC cells.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Bárbara Cassu; Roberto, Matheus Mantuanelli; Hoshina, Márcia Miyuki; Menegário, Amauri Antônio; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The problems that most affect the quality of the waters of rivers and lakes are associated with the discharges performed in these environments, mainly industrial and domestic effluents inappropriately treated or untreated. The comet assay is a sensitive tool and is recommended for studies of environmental biomonitoring, which aim to determine the genotoxicity potential of water pollutants. This study aimed to assess the genotoxic potential of the Ribeirão Tatu waters, region of Limeira, São Paulo (SP), by the comet assay with mammalian cells (hepatoma tissue culture (HTC)). Water samples were collected along the Ribeirão Tatu at three distinct periods: November 2008, February 2009 and August 2009, and five collection sites were established: P1, source of the stream; P2, site located downstream the urban perimeter of the municipality of Cordeirópolis and after receiving the pollution load of this city; P3, collection site located upstream the urban perimeter of the city of Limeira; P4, urban area of Limeira; and P5, rural area of Limeira, downstream the discharges of the city sewage. The results showed that for the November 2008 collection, there was no water sample-induced genotoxicity; for the February 2009 collection, the sites P1 and P2 were statistically significant in relation to the negative control (NC), and for the August 2009 collection, the site P5 was statistically significant. These results could be explained by the content of different metals during the different seasons that are under the influence of domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents and also due to the seasonality, since the water samples collected in the period of heavy rain (February 2009) presented a higher genotoxicity possibly due to the entrainment of contaminants into the bed of the stream promoted by the outflow of rainwaters. The comet assay showed to be a useful and sensitive tool in the evaluation of hydric resources impacted by pollutants of diverse origins, and a

  7. Development of 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Yuan; Xie, Fei-Xiang; Meng, Shu-Chao; Dai, Yuan-Dong; Li, Zhuang-Zhi; Ma, Ping; Yang, Tao; Nie, Rui-Juan; Wang, Fu-Ren

    2004-01-01

    A new HTc rf SQUID working at around 1.3GHz has been developed to avoid electromagnetic interference such as growing mobile communication jamming. This new system works in a frequency range from 1.23 to 1.42GHz (centred at 1.3GHz), which is not occupied by commercial communication. The sensor used in the 1.3GHz rf SQUID is made of a HTc coplanar superconducting resonator and a large-area HTc superconducting film concentrator. We have achieved in the 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID system a minimal flux noise of 2.5×10-5Phi0/(Hz)1/2 and a magnetic field sensitivity of 38fT/(Hz)1/2 in white noise range, respectively. The effective area of the concentrator fabricated on a 15×15mm2 substrate is 1.35mm2. It is shown that the 1.3GHz rf SQUID system has a high field sensitivity. Design and implementation of 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID offers a promising direction of rf SQUID development for higher working frequency ranges.

  8. 78 FR 13673 - HTC America, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... and tablet computers using Google Inc.'s Android operating system and Microsoft Corporation's Windows Mobile and Windows Phone operating systems. HTC has customized its Android-based mobile devices by adding... from those of competitors also manufacturing Android-based mobile devices. HTC has also customized...

  9. Expanding HIV testing and counselling into communities: Feasibility, acceptability, and effects of an integrated family planning/HTC service delivery model by Village Health Teams in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Akol, Angela; Mercer, Sarah; Chen, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Improving HIV testing and counselling (HTC) requires a range of strategies. This article reports on HTC service delivery by Village Health Teams (VHTs) in Uganda in the context of a model integrating this new component into pre-existing family planning services. Eight health centres from matched pairs were randomly allocated to intervention or control. After being trained, 36 VHTs reporting to selected facilities in the intervention group started offering HTC along with family planning, while VHTs in the control group provided family planning only. Proficiency testing was conducted as external quality assurance. A survey of all 36 VHTs and 137 family planning clients in the intervention group and 119 clients in the control group and a review of record data were conducted after 10 months. Survey responses by VHTs and their clients in the intervention group demonstrate knowledge of counselling messages and safe testing. External quality assessment results provide additional evidence of competency. Eighty per cent of the family planning clients surveyed in the intervention group received an HIV test during the intervention; 27% of those were first-time testers. More clients had ever tested for HIV in the intervention group compared with the control; clients also retested more often. Findings indicate that this model is feasible and acceptable for expanding quality HTC into communities. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number [NCT02244398].

  10. Evaluation of the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) Critical Experiment Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don; Elam, Karla Riggle; Fox, Patricia B

    2008-09-01

    In the 1980s, a series of critical experiments referred to as the Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) experiments was conducted by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) at the experimental criticality facility in Valduc, France. The plutonium-to- uranium ratio and the isotopic compositions of both the uranium and plutonium used in the simulated fuel rods were designed to be similar to what would be found in a typical pressurized-water reactor fuel assembly that initially had an enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U and was burned to 37,500 MWd/MTU. The fuel material also includes {sup 241}Am, which is present due to the decay of {sup 241}Pu. The HTC experiments include configurations designed to simulate fuel handling activities, pool storage, and transport in casks constructed of thick lead or steel. Rights of use for the HTC experiment data were purchased under an agreement that limits release of the information. Consequently, a detailed and complete description of the experiments is not presented in this report. This report discusses evaluation of the four HTC data reports, modeling of the experiments, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and upper subcritical limit (USL) calculation. The report also presents some conclusions and recommendations concerning use of the HTC experiment data for burnup credit applications. The similarity of the HTC experiments with PWR spent nuclear fuel has been quantified using sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, confirming that the HTC experiments are significantly more applicable to the validation of burnup credit calculations than other available mixed-oxide (MOX) experiments. The HTC experiments were designed and executed with a high level of rigor, resulting in experimental uncertainties that are lower than many of the earlier MOX experiments. The HTC data reports, together with information provided in this report, provide sufficient data to allow for either detailed or simplified computational models to be

  11. Wastewater treatment--adsorption of organic micropollutants on activated HTC-carbon derived from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kirschhöfer, Frank; Sahin, Olga; Becker, Gero C; Meffert, Florian; Nusser, Michael; Anderer, Gilbert; Kusche, Stepan; Klaeusli, Thomas; Kruse, Andrea; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Organic micropollutants (MPs), in particular xenobiotics and their transformation products, have been detected in the aquatic environment and the main sources of these MPs are wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, an additional cleaning step is necessary. The use of activated carbon (AC) is one approach to providing this additional cleaning. Industrial AC derived from different carbonaceous materials is predominantly produced in low-income countries by polluting processes. In contrast, AC derived from sewage sludge by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a regional and sustainable alternative, based on waste material. Our experiments demonstrate that the HTC-AC from sewage sludge was able to remove most of the applied MPs. In fact more than 50% of sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac and bezafibrate were removed from artificial water samples. With the same approach carbamazepine was eliminated to nearly 70% and atrazine more than 80%. In addition a pre-treated (phosphorus-reduced) HTC-AC was able to eliminate 80% of carbamazepine and diclofenac. Atrazine, sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate were removed to more than 90%. Experiments using real wastewater samples with high organic content (11.1 g m(-3)) succeeded in proving the adsorption capability of phosphorus-reduced HTC-AC. PMID:26877044

  12. Wastewater treatment--adsorption of organic micropollutants on activated HTC-carbon derived from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kirschhöfer, Frank; Sahin, Olga; Becker, Gero C; Meffert, Florian; Nusser, Michael; Anderer, Gilbert; Kusche, Stepan; Klaeusli, Thomas; Kruse, Andrea; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Organic micropollutants (MPs), in particular xenobiotics and their transformation products, have been detected in the aquatic environment and the main sources of these MPs are wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, an additional cleaning step is necessary. The use of activated carbon (AC) is one approach to providing this additional cleaning. Industrial AC derived from different carbonaceous materials is predominantly produced in low-income countries by polluting processes. In contrast, AC derived from sewage sludge by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a regional and sustainable alternative, based on waste material. Our experiments demonstrate that the HTC-AC from sewage sludge was able to remove most of the applied MPs. In fact more than 50% of sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac and bezafibrate were removed from artificial water samples. With the same approach carbamazepine was eliminated to nearly 70% and atrazine more than 80%. In addition a pre-treated (phosphorus-reduced) HTC-AC was able to eliminate 80% of carbamazepine and diclofenac. Atrazine, sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate were removed to more than 90%. Experiments using real wastewater samples with high organic content (11.1 g m(-3)) succeeded in proving the adsorption capability of phosphorus-reduced HTC-AC.

  13. Impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on HIV prevention practices among traditional birth attendants in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Alice; Pharr, Jennifer R; Nwokoro, Uche; Ike, Anulika; Ali, Christiana; Ejiro, Ogheneaga; Osuyali, John; Obiefune, Michael; Fiscella, Kevin; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2015-02-01

    Nigeria is second in the world for the number of people with HIV and has a high rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Over 60% of births in Nigeria occur outside of health care facilities, and because of this, Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) play a significant role in maternal and child health. It is important that TBAs be knowledgeable about HIV prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on the HIV prevention practices among TBAs in Nigeria. Five hundred TBAs were surveyed. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess differences in HIV prevention practices between TBAs with and without HTC knowledge. TBAs with HTC knowledge are significantly more likely to engage in HIV prevention practices than TBAs without HTC. Prevention practices included: wearing gloves during delivery (p < 0.01), sterilization of delivery equipment (p < 0.01), participation in blood safety training (p < 0.01), and disposal of sharps (p < 0.01). As long as a high percent of births occur outside health care facilities in Nigeria, there will be a need for TBAs. Providing TBAs with HTC training increases HIV prevention practices and can be a key to improve maternal and child health.

  14. Impact of HIV Testing and Counseling (HTC) Knowledge on HIV Prevention Practices Among Traditional Birth Attendants in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Osuji, Alice; Pharr, Jennifer R.; Nwokoro, Uche; Ike, Anulika; Ali, Christiana; Ejiro, Ogheneaga; Osuyali, John; Obiefune, Michael; Fiscella, Kevin; Ezeanolue, Echezona E.

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria is second in the world for the number of people with HIV and has a high rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Over 60% of births in Nigeria occur outside of health care facilities, and because of this, Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) play a significant role in maternal and child health. It is important that TBAs be knowledgeable about HIV prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on the HIV prevention practices among TBAs in Nigeria. Five hundred TBAs were surveyed. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess differences in HIV prevention practices between TBAs with and without HTC knowledge. TBAs with HTC knowledge are significantly more likely to engage in HIV prevention practices than TBAs without HTC. Prevention practices included: wearing gloves during delivery (p < 0.01), sterilization of delivery equipment (p < 0.01), participation in blood safety training (p < 0.01), and disposal of sharps (p < 0.01). As long as a high percent of births occur outside health care facilities in Nigeria, there will be a need for TBAs. Providing TBAs with HTC training increases HIV prevention practices and can be a key to improve maternal and child health. PMID:25674783

  15. A simplified HTc rf SQUID to analyze the human cardiac magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Tang, Fakuan; Ma, Ping; Gan, Zizhao

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a four-channel high temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUID) in a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR) that can be used to analyze the cardiac magnetic field. It is more robust and compact than existing systems. To achieve the high-quality magnetocardiographic signal, we explored new adaptive software gradiometry technology constructed by the first-order axial gradiometer with a baseline of 80mm, which can adjust its performance timely with the surrounding conditions. The magnetic field sensitivity of each channel was less than 100fT/√Hz in the white noise region. Especially, in the analysis of MCG signal data, we proposed the total transient mapping (TTM) technique to visualize current density map (CDM), then we focused to observe the time-varying behavior of excitation propagation and estimated the underlying currents at T wave. According to the clear 3D imaging, isomagnetic field and CDM, the position and distribution of a current source in the heart can be visualized. It is believed that our four-channel HTc rf SQUID magnetometer based on biomagnetic system is available to detect MCG signals with sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. In addition, the CDM showed the macroscopic current activation pattern, in a way, it has established strong underpinnings for researching the cardiac microscopic movement mechanism and opening the way for its use in clinical diagnosis.

  16. Critical Current Test of Liquid Hydrogen Cooled HTC Superconductors under External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Tatsumoto, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    High-Tc (HTC) superconductors including MgB2 will show excellent properties under temperature of Liquid Hydrogen (LH2:20K), which has large latent heat and low viscosity coefficient. In order to design and fabricate the LH2 cooled superconducting energy devices, we must clear the cooling property of LH2 for superconductors, the cooling system and safety design of LH2 cooled superconducting devices and electro-magnetic property evaluation of superconductors (BSCCO, REBCO and MgB2) and their magnets cooled by LH2. As the first step of the study, an experimental setup which can be used for investigating heat transfer characteristics of LH2 in a pool and also in forced flow (circulation loop with a pump), and also for evaluation of electro-magnetic properties of LH2 cooled superconductors under external magnetic field (up to 7 T). In this paper, we will show a short sketch of the experimental set-up, practical experiences in safety operation of liquid hydrogen cooling system and example test results of critical current evaluation of HTC superconductors cooled by LH2.

  17. The endomembrane requirement for cell surface repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Miyake, Katsuya; Vogel, Steven S.

    2003-01-01

    The capacity to reseal a plasma membrane disruption rapidly is required for cell survival in many physiological environments. Intracellular membrane (endomembrane) is thought to play a central role in the rapid resealing response. We here directly compare the resealing response of a cell that lacks endomembrane, the red blood cell, with that of several nucleated cells possessing an abundant endomembrane compartment. RBC membrane disruptions inflicted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, even those initially smaller than hemoglobin, failed to reseal rapidly. By contrast, much larger laser-induced disruptions made in sea urchin eggs, fibroblasts, and neurons exhibited rapid, Ca(2+)-dependent resealing. We conclude that rapid resealing is not mediated by simple physiochemical mechanisms; endomembrane is required.

  18. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of heteroatom-bearing compounds via gas chromatography-chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Kümmel, Steffen; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Gehre, Matthias

    2015-09-15

    The traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) approach toward compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of hydrogen for heteroatom-bearing (i.e., N, Cl, S) compounds has been afflicted by fractionation bias due to formation of byproducts HCN, HCl, and H2S. This study presents a chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC) approach for organic compounds containing nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. Following peak separation along a gas chromatographic (GC) column, the use of thermally stable ceramic Cr/HTC reactors at 1100-1500 °C and chemical sequestration of N, Cl, and S by chromium result in quantitative conversion of compound-specific organic hydrogen to H2 analyte gas. The overall hydrogen isotope analysis via GC-Cr/HTC-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) achieved a precision of better than ± 5 mUr along the VSMOW-SLAP scale. The accuracy of GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS was validated with organic reference materials (RM) in comparison with online EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS and offline dual-inlet IRMS. The utility and reliability of the GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS system were documented during the routine measurement of more than 500 heteroatom-bearing organic samples spanning a δ(2)H range of -181 mUr to 629 mUr.

  19. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of heteroatom-bearing compounds via gas chromatography-chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Kümmel, Steffen; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Gehre, Matthias

    2015-09-15

    The traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) approach toward compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of hydrogen for heteroatom-bearing (i.e., N, Cl, S) compounds has been afflicted by fractionation bias due to formation of byproducts HCN, HCl, and H2S. This study presents a chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC) approach for organic compounds containing nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. Following peak separation along a gas chromatographic (GC) column, the use of thermally stable ceramic Cr/HTC reactors at 1100-1500 °C and chemical sequestration of N, Cl, and S by chromium result in quantitative conversion of compound-specific organic hydrogen to H2 analyte gas. The overall hydrogen isotope analysis via GC-Cr/HTC-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) achieved a precision of better than ± 5 mUr along the VSMOW-SLAP scale. The accuracy of GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS was validated with organic reference materials (RM) in comparison with online EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS and offline dual-inlet IRMS. The utility and reliability of the GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS system were documented during the routine measurement of more than 500 heteroatom-bearing organic samples spanning a δ(2)H range of -181 mUr to 629 mUr. PMID:26291200

  20. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of wheat straw: influence of feedwater pH prepared by acetic acid and potassium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Reza, M Toufiq; Rottler, Erwin; Herklotz, Laureen; Wirth, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, influence of feedwater pH (2-12) was studied for hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of wheat straw at 200 and 260°C. Acetic acid and KOH were used as acidic and basic medium, respectively. Hydrochars were characterized by elemental and fiber analyses, SEM, surface area, pore volume and size, and ATR-FTIR, while HTC process liquids were analyzed by HPLC and GC. Both hydrochar and HTC process liquid qualities vary with feedwater pH. At acidic pH, cellulose and elemental carbon increase in hydrochar, while hemicellulose and pseudo-lignin decrease. Hydrochars produced at pH 2 feedwater has 2.7 times larger surface area than that produced at pH 12. It also has the largest pore volume (1.1 × 10(-1) ml g(-1)) and pore size (20.2 nm). Organic acids were increasing, while sugars were decreasing in case of basic feedwater, however, phenolic compounds were present only at 260°C and their concentrations were increasing in basic feedwater. PMID:25710573

  1. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Echizen, Kanae; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya; Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Hirano, Shinji; Terai, Kenta; Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  2. Auxin requirements of sycamore cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Moloney, M M; Hall, J F; Robinson, G M; Elliott, M C

    1983-04-01

    Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cell suspension cultures (strain OS) require 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in their culture medium for normal growth. If the 2,4-D is omitted, rates of cell division are dramatically reduced and cell lysis may occur. Despite this ;auxin requirement,' it has been shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that the cells synthesize indol-3yl-acetic acid (IAA). Changes in free 2,4-D and IAA in the cells during a culture passage have been monitored.There is a rapid uptake of 2,4-D by the cells during the lag phase leading to a maximum concentration per cell (125 nanograms per 10(6) cells) on day 2 followed by a decline to 45 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 (middle of linear phase). The initial concentration of IAA (0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells) rises slowly to a peak of 1.4 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 then decreases rapidly to 0.2 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 15 (early declining phase) and 0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 23 (early stationary phase).

  3. Differential requirement for Nfil3 during NK cell development.

    PubMed

    Seillet, Cyril; Huntington, Nicholas D; Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Axelsson, Elin; Minnich, Martina; Brady, Hugh J M; Busslinger, Meinrad; Smyth, Mark J; Belz, Gabrielle T; Carotta, Sebastian

    2014-03-15

    NK cells can be grouped into distinct subsets that are localized to different organs and exhibit a different capacity to secrete cytokines and mediate cytotoxicity. Despite these hallmarks that reflect tissue-specific specialization in NK cells, little is known about the factors that control the development of these distinct subsets. The basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nfil3 (E4bp4) is essential for bone marrow-derived NK cell development, but it is not clear whether Nfil3 is equally important for all NK cell subsets or how it induces NK lineage commitment. In this article, we show that Nfil3 is required for the formation of Eomes-expressing NK cells, including conventional medullary and thymic NK cells, whereas TRAIL(+) Eomes(-) NK cells develop independently of Nfil3. Loss of Nfil3 during the development of bone marrow-derived NK cells resulted in reduced expression of Eomes and, conversely, restoration of Eomes expression in Nfil3(-/-) progenitors rescued NK cell development and maturation. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Nfil3 drives the formation of mature NK cells by inducing Eomes expression and reveal the differential requirements of NK cell subsets for Nfil3. PMID:24532575

  4. Testicular Niche Required for Human Spermatogonial Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James F.; Yango, Pamela; Altman, Eran; Choudhry, Shweta; Poelzl, Andrea; Zamah, Alberuni M.; Rosen, Mitchell; Klatsky, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Prepubertal boys treated with high-dose chemotherapy do not have an established means of fertility preservation because no established in vitro technique exists to expand and mature purified spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) to functional sperm in humans. In this study, we define and characterize the unique testicular cellular niche required for SSC expansion using testicular tissues from men with normal spermatogenesis. Highly purified SSCs and testicular somatic cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using SSEA-4 and THY1 as markers of SSCs and somatic cells. Cells were cultured on various established niches to assess their role in SSC expansion in a defined somatic cellular niche. Of all the niches examined, cells in the SSEA-4 population exclusively bound to adult testicular stromal cells, established colonies, and expanded. Further characterization of these testicular stromal cells revealed distinct mesenchymal markers and the ability to undergo differentiation along the mesenchymal lineage, supporting a testicular multipotent stromal cell origin. In vitro human SSC expansion requires a unique niche provided exclusively by testicular multipotent stromal cells with mesenchymal properties. These findings provide an important foundation for developing methods of inducing SSC growth and maturation in prepubertal testicular tissue, essential to enabling fertility preservation for these boys. PMID:25038247

  5. The study of ultrasonic irradiation effects on solid state powders of HTc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Mahboubeh; Khoshnevisan, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an ultrasound assisted solid state synthesis method for high-temperature (HTc) YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) superconductor nanostructures with different morphologies is presented. Here, the routine heat treatment of the powder mixture of as-prepared precursors is followed by the ultrasound irradiation inside various alcoholic solutions. Not only the influence of the ultrasound irradiation intensity and duration but also the influence of different solvents such as ethanol, methanol and 1-butanol with various vapor pressures and so various destruction powers were also studied on the morphology and particle size of the products. The various morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) which not only have been affected by intensity and type of alcoholic solvent but also sonication time and ultrasound power have significant role as well. Formation of the YBCO superconducting phase was examined by using Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) which indicates the crystalline preferred growth in c-axis orientation in crystal. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed the ultrasound waves had no important effect on the onset critical temperature of the prepared nanorods (about 91.64 K) which is compared with the bulk samples (Tc ˜ 92K).

  6. Timing-Dependent Actions of NGF Required for Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Yu-ichi; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Background Continuous NGF stimulation induces PC12 cell differentiation. However, why continuous NGF stimulation is required for differentiation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the timing-dependent requirement of NGF action for cell differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings To address the timing-dependency of the NGF action, we performed a discontinuous stimulation assay consisting of a first transient stimulation followed by an interval and then a second sustained stimulation and quantified the neurite extension level. Consequently, we observed a timing-dependent action of NGF on cell differentiation, and discontinuous NGF stimulation similarly induced differentiation. The first stimulation did not induce neurite extension, whereas the second stimulation induced fast neurite extension; therefore, the first stimulation is likely required as a prerequisite condition. These observations indicate that the action of NGF can be divided into two processes: an initial stimulation-driven latent process and a second stimulation-driven extension process. The latent process appears to require the activities of ERK and transcription, but not PI3K, whereas the extension-process requires the activities of ERK and PI3K, but not transcription. We also found that during the first stimulation, the activity of NGF can be replaced by PACAP, but not by insulin, EGF, bFGF or forskolin; during the second stimulation, however, the activity of NGF cannot be replaced by any of these stimulants. These findings allowed us to identify potential genes specifically involved in the latent process, rather than in other processes, using a microarray. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that NGF induces the differentiation of PC12 cells via mechanically distinct processes: an ERK-driven and transcription-dependent latent process, and an ERK- and PI3K-driven and transcription-independent extension process. PMID:20126402

  7. Antigen conformation determines processing requirements for T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, H Z; Berkower, I J; Busch, M; Gurd, F R; Berzofsky, J A

    1984-01-01

    We studied the difference in requirements for processing and presentation to a single T-cell clone of four different forms of the same epitope of sperm whale myoglobin--namely, on the native protein, on two conformationally altered forms of the protein, or as a 22-residue antigenic peptide fragment. The T-cell clone was I-Ed-restricted and specific for an epitope on the CNBr fragment 132-153 involving Lys-140. As inhibitors of macrophage processing of antigen, we used several agents that inhibit lysosomal function: the weak bases chloroquine and NH4Cl, the cationic ionophore monensin, and the competitive protease inhibitor leupeptin. When these agents were used to inhibit processing of antigen by presenting cells and then washed out before T cells were added to culture, they inhibited the presentation of native antigen but not of fragment 132-153. To our surprise, the intact but denatured form, S-methylmyoglobin, behaved like the fragment not like the native protein. Apomyoglobin was intermediate in susceptibility to inhibition. Thus, native myoglobin requires a processing step that appears to involve lysosomal proteolysis, which is not required by fragment 132-153 or the denatured unfolded forms. For an antigen the size of myoglobin (Mr 17,800), it appears that unfolding of the native conformation, rather than further reduction in size, is the critical parameter determining the need for processing. Since a major difference between native myoglobin and the other forms is the greater accessibility in the latter of sites, such as hydrophobic residues, buried in the native protein, we propose that processing may be necessary to expose these sites, perhaps for interaction with the cell membrane or the Ia of the antigen-presenting cell. PMID:6333686

  8. Lipid requirements for entry of protein toxins into cells.

    PubMed

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Bergan, Jonas; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Skotland, Tore

    2014-04-01

    The plant toxin ricin and the bacterial toxin Shiga toxin both belong to a group of protein toxins having one moiety that binds to the cell surface, and another, enzymatically active moiety, that enters the cytosol and inhibits protein synthesis by inactivating ribosomes. Both toxins travel all the way from the cell surface to endosomes, the Golgi apparatus and the ER before the ribosome-inactivating moiety enters the cytosol. Shiga toxin binds to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface and is therefore dependent on this lipid for transport into the cells, whereas ricin binds both glycoproteins and glycolipids with terminal galactose. The different steps of transport used by these toxins have specific requirements for lipid species, and with the recent developments in mass spectrometry analysis of lipids and microscopical and biochemical dissection of transport in cells, we are starting to see the complexity of endocytosis and intracellular transport. In this article we describe lipid requirements and the consequences of lipid changes for the entry and intoxication with ricin and Shiga toxin. These toxins can be a threat to human health, but can also be exploited for diagnosis and therapy, and have proven valuable as tools to study intracellular transport.

  9. Differential microtubule requirements for transcytosis in MDCK cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, W; Mâle, P; Mellman, I

    1990-01-01

    Given the role of microtubules in directing the transport of many intracellular organelles, we investigated whether intact microtubules were also required for transcytosis across epithelia. Using polarized MDCK cells expressing receptors for the Fc domain of IgG (FcRII-B2) or polymeric immunoglobulin (pIg-R), we examined the involvement of microtubules in apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical transcytosis, respectively. While depolymerization of microtubules with nocodozole had no effect on apical to basolateral transcytosis via FcR, basolateral to apical transcytosis of dimeric IgA via pIg-R was almost completely blocked. Inhibition due to nocodozole was selective for basolateral to apical transcytosis, since neither endocytosis nor receptor recycling was significantly affected at either plasma membrane domain. As shown by confocal microscopy, the block in transcytosis was due to the inability of MDCK cells to translocate IgA-containing vesicles from the basolateral to the apical cytoplasm in the absence of an intact microtubule network. The nocodazole sensitive step could be partially by-passed, however, by allowing cells to internalize IgA at 17 degrees C prior to nocodazole treatment. Although incubation at 17 degrees C blocked release of IgA into the apical medium, it did not prevent translocation of IgA-containing vesicles to the apical cytoplasm. Thus, receptor-mediated transcytosis in opposite directions exhibits distinct requirements for microtubules, a feature which reflects the spatial organization of MDCK cells. Images Fig.3 Fig.7 PMID:2170116

  10. Prenylation is required for polar cell elongation, cell adhesion, and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Thole, Julie M; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Quatrano, Ralph S; Running, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Protein prenylation is required for a variety of growth and developmental processes in flowering plants. Here we report the consequences of loss of function of all known prenylation subunits in the moss Physcomitrella patens. As in Arabidopsis, protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I are not required for viability. However, protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I activity is required for cell adhesion, polar cell elongation, and cell differentiation. Loss of protein geranylgeranyltransferase activity results in colonies of round, single-celled organisms that resemble unicellular algae. The loss of protein farnesylation is not as severe but also results in polar cell elongation and differentiation defects. The complete loss of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase activity appears to be lethal in P. patens. Labeling with antibodies to cell wall components support the lack of polarity establishment and the undifferentiated state of geranylgeranyltransferase type I mutant plants. Our results show that prenylated proteins play key roles in P. patens development and differentiation processes.

  11. Technical safety requirements for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF).

    SciTech Connect

    Seylar, Roland F.

    2004-02-01

    These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) identify the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, in compliance with 10 CFR 830, 'Nuclear Safety Management.' The bases for the TSRs are established in the AHCF Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), which was issued in compliance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements.' The AHCF Limiting Conditions of Operation (LCOs) apply only to the ventilation system, the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and the inventory. Surveillance Requirements (SRs) apply to the ventilation system, HEPA filters, and associated monitoring equipment; to certain passive design features; and to the inventory. No Safety Limits are necessary, because the AHCF is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility.

  12. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  13. Requirement for metalloendoprotease in exocytosis: evidence in mast cells and adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Mundy, D I; Strittmatter, W J

    1985-03-01

    Exocytosis is initiated by the receptor-mediated influx of calcium that results in fusion of the secretory vesicle with the plasma membrane. We examined the possibility that calcium-dependent exocytosis in mast cells and adrenal chromaffin cells requires metalloendoprotease activity. Metalloendoprotease inhibitors and dipeptide substrates block exocytosis in these cells with the same specificity and dose dependency as that with which they interact with metalloendoproteases. Metalloendoprotease activity is identified in these cells with fluorogenic synthetic substrates, which also blocked exocytosis. Metalloendoprotease activity is highest in the plasma membrane of chromaffin cells. The metalloendoprotease appears to be required in exocytosis at a step dependent on or after calcium entry, since exocytosis initiated by direct calcium introduction in both mast cells and chromaffin cells is blocked by metalloendoprotease inhibitors.

  14. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians.

    PubMed

    Tu, Kimberly C; Pearson, Bret J; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-05-15

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell death, i.e. in response to starvation or injury. But how these two antagonistic processes are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we explore the role of the core components of the TOR pathway during planarian tissue homeostasis and regeneration and identified an essential function for TORC1 in these two processes. RNAi-mediated silencing of TOR in intact animals resulted in a significant increase in cell death, whereas stem cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were unaffected. Amputated animals failed to increase stem cell proliferation after wounding and displayed defects in tissue remodeling. Together, our findings suggest two distinct roles for TORC1 in planarians. TORC1 is required to modulate the balance between cell proliferation and cell death during normal cell turnover and in response to nutrients. In addition, it is required to initiate appropriate stem cell proliferation during regeneration and for proper tissue remodeling to occur to maintain scale and proportion.

  15. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Pearson, Bret J.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell death, i.e. in response to starvation or injury. But how these two antagonistic processes are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we explore the role of the core components of the TOR pathway during planarian tissue homeostasis and regeneration and identified an essential function for TORC1 in these two processes. RNAi-mediated silencing of TOR in intact animals resulted in a significant increase in cell death, whereas stem cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were unaffected. Amputated animals failed to increase stem cell proliferation after wounding and displayed defects in tissue remodeling. Together, our findings suggest two distinct roles for TORC1 in planarians. TORC1 is required to modulate the balance between cell proliferation and cell death during normal cell turnover and in response to nutrients. In addition, it is required to initiate appropriate stem cell proliferation during regeneration and for proper tissue remodeling to occur to maintain scale and proportion. PMID:22445864

  16. Production of mouse lymphotoxin by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated spleen cells requires two cell fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Aksamit, R R; Leonard, E J

    1982-01-01

    The appearance of lymphotoxin in the culture fluid of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated mouse spleen cells required two cell fractions that were separated by adherence to plastic. Upon stimulation with PHA, neither cell fraction alone produced significant amounts of lymphotoxin; however, when the cell fractions were combined and then stimulated with PHA, full activity was produced. Cytotoxic activity was not fully restored by combining PHA-stimulated cultured fluids from adherent and nonadherent cell fractions. This indicated that the cytotoxic activity was not the result of two factors, one produced by each cell fraction, that acted on the target cells, but rather, two cells interacted to produce lymphotoxin. Treatment of the unfractionated spleen cells with monoclonal anti-Thy1.2 and complement before PHA stimulation greatly reduced the production of lymphotoxin and indicated that at least one of the cells was a T cell. Lymphotoxin production was partially restored by the addition of nonadherent cells to the anti-Thy1.2-treated cells, suggesting that the T cell was nonadherent. Treatment of unfractionated cells with either silica or carrageenan had no effect on the subsequent production of lymphotoxin by PHA, suggesting that the adherent cell was not actively phagocytic. PMID:6980190

  17. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  18. Lipid Membranes Facilitate Conformational Changes Required for Reovirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellular entry of nonenveloped and enveloped viruses is often accompanied by dramatic conformational changes within viral structural proteins. These rearrangements are triggered by a variety of mechanisms, such as low pH, virus-receptor interactions, and virus-host chaperone interactions. Reoviruses, a model system for entry of nonenveloped viruses, undergo a series of disassembly steps within the host endosome. One of these steps, infectious subviral particle (ISVP)-to-ISVP* conversion, is necessary for delivering the genome-containing viral core into host cells, but the physiological trigger that mediates ISVP-to-ISVP* conversion during cell entry is unknown. Structural studies of the reovirus membrane penetration protein, μ1, predict that interactions between μ1 and negatively charged lipid head groups may promote ISVP* formation; however, experimental evidence for this idea is lacking. Here, we show that the presence of polyanions (SO42− and HPO42−) or lipids in the form of liposomes facilitates ISVP-to-ISVP* conversion. The requirement for charged lipids appears to be selective, since phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine promoted ISVP* formation, whereas other lipids, such as sphingomyelin and sulfatide, either did not affect ISVP* formation or prevented ISVP* formation. Thus, our work provides evidence that interactions with membranes can function as a trigger for a nonenveloped virus to gain entry into host cells. IMPORTANCE Cell entry, a critical stage in the virus life cycle, concludes with the delivery of the viral genetic material across host membranes. Regulated structural transitions within nonenveloped and enveloped viruses are necessary for accomplishing this step; these conformational changes are predominantly triggered by low pH and/or interactions with host proteins. In this work, we describe a previously unknown trigger, interactions with lipid membranes, which can induce the structural rearrangements required for cell

  19. RBPJ in mouse Sertoli cells is required for proper regulation of the testis stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Thomas Xavier; Farmaha, Jaspreet Kaur; Kow, Sean; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells are influenced by their surrounding microenvironment, or niche. In the testis, Sertoli cells are the key niche cells directing the population size and differentiation fate of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Failure to properly regulate SSCs leads to infertility or germ cell hyperplasia. Several Sertoli cell-expressed genes, such as Gdnf and Cyp26b1, have been identified as being indispensable for the proper maintenance of SSCs in their niche, but the pathways that modulate their expression have not been identified. Although we have recently found that constitutively activating NOTCH signaling in Sertoli cells leads to premature differentiation of all prospermatogonia and sterility, suggesting that there is a crucial role for this pathway in the testis stem cell niche, a true physiological function of NOTCH signaling in Sertoli cells has not been demonstrated. To this end, we conditionally ablated recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (Rbpj), a crucial mediator of NOTCH signaling, in Sertoli cells using Amh-cre. Rbpj knockout mice had: significantly increased testis sizes; increased expression of niche factors, such as Gdnf and Cyp26b1; significant increases in the number of pre- and post-meiotic germ cells, including SSCs; and, in a significant proportion of mice, testicular failure and atrophy with tubule lithiasis, possibly due to these unsustainable increases in the number of germ cells. We also identified germ cells as the NOTCH ligand-expressing cells. We conclude that NOTCH signaling in Sertoli cells is required for proper regulation of the testis stem cell niche and is a potential feedback mechanism, based on germ cell input, that governs the expression of factors that control SSC proliferation and differentiation.

  20. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  1. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  2. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  3. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  4. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  5. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  6. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  7. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  8. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  9. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  10. Castration-Resistant Lgr5+ Cells Are Long-Lived Stem Cells Required for Prostatic Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bu-er; Wang, Xi; Long, Jason E.; Eastham-Anderson, Jeff; Firestein, Ron; Junttila, Melissa R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The adult prostate possesses a significant regenerative capacity that is of great interest for understanding adult stem cell biology. We demonstrate that leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is expressed in a rare population of prostate epithelial progenitor cells, and a castration-resistant Lgr5+ population exists in regressed prostate tissue. Genetic lineage tracing revealed that Lgr5+ cells and their progeny are primarily luminal. Lgr5+ castration-resistant cells are long lived and upon regeneration, both luminal Lgr5+ cells and basal Lgr5+ cells expand. Moreover, single Lgr5+ cells can generate multilineage prostatic structures in renal transplantation assays. Additionally, Lgr5+ cell depletion revealed that the regenerative potential of the castrated adult prostate depends on Lgr5+ cells. Together, these data reveal insights into the cellular hierarchy of castration-resistant Lgr5+ cells, indicate a requirement for Lgr5+ cells during prostatic regeneration, and identify an Lgr5+ adult stem cell population in the prostate. PMID:25937372

  11. Efficient Plasma Cell Differentiation and Trafficking Require Cxcr4 Desensitization.

    PubMed

    Biajoux, Vincent; Natt, Jessica; Freitas, Christelle; Alouche, Nagham; Sacquin, Antoine; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin, Françoise; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Espéli, Marion; Balabanian, Karl

    2016-09-27

    CXCR4 plays a central role in B cell immune response, notably by promoting plasma cell (PC) migration and maintenance in the bone marrow (BM). Gain-of-function mutations in CXCR4 affecting receptor desensitization have been reported in the rare immunodeficiency called WHIM syndrome (WS). Despite lymphopenia, patients mount an immune response but fail to maintain it over time. Using a knockin mouse model phenocopying WS, we showed that, counter-intuitively, a gain of Cxcr4 function inhibited the maintenance of antibody titers after immunization. Although the Cxcr4 mutation intrinsically and locally promoted germinal center response and PC differentiation, antigen-specific PCs were barely detected in the BM, a defect mirrored by early accumulation of immature plasmablasts potentially occupying the survival niches for long-lived PCs. Therefore, fine-tuning of Cxcr4 desensitization is critically required for efficient PC differentiation and maintenance, and absence of such a regulatory process may account for the defective humoral immunity observed in WS patients. PMID:27681431

  12. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Michelle L; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A; Schnell, Santiago; Kulesa, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent-based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns.

  13. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  14. Simvastatin requires activation in accessory cells to modulate T-cell responses in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Yakin, Yakup; Körber, Sandra; Grensemann, Barbara; Bendella, Zeynep; Boyaci, Niyazi; Gallert, Willem-Jakob; Yanik, Sarah Derya; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    T-cell-dependent airway and systemic inflammation triggers the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Retrospective studies suggest that simvastatin has anti-inflammatory effects in both diseases but it is unclear, which cell types are targeted. We hypothesized that simvastatin modulates T-cell activity. Circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, either pure, co-cultured with monocytes or alveolar macrophages (AM) or in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), were ex vivo activated towards Th1/Tc1 or Th2/Tc2 and incubated with simvastatin. Markers for Th1/Tc1 (IFNγ) and Th2/Tc2 (IL-5, IL-13) were measured by ELISA; with PBMCs this was done comparative between 11 healthy never-smokers, 11 current smokers without airflow limitation, 14 smokers with COPD and 11 never-smokers with atopic asthma. T-cell activation induced IFNγ, IL-5 and IL-13 in the presence and absence of accessory cells. Simvastatin did not modulate cytokine expression in pure T-cell fractions. β-hydroxy-simvastatin acid (activated simvastatin) suppressed IL-5 and IL-13 in pure Th2- and Tc2-cells. Simvastatin suppressed IL-5 and IL-13 in Th2-cells co-cultivated with monocytes or AM, which was partially reversed by the carboxylesterase inhibitor benzil. Simvastatin suppressed IL-5 production of Th2/Tc2-cells in PBMCs without differences between cohorts and IL-13 stronger in never-smokers and asthma compared to COPD. Simvastatin induced IFNγ in Th1/Tc1-cells in PBMCs of all cohorts except asthmatics. Simvastatin requires activation in accessory cells likely by carboxylesterase to suppress IL-5 and IL-13 in Th2/Tc2-cells. The effects on Il-13 are partially reduced in COPD. Asthma pathogenesis prevents simvastatin-induced IFNγ up-regulation. Simvastatin has anti-inflammatory effects that could be of interest for asthma therapy.

  15. Requirement of cell nucleus for Sindbis virus replication in cultured Aedes albopictus cells.

    PubMed

    Erwin, C; Brown, D T

    1983-02-01

    The ability of Sindbis virus to grow in enucleated BHK-21 (vertebrate) and Aedes albopictus (invertebrate) cells was tested to determine the dependence of this virus upon nuclear function in these two phylogenetically unrelated hosts. Although both cell types could be demonstrated to produce viable cytoplasts (enucleated cells) which produced virus-specific antigen subsequent to infection. BHK cytoplasts produced a significant number of progeny virions, whereas mosquito cytoplasts did not. The production of vesicular stomatitis virus in mosquito cells was not significantly reduced by enucleation. That such a host function was not essential for vesicular stomatitis virus growth in insect cells is supported by the observation that the production of this virus by mosquito cells is not actinomycin D sensitive. This result agrees with a previously published report in which it was shown that Sindbis virus maturation in invertebrate cells is inhibited by actinomycin D, indicating a possible requirement for host cell nuclear function (Scheefers-Borchel et al., Virology, 110:292-301, 1981).

  16. Assessing Hepatitis C Burden and Treatment Effectiveness through the British Columbia Hepatitis Testers Cohort (BC-HTC): Design and Characteristics of Linked and Unlinked Participants

    PubMed Central

    Janjua, Naveed Zafar; Kuo, Margot; Chong, Mei; Yu, Amanda; Alvarez, Maria; Cook, Darrel; Armour, Rosemary; Aiken, Ciaran; Li, Karen; Mussavi Rizi, Seyed Ali; Woods, Ryan; Godfrey, David; Wong, Jason; Gilbert, Mark; Tyndall, Mark W.; Krajden, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Background The British Columbia (BC) Hepatitis Testers Cohort (BC-HTC) was established to assess and monitor hepatitis C (HCV) epidemiology, cost of illness and treatment effectiveness in BC, Canada. In this paper, we describe the cohort construction, data linkage process, linkage yields, and comparison of the characteristics of linked and unlinked individuals. Methods The BC-HTC includes all individuals tested for HCV and/or HIV or reported as a case of HCV, hepatitis B (HBV), HIV or active tuberculosis (TB) in BC linked with the provincial health insurance client roster, medical visits, hospitalizations, drug prescriptions, the cancer registry and mortality data using unique personal health numbers. The cohort includes data since inception (1990/1992) of each database until 2012/2013 with plans for annual updates. We computed linkage rates by year and compared the characteristics of linked and unlinked individuals. Results Of 2,656,323 unique individuals available in the laboratory and surveillance data, 1,427,917(54%) were included in the final linked cohort, including about 1.15 million tested for HCV and about 1.02 million tested for HIV. The linkage rate was 86% for HCV tests, 89% for HCV cases, 95% for active TB cases, 48% for HIV tests and 36% for HIV cases. Linkage rates increased from 40% for HCV negatives and 70% for HCV positives in 1992 to ~90% after 2005. Linkage rates were lower for males, younger age at testing, and those with unknown residence location. Linkage rates for HCV testers co-infected with HIV, HBV or TB were very high (90–100%). Conclusion Linkage rates increased over time related to improvements in completeness of identifiers in laboratory, surveillance, and registry databases. Linkage rates were higher for HCV than HIV testers, those testing positive, older individuals, and females. Data from the cohort provide essential information to support the development of prevention, care and treatment initiatives for those infected with HCV

  17. LSD1 is Required for Hair Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Cai, Chengfu; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-05-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) plays an important role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. It has recently been demonstrated that during development, downregulation of LSD1 inhibits cell proliferation, modulates the expression of cell cycle regulators, and reduces hair cell formation in the zebrafish lateral line, which suggests that LSD1-mediated epigenetic regulation plays a key role in the development of hair cells. However, the role of LSD1 in hair cell regeneration after hair cell loss remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the effect of LSD1 on hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced hair cell loss. We show that the LSD1 inhibitor trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine (2-PCPA) significantly decreases the regeneration of hair cells in zebrafish after neomycin damage. In addition, immunofluorescent staining demonstrates that 2-PCPA administration suppresses supporting cell proliferation and alters cell cycle progression. Finally, in situ hybridization shows that 2-PCPA significantly downregulates the expression of genes related to Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf activation. Altogether, our data suggest that downregulation of LSD1 significantly decreases hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced hair cell loss through inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf signaling pathways. Thus, LSD1 plays a critical role in hair cell regeneration and might represent a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of hearing loss.

  18. Collective Chemotaxis Requires Contact-Dependent Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Theveneau, Eric; Marchant, Lorena; Kuriyama, Sei; Gull, Mazhar; Moepps, Barbara; Parsons, Maddy; Mayor, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary Directional collective migration is now a widely recognized mode of migration during embryogenesis and cancer. However, how a cluster of cells responds to chemoattractants is not fully understood. Neural crest cells are among the most motile cells in the embryo, and their behavior has been likened to malignant invasion. Here, we show that neural crest cells are collectively attracted toward the chemokine Sdf1. While not involved in initially polarizing cells, Sdf1 directionally stabilizes cell protrusions promoted by cell contact. At this cell contact, N-cadherin inhibits protrusion and Rac1 activity and in turn promotes protrusions and activation of Rac1 at the free edge. These results show a role for N-cadherin during contact inhibition of locomotion, and they reveal a mechanism of chemoattraction likely to function during both embryogenesis and cancer metastasis, whereby attractants such as Sdf1 amplify and stabilize contact-dependent cell polarity, resulting in directional collective migration. PMID:20643349

  19. Large stationary fuel cell systems: Status and dynamic requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Manfred

    Molten carbonate fuel cell demonstrations to-date, have been able to show the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies (>50%) of any stand-alone fuel cell type. The primary developer of this type of fuel cell in United States is Fuel Cell Energy Corporation (FCE), the developer and manufacturer of the Direct FuelCell ™ concept. FCE and MTU CFC Solutions in Germany, a licensee of FCE have demonstrated carbonate fuel cells from 10 kW to 2 MW of electrical output on a variety of fuels. IHI in Japan are also developing carbonate fuel cells for stationary power and have recently successfully demonstrated the technology in Kawagoe, Japan. In Italy, Ansaldo fuel cell have demonstrated a 100 kW carbonate fuel cell in Milan. In Korea, the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy has committed to install 300 fuel cell units, sized 250 kW to 1 MW, for distributed power generation by 2012. Carbonate fuel cell technology is more fuel flexible than lower temperature fuel cell technologies and is well suited for on-site stationary CHP applications as well as to marine, military, and traction applications. The present paper gives an overview about the commercialisation efforts for the molten carbonate fuel cell technology.

  20. CD4 T Cell Help via B Cells Is Required for Lymphopenia-Induced CD8 T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Ab-mediated lymphoablation is commonly used in solid organ and hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, these strategies fail to control pathogenic memory T cells efficiently and to improve long-term transplant outcomes significantly. Understanding the mechanisms of T cell reconstitution is critical for enhancing the efficacy of Ab-mediated depletion in sensitized recipients. Using a murine analog of anti-thymocyte globulin (mATG) in a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, we previously showed that peritransplant lymphocyte depletion induces rapid memory T cell proliferation and only modestly prolongs allograft survival. We now report that T cell repertoire following depletion is dominated by memory CD4 T cells. Additional depletion of these residual CD4 T cells severely impairs the recovery of memory CD8 T cells after mATG treatment. The CD4 T cell help during CD8 T cell recovery depends on the presence of B cells expressing CD40 and intact CD40/CD154 interactions. The requirement for CD4 T cell help is not limited to the use of mATG in heart allograft recipients, and it is observed in nontransplanted mice and after CD8 T cell depletion with mAb instead of mATG. Most importantly, limiting helper signals increases the efficacy of mATG in controlling memory T cell expansion and significantly extends heart allograft survival in sensitized recipients. Our findings uncover the novel role for helper memory CD4 T cells during homeostatic CD8 T cell proliferation and open new avenues for optimizing lymphoablative therapies in allosensitized patients.

  1. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  2. Haematopoietic stem cells require a highly regulated protein synthesis rate.

    PubMed

    Signer, Robert A J; Magee, Jeffrey A; Salic, Adrian; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-05-01

    Many aspects of cellular physiology remain unstudied in somatic stem cells, for example, there are almost no data on protein synthesis in any somatic stem cell. Here we set out to compare protein synthesis in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and restricted haematopoietic progenitors. We found that the amount of protein synthesized per hour in HSCs in vivo was lower than in most other haematopoietic cells, even if we controlled for differences in cell cycle status or forced HSCs to undergo self-renewing divisions. Reduced ribosome function in Rpl24(Bst/+) mice further reduced protein synthesis in HSCs and impaired HSC function. Pten deletion increased protein synthesis in HSCs but also reduced HSC function. Rpl24(Bst/+) cell-autonomously rescued the effects of Pten deletion in HSCs; blocking the increase in protein synthesis, restoring HSC function, and delaying leukaemogenesis. Pten deficiency thus depletes HSCs and promotes leukaemia partly by increasing protein synthesis. Either increased or decreased protein synthesis impairs HSC function.

  3. VISA is required for B cell expression of TLR7.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang-Guo; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Akerlund, Linda J; Shu, Hong-Bing; Cambier, John C

    2012-01-01

    B cells play a critical role in the initialization and development of the systemic lupus erythematosus that is dependent on the expression of the endosomal ssRNA receptor TLR7. Previous studies have established that B cell expression of TLR7 is controlled by the type I IFN secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In this article, we report that VISA, also known as MAVS, IPS-1, and CardIf, essential for RIG-I/MDA5-mediated signaling following sensing of cytosolic RNA, regulate B cell expression of TLR7 and CD23. We found that B cells from a VISA(-/-) mouse express reduced TLR7 but normal basal levels of type I IFN. We also show that although IFN-β and TLR7 agonists synergize to promote TLR7 expression in VISA(-/-) B cells, they do not fully complement the defect seen in VISA(-/-) cells. Cell transfer experiments revealed that the observed effects of VISA(-/-) are B cell intrinsic. The reduced TLR7 expression in B cells is correlated with impaired TLR7 agonist-induced upregulation of activation markers CD69 and CD86, cell proliferation, production of IFN-α, TNF, and IL-12, and NF-κB activation. Finally, studies indicate that genetic background may influence the observed phenotype of our VISA(-/-) mice, because VISA(-/-) B cells differ in CD23 and TLR7 expression when on C57BL/6 versus 129Sv-C57BL/6 background. Thus, our findings suggest an unexpected link between VISA-mediated cytosolic RLR signaling and autoimmunity.

  4. Dissociation of two signals required for activation of resting B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Julius, M H; von Boehmer, H; Sidman, C L

    1982-01-01

    Cellular interactions involved in the T cell-dependent activation of B cells were analyzed by using lines and clones of helper T cells specific for determinants expressed on the B cell surface. Activation of male antigen-, M locus-, and H-2-specific T cells was shown to support polyclonal Ig production by a population of B cells that did not require T-cell-B-cell interaction for induction/amplification. However, these T cells alone did not activate gradient-purified small (resting) B cells. The activation of small B cells was shown to require not only a signal derived through an antigen-specific T-helper cell-B cell interaction but in addition a second signal that could be provided by anti-Ig antibodies. PMID:6979046

  5. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart IIIii of... - Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring... Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63—Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program As stated in § 63.8192(g)(1), your mercury monitoring system...

  6. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart IIIii of... - Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring... Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63—Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program As stated in § 63.8192(g)(1), your mercury monitoring system...

  7. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart IIIii of... - Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring... Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63—Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program As stated in § 63.8192(g)(1), your mercury monitoring system...

  8. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart IIIii of... - Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring... Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63—Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program As stated in § 63.8192(g)(1), your mercury monitoring system...

  9. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart IIIii of... - Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring... Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63—Requirements for Cell Room Monitoring Program As stated in § 63.8192(g)(1), your mercury monitoring system...

  10. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  11. Piezo2 is required for Merkel cell mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seung-Hyun; Ranade, Sanjeev; Weyer, Andy D.; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Baba, Yoshichika; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Petrus, Matt; Miyamoto, Takashi; Reddy, Kritika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2014-01-01

    Summary How we sense touch remains fundamentally unknown1,2. The Merkel cell-neurite complex is a gentle touch receptor in the skin that mediates slowly-adapting (SA) responses of Aβ sensory fibers to encode fine details of objects3-6. This mechanoreceptor complex was recognized to play an essential role in sensing gentle touch nearly 50 years ago3,4. However, whether Merkel cells or afferent fibers themselves sense mechanical force is still debated, and the molecular mechanism of mechanotransduction is unknown1,2,7-12. Interestingly, synapse-like junctions are observed between Merkel cells and associated afferents6,13-15, and yet it is unclear if Merkel cells are inherently mechanosensitive or whether they can rapidly transmit such information to the neighboring nerve1,2,16,17. Here we show for the first time that Merkel cells produce touch-sensitive currents in vitro. Piezo2, a mechanically-activated (MA) cation channel, is expressed in Merkel cells. We engineered mice deficient in Piezo2 in the skin, but not in sensory neurons, and show that Merkel cell mechanosensitivity completely depends on Piezo2. In these mice, Merkel cell-neurite complex-mediated SA responses in vivo show reduced static firing rates, and moreover, they display moderately decreased behavioral responses to gentle touch. Our results indicate that Piezo2 is the Merkel cell mechanotransduction channel and provide the first line of evidence that Piezos play a physiological role in mechanosensation in mammals. Furthermore, our data present evidence for a two-receptor site model, where both Merkel cells and innervating afferents act in concert as mechanosensors. The two-receptor system could provide this mechanoreceptor complex with a tuning mechanism to achieve highly sophisticated responses to a given mechanical stimulus15,18,19. PMID:24717433

  12. Doxorubicin-mediated Apoptosis in Glioma Cells Requires NFAT3

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Sreelatha; Vanamala, Sravan K.; Gujrati, Meena; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT), a family of transcription factors, has been implicated in many cellular processes, including some cancers. For the first time, the present study characterizes the role of NFAT3 in doxorubicin (DOX) mediated apoptosis, migration, and invasion in SNB19 and U87 glioma cells. This study demonstrates specific knockdown of NFAT3 results in a dramatic inhibition of the apoptotic effect, induced by DOX, and favors cell survival. Inhibition of NFAT3 activation by shNFAT3 (shNF3) significantly downregulated TNF-α induction, its receptor TNFR1, caspase 10, caspase 3 and PARP, abrogating DOX-mediated apoptosis in glioma cells. DOX treatment resulted in NFAT3 translocation to the nucleus. Similarly, shNF3 treatment in SNB19 and U87 cells reversed DOX-induced inhibition of cell migration and invasion as determined by wound healing and matrigel invasion assays. Taken together, these results indicate that NFAT3 is a prerequisite for the induction of DOX-mediated apoptosis in glioma cells. PMID:19784808

  13. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  14. WWP2 is required for normal cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Che, Xun; Chen, Changyan; Lu, Luo; Dai, Wei

    2015-09-01

    WWP2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase belonging to the Nedd4-like family. Given that WWP2 target proteins including PTEN that are crucial for regulating cell proliferation or suppressing tumorigenesis, we have asked whether WWP2 plays a role in controlling cell cycle progression. Here we report that WWP2 is necessary for normal cell cycle progression as its silencing significantly reduces the cell proliferation rate. We have identified that an isoform of WWP2 (WWP2-V4) is highly expressed in the M phase of the cell cycle. Silencing of WWP2 accelerates the turnover of cyclin E, which is accompanied by increased levels of phospho-histone H3 (p-H3) and cyclin B. Moreover, silencing of WWP2 results in compromised phosphorylation of Akt(S473), a residue whose phosphorylation is tightly associated with the activation of the kinase. Combined, these results strongly suggest that WWP2 is an important component in regulating the Akt signaling cascade, as well as cell cycle progression. PMID:26622940

  15. WWP2 is required for normal cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Che, Xun; Chen, Changyan; Lu, Luo; Dai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    WWP2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase belonging to the Nedd4-like family. Given that WWP2 target proteins including PTEN that are crucial for regulating cell proliferation or suppressing tumorigenesis, we have asked whether WWP2 plays a role in controlling cell cycle progression. Here we report that WWP2 is necessary for normal cell cycle progression as its silencing significantly reduces the cell proliferation rate. We have identified that an isoform of WWP2 (WWP2-V4) is highly expressed in the M phase of the cell cycle. Silencing of WWP2 accelerates the turnover of cyclin E, which is accompanied by increased levels of phospho-histone H3 (p-H3) and cyclin B. Moreover, silencing of WWP2 results in compromised phosphorylation of AktS473, a residue whose phosphorylation is tightly associated with the activation of the kinase. Combined, these results strongly suggest that WWP2 is an important component in regulating the Akt signaling cascade, as well as cell cycle progression. PMID:26622940

  16. A requirement for trypsin-sensitive cell-surface components for cell-cell interactions of embryonic neural retina cells

    PubMed Central

    McClay, DR; Godding, LR; Fransen, ME

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative assay was used to measure the rate of collection of a population of embryonic neural retina cells to the surface of cell aggregates. The rate of collection of freshly trysinized cells was limited in the initial stages by the rate of replacement of trypsin-sensitive cell- surface components. When cells were preincubated, or "recovered," and then added to cell aggregates, collection occurred at a linear rate and was independent of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The adhesion of recovered cells was temperature and energy dependent, and was reversibly inhibited by cytochalasin B. Colchicine had little effect on collection of recovered cells. Antiserum directed against recovered cell membranes was shown to bind to recovered cells by indirect immunofluorescence. The antiserum also was shown to inhibit collection of recovered cells to aggregates, suggesting that at least some of the antigens identified might be involved in the adhesion process. The inhibitory effect of the antiserum was dose dependent . Freshly trypsinized cells absorbed neither the immunofluorescence activity nor the adhesion-inhibiting activity. Recovered cells absorbed away both activities. In specificity studies, dorsal neural retina cells adhered to aggregates of ventral optic tectum in preference to aggregates of dorsal optic tectum. The adhesive specificity of the dorsal retina cells was less sensitive to trypsin than the adhesive specificity of ventral retina cells which adhered preferentially to dorsal tectal aggregates only after a period of recovery. PMID:562349

  17. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Doignon, François; Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype.

  18. Cell-autonomous requirement for TCF1 and LEF1 in the development of Natural Killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Zhu, Wandi S; Steinke, Farrah C; Xue, Hai-Hui; Sen, Jyoti Misra

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells develop from common CD4(+) CD8(+) thymocyte precursors. Transcriptional programs that regulate the development of NKT cells in the thymus development remain to be fully delineated. Here, we demonstrate a cell-intrinsic requirement for transcription factors TCF1 and LEF1 for the development of all subsets of NKT cells. Conditional deletion of TCF1 alone results in a substantial reduction in NKT cells. The remaining NKT cells are eliminated when TCF1 and LEF1 are both deleted. These data reveal an essential role for TCF1 and LEF1 in development of NKT cells.

  19. The study of ultrasonic irradiation effects on solid state powders of HTc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7‑x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Mahboubeh; Khoshnevisan, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an ultrasound assisted solid state synthesis method for high-temperature (HTc) YBa2Cu3O7‑x (YBCO) superconductor nanostructures with different morphologies is presented. Here, the routine heat treatment of the powder mixture of as-prepared precursors is followed by the ultrasound irradiation inside various alcoholic solutions. Not only the influence of the ultrasound irradiation intensity and duration but also the influence of different solvents such as ethanol, methanol and 1-butanol with various vapor pressures and so various destruction powers were also studied on the morphology and particle size of the products. The various morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) which not only have been affected by intensity and type of alcoholic solvent but also sonication time and ultrasound power have significant role as well. Formation of the YBCO superconducting phase was examined by using Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) which indicates the crystalline preferred growth in c-axis orientation in crystal. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed the ultrasound waves had no important effect on the onset critical temperature of the prepared nanorods (about 91.64 K) which is compared with the bulk samples (Tc ˜ 92K).

  20. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype. PMID:26711260

  1. Apoptosis-Inducing-Factor-Dependent Mitochondrial Function Is Required for T Cell but Not B Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Milasta, Sandra; Dillon, Christopher P; Sturm, Oliver E; Verbist, Katherine C; Brewer, Taylor L; Quarato, Giovanni; Brown, Scott A; Frase, Sharon; Janke, Laura J; Perry, S Scott; Thomas, Paul G; Green, Douglas R

    2016-01-19

    The role of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in promoting cell death versus survival remains controversial. We report that the loss of AIF in fibroblasts led to mitochondrial electron transport chain defects and loss of proliferation that could be restored by ectopic expression of the yeast NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1. Aif-deficiency in T cells led to decreased peripheral T cell numbers and defective homeostatic proliferation, but thymic T cell development was unaffected. In contrast, Aif-deficient B cells developed and functioned normally. The difference in the dependency of T cells versus B cells on AIF for function and survival correlated with their metabolic requirements. Ectopic Ndi1 expression rescued homeostatic proliferation of Aif-deficient T cells. Despite its reported roles in cell death, fibroblasts, thymocytes and B cells lacking AIF underwent normal death. These studies suggest that the primary role of AIF relates to complex I function, with differential effects on T and B cells.

  2. PAF-Wnt signaling-induced cell plasticity is required for maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Wang, Wenqi; Schneider, Andrea; Sun Oh, Young; Lin, Steven H.; Park, Bum-Joon; Chen, Junjie; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to tumour heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of cancer cell stemness remain elusive. Here we identify PCNA-associated factor (PAF) as a key molecule that controls cancer cell stemness. PAF is highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). In MECs, ectopic expression of PAF induces anchorage-independent cell growth and breast CSC marker expression. In mouse models, conditional PAF expression induces mammary ductal hyperplasia. Moreover, PAF expression endows MECs with a self-renewing capacity and cell heterogeneity generation via Wnt signalling. Conversely, ablation of endogenous PAF induces the loss of breast cancer cell stemness. Further cancer drug repurposing approaches reveal that NVP-AUY922 downregulates PAF and decreases breast cancer cell stemness. Our results unveil an unsuspected role of the PAF-Wnt signalling axis in modulating cell plasticity, which is required for the maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness. PMID:26843124

  3. Design requirements for high-efficiency high concentration ratio space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H.; Patterson, R.

    1980-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator system concept was developed for low cost, multikilowatt space solar arrays. The system imposes some requirements on solar cells which are new and different from those imposed for conventional applications. The solar cells require a circular active area of approximately 4 mm in diameter. High reliability contacts are required on both front and back surfaces. The back area must be metallurgically bonded to a heat sink. The cell should be designed to achieve the highest practical efficiency at 100 AMO suns and at 80 C. The cell design must minimize losses due to nonuniform illumination intensity and nonnormal light incidence. The primary radiation concern is the omnidirectional proton environment.

  4. Selenoprotein expression in Hürthle cell carcinomas and in the human Hürthle cell carcinoma line XTC.UC1.

    PubMed

    Menth, Marianne; Schmutzler, Cornelia; Mentrup, Birgit; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Honjoh, Tsutomu; Köhrle, Josef

    2005-05-01

    Hürthle cell carcinomas (HTC) are characterized by mitochondrial amplification and enhanced oxygen metabolism. To clarify if defects in enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species are involved in the pathogenesis of HTC, we analyzed selenium (Se)-dependent expression of various detoxifying selenoproteins in the HTC cell line XTC.UC1. Glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase activity was found both in cell lysates and conditioned media of XTC.UC1 cells and was increased by Na(2)SeO(3). Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of thioredoxin reductase both in cell lysates and conditioned media and of glutathione peroxidase 3 in conditioned media. Type I 5'-deiodinase, another selenoprotein that catalyzes thyroid hormone metabolism, was detectable only in cell lysates by enzyme assay and Western blot, and responded to stimulation by both Na(2)SeO(3) and retinoic acid. A selenoprotein P signal was detected in conditioned media by Western blot, but was not enhanced by Na(2)SeO(3) treatment. In situ hybridization revealed glutathione peroxidase mRNAs in HTC specimen; glutathione peroxidase 3 mRNA levels were reduced. These data suggest adequate expression and Se-dependent regulation of a couple of selenoproteins involved in antioxidant defense and thyroid hormone metabolism in XTC.UC1 cells, so far giving no evidence of a role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of HTCs.

  5. Positive selection of T cells: rescue from programmed cell death and differentiation require continual engagement of the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Positive selection of T cells is a complex developmental process generating long-lived, functionally mature CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ cells from short-lived, immature CD4+CD8+ precursors. The process is initiated in the thymus by interaction of the alpha beta TCR with molecules encoded by the MHC, occurs without cell division, and involves rescue from programmed cell death (PCD), as well as induction of differentiation and maturation of selected precursors. It is unclear whether development of small, positively selected CD4+CD8+ thymocytes (characterized by up-regulated levels of TCR and CD69 molecules) depends on further interactions with MHC molecules and, if so, whether such interactions are required for survival, for maturation, or for both. The involvement of the TCR and/or CD4/CD8 coreceptors in transmitting additional signals is also unknown. We have examined these questions by analyzing survival and differentiation of early (CD4+CD8+TCRhi) and later (CD4-CD8+TCRhi) postselection stages of thymocytes from normal and bcl-2 transgenic mice expressing transgenic, class I MHC-restricted TCR, upon intrathymic transfer into recipients that lacked ligands either for both the TCR and CD8 coreceptor, or for the TCR only. The results provide direct evidence that induction of differentiation of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by recognition of MHC molecules does not rescue them from PCD and is insufficient to activate the entire maturation program. Both processes require continual engagement of the TCR by positively selecting MHC molecules that, at least in the case of class I MHC-restricted CD4-CD8+ T cells, cannot be substituted by the engagement of coreceptor alone. PMID:7759993

  6. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  7. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T.; Lorenzo, Óscar; Revuelta, José L.; McCabe, Paul F.; Arellano, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined. PMID:24723397

  8. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T; Lorenzo, Oscar; Revuelta, José L; McCabe, Paul F; Arellano, Juan B

    2014-07-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined.

  9. Fuel cell systems for passenger cars - opportunities and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Tachtler, J.; Bourne, C.

    1996-12-31

    From the point of view of energy density, handling and economy, present-day motor fuels are superior to all known alternatives. The internal combustion engine powered by them satisfies the requirements of customers to an excellent degree. The search for alternatives can therefore only be justified if emissions can be avoided totally and non-fossil primary energy sources can be used or at least partially our dependence on mineral oil can be reduced. What was long suspected has been increasingly confirmed, not least by developments at BMW: electricity (stored in batteries) and hydrogen offer the best prerequisites for achieving these goals in the long term. These forms of energy can be produced in sufficient quantities and with relatively little effect on the environment. They promise to produce an absolute minimum of pollutants when used in vehicles. Natural gas, which is very similar to hydrogen, and hybrid systems, that would compensate for battery risks, could perform a valuable function in the transitional phase.

  10. Calcium-regulated exocytosis is required for cell membrane resealing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we visualized exocytosis during membrane resealing in sea urchin eggs and embryos. Upon wounding by a laser beam, both eggs and embryos showed a rapid burst of localized Ca(2+)- regulated exocytosis. The rate of exocytosis was correlated quantitatively with successfully resealing. In embryos, whose activated surfaces must first dock vesicles before fusion, exocytosis and membrane resealing were inhibited by neurotoxins that selectively cleave the SNARE complex proteins, synaptobrevin, SNAP-25, and syntaxin. In eggs, whose cortical vesicles are already docked, vesicles could be reversibly undocked with externally applied stachyose. If cortical vesicles were undocked both exocytosis and plasma membrane resealing were completely inhibited. When cortical vesicles were transiently undocked, exposure to tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxin type C1 rendered them no longer competent for resealing, although botulinum neurotoxin type A was still ineffective. Cortical vesicles transiently undocked in the presence of tetanus toxin were subsequently fusion incompetent although to a large extent they retained their ability to redock when stachyose was diluted. We conclude that addition of internal membranes by exocytosis is required and that a SNARE-like complex plays differential roles in vesicle docking and fusion for the repair of disrupted plasma membrane. PMID:8557742

  11. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  12. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  13. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  14. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated peripheral regulatory T cell and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses towards innocuous foreign antigens via peripheral regulatory T cells (pTreg cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure to instruct naïve CD4+ T cells to differentiate into pTreg cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs are dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for pTreg cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b− cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pTreg cells, and conversely, loss of IRF8-dependent CD11b− cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in pTreg cell induction and their redundancy during oral tolerance development. PMID:27019226

  15. Steroids are required for epidermal cell fate establishment in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Kavitha T; Chen, Andrew Y; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2009-05-12

    The simple structure of Arabidopsis roots provides an excellent model system to study epidermal cell fate specification. Epidermal cells in contact with 2 underlying cortical cells differentiate into hair cells (H cells; trichoblasts), whereas cells that contact only a single cortical cell differentiate into mature hairless cells (N cells; atrichoblasts). This position-dependent patterning, in combination with the constrained orientation of cell divisions, results in hair and nonhair cell files running longitudinally along the root epidermis. Here, we present strong evidence that steroid hormones called brassinosteroids (BRs) are required to maintain position-dependent fate specification in roots. We show that BRs are required for normal expression levels and patterns of WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2), master regulators of epidermal patterning. Loss of BR signaling results in loss of hair cells in H positions, likely as a consequence of reduced expression of CAPRICE (CPC), a direct downstream target of WER. Our observations demonstrate that in addition to their well-known role in cell expansion, BRs play an essential role in directing cell fate.

  16. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  17. NK cell-extrinsic IL-18 signaling is required for efficient NK-cell activation by vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Brandstadter, Joshua D; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    NK cells are important for the control of vaccinia virus (VV) in vivo. Recent studies have shown that multiple pathways are required for effective activation of NK cells. These include both TLR-dependent and -independent pathways, as well as the NKG2D activating receptor that recognizes host stress-induced NKG2D ligands. However, it remains largely unknown what controls the upregulation of NKG2D ligands in response to VV infection. In this study using C57BL/6 mice, we first showed that IL-18 is critical for NK-cell activation and viral clearance. We then demonstrated that IL-18 signaling on both NK cells and DCs is required for efficient NK-cell activation upon VV infection in vitro. We further showed in vivo that efficient NK-cell activation in response to VV is dependent on DCs and IL-18 signaling in non-NK cells, suggesting an essential role for NK cell-extrinsic IL-18 signaling in NK-cell activation. Mechanistically, IL-18 signaling in DCs promotes expression of Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Collectively, our data reveal a previously unrecognized role for NK cell-extrinsic IL-18 signaling in NK-cell activation through upregulation of NKG2D ligands. These observations may provide insights into the design of effective NK-cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancer.

  18. Hemogenic endothelial cell specification requires c-kit, notch signaling, and p27-mediated cell-cycle control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delineating the mechanism or mechanisms that regulate the specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from primordial endothelium is critical for optimizing their derivation from human stem cells for clinical therapies. We previously determined that retinoic acid (RA) is required for hemogenic spec...

  19. Activation requirements and responses to TLR ligands in human CD4+ T cells: comparison of two T cell isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina L; Thomas, Jeremy J; Rojas, Roxana E

    2009-05-15

    Direct regulation of T cell function by microbial ligands through Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an emerging area of T cell biology. Currently either immunomagnetic cell sorting (IMACS) or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), are utilized to isolate T-cell subsets for such studies. However, it is unknown to what extent differences in T cell purity between these isolation techniques influence T cell functional assays. We compared the purity, response to mitogen, activation requirements, and response to TLR ligands between human CD4(+) T cells isolated either by IMACS (IMACS-CD4(+)) or by IMACS followed by FACS (IMACS/FACS-CD4(+)). As expected, IMACS-CD4(+) were less pure than IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) (92.5%+/-1.4% versus 99.7%+/-0.2%, respectively). Consequently, IMACS-CD4(+) proliferated and produced cytokines in response to mitogen alone and had lower activation requirements compared to IMACS/FACS-CD4(+). In addition IMACS-CD4(+) but not IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) responses were upregulated by the TLR-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, TLR-2 and TLR-5 engagement induced costimulation in both IMACS-CD4(+) and highly purified IMACS-/FACS-CD4(+). Altogether these results indicate that small differences in cell purity can significantly alter T cell responses to TLR ligands. This study stresses the importance of a stringent purification method when investigating the role of microbial ligands in T cell function. PMID:19272393

  20. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization. PMID:27312576

  1. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization.

  2. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  3. Syk Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for the Positive Selection of Immature B Cells into the Recirculating B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin; Gulbranson-Judge, Adam; Quinn, Marian E.; Walters, Alice E.; MacLennan, Ian C.M.; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Syk has been implicated as a key signal transducer from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We show here that mutation of the Syk gene completely blocks the maturation of immature B cells into recirculating cells and stops their entry into B cell follicles. Furthermore, using radiation chimeras we demonstrate that this developmental block is due to the absence of Syk in the B cells themselves. Syk-deficient B cells are shown to have the life span of normal immature B cells. If this is extended by over-expression of Bcl-2, they accumulate in the T zone and red pulp of the spleen in increased numbers, but still fail to mature to become recirculating follicular B cells. Despite this defect in maturation, Syk-deficient B cells were seen to give rise to switched as well as nonswitched splenic plasma cells. Normally only a proportion of immature B cells is recruited into the recirculating pool. Our results suggest that Syk transduces a BCR signal that is absolutely required for the positive selection of immature B cells into the recirculating B cell pool. PMID:9396770

  4. Change in Cell Shape Is Required for Matrix Metalloproteinase-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2010-01-01

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a “cuboidal” epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-β-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents. PMID:18506791

  5. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  6. National Ingition Facility subsystem design requirements pockels cell subsystem SSDR 1.3.3

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.

    1996-10-31

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Pockels cell subsystem (WBS 1.3.3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Invariant NKT cells require autophagy to coordinate proliferation and survival signals during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Bo; Zhao, Meng; Miller, Brian C; Véla, Jose Luis; Bruinsma, Monique W; Virgin, Herbert W; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-06-15

    Autophagy regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival in multiple cell types, including cells of the immune system. In this study, we examined the effects of a disruption of autophagy on the differentiation of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Using mice with a T lymphocyte-specific deletion of Atg5 or Atg7, two members of the macroautophagic pathway, we observed a profound decrease in the iNKT cell population. The deficit is cell-autonomous, and it acts predominantly to reduce the number of mature cells, as well as the function of peripheral iNKT cells. In the absence of autophagy, there is reduced progression of iNKT cells in the thymus through the cell cycle, as well as increased apoptosis of these cells. Importantly, the reduction in Th1-biased iNKT cells is most pronounced, leading to a selective reduction in iNKT cell-derived IFN-γ. Our findings highlight the unique metabolic and genetic requirements for the differentiation of iNKT cells.

  8. Phenotypically distinct helper NK cells are required for gp96-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sedlacek, Abigail L.; Kinner-Bibeau, Lauren B.; Binder, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the extracellular environment, are immunogenic. Following cross-presentation of HSP-chaperoned peptides by CD91+ antigen presenting cells (APCs), T cells are primed with specificity for the derivative antigen-bearing cell. Accordingly, tumor-derived HSPs are in clinical trials for cancer immunotherapy. We investigate the role of NK cells in gp96-mediated anti-tumor immune responses given their propensity to lyse tumor cells. We show that gp96-mediated rejection of tumors requires a unique and necessary helper role in NK cells. This helper role occurs during the effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response and is required for T cell and APC function. Gp96 activates NK cells indirectly via APCs to a phenotype distinct from NK cells activated by other mechanisms such as IL-2. While NK cells have both lytic and cytokine producing properties, we show that gp96 selectively activates cytokine production in NK cells, which is important in the HSP anti-tumor immune response, and leaves their cytotoxic capacity unchanged. PMID:27431727

  9. Zebrafish neural tube morphogenesis requires Scribble-dependent oriented cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Žigman, Mihaela; Trinh, Le A; Fraser, Scott E; Moens, Cecilia B

    2011-01-11

    How control of subcellular events in single cells determines morphogenesis on the scale of the tissue is largely unresolved. The stereotyped cross-midline mitoses of progenitors in the zebrafish neural keel provide a unique experimental paradigm for defining the role and control of single-cell orientation for tissue-level morphogenesis in vivo. We show here that the coordinated orientation of individual progenitor cell division in the neural keel is the cellular determinant required for morphogenesis into a neural tube epithelium with a single straight lumen. We find that Scribble is required for oriented cell division and that its function in this process is independent of canonical apicobasal and planar polarity pathways. We identify a role for Scribble in controlling clustering of α-catenin foci in dividing progenitors. Loss of either Scrib or N-cadherin results in abnormally oriented mitoses, reduced cross-midline cell divisions, and similar neural tube defects. We propose that Scribble-dependent nascent cell-cell adhesion clusters between neuroepithelial progenitors contribute to define orientation of their cell division. Finally, our data demonstrate that while oriented mitoses of individual cells determine neural tube architecture, the tissue can in turn feed back on its constituent cells to define their polarization and cell division orientation to ensure robust tissue morphogenesis.

  10. LMP1-deficient Epstein-Barr virus mutant requires T cells for lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Plowshay, Julie; Ranheim, Erik A.; Burlingham, William J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Asimakopoulos, Fotis; Tang, Weihua; Gulley, Margaret L.; Cesarman, Ethel; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection transforms B cells in vitro and is associated with human B cell lymphomas. The major EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), mimics constitutively active CD40 and is essential for outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cells in vitro; however, EBV-positive diffuse large B cell lymphomas and Burkitt lymphomas often express little or no LMP1. Thus, EBV may contribute to the development and maintenance of human lymphomas even in the absence of LMP1. Here, we found that i.p. injection of human cord blood mononuclear cells infected with a LMP1-deficient EBV into immunodeficient mice induces B cell lymphomas. In this model, lymphoma development required the presence of CD4+ T cells in cord blood and was inhibited by CD40-blocking Abs. In contrast, LMP1-deficient EBV established persistent latency but did not induce lymphomas when directly injected into mice engrafted with human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus. WT EBV induced lymphomas in both mouse models and did not require coinjected T cells in the cord blood model. Together, these results demonstrate that LMP1 is not essential for EBV-induced lymphomas in vivo and suggest that T cells supply signals that substitute for LMP1 in EBV-positive B cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:25485679

  11. c-di-GMP induction of Dictyostelium cell death requires the polyketide DIF-1.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; Giusti, Corinne; Golstein, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Cell death in the model organism Dictyostelium, as studied in monolayers in vitro, can be induced by the polyketide DIF-1 or by the cyclical dinucleotide c-di-GMP. c-di-GMP, a universal bacterial second messenger, can trigger innate immunity in bacterially infected animal cells and is involved in developmental cell death in Dictyostelium. We show here that c-di-GMP was not sufficient to induce cell death in Dictyostelium cell monolayers. Unexpectedly, it also required the DIF-1 polyketide. The latter could be exogenous, as revealed by a telling synergy between c-di-GMP and DIF-1. The required DIF-1 polyketide could also be endogenous, as shown by the inability of c-di-GMP to induce cell death in Dictyostelium HMX44A cells and DH1 cells upon pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DIF-1 biosynthesis. In these cases, c-di-GMP-induced cell death was rescued by complementation with exogenous DIF-1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that c-di-GMP could trigger cell death in Dictyostelium only in the presence of the DIF-1 polyketide or its metabolites. This identified another element of control to this cell death and perhaps also to c-di-GMP effects in other situations and organisms.

  12. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2016-09-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  13. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Zarkower, David

    2016-01-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  14. Design of Manufacturing Cells for Uncertain Production Requirements with Presence of Routing Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eski, Ozgur; Ozkarahan, Irem

    Cellular manufacturing has been seen as an effective strategy to the changing worldwide competition. Most of the existing cell design methods ignore the existence of stochastic production requirements and routing flexibility. In this study, a simulation based Fuzzy Goal Programming model is proposed for solving cell formation problems considering stochastic production requirements and routing flexibility. The model covers the objectives of minimizing inter-cell movements, maximizing system utilization, minimizing mean tardiness and minimizing the percentage of tardy jobs. The simple additive method and max-min method are used to handle fuzzy goals. A tabu search based solution methodology is used for solution of the proposed models and the results are presented.

  15. Sox2 Is Required for Maintenance and Differentiation of Bronchiolar Clara, Ciliated, and Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Wert, Susan E.; Keiser, Angela R.; Smith, April N.; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    The bronchioles of the murine lung are lined by a simple columnar epithelium composed of ciliated, Clara, and goblet cells that together mediate barrier function, mucociliary clearance and innate host defense, vital for pulmonary homeostasis. In the present work, we demonstrate that expression of Sox2 in Clara cells is required for the differentiation of ciliated, Clara, and goblet cells that line the bronchioles of the postnatal lung. The gene was selectively deleted in Clara cells utilizing Scgb1a1-Cre, causing the progressive loss of Sox2 in the bronchioles during perinatal and postnatal development. The rate of bronchiolar cell proliferation was decreased and associated with the formation of an undifferentiated, cuboidal-squamous epithelium lacking the expression of markers of Clara cells (Scgb1a1), ciliated cells (FoxJ1 and α-tubulin), and goblet cells (Spdef and Muc5AC). By adulthood, bronchiolar cell numbers were decreased and Sox2 was absent in extensive regions of the bronchiolar epithelium, at which time residual Sox2 expression was primarily restricted to selective niches of CGRP staining neuroepithelial cells. Allergen-induced goblet cell differentiation and mucus production was absent in the respiratory epithelium lacking Sox2. In vitro, Sox2 activated promoter-luciferase reporter constructs for differentiation markers characteristic of Clara, ciliated, and goblet cells, Scgb1a1, FoxJ1, and Agr2, respectively. Sox2 physically interacted with Smad3 and inhibited TGF-β1/Smad3-mediated transcriptional activity in vitro, a pathway that negatively regulates proliferation. Sox2 is required for proliferation and differentiation of Clara cells that serve as the progenitor cells from which Clara, ciliated, and goblet cells are derived. PMID:20011520

  16. Ki-67 is required for maintenance of cancer stem cells but not cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cidado, Justin; Wong, Hong Yuen; Rosen, D. Marc; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Garay, Joseph P.; Fessler, Abigail G.; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Hicks, Jessica; Cochran, Rory L.; Croessmann, Sarah; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Mohseni, Morassa; Beaver, Julia A.; Chu, David; Cravero, Karen; Christenson, Eric S.; Medford, Arielle; Mattox, Austin; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Argani, Pedram; Chawla, Ajay; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-01-01

    Ki-67 expression is correlated with cell proliferation and is a prognostic marker for various cancers; however, its function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that genetic disruption of Ki-67 in human epithelial breast and colon cancer cells depletes the cancer stem cell niche. Ki-67 null cells had a proliferative disadvantage compared to wildtype controls in colony formation assays and displayed increased sensitivity to various chemotherapies. Ki-67 null cancer cells showed decreased and delayed tumor formation in xenograft assays, which was associated with a reduction in cancer stem cell markers. Immunohistochemical analyses of human breast cancers revealed that Ki-67 expression is maintained at equivalent or greater levels in metastatic sites of disease compared to matched primary tumors, suggesting that maintenance of Ki-67 expression is associated with metastatic/clonogenic potential. These results elucidate Ki-67's role in maintaining the cancer stem cell niche, which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for human malignancies. PMID:26823390

  17. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  18. Platelet-Derived Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Is Required for the Transformation of Circulating Monocytes into Multipotential Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seta, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Yuka; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi; Kuwana, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously described a primitive cell population derived from human circulating CD14+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs), which are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. To generate MOMCs in vitro, monocytes are required to bind to fibronectin and be exposed to soluble factor(s) derived from circulating CD14− cells. The present study was conducted to identify factors that induce MOMC differentiation. Methods We cultured CD14+ monocytes on fibronectin in the presence or absence of platelets, CD14− peripheral blood mononuclear cells, platelet-conditioned medium, or candidate MOMC differentiation factors. The transformation of monocytes into MOMCs was assessed by the presence of spindle-shaped adherent cells, CD34 expression, and the potential to differentiate in vitro into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. Results The presence of platelets or platelet-conditioned medium was required to generate MOMCs from monocytes. A screening of candidate platelet-derived soluble factors identified stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 as a requirement for generating MOMCs. Blocking an interaction between SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 inhibited MOMC generation, further confirming SDF-1′s critical role in this process. Finally, circulating MOMC precursors were found to reside in the CD14+CXCR4high cell population. Conclusion The interaction of SDF-1 with CXCR4 is essential for the transformation of circulating monocytes into MOMCs. PMID:24066125

  19. Pharyngeal Satellite Cells Undergo Myogenesis Under Basal Conditions and Are Required for Pharyngeal Muscle Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Phillips, Brittany L; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Vest, Katherine E; Vera, Yandery; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-12-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of the nasal, oral, and laryngeal pharynxes are required for swallowing. Pharyngeal muscles are preferentially affected in some muscular dystrophies yet spared in others. Muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, may be critical factors in the development of pharyngeal muscle disorders; however, very little is known about pharyngeal satellite cells (PSC) and their role in pharyngeal muscles. We show that PSC are distinct from the commonly studied hindlimb satellite cells both transcriptionally and biologically. Under basal conditions PSC proliferate, progress through myogenesis, and fuse with pharyngeal myofibers. Furthermore, PSC exhibit biologic differences dependent on anatomic location in the pharynx. Importantly, PSC are required to maintain myofiber size and myonuclear number in pharyngeal myofibers. Together, these results demonstrate that PSC are critical for pharyngeal muscle maintenance and suggest that satellite cell impairment could contribute to pharyngeal muscle pathology associated with various muscular dystrophies and aging.

  20. NASA specification for manufacturing and performance requirements of NASA standard aerospace nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    On November 25, 1985, the NASA Chief Engineer established a NASA-wide policy to maintain and to require the use of the NASA standard for aerospace nickel-cadmium cells and batteries. The Associate Administrator for Safety, Reliability, Maintainability, and Quality Assurance stated on December 29, 1986, the intent to retain the NASA standard cell usage policy established by the Office of the Chief Engineer. The current NASA policy is also to incorporate technological advances as they are tested and proven for spaceflight applications. This policy will be implemented by modifying the existing standard cells or by developing new NASA standards and their specifications in accordance with the NASA's Aerospace Battery Systems Program Plan. This NASA Specification for Manufacturing and Performance Requirements of NASA Standard Aerospace Nickel-Cadmium Cells is prepared to provide requirements for the NASA standard nickel-cadmium cell. It is an interim specification pending resolution of the separator material availability. This specification has evolved from over 15 years of nickel-cadmium cell experience by NASA. Consequently, considerable experience has been collected and cell performance has been well characterized from many years of ground testing and from in-flight operations in both geosynchronous (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) applications. NASA has developed and successfully used two standard flight qualified cell designs.

  1. Doxorubicin-induced cell death requires cathepsin B in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Bien, S; Rimmbach, C; Neumann, H; Niessen, J; Reimer, E; Ritter, C A; Rosskopf, D; Cinatl, J; Michaelis, M; Schroeder, H W S; Kroemer, H K

    2010-11-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin B acts as a key player in apoptosis. Cathepsin B-mediated cell death is induced by various stimuli such as ischemia, bile acids or TNFα. Whether cathepsin B can be influenced by anticancer drugs, however, has not been studied in detail. Here, we describe the modulation of doxorubicin-induced cell death by silencing of cathepsin B expression. Previously, it was shown that doxorubicin, in contrast to other drugs, selectively regulates expression and activity of cathepsin B. Selective silencing of cathepsin B by siRNA or the cathepsin B specific inhibitor CA074Me modified doxorubicin-mediated cell death in Hela tumor cells. Both Caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage were significantly reduced in cells lacking cathepsin B. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization as well as the release of cytochrome C and AIF from mitochondria into cytosol induced by doxorubicin were significantly diminished in cathepsin B suppressed cells. In addition, doxorubicin associated down-regulation of XIAP was not observed in cathepsin B silenced cells. Lack of cathepsin B significantly modified cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cdk1, Wee1 and p21 without significant changes in G(1), S or G(2)M cell cycle phases maybe indicating further cell cycle independent actions of these proteins. Consequently, cell viability following doxorubicin was significantly elevated in cells with cathepsin B silencing. In summary, our data strongly suggest a role of cathepsin B in doxorubicin-induced cell death. Therefore, increased expression of cathepsin B in various types of cancer can modify susceptibility towards doxorubicin. PMID:20709028

  2. ABCC4 is required for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoting; Guo, Yinan; Yue, Wentao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Meng; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), also known as ATP-cassette binding protein 4 (ABCC4), is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which are capable of pumping a wide variety of drugs out of the cell. However, little is known about the function of ABCC4 in the proliferation of lung cancer cells. Methods ABCC4 mRNA and protein levels in lung cancer cell lines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. A lentivirus-mediated RNA interference technique was used to inhibit ABCC4 mRNA expression in A549 and 801D cells. The function of ABCC4 in cell growth was investigated by MTS and colony formation assays. The role of ABCC4 in cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. ABCC4 mRNA levels in 30 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results ABCC4 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. ABCC4 expression was markedly downregulated in A549 and 801D cells using the RNA interference technique. Suppression of ABCC4 expression inhibited cell growth. The percentage of cells in G1 phase was increased when ABCC4 expression was suppressed. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein was weakened, originating in the downregulation of ABCC4. ABCC4 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. Conclusion ABCC4 may play an important role in the control of A549 and 801D cell growth. ABCC4 is a potential target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24591841

  3. Rubisco Activity in Guard Cells Compared with the Solute Requirement for Stomatal Opening 1

    PubMed Central

    Reckmann, Udo; Scheibe, Renate; Raschke, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the [14C]carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to 14CO2 for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19 femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667255

  4. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Vanderleest, Timothy E.; Jewett, Cayla E.; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fabian, Lacramioara; Robinett, Carmen C.; Brill, Julie A.; Loerke, Dinah; Fuller, Margaret T.; Blankenship, J. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr) and funnel cakes (fun) encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression. PMID:26528720

  5. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Vanderleest, Timothy E; Jewett, Cayla E; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fabian, Lacramioara; Robinett, Carmen C; Brill, Julie A; Loerke, Dinah; Fuller, Margaret T; Blankenship, J Todd

    2015-11-01

    Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr) and funnel cakes (fun) encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression. PMID:26528720

  6. Rubisco activity in guard cells compared with the solute requirement for stomatal opening. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Reckmann, U.; Scheibe, R.; Raschke, K. )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the ({sup 14}C) carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant.

  7. Short circuit testing of a nickel-hydrogen cell for compliance with range safety requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Tracinski, W.A.; Applewhite, A.Z.

    1997-12-01

    Short circuit testing was performed on a single stack, Independent Pressure Vessel (IPV) aerospace Nickel-Hydrogen cell with axial terminals for compliance with range safety requirements. The cell contained two brazed ceramic seals, was 3 1/2 inches in diameter, and had a nameplate rating of 85.5 Ah. The majority of the energy was released in the first ten minutes with peak terminal temperature reaching 192 degrees Celsius. No breaching of the cell was evident and the cell returned to normal open circuit voltage within fifteen minutes of the load being removed.

  8. Mind bomb 1 is required for pancreatic β-cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Signe; Kobberup, Sune; Jørgensen, Mette C.; Kalisz, Mark; Klein, Tino; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Gegg, Moritz; Lickert, Heiko; Lindner, Jill; Magnuson, Mark A.; Kong, Young-Yun; Serup, Palle; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Jensen, Jan N.

    2012-01-01

    During early pancreatic development, Notch signaling represses differentiation of endocrine cells and promotes proliferation of Nkx6-1+Ptf1a+ multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs). Later, antagonistic interactions between Nkx6 transcription factors and Ptf1a function to segregate MPCs into distal Nkx6-1−Ptf1a+ acinar progenitors and proximal Nkx6-1+Ptf1a− duct and β-cell progenitors. Distal cells are initially multipotent, but evolve into unipotent, acinar cell progenitors. Conversely, proximal cells are bipotent and give rise to duct cells and late-born endocrine cells, including the insulin producing β-cells. However, signals that regulate proximodistal (P-D) patterning and thus formation of β-cell progenitors are unknown. Here we show that Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) is required for correct P-D patterning of the developing pancreas and β-cell formation. We found that endoderm-specific inactivation of Mib1 caused a loss of Nkx6-1+Ptf1a− and Hnf1β+ cells and a corresponding loss of Neurog3+ endocrine progenitors and β-cells. An accompanying increase in Nkx6-1−Ptf1a+ and amylase+ cells, occupying the proximal domain, suggests that proximal cells adopt a distal fate in the absence of Mib1 activity. Impeding Notch-mediated transcriptional activation by conditional expression of dominant negative Mastermind-like 1 (Maml1) resulted in a similarly distorted P-D patterning and suppressed β-cell formation, as did conditional inactivation of the Notch target gene Hes1. Our results reveal iterative use of Notch in pancreatic development to ensure correct P-D patterning and adequate β-cell formation. PMID:22529374

  9. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Mika; Lehenkari, Petri; Kuvaja, Paula; Kaakinen, Mika; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-11-01

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell-cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells.

  10. Requirement for CD4 T Cell Help in Generating Functional CD8 T Cell Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Shen, Hao

    2003-04-01

    Although primary CD8 responses to acute infections are independent of CD4 help, it is unknown whether a similar situation applies to secondary responses. We show that depletion of CD4 cells during the recall response has minimal effect, whereas depletion during the priming phase leads to reduced responses by memory CD8 cells to reinfection. Memory CD8 cells generated in CD4+/+ mice responded normally when transferred into CD4-/- hosts, whereas memory CD8 cells generated in CD4-/- mice mounted defective recall responses in CD4+/+ adoptive hosts. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in the development of functional CD8 memory.

  11. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M.; Liu, Jinsong; Chadee, Deborah N.

    2012-08-15

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  12. FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Huang, Guanling; Zhu, Pingping; Liu, Jing; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exert a crucial role in early immune responses as a major innate effector component. However, the underlying mechanisms of NK cell development remain largely elusive. Here we show that robust autophagy appears in the stage of immature NK cells (iNKs), which is required for NK cell development. Autophagy defects result in damaged mitochondria and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that leads to apoptosis of NK cells. Autophagy protects NK cell viability during development through removal of damaged mitochondria and intracellular ROS. Phosphorylated Forkhead box O (FoxO)1 is located to the cytoplasm of iNKs and interacts with Atg7, leading to induction of autophagy. FoxO1 deficiency or an inactive FoxO1AAA mutant abrogates autophagy initiation in iNKs and impairs NK cell development and viral clearance. Therefore we conclude that FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and NK cell-induced innate immunity. PMID:27010363

  13. ES cell cycle progression and differentiation require the action of the histone methyltransferase Dot1L.

    PubMed

    Barry, Evan R; Krueger, Winfried; Jakuba, Caroline M; Veilleux, Eric; Ambrosi, Dominic J; Nelson, Craig E; Rasmussen, Theodore P

    2009-07-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) proliferate with rapid cell cycle kinetics but without loss of pluripotency. The histone methyltransferase Dot1L is responsible for methylation of histone H3 at lysine 79 (H3K79me). We investigated whether ESCs require Dot1L for proper stem cell behavior. ESCs deficient in Dot1L tolerate a nearly complete loss of H3K79 methylation without a substantial impact on proliferation or morphology. However, shortly after differentiation is induced, Dot1L-deficient cells cease proliferating and arrest in G2/M-phase of the cell cycle, with increased levels of aneuploidy. In addition, many aberrant mitotic spindles occur in Dot1L-deficient cells. Surprisingly, these mitotic and cell cycle defects fail to trigger apoptosis, indicating that mouse ESCs lack stringent cell cycle checkpoint control during initial stages of differentiation. Transcriptome analysis indicates that Dot1L deficiency causes the misregulation of a select set of genes, including many with known roles in cell cycle control and cellular proliferation as well as markers of endoderm differentiation. The data indicate a requirement for Dot1L function for early stages of ESC differentiation where Dot1L is necessary for faithful execution of mitosis and proper transcription of many genes throughout the genome. PMID:19544450

  14. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue.

  15. Communication between Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in Tuberculosis: Requirements for Naive CD4+ T Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Zedler, Ulrike; Baiocchini, Andrea; del Nonno, Franca; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous by phenotype, function, and tissue localization and distinct from inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs. Current information regarding the susceptibility and functional role of primary human DC subsets to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is limited. Here, we dissect the response of different primary DC subsets to Mtb infection. Myeloid CD11c+ cells and pDCs (C-type lectin 4C+ cells) were located in human lymph nodes (LNs) of tuberculosis (TB) patients by histochemistry. Rare CD141hi DCs (C-type lectin 9A+ cells) were also identified. Infection with live Mtb revealed a higher responsiveness of myeloid CD1c+ DCs compared to CD141hi DCs and pDCs. CD1c+ DCs produced interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-1β but not IL-12p70, a cytokine important for Th1 activation and host defenses against Mtb. Yet, CD1c+ DCs were able to activate autologous naïve CD4+ T cells. By combining cell purification with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and gene expression profiling on rare cell populations, we detected in responding CD4+ T cells, genes related to effector-cytolytic functions and transcription factors associated with Th1, Th17, and Treg polarization, suggesting multifunctional properties in our experimental conditions. Finally, immunohistologic analyses revealed contact between CD11c+ cells and pDCs in LNs of TB patients and in vitro data suggest that cooperation between Mtb-infected CD1c+ DCs and pDCs favors stimulation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25071784

  16. Tbx16 and Msgn1 are required to establish directional cell migration of zebrafish mesodermal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alyssa J; Kimelman, David

    2015-10-15

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential process that occurs repeatedly during embryogenesis whereby stably adherent cells convert to an actively migrating state. While much is known about the factors and events that initiate the EMT, the steps that cells undergo to become directionally migratory are far less well understood. Zebrafish embryos lacking the transcription factors Tbx16/Spadetail and Mesogenin1 (Msgn1) are a valuable system for investigating the EMT. Mesodermal cells in these embryos are unable to perform the EMT necessary to leave the most posterior end of the body (the tailbud) and join the pre-somitic mesoderm, a process that is conserved in all vertebrates. It has previously been very difficult to study this EMT in vertebrates because of the multiple cell types in the tailbud and the morphogenetic changes the whole embryo undergoes. Here, we describe a novel tissue explant system for imaging the mesodermal cell EMT in vivo that allows us to investigate the requirements for cells to acquire migratory properties during the EMT with high spatio-temporal resolution. This method revealed that, despite the inability of tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells to leave the tailbud, actin-based protrusions form surprisingly normally in these cells and they become highly motile. However, tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells have specific cell-autonomous defects in the persistence and anterior direction of migration because the lamellipodia they form are not productive in driving anteriorward migration. Additionally, we show that mesoderm morphogenesis and differentiation are separable and that there is a migratory cue that directs mesodermal cell migration that is independent of Tbx16 and Msgn1. This work defines changes that cells undergo as they complete the EMT and provides new insight into the mechanisms required in vivo for cells to become mesenchymal.

  17. Apical-basal polarity proteins are required cell-type specifically to direct photoreceptor morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Jennifer J; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2012-12-18

    Insect photoreceptor function is dependent on precise placement of the rhabdomeres, elaborated apical domains specialized for capturing light, within each facet of a compound eye. In Diptera, an asymmetric arrangement of rhabdomeres, combined with a particular pattern of axonal connections, enhances light sensitivity through the principle of neural superposition. To achieve the necessary retinal geometry, different photoreceptors (R cells) have distinct shapes. The Crumbs and Bazooka complexes play critical roles in directing rhabdomere development, but whether they might direct cell-type-specific apical architectures is unknown. We demonstrate that while mutations in Bazooka complex members cause pleiotropic morphogenesis defects in all R cell subtypes, Crumbs (Crb) and Stardust (Sdt) function cell autonomously to direct early stages in rhabdomere assembly in specific subsets of R cells. This requirement is reflected in the cell-type-specific expression of Crb protein and demonstrates that Sdt and Crb can act independently to similar effect. These two genes are also required for zonula adherens (ZA) assembly but display an unusual pattern of cellular redundancy for this function, as each gene is required in only one of two adjoining cells. Our results provide a direct link between fate specification and morphogenetic patterning and suggest a model for ZA assembly.

  18. Myosin Id is required for planar cell polarity in ciliated tracheal and ependymal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hegan, Peter S; Ostertag, Eric; Geurts, Aron M; Mooseker, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    In wild type (WT) tracheal epithelial cells, ciliary basal bodies are oriented such that all cilia on the cell surface beat in the same upward direction. This precise alignment of basal bodies and, as a result, the ciliary axoneme, is termed rotational planar cell polarity (PCP). Rotational PCP in the multi-ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea is perturbed in rats lacking myosin Id (Myo1d). Myo1d is localized in the F-actin and basal body rich subapical cortex of the ciliated tracheal epithelial cell. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Myo1d knock out (KO) trachea revealed that the unidirectional bending pattern is disrupted. Instead, cilia splay out in a disordered, often radial pattern. Measurement of the alignment axis of the central pair axonemal microtubules was much more variable in the KO, another indicator that rotational PCP is perturbed. The asymmetric localization of the PCP core protein Vangl1 is lost. Both the velocity and linearity of cilia-driven movement of beads above the tracheal mucosal surface was impaired in the Myo1d KO. Multi-ciliated brain ependymal epithelial cells exhibit a second form of PCP termed translational PCP in which basal bodies and attached cilia are clustered at the anterior side of the cell. The precise asymmetric clustering of cilia is disrupted in the ependymal cells of the Myo1d KO rat. While basal body clustering is maintained, left-right positioning of the clusters is lost.

  19. The Zebrafish G12 Gene is required for Nuclear Positioning and Cell Migrations during Early Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinsch, S. S.; Conway, G. C.

    2003-01-01

    After fertilization Zebrafish embryos undergo synchronous cleavage to form a blastula of cells sitting upon a single multinucleate yolk cell. At the beginning of gastrulation these cells undergo extensive cell migrations to form the major body axes. We have discovered a gene, G12, which is required for cell migrations and positioning of nuclei in the large syncytial yolk cell. Overexpression of a G12-GFP fusion protein is not toxic and shows that the protein localizes inside the yolk cell to the yolk nuclei, microtubules, and to the margin between the blastomeres and the large yolk cell. Morpholino (MO) injection into the 1-cell embryo or into just the yolk syncytium conipletely inhibits cell migrations, doming of the yolk cell, and positioning of nuclei around the margin. This effect can be partially rescued by injection of G12-GFP encoding RNA. Given the known role of microtubules in nuclear positioning of yolk nuclei in Zebrafish, we investigated the microtubules in morpholiiio injected and rescued embryos. We find that microtubules are sparse and disorganized in MO-injected embryos and are restored to normal organization upon G12-GFP rescue. G12 plays a pivotal role in organization of inicrotubules during early development. G12 is highly conserved in vertebrates and two homologues exist in the human genome. One of the human hoinologues is amplified in aggressive breast tumors.

  20. Metabolic requirements for the maintenance of self-renewing stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Keisuke; Suda, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    A distinctive feature of stem cells is their capacity to self-renew to maintain pluripotency. Studies of genetically-engineered mouse models and recent advances in metabolomic analysis, particularly in haematopoietic stem cells, have deepened our understanding of the contribution made by metabolic cues to the regulation of stem cell self-renewal. Many types of stem cells heavily rely on anaerobic glycolysis, and stem cell function is also regulated by bioenergetic signalling, the AKT–mTOR pathway, Gln metabolism and fatty acid metabolism. As maintenance of a stem cell pool requires a finely-tuned balance between self-renewal and differentiation, investigations into the molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways underlying these decisions hold great therapeutic promise. PMID:24651542

  1. Centriole maturation requires regulated Plk1 activity during two consecutive cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dong; Farmer, Veronica; Shukla, Anil; James, Jana; Gruskin, Richard; Kiriyama, Shigeo; Loncarek, Jadranka

    2014-09-29

    Newly formed centrioles in cycling cells undergo a maturation process that is almost two cell cycles long before they become competent to function as microtubule-organizing centers and basal bodies. As a result, each cell contains three generations of centrioles, only one of which is able to form cilia. It is not known how this long and complex process is regulated. We show that controlled Plk1 activity is required for gradual biochemical and structural maturation of the centrioles and timely appendage assembly. Inhibition of Plk1 impeded accumulation of appendage proteins and appendage formation. Unscheduled Plk1 activity, either in cycling or interphase-arrested cells, accelerated centriole maturation and appendage and cilia formation on the nascent centrioles, erasing the age difference between centrioles in one cell. These findings provide a new understanding of how the centriole cycle is regulated and how proper cilia and centrosome numbers are maintained in the cells.

  2. MMP7 is required to mediate cell invasion and tumor formation upon Plakophilin3 loss.

    PubMed

    Basu, Srikanta; Thorat, Rahul; Dalal, Sorab N

    2015-01-01

    Plakophilin3 (PKP3) loss results in increased transformation in multiple cell lines in vitro and increased tumor formation in vivo. A microarray analysis performed in the PKP3 knockdown clones, identified an inflammation associated gene signature in cell lines derived from stratified epithelia as opposed to cell lines derived from simple epithelia. However, in contrast to the inflammation associated gene signature, the expression of MMP7 was increased upon PKP3 knockdown in all the cell lines tested. Using vector driven RNA interference, it was demonstrated that MMP7 was required for in-vitro cell migration and invasion and tumor formation in vivo. The increase in MMP7 levels was due to the increase in levels of the Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver3 (PRL3), which is observed upon PKP3 loss. The results suggest that MMP7 over-expression may be one of the mechanisms by which PKP3 loss leads to increased cell invasion and tumor formation.

  3. The vacuole/lysosome is required for cell-cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yui; Weisman, Lois S

    2015-08-31

    Organelles are distributed to daughter cells, via inheritance pathways. However, it is unclear whether there are mechanisms beyond inheritance, which ensure that organelles are present in all cells. Here we present the unexpected finding that the yeast vacuole plays a positive essential role in initiation of the cell-cycle. When inheritance fails, a new vacuole is generated. We show that this occurs prior to the next cell-cycle, and gain insight into this alternative pathway. Moreover, we find that a combination of a defect in inheritance with an acute block in the vacuole biogenesis results in the loss of a functional vacuole and a specific arrest of cells in early G1 phase. Furthermore, this role for the vacuole in cell-cycle progression requires an intact TORC1-SCH9 pathway that can only signal from a mature vacuole. These mechanisms may serve as a checkpoint for the presence of the vacuole/lysosome.

  4. Rotaviruses require basolateral molecules for efficient infection of polarized MDCKII cells.

    PubMed

    Realpe, Mauricio; Espinosa, Rafaela; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2010-02-01

    In this work we evaluated the ability of rotavirus strains with different receptor requirements to infect the apical and basolateral surfaces of polarized MDCKII cells. We used neuraminidase (NA)-sensitive (RRV and TFR-1) and neuraminidase-resistant (Wa and UK) viruses that differ in their use of integrins. Regardless of their receptor requirements, all virus strains tested were found to efficiently infect cells from both membrane surface domains, with preference for the basolateral domain, since: (i) disruption of tight junctions of polarized cell monolayers by calcium chelation led to a reversible increase of rotavirus infectivity, (ii) the viruses infected preferentially the cells located at the borders of microcolonies of polarized cells, and (iii) in cells grown on a permeable support all four virus strains were able to start the infection by either plasma membrane domain. Preferential infection (5-11-fold more efficiently) of the basolateral surface correlated with the neuraminidase resistance of the virus strains, but not with their requirement for integrins, which in MDCKII cells seem to be used by all four viruses. The infection of both cell surface domains by RRV was found to depend on the presence of terminal sialic acids, since its infectivity was reduced by neuraminidase treatment of the cells and it was also blocked by incubation of the virus with glycophorin A. The efficient infection through the basolateral membrane surface of polarized cells might be relevant for the pathogenesis of rotavirus, especially given the recent reports of antigenemia and extraintestinal spread of the virus in children and animal models. PMID:19932141

  5. Erythropoietin enhancement of rat pancreatic tumor cell proliferation requires the activation of ERK and JNK signals.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chhanda; Udupa, Kodetthoor B

    2008-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) regulates the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid cells by binding to its specific transmembrane receptor EPOR. Recent studies, however, have shown that the EPOR is additionally present in various cancer cells and EPO induces the proliferation of these cells, suggesting a different function for EPO other than erythropoiesis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine EPOR expression and the role of EPO in the proliferation and signaling cascades involved in this process, using the rat pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J. Our results showed that AR42J cells expressed EPOR, and EPO significantly enhanced their proliferation. Cell cycle analysis of EPO-treated cells indicated an increased percentage of cells in the S phase, whereas cell numbers in G0/G1 phase were significantly reduced. Phosphorylation of extracellular regulatory kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) was rapidly stimulated and sustained after EPO addition. Treatment of cells with mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059 or JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited EPO-enhanced proliferation and also increased the fraction of cells in G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, the inhibition of JNK using small interference RNA (siRNA) suppressed EPO-enhanced proliferation of AR42J cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR42J cells express EPOR and that the activation of both ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 by EPO is essential in regulating proliferation and the cell cycle. Thus both appear to play a key role in EPO-enhanced proliferation and suggest that the presence of both is required for EPO-mediated proliferation of AR42J cells.

  6. The Molecular Chaperone Hsp90 Is Required for Cell Cycle Exit in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bandura, Jennifer L.; Jiang, Huaqi; Nickerson, Derek W.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite+ reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis. PMID:24086162

  7. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Jiang, Huaqi; Nickerson, Derek W; Edgar, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+) reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis. PMID:24086162

  8. Drosophila PI4KIIIalpha is required in follicle cells for oocyte polarization and Hippo signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Denef, Natalie; Tang, Charm; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2011-01-01

    In a genetic screen we isolated mutations in CG10260, which encodes a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4KIIIalpha), and found that PI4KIIIalpha is required for Hippo signaling in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells. PI4KIIIalpha mutations in the posterior follicle cells lead to oocyte polarization defects similar to those caused by mutations in the Hippo signaling pathway. PI4KIIIalpha mutations also cause misexpression of well-established Hippo signaling targets. The Merlin-Expanded-Kibra complex is required at the apical membrane for Hippo activity. In PI4KIIIalpha mutant follicle cells, Merlin fails to localize to the apical domain. Our analysis of PI4KIIIalpha mutants provides a new link in Hippo signal transduction from the cell membrane to its core kinase cascade. PMID:21429988

  9. A large dispersed chromosomal region required for chromosome segregation in sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling Juan; Errington, Jeff

    2002-08-01

    The cis-acting sequences required for chromosome segregation are poorly understood in most organisms, including bacteria. Sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis undergo an unusual asymmetric cell division during which the origin of DNA replication (oriC) region of the chromosome migrates to an extreme polar position. We have now characterized the sequences required for this migration. We show that the previously characterized soj-spo0J chromosome segregation system is not essential for chromosome movement to the cell pole, so this must be driven by an additional segregation mechanism. Observations on a large set of precisely engineered chromosomal inversions and translocations have identified a polar localization region (PLR), which lies approximately 150-300 kbp to the left of oriC. Surprisingly, oriC itself has no involvement in this chromosome segregation system. Dissection of the PLR showed that it has internal functional redundancy, reminiscent of the large diffuse centromeres of most eukaryotic cells.

  10. The SWI/SNF ATPases Are Required for Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Madany, Pasil; Akech, Jacqueline; Dobson, Jason R; Douthwright, Stephen; Browne, Gillian; Colby, Jennifer L; Winter, Georg E; Bradner, James E; Pratap, Jitesh; Sluder, Greenfield; Bhargava, Rohit; Chiosea, Simion I; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Imbalzano, Anthony N

    2015-11-01

    The Brahma (BRM) and Brahma-related Gene 1 (BRG1) ATPases are highly conserved homologs that catalyze the chromatin remodeling functions of the multi-subunit human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes in a mutually exclusive manner. SWI/SNF enzyme subunits are mutated or missing in many cancer types, but are overexpressed without apparent mutation in other cancers. Here, we report that both BRG1 and BRM are overexpressed in most primary breast cancers independent of the tumor's receptor status. Knockdown of either ATPase in a triple negative breast cancer cell line reduced tumor formation in vivo and cell proliferation in vitro. Fewer cells in S phase and an extended cell cycle progression time were observed without any indication of apoptosis, senescence, or alterations in migration or attachment properties. Combined knockdown of BRM and BRG1 showed additive effects in the reduction of cell proliferation and time required for completion of cell cycle, suggesting that these enzymes promote cell cycle progression through independent mechanisms. Knockout of BRG1 or BRM using CRISPR/Cas9 technology resulted in the loss of viability, consistent with a requirement for both enzymes in triple negative breast cancer cells.

  11. Ezrin and Moesin Are Required for Efficient T Cell Adhesion and Homing to Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily J. H.; Shaffer, Meredith H.; Williamson, Edward K.; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K.

    2013-01-01

    T cell trafficking between the blood and lymphoid organs is a complex, multistep process that requires several highly dynamic and coordinated changes in cyto-architecture. Members of the ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) family of actin-binding proteins have been implicated in several aspects of this process, but studies have yielded conflicting results. Using mice with a conditional deletion of ezrin in CD4+ cells and moesin-specific siRNA, we generated T cells lacking ERM proteins, and investigated the effect on specific events required for T cell trafficking. ERM-deficient T cells migrated normally in multiple in vitro and in vivo assays, and could undergo efficient diapedesis in vitro. However, these cells were impaired in their ability to adhere to the β1 integrin ligand fibronectin, and to polarize appropriately in response to fibronectin and VCAM-1 binding. This defect was specific for β1 integrins, as adhesion and polarization in response to ICAM-1 were normal. In vivo, ERM-deficient T cells showed defects in homing to lymphoid organs. Taken together, these results show that ERM proteins are largely dispensable for T cell chemotaxis, but are important for β1 integrin function and homing to lymphoid organs. PMID:23468835

  12. Antibody response to a T-dependent antigen requires B cell expression of complement receptors

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody responses to T- dependent antigens require complement receptors expressed on either B lymphocytes or follicular dendritic cells. We have used RAG-2 deficient blastocyst complementation to create mice specifically lacking B cell complement receptors. Despite normal expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1[CD35]) and CR2 (CD21) on follicular dendritic cells, these mice have a profound defect in their capacity to mount a T-dependent antibody response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This suggests that CD21 and/or CD35 on B lymphocytes may be required for cellular activation, adsorptive endocytosis of antigen, recruitment to germinal centers, and/or protection from apoptosis during the humoral response to T-dependent antigens. PMID:8666942

  13. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated induction of peripheral T(reg) cells and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens by peripheral regulatory T cells (pT(reg) cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure for the 'instruction' of naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into pT(reg) cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs were dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) were critical, for pT(reg) cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b(-) cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pT(reg) cells and, conversely, loss of transcription factor IRF8-dependent CD11b(-) cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in the induction of pT(reg) cells and their redundancy during the development of oral tolerance.

  14. Spen is required for pigment cell survival during pupal development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Querenet, Matthieu; Goubard, Valerie; Chatelain, Gilles; Davoust, Nathalie; Mollereau, Bertrand

    2015-06-15

    Apoptosis is required during development to eliminate superfluous cells and sculpt tissues; spatial and timed control of apoptosis ensures that the necessary number of cells is eliminated at a precise time in a given tissue. The elimination of supernumerary pigment or inter-ommatidial cells (IOCs) depends on cell-cell communication and is necessary for the formation of the honeycomb-like structure of the Drosophila eye. However, the mechanisms occurring during pupal development and controlling apoptosis of superfluous IOC in space and time remain unclear. Here, we found that split-ends (spen) is required for IOC survival at the time of removal of superfluous IOCs. Loss of spen function leads to abnormal removal of IOCs by apoptosis. We show that spen is required non-autonomously in cone cells for the survival of IOCs by positively regulating the Spitz/EGFR pathway. We propose that Spen is an important survival factor that ensures spatial control of the apoptotic wave that is necessary for the correct patterning and formation of the Drosophila eye.

  15. Vimentin is sufficient and required for wound repair and remodeling in alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Soni, Pritin N.; Troken, James R.; Sitikov, Albert; Trejo, Humberto E.; Ridge, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological and pathophysiological implications of the expression of vimentin, a type III intermediate filament protein, in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are unknown. We provide data demonstrating that vimentin is regulated by TGFβ1, a major cytokine released in response to acute lung injury and that vimentin is required for wound repair and remodeling of the alveolar epithelium. Quantitative real-time PCR shows a 16-fold induction of vimentin mRNA in TGFβ1-treated transformed AECs. Luciferase assays identify a Smad-binding element in the 5′ promoter of vimentin responsible for TGFβ1-induced transcription. Notably, TGFβ1 induces vimentin protein expression in AECs, which is associated with a 2.5-fold increase in cell motility, resulting in increased rates of migration and wound closure. These effects are independent of cell proliferation. TGFβ1-mediated vimentin protein expression, cell migration, and wound closure are prevented by a pharmacological inhibitor of the Smad pathway and by expression of Ad-shRNA against vimentin. Conversely, overexpression of mEmerald-vimentin is sufficient for increased cell-migration and wound-closure rates. These results demonstrate that vimentin is required and sufficient for increased wound repair in an in vitro model of lung injury.—Rogel, M. R., Soni, P. N., Troken, J. R., Sitikov, A., Trejo, H. E., Ridge, K. M. Vimentin is sufficient and required for wound repair and remodeling in alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:21803859

  16. Development and validation of an universal interface for compound-specific stable isotope analysis of chlorine (37Cl/35Cl) by GC-high-temperature conversion (HTC)-MS/IRMS.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Gilevska, Tetyana; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2015-03-01

    A universal application of compound-specific isotope analysis of chlorine was thus far limited by the availability of suitable analysis techniques. In this study, gas chromatography in combination with a high-temperature conversion interface (GC-HTC), converting organic chlorine in the presence of H2 to gaseous HCl, was coupled to a dual-detection system, combining an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) and isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The combination of the MS/IRMS detection enabled a detailed characterization, optimization, and online monitoring of the high-temperature conversion process via ion trap MS as well as a simultaneous chlorine isotope analysis by the IRMS. Using GC-HTC-MS/IRMS, chlorine isotope analysis at optimized conversion conditions resulted in very accurate isotope values (δ(37)Cl(SMOC)) for measured reference material with known isotope composition, including chlorinated ethylene, chloromethane, hexachlorocyclohexane, and trichloroacetic acids methyl ester. Respective detection limits were determined to be <15 nmol Cl on column with achieved precision of <0.3‰.

  17. neurogenin3 is required for the development of the four endocrine cell lineages of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gradwohl, Gérard; Dierich, Andrée; LeMeur, Marianne; Guillemot, François

    2000-01-01

    In the mammalian pancreas, the endocrine cell types of the islets of Langerhans, including the α-, β-, δ-, and pancreatic polypeptide cells as well as the exocrine cells, derive from foregut endodermal progenitors. Recent genetic studies have identified a network of transcription factors, including Pdx1, Isl1, Pax4, Pax6, NeuroD, Nkx2.2, and Hlxb9, regulating the development of islet cells at different stages, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the specification of pancreatic endocrine precursors remain unknown. neurogenin3 (ngn3) is a member of a family of basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors that is involved in the determination of neural precursor cells in the neuroectoderm. ngn3 is expressed in discrete regions of the nervous system and in scattered cells in the embryonic pancreas. We show herein that ngn3-positive cells coexpress neither insulin nor glucagon, suggesting that ngn3 marks early precursors of pancreatic endocrine cells. Mice lacking ngn3 function fail to generate any pancreatic endocrine cells and die postnatally from diabetes. Expression of Isl1, Pax4, Pax6, and NeuroD is lost, and endocrine precursors are lacking in the mutant pancreatic epithelium. Thus, ngn3 is required for the specification of a common precursor for the four pancreatic endocrine cell types. PMID:10677506

  18. In vivo collective cell migration requires an LPAR2-dependent increase in tissue fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Sei; Theveneau, Eric; Benedetto, Alexandre; Parsons, Maddy; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Charras, Guillaume; Kabla, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) are common to cancer and morphogenesis, and are often considered to be mutually exclusive in spite of the fact that many cancer and embryonic cells that have gone through EMT still cooperate to migrate collectively. Here we use neural crest (NC) cells to address the question of how cells that have down-regulated cell–cell adhesions can migrate collectively. NC cell dissociation relies on a qualitative and quantitative change of the cadherin repertoire. We found that the level of cell–cell adhesion is precisely regulated by internalization of N-cadherin downstream of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 2. Rather than promoting the generation of single, fully mesenchymal cells, this reduction of membrane N-cadherin only triggers a partial mesenchymal phenotype. This intermediate phenotype is characterized by an increase in tissue fluidity akin to a solid-like–to–fluid-like transition. This change of plasticity allows cells to migrate under physical constraints without abolishing cell cooperation required for collectiveness. PMID:25002680

  19. HDAC6 activity is not required for basal autophagic flux in metastatic prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 is a multifunctional lysine deacetylase that is recently emerging as a central facilitator of response to stress and may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. The histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin has been shown to slow the growth of metastatic prostate cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the proteins histone deacetylase 6 interacts with, and thus its role in cancer cells, remains poorly characterized. Histone deacetylase 6 deacetylase activity has recently been shown to be required for efficient basal autophagic flux. Autophagy is often dysregulated in cancer cells and may confer stress resistance and allow for cell maintenance and a high proliferation rate. Tubacin may therefore slow cancer cell proliferation by decreasing autophagic flux. We characterized the histone deacetylase 6-interacting proteins in LNCaP metastatic prostate cancer cells and found that histone deacetylase 6 interacts with proteins involved in several cellular processes, including autophagy. Based on our interaction screen, we assessed the impact of the histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and found that tubacin does not influence autophagic flux. Histone deacetylase 6 therefore influences cell proliferation through an autophagy-independent mechanism. PMID:26643866

  20. Transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is required for the hormone-sensing cell lineage in mammary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kunasegaran, Kamini; Ho, Victor; Chang, Ted H-T; De Silva, Duvini; Bakker, Martijn L; Christoffels, Vincent M; Pietersen, Alexandra M

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development) and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production). Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER) and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells.

  1. Transcriptional Repressor Tbx3 Is Required for the Hormone-Sensing Cell Lineage in Mammary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kunasegaran, Kamini; Ho, Victor; Chang, Ted H-. T.; De Silva, Duvini; Bakker, Martijn L.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Pietersen, Alexandra M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development) and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production). Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER) and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells. PMID:25343378

  2. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 Is Required to Trigger Pyroptotic Death of Lymphoid-Tissue-Derived CD4 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Nicole L K; Doitsh, Gilad; Monroe, Kathryn M; Yang, Zhiyuan; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Levy, David N; Greene, Warner C

    2015-09-01

    The progressive depletion of CD4 T cells underlies clinical progression to AIDS in untreated HIV-infected subjects. Most dying CD4 T cells correspond to resting nonpermissive cells residing in lymphoid tissues. Death is due to an innate immune response against the incomplete cytosolic viral DNA intermediates accumulating in these cells. The viral DNA is detected by the IFI16 sensor, leading to inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation, and the induction of pyroptosis, a highly inflammatory form of programmed cell death. We now show that cell-to-cell transmission of HIV is obligatorily required for activation of this death pathway. Cell-free HIV-1 virions, even when added in large quantities, fail to activate pyroptosis. These findings underscore the infected CD4 T cells as the major killing units promoting progression to AIDS and highlight a previously unappreciated role for the virological synapse in HIV pathogenesis.

  3. The HLH protein Extramacrochaetae is required for R7 cell and cone cell fates in the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Notch signaling is one of the most important pathways in development and homeostasis, and is altered in multiple pathologies. Study of Drosophila eye development shows that Notch signaling depends on the HLH protein Extramacrochaetae. Null mutant clones show that extramacrochaetae is required for multiple aspects of eye development that depend on Notch signaling, including morphogenetic furrow progression, differentiation of R4, R7 and cone cell types, and rotation of ommatidial clusters. Detailed analysis of R7 and cone cell specification reveals that extramacrochaetae acts cell autonomously and epistatically to Notch, and is required for normal expression of bHLH genes encoded by the E(spl)-C which are effectors of most Notch signaling. A model is proposed in which Extramacrochaetae acts in parallel to or as a feed-forward regulator of the E(spl)-Complex to promote Notch signaling in particular cellular contexts. PMID:19118542

  4. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cells Requires IRF4 but Not XBP-1

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Caline G.; Rangaswamy, Udaya Shankari; Wakeman, Brian S.; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses display tropism for B cells and, like all known herpesviruses, exhibit distinct lytic and latent life cycles. One well-established observation among members of the gammaherpesvirus family is the link between viral reactivation from latently infected B cells and plasma cell differentiation. Importantly, a number of studies have identified a potential role for a CREB/ATF family member, X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), in trans-activating the immediate early BZLF-1 or BRLF1/gene 50 promoters of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), respectively. XBP-1 is required for the unfolded protein response and has been identified as a critical transcription factor in plasma cells. Here, we demonstrate that XBP-1 is capable of trans-activating the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) RTA promoter in vitro, consistent with previous observations for EBV and KSHV. However, we show that in vivo there does not appear to be a requirement for XBP-1 expression in B cells for virus reactivation. The MHV68 M2 gene product under some experimental conditions plays an important role in virus reactivation from B cells. M2 has been shown to drive B cell differentiation to plasma cells, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, both of which are dependent on M2 induction of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression. IRF4 is required for plasma cell differentiation, and consistent with a role for plasma cells in MHV68 reactivation from B cells, we show that IRF4 expression in B cells is required for efficient reactivation of MHV68 from splenocytes. Thus, the latter analyses are consistent with previous studies linking plasma cell differentiation to MHV68 reactivation from B cells. The apparent independence of MHV68 reactivation from XBP-1 expression in plasma cells may reflect redundancy among CREB/ATF family members or the involvement of other plasma cell-specific transcription factors. Regardless, these findings

  5. Differential requirements of two insect cell lines for growth in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, J L; Fan, F

    1997-06-01

    The development of a serum-free medium that supports the growth of cells from a Spodoptera frugiperda and a Lymantria dispar cell line is reported. A yeast hydrolysate provided the B-vitamin complex, and a combination of a meat hydrolysate and tryptose provided most of the free amino acids required for cell growth. Supplemental cystine and methionine were required to achieve maximum cell growth. The serum or serum replacements used in earlier formulations were replaced with commercial lipid preparations and increased levels of iron salts. Although the cell growth cycle had a somewhat extended lag phase and the population doubling time of the S. frugiperda cells was longer than on serum-containing medium, the saturation densities were much higher. Spodoptera cells grown in this medium replicated the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus well, producing 8.71 x 10(6) TCID50 extracellular virus and 4.4 x 10(6) polyhedra/ml culture. The specific activity of the polyhedra was somewhat less than that of polyhedra produced in insects. PMID:9201517

  6. Differential requirements of two insect cell lines for growth in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, J L; Fan, F

    1997-06-01

    The development of a serum-free medium that supports the growth of cells from a Spodoptera frugiperda and a Lymantria dispar cell line is reported. A yeast hydrolysate provided the B-vitamin complex, and a combination of a meat hydrolysate and tryptose provided most of the free amino acids required for cell growth. Supplemental cystine and methionine were required to achieve maximum cell growth. The serum or serum replacements used in earlier formulations were replaced with commercial lipid preparations and increased levels of iron salts. Although the cell growth cycle had a somewhat extended lag phase and the population doubling time of the S. frugiperda cells was longer than on serum-containing medium, the saturation densities were much higher. Spodoptera cells grown in this medium replicated the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus well, producing 8.71 x 10(6) TCID50 extracellular virus and 4.4 x 10(6) polyhedra/ml culture. The specific activity of the polyhedra was somewhat less than that of polyhedra produced in insects.

  7. CRTC2 is required for β-cell function and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Chandra E; Fu, Accalia; Reeks, Courtney; Screaton, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Previous work in insulinoma cell lines has established that calcineurin plays a critical role in the activation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (Creb), a key transcription factor required for β-cell function and survival, by dephosphorylating the Creb coactivator Creb-regulated transcription coactivator (Crtc)2 at 2 regulatory sites, Ser171 and Ser275. Here, we report that Crtc2 is essential both for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and cell survival in the β-cell. Endogenous Crtc2 activation is achieved via increasing glucose levels to the physiological feeding range, indicating that Crtc2 is a sensor that couples ambient glucose concentrations to Creb activity in the β-cell. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporin A and tacrolimus that target the protein phosphatase calcineurin are commonly administered after organ transplantation. Chronic use is associated with reduced insulin secretion and new onset diabetes, suggestive of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Importantly, we show that overexpression of a Crtc2 mutant rendered constitutively active by introduction of nonphosphorylatable alanine residues at Ser171 and Ser275 permits Creb target gene activation under conditions when calcineurin is inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that promoting Crtc2-Creb activity is required for β-cell function and proliferation and promoting this pathway could ameliorate symptoms of new onset diabetes after transplantation.

  8. TCR ITAM multiplicity is required for the generation of follicular helper T-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, SuJin; Palin, Amy C; Li, LiQi; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Jan; Herz, Jasmin; Tubo, Noah; Chu, Hamlet; Pepper, Marion; Lesourne, Renaud; Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Pinkhasov, Julia; Jenkins, Marc K; McGavern, Dorian; Love, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    The T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex contains 10 copies of a di-tyrosine Immunoreceptor-Tyrosine-based-Activation-Motif (ITAM) that initiates TCR signalling by recruiting protein tyrosine kinases. ITAM multiplicity amplifies TCR signals, but the importance of this capability for T-cell responses remains undefined. Most TCR ITAMs (6 of 10) are contributed by the CD3ζ subunits. We generated 'knock-in' mice that express non-signalling CD3ζ chains in lieu of wild-type CD3ζ. Here we demonstrate that ITAM multiplicity is important for the development of innate-like T-cells and follicular helper T-cells, events that are known to require strong/sustained TCR-ligand interactions, but is not essential for 'general' T-cell responses including proliferation and cytokine production or for the generation of a diverse antigen-reactive TCR repertoire. PMID:25959494

  9. Drosophila stem cells share a common requirement for the histone H2B ubiquitin protease scrawny.

    PubMed

    Buszczak, Michael; Paterno, Shelley; Spradling, Allan C

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells within diverse tissues share the need for a chromatin configuration that promotes self-renewal, yet few chromatin proteins are known to regulate multiple types of stem cells. We describe a Drosophila gene, scrawny (scny), encoding a ubiquitin-specific protease, which is required in germline, epithelial, and intestinal stem cells. Like its yeast relative UBP10, Scrawny deubiquitylates histone H2B and functions in gene silencing. Consistent with previous studies of this conserved pathway of chromatin regulation, scny mutant cells have elevated levels of ubiquitinylated H2B and trimethylated H3K4. Our findings suggest that inhibiting H2B ubiquitylation through scny represents a common mechanism within stem cells that is used to repress the premature expression of key differentiation genes, including Notch target genes.

  10. TCR ITAM multiplicity is required for the generation of follicular helper T-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, SuJin; Palin, Amy C; Li, LiQi; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Jan; Herz, Jasmin; Tubo, Noah; Chu, Hamlet; Pepper, Marion; Lesourne, Renaud; Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Pinkhasov, Julia; Jenkins, Marc K; McGavern, Dorian; Love, Paul E

    2015-05-11

    The T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex contains 10 copies of a di-tyrosine Immunoreceptor-Tyrosine-based-Activation-Motif (ITAM) that initiates TCR signalling by recruiting protein tyrosine kinases. ITAM multiplicity amplifies TCR signals, but the importance of this capability for T-cell responses remains undefined. Most TCR ITAMs (6 of 10) are contributed by the CD3ζ subunits. We generated 'knock-in' mice that express non-signalling CD3ζ chains in lieu of wild-type CD3ζ. Here we demonstrate that ITAM multiplicity is important for the development of innate-like T-cells and follicular helper T-cells, events that are known to require strong/sustained TCR-ligand interactions, but is not essential for 'general' T-cell responses including proliferation and cytokine production or for the generation of a diverse antigen-reactive TCR repertoire.

  11. Chemokine-dependent T cell migration requires aquaporin-3–mediated hydrogen peroxide uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chikuma, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Verkman, Alan S.; Inoue, Shintaro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine-dependent trafficking is indispensable for the effector function of antigen-experienced T cells during immune responses. In this study, we report that the water/glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed on T cells and regulates their trafficking in cutaneous immune reactions. T cell migration toward chemokines is dependent on AQP3-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) uptake but not the canonical water/glycerol transport. AQP3-mediated H2O2 transport is essential for the activation of the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the subsequent actin dynamics. Coincidentally, AQP3-deficient mice are defective in the development of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity, which is attributed to the impaired trafficking of antigen-primed T cells to the hapten-challenged skin. We therefore suggest that AQP3-mediated H2O2 uptake is required for chemokine-dependent T cell migration in sufficient immune response. PMID:22927550

  12. Skp2 is required for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Huang, Yu-Fan; Zhou, Xin-Ke; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Yi-Fan; Lv, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Xiu-Rong; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint. Here, we showed that the ubiquitin E3-ligase protein Skp2, also as a cell-cycle regulatory protein, was required for the activation of Aurora B and its downstream protein. When we restored Skp2 knockdown Hela cells with Skp2 and Skp2-LRR E3 ligase dead mutant we found that Skp2 could rescue the defect in the activation of Aurora B, but the mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, we discovered that Skp2 could interact with Aurora B and trigger Aurora B Lysine (K) 63-linked ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrated the essential role of Skp2 in cell mitosis progression and spindle checkpoint, which was Aurora B dependent. Our results identified a novel ubiquitinated substrate of Skp2, and also indicated that Aurora B ubiquitination might serve as an important event for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

  13. The actin gene ACT1 is required for phagocytosis, motility, and cell separation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Norman E; Tsao, Che-Chia; Bowen, Josephine; Hehman, Gery L; Williams, Ruth J; Frankel, Joseph

    2006-03-01

    A previously identified Tetrahymena thermophila actin gene (C. G. Cupples and R. E. Pearlman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5160-5164, 1986), here called ACT1, was disrupted by insertion of a neo3 cassette. Cells in which all expressed copies of this gene were disrupted exhibited intermittent and extremely slow motility and severely curtailed phagocytic uptake. Transformation of these cells with inducible genetic constructs that contained a normal ACT1 gene restored motility. Use of an epitope-tagged construct permitted visualization of Act1p in the isolated axonemes of these rescued cells. In ACT1Delta mutant cells, ultrastructural abnormalities of outer doublet microtubules were present in some of the axonemes. Nonetheless, these cells were still able to assemble cilia after deciliation. The nearly paralyzed ACT1Delta cells completed cleavage furrowing normally, but the presumptive daughter cells often failed to separate from one another and later became reintegrated. Clonal analysis revealed that the cell cycle length of the ACT1Delta cells was approximately double that of wild-type controls. Clones could nonetheless be maintained for up to 15 successive fissions, suggesting that the ACT1 gene is not essential for cell viability or growth. Examination of the cell cortex with monoclonal antibodies revealed that whereas elongation of ciliary rows and formation of oral structures were normal, the ciliary rows of reintegrated daughter cells became laterally displaced and sometimes rejoined indiscriminately across the former division furrow. We conclude that Act1p is required in Tetrahymena thermophila primarily for normal ciliary motility and for phagocytosis and secondarily for the final separation of daughter cells.

  14. Lineage-Specific Early Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Requires a G2 Cell Cycle Pause.

    PubMed

    Van Oudenhove, Jennifer J; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Ghule, Prachi N; Del Rio, Roxana; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Stein, Gary S

    2016-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have an abbreviated G1 phase of the cell cycle that allows rapid proliferation and maintenance of pluripotency. Lengthening of G1 corresponds to loss of pluripotency during differentiation. However, precise mechanisms that link alterations in the cell cycle and early differentiation remain to be defined. We investigated initial stages of mesendodermal lineage commitment in hESCs, and observed a cell cycle pause. Transcriptome profiling identified several genes with known roles in regulation of the G2/M transition that were differentially expressed early during lineage commitment. WEE1 kinase, which blocks entry into mitosis by phosphorylating CDK1 at Y15, was the most highly expressed of these genes. Inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation by a specific inhibitor of WEE1 restored cell cycle progression by preventing the G2 pause. Directed differentiation of hESCs revealed that cells paused during commitment to the endo- and mesodermal, but not ectodermal, lineages. Functionally, WEE1 inhibition during meso- and endodermal differentiation selectively decreased expression of definitive endodermal markers SOX17 and FOXA2. Our findings identify a novel G2 cell cycle pause that is required for endodermal differentiation and provide important new mechanistic insights into early events of lineage commitment. Stem Cells 2016;34:1765-1775. PMID:26946228

  15. Beta-Cell ARNT Is Required for Normal Glucose Tolerance in Murine Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Sue Mei; Cha, Kuan Minn; Karunatillake, Ayesha; Stokes, Rebecca A.; Cheng, Kim; McLean, Mark; Cheung, N. W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gunton, Jenny E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Insulin secretion increases in normal pregnancy to meet increasing demands. Inability to increase beta-cell function results in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We have previously shown that the expression of the transcription factor ARNT (Aryl-hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator) is reduced in the islets of humans with type 2 diabetes. Mice with a beta-cell specific deletion of ARNT (β-ARNT mice) have impaired glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. We hypothesised that ARNT is required to increase beta-cell function during pregnancy, and that β-ARNT mice would be unable to compensate for the beta-cell stress of pregnancy. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms of ARNT regulation of beta-cell function and glucose tolerance in pregnancy. Methods β-ARNT females were mated with floxed control (FC) males and FC females with β-ARNT males. Results During pregnancy, β-ARNT mice had a marked deterioration in glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. There was impaired beta-cell proliferation in late pregnancy, associated with decreased protein and mRNA levels of the islet cell-cycle regulator cyclinD2. There was also reduced expression of Irs2 and G6PI. In contrast, in control mice, pregnancy was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in ARNT protein and a 1.6-fold increase in cyclinD2 protein, and with increased beta-cell proliferation. Conclusions Islet ARNT increases in normal murine pregnancy and beta-cell ARNT is required for cyclinD2 induction and increased beta-cell proliferation in pregnancy. PMID:24204824

  16. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  17. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  18. Stage-specific requirement for cyclin D1 in glial progenitor cells of the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Nobs, Lionel; Baranek, Constanze; Nestel, Sigrun; Kulik, Akos; Kapfhammer, Josef; Nitsch, Cordula; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2014-05-01

    Despite the vast abundance of glial progenitor cells in the mouse brain parenchyma, little is known about the molecular mechanisms driving their proliferation in the adult. Here we unravel a critical role of the G1 cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in controlling cell division of glial cells in the cortical grey matter. We detect cyclin D1 expression in Olig2-immunopositive (Olig2+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, as well as in Iba1+ microglia and S100β+ astrocytes in cortices of 3-month-old mice. Analysis of cyclin D1-deficient mice reveals a cell and stage-specific molecular control of cell cycle progression in the various glial lineages. While proliferation of fast dividing Olig2+ cells at early postnatal stages becomes gradually dependent on cyclin D1, this particular G1 regulator is strictly required for the slow divisions of Olig2+/NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors in the adult cerebral cortex. Further, we find that the population of mature oligodendrocytes is markedly reduced in the absence of cyclin D1, leading to a significant decrease in the number of myelinated axons in both the prefrontal cortex and the corpus callosum of 8-month-old mutant mice. In contrast, the pool of Iba1+ cells is diminished already at postnatal day 3 in the absence of cyclin D1, while the number of S100β+ astrocytes remains unchanged in the mutant.

  19. CD34 EXPRESSION BY HAIR FOLLICLE STEM CELLS IS REQUIRED FOR SKIN TUMOR DEVELOPMENT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used knockout mice to show that a cell surface protein called CD34 is required for skin tumor formation in mice. Wild type mice treated with 7-12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and a tumor promoter developed papillomas. When we treated CD34 knockout (KO) mice the same way, n...

  20. Math5 is required for retinal ganglion cell and optic nerve formation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nadean L.; Patel, Sima; Brzezinski, Joseph; Glaser, Tom

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The vertebrate retina contains seven major neuronal and glial cell types in an interconnected network that collects, processes and sends visual signals through the optic nerve to the brain. Retinal neuron differentiation is thought to require both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, yet few intrinsic gene products have been identified that direct this process. Math5 (Atoh7) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is specifically expressed by mouse retinal progenitors. Math5 is highly homologous to atonal, which is critically required for R8 neuron formation during Drosophila eye development. Like R8 cells in the fly eye, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the first neurons in the vertebrate eye. Here we show that Math5 mutant mice are fully viable, yet lack RGCs and optic nerves. Thus, two evolutionarily diverse eye types require atonal gene family function for the earliest stages of retinal neuron formation. At the same time, the abundance of cone photoreceptors is significantly increased in Math5−/− retinae, suggesting a binary change in cell fate from RGCs to cones. A small number of nascent RGCs are detected during embryogenesis, but these fail to develop further, suggesting that committed RGCs may also require Math5 function. PMID:11493566

  1. Scrib is Required for Epithelial Cell Identity and Prevents Epithelial To Mesenchymal Transition in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yamben, Idella F.; Rachel, Rivka A.; Shatadal, Shalini; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Warming, Soren; Griep, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and function of epithelial tissues depends on the establishment and maintenance of defining characteristics of epithelial cells, cell-cell adhesion and cell polarity. Disruption of these characteristics can lead to the loss of epithelial identity through a process called epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which can contribute to pathological conditions such as tissue fibrosis and invasive cancer. In invertebrates, the epithelial polarity gene scrib plays a critical role in establishing and maintaining cell adhesion and polarity. In this study we asked if the mouse homolog, Scrib, is required for establishment and/or maintenance of epithelial identity in vivo. To do so, we conditionally deleted Scrib in the head ectoderm tissue that gives rise to both the ocular lens and the corneal epithelium. Deletion of Scrib in the lens resulted in a change in epithelial cell shape from cuboidal to flattened and elongated. Early in the process, the cell adhesion protein, E-cadherin, and apical polarity protein, ZO-1, were downregulated and the myofibroblast protein, αSMA, was upregulated, suggesting EMT was occurring in the Scrib deficient lenses. Correlating temporally with the upregulation of αSMA, Smad3 and Smad4, TGFβ signaling intermediates, accumulated in the nucleus and Snail, a TGFβ target and transcriptional repressor of the gene encoding E-cadherin, was upregulated. Pax6, a lens epithelial transcription factor required to maintain lens epithelial cell identity also was downregulated. Loss of Scrib in the corneal epithelium also led to molecular changes consistent with EMT, suggesting that the effect of Scrib deficiency was not unique to the lens. Together, these data indicate that mammalian Scrib is required to maintain epithelial identity and that loss of Scrib can culminate in EMT, mediated, at least in part, through TGFβ signaling. PMID:24095903

  2. The development of innate lymphoid cells requires TOX-dependent generation of a common innate lymphoid cell progenitor.

    PubMed

    Seehus, Corey R; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined on the basis of effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways that lead to ILC-lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we found that the transcriptional regulator TOX was required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors into ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrated that TOX deficiency resulted in early defects in the survival or proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as ILC differentiation at a later stage. In addition, comparative transcriptome analysis of bone marrow progenitors revealed that TOX-deficient cells failed to upregulate many genes of the ILC program, including genes that are targets of Notch, which indicated that TOX is a key determinant of early specification to the ILC lineage.

  3. Fast Adaptation in Vestibular Hair Cells Requires Myosin-1c Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Eric A.; Scarborough, John D.; Hirono, Moritoshi; Miller, Emilie D.; Shah, Kavita; Mercer, John A.; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Gillespie, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In sensory hair cells of the inner ear, mechanical amplification of small stimuli requires fast adaptation, the rapid closing of mechanically activated transduction channels. In frog and mouse vestibular hair cells, we found that the rate of fast adaptation depends on both channel opening and stimulus size and that it is modeled well as a release of a mechanical element in series with the transduction apparatus. To determine whether myosin-1c molecules of the adaptation motor are responsible for the release, we introduced the Y61G mutation into the Myo1c locus and generated mice homozygous for this sensitized allele. Measuring transduction and adaptation in the presence of NMB-ADP, an allele-specific inhibitor, we found that the inhibitor not only blocked slow adaptation, as demonstrated previously in transgenic mice, but also inhibited fast adaptation. These results suggest that mechanical activity of myosin-1c is required for fast adaptation in vestibular hair cells. PMID:16102537

  4. iNKT cells require TSC1 for terminal maturation and effector lineage fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhong; Yang, Jialong; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongxia; Gorentla, Balachandra; Shin, Jinwook; Qiu, Yurong; Que, Loretta G.; Foster, W. Michael; Xia, Zhenwei; Chi, Hongbo; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Terminal maturation of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells from stage 2 (CD44+NK1.1–) to stage 3 (CD44+NK1.1+) is accompanied by a functional acquisition of a predominant IFN-γ–producing (iNKT-1) phenotype; however, some cells develop into IL-17–producing iNKT (iNKT-17) cells. iNKT-17 cells are rare and restricted to a CD44+NK1.1– lineage. It is unclear how iNKT terminal maturation is regulated and what factors mediate the predominance of iNKT-1 compared with iNKT-17. The tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1) is an important negative regulator of mTOR signaling, which regulates T cell differentiation, function, and trafficking. Here, we determined that mice lacking TSC1 exhibit a developmental block of iNKT differentiation at stage 2 and skew from a predominantly iNKT-1 population toward a predominantly iNKT-17 population, leading to enhanced airway hypersensitivity. Evaluation of purified iNKT cells revealed that TSC1 promotes T-bet, which regulates iNKT maturation, but downregulates ICOS expression in iNKT cells by inhibiting mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, mice lacking T-bet exhibited both a terminal maturation defect of iNKT cells and a predominance of iNKT-17 cells, and increased ICOS expression was required for the predominance of iNKT-17 cells in the population of TSC1-deficient iNKT cells. Our data indicate that TSC1-dependent control of mTORC1 is crucial for terminal iNKT maturation and effector lineage decisions, resulting in the predominance of iNKT-1 cells. PMID:24614103

  5. FGF7 and cell density are required for final differentiation of pancreatic amylase-positive cells from human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yoshie, Susumu; Yue, Fengming; Mogi, Akimi; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-01

    The major molecular signals of pancreatic exocrine development are largely unknown. We examine the role of fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) in the final induction of pancreatic amylase-containing exocrine cells from induced-pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Our protocol consisted in three steps: Step I, differentiation of definitive endoderm (DE) by activin A treatment of hES cell colonies; Step II, differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells by re-plating of the cells of Step I onto 24-well plates at high density and stimulation with all-trans retinoic acid; Step III, differentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells with a combination of FGF7, glucagon-like peptide 1 and nicotinamide. The expression levels of pancreatic endodermal markers such as Foxa2, Sox17 and gut tube endoderm marker HNF1β were up-regulated in both Step I and II. Moreover, in Step III, the induced cells expressed pancreatic markers such as amylase, carboxypeptidase A and chymotrypsinogen B, which were similar to those in normal human pancreas. From day 8 in Step III, cells immunohistochemically positive for amylase and for carboxypeptidase A, a pancreatic exocrine cell product, were induced by FGF7. Pancreatic progenitor Pdx1-positive cells were localized in proximity to the amylase-positive cells. In the absence of FGF7, few amylase-positive cells were identified. Thus, our three-step culture protocol for human ES cells effectively induces the differentiation of amylase- and carboxypeptidase-A-containing pancreatic exocrine cells.

  6. TAF4b is required for mouse spermatogonial stem cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lovasco, Lindsay A.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term mammalian spermatogenesis requires proper development of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that replenish the testis with germ cell progenitors during adult life. TAF4b is a gonadal-enriched component of the general transcription factor complex, TFIID, which is required for the maintenance of spermatogenesis in the mouse. Successful germ cell transplantation assays into adult TAF4b-deficient host testes suggested that TAF4b performs an essential germ cell autonomous function in SSC establishment and/or maintenance. To elucidate the SSC function of TAF4b, we characterized the initial gonocyte pool and rounds of spermatogenic differentiation in the context of the Taf4b-deficient mouse testis. Here we demonstrate a significant reduction in the late embryonic gonocyte pool and a deficient expansion of this pool soon after birth. Resulting from this reduction of germ cell progenitors is a developmental delay in meiosis initiation, as compared to age-matched controls. While GFRα1+ spermatogonia are appropriately present as Asingle and Apaired in wild type testes, TAF4b-deficient testes display an increased proportion of long and clustered chains of GFRα1+ cells. In the absence of TAF4b, seminiferous tubules in the adult testis either lack germ cells altogether or are found to have missing generations of spermatogenic progenitor cells. Together these data indicate that TAF4b-deficient spermatogenic progenitor cells display a tendency for differentiation at the expense of self-renewal and a renewing pool of SSCs fail to establish during the critical window of SSC development. PMID:25727968

  7. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  8. A mex3 homolog is required for differentiation during planarian stem cell lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu Jun; Hallows, Stephanie E; Currie, Ko W; Xu, ChangJiang; Pearson, Bret J

    2015-01-01

    Neoblasts are adult stem cells (ASCs) in planarians that sustain cell replacement during homeostasis and regeneration of any missing tissue. While numerous studies have examined genes underlying neoblast pluripotency, molecular pathways driving postmitotic fates remain poorly defined. In this study, we used transcriptional profiling of irradiation-sensitive and irradiation-insensitive cell populations and RNA interference (RNAi) functional screening to uncover markers and regulators of postmitotic progeny. We identified 32 new markers distinguishing two main epithelial progenitor populations and a planarian homolog to the MEX3 RNA-binding protein (Smed-mex3-1) as a key regulator of lineage progression. mex3-1 was required for generating differentiated cells of multiple lineages, while restricting the size of the stem cell compartment. We also demonstrated the utility of using mex3-1(RNAi) animals to identify additional progenitor markers. These results identified mex3-1 as a cell fate regulator, broadly required for differentiation, and suggest that mex3-1 helps to mediate the balance between ASC self-renewal and commitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07025.001 PMID:26114597

  9. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice.

  10. MYADM regulates Rac1 targeting to ordered membranes required for cell spreading and migration.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Kremer, Leonor; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Calvo, María; Enrich, Carlos; Correas, Isabel; Millán, Jaime; Alonso, Miguel A

    2011-04-15

    Membrane organization into condensed domains or rafts provides molecular platforms for selective recruitment of proteins. Cell migration is a general process that requires spatiotemporal targeting of Rac1 to membrane rafts. The protein machinery responsible for making rafts competent to recruit Rac1 remains elusive. Some members of the MAL family of proteins are involved in specialized processes dependent on this type of membrane. Because condensed membrane domains are a general feature of the plasma membrane of all mammalian cells, we hypothesized that MAL family members with ubiquitous expression and plasma membrane distribution could be involved in the organization of membranes for cell migration. We show that myeloid-associated differentiation marker (MYADM), a protein with unique features within the MAL family, colocalizes with Rac1 in membrane protrusions at the cell surface and distributes in condensed membranes. MYADM knockdown (KD) cells had altered membrane condensation and showed deficient incorporation of Rac1 to membrane raft fractions and, similar to Rac1 KD cells, exhibited reduced cell spreading and migration. Results of rescue-of-function experiments by expression of MYADM or active Rac1L61 in cells knocked down for Rac1 or MYADM, respectively, are consistent with the idea that MYADM and Rac1 act on parallel pathways that lead to similar functional outcomes. PMID:21325632

  11. Identification of Genes Required for Normal Pheromone-Induced Cell Polarization in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, J.; Valtz, N.; Herskowitz, I.

    1994-01-01

    In response to mating pheromones, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adopt a polarized ``shmoo'' morphology, in which the cytoskeleton and proteins involved in mating are localized to a cell-surface projection. This polarization is presumed to reflect the oriented morphogenesis that occurs between mating partners to facilitate cell and nuclear fusion. To identify genes involved in pheromone-induced cell polarization, we have isolated mutants defective in mating to an enfeebled partner and studied a subset of these mutants. The 34 mutants of interest are proficient for pheromone production, arrest in response to pheromone, mate to wild-type strains, and exhibit normal cell polarity during vegetative growth. The mutants were divided into classes based on their morphological responses to mating pheromone. One class is unable to localize cell-surface growth in response to mating factor and instead enlarges in a uniform manner. These mutants harbor special alleles of genes required for cell polarization during vegetative growth, BEM1 and CDC24. Another class of mutants forms bilobed, peanut-like shapes when treated with pheromone and defines two genes, PEA1 and PEA2. PEA1 is identical to SPA2. A third class forms normally shaped but tiny shmoos and defines the gene TNY1. A final group of mutants exhibits apparently normal shmoo morphology. The nature of their mating defect is yet to be determined. We discuss the possible roles of these gene products in establishing cell polarity during mating. PMID:8013906

  12. Androgen Receptor Coactivator ARID4B Is Required for the Function of Sertoli Cells in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yang; Pan, I-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Defects in spermatogenesis, a process that produces spermatozoa inside seminiferous tubules of the testis, result in male infertility. Spermatogenic progression is highly dependent on a microenvironment provided by Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells and epithelium of seminiferous tubules. However, genes that regulate such an important activity of Sertoli cells are poorly understood. Here, we found that AT-rich interactive domain 4B (ARID4B), is essential for the function of Sertoli cells to regulate spermatogenesis. Specifically, we generated Sertoli cell-specific Arid4b knockout (Arid4bSCKO) mice, and showed that the Arid4bSCKO male mice were completely infertile with impaired testis development and significantly reduced testis size. Importantly, severe structural defects accompanied by loss of germ cells and Sertoli cell-only phenotype were found in many seminiferous tubules of the Arid4bSCKO testes. In addition, maturation of Sertoli cells was significantly delayed in the Arid4bSCKO mice, associated with delayed onset of spermatogenesis. Spermatogenic progression was also defective, showing an arrest at the round spermatid stage in the Arid4bSCKO testes. Interestingly, we showed that ARID4B functions as a “coactivator” of androgen receptor and is required for optimal transcriptional activation of reproductive homeobox 5, an androgen receptor target gene specifically expressed in Sertoli cells and critical for spermatogenesis. Together, our study identified ARID4B to be a key regulator of Sertoli cell function important for male germ cell development. PMID:26258622

  13. Actopaxin (α-Parvin) Phosphorylation Is Required for Matrix Degradation and Cancer Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; LaLonde, Sara E.; LaLonde, David P.; Clarke, Dominic; Turner, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cell adhesion and motility is known to be an important factor in the development of tumor malignancy. Actopaxin (α-parvin) is a paxillin, integrin-linked kinase, and F-actin binding focal adhesion protein with several serine phosphorylation sites in the amino terminus that contribute to the regulation of cell spreading and migration. Here, phosphorylation of actopaxin is shown to contribute to the regulation of matrix degradation and cell invasion. Osteosarcoma cells stably expressing wild type (WT), nonphosphorylatable (Quint), and phosphomimetic (S4D/S8D) actopaxin demonstrate that actopaxin phosphorylation is necessary for efficient Src and matrix metalloproteinase-driven degradation of extracellular matrix. Rac1 was found to be required for actopaxin-induced matrix degradation whereas inhibition of myosin contractility promoted degradation in the phosphomutant-expressing Quint cells, indicating that a balance of Rho GTPase signaling and regulation of cellular tension are important for the process. Furthermore, actopaxin forms a complex with the Rac1/Cdc42 GEF β-PIX and Rac1/Cdc42 effector PAK1, to regulate actopaxin-dependent matrix degradation. Actopaxin phosphorylation is elevated in the invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 compared with normal breast epithelial MCF10A cells. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable Quint actopaxin in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibits cell invasion whereas overexpression of WT actopaxin promotes invasion in MCF10A cells. Taken together, this study demonstrates a new role for actopaxin phosphorylation in matrix degradation and cell invasion via regulation of Rho GTPase signaling. PMID:22955285

  14. Planarian MBD2/3 is required for adult stem cell pluripotency independently of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Jaber-Hijazi, Farah; Lo, Priscilla J K P; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Foster, Jeremy M; Benner, Jack S; Tejada Romero, Belen; Chen, Chen; Malla, Sunir; Solana, Jordi; Ruzov, Alexey; Aziz Aboobaker, A

    2013-12-01

    Planarian adult stem cells (pASCs) or neoblasts represent an ideal system to study the evolution of stem cells and pluripotency as they underpin an unrivaled capacity for regeneration. We wish to understand the control of differentiation and pluripotency in pASCs and to understand how conserved, convergent or divergent these mechanisms are across the Bilateria. Here we show the planarian methyl-CpG Binding Domain 2/3 (mbd2/3) gene is required for pASC differentiation during regeneration and tissue homeostasis. The genome does not have detectable levels of 5-methylcytosine (5(m)C) and we find no role for a potential DNA methylase. We conclude that MBD proteins may have had an ancient role in broadly controlling animal stem cell pluripotency, but that DNA methylation is not involved in planarian stem cell differentiation.

  15. Planarian MBD2/3 is required for adult stem cell pluripotency independently of DNA methylation☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaber-Hijazi, Farah; Lo, Priscilla J.K.P.; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Foster, Jeremy M.; Benner, Jack S.; Tejada Romero, Belen; Chen, Chen; Malla, Sunir; Solana, Jordi; Ruzov, Alexey; Aziz Aboobaker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Planarian adult stem cells (pASCs) or neoblasts represent an ideal system to study the evolution of stem cells and pluripotency as they underpin an unrivaled capacity for regeneration. We wish to understand the control of differentiation and pluripotency in pASCs and to understand how conserved, convergent or divergent these mechanisms are across the Bilateria. Here we show the planarian methyl-CpG Binding Domain 2/3 (mbd2/3) gene is required for pASC differentiation during regeneration and tissue homeostasis. The genome does not have detectable levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and we find no role for a potential DNA methylase. We conclude that MBD proteins may have had an ancient role in broadly controlling animal stem cell pluripotency, but that DNA methylation is not involved in planarian stem cell differentiation. PMID:24063805

  16. ATM kinase is required for telomere elongation in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stella Suyong; Bohrson, Craig; Pike, Alexandra Mims; Wheelan, Sarah Jo; Greider, Carol Widney

    2015-01-01

    Summary Short telomeres induce a DNA damage response, senescence and apoptosis; thus, maintaining telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell viability. Telomerase addition of telomere repeats is tightly regulated in cells. To probe pathways that regulate telomere addition, we developed the ADDIT assay to measure new telomere addition at a single telomere in vivo. Sequence analysis showed telomerase specific addition of repeats onto a new telomere occurred in just 48 hr. Using the ADDIT assay, we found that ATM is required for addition of new repeats onto telomeres in mouse cells. Evaluation of bulk telomeres, in both human and mouse cells, showed that blocking ATM inhibited telomere elongation. Finally, the activation of ATM through the inhibition of PARP1 resulted in increased telomere elongation, supporting the central role of the ATM pathway in regulating telomere addition. Understanding this role of ATM may yield new areas for possible therapeutic intervention in telomere-mediated disease. PMID:26586427

  17. ATM Kinase Is Required for Telomere Elongation in Mouse and Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stella Suyong; Bohrson, Craig; Pike, Alexandra Mims; Wheelan, Sarah Jo; Greider, Carol Widney

    2015-11-24

    Short telomeres induce a DNA damage response, senescence, and apoptosis, thus maintaining telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell viability. Telomerase addition of telomere repeats is tightly regulated in cells. To probe pathways that regulate telomere addition, we developed the ADDIT assay to measure new telomere addition at a single telomere in vivo. Sequence analysis showed telomerase-specific addition of repeats onto a new telomere occurred in just 48 hr. Using the ADDIT assay, we found that ATM is required for addition of new repeats onto telomeres in mouse cells. Evaluation of bulk telomeres, in both human and mouse cells, showed that blocking ATM inhibited telomere elongation. Finally, the activation of ATM through the inhibition of PARP1 resulted in increased telomere elongation, supporting the central role of the ATM pathway in regulating telomere addition. Understanding this role of ATM may yield new areas for possible therapeutic intervention in telomere-mediated disease.

  18. Bacillus subtilis α-Phosphoglucomutase Is Required for Normal Cell Morphology and Biofilm Formation†

    PubMed Central

    Lazarevic, Vladimir; Soldo, Blazenka; Médico, Noël; Pooley, Harold; Bron, Sierd; Karamata, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Mutations designated gtaC and gtaE that affect α-phosphoglucomutase activity required for interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate were mapped to the Bacillus subtilis pgcA (yhxB) gene. Backcrossing of the two mutations into the 168 reference strain was accompanied by impaired α-phosphoglucomutase activity in the soluble cell extract fraction, altered colony and cell morphology, and resistance to phages φ29 and ρ11. Altered cell morphology, reversible by additional magnesium ions, may be correlated with a deficiency in the membrane glycolipid. The deficiency in biofilm formation in gtaC and gtaE mutants may be attributed to an inability to synthesize UDP-glucose, an important intermediate in a number of cell envelope biosynthetic processes. PMID:15640167

  19. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C; Regev, Aviv; Williams, Matthew A; Tantin, Dean

    2015-11-16

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4(+) memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4(+) T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4(+) T cell memory.

  20. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N.; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4+ memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4+ T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4+ T cell memory. PMID:26481684

  1. Isoprenoid metabolism is required for stimulation of the respiratory burst oxidase of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bokoch, G M; Prossnitz, V

    1992-01-01

    The formation of oxygen radicals by phagocytic cells occurs through the activation of a multiple-component NADPH oxidase system. An unidentified low molecular weight GTP-binding protein has been proposed to modulate the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins undergo posttranslational processing, including an initial covalent incorporation of an isoprenyl group. To test whether such an isoprenylation reaction might be required for the activity of the oxidase, we utilized compactin and lovastatin as inhibitors of the isoprenylation pathway. Treatment of DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells with compactin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of O2- formation in response to FMLP or phorbol myristate acetate. Cell viability was not affected nor was normal differentiation of the HL-60 cells into a neutrophil-like cell. The inhibitory effect of compactin was specifically prevented by addition of exogenous mevalonic acid to the HL-60 cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of the drug were due to blockade of the pathway leading to isoprenoid synthesis. Addition of cholesterol, ubiquinone, or dolichol, which are also downstream products of the isoprenoid pathway, did not override the inhibitory effects of the drug. Subcellular fractions were prepared from compactin-treated cells, and the location of the compactin-sensitive factor was determined by complementation analysis in a cell-free NADPH oxidase system. The inhibited factor was localized to the HL-60 cytosol. These data suggest that an isoprenoid pathway intermediate is necessary for activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This is likely to represent the requirement for an isoprenoid moiety in the posttranslational modification of a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein. Our studies provide support for the involvement of such a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein in NADPH oxidase activation. Images PMID:1310693

  2. The Arabidopsis PILZ group genes encode tubulin-folding cofactor orthologs required for cell division but not cell growth.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, Katharina; Maulbetsch, Christoph; Priester, Bianca; Trautmann, Susanne; Pacher, Tobias; Geiges, Bernd; Küttner, Frank; Lepiniec, Loic; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Jürgens, Gerd; Mayer, Ulrike

    2002-04-15

    Plant microtubules are organized into specific cell cycle-dependent arrays that have been implicated in diverse cellular processes, including cell division and organized cell expansion. Mutations in four Arabidopsis genes collectively called the PILZ group result in lethal embryos that consist of one or a few grossly enlarged cells. The mutant embryos lack microtubules but not actin filaments. Whereas the cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE is not localized properly, trafficking of the putative auxin efflux carrier PIN1 to the plasma membrane is normal. The four PILZ group genes were isolated by map-based cloning and are shown to encode orthologs of mammalian tubulin-folding cofactors (TFCs) C, D, and E, and associated small G-protein Arl2 that mediate the formation of alpha/beta-tubulin heterodimers in vitro. The TFC C ortholog, PORCINO, was detected in cytosolic protein complexes and did not colocalize with microtubules. Another gene with a related, although weaker, embryo-lethal phenotype, KIESEL, was shown to encode a TFC A ortholog. Our genetic ablation of microtubules shows their requirement in cell division and vesicle trafficking during cytokinesis, whereas cell growth is mediated by microtubule-independent vesicle trafficking to the plasma membrane during interphase.

  3. The Arabidopsis PILZ group genes encode tubulin-folding cofactor orthologs required for cell division but not cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Steinborn, Katharina; Maulbetsch, Christoph; Priester, Bianca; Trautmann, Susanne; Pacher, Tobias; Geiges, Bernd; Küttner, Frank; Lepiniec, Loic; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Jürgens, Gerd; Mayer, Ulrike

    2002-01-01

    Plant microtubules are organized into specific cell cycle-dependent arrays that have been implicated in diverse cellular processes, including cell division and organized cell expansion. Mutations in four Arabidopsis genes collectively called the PILZ group result in lethal embryos that consist of one or a few grossly enlarged cells. The mutant embryos lack microtubules but not actin filaments. Whereas the cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE is not localized properly, trafficking of the putative auxin efflux carrier PIN1 to the plasma membrane is normal. The four PILZ group genes were isolated by map-based cloning and are shown to encode orthologs of mammalian tubulin-folding cofactors (TFCs) C, D, and E, and associated small G-protein Arl2 that mediate the formation of α/β-tubulin heterodimers in vitro. The TFC C ortholog, PORCINO, was detected in cytosolic protein complexes and did not colocalize with microtubules. Another gene with a related, although weaker, embryo-lethal phenotype, KIESEL, was shown to encode a TFC A ortholog. Our genetic ablation of microtubules shows their requirement in cell division and vesicle trafficking during cytokinesis, whereas cell growth is mediated by microtubule-independent vesicle trafficking to the plasma membrane during interphase. PMID:11959844

  4. DipM, a new factor required for peptidoglycan remodelling during cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    In bacteria, cytokinesis is dependent on lytic enzymes that facilitate remodelling of the cell wall during constriction. In this work, we identify a thus far uncharacterized periplasmic protein, DipM, that is required for cell division and polarity in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM is composed of four peptidoglycan binding (LysM) domains and a C-terminal lysostaphin-like (LytM) peptidase domain. It binds to isolated murein sacculi in vitro, and is recruited to the site of constriction through interaction with the cell division protein FtsN. Mutational analyses showed that the LysM domains are necessary and sufficient for localization of DipM, while its peptidase domain is essential for function. Consistent with a role in cell wall hydrolysis, DipM was found to interact with purified murein sacculi in vitro and to induce cell lysis upon overproduction. Its inactivation causes severe defects in outer membrane invagination, resulting in a significant delay between cytoplasmic compartmentalization and final separation of the daughter cells. Overall, these findings indicate that DipM is a periplasmic component of the C. crescentus divisome that facilitates remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer and, thus, coordinated constriction of the cell envelope during the division process.

  5. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  6. Characterization of Drosophila mini-me, a Gene Required for Cell Proliferation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Chonnettia; Reifegerste, Rita; Moses, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila eye, the morphogenetic furrow is a developmental organizing center for patterning and cell proliferation. The furrow acts both to limit eye size and to coordinate the number of cells to the number of facets. Here we report the molecular and functional characterization of Drosophila mini-me (mnm), a potential regulator of cell proliferation and survival in the developing eye. We first identified mnm as a dominant modifier of hedgehog loss-of-function in the developing eye. We report that mnm encodes a conserved protein with zinc knuckle and RING finger domains. We show that mnm is dispensable for patterning of the eye disc, but required in the eye for normal cell proliferation and survival. We also show that mnm null mutant cells exhibit altered cell cycle profiles and contain excess nucleic acid. Moreover, mnm overexpression can induce cells to proliferate and incorporate BrdU. Thus, our data implicate mnm as a regulator of mitotic progression during the proliferative phase of eye development, possibly through the control of nucleic acid metabolism. PMID:16547096

  7. Nuclear thioredoxin-1 is required to suppress cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Shou; Tang, Wen-Xin; Chen, Zheng-Wang . E-mail: zwchen@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2007-09-21

    Different cell line with increased thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) showed a decreased or increased sensitivity to cell killing by cisplatin. Recently, several studies found that the subcellular localization of Trx-1 is closely associated with its functions. In this study, we explored the association of the nuclear Trx-1 with the cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells MCF-7. Firstly, we found that higher total Trx-1 accompanied by no change of nuclear Trx-1 can not influence apoptosis induced by cisplatin in MCF-7 cells transferred with Trx-1 cDNA. Secondly, higher nuclear Trx-1 accompanied by no change of total Trx-1 can protect cells from apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Thirdly, high nuclear Trx-1 involves in the cisplatin-resistance in cisplatin-resistive cells. Meanwhile, we found that the mRNA level of p53 is closely correlated with the level of nuclear Trx-1. In summary, we concluded that the nuclear Trx-1 is required to resist apoptosis of MCF-7 cells induced by cisplatin, probably through up-regulating the anti-apoptotic gene, p53.

  8. Cell Type–dependent Requirement for PIP Box–regulated Cdt1 Destruction During S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun O.; Zacharek, Sima J.; Xiong, Yue

    2010-01-01

    DNA synthesis–coupled proteolysis of the prereplicative complex component Cdt1 by the CRL4Cdt2 E3 ubiquitin ligase is thought to help prevent rereplication of the genome during S phase. To directly test whether CRL4Cdt2-triggered destruction of Cdt1 is required for normal cell cycle progression in vivo, we expressed a mutant version of Drosophila Cdt1 (Dup), which lacks the PCNA-binding PIP box (DupΔPIP) and which cannot be regulated by CRL4Cdt2. DupΔPIP is inappropriately stabilized during S phase and causes developmental defects when ectopically expressed. DupΔPIP restores DNA synthesis to dup null mutant embryonic epidermal cells, but S phase is abnormal, and these cells do not progress into mitosis. In contrast, DupΔPIP accumulation during S phase did not adversely affect progression through follicle cell endocycles in the ovary. In this tissue the combination of DupΔPIP expression and a 50% reduction in Geminin gene dose resulted in egg chamber degeneration. We could not detect Dup hyperaccumulation using mutations in the CRL4Cdt2 components Cul4 and Ddb1, likely because these cause pleiotropic effects that block cell proliferation. These data indicate that PIP box–mediated destruction of Dup is necessary for the cell division cycle and suggest that Geminin inhibition can restrain DupΔPIP activity in some endocycling cell types. PMID:20826610

  9. Proliferation of Double-Strand Break-Resistant Polyploid Cells Requires Drosophila FANCD2.

    PubMed

    Bretscher, Heidi S; Fox, Donald T

    2016-06-01

    Conserved DNA-damage responses (DDRs) sense genome damage and prevent mitosis of broken chromosomes. How cells lacking DDRs cope with broken chromosomes during mitosis is poorly understood. DDRs are frequently inactivated in cells with extra genomes (polyploidy), suggesting that study of polyploidy can reveal how cells with impaired DDRs/genome damage continue dividing. Here, we show that continued division and normal organ development occurs in polyploid, DDR-impaired Drosophila papillar cells. As papillar cells become polyploid, they naturally accumulate broken acentric chromosomes but do not apoptose/arrest the cell cycle. To survive mitosis with acentric chromosomes, papillar cells require Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI, as well as Blm helicase, but not canonical DDR signaling. FANCD2 acts independently of previous S phases to promote alignment and segregation of acentric DNA produced by double-strand breaks, thus avoiding micronuclei and organ malformation. Because polyploidy and impaired DDRs can promote cancer, our findings provide insight into disease-relevant DNA-damage tolerance mechanisms. PMID:27270041

  10. TCF1 Is Required for the T Follicular Helper Cell Response to Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tuoqi; Shin, Hyun Mu; Moseman, E Ashley; Ji, Yun; Huang, Bonnie; Harly, Christelle; Sen, Jyoti M; Berg, Leslie J; Gattinoni, Luca; McGavern, Dorian B; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2015-09-29

    T follicular helper (TFH) and T helper 1 (Th1) cells generated after viral infections are critical for the control of infection and the development of immunological memory. However, the mechanisms that govern the differentiation and maintenance of these two distinct lineages during viral infection remain unclear. We found that viral-specific TFH and Th1 cells showed reciprocal expression of the transcriptions factors TCF1 and Blimp1 early after infection, even before the differential expression of the canonical TFH marker CXCR5. Furthermore, TCF1 was intrinsically required for the TFH cell response to viral infection; in the absence of TCF1, the TFH cell response was severely compromised, and the remaining TCF1-deficient TFH cells failed to maintain TFH-associated transcriptional and metabolic signatures, which were distinct from those in Th1 cells. Mechanistically, TCF1 functioned through forming negative feedback loops with IL-2 and Blimp1. Our findings demonstrate an essential role of TCF1 in TFH cell responses to viral infection. PMID:26365183

  11. Early nucleosome deposition on, and replication of, HSV DNA requires cell factor PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Iryna; Boyer, Mark; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is a double stranded DNA virus that can cause lytic infections in epithelial cells of the skin and latent infections in neuronal cells of the peripheral nervous system. After virion attachment to the cell membrane, the capsid enters the cytoplasm and is transported to the nucleus. Following docking at the nuclear pore, the HSV DNA, and contents of the virion, are injected into the nucleus. The viral DNA that enters the nucleus is devoid of histones, but begins to be covered with them soon after entry. The covering of histones, in the form of nucleosomes, reaches a maximum during the early stages of infection and drops off during late infection (after DNA replication). However during latency the genome is saturated with nucleosomes. In this study, we examine the role of cell Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) a cellular DNA polymerase accessory protein (processivity factor), and cell DNA polymerases in histone deposition during the early stages of HSV infection. Using SiRNA knockdown, and a cytosine arabinoside (araC) chemical inhibitor, we conclude that PCNA is important for viral replication and histone deposition. However, cell DNA polymerases that bind PCNA do not appear to be required for these processes and PCNA does not appear to bind to the viral DNA polymerase (which has its own viral processivity factor). PMID:25672886

  12. Differential requirement for OBF-1 during antibody-secreting cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Lynn M.; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Dietrich, Wendy; Hawkins, Edwin; Kallies, Axel; Nutt, Stephen L.; Tarlinton, David M.; Matthias, Patrick; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2005-01-01

    Resting B cells can be cultured to induce antibody-secreting cell (ASC) differentiation in vitro. A quantitative analysis of cell behavior during such a culture allows the influences of different stimuli and gene products to be measured. The application of this analytical system revealed that the OBF-1 transcriptional coactivator, whose loss impairs antibody production in vivo, has two effects on ASC development. Although OBF-1 represses early T cell–dependent (TD) differentiation, it is also critical for the completion of the final stages of ASC development. Under these conditions, the loss of OBF-1 blocks the genetic program of ASC differentiation so that Blimp-1/prdm1 induction fails, and bcl-6, Pax5, and AID are not repressed as in control ASC. Retroviral complementation confirmed that OBF-1 was the critical entity. Surprisingly, when cells were cultured in lipopolysaccharide to mimic T cell–independent conditions, OBF-1–null B cells differentiated normally to ASC. In the OBF-1−/− ASC generated under either culture regimen, antibody production was normal or only modestly reduced, revealing that Ig genes are not directly dependent on OBF-1 for their expression. The differential requirement for OBF-1 in TD ASC generation was confirmed in vivo. These studies define a new regulatory role for OBF-1 in determining the cell-autonomous capacity of B cells to undergo terminal differentiation in response to different immunological signals. PMID:15867091

  13. Memory CD8(+) T Cells Require Increased Concentrations of Acetate Induced by Stress for Optimal Function.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Maria L; Ma, Eric H; Bantug, Glenn R; Grählert, Jasmin; Pfister, Simona; Glatter, Timo; Jauch, Annaïse; Dimeloe, Sarah; Slack, Emma; Dehio, Philippe; Krzyzaniak, Magdalena A; King, Carolyn G; Burgener, Anne-Valérie; Fischer, Marco; Develioglu, Leyla; Belle, Réka; Recher, Mike; Bonilla, Weldy V; Macpherson, Andrew J; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Jones, Russell G; Hess, Christoph

    2016-06-21

    How systemic metabolic alterations during acute infections impact immune cell function remains poorly understood. We found that acetate accumulates in the serum within hours of systemic bacterial infections and that these increased acetate concentrations are required for optimal memory CD8(+) T cell function in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, upon uptake by memory CD8(+) T cells, stress levels of acetate expanded the cellular acetyl-coenzyme A pool via ATP citrate lyase and promoted acetylation of the enzyme GAPDH. This context-dependent post-translational modification enhanced GAPDH activity, catalyzing glycolysis and thus boosting rapid memory CD8(+) T cell responses. Accordingly, in a murine Listeria monocytogenes model, transfer of acetate-augmented memory CD8(+) T cells exerted superior immune control compared to control cells. Our results demonstrate that increased systemic acetate concentrations are functionally integrated by CD8(+) T cells and translate into increased glycolytic and functional capacity. The immune system thus directly relates systemic metabolism with immune alertness. PMID:27212436

  14. An essential single domain response regulator required for normal cell division and differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, G B; Lane, T; Ohta, N; Sommer, J M; Newton, A

    1995-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways mediated by sensor histidine kinases and cognate response regulators control a variety of physiological processes in response to environmental conditions. Here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus these systems also play essential roles in the regulation of polar morphogenesis and cell division. Previous studies have implicated histidine kinase genes pleC and divJ in the regulation of these developmental events. We now report that divK encodes an essential, cell cycle-regulated homolog of the CheY/Spo0F subfamily and present evidence that this protein is a cognate response regulator of the histidine kinase PleC. The purified kinase domain of PleC, like that of DivJ, can serve as an efficient phosphodonor to DivK and as a phospho-DivK phosphatase. Based on these and earlier genetic results we propose that PleC and DivK are members of a signal transduction pathway that couples motility and stalk formation to completion of a late cell division cycle event. Gene disruption experiments and the filamentous phenotype of the conditional divK341 mutant reveal that DivK also functions in an essential signal transduction pathway required for cell division, apparently in response to another histidine kinase. We suggest that phosphotransfer mediated by these two-component signal transduction systems may represent a general mechanism regulating cell differentiation and cell division in response to successive cell cycle checkpoints. Images PMID:7664732

  15. Tumor suppressor gene Rb is required for self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yueh-Chiang; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Page, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb is essential for maintaining the quiescence and for regulating the differentiation of somatic stem cells. Inactivation of Rb in somatic stem cells typically leads to their overexpansion, often followed by increased apoptosis, defective terminal differentiation, and tumor formation. However, Rb’s roles in germ-line stem cells have not been explored. We conditionally disrupted the Rb gene in mouse germ cells in vivo and discovered unanticipated consequences for GFRa1-protein-expressing Asingle (GFRa1+ As) spermatogonia, the major source of male germ-line stem cells. Rb-deficient GFRa1+ As spermatogonia were present at normal density in testes 5 d after birth, but they lacked the capacity for self-renewal, resulting in germ cell depletion by 2 mo of age. Rb deficiency did not affect the proliferative activity of GFRa1+ As spermatogonia, but their progeny were exclusively transit-amplifying progenitor spermatogonia and did not include GFRa1+ As spermatogonia. In addition, Rb deficiency caused prolonged proliferation of progenitor spermatogonia, transiently enlarging this population. Despite these defects, Rb deficiency did not block terminal differentiation into functional sperm; offspring were readily obtained from young males whose germ cell pool was not yet depleted. We conclude that Rb is required for self-renewal of germ-line stem cells, but contrary to its critical roles in somatic stem cells, it is dispensable for their proliferative activity and terminal differentiation. Thus, this study identifies an unexpected function for Rb in maintaining the stem cell pool in the male germ line. PMID:23858447

  16. Comprehensive Identification of Meningococcal Genes and Small Noncoding RNAs Required for Host Cell Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Capel, Elena; Zomer, Aldert L.; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bole, Christine; Izac, Brigitte; Frapy, Eric; Meyer, Julie; Bouzinba-Ségard, Haniaa; Bille, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Anne; Cavau, Anne; Letourneur, Franck; Bourdoulous, Sandrine; Rattei, Thomas; Coureuil, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and septicemia, affecting infants and adults worldwide. N. meningitidis is also a common inhabitant of the human nasopharynx and, as such, is highly adapted to its niche. During bacteremia, N. meningitidis gains access to the blood compartment, where it adheres to endothelial cells of blood vessels and causes dramatic vascular damage. Colonization of the nasopharyngeal niche and communication with the different human cell types is a major issue of the N. meningitidis life cycle that is poorly understood. Here, highly saturated random transposon insertion libraries of N. meningitidis were engineered, and the fitness of mutations during routine growth and that of colonization of endothelial and epithelial cells in a flow device were assessed in a transposon insertion site sequencing (Tn-seq) analysis. This allowed the identification of genes essential for bacterial growth and genes specifically required for host cell colonization. In addition, after having identified the small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) located in intergenic regions, the phenotypes associated with mutations in those sRNAs were defined. A total of 383 genes and 8 intergenic regions containing sRNA candidates were identified to be essential for growth, while 288 genes and 33 intergenic regions containing sRNA candidates were found to be specifically required for host cell colonization. PMID:27486197

  17. p38α MAPK is required for arsenic-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Gyum; Shi, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure has been reported to cause neoplastic transformation through the activation of PcG proteins. In the present study, we show that activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation. Exposure of cells to 0.5 μM arsenic increased CRE and c-Fos promoter activities that were accompanied by increases in p38α MAPK and CREB phosphorylation and expression levels concurrently with AP-1 activation. Introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNA-p38α into BALB/c 3T3 cells markedly suppressed arsenic-induced colony formation compared with wildtype cells. CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were decreased in p38α knockdown cells after arsenic treatment. Arsenic-induced AP-1 activation, measured as c-Fos and CRE promoter activities, and CREB phosphorylation were attenuated by p38 inhibition in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Thus, p38α MAPK activation is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation mediated through CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation.

  18. Derivation of lung mesenchymal lineages from the fetal mesothelium requires hedgehog signaling for mesothelial cell entry

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Radhika; Ai, Xingbin; Fine, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mesothelial progenitors contribute to mesenchymal lineages of developing organs. To what extent the overlying mesothelium contributes to lung development remains unknown. To rigorously address this question, we employed Wt1CreERT2/+ mice for high-fidelity lineage tracing after confirming that Cre recombinase was mesothelial specific and faithfully recapitulated endogenous Wilms’ tumor 1 (Wt1) gene expression. We visualized WT1+ mesothelial cell entry into the lung by live imaging and identified their progenies in subpopulations of bronchial smooth muscle cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and desmin+ fibroblasts by lineage tagging. Derivation of these lineages was only observed with Cre recombinase activation during early lung development. Using loss-of-function assays in organ cultures, and targeted mesothelial-restricted hedgehog loss-of-function mice, we demonstrated that mesothelial cell movement into the lung requires the direct action of hedgehog signaling. By contrast, hedgehog signaling was not required for fetal mesothelial heart entry. These findings further support a paradigm wherein the mesothelium is a source of progenitors for mesenchymal lineages during organogenesis and indicate that signals controlling mesothelial cell entry are organ specific. PMID:24130328

  19. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread. PMID:27225131

  20. The Interaction Between Ran and NTF2 is Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Quimby, B. Booth; Wilson, Cassandra A.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2000-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran is required for the trafficking of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. Ran also has been implicated in cell cycle control, specifically in mitotic spindle assembly. In interphase cells, Ran is predominately nuclear and thought to be GTP bound, but it is also present in the cytoplasm, probably in the GDP-bound state. Nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF2) has been shown to import RanGDP into the nucleus. Here, we examine the in vivo role of NTF2 in Ran import and the effect that disruption of Ran imported into the nucleus has on the cell cycle. A temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NTF2 that does not bind to Ran is unable to import Ran into the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature. Moreover, when Ran is inefficiently imported into the nucleus, cells arrest in G2 in a MAD2 checkpoint-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that NTF2 is required to transport Ran into the nucleus in vivo. Furthermore, we present data that suggest that depletion of nuclear Ran triggers a spindle-assembly checkpoint-dependent cell cycle arrest. PMID:10930458

  1. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread.

  2. Gravin regulates mesodermal cell behavior changes required for axis elongation during zebrafish gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Douglas C; Pyati, Ujwal J; Kimelman, David

    2007-06-15

    Convergent extension of the mesoderm is the major driving force of vertebrate gastrulation. During this process, mesodermal cells move toward the future dorsal side of the embryo, then radically change behavior as they initiate extension of the body axis. How cells make this transition in behavior is unknown. We have identified the scaffolding protein and tumor suppressor Gravin as a key regulator of this process in zebrafish embryos. We show that Gravin is required for the conversion of mesodermal cells from a highly migratory behavior to the medio-laterally intercalative behavior required for body axis extension. In the absence of Gravin, paraxial mesodermal cells fail to shut down the protrusive activity mediated by the Rho/ROCK/Myosin II pathway, resulting in embryos with severe extension defects. We propose that Gravin functions as an essential scaffold for regulatory proteins that suppress the migratory behavior of the mesoderm during gastrulation, and suggest that this function also explains how Gravin inhibits invasive behaviors in metastatic cells.

  3. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  4. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  5. Evolution of New cis-Regulatory Motifs Required for Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Patterning of C. elegans vulval cell fates relies on inductive signaling. In this induction event, a single cell, the gonadal anchor cell, secretes LIN-3/EGF and induces three out of six competent precursor cells to acquire a vulval fate. We previously showed that this developmental system is robust to a four-fold variation in lin-3/EGF genetic dose. Here using single-molecule FISH, we find that the mean level of expression of lin-3 in the anchor cell is remarkably conserved. No change in lin-3 expression level could be detected among C. elegans wild isolates and only a low level of change—less than 30%—in the Caenorhabditis genus and in Oscheius tipulae. In C. elegans, lin-3 expression in the anchor cell is known to require three transcription factor binding sites, specifically two E-boxes and a nuclear-hormone-receptor (NHR) binding site. Mutation of any of these three elements in C. elegans results in a dramatic decrease in lin-3 expression. Yet only a single E-box is found in the Drosophilae supergroup of Caenorhabditis species, including C. angaria, while the NHR-binding site likely only evolved at the base of the Elegans group. We find that a transgene from C. angaria bearing a single E-box is sufficient for normal expression in C. elegans. Even a short 58 bp cis-regulatory fragment from C. angaria with this single E-box is able to replace the three transcription factor binding sites at the endogenous C. elegans lin-3 locus, resulting in the wild-type expression level. Thus, regulatory evolution occurring in cis within a 58 bp lin-3 fragment, results in a strict requirement for the NHR binding site and a second E-box in C. elegans. This single-cell, single-molecule, quantitative and functional evo-devo study demonstrates that conserved expression levels can hide extensive change in cis-regulatory site requirements and highlights the evolution of new cis-regulatory elements required for cell-specific gene expression. PMID:27588814

  6. Life-Threatening Hematuria Requiring Transcatheter Embolization Following Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, H.; Whittlestone, T.; Callaway, M.P.

    2006-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation is increasingly being acknowledged as a valid treatment for renal cell carcinoma in patients in whom definitive curative resection is deemed either undesirable or unsafe. A number of published series have shown the technique to have encouraging results and relatively low complication rates. In this article, we report a case of delayed life-threatening hematuria requiring transcatheter embolization of a bleeding intrarenal artery in a patient who had undergone imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation of a 3 cm renal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, such a complication has not been reported previously.

  7. FOXOs support the metabolic requirements of normal and tumor cells by promoting IDH1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Charitou, Paraskevi; Rodriguez-Colman, Maria; Gerrits, Johan; van Triest, Miranda; Groot Koerkamp, Marian; Hornsveld, Marten; Holstege, Frank; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Burgering, Boudewijn MT

    2015-01-01

    FOXO transcription factors are considered bona fide tumor suppressors; however, recent studies showed FOXOs are also required for tumor survival. Here, we identify FOXOs as transcriptional activators of IDH1. FOXOs promote IDH1 expression and thereby maintain the cytosolic levels of α-ketoglutarate and NADPH. In cancer cells carrying mutant IDH1, FOXOs likewise stimulate mutant IDH1 expression and maintain the levels of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, which stimulates cancer cell proliferation and inhibits TET enzymes and histone demethylases. Combined, our data provide a new paradigm for the paradoxical role of FOXOs in both tumor suppression and promotion. PMID:25648147

  8. Evolution of New cis-Regulatory Motifs Required for Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Barkoulas, Michalis; Vargas Velazquez, Amhed M; Peluffo, Alexandre E; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2016-09-01

    Patterning of C. elegans vulval cell fates relies on inductive signaling. In this induction event, a single cell, the gonadal anchor cell, secretes LIN-3/EGF and induces three out of six competent precursor cells to acquire a vulval fate. We previously showed that this developmental system is robust to a four-fold variation in lin-3/EGF genetic dose. Here using single-molecule FISH, we find that the mean level of expression of lin-3 in the anchor cell is remarkably conserved. No change in lin-3 expression level could be detected among C. elegans wild isolates and only a low level of change-less than 30%-in the Caenorhabditis genus and in Oscheius tipulae. In C. elegans, lin-3 expression in the anchor cell is known to require three transcription factor binding sites, specifically two E-boxes and a nuclear-hormone-receptor (NHR) binding site. Mutation of any of these three elements in C. elegans results in a dramatic decrease in lin-3 expression. Yet only a single E-box is found in the Drosophilae supergroup of Caenorhabditis species, including C. angaria, while the NHR-binding site likely only evolved at the base of the Elegans group. We find that a transgene from C. angaria bearing a single E-box is sufficient for normal expression in C. elegans. Even a short 58 bp cis-regulatory fragment from C. angaria with this single E-box is able to replace the three transcription factor binding sites at the endogenous C. elegans lin-3 locus, resulting in the wild-type expression level. Thus, regulatory evolution occurring in cis within a 58 bp lin-3 fragment, results in a strict requirement for the NHR binding site and a second E-box in C. elegans. This single-cell, single-molecule, quantitative and functional evo-devo study demonstrates that conserved expression levels can hide extensive change in cis-regulatory site requirements and highlights the evolution of new cis-regulatory elements required for cell-specific gene expression. PMID:27588814

  9. The effect of estrogen on bone requires ERα in nonhematopoietic cells but is enhanced by ERα in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Petra; Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Farman, Helen; Windahl, Sara H.; Carlsten, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The effects of estrogen on bone are mediated mainly via estrogen receptor (ER)α. ERα in osteoclasts (hematopoietic origin) is involved in the trabecular bone-sparing effects of estrogen, but conflicting data are reported on the role of ERα in osteoblast lineage cells (nonhematopoietic origin) for bone metabolism. Because Cre-mediated cell-specific gene inactivation used in previous studies might be confounded by nonspecific and/or incomplete cell-specific ERα deletion, we herein used an alternative approach to determine the relative importance of ERα in hematopoietic (HC) and nonhematopoietic cells (NHC) for bone mass. Chimeric mice with selective inactivation of ERα in HC or NHC were created by bone marrow transplantations of wild-type (WT) and ERα-knockout (ERα−/−) mice. Estradiol treatment increased both trabecular and cortical bone mass in ovariectomized WT/WT (defined as recipient/donor) and WT/ERα−/− mice but not in ERα−/−/WT or ERα−/−/ERα−/− mice. However, estradiol effects on both bone compartments were reduced (∼50%) in WT/ERα−/− mice compared with WT/WT mice. The effects of estradiol on fat mass and B lymphopoiesis required ERα specifically in NHC and HC, respectively. In conclusion, ERα in NHC is required for the effects of estrogen on both trabecular and cortical bone, but these effects are enhanced by ERα in HC. PMID:25117411

  10. Merkel cell tumor of the skin treated with localized radiotherapy: are widely negative margins required?

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Mark; Packard, Matthew; Velosa, Claudia; Silverman, Jan; Werts, Day; Parda, David

    2011-01-01

    Merkel's cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumor that can affect a wide variety of sites throughout the body. Commonly, it affects the skin alone and the management of limited disease can be confusing since the natural history of the disease involves distant metastasis. Traditional management has required wide local excision with negative margins of resection. We describe a case treated with local therapy alone and review the literature to suggest that complete microscopic excision may not be required if adjuvant radiotherapy is used. PMID:21464874

  11. Merkel cell tumor of the skin treated with localized radiotherapy: are widely negative margins required?

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Mark; Packard, Matthew; Velosa, Claudia; Silverman, Jan; Werts, Day; Parda, David

    2011-03-30

    Merkel's cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumor that can affect a wide variety of sites throughout the body. Commonly, it affects the skin alone and the management of limited disease can be confusing since the natural history of the disease involves distant metastasis. Traditional management has required wide local excision with negative margins of resection. We describe a case treated with local therapy alone and review the literature to suggest that complete microscopic excision may not be required if adjuvant radiotherapy is used.

  12. Cell-intrinsic in vivo requirement for the E47-p21 pathway in long-term hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Patricia M; Ding, Ying; Borghesi, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Major regulators of long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) self-renewal and proliferation have been identified, but knowledge of their in vivo interaction in a linear pathway is lacking. In this study, we show a direct genetic link between the transcription factor E47 and the major cell cycle regulator p21 in controlling LT-HSC integrity in vivo under repopulation stress. Numerous studies have shown that E47 activates p21 transcription in hematopoietic subsets in vitro, and we now reveal the in vivo relevance of the E47-p21 pathway by reducing the gene dose of each factor individually (E47(het) or p21(het)) versus in tandem (E47(het)p21(het)). E47(het)p21(het) LT-HSCs and downstream short-term hematopoietic stem cells exhibit hyperproliferation and preferential susceptibility to mitotoxin compared to wild-type or single haploinsufficient controls. In serial adoptive transfers that rigorously challenge self-renewal, E47(het)p21(het) LT-HSCs dramatically and progressively decline, indicating the importance of cell-intrinsic E47-p21 in preserving LT-HSCs under stress. Transient numeric recovery of downstream short-term hematopoietic stem cells enabled the production of functionally competent myeloid but not lymphoid cells, as common lymphoid progenitors were decreased, and peripheral lymphocytes were virtually ablated. Thus, we demonstrate a developmental compartment-specific and lineage-specific requirement for the E47-p21 pathway in maintaining LT-HSCs, B cells, and T cells under hematopoietic repopulation stress in vivo.

  13. Identification of TRAPPC8 as a Host Factor Required for Human Papillomavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Mori, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Kukimoto, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped virus composed of a circular DNA genome and two capsid proteins, L1 and L2. Multiple interactions between its capsid proteins and host cellular proteins are required for infectious HPV entry, including cell attachment and internalization, intracellular trafficking and viral genome transfer into the nucleus. Using two variants of HPV type 51, the Ma and Nu strains, we have previously reported that MaL2 is required for efficient pseudovirus (PsV) transduction. However, the cellular factors that confer this L2 dependency have not yet been identified. Here we report that the transport protein particle complex subunit 8 (TRAPPC8) specifically interacts with MaL2. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HeLa cells yielded reduced levels of reporter gene expression when inoculated with HPV51Ma, HPV16, and HPV31 PsVs. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HaCaT cells also showed reduced susceptibility to infection with authentic HPV31 virions, indicating that TRAPPC8 plays a crucial role in native HPV infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the central region of TRAPPC8 was exposed on the cell surface and colocalized with inoculated PsVs. The entry of Ma, Nu, and L2-lacking PsVs into cells was equally impaired in TRAPPC8 knockdown HeLa cells, suggesting that TRAPPC8-dependent endocytosis plays an important role in HPV entry that is independent of L2 interaction. Finally, expression of GFP-fused L2 that can also interact with TRAPPC8 induced dispersal of the Golgi stack structure in HeLa cells, a phenotype also observed by TRAPPC8 knockdown. These results suggest that during viral intracellular trafficking, binding of L2 to TRAPPC8 inhibits its function resulting in Golgi destabilization, a process that may assist HPV genome escape from the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24244674

  14. p53 Requires the Stress Sensor USF1 to Direct Appropriate Cell Fate Decision

    PubMed Central

    Bouafia, Amine; Corre, Sébastien; Gilot, David; Mouchet, Nicolas; Prince, Sharon; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a major hallmark of cancer. To maintain genomic integrity, cells are equipped with dedicated sensors to monitor DNA repair or to force damaged cells into death programs. The tumor suppressor p53 is central in this process. Here, we report that the ubiquitous transcription factor Upstream Stimulatory factor 1 (USF1) coordinates p53 function in making proper cell fate decisions. USF1 stabilizes the p53 protein and promotes a transient cell cycle arrest, in the presence of DNA damage. Thus, cell proliferation is maintained inappropriately in Usf1 KO mice and in USF1-deficient melanoma cells challenged by genotoxic stress. We further demonstrate that the loss of USF1 compromises p53 stability by enhancing p53-MDM2 complex formation and MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. In USF1-deficient cells, the level of p53 can be restored by the re-expression of full-length USF1 protein similarly to what is observed using Nutlin-3, a specific inhibitor that prevents p53-MDM2 interaction. Consistent with a new function for USF1, a USF1 truncated protein lacking its DNA-binding and transactivation domains can also restore the induction and activity of p53. These findings establish that p53 function requires the ubiquitous stress sensor USF1 for appropriate cell fate decisions in response to DNA-damage. They underscore the new role of USF1 and give new clues of how p53 loss of function can occur in any cell type. Finally, these findings are of clinical relevance because they provide new therapeutic prospects in stabilizing and reactivating the p53 pathway. PMID:24831529

  15. Inflammasome-independent NLRP3 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Du, Qianming; Lu, Ping; Fan, Huimin; Lu, Jinrong; Hu, Rong

    2016-03-15

    Inflammasome NLRP3 plays a crucial role in the process of colitis and colitis--associated colon cancer. Even though much is known regarding the NLRP3 inflammasome that regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release in innate immune cells, the role of NLRP3 in non-immune cells is still unclear. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 was highly expressed in mesenchymal-like colon cancer cells (SW620), and was upregulated by tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) respectively, during EMT in colon cancer epithelial cells HCT116 and HT29. Knockdown of NLRP3 retained epithelial spindle-like morphology of HCT116 and HT29 cells and reversed the mesenchymal characteristic of SW620 cells, indicated by the decreased expression of vimentin and MMP9 and increased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, knockdown of NLRP3 in colorectal carcinoma cells displayed diminished cell migration and invasion. Interestingly, during the EMT process induced by TNF-α or TGF-β1, the cleaved caspase-1 and ASC speck were not detected, indicating that NLRP3 functions in an inflammasome-independent way. Further studies demonstrated that NLRP3 protein expression was regulated by NF-κB signaling in TNF-α or TGF-β1-induced EMT, as verified by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Moreover, NLRP3 knockdown reduced the expression of Snail1, indicating that NLRP3 may promote EMT through regulating Snail1. In summary, our results showed that the NLRP3 expression, not the inflammasome activation, was required for EMT in colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26968633

  16. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M.; DeLeonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult. PMID:18155189

  17. Sensor Needs and Requirements for Fuel Cells and CIDI/SIDI Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.

    2000-03-01

    To reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, improve urban air quality, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced vehicle technologies and fuels. Enabling technologies for fuel cell power systems and direct-injection engines are being developed by DOE through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry collaboration to produce vehicles having up to three times the fuel economy of conventional mid-size automobiles. Sensors have been identified as a research and development need for both fuel cell and direct-injection systems, because current sensor technologies do not adequately meet requirements. Sensors are needed for emission control, for passenger safety and comfort, to increase system lifetime, and for system performance enhancement through feedback and control. These proceedings document the results of a workshop to define sensor requirements for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems and direct-injection engines for automotive applications. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies. The objectives of the workshop were to: define the requirements for sensors; establish R&D priorities; identify the technical targets and technical barriers; and facilitate collaborations among participants. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies.

  18. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  19. DNA Repair Cofactors ATMIN and NBS1 Are Required to Suppress T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Jana; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Owusu, Michel; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Wiedner, Marc; Velimezi, Georgia; Moder, Martin; Turchinovich, Gleb; Hladik, Anastasiya; Gurnhofer, Elisabeth; Hayday, Adrian; Behrens, Axel; Knapp, Sylvia; Kenner, Lukas; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Loizou, Joanna I

    2015-11-01

    Proper development of the immune system is an intricate process dependent on many factors, including an intact DNA damage response. The DNA double-strand break signaling kinase ATM and its cofactor NBS1 are required during T cell development and for the maintenance of genomic stability. The role of a second ATM cofactor, ATMIN (also known as ASCIZ) in T cells is much less clear, and whether ATMIN and NBS1 function in synergy in T cells is unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of ATMIN and NBS1, either alone or in combination, using murine models. We show loss of NBS1 led to a developmental block at the double-positive stage of T cell development, as well as reduced TCRα recombination, that was unexpectedly neither exacerbated nor alleviated by concomitant loss of ATMIN. In contrast, loss of both ATMIN and NBS1 enhanced DNA damage that drove spontaneous peripheral T cell hyperactivation, proliferation as well as excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a highly inflammatory environment. Intriguingly, the disease causing T cells were largely proficient for both ATMIN and NBS1. In vivo this resulted in severe intestinal inflammation, colitis and premature death. Our findings reveal a novel model for an intestinal bowel disease phenotype that occurs upon combined loss of the DNA repair cofactors ATMIN and NBS1.

  20. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tim I M; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C Elizabeth; Burke, G A Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM-ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  1. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  2. DNA Repair Cofactors ATMIN and NBS1 Are Required to Suppress T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Prochazkova, Jana; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Owusu, Michel; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Wiedner, Marc; Velimezi, Georgia; Moder, Martin; Turchinovich, Gleb; Hladik, Anastasiya; Gurnhofer, Elisabeth; Hayday, Adrian; Behrens, Axel; Knapp, Sylvia; Kenner, Lukas; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Loizou, Joanna I.

    2015-01-01

    Proper development of the immune system is an intricate process dependent on many factors, including an intact DNA damage response. The DNA double-strand break signaling kinase ATM and its cofactor NBS1 are required during T cell development and for the maintenance of genomic stability. The role of a second ATM cofactor, ATMIN (also known as ASCIZ) in T cells is much less clear, and whether ATMIN and NBS1 function in synergy in T cells is unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of ATMIN and NBS1, either alone or in combination, using murine models. We show loss of NBS1 led to a developmental block at the double-positive stage of T cell development, as well as reduced TCRα recombination, that was unexpectedly neither exacerbated nor alleviated by concomitant loss of ATMIN. In contrast, loss of both ATMIN and NBS1 enhanced DNA damage that drove spontaneous peripheral T cell hyperactivation, proliferation as well as excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a highly inflammatory environment. Intriguingly, the disease causing T cells were largely proficient for both ATMIN and NBS1. In vivo this resulted in severe intestinal inflammation, colitis and premature death. Our findings reveal a novel model for an intestinal bowel disease phenotype that occurs upon combined loss of the DNA repair cofactors ATMIN and NBS1. PMID:26544571

  3. Requirement of full TCR repertoire for regulatory T cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Junko; Baba, Minato; Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Negishi, Hideo; Yanai, Hideyuki; Habu, Sonoko; Hori, Shohei; Honda, Kenya; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of intestinal homeostasis by the immune system involves the dynamic interplay between gut commensal microbiota and resident immune cells. It is well known that a large and diverse lymphocyte antigen receptor repertoire enables the immune system to recognize and respond to a wide range of invading pathogens. There is also an emerging appreciation for a critical role the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire serves in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Nevertheless, how the diversity of the TCR repertoire in Tregs affects intestinal homeostasis remains unknown. To address this question, we studied mice whose T cells express a restricted TCR repertoire. We observed the development of spontaneous colitis, accompanied by the induction of T-helper type 17 cells in the colon that is driven by gut commensal microbiota. We provide further evidence that a restricted TCR repertoire causes a loss of tolerogenicity to microbiota, accompanied by a paucity of peripherally derived, Helios− Tregs and hyperactivation of migratory dendritic cells. These results thus reveal a new facet of the TCR repertoire in which Tregs require a diverse TCR repitoire for intestinal homeostasis, suggesting an additional driving force in the evolutional significance of the TCR repertoire. PMID:26420876

  4. tmie Is required for gentamicin uptake by the hair cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Seojin; Lee, Jeong-Han; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Kyu-yup; Kim, Myoung Ok; Yun, Byung-Wook; Ryoo, ZaeYoung

    2013-04-01

    The circling (cir/cir) mouse is a spontaneous model of deafness due to deletion of a 40-kb genomic region that includes the transmembrane inner ear (tmie) gene. In addition to being deaf, cir/cir mice exhibit abnormal behaviors including circling and hyperactivity. Here we investigated differences between 3-d-old (that is, before hair-cell degeneration) cir/cir and phenotypically normal (+/cir) mice and the reason underlying the degeneration of the inner ear structure of cir/cir mice. To this end, we used gentamicin, gentamicin-Texas red conjugate, and FM1-43 to investigate mechanotransducer channel activity in the hair cells of cir/cir mice; these compounds are presumed to enter hair cells through the mechanotransducer channel. Although the structure of the inner ear of +/cir mice was equivalent to that of cir/cir mice, the hair cells of cir/cir mice (unlike +/cir) did not take up gentamicin, gentamicin-Texas red conjugate, or FM1-43. These findings suggest that hair cells in cir/cir mice demonstrate abnormal maturation and mechanotransduction. In addition, our current results indicate that tmie is required for maturation and maintenance of hair cells. PMID:23582420

  5. Protective cellular retroviral immunity requires both CD4+ and CD8+ immune T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hom, R C; Finberg, R W; Mullaney, S; Ruprecht, R M

    1991-01-01

    We have found previously that postexposure chemoprophylaxis with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (also known as zidovudine or AZT) in combination with recombinant human alpha A/D interferon fully protected mice exposed to a lethal dose of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RLV) against viremia and disease. After cessation of therapy, over 90% of these mice were able to resist rechallenge with live RLV, thus demonstrating an acquired immunity. Adoptive cell transfer of 4 x 10(7) cells from immunized mice fully protected naive recipients from viremia and splenomegaly after RLV challenge. However, when these immune T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations, only partial protection was found when 4 x 10(7) T cells of either subset were given. Full protection against RLV challenge was seen again when the T-cell subsets from immunized mice were recombined and transferred at the same number into naive mice. We conclude that cellular immunity alone is protective and that both CD4+ and CD8+ cell types are required for conferring full protection against live virus challenge. Images PMID:1898666

  6. Appressorium formation in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis requires a G2 cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Sónia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2015-01-01

    Many of the most important plant diseases are caused by fungal pathogens that form specialized cell structures to breach the leaf surface as well as to proliferate inside the plant. To initiate pathogenic development, the fungus responds to a set of inductive cues. Some of them are of extracellular nature (environmental signals) while others respond to intracellular conditions (developmental signals). These signals have to be integrated into a single response that has as a major outcome changes in the morphogenesis of the fungus. The cell cycle regulation is pivotal during these cellular differentiations, and we hypothesized that cell cycle regulation would be likely to provide control points for infection development by fungal pathogens. Although efforts have been done in various fungal systems, there is still limited information available regarding the relationship of these processes with the induction of the virulence programs. Hence, the role of fungal cell cycle regulators -which are wide conserved elements- as true virulence factors, has yet to be defined. Here we discuss the recent finding that the formation of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis seems to be incompatible with an active cell cycle and, therefore genetic circuits evolved in this fungus to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on plant surface, before the appressorium-mediated penetration into the plant tissue.

  7. MMP7 Is Required to Mediate Cell Invasion and Tumor Formation upon Plakophilin3 Loss

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Srikanta; Thorat, Rahul; Dalal, Sorab N.

    2015-01-01

    Plakophilin3 (PKP3) loss results in increased transformation in multiple cell lines in vitro and increased tumor formation in vivo. A microarray analysis performed in the PKP3 knockdown clones, identified an inflammation associated gene signature in cell lines derived from stratified epithelia as opposed to cell lines derived from simple epithelia. However, in contrast to the inflammation associated gene signature, the expression of MMP7 was increased upon PKP3 knockdown in all the cell lines tested. Using vector driven RNA interference, it was demonstrated that MMP7 was required for in-vitro cell migration and invasion and tumor formation in vivo. The increase in MMP7 levels was due to the increase in levels of the Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver3 (PRL3), which is observed upon PKP3 loss. The results suggest that MMP7 over-expression may be one of the mechanisms by which PKP3 loss leads to increased cell invasion and tumor formation. PMID:25875355

  8. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tim I. M.; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J.; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C. Elizabeth; Burke, G. A. Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM–ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  9. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G.; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J.; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  10. Msx genes define a population of mural cell precursors required for head blood vessel maturation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Miguel; Goupille, Olivier; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Lallemand, Yvan; Cumano, Ana; Robert, Benoît

    2011-07-01

    Vessels are primarily formed from an inner endothelial layer that is secondarily covered by mural cells, namely vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arteries and veins and pericytes in capillaries and veinules. We previously showed that, in the mouse embryo, Msx1(lacZ) and Msx2(lacZ) are expressed in mural cells and in a few endothelial cells. To unravel the role of Msx genes in vascular development, we have inactivated the two Msx genes specifically in mural cells by combining the Msx1(lacZ), Msx2(lox) and Sm22α-Cre alleles. Optical projection tomography demonstrated abnormal branching of the cephalic vessels in E11.5 mutant embryos. The carotid and vertebral arteries showed an increase in caliber that was related to reduced vascular smooth muscle coverage. Taking advantage of a newly constructed Msx1(CreERT2) allele, we demonstrated by lineage tracing that the primary defect lies in a population of VSMC precursors. The abnormal phenotype that ensues is a consequence of impaired BMP signaling in the VSMC precursors that leads to downregulation of the metalloprotease 2 (Mmp2) and Mmp9 genes, which are essential for cell migration and integration into the mural layer. Improper coverage by VSMCs secondarily leads to incomplete maturation of the endothelial layer. Our results demonstrate that both Msx1 and Msx2 are required for the recruitment of a population of neural crest-derived VSMCs.

  11. Activation requirements of circulating antigen-specific human CD8(+) memory T cells probed with insect cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guelly, Christian; Küpcü, Zaruhi; Zalusky, Doris; Karner, Margarete; Zehetner, Margit; Schweighoffer, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    We sought to define the molecular setup of an antigen-presenting cell that elicits antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro using insect cells that were infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Expression of single-chain HLA was complemented step-by-step with costimulatory molecules, including CD54 and CD80, by co-infection with the relevant viruses. Role of CD8 was assessed by introducing hybrid class I molecules where the alpha-3 domain of the HLA heavy chain molecule was replaced by its murine K(b) counterpart. Circulating T cells that respond to the EBV-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide GLGCTLVAML were previously shown to bear hallmarks of memory cells. We found that the HLA+peptide complex alone displayed on the surface of insect cells was sufficient to elicit IFN-gamma secretion from these freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells in ELISpot assays. Binding of CD8 was absolutely required, but coexpression of costimulatory molecules resulted only in minimal increase in the number of spots. Tumor antigen-specific CTL clones also reacted in a strictly antigen-specific manner, but required CD54 for quantitative responses. The amount of IFN-gamma produced by the individual reactive T cells was evaluated as spot size, and was also influenced by the costimulatory molecules: CD54 increased also the response magnitude of cultured CTL lines, while CD80 enhanced cytokine release from freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the stimulatory requirements of functionally competent effector/memory T cells and their exact enumeration will be helpful for increasing the efficacy of vaccines.

  12. Activation requirements of circulating antigen-specific human CD8(+) memory T cells probed with insect cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guelly, Christian; Küpcü, Zaruhi; Zalusky, Doris; Karner, Margarete; Zehetner, Margit; Schweighoffer, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    We sought to define the molecular setup of an antigen-presenting cell that elicits antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro using insect cells that were infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Expression of single-chain HLA was complemented step-by-step with costimulatory molecules, including CD54 and CD80, by co-infection with the relevant viruses. Role of CD8 was assessed by introducing hybrid class I molecules where the alpha-3 domain of the HLA heavy chain molecule was replaced by its murine K(b) counterpart. Circulating T cells that respond to the EBV-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide GLGCTLVAML were previously shown to bear hallmarks of memory cells. We found that the HLA+peptide complex alone displayed on the surface of insect cells was sufficient to elicit IFN-gamma secretion from these freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells in ELISpot assays. Binding of CD8 was absolutely required, but coexpression of costimulatory molecules resulted only in minimal increase in the number of spots. Tumor antigen-specific CTL clones also reacted in a strictly antigen-specific manner, but required CD54 for quantitative responses. The amount of IFN-gamma produced by the individual reactive T cells was evaluated as spot size, and was also influenced by the costimulatory molecules: CD54 increased also the response magnitude of cultured CTL lines, while CD80 enhanced cytokine release from freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the stimulatory requirements of functionally competent effector/memory T cells and their exact enumeration will be helpful for increasing the efficacy of vaccines. PMID:11754359

  13. Oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate is required for reductive carboxylation in cancer cells with mitochondrial defects

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Andrew R.; Hu, Zeping; Shi, Xiaolei; Jiang, Lei; Boroughs, Lindsey K.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Boriack, Richard; Rakheja, Dinesh; Sullivan, Lucas B.; Linehan, W. Marston; Chandel, Navdeep S.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian cells generate citrate by decarboxylating pyruvate in the mitochondria to supply the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, hypoxia and other impairments of mitochondrial function induce an alternative pathway that produces citrate by reductively carboxylating α-ketoglutarate (AKG) via NADPH-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). It is unknown how cells generate reducing equivalents necessary to supply reductive carboxylation in the setting of mitochondrial impairment. Here we identified shared metabolic features in cells using reductive carboxylation. Paradoxically, reductive carboxylation was accompanied by concomitant AKG oxidation in the TCA cycle. Inhibiting AKG oxidation decreased reducing equivalent availability and suppressed reductive carboxylation. Interrupting transfer of reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase increased NADH abundance and decreased NADPH abundance while suppressing reductive carboxylation. The data demonstrate that reductive carboxylation requires bidirectional AKG metabolism along oxidative and reductive pathways, with the oxidative pathway producing reducing equivalents used to operate IDH in reverse. PMID:24857658

  14. Removal of damaged proteins during ES cell fate specification requires the proteasome activator PA28

    PubMed Central

    Hernebring, Malin; Fredriksson, Åsa; Liljevald, Maria; Cvijovic, Marija; Norrman, Karin; Wiseman, John; Semb, Henrik; Nyström, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is triggered upon the first signs of cell fate specification but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we report that this phase of differentiation encompasses an unexpected induction of genes encoding the proteasome activator PA28αβ (11S), subunits of the immunoproteasome (20Si), and the 20Si regulator TNFα. This induction is accompanied by assembly of mature PA28-20S(i) proteasomes and elevated proteasome activity. Inhibiting accumulation of PA28α using miRNA counteracted the removal of damaged proteins demonstrating that PA28αβ has a hitherto unidentified role required for resetting the levels of protein damage at the transition from self-renewal to cell differentiation. PMID:23459332

  15. The transmission of nuclear pore complexes to daughter cells requires a cytoplasmic pool of Nsp1.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Paolo; Webster, Brant M; Fröhlich, Florian; Lusk, C Patrick

    2013-10-28

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are essential protein assemblies that span the nuclear envelope and establish nuclear-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. We have investigated mechanisms that control NPC number in mother and daughter cells during the asymmetric division of budding yeast. By simultaneously tracking existing NPCs and newly synthesized NPC protomers (nups) through anaphase, we uncovered a pool of the central channel nup Nsp1 that is actively targeted to the bud in association with endoplasmic reticulum. Bud targeting required an intact actin cytoskeleton and the class V myosin, Myo2. Selective inhibition of cytoplasmic Nsp1 or inactivation of Myo2 reduced the inheritance of NPCs in daughter cells, leading to a daughter-specific loss of viability. Our data are consistent with a model in which Nsp1 releases a barrier that otherwise prevents NPC passage through the bud neck. It further supports the finding that NPC inheritance, not de novo NPC assembly, is primarily responsible for controlling NPC number in daughter cells.

  16. Epithelial cell migration requires the interaction between the vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Velez-delValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; Galván-Mendoza, Ivan J.; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial migration plays a central role in development, wound repair and tumor metastasis, but the role of intermediate filament in this important event is unknown. We showed recently that vimentin coexists in the same cell with keratin-KRT14 at the leading edge of the migrating epidermal cells, and knockdown of vimentin impaired colony growth. Here we demonstrate that vimentin co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with keratin-KRT14, and mutations in the -YRKLLEGEE- sequence of vimentin significantly reduced migration of the keratinocytes. Our data demonstrates that keratinocyte migration requires the interaction between vimentin and keratins at the -YRKLLEGEE- sequence at the helical 2B domain of vimentin. These findings have broad implications for understanding the roles of vimentin intermediate filaments in normal and neoplastic epithelial cells. PMID:27072292

  17. APC binds intermediate filaments and is required for their reorganization during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yasuhisa; Boëda, Batiste; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2013-02-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are components of the cytoskeleton involved in most cellular functions, including cell migration. Primary astrocytes mainly express glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and nestin, which are essential for migration. In a wound-induced migration assay, IFs reorganized to form a polarized network that was coextensive with microtubules in cell protrusions. We found that the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) was required for microtubule interaction with IFs and for microtubule-dependent rearrangements of IFs during astrocyte migration. We also show that loss or truncation of APC correlated with the disorganization of the IF network in glioma and carcinoma cells. In migrating astrocytes, vimentin-associated APC colocalized with microtubules. APC directly bound polymerized vimentin via its armadillo repeats. This binding domain promoted vimentin polymerization in vitro and contributed to the elongation of IFs along microtubules. These results point to APC as a crucial regulator of IF organization and confirm its fundamental role in the coordinated regulation of cytoskeletons.

  18. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  19. Tubulin glycylases are required for primary cilia, control of cell proliferation and tumor development in colon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Cecilia; Papon, Laura; Cacheux, Wulfran; Marques Sousa, Patricia; Lascano, Valeria; Tort, Olivia; Giordano, Tiziana; Vacher, Sophie; Lemmers, Benedicte; Mariani, Pascale; Meseure, Didier; Medema, Jan Paul; Bièche, Ivan; Hahne, Michael; Janke, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    TTLL3 and TTLL8 are tubulin glycine ligases catalyzing posttranslational glycylation of microtubules. We show here for the first time that these enzymes are required for robust formation of primary cilia. We further discover the existence of primary cilia in colon and demonstrate that TTLL3 is the only glycylase in this organ. As a consequence, colon epithelium shows a reduced number of primary cilia accompanied by an increased rate of cell division in TTLL3-knockout mice. Strikingly, higher proliferation is compensated by faster tissue turnover in normal colon. In a mouse model for tumorigenesis, lack of TTLL3 strongly promotes tumor development. We further demonstrate that decreased levels of TTLL3 expression are linked to the development of human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, we have uncovered a novel role for tubulin glycylation in primary cilia maintenance, which controls cell proliferation of colon epithelial cells and plays an essential role in colon cancer development. PMID:25180231

  20. Class I histone deacetylase activity is required for proliferation of renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinhua; Yan, Yanli; Zhao, Ting C; Bayliss, George; Yan, Haidong; Zhuang, Shougang

    2013-08-01

    The process of renal regeneration after acute kidney injury is thought to recapitulate renal development, and proliferation of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) is a critical step in the regenerative response. Recent studies indicate that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are required for embryonic kidney gene expression, growth, and differentiation. The role and underlying mechanisms of class I HDAC activation in RPTC proliferation, however, remain unclear. In this study, we used cultured RPTCs to examine this issue since four class I HDAC isoforms (1, 2, 3, and 8) are abundantly expressed in this cell type. Blocking class I HDAC activity with a highly selective inhibitor, MS-275, induced global histone H3 hyperacetylation, reduced RPTC proliferation, and diminished expression of cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Silencing HDAC1, 3, or 8 with small interfering RNA resulted in similar biological effects. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) was required for RPTC proliferation, and STAT3 functioned downstream of EGFR. Treatment with MS-275 or knockdown of HDAC1, 3, or 8 suppressed EGFR expression and phosphorylation, and silencing HDAC1 and 3 also reduced STAT3 phosphorylation. However, HDAC2 downregulation did not affect RPTC proliferation and phosphorylation of EGFR and STAT3. Collectively, these data reveal a critical role of class I HDACs in mediating proliferation of renal epithelial cells through activation of the EGFR/STAT3 signaling pathway.

  1. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A is required for the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-15

    The segregation and transmission of the mitochondrial genome in humans are complicated processes but are particularly important for understanding the inheritance and clinical abnormalities of mitochondrial disorders. However, the molecular mechanism of the segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for the segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TFAM in HeLa cells resulted in the enlarged mtDNA, as indicated by the assembly of fluorescent signals stained with PicoGreen. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the enlarged mtDNA and further showed the existence of increased numbers of mitochondria lacking mtDNA signals in TFAM knockdown cells. By complementation analysis, the C-terminal tail of TFAM, which enhances its affinity with DNA, was found to be required for the appropriate distribution of mtDNA. Furthermore, we found that TFAM knockdown induced asymmetric segregation of mtDNA between dividing daughter cells. These results suggest an essential role for human TFAM in symmetric segregation of mtDNA. PMID:20955698

  2. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Akinori; Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  3. Diaphanous-Related Formin 2 and Profilin I Are Required for Gastrulation Cell Movements

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Lei; Chan, Tun-Hao; Lin, Meng-Ju; Huang, Wei-Pang; Lou, Show-Wan; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Intensive cellular movements occur during gastrulation. These cellular movements rely heavily on dynamic actin assembly. Rho with its associated proteins, including the Rho-activated formin, Diaphanous, are key regulators of actin assembly in cellular protrusion and migration. However, the function of Diaphanous in gastrulation cell movements remains unclear. To study the role of Diaphanous in gastrulation, we isolated a partial zebrafish diaphanous-related formin 2 (zdia2) clone with its N-terminal regulatory domains. The GTPase binding domain of zDia2 is highly conserved compared to its mammalian homologues. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we showed that zDia2 interacts with constitutively-active RhoA and Cdc42. The zdia2 mRNAs were ubiquitously expressed during early embryonic development in zebrafish as determined by RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses. Knockdown of zdia2 by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) blocked epiboly formation and convergent extension in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of a human mdia gene partially rescued these defects. Time-lapse recording further showed that bleb-like cellular processes of blastoderm marginal deep marginal cells and pseudopod-/filopod-like processes of prechordal plate cells and lateral cells were abolished in the zdia2 morphants. Furthermore, zDia2 acts cell-autonomously since transplanted zdia2-knockdown cells exhibited low protrusive activity with aberrant migration in wild type host embryos. Lastly, co-injection of antisense MOs of zdia2 and zebrafish profilin I (zpfn 1), but not zebrafish profilin II, resulted in a synergistic inhibition of gastrulation cell movements. These results suggest that zDia2 in conjunction with zPfn 1 are required for gastrulation cell movements in zebrafish. PMID:18941507

  4. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  5. Curing of yeast [PSI+] prion by guanidine inactivation of Hsp104 does not require cell division.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue-Xuan; Greene, Lois E; Masison, Daniel C; Eisenberg, Evan

    2005-09-01

    Propagation of the yeast prion [PSI+], a self-replicating aggregated form of Sup35p, requires Hsp104. One model to explain this phenomenon proposes that, in the absence of Hsp104, Sup35p aggregates enlarge but fail to replicate thus becoming diluted out as the yeast divide. To test this model, we used live imaging of Sup35p-GFP to follow the changes that occur in [PSI+] cells after the addition of guanidine to inactivate Hsp104. After guanidine addition there was initially an increase in aggregation of Sup35p-GFP; but then, before the yeast divided, the aggregates began to dissolve, and after approximately 6 h the Sup35-GFP looked identical to the Sup35-GFP in [psi+] cells. Although plating studies showed that the yeast were still [PSI+], this reduction in aggregation suggested that curing of [PSI+] by inactivation of Hsp104 might be independent of cell division. This was tested by measuring the rate of curing of [PSI+] cells in both dividing and nondividing cells. Cell division was inhibited by adding either alpha factor or farnesol. Remarkably, with both of these methods, we found that the rate of curing was not significantly affected by cell division. Thus, cell division is not a determining factor for curing [PSI+] by inactivating Hsp104 with guanidine. Rather, curing apparently occurs because Sup35-GFP polymers slowly depolymerize in the absence of Hsp104 activity. Hsp104 then counteracts this curing possibly by catalyzing formation of new polymers. PMID:16123122

  6. Analysis of dynamic requirements for fuel cell systems for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischinger, Stefan; Schönfelder, Carsten; Ogrzewalla, Jürgen

    Conventional vehicles with internal combustion engines, as well as battery powered electric vehicles, achieve one of the most important customer requirements; achieving extremely short response times to load changes. Also, fast acceleration times from a cold start to full power in the range of seconds are practicable. New fuel cell-based propulsion systems, as well as auxiliary power units, have to fulfill the same demands to become competitive. This includes heating-up the system to operating temperature as well as the control strategy for start-up. An additional device to supply starting air is necessary, if the compressor motor can only be operated with fuel cell voltage. Since the system components (for example, the air supply or the fuel supply) are not mechanically coupled, as is the case with conventional internal combustion engines, these components have to be controlled by different sensors and actuators. This can be an advantage in optimizing the system, but it also can represent an additional challenge. This paper describes the fuel cell system requirements regarding transient operation and their dependence on system structure. In particular, the requirements for peripheral components such as air supply, fuel supply and the balance of heat in a fuel cell system are examined. Furthermore, the paper outlines the necessity of an electric storage device and its resultant capacity, which will enable faster load changes. Acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle are accomplished through the use of the electric storage device, while the fuel cell system only has to deliver the mean power consumption without higher load peaks. On the basis of system simulation, different concepts are evaluated for use as a propulsion system or APU and, then, critical components are identified. The effects of advanced control strategies regarding the dynamic behavior of the system are demonstrated. Technically, a fuel cell system could be a viable propulsion system alternative

  7. Deletion of antigen-specific immature thymocytes by dendritic cells requires LFA-1/ICAM interactions.

    PubMed

    Carlow, D A; van Oers, N S; Teh, S J; Teh, H S

    1992-03-15

    An in vitro assay was used for assessing the participation of various cell surface molecules and the efficacy of various cell types in the deletion of Ag-specific immature thymocytes. Thymocytes from mice expressing a transgenic TCR specific for the male Ag presented by the H-2Db class I MHC molecule were used as a target for deletion. In H-2d transgenic mice, cells bearing the transgenic TCR are not subjected to thymic selection as a consequence of the absence of the restricting H-2Db molecule but, nevertheless, express this TCR on the vast majority of immature CD4+8+ thymocytes. In this report we show that CD4+8+ thymocytes from H-2d TCR-transgenic mice are preferentially killed upon in vitro culture with male APC; DC were particularly effective in mediating in vitro deletion when compared with either B cells or T cells. Deletion of CD4+8+ thymocytes by DC was H-2b restricted and could be inhibited by mAb to either LFA-1 alpha or CD8. Partial inhibition was observed with mAb to ICAM-1, whereas mAb to CD4 and LFA-1 beta were without effect. These results are the first direct evidence of LFA-1 involvement in negative selection and provide further direct support for the participation of CD8/class I MHC interactions in this process. Like the requirements for deletion, activation of mature male-specific CD4-8+ T cells from female H-2b TCR-transgenic mice was also largely dependent on Ag presentation by DC and required both LFA-1/ICAM and CD8/class I MHC interactions; these results support the view that activation and deletion may represent maturation stage-dependent consequences of T cells encountering the same APC. Finally, our results also support the hypothesis that negative selection (deletion) does not require previous positive selection because deletion was observed under conditions where positive selection had not occurred.

  8. Structural requirements for novel coenzyme-substrate derivatives to inhibit intracellular ornithine decarboxylase and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Gehring, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    Creating transition-state mimics has proven to be a powerful strategy in developing inhibitors to treat malignant diseases in several cases. In the present study, structurally diverse coenzyme-substrate derivatives mimicking this type for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent human ornithine decarboxylase (hODC), a potential anticancer target, were designed, synthesized, and tested to elucidate the structural requirements for optimal inhibition of intracellular ODC as well as of tumor cell proliferation. Of 23 conjugates, phosphopyridoxyl- and pyridoxyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester (pPTME, PTME) proved significantly more potent in suppression proliferation (IC(50) up to 25 microM) of glioma cells (LN229) than alpha-DL-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a medically used irreversible inhibitor of ODC. In agreement with molecular modeling predictions, the inhibitory action of pPTME and PTME toward intracellular ODC of LN229 cells exceeded that of the previous designed lead compound POB. The inhibitory active compounds feature hydrophobic side chain fragments and a kind of polyamine motif (-NH-(CH(X))(4)-NH-). In addition, they induce, as polyamine analogs often do, the activity of the polyamine catabolic enzymes polyamine oxidase and spermine/spermidine N(1)-acetyltransferase up to 250 and 780%, respectively. The dual-action mode of these compounds in LN229 cells affects the intracellular polyamine metabolism and might underlie the more favorable cell proliferation inhibition in comparison with DFMO.

  9. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  10. Initiation of human cytomegalovirus infection requires initial interaction with cell surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Compton, T; Nowlin, D M; Cooper, N R

    1993-04-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that the initial event in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is attachment to extracellular heparan sulfate. Further, this interaction is important for initiation of infection in fibroblast cells. Using microbinding assays to specifically monitor virus attachment as well as plaque titration assays to measure infectivity, we found that heparin competition as well as enzymatic digestion of cells with heparinase blocked virus attachment, initiation of immediate-early gene expression and infectivity. Other major glycosaminoglycans were found not to be involved in HCMV attachment and infectivity. In addition, HCMV was unable to attach to mutant derivatives of Chinese hamster ovary cells deficient in synthesis of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Basic fibroblast growth factor, which requires initial interaction with extracellular heparin prior to binding to its high affinity receptor, also inhibited HCMV attachment to cells. Time-course experiments revealed that the initial HCMV binding was sensitive to heparin competition (10 micrograms/ml) or 0.75 M salt washes. The initial heparin-dissociable binding converted rapidly to high affinity (heparin resistant) HCMV attachment. These data suggest that sequential receptor interactions may mediate HCMV adsorption to cells. Heparin affinity chromatography revealed that multiple HCMV envelope glycoproteins, including gB, are capable of binding to heparin.

  11. PKN3 is required for malignant prostate cell growth downstream of activated PI 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Frauke; Möpert, Kristin; Schmiedeknecht, Anett; Santel, Ansgar; Czauderna, Frank; Aleku, Manuela; Penschuck, Silke; Dames, Sibylle; Sternberger, Maria; Röhl, Thomas; Wellmann, Axel; Arnold, Wolfgang; Giese, Klaus; Kaufmann, Jörg; Klippel, Anke

    2004-01-01

    Chronic activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PTEN signal transduction pathway contributes to metastatic cell growth, but up to now effectors mediating this response are poorly defined. By simulating chronic activation of PI3K signaling experimentally, combined with three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions and gene expression profiling, we aimed to identify novel effectors that contribute to malignant cell growth. Using this approach we identified and validated PKN3, a barely characterized protein kinase C-related molecule, as a novel effector mediating malignant cell growth downstream of activated PI3K. PKN3 is required for invasive prostate cell growth as assessed by 3D cell culture assays and in an orthotopic mouse tumor model by inducible expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA). We demonstrate that PKN3 is regulated by PI3K at both the expression level and the catalytic activity level. Therefore, PKN3 might represent a preferred target for therapeutic intervention in cancers that lack tumor suppressor PTEN function or depend on chronic activation of PI3K. PMID:15282551

  12. BMP9-Induced Survival Effect in Liver Tumor Cells Requires p38MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvaro, María; Addante, Annalisa; Roncero, Cesáreo; Fernández, Margarita; Fabregat, Isabel; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Herrera, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    The study of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) role in tumorigenic processes, and specifically in the liver, has gathered importance in the last few years. Previous studies have shown that BMP9 is overexpressed in about 40% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In vitro data have also shown evidence that BMP9 has a pro-tumorigenic action, not only by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration, but also by promoting proliferation and survival in liver cancer cells. However, the precise mechanisms driving these effects have not yet been established. In the present work, we deepened our studies into the intracellular mechanisms implicated in the BMP9 proliferative and pro-survival effect on liver tumor cells. In HepG2 cells, BMP9 induces both Smad and non-Smad signaling cascades, specifically PI3K/AKT and p38MAPK. However, only the p38MAPK pathway contributes to the BMP9 growth-promoting effect on these cells. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that p38MAPK activation, although dispensable for the BMP9 proliferative activity, is required for the BMP9 protective effect on serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the signaling pathways involved in the BMP9 pro-tumorigenic role in liver tumor cells. PMID:26343646

  13. A novel isoform of MAP4 organises the paraxial microtubule array required for muscle cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mogessie, Binyam; Roth, Daniel; Rahil, Zainab; Straube, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical for muscle cell differentiation and undergoes reorganisation into an array of paraxial microtubules, which serves as template for contractile sarcomere formation. In this study, we identify a previously uncharacterised isoform of microtubule-associated protein MAP4, oMAP4, as a microtubule organising factor that is crucial for myogenesis. We show that oMAP4 is expressed upon muscle cell differentiation and is the only MAP4 isoform essential for normal progression of the myogenic differentiation programme. Depletion of oMAP4 impairs cell elongation and cell–cell fusion. Most notably, oMAP4 is required for paraxial microtubule organisation in muscle cells and prevents dynein- and kinesin-driven microtubule–microtubule sliding. Purified oMAP4 aligns dynamic microtubules into antiparallel bundles that withstand motor forces in vitro. We propose a model in which the cooperation of dynein-mediated microtubule transport and oMAP4-mediated zippering of microtubules drives formation of a paraxial microtubule array that provides critical support for the polarisation and elongation of myotubes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05697.001 PMID:25898002

  14. [Regulatory requirements regarding cell-based medicinal products for human and veterinary use - a comparison].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann-Gottke, Johanna; Duchow, Karin

    2015-11-01

    At present, there is no separate regulatory framework for cell-based medicinal products (CBMP) for veterinary use at the European or German level. Current European and national regulations exclusively apply to the corresponding medicinal products for human use. An increasing number of requests for the regulatory classification of CBMP for veterinary use, such as allogeneic stem cell preparations and dendritic cell-based autologous tumour vaccines, and a rise in scientific advice for companies developing these products, illustrate the need for adequate legislation. Currently, advice is given and decisions are made on a case-by-case basis regarding the regulatory classification and authorisation requirements.Since some of the CBMP - in particular in the area of stem-cell products - are developed in parallel for human and veterinary use, there is an urgent need to create specific legal definitions, regulations, and guidelines for these complex innovative products in the veterinary sector as well. Otherwise, there is a risk that that the current legal grey area regarding veterinary medicinal products will impede therapeutic innovations in the long run. A harmonised EU-wide approach is desirable. Currently the European legislation on veterinary medicinal products is under revision. In this context, veterinary therapeutics based on allogeneic cells and tissues will be defined and regulated. Certainly, the legal framework does not have to be as comprehensive as for human CBMP; a leaner solution is conceivable, similar to the special provisions for advanced-therapy medicinal products laid down in the German Medicines Act.

  15. Heparan sulfate mimetic PG545-mediated antilymphoma effects require TLR9-dependent NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Todd V; Lin, Liwen; Brandstadter, Joshua D; Rendell, Victoria R; Dredge, Keith; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which serves as a barrier to tumor invasion and metastasis. Heparanase promotes tumor growth by cleaving HS chains of proteoglycan and releasing HS-bound angiogenic growth factors and facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the ECM. HS mimetics, such as PG545, have been developed as antitumor agents and are designed to suppress angiogenesis and metastasis by inhibiting heparanase and competing for the HS-binding domain of angiogenic growth factors. However, how PG545 exerts its antitumor effect remains incompletely defined. Here, using murine models of lymphoma, we determined that the antitumor effects of PG545 are critically dependent on NK cell activation and that NK cell activation by PG545 requires TLR9. We demonstrate that PG545 does not activate TLR9 directly but instead enhances TLR9 activation through the elevation of the TLR9 ligand CpG in DCs. Specifically, PG545 treatment resulted in CpG accumulation in the lysosomal compartment of DCs, leading to enhanced production of IL-12, which is essential for PG545-mediated NK cell activation. Overall, these results reveal that PG545 activates NK cells and that this activation is critical for the antitumor effect of PG545. Moreover, our findings may have important implications for improving NK cell-based antitumor therapies. PMID:26649979

  16. Bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells with polyaniline-silica nanocomposites as an efficient hole-collecting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsennia, Mohsen; Bidgoli, Maryam Massah; Khoddami, Mohammad Hossein; Salehi, Alireza; Boroumand, Farhad Akbari

    2016-01-01

    At first, bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells (PSCs) with conventional configuration: ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:C60/Al, containing different blend ratios of poly(3-hexylthiophene):fullerene, (P3HT):C60 as active layer have been fabricated. The effect of replacement of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) by the prepared polyaniline-fumed silica (PANI-SiO2) nanocomposites as the hole-collecting layer (HCL) on the performance of the fabricated PSC with the optimized blending ratio of P3HT:C60 was examined in detail. According to the obtained results, it was found that the fabricated PSC with PANI-SiO2 nanocomposite containing 10% SiO2 (PANI-10% SiO2) as the HCL and P3HT:C60 with the optimized blending ratio (P3HT:33% C60) as active layer exhibited best performance with a fill factor (FF) of 0.35, compared to the PSC containing conventional PEDOT:PSS HCL with an FF of 0.32. Our demonstration suggests that PANI-SiO2 nanocomposites could be promising HCL replacing PEDOT:PSS in PSCs as well as other organic electronic devices.

  17. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  18. UBIAD1-mediated vitamin K2 synthesis is required for vascular endothelial cell survival and development

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-organ animals, such as vertebrates, require the development of a closed vascular system to ensure the delivery of nutrients to, and the transport of waste from, their organs. As a result, an organized vascular network that is optimal for tissue perfusion is created through not only the generation of new blood vessels but also the remodeling and maintenance of endothelial cells via apoptotic and cell survival pathways. Here, we show that UBIAD1, a vitamin K2/menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme, functions cell-autonomously to regulate endothelial cell survival and maintain vascular homeostasis. From a recent vascular transgene-assisted zebrafish forward genetic screen, we have identified a ubiad1 mutant, reddish/reh, which exhibits cardiac edema as well as cranial hemorrhages and vascular degeneration owing to defects in endothelial cell survival. These findings are further bolstered by the expression of UBIAD1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human heart tissue, as well as the rescue of the reh cardiac and vascular phenotypes with either zebrafish or human UBIAD1. Furthermore, we have discovered that vitamin K2, which is synthesized by UBIAD1, can also rescue the reh vascular phenotype but not the reh cardiac phenotype. Additionally, warfarin-treated zebrafish, which have decreased active vitamin K, display similar vascular degeneration as reh mutants, but exhibit normal cardiac function. Overall, these findings reveal an essential role for UBIAD1-generated vitamin K2 to maintain endothelial cell survival and overall vascular homeostasis; however, an alternative UBIAD1/vitamin K-independent pathway may regulate cardiac function. PMID:23533172

  19. A new cruzipain-mediated pathway of human cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi requires trypomastigote membranes.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Isabela M; Scharfstein, Julio; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2004-10-01

    The intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas' disease, a chronic illness associated with cardiomyopathy and digestive disorders. This pathogen invades mammalian cells by signaling them through multiple transduction pathways. We previously showed that cruzipain, the main cysteine protease of T. cruzi, promotes host cell invasion by activating kinin receptors. Here, we report a cruzipain-mediated invasion route that is not blocked by kinin receptor antagonists. By testing different strains of T. cruzi, we observed a correlation between the level of cruzipain secreted by trypomastigotes and the capacity of the pathogen to invade host cells. Consistent with a role for cruzipain, the cysteine protease inhibitor N-methylpiperazine-urea-Phe-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-benzene impaired the invasion of human smooth muscle cells by strains Dm28c and X10/6 but not by the G isolate. Cruzipain-rich supernatants of Dm28c trypomastigotes enhanced the infectivity of isolate G parasites twofold, an effect which was abolished by the cysteine protease inhibitor l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane and by thapsigargin, a drug that induces depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The enhancement due to Dm28 supernatants was abolished upon cruzipain immunodepletion, and the activity was restored by purified cruzipain. In contrast, supernatants from isolate G trypomastigotes (with low levels of cruzipain) or supernatants from Dm28c epimastigotes or purified cruzipain alone did not enhance parasite invasion, indicating that the protease is required but not sufficient to engage this invasion pathway. We provide evidence that activation of this pathway requires cruzipain-mediated processing of a trypomastigote molecule associated with parasite-shed membranes. Our results couple cruzipain to host cell invasion through a kinin-independent route and further suggest that high-level cruzipain expression may contribute to parasite infectivity.

  20. Hemorrhagic Cystitis Requiring Bladder Irrigation is Associated with Poor Mortality in Hospitalized Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raup, Valary T.; Potretzke, Aaron M.; Manley, Brandon J.; Brockman, John A.; Bhayani, Sam B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the overall prognosis of post-stem cell transplant inpatients who required continuous bladder irrigation (CBI) for hematuria. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of adult stem cell transplant recipients who received CBI for de novo hemorrhagic cystitis as inpatients on the bone marrow transplant service at Washington University from 2011-2013. Patients who had a history of genitourinary malignancy and/or recent surgical urologic intervention were excluded. Multiple variables were examined for association with death. Results: Thirty-three patients met our inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 48 years (23-65). Common malignancies included acute myelogenous leukemia (17/33, 57%), acute lymphocytic leukemia (3/33, 10%), and peripheral T cell lymphoma (3/33, 10%). Median time from stem cell transplant to need for CBI was 2.5 months (0 days-6.6 years). All patients had previously undergone chemotherapy (33/33, 100%) and 14 had undergone prior radiation therapy (14/33, 42%). Twenty-eight patients had an infectious disease (28/33, 85%), most commonly BK viremia (19/33, 58%), cytomegalovirus viremia (17/33, 51%), and bacterial urinary tract infection (8/33, 24%). Twenty-two patients expired during the same admission as CBI treatment (22/33 or 67% of total patients, 22/28 or 79% of deaths), with a 30-day mortality of 52% and a 90-day mortality of 73% from the start of CBI. Conclusions: Hemorrhagic cystitis requiring CBI is a symptom of severe systemic disease in stem cell transplant patients. The need for CBI administration may be a marker for mortality risk from a variety of systemic insults, rather than directly attributable to the hematuria. PMID:26742970

  1. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter.

    PubMed

    Rama, Ana R; Hernandez, Rosa; Perazzoli, Gloria; Burgos, Miguel; Melguizo, Consolación; Vélez, Celia; Prados, Jose

    2015-06-04

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA) to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E) towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  2. AKT induces erythroid-cell maturation of JAK2-deficient fetal liver progenitor cells and is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Saghi; Kitidis, Claire; Zhao, Wei; Marinkovic, Dragan; Fleming, Mark D; Luo, Biao; Marszalek, Joseph; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-01

    AKT serine threonine kinase of the protein kinase B (PKB) family plays essential roles in cell survival, growth, metabolism, and differentiation. In the erythroid system, AKT is known to be rapidly phosphorylated and activated in response to erythropoietin (Epo) engagement of Epo receptor (EpoR) and to sustain survival signals in cultured erythroid cells. Here we demonstrate that activated AKT complements EpoR signaling and supports erythroid-cell differentiation in wild-type and JAK2-deficient fetal liver cells. We show that erythroid maturation of AKT-transduced cells is not solely dependent on AKT-induced cell survival or proliferation signals, suggesting that AKT transduces also a differentiation-specific signal downstream of EpoR in erythroid cells. Down-regulation of expression of AKT kinase by RNA interference, or AKT activity by expression of dominant negative forms, inhibits significantly fetal liver-derived erythroid-cell colony formation and gene expression, demonstrating that AKT is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell maturation.

  3. Goblet Cell Hyperplasia Requires High Bicarbonate Transport To Support Mucin Release

    PubMed Central

    Gorrieri, Giulia; Scudieri, Paolo; Caci, Emanuela; Schiavon, Marco; Tomati, Valeria; Sirci, Francesco; Napolitano, Francesco; Carrella, Diego; Gianotti, Ambra; Musante, Ilaria; Favia, Maria; Casavola, Valeria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Rea, Federico; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Di Bernardo, Diego; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Goblet cell hyperplasia, a feature of asthma and other respiratory diseases, is driven by the Th-2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. In human bronchial epithelial cells, we find that IL-4 induces the expression of many genes coding for ion channels and transporters, including TMEM16A, SLC26A4, SLC12A2, and ATP12A. At the functional level, we find that IL-4 enhances calcium- and cAMP-activated chloride/bicarbonate secretion, resulting in high bicarbonate concentration and alkaline pH in the fluid covering the apical surface of epithelia. Importantly, mucin release, elicited by purinergic stimulation, requires the presence of bicarbonate in the basolateral solution and is defective in cells derived from cystic fibrosis patients. In conclusion, our results suggest that Th-2 cytokines induce a profound change in expression and function in multiple ion channels and transporters that results in enhanced bicarbonate transport ability. This change is required as an important mechanism to favor release and clearance of mucus. PMID:27786259

  4. The NIP7 protein is required for accurate pre-rRNA processing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Morello, Luis G; Hesling, Cédric; Coltri, Patrícia P; Castilho, Beatriz A; Rimokh, Ruth; Zanchin, Nilson I T

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires the function of a large number of trans-acting factors which interact transiently with the nascent pre-rRNA and dissociate as the ribosomal subunits proceed to maturation and export to the cytoplasm. Loss-of-function mutations in human trans-acting factors or ribosome components may lead to genetic syndromes. In a previous study, we have shown association between the SBDS (Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome) and NIP7 proteins and that downregulation of SBDS in HEK293 affects gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. In this study, we show that downregulation of NIP7 affects pre-rRNA processing, causing an imbalance of the 40S/60S subunit ratio. We also identified defects at the pre-rRNA processing level with a decrease of the 34S pre-rRNA concentration and an increase of the 26S and 21S pre-rRNA concentrations, indicating that processing at site 2 is particularly slower in NIP7-depleted cells and showing that NIP7 is required for maturation of the 18S rRNA. The NIP7 protein is restricted to the nuclear compartment and co-sediments with complexes with molecular masses in the range of 40S-80S, suggesting an association to nucleolar pre-ribosomal particles. Downregulation of NIP7 affects cell proliferation, consistently with an important role for NIP7 in rRNA biosynthesis in human cells.

  5. Ferroportin and exocytoplasmic ferroxidase activity are required for brain microvascular endothelial cell iron efflux.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2013-06-14

    The mechanism(s) of iron flux across the brain microvasculature endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the blood-brain barrier remains unknown. Although both hephaestin (Hp) and the ferrous iron permease ferroportin (Fpn) have been identified in BMVEC, their roles in iron efflux have not been examined. Using a human BMVEC line (hBMVEC), we have demonstrated that these proteins are required for iron efflux from these cells. Expression of both Hp and Fpn protein was confirmed in hBMVEC by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence; we show that hBMVEC express soluble ceruloplasmin (Cp) transcript as well. Depletion of endogenous Hp and Cp via copper chelation leads to the reduction of hBMVEC Fpn protein levels as well as a complete inhibition of (59)Fe efflux. Both hBMVEC Fpn protein and (59)Fe efflux activity are restored upon incubation with 6.6 nm soluble plasma Cp. These results are independent of the source of cell iron, whether delivered as transferrin- or non-transferrin-bound (59)Fe. Our results demonstrate that iron efflux from hBMVEC Fpn requires the action of an exocytoplasmic ferroxidase, which can be either endogenous Hp or extracellular Cp.

  6. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  7. The α isoform of topoisomerase II is required for hypercompaction of mitotic chromosomes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Farr, Christine J; Antoniou-Kourounioti, Melissa; Mimmack, Michael L; Volkov, Arsen; Porter, Andrew C G

    2014-04-01

    As proliferating cells transit from interphase into M-phase, chromatin undergoes extensive reorganization, and topoisomerase (topo) IIα, the major isoform of this enzyme present in cycling vertebrate cells, plays a key role in this process. In this study, a human cell line conditional null mutant for topo IIα and a derivative expressing an auxin-inducible degron (AID)-tagged version of the protein have been used to distinguish real mitotic chromosome functions of topo IIα from its more general role in DNA metabolism and to investigate whether topo IIβ makes any contribution to mitotic chromosome formation. We show that topo IIβ does contribute, with endogenous levels being sufficient for the initial stages of axial shortening. However, a significant effect of topo IIα depletion, seen with or without the co-depletion of topo IIβ, is the failure of chromosomes to hypercompact when delayed in M-phase. This requires much higher levels of topo II protein and is impaired by drugs or mutations that affect enzyme activity. A prolonged delay at the G2/M border results in hyperefficient axial shortening, a process that is topo IIα-dependent. Rapid depletion of topo IIα has allowed us to show that its function during late G2 and M-phase is truly required for shaping mitotic chromosomes.

  8. Zic2 is an enhancer-binding factor required for embryonic stem cell specification

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhuojuan; Gao, Xin; Lin, Chengqi; Smith, Edwin; Marshall, Stacy; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Zinc finger protein of the cerebellum 2 (Zic2) is one of the vertebrate homologs of the Drosophila pair-rule gene odd-paired (opa). Our molecular and biochemical studies demonstrate that Zic2 preferentially binds to transcriptional enhancers and is required for the regulation of gene expression in embryonic stem cells. Detailed genome-wide and molecular studies reveal that Zic2 can function with Mbd3/NuRD in regulating the chromatin state and transcriptional output of genes linked to differentiation. Zic2 is required for proper differentiation of ES cells, similar to what has been previously reported for Mbd3/NuRD. Our study identifies Zic2 as a key factor in the execution of transcriptional fine-tuning with Mbd3/NuRD in ES cells through interactions with enhancers. Our study also points to the role of the Zic family of proteins as enhancer-specific binding factors functioning in development. PMID:25699711

  9. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  10. 40 CFR 600.304-12 - Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. 600.304-12 Section 600.304-12 Protection of Environment... fuel cell vehicles. Fuel economy labels for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles must meet the...

  11. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  12. 40 CFR 600.304-12 - Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. 600.304-12 Section 600.304-12 Protection of Environment... fuel cell vehicles. Fuel economy labels for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles must meet the...

  13. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  14. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  15. 40 CFR 600.304-12 - Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. 600.304-12 Section 600.304-12 Protection of Environment... fuel cell vehicles. Fuel economy labels for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles must meet the...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  17. Multiple requirements for SHPTP2 in epidermal growth factor-mediated cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A M; Hausdorff, S F; O'Reilly, A M; Freeman, R M; Neel, B G

    1996-01-01

    Using transient overexpression and microinjection approaches, we examined SHPTP2's function in growth factor signaling. Overexpression of catalytically inactive SHPTP2 (PTP2CS) but not catalytically inactive SHPTP1, inhibited mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and Elk-1 transactivation following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation of 293 cells. An SHPTP2 mutant with both C-terminal tyrosyl phosphorylation sites converted to phenylalanine (PTP2YF) was also without effect; moreover, PTP2YF rescued PTP2CS-induced inhibition of EGF-induced Elk-1 transactivation. PTP2CS did not inhibit transactivation by activated Ras, suggesting that SHPTP2 acts upstream of or parallel to Ras. Neither PTP2CS nor PTP2YF inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced Elk-1 transactivation. Thus, protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity, but not tyrosyl phosphorylation of SHPTP2, is required for the immediate-early responses to EGF but not to PDGF. To determine whether SHPTP2 is required later in the cell cycle, we assessed S-phase entry in NIH 3T3 cells microinjected with anti-SHPTP2 antibodies or with a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein encoding both SH2 domains (GST-SH2). Microinjection of anti-SHPTP2 antibodies prior to stimulation inhibited EGF- but no PDGF- or serum-induced S-phase entry. Anti-SHPTP2 antibodies or GST-SH2 fusion protein could inhibit EGF-induced S-phase entry for up to 8 h after EGF addition. Although MAP kinase activation was detected shortly after EGF stimulation, no MAP kinase activation was detected around the restriction point. Therefore, SHPTP2 is absolutely required for immediate-early and late events induced by some, but not all, growth factors, and the immediate-early and late signal transduction pathways regulated by SHPTP2 are distinguishable. PMID:8622663

  18. Mouse TEX14 is required for embryonic germ cell intercellular bridges but not female fertility.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Michael P; Iwamori, Naoki; Agno, Julio E; Matzuk, Martin M

    2009-03-01

    A conserved feature of germ cell cytokinesis is the formation of stable intercellular bridges between daughter cells. These intercellular bridges are seen in diverse species from Drosophila melanogaster to Homo sapiens and have been shown to have roles in communication of large numbers of germ cells. In testis expressed gene 14 (Tex14) knockout mice, intercellular bridges do not form during spermatogenesis, and male mice are sterile, demonstrating an essential role for intercellular bridges in postnatal spermatogenesis in mammals. Intercellular bridges also form between dividing germ cells in both male and female embryos. However, little is known about the formation or role of the embryonic intercellular bridges in mammals. In females, embryonic intercellular bridges have been proposed to have a role in development of the presumptive oocyte. Herein, we show that TEX14 is an essential component of male and female embryonic intercellular bridges. In addition, we demonstrate that mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1, official symbol KIF23), which we have discovered is a component of intercellular bridges during spermatogenesis, is also a component of male and female embryonic intercellular bridges. Germ cell intercellular bridges are readily identified by KIF23 immunofluorescence between the gonocytes and oogonia of control mice but are absent between germ cells of Tex14-null mice. Furthermore, by electron microscopy, intercellular bridges are present in all control newborn ovaries but are absent in the Tex14 knockout ovaries. Despite the absence of embryonic intercellular bridges in the Tex14-null mice, male mice initiate spermatogenesis, and female mice are fertile. Although fewer oocytes were present in Tex14-null neonatal ovaries, folliculogenesis was still active at 1 yr of age. Thus, while TEX14 and intercellular bridges have an essential role in postnatal spermatogenesis, they are not required in the embryo.

  19. A cell-free CENP-A assembly system defines the chromatin requirements for centromere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Westhorpe, Frederick G.; Fuller, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENP-A nucleosomes in chromatin and are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Centromeric chromatin epigenetically seeds new CENP-A nucleosome formation, thereby maintaining functional centromeres as cells divide. The features within centromeric chromatin that direct new CENP-A assembly remain unclear. Here, we developed a cell-free CENP-A assembly system that enabled the study of chromatin-bound CENP-A and soluble CENP-A separately. We show that two distinct domains of CENP-A within existing CENP-A nucleosomes are required for new CENP-A assembly and that CENP-A nucleosomes recruit the CENP-A assembly factors CENP-C and M18BP1 independently. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of CENP-C recruitment to centromeres is dependent on the density of underlying CENP-A nucleosomes. PMID:26076692

  20. Supraphysiological Levels of Quercetin Glycosides are Required to Alter Mineralization in Saos2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Leslie A.; Peters, Sandra J.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Ward, Wendy E.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoid intake is positively correlated to bone mineral density (BMD) in women. Flavonoids such as quercetin exhibit strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity that may be beneficial for bone health. Quercetin, previously shown to positively influence osteoblasts, is metabolized into glycosides including rutin and hyperoside. We compared the effects of these glycosides on mineralization in human osteoblast (Saos2) cells. Administration of rutin (≥25 µM) and hyperoside (≥5 µM) resulted in higher mineral content, determined using the alizarin red assay. This was accompanied by higher alkaline phosphatase activity with no cell toxicity. The expression of osteopontin, sclerostin, TNFα and IL6, known stimuli for decreasing osteoblast activity, were reduced with the addition of rutin or hyperoside. In summary, rutin and hyperoside require supraphysiological levels, when administered individually, to positively influence osteoblast activity. This information may be useful in developing nutraceuticals to support bone health. PMID:27136576

  1. JunB is required for endothelial cell morphogenesis by regulating core-binding factor β

    PubMed Central

    Licht, Alexander H.; Pein, Oliver T.; Florin, Lore; Hartenstein, Bettina; Reuter, Hendrik; Arnold, Bernd; Lichter, Peter; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism triggering the organization of endothelial cells (ECs) in multicellular tubules is mechanistically still poorly understood. We demonstrate that cell-autonomous endothelial functions of the AP-1 subunit JunB are required for proper endothelial morphogenesis both in vivo in mouse embryos with endothelial-specific ablation of JunB and in in vitro angiogenesis models. By cDNA microarray analysis, we identified core-binding factor β (CBFβ), which together with the Runx proteins forms the heterodimeric core-binding transcription complex CBF, as a novel JunB target gene. In line with our findings, expression of the CBF target MMP-13 was impaired in JunB-deficient ECs. Reintroduction of CBFβ into JunB-deficient ECs rescued the tube formation defect and MMP-13 expression, indicating an important role for CBFβ in EC morphogenesis. PMID:17158955

  2. The DCL gene of tomato is required for chloroplast development and palisade cell morphogenesis in leaves.

    PubMed

    Keddie, J S; Carroll, B; Jones, J D; Gruissem, W

    1996-08-15

    The defective chloroplasts and leaves-mutable (dcl-m) mutation of tomato was identified in a Ds mutagenesis screen. This unstable mutation affects both chloroplast development and palisade cell morphogenesis in leaves. Mutant plants are clonally variegated as a result of somatic excision of Ds and have albino leaves with green sectors. Leaf midribs and stems are light green with sectors of dark green tissue but fruit and petals are wild-type in appearance. Within dark green sectors of dcl-m leaves, palisade cells are normal, whereas in albino areas of dcl-m leaves, palisade cells do not expand to become their characteristic columnar shape. The development of chloroplasts from proplastids in albino areas is apparently blocked at an early stage. DCL was cloned using Ds as a tag and encodes a novel protein of approximately 25 kDa, containing a chloroplast transit peptide and an acidic alpha-helical region. DCL protein was imported into chloroplasts in vitro and processed to a mature form. Because of the ubiquitous expression of DCL and the proplastid-like appearance of dcl-affected plastids, the DCL protein may regulate a basic and universal function of the plastid. The novel dcl-m phenotype suggests that chloroplast development is required for correct palisade cell morphogenesis during leaf development.

  3. Meis1 Is Required for the Maintenance of Postnatal Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Takehiro; Asano, Yusuke; Iida, Hajime; Watanabe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takuro; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Most epithelial tissues retain stem/progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis of the adult tissues; however, the existence of a thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitor capable of maintaining homeostasis of the postnatal thymus remains unclear. Here, we show that a cell population expressing high levels of Meis1, a homeodomain transcription factor, is enriched in TECs with an immature cellular phenotype. These TECs selectively express genes involved in embryonic thymic organogenesis and epithelial stem cell maintenance, and also have the potential to proliferate and differentiate into mature TEC populations. Furthermore, postnatal inactivation of Meis1 in TECs caused disorganization of the thymic architecture, which ultimately leads to premature disappearance of the thymus. There was an age-associated reduction in the proportion of the TEC population expressing high levels of Meis1, which may also be related to thymic involution. These findings indicate that Meis1 is potentially involved in the maintenance of postnatal TECs with progenitor activity that is required for homeostasis of the postnatal thymus. PMID:24594519

  4. Antiapoptotic protein Lifeguard is required for survival and maintenance of Purkinje and granular cells.

    PubMed

    Hurtado de Mendoza, Tatiana; Perez-Garcia, Carlos G; Kroll, Todd T; Hoong, Nien H; O'Leary, Dennis D M; Verma, Inder M

    2011-10-11

    Lifeguard (LFG) is an inhibitor of Fas-mediated cell death and is highly expressed in the cerebellum. We investigated the biological role of LFG in the cerebellum in vivo, using mice with reduced LFG expression generated by shRNA lentiviral transgenesis (shLFG mice) as well as LFG null mice. We found that LFG plays a role in cerebellar development by affecting cerebellar size, internal granular layer (IGL) thickness, and Purkinje cell (PC) development. All these features are more severe in early developmental stages and show substantial recovery overtime, providing a remarkable example of cerebellar plasticity. In adult mice, LFG plays a role in PC maintenance shown by reduced cellular density and abnormal morphology with increased active caspase 8 and caspase 3 immunostaining in shLFG and knockout (KO) PCs. We studied the mechanism of action of LFG as an inhibitor of the Fas pathway and provided evidence of the neuroprotective role of LFG in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and PCs in an organotypic cerebellar culture system. Biochemical analysis of the Fas pathway revealed that LFG inhibits Fas-mediated cell death by interfering with caspase 8 activation. This result is supported by the increased number of active caspase 8-positive PCs in adult mice lacking LFG. These data demonstrate that LFG is required for proper development and survival of granular and Purkinje cells and suggest LFG may play a role in cerebellar disorders.

  5. Requirements for efficient cell-type proportioning: regulatory timescales, stochasticity and lateral inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuty, B.; Kaneko, K.

    2016-04-01

    The proper functioning of multicellular organisms requires the robust establishment of precise proportions between distinct cell types. This developmental differentiation process typically involves intracellular regulatory and stochastic mechanisms to generate cell-fate diversity as well as intercellular signaling mechanisms to coordinate cell-fate decisions at tissue level. We thus surmise that key insights about the developmental regulation of cell-type proportion can be captured by the modeling study of clustering dynamics in population of inhibitory-coupled noisy bistable systems. This general class of dynamical system is shown to exhibit a very stable two-cluster state, but also metastability, collective oscillations or noise-induced state hopping, which can prevent from timely and reliably reaching a robust and well-proportioned clustered state. To circumvent these obstacles or to avoid fine-tuning, we highlight a general strategy based on dual-time positive feedback loops, such as mediated through transcriptional versus epigenetic mechanisms, which improves proportion regulation by coordinating early and flexible lineage priming with late and firm commitment. This result sheds new light on the respective and cooperative roles of multiple regulatory feedback, stochasticity and lateral inhibition in developmental dynamics.

  6. Pim2 is required for maintaining multiple myeloma cell growth through modulating TSC2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Zavorotinskaya, Tatiana; Dai, Yumin; Niu, Xiao-Hong; Castillo, Joseph; Sim, Janet; Yu, Jianjun; Wang, Yingyun; Langowski, John L; Holash, Jocelyn; Shannon, Kevin; Garcia, Pablo D

    2013-08-29

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy. Despite recent treatment advances, it remains incurable. Here, we report that Pim2 kinase expression is highly elevated in MM cells and demonstrate that it is required for MM cell proliferation. Functional interference of Pim2 activity either by short hairpin RNAs or by a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor leads to significant inhibition of MM cell proliferation. Pim inhibition results in a significant decrease of mammalian target of rapamycin C1 (mTOR-C1) activity, which is critical for cell proliferation. We identify TSC2, a negative regulator of mTOR-C1, as a novel Pim2 substrate and show that Pim2 directly phosphorylates TSC2 on Ser-1798 and relieves the suppression of TSC2 on mTOR-C1. These findings support Pim2 as a promising therapeutic target for MM and define a novel Pim2-TSC2-mTOR-C1 pathway that drives MM proliferation. PMID:23818547

  7. c-Fos activated phospholipid synthesis is required for neurite elongation in differentiating PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Germán A; Bussolino, Daniela F; Portal, Maximiliano M; Alfonso Pecchio, Adolfo; Renner, Marianne L; Borioli, Graciela A; Guido, Mario E; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2004-04-01

    We have previously shown that c-Fos activates phospholipid synthesis through a mechanism independent of its genomic AP-1 activity. Herein, using PC12 cells induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor, the genomic effect of c-Fos in initiating neurite outgrowth is shown as distinct from its nongenomic effect of activating phospholipid synthesis and sustaining neurite elongation. Blocking c-Fos expression inhibited differentiation, phospholipid synthesis activation, and neuritogenesis. In cells primed to grow, blocking c-Fos expression determined neurite retraction. However, transfected cells expressing c-Fos or c-Fos deletion mutants with capacity to activate phospholipid synthesis sustain neurite outgrowth and elongation in the absence of nerve growth factor. Results disclose a dual function of c-Fos: it first releases the genomic program for differentiation and then associates to the endoplasmic reticulum and activates phospholipid synthesis. Because phospholipids are key membrane components, we hypothesize this latter phenomenon as crucial to support membrane genesis demands required for cell growth and neurite elongation. PMID:14767061

  8. Specific asparagine-linked oligosaccharides are not required for certain neuron-neuron and neuron-Schwann cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To determine whether specific asparagine-linked (N-linked) oligosaccharides present in cell surface glycoproteins are required for cell-cell interactions within the peripheral nervous system, we have used castanospermine to inhibit maturation of N-linked sugars in cell cultures of neurons or neurons plus Schwann cells. Maximally 10-15% of the N-linked oligosaccharides on neuronal proteins have normal structure when cells are cultured in the presence of 250 micrograms/ml castanospermine; the remaining oligosaccharides are present as immature carbohydrate chains not normally found in these glycoproteins. Although cultures were treated for 2 wk with castanospermine, cells always remained viable and appeared healthy. We have analyzed several biological responses of embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons, with or without added purified populations of Schwann cells, in the presence of castanospermine. We have observed that a normal complement of mature, N- linked sugars are not required for neurite outgrowth, neuron-Schwann cell adhesion, neuron-induced Schwann cell proliferation, or ensheathment of neurites by Schwann cells. Treatment of neuronal cultures with castanospermine increases the propensity of neurites to fasciculate. Extracellular matrix deposition by Schwann cells and myelination of neurons by Schwann cells are greatly diminished in the presence of castanospermine as assayed by electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry, suggesting that specific N-linked oligosaccharides are required for the expression of these cellular functions. PMID:3522602

  9. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein K is required for efficient cell-to-cell spread and virus egress

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Antonie . E-mail: toni.neubauer@micro.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2004-11-10

    The function of the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein K (gK) homologue was investigated. Deletion of 88% of the UL53-homologous open reading frame in EHV-1 strain RacH resulted in a severe growth defect of the gK-negative virus (H{delta}gK) as reflected by a significant decrease in the production of infectious virus progeny on RK13 cells. The H{delta}gK virus induced only minute plaques, was unable to form syncytia, and its penetration efficiency into RK13 cells was reduced by approximately 40%. To further analyze gK function and intracellular trafficking, gK of strain RacH was replaced by a C-terminally truncated gK-green fluorescent protein fusion protein (gK-GFP). The generated recombinant virus was shown to replicate well on non-complementing cells, and virus penetration and syncytium formation were comparable to parental RacH. A reduction in plaque size and slightly decreased intra- and extracellular virus titers, however, were observed. The gK-GFP fusion protein was expressed with early-late kinetics, and multiple forms of the protein exhibiting M{sub r}s between 50,000 and 85,000 were detected by Western blot analysis. The various gK-GFP forms were shown to be N-glycosylated, associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus, and were incorporated into extracellular virions. Complete processing of gK-GFP was only observed within the context of viral infection. From the results, we concluded that EHV-1 gK is required for efficient virus growth in vitro and that the carboxy-terminal amino acids are not required for its function, because the gK-GFP fusion protein was able to complement for EHV-1 growth in the absence of authentic gK.

  10. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell–cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pietilä, Mika; Lehenkari, Petri; Kuvaja, Paula; Kaakinen, Mika; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-11-01

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48 h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell–cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells.

  11. Distinct Processes and Transcriptional Targets Underlie CDX2 Requirements in Intestinal Stem Cells and Differentiated Villus Cells

    PubMed Central

    San Roman, Adrianna K.; Tovaglieri, Alessio; Breault, David T.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lgr5-expressing intestinal stem cells (ISCs) renew the adult gut epithelium by producing mature villus cells (VCs); the transcriptional basis for ISC functions remains unclear. RNA sequencing analysis identified transcripts modulated during differentiation of Lgr5+ ISCs into VCs, with high expression of the intestine-restricted transcription factor (TF) gene Cdx2 in both populations. Cdx2-deleted mouse ISCs showed impaired proliferation and long-term inability to produce mature lineages, revealing essential ISC functions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis of CDX2 in Lgr5+ ISCs, coupled with mRNA profiling of control and Cdx2−/− ISCs, identified features of CDX2 regulation distinct from VCs. Most CDX2 binding in ISCs occurs in anticipation of future gene expression, but whereas CDX2 primarily activates VC genes, direct ISC targets are activated and repressed. Diverse CDX2 requirements in stem and differentiated cells may reflect the versatility of TFs that specify a tissue in development and control the same tissue in adults. PMID:26489894

  12. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akinori; Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2014-01-24

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria and that this occurs in a DDR-independent manner.

  13. Heterogeneous accessory cell requirement for human peripheral blood T lymphocyte activation by PHA into IL-2-responsive colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Oudhriri, N; Gourdin, M F; Bouguet, J; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1984-08-01

    Mitogen-driven T cell proliferation in liquid culture requires accessory cells that cooperate in interleukin 2 production. We have investigated the accessory cell requirement for human lymphocyte colony formation under PHA stimulation. Semisolid medium limits cell-to-cell contact emphasizing the role of cooperating cells both in growth factor production and in triggering events. Culturing at high T cell density demonstrates that accessory cells can be substituted for colony formation by exogenous IL-2. Culturing at low T cell density in the presence of IL-2 also demonstrates that accessory cells are required for activation of a subset of progenitors into IL-2 responsive colony-forming cells. Consequently, T colony progenitors, contained in the E-rosetting cell fraction of peripheral blood, are heterogeneous in their triggering signals: a minor subset is directly inducible by PHA, and a major subset is inducible by PHA in the presence of accessory cells. We found that monocytes and some leukemic B cells support effective accessory function in both colony growth factor production and colony progenitor sensitization. PMID:6611211

  14. The cognate coat protein is required for cell-to-cell movement of a chimeric brome mosaic virus mediated by the cucumber mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Nagano, H; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1999-12-20

    Cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) and brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV) have many similarities, including the three-dimensional structure of virions, genome organizations, and requirement of the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. We have shown that a chimeric BMV with the CMV 3a movement protein (MP) gene instead of its own cannot move from cell to cell in Chenopodium quinoa, a common permissive host for both BMV and CMV. Another chimeric BMV was constructed by replacing both MP and CP genes of BMV with those of CMV (MP/CP-chimera) and tested for its infectivity in C. quinoa, to determine whether the CMV CP has some functions required for the CMV MP-mediated cell-to-cell movement and to exhibit functional difference between CPs of BMV and CMV. Cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera occurred, and small local lesions were induced on the inoculated leaves. A frameshift mutation introduced in the CMV CP gene of the MP/CP-chimera resulted in a lack of cell-to-cell movement of the chimeric virus. These results indicate that the viral movement mediated by the CMV MP requires its cognate CP. Deletion of the amino-terminal region in CMV CP, which is not obligatory for CMV movement, also abolished cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera. This may suggest some differences in cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera and CMV. On the other hand, the sole replacement of BMV CP gene with that of CMV abolished viral cell-to-cell movement, suggesting a possibility that the viral movement mediated by the BMV MP may also require its cognate CP. Functional compatibility between MP and CP in viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  15. DARPP-32 is required for MAPK/ERK signaling in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; Zaballos, Miguel A; Santisteban, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2012-03-01

    Modulation of MAPK signaling duration by cAMP defines its physiological output by driving cells toward proliferation or differentiation. Understanding how the kinetics of MAPK signaling are integrated with other cellular signals is a key issue in development and cancer. Here we show that dopamine and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32), a protein required for thyroid cell differentiation, determines whether MAPK/ERK activation is sustained or transient. Serum, a stimulus that activates MAPK signaling and does not independently increase DARPP-32 levels results in transient activation of the MAPK pathway. By contrast, TSH + (IGF-I) activate MAPK signaling but also independently increase DARPP-32 levels. Our results are consistent with a model in which maintenance of DARPP-32 expression by TSH + IGF-I leads to sustained MAPK signaling. Moreover, the sensitivity of MAPK/ERK signaling in thyroid cells is lost when de novo DARPP-32 expression is blocked by small interfering RNA. Because both DARPP-32 levels and function as inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1, a key inhibitor of MAPK kinase activity, are governed by cAMP/protein kinase A, the results may explain why in thyroid cells cAMP signaling downstream from TSH controls the duration of MAPK pathway activity. Thus, fine-tuning of DARPP-32 levels leads to changes in the kinetics or sensitivity of MAPK/ERK signaling. Given the implications of MAPK signaling in thyroid cancer and the loss of DARPP-32 in tumor and transformed thyroid cells, DARPP-32 may represent a key therapeutic target. PMID:22301787

  16. α6-integrin is required for the adhesion and vasculogenic potential of hemangioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M.; Guerin, Coralie L.; Boscolo, Elisa; Bieche, Ivan; Mulliken, John B.; Bischoff, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common tumor of infancy. Hemangioma stem cells (HemSC) are a mesenchymal subpopulation isolated from IH CD133+ cells. HemSC can differentiate into endothelial and pericyte/smooth muscle cells and form vascular networks when injected in immune-deficient mice. α6-Integrin subunit has been implicated in the tumorgenicity of glioblastoma stem cells and the homing properties of hematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal progenitor cells. Therefore, we investigated the possible function(s) of α6-integrin in HemSC. Methods/Results We documented α6-integrin expression in IH tumor specimens and HemSC by RT-qPCR and flow cytometry. We examined the effect of blocking or silencing α6-integrin on the adhesive and proliferative properties of HemSCin vitro and the vasculogenic and homing properties of HemSCin vivo. Targeting α6-integrin in cultured HemSC inhibited adhesion to laminin but had no effect on proliferation. Vessel-forming ability in Matrigel implants and hepatic homing after intravenous delivery were significantly decreased in α6-integrin siRNA transfected HemSC. Conclusion α6-Integrin is required for HemSC adherence to laminin, vessel formation in vivo and for homing to the liver. Thus, we uncovered an important role for α6 integrin in the vasculogenic properties of HemSC. Our results suggest that α6-integrin expression on HemSC could be a new target for anti-hemangioma therapy. PMID:24022922

  17. Differential Requirement for LAT and SLP-76 in GPVI versus T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Barbi A.; Myung, Peggy S.; Obergfell, Achim; Myers, Erin E.; Cheng, Alec M.; Watson, Stephen P.; Pear, Warren S.; Allman, David; Shattil, Sanford J.; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    Mice deficient in the adaptor Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte phosphoprotein of 76 kD (SLP-76) exhibit a bleeding disorder and lack T cells. Linker for activation of T cells (LAT)-deficient mice exhibit a similar T cell phenotype, but show no signs of hemorrhage. Both SLP-76 and LAT are important for optimal platelet activation downstream of the collagen receptor, GPVI. In addition, SLP-76 is involved in signaling mediated by integrin αIIbβ3. Because SLP-76 and LAT function coordinately in T cell signal transduction, yet their roles appear to differ in hemostasis, we investigated in detail the functional consequences of SLP-76 and LAT deficiencies in platelets. Previously we have shown that LAT−/− platelets exhibit defective responses to the GPVI-specific agonist, collagen-related peptide (CRP). Consistent with this, we find that surface expression of P-selectin in response to high concentrations of GPVI ligands is reduced in both LAT- and SLP-76–deficient platelets. However, platelets from LAT−/− mice, but not SLP-76−/− mice, aggregate normally in response to high concentrations of collagen and convulxin. Additionally, unlike SLP-76, LAT is not tyrosine phosphorylated after fibrinogen binding to integrin αIIbβ3, and collagen-stimulated platelets deficient in LAT spread normally on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. Together, these findings indicate that while LAT and SLP-76 are equally required for signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR, platelet activation downstream of GPVI and αIIbβ3 shows a much greater dependency on SLP-76 than LAT. PMID:11901197

  18. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  19. Temporal control of glial cell migration in the Drosophila eye requires gilgamesh, hedgehog, and eye specification genes.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Attix, Suzanne; Gunning, Dorian; Zipursky, S Lawrence

    2002-01-17

    In the Drosophila visual system, photoreceptor neurons (R cells) extend axons towards glial cells located at the posterior edge of the eye disc. In gilgamesh (gish) mutants, glial cells invade anterior regions of the eye disc prior to R cell differentiation and R cell axons extend anteriorly along these cells. gish encodes casein kinase Igamma. gish, sine oculis, eyeless, and hedgehog (hh) act in the posterior region of the eye disc to prevent precocious glial cell migration. Targeted expression of Hh in this region rescues the gish phenotype, though the glial cells do not require the canonical Hh signaling pathway to respond. We propose that the spatiotemporal control of glial cell migration plays a critical role in determining the directionality of R cell axon outgrowth. PMID:11804568

  20. Human T-cell subset requirements for the production of specific anti-influenza virus antibody in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yarchoan, R.; Biddison, W.E.; Schneider, H.S.; Nelson, D.L.

    1982-04-01

    Studies were undertaken to define the helper T-cell requirements for in vitro specific antibody production to influenza virus. Subpopulations of human T cells were separated on the basis of their reactivity with the monoclonal antibody OKT4. B cells cultured with OKT4+ T cells produced specific antibody to influenza virus, while B cells cultured with OKT4- T cells did not. Irradiation (1200 rads) of the OKT4- subset to potentially eliminate suppressor-cell activity did not augment the helper-cell function of that subset. Thus, unlike the cytotoxic T-cell response to influenza, help for an in vitro antibody response is mediated only by OKT4+ T cells.

  1. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  2. Collective cell migration requires suppression of actomyosin at cell-cell contacts mediated by DDR1 and the cell polarity regulators Par3 and Par6.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Carcedo, Cristina; Hooper, Steven; Chaudhry, Shahid I; Williamson, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Leitinger, Birgit; Sahai, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Collective cell migration occurs in a range of contexts: cancer cells frequently invade in cohorts while retaining cell-cell junctions. Here we show that collective invasion by cancer cells depends on decreasing actomyosin contractility at sites of cell-cell contact. When actomyosin is not downregulated at cell-cell contacts, migrating cells lose cohesion. We provide a molecular mechanism for this downregulation. Depletion of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) blocks collective cancer-cell invasion in a range of two-dimensional, three-dimensional and 'organotypic' models. DDR1 coordinates the Par3/Par6 cell-polarity complex through its carboxy terminus, binding PDZ domains in Par3 and Par6. The DDR1-Par3/Par6 complex controls the localization of RhoE to cell-cell contacts, where it antagonizes ROCK-driven actomyosin contractility. Depletion of DDR1, Par3, Par6 or RhoE leads to increased actomyosin contactility at cell-cell contacts, a loss of cell-cell cohesion and defective collective cell invasion.

  3. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 {times} 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V{sub x} ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V{sub x}, the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90{degree}. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 {times} 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  4. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 [times] 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V[sub x] ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V[sub x], the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90[degree]. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 [times] 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  5. Immune Cell Inhibition by SLAMF7 Is Mediated by a Mechanism Requiring Src Kinases, CD45, and SHIP-1 That Is Defective in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huaijian; Cruz-Munoz, Mario-Ernesto; Wu, Ning; Robbins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule F7 (SLAMF7) is a receptor present on immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. It is also expressed on multiple myeloma (MM) cells. This led to development of an anti-SLAMF7 antibody, elotuzumab, showing efficacy against MM. SLAMF7 mediates activating or inhibitory effects in NK cells, depending on whether cells express or do not express the adaptor EAT-2. Since MM cells lack EAT-2, we elucidated the inhibitory effectors of SLAMF7 in EAT-2-negative NK cells and tested whether these effectors were triggered in MM cells. SLAMF7-mediated inhibition in NK cells lacking EAT-2 was mediated by SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 1 (SHIP-1), which was recruited via tyrosine 261 of SLAMF7. Coupling of SLAMF7 to SHIP-1 required Src kinases, which phosphorylated SLAMF7. Although MM cells lack EAT-2, elotuzumab did not induce inhibitory signals in these cells. This was at least partly due to a lack of CD45, a phosphatase required for Src kinase activation. A defect in SLAMF7 function was also observed in CD45-deficient NK cells. Hence, SLAMF7-triggered inhibition is mediated by a mechanism involving Src kinases, CD45, and SHIP-1 that is defective in MM cells. This defect might explain why elotuzumab eliminates MM cells by an indirect mechanism involving the activation of NK cells. PMID:25312647

  6. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α− conventional dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4+ T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)+ B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c+ cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c+ cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α− conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4+ T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α+ cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α− cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:27306570

  7. Osmotic Regulation Is Required for Cancer Cell Survival under Solid Stress.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Daniel J; McAndrews, Kathleen M; Brandenburg, Chandler P; Ravikumar, Nithin; Kieu, Quang Minh N; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-10-01

    For a solid tumor to grow, it must be able to support the compressive stress that is generated as it presses against the surrounding tissue. Although the literature suggests a role for the cytoskeleton in counteracting these stresses, there has been no systematic evaluation of which filaments are responsible or to what degree. Here, using a three-dimensional spheroid model, we show that cytoskeletal filaments do not actively support compressive loads in breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer. However, modulation of tonicity can induce alterations in spheroid size. We find that under compression, tumor cells actively efflux sodium to decrease their intracellular tonicity, and that this is reversible by blockade of sodium channel NHE1. Moreover, although polymerized actin does not actively support the compressive load, it is required for sodium efflux. Compression-induced cell death is increased by both sodium blockade and actin depolymerization, whereas increased actin polymerization offers protective effects and increases sodium efflux. Taken together, these results demonstrate that cancer cells modulate their tonicity to survive under compressive solid stress. PMID:26445434

  8. Regulatory requirements for clinical trial and marketing authorisation application for cell-based medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Salmikangas, P; Flory, E; Reinhardt, J; Hinz, T; Maciulaitis, R

    2010-01-01

    The new era of regenerative medicine has led to rapid development of new innovative therapies especially for diseases and tissue/organ defects for which traditional therapies and medicinal products have not provided satisfactory outcome. Although the clinical use and developments of cell-based medicinal products (CBMPs) could be witnessed already for a decade, robust scientific and regulatory provisions for these products have only recently been enacted. The new Regulation for Advanced Therapies (EC) 1394/2007 together with the revised Annex I, Part IV of Directive 2001/83/EC provides the new legal framework for CBMPs. The wide variety of cell-based products and the foreseen limitations (small sample sizes, short shelf life) vs. particular risks (microbiological purity, variability, immunogenicity, tumourigenicity) associated with CBMPs have called for a flexible, case-by-case regulatory approach for these products. Consequently, a risk-based approach has been developed to allow definition of the amount of scientific data needed for a Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) of each CBMP. The article provides further insight into the initial risk evaluation, as well as to the quality, non-clinical, and clinical requirements of CBMPs. Special somatic cell therapies designed for active immunotherapy are also addressed. PMID:19940964

  9. Stemness factor Sall4 is required for DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianhua; Todorova, Dilyana; Su, Ning-Yuan; Kim, Jinchul; Lee, Pei-Jen; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are genetically more stable than somatic cells, thereby preventing the passage of genomic abnormalities to their derivatives including germ cells. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unclear. In this paper, we show that the stemness factor Sall4 is required for activating the critical Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM)–dependent cellular responses to DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in mouse ESCs and confer their resistance to DSB-induced cytotoxicity. Sall4 is rapidly mobilized to the sites of DSBs after DNA damage. Furthermore, Sall4 interacts with Rad50 and stabilizes the Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 complex for the efficient recruitment and activation of ATM. Sall4 also interacts with Baf60a, a member of the SWI/SNF (switch/sucrose nonfermentable) ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, which is responsible for recruiting Sall4 to the site of DNA DSB damage. Our findings provide novel mechanisms to coordinate stemness of ESCs with DNA damage response, ensuring genomic stability during the expansion of ESCs. PMID:25733712

  10. Regulatory requirements for clinical trial and marketing authorisation application for cell-based medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Salmikangas, P; Flory, E; Reinhardt, J; Hinz, T; Maciulaitis, R

    2010-01-01

    The new era of regenerative medicine has led to rapid development of new innovative therapies especially for diseases and tissue/organ defects for which traditional therapies and medicinal products have not provided satisfactory outcome. Although the clinical use and developments of cell-based medicinal products (CBMPs) could be witnessed already for a decade, robust scientific and regulatory provisions for these products have only recently been enacted. The new Regulation for Advanced Therapies (EC) 1394/2007 together with the revised Annex I, Part IV of Directive 2001/83/EC provides the new legal framework for CBMPs. The wide variety of cell-based products and the foreseen limitations (small sample sizes, short shelf life) vs. particular risks (microbiological purity, variability, immunogenicity, tumourigenicity) associated with CBMPs have called for a flexible, case-by-case regulatory approach for these products. Consequently, a risk-based approach has been developed to allow definition of the amount of scientific data needed for a Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) of each CBMP. The article provides further insight into the initial risk evaluation, as well as to the quality, non-clinical, and clinical requirements of CBMPs. Special somatic cell therapies designed for active immunotherapy are also addressed.

  11. Autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling is required for conidiogenous cell development in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bo; Xu, Xiaojin; Chen, Guoqing; Zhang, Dandan; Tang, Mingzhi; Xu, Fei; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Conidiation patterning is evolutionarily complex and mechanism concerning conidiogenous cell differentiation remains largely unknown. Magnaporthe oryzae conidiates in a sympodial way and uses its conidia to infect host and disseminate blast disease. Arrestins are multifunctional proteins that modulate receptor down-regulation and scaffold components of intracellular trafficking routes. We here report an alpha-arrestin that regulates patterns of conidiation and contributes to pathogenicity in M. oryzae. We show that disruption of ARRDC1 generates mutants which produce conidia in an acropetal array and ARRDC1 significantly affects expression profile of CCA1, a virulence-related transcription factor required for conidiogenous cell differentiation. Although germ tubes normally develop appressoria, penetration peg formation is dramatically impaired and Δarrdc1 mutants are mostly nonpathogenic. Fluorescent analysis indicates that EGFP-ARRDC1 puncta are well colocalized with DsRed2-Atg8, and this distribution profile could not be altered in Δatg9 mutants, suggesting ARRDC1 enters into autophagic flux before autophagosome maturation. We propose that M. oryzae employs ARRDC1 to regulate specific receptors in response to conidiation-related signals for conidiogenous cell differentiation and utilize autophagosomes for desensitization of conidiogenous receptor, which transmits extracellular signal to the downstream elements of transcription factors. Our investigation extends novel significance of autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling to fungal parasites. PMID:27498554

  12. Zebrafish vasa is required for germ-cell differentiation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Odelya; Forbes, Meredyth M; Marlow, Florence L

    2014-10-01

    Vasa is a universal marker of the germ line in animals, yet mutations disrupting vasa cause sexually dimorphic infertility, with impaired development of the ovary in some animals and the testis in others. The basis for this sexually dimorphic requirement for Vasa is not clear; in most animals examined, both the male and female gonad express vasa throughout the life of the germ line. Here we characterized a loss-of-function mutation disrupting zebrafish vasa. We show that maternally provided Vasa is stable through the first ten days of development in zebrafish, and thus likely fulfills any early roles for Vasa during germ-line specification, migration, survival, and maintenance. Although zygotic Vasa is not essential for the development of juvenile gonads, vasa mutants develop exclusively as sterile males. Furthermore, phenotypes of vasa;p53 compound mutants are indistinguishable from those of vasa mutants, therefore the failure of vasa mutants to differentiate as females and to support germ-cell development in the testis is not due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Instead, we found that failure to progress beyond the pachytene stage of meiosis causes the loss of germ-line stem cells, leaving empty somatic tubules. Our studies provide insight into the function of zebrafish vasa during female meiosis, differentiation, and maintenance of germ-line stem cells.

  13. N-WASP is required for B-cell-mediated autoimmunity in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Stefano; Santori, Elettra; Abernethy, Katrina; Mizui, Masayuki; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Recher, Mike; Capuder, Kelly; Csizmadia, Eva; Ryan, Douglas; Mathew, Divij; Tsokos, George C; Snapper, Scott; Westerberg, Lisa S; Thrasher, Adrian J; Candotti, Fabio; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2016-01-14

    Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene (WAS) are responsible for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, eczema, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity. Mice with conditional deficiency of Was in B lymphocytes (B/WcKO) have revealed a critical role for WAS protein (WASP) expression in B lymphocytes in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Neural WASP (N-WASP) is a broadly expressed homolog of WASP, and regulates B-cell signaling by modulating B-cell receptor (BCR) clustering and internalization. We have generated a double conditional mouse lacking both WASP and N-WASP selectively in B lymphocytes (B/DcKO). Compared with B/WcKO mice, B/DcKO mice showed defective B-lymphocyte proliferation and impaired antibody responses to T-cell-dependent antigens, associated with decreased autoantibody production and lack of autoimmune kidney disease. These results demonstrate that N-WASP expression in B lymphocytes is required for the development of autoimmunity of WAS and may represent a novel therapeutic target in WAS. PMID:26468226

  14. Association of CD8 with p56lck is required for early T cell signalling events.

    PubMed Central

    Chalupny, N J; Ledbetter, J A; Kavathas, P

    1991-01-01

    The human CD8 glycoprotein functions as a co-receptor during T cell activation by both binding to MHC class I and transducing a transmembrane signal. The ability of CD8 to transduce a signal is mediated in part by its association with the protein tyrosine kinase p56lck. Using a panel of human CD8 alpha mutants, we demonstrated that the presence of a functional p56lck binding site is required for the early signalling events transduced by CD8, including increased [Ca2+]i and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, our results demonstrate that wild-type and all mutant forms of CD8 alpha have an inhibitory effect on signal transduction after CD3-CD3 or CD3-CD4 crosslinking when transfected into the (CD3+, CD4+, CD8-) H9 T cell line, suggesting that intermolecular associations of CD8, independent of its association with p56lck, are responsible for this effect. Signalling through CD4 or CD8 in a double positive thymocyte may therefore be different than in a single positive thymocyte or mature T cell. Images PMID:1902413

  15. N-WASP is required for B-cell-mediated autoimmunity in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Stefano; Santori, Elettra; Abernethy, Katrina; Mizui, Masayuki; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Recher, Mike; Capuder, Kelly; Csizmadia, Eva; Ryan, Douglas; Mathew, Divij; Tsokos, George C; Snapper, Scott; Westerberg, Lisa S; Thrasher, Adrian J; Candotti, Fabio; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2016-01-14

    Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene (WAS) are responsible for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, eczema, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity. Mice with conditional deficiency of Was in B lymphocytes (B/WcKO) have revealed a critical role for WAS protein (WASP) expression in B lymphocytes in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Neural WASP (N-WASP) is a broadly expressed homolog of WASP, and regulates B-cell signaling by modulating B-cell receptor (BCR) clustering and internalization. We have generated a double conditional mouse lacking both WASP and N-WASP selectively in B lymphocytes (B/DcKO). Compared with B/WcKO mice, B/DcKO mice showed defective B-lymphocyte proliferation and impaired antibody responses to T-cell-dependent antigens, associated with decreased autoantibody production and lack of autoimmune kidney disease. These results demonstrate that N-WASP expression in B lymphocytes is required for the development of autoimmunity of WAS and may represent a novel therapeutic target in WAS.

  16. Cathepsin L is required for endothelial progenitor cell-induced neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Urbich, Carmen; Heeschen, Christopher; Aicher, Alexandra; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Bruhl, Thomas; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin D.; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2004-01-15

    Infusion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but not of mature endothelial cells (ECs), promotes neovascularization after ischemia. We performed a gene expression profiling of EPCs and ECs to identify genes, which might be important for the neovascularization capacity of EPCs. Intriguingly, the protease cathepsin L (CathL) was highly expressed in EPCs as opposed to ECs and is essential for matrix degradation and invasion by EPCs in vitro. CathL deficient mice showed impaired functional recovery after hind limb ischemia supporting the concept for an important role of CathL in postnatal neovascularization. Infused CathL deficient progenitor cells failed to home to sites of ischemia and to augment neovascularization. In contrast, over expression of CathL in mature ECs significantly enhanced their invasive activity and induced their neovascularization capacity in vivo. Taken together, CathL plays a crucial role for the integration of circulating EPCs into the ischemic tissue and is required for neovascularization mediated by EPCs.

  17. Autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling is required for conidiogenous cell development in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Xu, Xiaojin; Chen, Guoqing; Zhang, Dandan; Tang, Mingzhi; Xu, Fei; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Conidiation patterning is evolutionarily complex and mechanism concerning conidiogenous cell differentiation remains largely unknown. Magnaporthe oryzae conidiates in a sympodial way and uses its conidia to infect host and disseminate blast disease. Arrestins are multifunctional proteins that modulate receptor down-regulation and scaffold components of intracellular trafficking routes. We here report an alpha-arrestin that regulates patterns of conidiation and contributes to pathogenicity in M. oryzae. We show that disruption of ARRDC1 generates mutants which produce conidia in an acropetal array and ARRDC1 significantly affects expression profile of CCA1, a virulence-related transcription factor required for conidiogenous cell differentiation. Although germ tubes normally develop appressoria, penetration peg formation is dramatically impaired and Δarrdc1 mutants are mostly nonpathogenic. Fluorescent analysis indicates that EGFP-ARRDC1 puncta are well colocalized with DsRed2-Atg8, and this distribution profile could not be altered in Δatg9 mutants, suggesting ARRDC1 enters into autophagic flux before autophagosome maturation. We propose that M. oryzae employs ARRDC1 to regulate specific receptors in response to conidiation-related signals for conidiogenous cell differentiation and utilize autophagosomes for desensitization of conidiogenous receptor, which transmits extracellular signal to the downstream elements of transcription factors. Our investigation extends novel significance of autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling to fungal parasites. PMID:27498554

  18. CD8+ T cell migration to the skin requires CD4+ help in a murine model of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Nanna; Wolff, Henrik; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in contact hypersensitivity responses have not been fully solved, and remain an important question. Using an adoptive transfer model, we investigated the role of the respective T cell subset. Magnetic bead separated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from oxazolone sensitized C57BL/6 mice were transferred into RAG-/- mice, followed by hapten challenge and analysis of inflammatory parameters at 24 hours post exposure. The CD4+ T cell recipient mice developed partial contact hypersensitivity responses to oxazolone. CD8+ T cells caused significant amplification of the response in recipients of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells including ear swelling, type 1 inflammatory mediators, and cell killing. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were not sufficient to mediate contact hypersensitivity, although abundantly present in the lymph nodes in the CD8+ T cell reconstituted mice. There were no signs of inflammation at the site of hapten exposure, indicating impaired recruitment of CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD4+ T cells. These data show that CD4+ T cells mediate contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone, but CD8+ T cells contribute with the most potent effector mechanisms. Moreover, our results suggest that CD4+ T cell function is required for the mobilization of CD8+ effector T cells to the site of hapten exposure. The results shed new light on the relative importance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the effector phase of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:22916101

  19. Requirement for Ssbp2 in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, June; Kurasawa, Yasuhiro; Wang, Yang; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Liang, Hong; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Raymond, Aaron C.; Estrov, Zeev; Brandt, Stephen J.; Davis, Richard E.; Zweidler–McKay, Patrick; Amin, Hesham M.; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms governing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation are not fully understood. Sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein 2 (SSBP2) is a candidate acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) suppressor gene located at chromosome 5q14. SSBP2 binds the transcriptional adaptor protein Lim-domain binding protein 1 (LDB1) and enhances LDB1 stability to regulate gene expression. Notably, Ldb1 is essential for HSC specification during early development and maintenance in adults. We previously reported shortened lifespan and greater susceptibility to B cell lymphomas and carcinomas in Ssbp2 −/− mice. However, whether Ssbp2 plays a regulatory role in normal HSC function and leukemogenesis is unknown. Here, we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate a requirement for Ssbp2 in the function and transcriptional program of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in vivo. We found that hematopoietic tissues were hypoplastic in Ssbp2−/− mice and the frequency of lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor cells in bone marrow was reduced. Other significant features of these mice were delayed recovery from 5-fluorouracil treatment and diminished multilineage reconstitution in lethally irradiated bone marrow recipients. Dramatic reduction of Notch1 transcripts and increased expression of transcripts encoding the transcription factor E2a and its downstream target Cdkn1a also distinguished Ssbp2−/− HSPCs from wild-type HSPCs. Finally, a tendency towards coordinated expression of SSBP2 and the AML suppressor NOTCH1 in a subset of The Cancer Genome Atlas AML cases suggested a role for SSBP2 in AML pathogenesis. Collectively, our results uncovered a critical regulatory function for SSBP2 in HSPC gene expression and function. PMID:25238756

  20. Effect of Spermidine Analogues on Cell Growth of Escherichia coli Polyamine Requiring Mutant MA261

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Taketo; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Terui, Yusuke; Takao, Koichi; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spermidine analogues [norspermidine (NSPD, 33), spermidine (SPD, 34), homospermidine (HSPD, 44) and aminopropylcadaverine (APCAD, 35)] on cell growth were studied using Escherichia coli polyamine-requiring mutant MA261. Cell growth was compared at 32°C, 37°C, and 42°C. All four analogues were taken up mainly by the PotABCD spermidine-preferential uptake system. The degree of stimulation of cell growth at 32°C and 37°C was NSPD ≥ SPD ≥ HSPD > APCAD, and SPD ≥ HSPD ≥ NSPD > APCAD, respectively. However, at 42°C, it was HSPD » SPD > NSPD > APCAD. One reason for this is HSPD was taken up effectively compared with other triamines. In addition, since natural polyamines (triamines and teteraamines) interact mainly with RNA, and the structure of RNA is more flexible at higher temperatures, HSPD probably stabilized RNA more tightly at 42°C. We have thus far found that 20 kinds of protein syntheses are stimulated by polyamines at the translational level. Among them, synthesis of OppA, RpoE and StpA was more strongly stimulated by HSPD at 42°C than at 37°C. Stabilization of the initiation region of oppA and rpoE mRNA was tighter by HSPD at 42°C than 37°C determined by circular dichroism (CD). The degree of polyamine stimulation of OppA, RpoE and StpA synthesis by NSPD, SPD and APCAD was smaller than that by HSPD at 42°C. Thus, the degree of stimulation of cell growth by spermidine analogues at the different temperatures is dependent on the stimulation of protein synthesis by some components of the polyamine modulon. PMID:27434546

  1. ER Alpha Rapid Signaling Is Required for Estrogen Induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Ueda, Kazutaka; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Diomede, Olga I.; Andrade, Tiffany; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which likely underlies its ability to accelerate re-endothelialization and reduce adverse remodeling after vascular injury. In previous studies, we have shown that the protective effects of E2 (the active endogenous form of estrogen) in vascular injury require the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). ERα transduces the effects of estrogen via a classical DNA binding, “genomic” signaling pathway and via a more recently-described “rapid” signaling pathway that is mediated by a subset of ERα localized to the cell membrane. However, which of these pathways mediates the effects of estrogen on endothelial cells is poorly understood. Here we identify a triple point mutant version of ERα (KRR ERα) that is specifically defective in rapid signaling, but is competent to regulate transcription through the “genomic” pathway. We find that in ECs expressing wild type ERα, E2 regulates many genes involved in cell migration and proliferation, promotes EC migration and proliferation, and also blocks the adhesion of monocytes to ECs. ECs expressing KRR mutant ERα, however, lack all of these responses. These observations establish KRR ERα as a novel tool that could greatly facilitate future studies into the vascular and non-vascular functions of ERα rapid signaling. Further, they support that rapid signaling through ERα is essential for many of the transcriptional and physiological responses of ECs to E2, and that ERα rapid signaling in ECs, in vivo, may be critical for the vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen. PMID:27035664

  2. Controlled synthesis of the DSF cell-cell signal is required for biofilm formation and virulence in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Torres, Pablo S; Malamud, Florencia; Rigano, Luciano A; Russo, Daniela M; Marano, María Rosa; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Bouarab, Kamal; Dow, John Maxwell; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2007-08-01

    Virulence of the black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is regulated by cell-cell signalling involving the diffusible signal factor DSF. Synthesis and perception of DSF require products of genes within the rpf cluster (for regulation of pathogenicity factors). RpfF directs DSF synthesis whereas RpfC and RpfG are involved in DSF perception. Here we have examined the role of the rpf/DSF system in biofilm formation in minimal medium using confocal laser-scanning microscopy of GFP-labelled bacteria. Wild-type Xcc formed microcolonies that developed into a structured biofilm. In contrast, an rpfF mutant (DSF-minus) and an rpfC mutant (DSF overproducer) formed only unstructured arrangements of bacteria. A gumB mutant, defective in xanthan biosynthesis, was also unable to develop the typical wild-type biofilm. Mixed cultures of gumB and rpfF mutants formed a typical biofilm in vitro. In contrast, in mixed cultures the rpfC mutant prevented the formation of the structured biofilm by the wild-type and did not restore wild-type biofilm phenotypes to gumB or rpfF mutants. These effects on structured biofilm formation were correlated with growth and disease development by Xcc strains in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These findings suggest that DSF signalling is finely balanced during both biofilm formation and virulence. PMID:17635553

  3. The acquisition of mechano‐electrical transducer current adaptation in auditory hair cells requires myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Marcotti, Walter; Corns, Laura F.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K.; Avraham, Karen B.; Steel, Karen P.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The transduction of sound into electrical signals occurs at the hair bundles atop sensory hair cells in the cochlea, by means of mechanosensitive ion channels, the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) channels.The MET currents decline during steady stimuli; this is termed adaptation and ensures they always work within the most sensitive part of their operating range, responding best to rapidly changing (sound) stimuli.In this study we used a mouse model (Snell's waltzer) for hereditary deafness in humans that has a mutation in the gene encoding an unconventional myosin, myosin VI, which is present in the hair bundles.We found that in the absence of myosin VI the MET current fails to acquire its characteristic adaptation as the hair bundles develop.We propose that myosin VI supports the acquisition of adaptation by removing key molecules from the hair bundle that serve a temporary, developmental role. Abstract Mutations in Myo6, the gene encoding the (F‐actin) minus end‐directed unconventional myosin, myosin VI, cause hereditary deafness in mice (Snell's waltzer) and humans. In the sensory hair cells of the cochlea, myosin VI is expressed in the cell bodies and along the stereocilia that project from the cells’ apical surface. It is required for maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanosensitive hair bundles formed by the stereocilia. In this study we investigate whether myosin VI contributes to mechano‐electrical transduction. We report that Ca2+‐dependent adaptation of the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) current, which serves to keep the transduction apparatus operating within its most sensitive range, is absent in outer and inner hair cells from homozygous Snell's waltzer mutant mice, which fail to express myosin VI. The operating range of the MET channels is also abnormal in the mutants, resulting in the absence of a resting MET current. We found that cadherin 23, a component of the hair bundle's transient lateral links

  4. Asymmetric Receptor Contact is Required for Tyrosine Autophosphorylation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.; Boggon, T; Tomé, F; Mandiyan, V; Lax, I; Schlessinge, J

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine autophosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in regulation of kinase activity and in recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Autophosphorylation is mediated by a sequential and precisely ordered intermolecular (trans) reaction. In this report we present structural and biochemical experiments demonstrating that formation of an asymmetric dimer between activated FGFR1 kinase domains is required for transphosphorylation of FGFR1 in FGF-stimulated cells. Transphosphorylation is mediated by specific asymmetric contacts between the N-lobe of one kinase molecule, which serves as an active enzyme, and specific docking sites on the C-lobe of a second kinase molecule, which serves a substrate. Pathological loss-of-function mutations or oncogenic activating mutations in this interface may hinder or facilitate asymmetric dimer formation and transphosphorylation, respectively. The experiments presented in this report provide the molecular basis underlying the control of transphosphorylation of FGF receptors and other receptor tyrosine kinases.

  5. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    PubMed Central

    Bullara, D.; De Decker, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction–diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction–diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns. PMID:25959141

  6. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullara, D.; de Decker, Y.

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction-diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction-diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns.

  7. Protection against henipaviruses in swine requires both, cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brad S; Hardham, John M; Smith, Greg; Weingartl, Eva T; Dominowski, Paul J; Foss, Dennis L; Mwangi, Duncan; Broder, Christopher C; Roth, James A; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-09-14

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are members of the genus Henipavirus, within the family Paramyxoviridae. Nipah virus has caused outbreaks of human disease in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Singapore, India and Philippines, in addition to a large outbreak in swine in Malaysia in 1998/1999. Recently, NiV was suspected to be a causative agent of an outbreak in horses in 2014 in the Philippines, while HeV has caused multiple human and equine outbreaks in Australia since 1994. A swine vaccine able to prevent shedding of infectious virus is of veterinary and human health importance, and correlates of protection against henipavirus infection in swine need to be better understood. In the present study, three groups of animals were employed. Pigs vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant soluble HeV G protein (sGHEV) and challenged with HeV, developed antibody levels considered to be protective prior to the challenge (titers of 320). However, activation of the cell-mediated immune response was not detected, and the animals were only partially protected against challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of HeV per animal. In the second group, cross-neutralizing antibody levels against NiV in the sGHEV vaccinated animals did not reach protective levels, and with no activation of cellular immune memory, these animals were not protected against NiV. Only pigs orally infected with 5×10(4) PFU of NiV per animal were protected against nasal challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of NiV per animal. This group of pigs developed protective antibody levels, as well as cell-mediated immune memory. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells restimulated with UV-inactivated NiV upregulated IFN-gamma, IL-10 and the CD25 activation marker on CD4(+)CD8(+) T memory helper cells and to lesser extent on CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. In conclusion, both humoral and cellular immune responses were required for protection of swine against henipaviruses. PMID:27544586

  8. Entry of poliovirus into cells does not require a low-pH step.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, L; Carrasco, L

    1993-01-01

    The requirement of a low-pH step during poliovirus entry was investigated by using the macrolide antibiotic bafilomycin A1, which is a powerful and selective inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-ATPases. Thus, viruses such as Semliki Forest virus and vesicular stomatitis virus that enter cells through endosomes and need their acidification, are potently inhibited by bafilomycin A1, whereas poliovirus infection is not affected by the antibiotic. The presence of lysosomotropic agents such as chloroquine, amantadine, dansylcadaverine, and monensin during poliovirus entry did not inhibit infection, further supporting the idea that poliovirus does not depend on a low-pH step to enter the cytoplasm. The effect of bafilomycin A1 on other members of the Picornaviridae family was also assayed. Encephalomyocarditis virus entry into HeLa cells was not affected by the macrolide antibiotic, whereas rhinovirus was sensitive. Coentry of toxins, such as alpha-sarcin, with viral particles was potently inhibited by bafilomycin A1, indicating that an active vacuolar proton-ATPase is necessary for the early membrane permeabilization (coentry of alpha-sarcin) induced by poliovirus to take place. Images PMID:8392597

  9. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Stimulate an Angiogenic Program that Requires Endothelial MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Kachgal, Suraj; Carrion, Bita; Janson, Isaac A.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) have recently been characterized as mediators of tissue regeneration after injury. In addition to preventing fibrosis at the wound site, BMSCs elicit an angiogenic response within the fibrin matrix. The mechanistic interactions between BMSCs and invading endothelial cells (ECs) during this process are not fully understood. Using a three-dimensional, fibrin-based angiogenesis model, we sought to investigate the proteolytic mechanisms by which BMSCs promote vessel morphogenesis. We find that BMSC-mediated vessel formation depends on the proteolytic ability of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). Knockdown of the protease results in a small network of vessels with enlarged lumens. Contrastingly, vessel morphogenesis is unaffected by the knockdown of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, we find that BMSC-mediated vessel morphogenesis in vivo follows mechanisms similar to what we observe in vitro. Subcutaneous, cellular fibrin implants in C.B-17/SCID mice form aberrant vasculature when MMPs are inhibited with a broad spectrum chemical inhibitor, and a very minimal amount of vessels when MT1-MMP proteolytic activity is interrupted in ECs. Other studies have debated the necessity of MT1-MMP in the context of vessel invasion in fibrin, but this study clearly demonstrates its requirement in BMSC-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:22262018

  10. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment.

  11. Macrophage fusion, giant cell formation, and the foreign body response require matrix metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    MacLauchlan, Susan; Skokos, Eleni A.; Meznarich, Norman; Zhu, Dana H.; Raoof, Sana; Shipley, J. Michael; Senior, Robert M.; Bornstein, Paul; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells in several pathologic conditions, including the foreign body response (FBR). We detected high levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 during macrophage fusion in vitro and in foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) in vivo. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow-derived macrophages were induced to fuse with IL-4 in the presence of MMP-9 function-blocking antibodies and displayed reduced fusion. A similar defect, characterized by delayed shape change and abnormal morphology, was observed in MMP-9 null macrophages. Analysis of the FBR in MMP-9 null mice was then pursued to evaluate the significance of these findings. Specifically, mixed cellulose ester disks and polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted s.c. in MMP-9 null and WT mice and excised 2–4 weeks later. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses indicated equal macrophage recruitment between MMP-9 null and WT mice, but FBGC formation was compromised in the former. In addition, MMP-9 null mice displayed abnormalities in extracellular matrix assembly and angiogenesis. Consistent with a requirement for MMP-9 in fusion, we also observed reduced MMP-9 levels in MCP-1 null macrophages, previously shown to be defective in FBGC formation. Collectively, our studies show abnormalities in MMP-9 null mice during the FBR and suggest a role for MMP-9 in macrophage fusion. PMID:19141565

  12. Directed blood donor program decreases donor exposure for children with sickle cell disease requiring chronic transfusion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D O; Covert, B; Lindsey, T; Edwards, V; McLaughlin, L; Theus, J; Wray, R J; Jupka, K; Baker, D; Robbins, M; DeBaun, M R

    2012-01-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), primary and secondary prevention of strokes require indefinite regular blood transfusion therapy. The risks associated with repeated transfusions include alloimmunization and increased donor exposure. The Charles Drew Program is a directed blood donor program designed to lower donor exposure, decreasing the associated complications of transfusion; however, no evidence exists demonstrating the magnitude of the benefit to the recipient. Further, the use of extended red blood cell (RBC) antigen matching for C, E, and K has been well documented in a clinical trial setting but not extensively evaluated in a standard care setting. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness in reducing alloimmunization when matching for C, E, and K and the magnitude of the decrease in donor exposure in a directed blood donor program. The rate of alloimmunization and reduction of donor exposure were determined during the course of 1 year in a cohort of children with SCD who received regular directed donor blood transfusions. A total of 24 recipients were in the program, 16 females and 8 males, 4 to 20 years of age. During 2008, alloimmunization was 0 percent and donor exposure was reduced by 20 percent, compared with usual care. Extended RBC antigen matching has the same benefit as in a clinical trial setting for patients with SCD receiving blood transfusion therapy. Despite significant effort, we only achieved a modest decrease in donor exposure and cannot determine the immediate benefit of a directed blood donor program.

  13. Differential Requirements of TCR Signaling in Homeostatic Maintenance and Function of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baojun; Wu, Jianxuan; Jiao, Yiqun; Bock, Cheryl; Dai, Meifang; Chen, Benny; Chao, Nelson; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are generated exclusively in the fetal thymus and maintained in the skin epithelium throughout postnatal life of the mouse. DETCs have restricted antigenic specificity as a result of their exclusive usage of a canonical TCR. Although the importance of the TCR in DETC development has been well established, the exact role of TCR signaling in DETC homeostasis and function remains incompletely defined. In this study, we investigated TCR signaling in fully matured DETCs by lineage-restricted deletion of the Lat gene, an essential signaling molecule downstream of the TCR. We found that Lat deletion impaired TCR-dependent cytokine gene activation and the ability of DETCs to undergo proliferative expansion. However, linker for activation of T cells-deficient DETCs were able to maintain long-term population homeostasis, although with a reduced proliferation rate. Mice with Lat deletion in DETCs exhibited delayed wound healing accompanied by impaired clonal expansion within the wound area. Our study revealed differential requirements for TCR signaling in homeostatic maintenance of DETCs and in their effector function during wound healing. PMID:26408667

  14. Requirement of Stat3 Signaling in the Postnatal Development of Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Rumi; Kakugawa, Kiyokazu; Yasuda, Takuwa; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Sibilia, Maria; Katsura, Yoshimoto; Levi, Ben; Abramson, Jakub; Koseki, Yoko; Koseki, Haruhiko; van Ewijk, Willem; Hollander, Georg A; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Thymic medullary regions are formed in neonatal mice as islet-like structures, which increase in size over time and eventually fuse a few weeks after birth into a continuous structure. The development of medullary thymic epithelial cells (TEC) is dependent on NF-κB associated signaling though other signaling pathways may contribute. Here, we demonstrate that Stat3-mediated signals determine medullary TEC cellularity, architectural organization and hence the size of the medulla. Deleting Stat3 expression selectively in thymic epithelia precludes the postnatal enlargement of the medulla retaining a neonatal architecture of small separate medullary islets. In contrast, loss of Stat3 expression in cortical TEC neither affects the cellularity or organization of the epithelia. Activation of Stat3 is mainly positioned downstream of EGF-R as its ablation in TEC phenocopies the loss of Stat3 expression in these cells. These results indicate that Stat3 meditated signal via EGF-R is required for the postnatal development of thymic medullary regions. PMID:26789017

  15. Membrane repair of human skeletal muscle cells requires Annexin-A5.

    PubMed

    Carmeille, Romain; Bouvet, Flora; Tan, Sisareuth; Croissant, Coralie; Gounou, Céline; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Brisson, Alain R; Bouter, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Defect in membrane repair contributes to the development of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi myopathy. In healthy skeletal muscle, unraveling membrane repair mechanisms requires to establish an exhaustive list of the components of the resealing machinery. Here we show that human myotubes rendered deficient for Annexin-A5 (AnxA5) suffer from a severe defect in membrane resealing. This defect is rescued by the addition of recombinant AnxA5 while an AnxA5 mutant, which is unable to form 2D protein arrays, has no effect. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we show that AnxA5 binds to the edges of the torn membrane, as early as a few seconds after sarcolemma injury, where it probably self-assembles into 2D arrays. In addition, we observed that membrane resealing is associated with the presence of a cluster of lipid vesicles at the wounded site. AnxA5 is present at the surface of these vesicles and may thus participate in plugging the cell membrane disruption. Finally, we show that AnxA5 behaves similarly in myotubes from a muscle cell line established from a patient suffering from LGMD2B, a myopathy due to dysferlin mutations, which indicates that trafficking of AnxA5 during sarcolemma damage is independent of the presence of dysferlin. PMID:27286750

  16. Glucocorticoid Modulation of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatoma Cells Requires the Mitochondrial Fission Protein Drp1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Paz, José C.; Sebastián, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Liesa, Marc; Segalés, Jessica; Palacín, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance hepatic energy metabolism and gluconeogenesis partly through changes in mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial function is influenced by the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission events. However, whether glucocorticoids modulate mitochondrial function through the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is currently unknown. Results: Here, we report that the effects of dexamethasone on mitochondrial function and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells are dependent on the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Dexamethasone increased routine oxygen consumption, maximal respiratory capacity, superoxide anion, proton leak, and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells. Under these conditions, dexamethasone altered mitochondrial morphology, which was paralleled by a large increase in Drp1 expression, and reduced mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2. In vivo dexamethasone treatment also enhanced Drp1 expression in mouse liver. On the basis of these observations, we analyzed the dependence on the Drp1 function of dexamethasone effects on mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis. We show that the increase in mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis induced by dexamethasone are hampered by the inhibition of Drp1 function. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that the effects of glucocorticoids on hepatic metabolism require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Conclusion: In summary, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial effects of dexamethasone both on mitochondrial respiration and on the gluconeogenic pathway depend on Drp1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 366–378. PMID:22703557

  17. The deubiquitinating enzyme complex BRISC is required for proper mitotic spindle assembly in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kaowen; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaojian; Hong, Ruisha; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Hua; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; He, Qihua; Zheng, Duo; Tang, Jun; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) negatively regulate protein ubiquitination and play an important role in diverse physiological processes, including mitotic division. The BRCC36 isopeptidase complex (BRISC) is a DUB that is specific for lysine 63–linked ubiquitin hydrolysis; however, its biological function remains largely undefined. Here, we identify a critical role for BRISC in the control of mitotic spindle assembly in cultured mammalian cells. BRISC is a microtubule (MT)-associated protein complex that predominantly localizes to the minus ends of K-fibers and spindle poles and directly binds to MTs; importantly, BRISC promotes the assembly of functional bipolar spindle by deubiquitinating the essential spindle assembly factor nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA). The deubiquitination of NuMA regulates its interaction with dynein and importin-β, which are required for its function in spindle assembly. Collectively, these results uncover BRISC as an important regulator of the mitotic spindle assembly and cell division, and have important implications for the development of anticancer drugs targeting BRISC. PMID:26195665

  18. Gorab Is Required for Dermal Condensate Cells to Respond to Hedgehog Signals during Hair Follicle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Choi, Yeon Ja; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yuhuan; Han, Yunlin; Jones, Evan C; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Clark, Richard A; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    GORAB is a golgin that localizes predominantly at the Golgi apparatus and physically interacts with small guanosine triphosphatases. GORAB is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues, including the skin. However, the biological function of this golgin in skin is unknown. Here, we report that disrupting the expression of the Gorab gene in mice results in hair follicle morphogenesis defects that were characterized by impaired follicular keratinocyte differentiation. This hair follicle phenotype was associated with markedly suppressed hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in dermal condensates in vivo. Gorab-deficient dermal mesenchymal cells also displayed a significantly reduced capability to respond to Hh pathway activation in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the formation of the primary cilium, a cellular organelle that is essential for the Hh pathway, was impaired in mutant dermal condensate cells, suggesting that Gorab may be required for the Hh pathway through facilitating the formation of primary cilia. Thus, data obtained from this study provided insight into the biological functions of Gorab during embryonic morphogenesis of the skin in which Hh signaling and primary cilia exert important functions. PMID:26967474

  19. Gorab is required for dermal condensate cells to respond to hedgehog signals during hair follicle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R.; Choi, Yeon Ja; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yuhuan; Han, Yunlin; Jones, Evan C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Clark, Richard A.; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    GORAB is a golgin that localizes predominantly at the Golgi apparatus and physically interacts with small GTPases. GORAB is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues, including the skin. However, the biological function of this golgin in skin is unknown. Here, we report that disrupting the expression of the Gorab gene in mice results in hair follicle morphogenesis defects that were characterized by impaired follicular keratinocyte differentiation. This hair follicle phenotype was associated with markedly suppressed hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in dermal condensates in vivo. Gorab-deficient dermal mesenchymal cells also displayed significantly reduced capability to respond to Hh pathway activation in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the formation of primary cilium, a cellular organelle that is essential for the Hh pathway, was impaired in mutant dermal papilla cells, suggesting that Gorab may be required for the Hh pathway through facilitating the formation of primary cilia. Thus, data obtained from this study provided insight onto the biological functions of Gorab during embryonic morphogenesis of skin in which Hh signaling and primary cilia exert important functions. PMID:26967474

  20. Live imaging and modeling of inner nuclear membrane targeting reveals its molecular requirements in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Andrea; Politi, Antonio Z.; Strnad, Petr; Xiang, Wanqing; Hossain, M. Julius

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins is essential for nuclear architecture and function, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a new reporter that allows real-time imaging of membrane protein transport from the ER to the INM using Lamin B receptor and Lap2β as model INM proteins. These reporters allowed us to characterize the kinetics of INM targeting and establish a mathematical model of this process and enabled us to probe its molecular requirements in an RNA interference screen of 96 candidate genes. Modeling of the phenotypes of genes involved in transport of these INM proteins predicted that it critically depended on the number and permeability of nuclear pores and the availability of nuclear binding sites, but was unaffected by depletion of most transport receptors. These predictions were confirmed with targeted validation experiments on the functional requirements of nucleoporins and nuclear lamins. Collectively, our data support a diffusion retention model of INM protein transport in mammalian cells. PMID:26056140

  1. Minimal requirements for exocytosis. A study using PC 12 cells permeabilized with staphylococcal alpha-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnert-Hilger, G.; Bhakdi, S.; Gratzl, M.

    1985-10-15

    The membrane-permeabilizing effects of streptolysin O, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, and digitonin on cultured rat pheochromocytoma cells were studied. All three agents perturbed the plasma membrane, causing release of intracellular YWRb and uptake of trypan blue. In addition, streptolysin O and digitonin also damaged the membranes of secretory vesicles, including a parallel release of dopamine. In contrast, the effects of alpha-toxin appeared to be strictly confined to the plasma membrane, and no dopamine release was observed with this agent. The exocytotic machinery, however, remained intact and could be triggered by subsequent introduction of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ into the medium. Dopamine release was entirely Ca2+ specific and occurred independent of the presence or absence of other cations or anions including K+ glutamate, K+ acetate, or Na+ chloride. Ca2+-induced exocytosis did not require the presence of Mg2+-ATP in the medium. The process was insensitive to pH alterations in the range pH 6.6-7.2, and appeared optimal at an osmolarity of 300 mosm/kg. Toxin permeabilization seems to be an excellent method for studying the minimal requirements for exocytosis.

  2. CULD is required for rhodopsin and TRPL channel endocytic trafficking and survival of photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endocytosis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and associated channels contributes to desensitization and adaptation of a variety of signaling cascades. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main light-sensing rhodopsin (Rh1; encoded by ninaE) and the downstream ion channel, transient receptor potential like (TRPL), are endocytosed in response to light, but the mechanism is unclear. By using an RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach, we discovered a protein we named CULD, a photoreceptor-cell enriched CUB- and LDLa-domain transmembrane protein, that is required for endocytic trafficking of Rh1 and TRPL. CULD localized to endocytic Rh1-positive or TRPL-positive vesicles. Mutations in culd resulted in the accumulation of Rh1 and TRPL within endocytic vesicles, and disrupted the regular turnover of endocytic Rh1 and TRPL. In addition, loss of CULD induced light- and age-dependent retinal degeneration, and reduced levels of Rh1, but not of TRPL, suppressed retinal degeneration in culd-null mutant flies. Our data demonstrate that CULD plays an important role in the endocytic turnover of Rh1 and TRPL, and suggest that CULD-dependent rhodopsin endocytic trafficking is required for maintaining photoreceptor integrity. PMID:26598556

  3. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs.

  4. Canonical Wnt Signaling is Required for Ophthalmic Trigeminal Placode Cell Fate Determination and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Lassiter, Rhonda N.T.; Dude, Carolynn; Reynolds, Stephanie B.; Winters, Nichelle I.; Baker, Clare V.H.; Stark, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Cranial placodes are ectodermal regions that contribute extensively to the vertebrate peripheral sensory nervous system. The development of the ophthalmic trigeminal (opV) placode, which gives rise only to sensory neurons of the ophthalmic lobe of the trigeminal ganglion, is a useful model of sensory neuron development. While key differentiation processes have been characterized at the tissue and cellular levels, the signaling pathways governing opV placode development have not. Here, we tested in chick whether the canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates opV placode development. By introducing a Wnt reporter into embryonic chick head ectoderm, we show that the canonical pathway is active in Pax3+ opV placode cells as, or shortly after, they are induced to express Pax3. Blocking the canonical Wnt pathway resulted in the failure of targeted cells to adopt or maintain an opV fate, as assayed by the expression of various markers including Pax3, FGFR4, Eya2, and the neuronal differentiation markers Islet1, neurofilament and NeuN, although, surprisingly, it led to upregulation of Neurogenin2, both in the opV placode and elsewhere in the ectoderm. Activating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, however, was not sufficient to induce Pax3, the earliest specific marker of the opV placode. We conclude that canonical Wnt signaling is necessary for normal opV placode development, and propose that other molecular cues are required in addition to Wnt signaling to promote cells toward an opV placode fate. PMID:17604017

  5. Topoisomerase IIβ is required for lamina-specific targeting of retinal ganglion cell axons and dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Linda M.; Xiao, Tong; Staub, Wendy; Baier, Herwig

    2011-01-01

    The specific partnering of synaptically connected neurons is central to nervous system function. Proper wiring requires the interchange of signals between a postmitotic neuron and its environment, a distinct pattern of transcription in the nucleus, and deployment of guidance and adhesion cues to the cell surface. To identify genes involved in neurite targeting by retinal ganglion cells (GCs), their presynaptic partners in the retina, and their postsynaptic targets in the optic tectum, we undertook a forward genetic screen for mutations disrupting visual responses in zebrafish. This rapid primary screen was subsequently refined by immunohistochemical labeling of retinal and tectal neurites to detect patterning errors. From this unbiased screen, the notorious (noto) mutant exhibited the most specific phenotypes: intact retinal and tectal differentiation but multiple neurite targeting defects in the retinal inner plexiform layer (IPL) and tectal neuropil. Positional cloning and morpholino phenocopy revealed that the mutation disrupts Topoisomerase IIβ (Top2b), a broadly distributed nuclear protein involved in chromatin modifications during postmitotic differentiation. Top2b-DNA interactions are known to regulate transcription of developmentally important genes, including axon guidance factors and cell adhesion molecules, but a specific role in local synaptic targeting has not been previously described. The neurite targeting defects among GC axons are largely restricted to crossovers between sublaminae of a specific layer, SFGS, and were shown by mosaic analysis to be autonomous to the GC axons. The noto mutant provides the first example of the importance of an epigenetic regulator, Top2b, in the intricate series of events that lead to a properly wired visual system. PMID:21610027

  6. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Biliary Epithelial Cell NRas Activation Requires Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR).

    PubMed

    Trussoni, Christy E; Tabibian, James H; Splinter, Patrick L; O'Hara, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocytes (biliary epithelial cells) actively participate in microbe-induced proinflammatory responses in the liver and contribute to inflammatory and infectious cholangiopathies. We previously demonstrated that cholangiocyte TLR-dependent NRas activation contributes to proinflammatory/ proliferative responses. We test the hypothesis that LPS-induced activation of NRas requires the EGFR. SV40-transformed human cholangiocytes (H69 cells), or low passage normal human cholangiocytes (NHC), were treated with LPS in the presence or absence of EGFR or ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (TACE) inhibitors. Ras activation assays, quantitative RT-PCR, and proliferation assays were performed in cells cultured with or without inhibitors or an siRNA to Grb2. Immunofluorescence for phospho-EGFR was performed on LPS-treated mouse samples and specimens from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, hepatitis C, and normal livers. LPS-treatment induced an association between the TLR/MyD88 and EGFR/Grb2 signaling apparatus, NRas activation, and EGFR phosphorylation. NRas activation was sensitive to EGFR and TACE inhibitors and correlated with EGFR phosphorylation. The TACE inhibitor and Grb2 depletion prevented LPS-induced IL6 expression (p<0.05) and proliferation (p<0.01). Additionally, cholangiocytes from LPS-treated mouse livers and human primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) livers exhibited increased phospho-EGFR (p<0.01). Moreover, LPS-induced mouse cholangiocyte proliferation was inhibited by concurrent treatment with the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib. Our results suggest that EGFR is essential for LPS-induced, TLR4/MyD88-mediated NRas activation and induction of a robust proinflammatory cholangiocyte response. These findings have implications not only for revealing the signaling potential of TLRs, but also implicate EGFR as an integral component of cholangiocyte TLR-induced proinflammatory processes.

  7. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs. PMID:27558729

  8. Differential requirements for H/ACA ribonucleoprotein components in cell proliferation and response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E; Hakakian, Yasaman; Kakarla, Veena; Naseem, Anum F; Ziai, Heliya; Alawi, Faizan

    2015-12-01

    H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) are comprised of four conserved proteins, dyskerin, NHP2, NOP10, and GAR1, and a function-specifying, noncoding H/ACA RNA. H/ACA RNPs contribute to telomerase assembly and stabilization, and posttranscriptional processing of nascent ribosomal RNA and spliceosomal RNA. However, very little is known about the coordinated action of the four proteins in other biologic processes. As described herein, we observed a differential requirement for the proteins in cell proliferation and identified a possible reliance for these factors in regulation of specific DNA damage biomarkers. In particular, GAR1 expression was upregulated following exposure to all forms of genotoxic stress tested. In contrast, levels of the other proteins were either reduced or unaffected. Only GAR1 showed an altered subcellular localization with a shift from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm after ultraviolet-C irradiation and doxorubicin treatments. Transient siRNA-mediated depletion of GAR1 and dyskerin arrested cell proliferation, whereas loss of either NHP2 or NOP10 had no effect. Finally, loss of dyskerin, GAR1, NHP2, and NOP10, respectively, limited the accumulation of DNA damage biomarkers. However, the individual responses were dependent upon the specific type of damage incurred. In general, loss of GAR1 had the most suppressive effect on the biomarkers tested. Since the specific responses to genotoxic stress, the contribution of each protein to cell proliferation, and the activation of DNA damage biomarkers were not equivalent, this suggests the possibility that at least some of the proteins, most notably GAR1, may potentially function independently of their respective roles within H/ACA RNP complexes. PMID:26265134

  9. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Emily E.; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C.; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration. PMID:26121639

  10. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Emily E; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration.

  11. Helper virus is not required for in vitro erythroid transformation of hematopoietic cells by Friend virus.

    PubMed

    Hankins, W D; Krantz, S B

    1980-09-01

    The Friend polycythemia virus complex (FVP), consisting of the replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) and a helper Friend murine leukemia virus (MuLV-F), produces erythroleukemia within 2-3 weeks in vivo. We have recently reported in vitro transformation of bone marrow cells by FVP, producing clusters of erythroid colonies (erythroid bursts) 4-6 days after infection. In contrast to uninfected bone marrow cells, FVP-treated cells proliferated and differentiated (synthesized hemoglobin) in the absence of added erythropoietin, the physiologic regulator of erythropoiesis. The relative roles of helper murine leukemia virus (MuLV) and SFFV in the in vitro erythroid transformation have now been examined. Pseudotype studies and the finding that cloned MuLV-F (free of SFFV) did not induce burst formation indicated that SFFV was essential for this in vitro effect of FVP. Because SFFV could not be obtained free of helper MuLV, we assessed the requirement of MuLV in the transformation by kinetic analyses of helper-deficient and helper-excess FVP preparations. Whereas helper-excess FVP gave single-hit kinetics both in vivo and in vitro, the helper-deficient FVP followed multiple-hit kinetics when titrated for spleen focus formation in vivo. Addition of MuLV-F to helper-deficient FVP prior to injection resulted in a marked enhancement of spleen focus formation and a conversion from multiple-hit to single-hit kinetics. In contrast, titration of this same preparation for erythroid burst transformation in vitro yielded single-hit kinetics, and the addition of helper MuLV-F had no effect. The time course of burst development was similar with or without added MuLV-F. Unlike burst transformation, SFFV production by these infected cultures followed multiple-hit kinetics. Addition of MuLV-F at the time of infection led to an enhancement of SFFV production and conversion of the titration curve from multiple-hit to single-hit. These data are consistent with the idea that

  12. Stem-loop binding protein is required for retinal cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and intraretinal axon pathfinding in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Imai, Fumiyasu; Yoshizawa, Asuka; Matsuzaki, Ayako; Oguri, Eri; Araragi, Masato; Nishiwaki, Yuko; Masai, Ichiro

    2014-10-01

    In the developing retina, neurogenesis and cell differentiation are coupled with cell proliferation. However, molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation are not fully understood. In this study, we found that retinal neurogenesis is severely delayed in the zebrafish stem-loop binding protein (slbp) mutant. SLBP binds to a stem-loop structure at the 3'-end of histone mRNAs, and regulates a replication-dependent synthesis and degradation of histone proteins. Retinal cell proliferation becomes slower in the slbp1 mutant, resulting in cessation of retinal stem cell proliferation. Although retinal stem cells cease proliferation by 2 days postfertilization (dpf) in the slbp mutant, retinal progenitor cells in the central retina continue to proliferate and generate neurons until at least 5dpf. We found that this progenitor proliferation depends on Notch signaling, suggesting that Notch signaling maintains retinal progenitor proliferation when faced with reduced SLBP activity. Thus, SLBP is required for retinal stem cell maintenance. SLBP and Notch signaling are required for retinal progenitor cell proliferation and subsequent neurogenesis. We also show that SLBP1 is required for intraretinal axon pathfinding, probably through morphogenesis of the optic stalk, which expresses attractant cues. Taken together, these data indicate important roles of SLBP in retinal development.

  13. WOX13-like genes are required for reprogramming of leaf and protoplast cells into stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Keiko; Reisewitz, Pascal; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Friedrich, Thomas; Ando, Sayuri; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Tamada, Yosuke; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kurata, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Masaki; Deguchi, Hironori; Rensing, Stefan A; Werr, Wolfgang; Murata, Takashi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Laux, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Many differentiated plant cells can dedifferentiate into stem cells, reflecting the remarkable developmental plasticity of plants. In the moss Physcomitrella patens, cells at the wound margin of detached leaves become reprogrammed into stem cells. Here, we report that two paralogous P. patens WUSCHEL-related homeobox 13-like (PpWOX13L) genes, homologs of stem cell regulators in flowering plants, are transiently upregulated and required for the initiation of cell growth during stem cell formation. Concordantly, Δppwox13l deletion mutants fail to upregulate genes encoding homologs of cell wall loosening factors during this process. During the moss life cycle, most of the Δppwox13l mutant zygotes fail to expand and initiate an apical stem cell to form the embryo. Our data show that PpWOX13L genes are required for the initiation of cell growth specifically during stem cell formation, in analogy to WOX stem cell functions in seed plants, but using a different cellular mechanism.

  14. Wdpcp, a PCP Protein Required for Ciliogenesis, Regulates Directional Cell Migration and Cell Polarity by Direct Modulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lozito, Thomas P.; Zhang, Zhen; Francis, Richard J.; Yagi, Hisato; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Sanker, Subramaniam; Francis, Deanne; Yu, Qing; San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Puligilla, Chandrakala; Chatterjee, Tania; Tansey, Terry; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kelley, Matthew W.; Spiliotis, Elias T.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Tuan, Rocky; Pazour, Gregory J.; Hukriede, Neil A.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) regulates cell alignment required for collective cell movement during embryonic development. This requires PCP/PCP effector proteins, some of which also play essential roles in ciliogenesis, highlighting the long-standing question of the role of the cilium in PCP. Wdpcp, a PCP effector, was recently shown to regulate both ciliogenesis and collective cell movement, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show Wdpcp can regulate PCP by direct modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. These studies were made possible by recovery of a Wdpcp mutant mouse model. Wdpcp-deficient mice exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of Bardet–Biedl/Meckel–Gruber ciliopathy syndromes, including cardiac outflow tract and cochlea defects associated with PCP perturbation. We observed Wdpcp is localized to the transition zone, and in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2, Nphp1, and Mks1 were lost from the transition zone, indicating Wdpcp is required for recruitment of proteins essential for ciliogenesis. Wdpcp is also found in the cytoplasm, where it is localized in the actin cytoskeleton and in focal adhesions. Wdpcp interacts with Sept2 and is colocalized with Sept2 in actin filaments, but in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2 was lost from the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting Wdpcp is required for Sept2 recruitment to actin filaments. Significantly, organization of the actin filaments and focal contacts were markedly changed in Wdpcp-deficient cells. This was associated with decreased membrane ruffling, failure to establish cell polarity, and loss of directional cell migration. These results suggest the PCP defects in Wdpcp mutants are not caused by loss of cilia, but by direct disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, Wdpcp mutant cochlea has normal kinocilia and yet exhibits PCP defects. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that a PCP component required for ciliogenesis can directly modulate the actin cytoskeleton to

  15. Rat dendritic cells function as accessory cells and control the production of a soluble factor required for mitogenic responses of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Klinkert, W E; LaBadie, J H; O'Brien, J P; Beyer, C F; Bowers, W E

    1980-01-01

    Transformation of T lymphocytes, induced by treatment with periodate or with neuraminidase plus galactose oxidase, requires the participation of accessory cells. Procedures were developed for the fractionation of rat lymph node cells, by which most of the lymphocytes can be recovered as a major population of cells that do not respond to mitogenic stimulation unless accessory cells from a separated minor population are added. Further purification led to a 1000-fold overall increase in accessory activity per cell, with a 50-70% yield. The purest preparations were virtually free of macrophages and contained more than 90% typical dendritic cells. Maximum responses occurred at a ratio of only one dendritic cell per 200 periodate-treated lymphocytes. This evidence thus indicates strongly that in rats, dendritic cells--not macrophages--function as accessory cells. Further, the number of dendritic cells in a preparation governed the magnitude of the mitogenic response and was limiting in the case of unfractionated lymph node cells. In addition, when oxidized with periodate or with neuraminidase plus galactose oxidase, the dendritic cell served as a very potent indirect stimulator of untreated responder lymphocytes. Both functions of the dendritic cell appeared to lack species specificity, since mouse dendritic cells were very active when tested with rat responder lymphocytes. A soluble factor (accessory cell-replacing factor), produced by cultures of lymph node or spleen cells subjected to oxidative mitogenesis, enabled otherwise unresponsive mitogen-treated lymphocytes to respond. Dendritic cells were required for the production of this factor but may not be solely responsible for its production. Images PMID:6968911

  16. The proliferative and morphologic responses of a colon carcinoma cell line (LIM 1215) require the production of two autocrine factors.

    PubMed Central

    Sizeland, A M; Burgess, A W

    1991-01-01

    The role of autocrine growth factors in tumor cell growth has been difficult to prove. Our results indicate that more than one autocrine factor is required for the autonomous growth of the LIM 1215 colonic carcinoma cell line. Furthermore, the morphologic changes induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) are also density dependent and appear to require a synergistic autocrine factor. The serum-free proliferation of the colonic carcinoma cell line LIM 1215 depends on cell density and the presence of EGF (A. Sizeland, S. Bol, and A.W. Burgess, Growth Factors 4:129-143, 1991). At cell densities below 10(4)/cm2, conditioned medium (from cells at a density of 10(5)/cm2) was required for the cells to elicit a mitogenic response to exogenous EGF. At higher cell densities (10(5)/cm2), the cells were independent of both exogenous EGF and conditioned medium. In addition, the EGF receptor was found to be phosphorylated on tyrosine in LIM 1215 cells proliferating at high density, suggesting that the autocrine production of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and subsequent ligation to the EGF receptor was occurring. The proliferation of cells at high density was partly inhibited by TGF alpha antibodies but was almost completely inhibited by an antisense oligonucleotide to TGF alpha. The antisense inhibition could be overcome by the addition of EGF, indicating that the effect of the antisense TGF alpha oligonucleotide was on the production of autocrine TGF alpha. LIM 1215 cells were also observed to undergo morphologic changes (spreading and actin cable organization) in response to EGF. These changes were density dependent, but they occurred with a cell density dependence different from that of the proliferative response. These results suggest two possibilities: that the morphologic changes and proliferative responses have different sensitivities to the autocrine factors or that the actions of the autocrine factors are mediated through different signal transduction

  17. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34+ precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  18. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  19. Peyer's Patch M Cells Derived from Lgr5+ Stem Cells Require SpiB and Are Induced by RankL in Cultured “Miniguts”

    PubMed Central

    de Lau, Wim; Kujala, Pekka; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Middendorp, Sabine; Li, Vivian S. W.; Barker, Nick; Martens, Anton; Hofhuis, Frans; DeKoter, Rodney P.; Peters, Peter J.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Peyer's patches consist of domains of specialized intestinal epithelium overlying gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Luminal antigens reach the GALT by translocation through epithelial gatekeeper cells, the so-called M cells. We recently demonstrated that all epithelial cells required for the digestive functions of the intestine are generated from Lgr5-expressing stem cells. Here, we show that M cells also derive from these crypt-based Lgr5 stem cells. The Ets family transcription factor SpiB, known to control effector functions of bone marrow-derived immune cells, is specifically expressed in M cells. In SpiB−/− mice, M cells are entirely absent, which occurs in a cell-autonomous fashion. It has been shown that Tnfsf11 (RankL) can induce M cell development in vivo. We show that in intestinal organoid (“minigut”) cultures, stimulation with RankL induces SpiB expression within 24 h and expression of other M cell markers subsequently. We conclude that RankL-induced expression of SpiB is essential for Lgr5 stem cell-derived epithelial precursors to develop into M cells. PMID:22778137

  20. Spoltud-1 is a chromatoid body component required for planarian long-term stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Lasko, Paul; Romero, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Freshwater planarians exhibit a striking power of regeneration, based on a population of undifferentiated totipotent stem cells, called neoblasts. These somatic stem cells have several characteristics resembling those of germ line stem cells in other animals, such as the presence of perinuclear RNA granules (chromatoid bodies). We have isolated a Tudor domain-containing gene in the planarian species Schmidtea polychroa, Spoltud-1, and show that it is expressed in neoblast cells, germ line cells and central nervous system, and during embryonic development. Within the neoblasts, Spoltud-1 protein is enriched in chromatoid bodies. Spoltud-1 RNAi eliminates protein expression after 3 weeks, and abolishes the power of regeneration of planarians after 7 weeks. Neoblast cells are eliminated by the RNAi treatment, disappearing at the end rather than gradually during the process. Neoblasts with no detectable Spoltud-1 protein are able to proliferate and differentiate. These results suggest that Spoltud-1 is required for long term stem cell self renewal. PMID:19389344

  1. Continuous inhibitory signaling by both SHP-1 and SHIP-1 pathways is required to maintain unresponsiveness of anergic B cells

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Andrew; Beavers, Nicole A.; Larson, Sandy R.; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Many autoreactive B cells persist in the periphery in a state of unresponsiveness called anergy. This unresponsiveness is rapidly reversible, requiring continuous BCR interaction with self-antigen and resultant regulatory signaling for its maintenance. Using adoptive transfer of anergic B cells with subsequent acute induction of gene deletion or expression, we demonstrate that the continuous activities of independent inhibitory signaling pathways involving the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1 are required to maintain anergy. Acute breach of anergy by compromise of either of these pathways leads to rapid cell activation, proliferation, and generation of short-lived plasma cells that reside in extrafollicular foci. Results are consistent with predicted/observed reduction in the Lyn–SHIP-1–PTEN–SHP-1 axis function in B cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients. PMID:27114609

  2. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-01

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  3. T suppressor cells are required for the maintenance of the antigen-induced B-cell unresponsive state in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Benveniste, E.; Stevens, R.H.

    1983-04-01

    Tetanus toxoid immunization of humans generates circulating B cells which secrete IgG anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies (IgG-Tet) when stimulated in vitro with T cells and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). A unique property of these cells is the inhibition of maturation into antibody-secreting plasma cells following a 1-hr in vitro pulse with tetanus toxoid. Studies were undertaken to determine if different T-cell subsets could modulate the in vitro generated B-cell unresponsive state. The addition of OKT4+/OKT8- cells to antigen-treated B cells resulted in a partial reversal of the antigen-induced inhibition of IgG-Tet synthesis. The addition of OKT4-/OKT8+ cells to the treated B cells caused a suppression of IgG-Tet synthesis comparable to that seen in cultures containing unfractionated T cells. These results indicate that (1) the B-cell unresponsive state generated by antigen treatment is not absolute, (2) the degree of B-cell unresponsiveness results from a balance of suppressor and helper signals, and (3) T-suppressor cells need to be present to induce and maintain the B-cell unresponsive state.

  4. MicroRNA-181a/b-1 Is Not Required for Innate γδ NKT Effector Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Inga; Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Oberdörfer, Linda; Witzlau, Katrin; Krueger, Andreas; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Thymic development of αβ T lymphocytes into invariant natural killer (NK) T cells depends on their selection via agonistic lipid antigen presented by CD1d. If successful, newly selected NKT cells gain effector functions already in the thymus. Some γδ T cell subsets also acquire effector functions in the thymus. However, it is not clear whether agonistic TCR stimulation is involved in thymic γδ T cell selection and development. Here we combine two genetic models to address this question. MiR-181a/b-1-/-mice, which show impaired agonistic T cell selection of invariant αβ NKT cells, were crossed to Tcrd-H2BeGFP reporter mice to monitor selection, intra-thymic expansion and differentiation of γδ T cells. We found that miR-181a/b-1-deficiency had no effect on numbers of thymic γδ T cell or on their differentiation towards an IL-17- or IFN-γ-producing effector phenotype. Also, the composition of peripheral lymph node γδ T cells was not affected by miR-181a/b-1-deficiency. Dendritic epidermal γδ T cells were normally present in knock-out animals. However, we observed elevated frequencies and numbers of γδ NKT cells in the liver, possibly because γδ NKT cells can expand and replace missing αβ NKT cells in peripheral niches. In summary, we investigated the role of miR-181a/b-1 for selection, intrathymic development and homeostasis of γδ T cells. We conclude that miR-181a/b-1-dependent modulation of T cell selection is not critically required for innate development of γδ NKT cells or of any other γδ T cell subtypes. PMID:26673421

  5. CELL WALL INVERTASE 4 is required for nectar production in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ruhlmann, Jeffrey M; Kram, Brian W; Carter, Clay J

    2010-01-01

    To date, no genes have been reported to directly affect the de novo production of floral nectar. In an effort to identify genes involved in nectar production, the Affymetrix((R)) ATH1 GeneChip was previously used to examine global gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana nectaries. One of the genes displaying highly enriched expression in nectaries was CELL WALL INVERTASE 4 (AtCWINV4, At2g36190), which encodes an enzyme that putatively catalyses the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. RT-PCR was used to confirm the nectary-enriched expression of AtCWINV4, as well as an orthologue from Brassica rapa. To probe biological function, two independent Arabidopsis cwinv4 T-DNA mutants were isolated. Unlike wild-type plants, cwinv4 lines did not produce nectar. While overall nectary morphology appeared to be normal, cwinv4 flowers accumulated higher than normal levels of starch in the receptacle, but not within the nectaries themselves. Conversely, wild-type, but not cwinv4, nectarial stomata stained intensely for starch. Cell wall extracts prepared from mutant flowers displayed greatly reduced invertase activity when compared with wild-type plants, and cwinv4 flowers also accumulated significantly lower levels of total soluble sugar. Cumulatively, these results implicate CWINV4 as an absolutely required factor for nectar production in the Brassicaceae, specifically by maintaining constant sink status within nectaries, thus allowing them to accumulate the sugars necessary for nectar production. In addition, CWINV4 is probably responsible for the hexose-rich composition observed for many Brassicaceae nectars.

  6. Lipid rafts are required for GLUT4 internalization in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Ros-Baro, A; Lopez-Iglesias, C; Peiro, S; Bellido, D; Palacin, M; Zorzano, A; Camps, M

    2001-10-01

    It has been recently reported that insulin recruits a novel signaling machinery to lipid rafts required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation [Baumann, A., Ribon, V., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Mora, S., Shigematsu, S., Bickel, P. E., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 407, 202-207, 2000; Chiang, S. H., Baumann, C. A., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Watson, R. T., Neudauer, C. L., Macara, I. G., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 410, 944-948]. We have assessed the role of lipid rafts on GLUT4 traffic in adipose cells. High GLUT4 levels were detected in caveolae from adipocytes by two approaches, the mechanical isolation of purified caveolae from plasma membrane lawns and the immunogold analysis of plasma membrane lawns followed by freeze-drying. The role of lipid rafts in GLUT4 trafficking was studied by adding nystatin or filipin at concentrations that specifically disrupt caveolae morphology and inhibit caveolae function without altering clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These caveolae inhibitors did not affect the insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, they blocked both the GLUT4 internalization and the down-regulation of glucose transport triggered by insulin removal in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our data indicate that lipid rafts are crucial for GLUT4 internalization after insulin removal. Given that high levels of GLUT4 were detected in caveolae from insulin-treated adipose cells, this transporter may be internalized from caveolae or caveolae may operate as an obligatory transition station before internalization.

  7. Dendritic cell maturation requires STAT1 and is under feedback regulation by suppressors of cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sharon H; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Mahdi, Rashid M; Ebong, Samuel; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2004-02-15

    In this study we show that activation of STAT pathways is developmentally regulated and plays a role in dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and maturation. The STAT6 signaling pathway is constitutively activated in immature DC (iDC) and declines as iDCs differentiate into mature DCs (mDCs). However, down-regulation of this pathway during DC differentiation is accompanied by dramatic induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), SOCS2, SOCS3, and cytokine-induced Src homology 2-containing protein expression, suggesting that inhibition of STAT6 signaling may be required for DC maturation. In contrast, STAT1 signaling is most robust in mDCs and is not inhibited by the up-regulated SOCS proteins, indicating that STAT1 and STAT6 pathways are distinctly regulated in maturing DC. Furthermore, optimal activation of STAT1 during DC maturation requires both IL-4 and GM-CSF, suggesting that synergistic effects of both cytokines may in part provide the requisite STAT1 signaling intensity for DC maturation. Analyses of STAT1(-/-) DCs reveal a role for STAT1 in repressing CD86 expression in precursor DCs and up-regulating CD40, CD11c, and SOCS1 expression in mDCs. We further show that SOCS proteins are differentially induced by IL-4 and GM-CSF in DCs. SOCS1 is primarily induced by IL-4 through a STAT1-dependent mechanism, whereas SOCS3 is induced mainly by GM-CSF. Taken together, these results suggest that cytokine-induced maturation of DCs is under feedback regulation by SOCS proteins and that the switch from constitutive activation of the STAT6 pathway in iDCs to predominant use of STAT1 signals in mDC is mediated in part by STAT1-induced SOCS expression.

  8. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  9. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  10. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Megason, Sean G.; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase is required for cell survival and growth in HeLa-S3 cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuhong; Huang, Dongyang; Liu, Yanmin; Pan, Xiaokang; Zhang, Jing; Liang, Bin

    2014-06-01

    Activation of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is linked to cancer cell survival in a variety of cancer cell lines, particularly under conditions of stress. As a potent activator of AMPK, metformin has become a hot topic of discussion for its effect on cancer cell. Here, we report that AMPK activated by metformin promotes HeLa-S3 cell survival and growth in vivo. Our results show that metformin inhibited cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells, but not in LKB1-deficient HeLa-S3 cells. Re-expression of LKB-1 in HeLa-S3 cells restored the growth inhibitory effect of metformin, indicating a requirement for LKB-1 in metformin-induced growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPK activation exerted a protective effect in HeLa-S3 cells by relieving ER stress, modulating ER Ca(2+) storage, and finally contributing to cellular adaptation and resistance to apoptosis. Our findings identify a link between AMPK activation and cell survival in HeLa-S3 cells, which demonstrates a beneficial effect of AMPK activated by metformin in cancer cell, and suggests a discrete re-evaluation on the role of metformin/AMPK activation on tumor cell growth, proliferation, and on clinical application in cancer therapy.

  12. Requirement of cAMP Signaling for Schwann Cell Differentiation Restricts the Onset of Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  13. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    PubMed

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  14. An ARID Domain-Containing Protein within Nuclear Bodies Is Required for Sperm Cell Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Binglian; He, Hui; Zheng, Yanhua; Wu, Wenye; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, plays a key role in sperm cell formation by activating expression of several germline genes. But how DUO1 itself is activated and how sperm cell formation is initiated remain unknown. To expand our understanding of sperm cell formation, we characterized an ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain)-containing protein, ARID1, that is specifically required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis. ARID1 localizes within nuclear bodies that are transiently present in the generative cell from which sperm cells arise, coincident with the timing of DUO1 activation. An arid1 mutant and antisense arid1 plants had an increased incidence of pollen with only a single sperm-like cell and exhibited reduced fertility as well as reduced expression of DUO1. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that ARID1 binds to the DUO1 promoter. Lastly, we found that ARID1 physically associates with histone deacetylase 8 and that histone acetylation, which in wild type is evident only in sperm, expanded to the vegetative cell nucleus in the arid1 mutant. This study identifies a novel component required for sperm cell formation in plants and uncovers a direct positive regulatory role of ARID1 on DUO1 through association with histone acetylation. PMID:25057814

  15. Tethering of ICAM on target cells is required for LFA-1-dependent NK cell adhesion and granule polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Liu, Dongfang; Long, Eric O.

    2013-01-01

    αLβ2 integrin (LFA-1) has an important role in the formation of T cell and NK cell cytotoxic immunological synapses and in target cell killing. Binding of LFA-1 to ICAM on target cells promotes not only adhesion, but also polarization of cytolytic granules in NK cells. Here we tested whether LFA-1-dependent NK cell responses are regulated by the distribution and mobility of ICAM at the surface of target cells. We show that depolymerization of F-actin in NK-sensitive target cells abrogated LFA-1-dependent conjugate formation and granule polarization in primary NK cells. Degranulation, which is not controlled by LFA-1, was not impaired. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and particle tracking by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 were distributed in largely immobile clusters. ICAM clusters were maintained and became highly mobile after actin depolymerization. Moreover, reducing ICAM-2 mobility on an NK-resistant target cell through expression of ezrin, an adapter molecule that tethers proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, enhanced LFA-1-dependent adhesion and granule polarization. Finally, while NK cells kept moving over freely diffusible ICAM-1 on a lipid bilayer, they bound and spread over solid-phase ICAM-1. We conclude that tethering, rather than clustering of ICAM promotes proper signaling by LFA-1 in NK cells. Our findings suggest that the lateral diffusion of integrin ligands on cells may be an important determinant of susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic lymphocytes. PMID:20675589

  16. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  17. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27622331

  18. Acute Cardiac Rejection Requires Directly Cytotoxic CD4 T cells: A Parallel Pathway between Fas and Perforin1

    PubMed Central

    Grazia, Todd J.; Plenter, Robert J.; Weber, Sarah M.; Lepper, Helen M.; Victorino, Francisco; Zamora, Martin R.; Pietra, Biagio A.; Gill, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Background CD4 T cells can suffice as effector cells to mediate primary acute cardiac allograft rejection. While CD4 T cells can readily kill appropriate target cells in vitro, the corresponding role of such cytolytic activity for mediating allograft rejection in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we determined whether the cytolytic effector molecules perforin and/or FasL (CD95L) were necessary for CD4 T cell-mediated rejection in vivo. Methods Wild type C3H(H-2k) or Fas (CD95)-deficient C3Hlpr (H-2k) hearts were transplanted into immune-deficient C57B6rag−/− (H-2b) mice. Recipients then were reconstituted with naïve purified CD4 T cells from either wild-type, perforin (pfp)-deficient, or FasL (gld)-deficient T cell donors. Results In vitro, alloreactive CD4 T cells were competent to lyse donor MHC class II+ target cells, largely by a Fas-dependent mechanism. In vivo, the individual disruption of either donor Fas expression (lpr) or CD4 T cell-derived perforin had no signifcant impact on acute rejection. However, FasL-deficient (gld) CD4 T cells demonstrated delayed allograft rejection. Importantly, the simultaneous removal of both donor Fas expression and CD4 T cell perforin completely abrograted acute rejection, despite the persistence of CD4 T cells within the graft. Conclusions Results demonstrate that the direct rejection of cardiac allografts by CD4 effector T cells requires the alternative contribution of graft Fas expression and T cell perforin expression. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that cytolytic activity by CD4 T cells can play an obligate role for primary acute allograft rejection in vivo. PMID:20061916

  19. Cellular Defense and Sensory Cell Survival Require Distinct Functions of ebi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Mi; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Tsuda, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune response and stress-induced apoptosis are well-established signaling pathways related to cellular defense. NF-κB and AP-1 are redox-sensitive transcription factors that play important roles in those pathways. Here we show that Ebi, a Drosophila homolog of the mammalian co-repressor molecule transducin β-like 1 (TBL1), variously regulates the expression of specific genes that are targets of redox-sensitive transcription factors. In response to different stimuli, Ebi activated gene expression to support the acute immune response in fat bodies, whereas Ebi repressed genes that are involved in apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. Thus, Ebi seems to act as a regulatory switch for genes that are activated or repressed in response to different external stimuli. Our results offer clear in vivo evidence that the Ebi-containing co-repressor complex acts in a distinct manner to regulate transcription that is required for modulating the output of various processes during Drosophila development. PMID:26524764

  20. HIV-1 Vpr-Induced Apoptosis Is Cell Cycle Dependent and Requires Bax but Not ANT

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Joshua L; DeHart, Jason L; Zimmerman, Erik S; Ardon, Orly; Kim, Baek; Jacquot, Guillaume; Benichou, Serge; Planelles, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr) causes G2 arrest and apoptosis in infected cells. We previously identified the DNA damage–signaling protein ATR as the cellular factor that mediates Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis. Here, we examine the mechanism of induction of apoptosis by Vpr and how it relates to induction of G2 arrest. We find that entry into G2 is a requirement for Vpr to induce apoptosis. We investigated the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by knockdown of its essential component, the adenine nucleotide translocator. We found that Vpr-induced apoptosis was unaffected by knockdown of ANT. Instead, apoptosis is triggered through a different mitochondrial pore protein, Bax. In support of the idea that checkpoint activation and apoptosis induction are functionally linked, we show that Bax activation by Vpr was ablated when ATR or GADD45α was knocked down. Certain mutants of Vpr, such as R77Q and I74A, identified in long-term nonprogressors, have been proposed to inefficiently induce apoptosis while activating the G2 checkpoint in a normal manner. We tested the in vitro phenotypes of these mutants and found that their abilities to induce apoptosis and G2 arrest are indistinguishable from those of HIV-1NL4–3 vpr, providing additional support to the idea that G2 arrest and apoptosis induction are mechanistically linked. PMID:17140287

  1. All Three Rows of Outer Hair Cells Are Required for Cochlear Amplification.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian auditory system, the three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the cochlea are thought to increase the displacement amplitude of the organ of Corti. This cochlear amplification is thought to contribute to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and sharp frequency selectivity of the hearing system. Recent studies have shown that traumatic stimuli, such as noise exposure and ototoxic acid, cause functional loss of OHCs in one, two, or all three rows. However, the degree of decrease in cochlear amplification caused by such functional losses remains unclear. In the present study, a finite element model of a cross section of the gerbil cochlea was constructed. Then, to determine effects of the functional losses of OHCs on the cochlear amplification, changes in the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) due to the functional losses of OHCs were calculated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM decreases significantly when a single row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification. PMID:26295049

  2. Cited2 is required for the maintenance of glycolytic metabolism in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinwei; Li, Qiang; Tang, Fangqiang; Puchowitz, Michelle A; Fujioka, Hisashi; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Danielpour, David; Yang, Yu-Chung

    2014-01-15

    Mammalian adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment and display a distinct metabolic phenotype compared with their progenitors. It has been proposed that HSCs generate energy mainly through anaerobic glycolysis in a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-dependent manner. Cited2 is an essential regulator for HSC quiescence, apoptosis, and function. Herein, we show that conditional deletion of Cited2 in murine HSCs results in elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, decreased cellular glutathione content, increased mitochondrial activity, and decreased glycolysis. At the molecular level, Cited2 deficiency significantly reduced the expression of genes involved in metabolism, such as Pdk2, Pdk4, and lactate dehydrogenases B and D (LDHB and LDHD). Cited2-deficient HSCs also exhibited increased Akt signaling, concomitant with elevated mTORC1 activity and phosphorylation of FoxOs. Further, inhibition of PI3/Akt, but not mTORC1, partially rescued the repression of Pdk4 caused by deletion of Cited2. Altogether, our results suggest that Cited2 is required for the maintenance of adult HSC glycolytic metabolism likely through regulating Pdk2, Pdk4, LDHB, LDHD, and Akt activity. PMID:24083546

  3. Sorbent Material Property Requirements for On-Board Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J-K; Hua, T. Q.

    2015-05-25

    Material properties required for on-board hydrogen storage in cryogenic sorbents for use with automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems are discussed. Models are formulated for physical, thermodynamic and transport properties, and for the dynamics of H-2 refueling and discharge from a sorbent bed. A conceptual storage configuration with in-bed heat exchanger tubes, a Type-3 containment vessel, vacuum insulation and requisite balance-of-plant components is developed to determine the peak excess sorption capacity and differential enthalpy of adsorption for 5.5 wt% system gravimetric capacity and 55% well-to-tank (WTT) efficiency. The analysis also determines the bulk density to which the material must be compacted for the storage system to reach 40 g.L-1 volumetric capacity. Thermal transport properties and heat transfer enhancement methods are analyzed to estimate the material thermal conductivity needed to achieve 1.5 kg.min(-1) H-2 refueling rate. Operating temperatures and pressures are determined for 55% WTT efficiency and 95% usable H-2. Needs for further improvements in material properties are analyzed that would allow reduction of storage pressure to 50 bar from 100 bar, elevation of storage temperature to 175-200 K from 150 K, and increase of WTT efficiency to 57.5% or higher.

  4. Decreased transfusion requirements in patients given stem cell allografts using a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; López-Martínez, Briceida; Gómez-Rangel, David; Estrada, Erick; Marín-López, Antonio; Bravo-Hernández, Gerardo; Manuel Hernández, Juan

    2003-06-01

    We report our experience of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation using non-myeloablative conditioning regimens delivered and supported on an outpatient basis. A group of 44 patients underwent 47 allograft procedures using peripheral blood stem cells. Approximately one third of the individuals did not require red blood cells transfusions: the median of transfused red blood cells units was 1 (range 0-10). In addition one out of three did not require platelet transfusions either, the median of platelet transfusions being 1 (range 0-6). In fourteen allografts (30%) neither red blood cells nor platelet transfusions were used. An inverse correlation was found between the number of CD34 cells infused and the PRBC and PLT transfusion requirements, those patients receiving high numbers of CD34 cells needing fewer transfusions of both PRBC and platelets. The possibility of conducting allografts without transfusion of blood products in some patients may result in a decrease in both cost and the risks stemming from exposure to human blood derivatives.

  5. TAT-RasGAP317-326 requires p53 and PUMA to sensitize tumor cells to genotoxins.

    PubMed

    Michod, David; Widmann, Christian

    2007-05-01

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, the associated side effects induced by lack of specificity to tumor cells remain a challenging problem. We have previously shown that TAT-RasGAP(317-326),a cell-permeable peptide derived from RasGAP, specifically sensitizes cancer cells to the action of genotoxins. The underlying mechanisms of this sensitization were not defined however. Here, we report that TAT-RasGAP(317-326) requires p53, but not the Ras effectors Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, to mediate its tumor sensitization abilities. The TAT-RasGAP(317-326) peptide, although not modulating the transcriptional activity of p53 or its phosphorylation and acetylation status, nevertheless requires a functional p53 cellular status to increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to genotoxins. Genes regulated by p53 encode proapoptotic proteins, such as PUMA, and cell cycle control proteins, such as p21. The ability of TAT-RasGAP(317-326) to sensitize cancer cells was found to require PUMA but not p21. TAT-RasGAP(317-326) did not affect PUMA levels, however, but increased genotoxin-induced mitochondrial depolarization and caspase-3 activation. These results indicate that TAT-RasGAP(317-326) sensitizes tumor cells by activating signals that intersect with the p53 pathway downstream of, or at the level of, proapoptotic p53 target gene products to increase the activation of the mitochondrial death pathway.

  6. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine.

    PubMed

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L; Yılmaz, Ömer H; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Sorensen, Poul H

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by (13)C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis. PMID:27605385

  7. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine.

    PubMed

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L; Yılmaz, Ömer H; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Sorensen, Poul H

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by (13)C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis.

  8. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C.; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L.; Yılmaz, Ömer H.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by 13C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis. PMID:27605385

  9. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C.; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L.; Yılmaz, Ömer H.; Deberardinis, Ralph J.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by 13C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis.

  10. Antioxidants Complement the Requirement for Protein Chaperone Function to Maintain β-Cell Function and Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jaeseok; Song, Benbo; Kim, Jiun; Kodali, Vamsi K; Pottekat, Anita; Wang, Miao; Hassler, Justin; Wang, Shiyu; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Back, Sung Hoon; Katze, Michael G; Kaufman, Randal J

    2015-08-01

    Proinsulin misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) initiates a cell death response, although the mechanism(s) remains unknown. To provide insight into how protein misfolding may cause β-cell failure, we analyzed mice with the deletion of P58(IPK)/DnajC3, an ER luminal co-chaperone. P58(IPK-/-) mice become diabetic as a result of decreased β-cell function and mass accompanied by induction of oxidative stress and cell death. Treatment with a chemical chaperone, as well as deletion of Chop, improved β-cell function and ameliorated the diabetic phenotype in P58(IPK-/-) mice, suggesting P58(IPK) deletion causes β-cell death through ER stress. Significantly, a diet of chow supplemented with antioxidant dramatically and rapidly restored β-cell function in P58(IPK-/-) mice and corrected abnormal localization of MafA, a critical transcription factor for β-cell function. Antioxidant feeding also preserved β-cell function in Akita mice that express mutant misfolded proinsulin. Therefore defective protein folding in the β-cell causes oxidative stress as an essential proximal signal required for apoptosis in response to ER stress. Remarkably, these findings demonstrate that antioxidant feeding restores cell function upon deletion of an ER molecular chaperone. Therefore antioxidant or chemical chaperone treatment may be a promising therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes.

  11. Multiple types of data are required to identify the mechanisms influencing the spatial expansion of melanoma cell colonies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The expansion of cell colonies is driven by a delicate balance of several mechanisms including cell motility, cell–to–cell adhesion and cell proliferation. New approaches that can be used to independently identify and quantify the role of each mechanism will help us understand how each mechanism contributes to the expansion process. Standard mathematical modelling approaches to describe such cell colony expansion typically neglect cell–to–cell adhesion, despite the fact that cell–to-cell adhesion is thought to play an important role. Results We use a combined experimental and mathematical modelling approach to determine the cell diffusivity, D, cell–to–cell adhesion strength, q, and cell proliferation rate, λ, in an expanding colony of MM127 melanoma cells. Using a circular barrier assay, we extract several types of experimental data and use a mathematical model to independently estimate D, q and λ. In our first set of experiments, we suppress cell proliferation and analyse three different types of data to estimate D and q. We find that standard types of data, such as the area enclosed by the leading edge of the expanding colony and more detailed cell density profiles throughout the expanding colony, does not provide sufficient information to uniquely identify D and q. We find that additional data relating to the degree of cell–to–cell clustering is required to provide independent estimates of q, and in turn D. In our second set of experiments, where proliferation is not suppressed, we use data describing temporal changes in cell density to determine the cell proliferation rate. In summary, we find that our experiments are best described using the range D=161−243μm2hour−1, q=0.3−0.5 (low to moderate strength) and λ=0.0305−0.0398hour−1, and with these parameters we can accurately predict the temporal variations in the spatial extent and cell density profile throughout the expanding melanoma cell colony. Conclusions Our

  12. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development.

  13. APC is required for muscle stem cell proliferation and skeletal muscle tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Alice; Lacour, Floriane; Giordani, Lorenzo; Colnot, Sabine; Maire, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a crucial regulator of many stem cell types. In constantly cycling stem cells of fast turnover tissues, APC loss results in the constitutive activation of a Wnt target gene program that massively increases proliferation and leads to malignant transformation. However, APC function in skeletal muscle, a tissue with a low turnover rate, has never been investigated. Here we show that conditional genetic disruption of APC in adult muscle stem cells results in the abrogation of adult muscle regenerative potential. We demonstrate that APC removal in adult muscle stem cells abolishes cell cycle entry and leads to cell death. By using double knockout strategies, we further prove that this phenotype is attributable to overactivation of β-catenin signaling. Our results demonstrate that in muscle stem cells, APC dampens canonical Wnt signaling to allow cell cycle progression and radically diverge from previous observations concerning stem cells in actively self-renewing tissues. PMID:26304725

  14. A Septin Requirement Differentiates Autonomous- and Contact-Facilitated T Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mujal, Adriana M.; Gilden, Julia K.; Gérard, Audrey; Kinoshita, Makoto; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    T cell proliferation is initiated by T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggering and/or by soluble growth factors. In characterizing T cells lacking the septin cytoskeleton, we found that successful cell division has discrete septin-dependent and -independent pathways. Septin-deficient T cells failed cytokinesis when prompted by pharmacological activation or cytokines. In contrast, cell division was independent of septins when cell-cell contacts, such as those from antigen-presenting cells, provided a niche. This septin-independent pathway was mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase activation through a combination of integrins and co-stimulatory signals. We could differentiate cytokine- versus antigen-driven expansion in vivo and thus demonstrate that targeting septins has strong potential to moderate detrimental bystander or homeostatic cytokine-driven proliferation without influencing expansion driven by conventional antigen-presentation. PMID:26692174

  15. APC is required for muscle stem cell proliferation and skeletal muscle tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alice; Lacour, Floriane; Giordani, Lorenzo; Colnot, Sabine; Maire, Pascal; Le Grand, Fabien

    2015-08-31

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a crucial regulator of many stem cell types. In constantly cycling stem cells of fast turnover tissues, APC loss results in the constitutive activation of a Wnt target gene program that massively increases proliferation and leads to malignant transformation. However, APC function in skeletal muscle, a tissue with a low turnover rate, has never been investigated. Here we show that conditional genetic disruption of APC in adult muscle stem cells results in the abrogation of adult muscle regenerative potential. We demonstrate that APC removal in adult muscle stem cells abolishes cell cycle entry and leads to cell death. By using double knockout strategies, we further prove that this phenotype is attributable to overactivation of β-catenin signaling. Our results demonstrate that in muscle stem cells, APC dampens canonical Wnt signaling to allow cell cycle progression and radically diverge from previous observations concerning stem cells in actively self-renewing tissues. PMID:26304725

  16. Regeneration of sensory hair cells requires localized interactions between the Notch and Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Carvajal, Andrés; Acedo, Joaquín Navajas; Jiang, Linjia; Kozlovskaja-Gumbrienė, Agnė; Alexander, Richard; Li, Hua; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Summary In vertebrates, mechano-electrical transduction of sound is accomplished by sensory hair cells. While mammalian hair cells are not replaced when lost, in fish they constantly renew and regenerate after injury. In vivo tracking and cell fate analyses of all dividing cells during lateral line hair cell regeneration revealed that support and hair cell progenitors localize to distinct tissue compartments. Importantly, we find that the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in these compartments is controlled by spatially restricted Notch signaling and its inhibition of Wnt-induced proliferation. The ability to simultaneously study and manipulate individual cell behaviors and multiple pathways in vivo, transforms the lateral line into a powerful paradigm to mechanistically dissect sensory organ regeneration. The striking similarities to other vertebrate stem cell compartments uniquely place zebrafish to help elucidate why mammals possess such low capacity to regenerate hair cells. PMID:26190147

  17. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka; Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  18. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  19. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  20. Intact vinculin protein is required for control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and rac-dependent lamellipodia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Studies were carried out using vinculin-deficient F9 embryonic carcinoma (gamma229) cells to analyze the relationship between structure and function within the focal adhesion protein vinculin, in the context of control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and movement. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed that transfection of the head (aa 1-821) or tail (aa 811-1066) domain of vinculin, alone or together, was unable to fully reverse the decrease in cell stiffness, spreading, and lamellipodia formation caused by vinculin deficiency. In contrast, replacement with intact vinculin completely restored normal cell mechanics and spreading regardless of whether its tyrosine phosphorylation site was deleted. Constitutively active rac also only induced extension of lamellipodia when microinjected into cells that expressed intact vinculin protein. These data indicate that vinculin's ability to physically couple integrins to the cytoskeleton, to mechanically stabilize cell shape, and to support rac-dependent lamellipodia formation all appear to depend on its intact three-dimensional structure.

  1. CD40 engagement on dendritic cells, but not on B or T cells, is required for long-term control of murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Shea, Ashley; Inglis, Chandra; Lee, Lian Ni; Sarawar, Sally R

    2008-11-01

    CD4 T cells are not essential for primary clearance of replicating murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) but are required for effective long-term control. The virus reactivates in the lungs of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient (CII-/-) mice that lack functional CD4 T cells. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is upregulated on activated CD4 T cells, and it is thought that CD40-CD40L interactions are an important component of CD4 T-cell help. Our previous studies have shown that agonistic antibodies to CD40 can substitute for CD4 T-cell function in the long-term control of MHV-68. In the present study, we sought to identify the CD40-positive cell type mediating this effect. To address this question, we adoptively transferred MHV-68 peptide-pulsed CII(-/-) dendritic cells (DC) that had been treated with an agonistic antibody to CD40 into MHV-68-infected CII(-/-) recipients. Viral reactivation was significantly lower in mice injected with anti-CD40-treated DC than in those injected with control DC or in mice that did not receive any DC. However, in similar experiments with B cells, anti-CD40 treatment had no effect. We also investigated the requirement for CD40 expression on T cells by adoptive transfer of T cells from CD40(+/+) or CD40(-/-) mice into T-cell-deficient recipients that were subsequently infected with MHV-68. The results showed that CD40 expression on T cells is not necessary for preventing viral reactivation. Taken together, our data suggest that CD40 engagement on DC, but not on T or B cells, is essential for effective long-term control of MHV-68.

  2. Phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase-mediated signalling is required for benzothiadiazole-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death in rice suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Song, Fengming; Zheng, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK)-mediated signalling in oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death was studied in rice suspension-cultured cells treated with benzothiadiazole (BTH) and infected by Xanthomonas oryza pv. oryza (Xoo), the causal agent of rice leaf blight disease. Treatment of rice suspension cells with BTH resulted in a significant oxidative burst, as indicated by accumulation of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2), and hypersensitive cell death, as determined by Evans blue staining. A peak in oxidative burst was detected 3-4 h after BTH treatment and hypersensitive cell death was observed 8 h after treatment. In addition, significant oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death were detected in BTH-treated suspension cells, but not in untreated control cells, after Xoo infection. Scavengers and antioxidants of active oxygen species, e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, and flavone, reduced significantly the BTH-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death, indicating that oxidative burst is required for BTH-induced hypersensitive cell death. Expression of the PLC/DGK pathway genes, a diacylglycerol kinase gene, OsDAGK1, and a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC1, and a defence-related EREBP transcriptional factor gene, OsBIERF3, was activated in rice cells after BTH treatment and in the BTH-treated cells after Xoo infection. Treatment of rice cells with phosphatidic acid, a phospholipid signalling molecule, resulted in the production of oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death. However, neomycin, a PLC inhibitor, inhibited partially but not completely the production of oxidative burst, hypersensitive cell death, and expression of OsBIERF3 and OsDAGK1 induced by BTH in rice cells. These results suggest that PLC/DGK-mediated signalling plays an important role in BTH-induced oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, and activation of defence response in rice.

  3. Downregulation of FOXP1 is required during germinal center B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Roa, Sergio; Bunting, Karen L.; Aznar, María Angela; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita; Fontán, Lorena; Fresquet, Vicente; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Robles, Eloy F.; De Smedt, Linde; Sagaert, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation and germinal center (GC) formation are dependent on the interplay between BCL6 and other transcriptional regulators. FOXP1 is a transcription factor that regulates early B-cell development, but whether it plays a role in mature B cells is unknown. Analysis of human tonsillar B-cell subpopulations revealed that FOXP1 shows the opposite expression pattern to BCL6, suggesting that FOXP1 regulates the transition from resting follicular B cell to activated GC B cell. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and gene expression assays on B cells indicated that FOXP1 acts as a transcriptional activator and repressor of genes involved in the GC reaction, half of which are also BCL6 targets. To study FOXP1 function in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing human FOXP1 in lymphoid cells. These mice exhibited irregular formation of splenic GCs, showing a modest increase in naïve and marginal-zone B cells and a significant decrease in GC B cells. Furthermore, aberrant expression of FOXP1 impaired transcription of noncoding γ1 germline transcripts and inhibited efficient class switching to the immunoglobulin G1 isotype. These studies show that FOXP1 is physiologically downregulated in GC B cells and that aberrant expression of FOXP1 impairs mechanisms triggered by B-cell activation, potentially contributing to B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:23580662

  4. Nutritional and metabolic requirements for the infection of HeLa cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Hopper-Chidlaw, Amanda C; Rice, Christopher J; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Kelly, David J; Thompson, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the causative agent of a spectrum of human and animal diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. It is a food--and water--borne pathogen and infects via ingestion followed by invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and phagocytic cells. In this study we employed a mutational approach to define the nutrients and metabolic pathways required by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during infection of a human epithelial cell line (HeLa). We deleted the key glycolytic genes, pfkA and pfkB to show that S. Typhimurium utilizes glycolysis for replication within HeLa cells; however, glycolysis was not absolutely essential for intracellular replication. Using S. Typhimurium strains deleted for genes encoding components of the phosphotransferase system and glucose transport, we show that glucose is a major substrate required for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium in HeLa cells. We also deleted genes encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of gluconeogenic substrates and the glyoxylate shunt and show that neither of these pathways were required for intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium within HeLa cells.

  5. The Mi-2-like Smed-CHD4 gene is required for stem cell differentiation in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Scimone, M. Lucila; Meisel, Joshua; Reddien, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater planarians are able to regenerate any missing part of their body and have extensive tissue turnover because of the action of dividing cells called neoblasts. Neoblasts provide an excellent system for in vivo study of adult stem cell biology. We identified the Smed-CHD4 gene, which is predicted to encode a chromatin-remodeling protein similar to CHD4/Mi-2 proteins, as required for planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis. Following inhibition of Smed-CHD4 with RNA interference (RNAi), neoblast numbers were initially normal, despite an inability of the animals to regenerate. However, the proliferative response of neoblasts to amputation or growth stimulation in Smed-CHD4(RNAi) animals was diminished. Smed-CHD4(RNAi) animals displayed a dramatic reduction in the numbers of certain neoblast progeny cells. Smed-CHD4 was required for the formation of these neoblast progeny cells. Together, these results indicate that Smed-CHD4 is required for neoblasts to produce progeny cells committed to differentiation in order to control tissue turnover and regeneration and suggest a crucial role for CHD4 proteins in stem cell differentiation. PMID:20223763

  6. Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Require LIF and Maintain Their Developmental Potential in Early Stage of Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, De; Guo, Yanjie; Li, Zhenzhen; Liu, Yajun; Gao, Xing; Gao, Yi; Cheng, Xiang; Hu, Junhe; Wang, Huayan

    2012-01-01

    Porcine induced pluripotent stem (piPS) cell lines have been generated recently by using a cocktail of defined transcription factors, however, the features of authentic piPS cells have not been agreed upon and most of published iPS clones did not meet the stringent requirements of pluripotency. Here, we report the generation of piPS cells from fibroblasts using retrovirus carrying four mouse transcription factors (mOct4, mSox2, mKlf4 and mc-Myc, 4F). Multiple LIF-dependent piPS cell lines were generated and these cells showed the morphology similar to mouse embryonic stem cells and other pluripotent stem cells. In addition to the routine characterization, piPS cells were injected into porcine pre-compacted embryos to generate chimera embryos and nuclear transfer (NT) embryos. The results showed that piPS cells retain the ability to integrate into inner and outer layers of the blastocysts, and support the NT embryos development to blastocysts. The generations of chimera embryos and NT embryos derived from piPS clones are a practical means to determine the quality of iPS cells ex vivo. PMID:23251622

  7. Endothelial cell apoptosis induced by bacteria-activated platelets requires caspase-8 and -9 and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kuckleburg, Christopher J; Tiwari, Raksha; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2008-02-01

    A common feature of severe sepsis is vascular inflammation and damage to the endothelium. Because platelets can be directly activated by bacteria and endotoxin, these cells may play an important role in determining the outcome of sepsis. For example, inhibiting platelet interactions with the endothelium has been shown to attenuate endothelial cell damage and improve survival during sepsis. Although not entirely understood, the interactions between bacteria-activated platelets and the endothelium may play a key role in the vascular pathology of bacterial sepsis. Haemophilus somnus is a bacterial pathogen that causes diffuse vascular inflammation and endothelial damage. In some cases H. somnus infection results in an acute and fatal form of vasculitis in the cerebral microvasculature known as thrombotic meningoencephalitis (TME). In this study, we have characterized the mechanisms involved in endothelial cell apoptosis induced by activated platelets. We observed that direct contact between H. somnus-activated platelets and endothelial cells induced significant levels of apoptosis; however, Fas receptor activation on bovine endothelial cells was not able to induce apoptosis unless protein synthesis was disrupted. Endothelial cell apoptosis by H. somnus-activated platelets required activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9, as inhibitors of either caspase inhibited apoptosis. Furthermore, activated platelets induced endothelial cell production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disrupting ROS activity in endothelial cells significantly inhibited apoptosis. These findings suggest that bacterial activation of platelets may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction observed during sepsis, specifically by inducing endothelial cell apoptosis.

  8. Na,K-ATPase β-Subunit Is Required for Epithelial Polarization, Suppression of Invasion, and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Quan, Karina; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Ball, William J.; Bander, Neil H.; Soler, Alejandro Peralta; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2001-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been implicated in maintaining the polarized phenotype of epithelial cells and suppression of invasiveness and motility of carcinoma cells. Na,K-ATPase, consisting of an α- and β-subunit, maintains the sodium gradient across the plasma membrane. A functional relationship between E-cadherin and Na,K-ATPase has not previously been described. We present evidence that the Na,K-ATPase plays a crucial role in E-cadherin–mediated development of epithelial polarity, and suppression of invasiveness and motility of carcinoma cells. Moloney sarcoma virus-transformed Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MSV-MDCK) have highly reduced levels of E-cadherin and β1-subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Forced expression of E-cadherin in MSV-MDCK cells did not reestablish epithelial polarity or inhibit the invasiveness and motility of these cells. In contrast, expression of E-cadherin and Na,K-ATPase β1-subunit induced epithelial polarization, including the formation of tight junctions and desmosomes, abolished invasiveness, and reduced cell motility in MSV-MDCK cells. Our results suggest that E-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion requires the Na,K-ATPase β-subunit's function to induce epithelial polarization and suppress invasiveness and motility of carcinoma cells. Involvement of the β1-subunit of Na,K-ATPase in the polarized phenotype of epithelial cells reveals a novel link between the structural organization and vectorial ion transport function of epithelial cells. PMID:11179415

  9. Different cryopreservation requirements in foetal versus adult skin cells from an endangered mammal, the Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    León-Quinto, Trinidad; Simón, Miguel A; Cadenas, Rafael; Martínez, Africa; Serna, Arturo

    2014-04-01

    Cryobanking somatic foetal cells acquire much relevance in endangered species for biodiversity conservation purposes. Such cells could be later used to reintroduce the lost genes into the breeding pool, by inducing pluripotency and/or nuclear transfer if necessary. Since requirements for preserving foetal cells are not always the same as for adult ones, we evaluated the cryosensitivity of foetal skin cells in comparison with adult ones from the critically endangered Iberian lynx. Responses to cryoinjury were analyzed in both thawed cell types by means of cell viability and functionality (by analyzing their membrane integrity, metabolic activity, glycosaminoglycan content and proliferative activity). Freezing media included the permeating cryoprotectant Me2SO, either alone or along with the non-permeating cryoprotectant sucrose at 0.1 or 0.2M. When Me2SO was the only cryoprotectant, survival rate fell in thawed foetal cells to 54±4% (against 89±6% for thawed adult ones) and both proliferative and metabolic activities remained significantly lower than values for thawed adult cells. However, the combination of sucrose (both 0.1 as 0.2) and Me2SO in foetal cells significantly increased their survival rates (to 71±4% and 73±5%, respectively), proliferative activities (partially at day 7 and completely at day 14 after thawing) and metabolic activities. Our findings clearly show a difference between foetal and adult cells concerning their cryopreservation sensitivity and requirements, as well as their recovery time after thawing. These results are of relevance for the cryopreservation of foetal and adult cells from the Iberian lynx and could be also useful for other mammals.

  10. Preoperative platelet transfusions and perioperative red blood cell requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Matthew A.; Jia, Qing; Clifford, Leanne; Wilson, Gregory; Brown, Michael J.; Hanson, Andrew C.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perioperative hemorrhage impacts patient outcomes and health care resource utilization, yet the risks of transfusion therapies are significant. In patients with preoperative thrombocytopenia, the effects of prophylactic preoperative platelet (PLT) transfusion on perioperative bleeding complications remain uncertain. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study of noncardiac surgical patients between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Propensity-adjusted analyses were used to evaluate associations between preoperative thrombocytopenia, preoperative PLT transfusion, and the outcomes of interest, with a primary outcome of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. RESULTS A total of 13,978 study participants were included; 860 (6.2%) had a PLT count of not more than 100 × 109/L with 71 (8.3%) receiving PLTs preoperatively. Administration of PLTs was associated with higher rates of perioperative RBC transfusion (66.2% vs. 49.1%, p 0.0065); however, in propensity-adjusted analysis there was no significant difference between groups (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval {95% CI}], 1.68 [0.95–2.99]; p =0.0764]. Patients receiving PLTs had higher rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR [95% CI], 1.95 [1.10–3.46]; p =0.0224) and longer hospital lengths of stay (estimate [95% bootstrap CI], 7.2 [0.8–13.9] days; p =0.0006) in propensity-adjusted analyses. CONCLUSION Preoperative PLT transfusion did not attenuate RBC requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery. Moreover, preoperative PLT transfusion was associated with increased ICU admission rates and hospital duration. These findings suggest that more conservative management of preoperative thrombocytopenia may be warranted. PMID:26559936

  11. ABCB5 is a limbal stem cell gene required for corneal development and repair

    PubMed Central

    Ksander, Bruce R.; Kolovou, Paraskevi E.; Wilson, Brian J.; Saab, Karim R.; Guo, Qin; Ma, Jie; McGuire, Sean P.; Gregory, Meredith S.; Vincent, William J. B.; Perez, Victor L.; Cruz-Guilloty, Fernando; Kao, Winston W. Y.; Call, Mindy K.; Tucker, Budd A.; Zhan, Qian; Murphy, George F.; Lathrop, Kira L.; Alt, Clemens; Mortensen, Luke J.; Lin, Charles P.; Zieske, James D.; Frank, Markus H.; Frank, Natasha Y.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration are sustained by limbal stem cells (LSCs)1–3, and LSC deficiency is a major cause of blindness worldwide4. Transplantation is often the only therapeutic option available to patients with LSC deficiency. However, while transplant success depends foremost on LSC frequency within grafts5, a gene allowing for prospective LSC enrichment has not been identified so far5. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 5 (ABCB5)6,7 marks LSCs and is required for LSC maintenance, corneal development and repair. Furthermore, we demonstrate that prospectively isolated human or murine ABCB5-positive LSCs possess the exclusive capacity to fully restore the cornea upon grafting to LSC-deficient mice in xenogeneic or syngeneic transplantation models. ABCB5 is preferentially expressed on label-retaining LSCs2 in mice and p63α-positive LSCs8 in humans. Consistent with these findings, ABCB5-positive LSC frequency is reduced in LSC-deficient patients. Abcb5 loss of function in Abcb5 knockout mice causes depletion of quiescent LSCs due to enhanced proliferation and apoptosis, and results in defective corneal differentiation and wound healing. Our results from gene knockout studies, LSC tracing and transplantation models, as well as phenotypic and functional analyses of human biopsy specimens, provide converging lines of evidence that ABCB5 identifies mammalian LSCs. Identification and prospective isolation of molecularly defined LSCs with essential functions in corneal development and repair has important implications for the treatment of corneal disease, particularly corneal blindness due to LSC deficiency. PMID:25030174

  12. Runx2 Expression in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Required for Arterial Medial Calcification in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-En; Chen, Theodore; Leaf, Elizabeth M; Speer, Mei Y; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2015-07-01

    Arterial medial calcification (AMC) is a hallmark of aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) transition to an osteogenic phenotype is a common feature of AMC, and is preceded by expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a master regulator of bone development. Whether SMC-specific Runx2 expression is required for osteogenic phenotype change and AMC remains unknown. We therefore created an improved targeting construct to generate mice with floxed Runx2 alleles (Runx2(f/f)) that do not produce truncated Runx2 proteins after Cre recombination, thereby preventing potential off-target effects. SMC-specific deletion using SM22-recombinase transgenic allele mice (Runx2(ΔSM)) led to viable mice with normal bone and arterial morphology. After vitamin D overload, arterial SMCs in Runx2(f/f) mice expressed Runx2, underwent osteogenic phenotype change, and developed severe AMC. In contrast, vitamin D-treated Runx2(ΔSM) mice had no Runx2 in blood vessels, maintained SMC phenotype, and did not develop AMC. Runx2 deletion did not affect serum calcium, phosphate, fibroblast growth factor-23, or alkaline phosphatase levels. In vitro, Runx2(f/f) SMCs calcified to a much greater extent than those derived from Runx2(ΔSM) mice. These data indicate a critical role of Runx2 in SMC osteogenic phenotype change and mineral deposition in a mouse model of AMC, suggesting that Runx2 and downstream osteogenic pathways in SMCs may be useful therapeutic targets for treating or preventing AMC in high-risk patients.

  13. Runx2 Expression in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Required for Arterial Medial Calcification in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mu-En; Chen, Theodore; Leaf, Elizabeth M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial medial calcification (AMC) is a hallmark of aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) transition to an osteogenic phenotype is a common feature of AMC, and is preceded by expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a master regulator of bone development. Whether SMC-specific Runx2 expression is required for osteogenic phenotype change and AMC remains unknown. We therefore created an improved targeting construct to generate mice with floxed Runx2 alleles (Runx2f/f) that do not produce truncated Runx2 proteins after Cre recombination, thereby preventing potential off-target effects. SMC-specific deletion using SM22–recombinase transgenic allele mice (Runx2ΔSM) led to viable mice with normal bone and arterial morphology. After vitamin D overload, arterial SMCs in Runx2f/f mice expressed Runx2, underwent osteogenic phenotype change, and developed severe AMC. In contrast, vitamin D–treated Runx2ΔSM mice had no Runx2 in blood vessels, maintained SMC phenotype, and did not develop AMC. Runx2 deletion did not affect serum calcium, phosphate, fibroblast growth factor-23, or alkaline phosphatase levels. In vitro, Runx2f/f SMCs calcified to a much greater extent than those derived from Runx2ΔSM mice. These data indicate a critical role of Runx2 in SMC osteogenic phenotype change and mineral deposition in a mouse model of AMC, suggesting that Runx2 and downstream osteogenic pathways in SMCs may be useful therapeutic targets for treating or preventing AMC in high-risk patients. PMID:25987250

  14. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  15. Claudin-4 is required for vasculogenic mimicry formation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong-Feng; Liu, An-Heng; An, Dai-Zhi; Sun, Ru-Bao; Shi, Yun; Shi, Yun-Xiang; Shi, Miao; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Li-Li; Feng, Qiong; Pan, Gui-Lan; Wang, Qiang

    2015-05-10

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) refers to the unique capability of aggressive tumor cells to mimic the pattern of embryonic vasculogenic networks. Claudins are aberrantly expressed in aggressive breast cancer. However, the relationship between claudins and VM formation is not clear. We examined VM in two human breast cancer cell lines with different aggressive capabilities (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells) and one human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVEC). Both HUVEC and MDA-MB-231 cells formed vascular channels in Matrigel cultures, while MCF-7 cells did not. Western blot analysis revealed a possible correlation between claudin-4 and -6 expression in breast cancer cell lines and tumor aggressiveness, with protein levels correlating with the ability to form vascular channels. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells with claudin-4 monoclonal antibodies completely inhibited the ability of cells to form vascular channels. Moreover, knockdown of claudin-4 by short hairpin RNA completely inhibited tubule formation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of claudin-4 in MCF-7 cells induced formation of vascular channels. Immunocytochemistry revealed that membranous claudin-4 protein was significantly associated with vascular channel formation. Collectively, these results indicate that claudin-4 may play a critical role in VM in human breast cancer cells, opening new opportunities to improve aggressive breast cancer therapy. PMID:25871476

  16. Differential requirement of RasGRP1 for γδ T cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ci, Xinxin; Gorentla, Balachandra; Sullivan, Sarah A.; Stone, James C.; Zhang, Weiguo; Pereira, Pablo; Lu, Jianxin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    γδ T cells (γδT) belong to a distinct T cell lineage that performs immune functions different from αβ T cells (αβT). Previous studies have established that Erk1/2 MAPKs are critical for positive selection of αβT cells. Additional evidence also suggests that elevated Erk1/2 activity promotes γδT cell generation. RasGRP1, a guanine nucleotide releasing factor for Ras, plays an important role in positive selection of αβT cells by activating the Ras-Erk1/2 pathway. In this report, we demonstrate that RasGRP1 is critical for TCR-induced Erk1/2 activation in γδT cells but exerts different roles for γδT cell generation and activation. Deficiency of RasGRP1 does not obviously affect γδT cell numbers in the thymus but leads to increased γδT cells, particularly CD4−CD8+ γδT cells, in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The virtually unhindered γδT cell development in the RasGRP1−/− thymus proved to be cell intrinsic, while the increase in CD8+ γδT cells is caused by non-cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Our data provides genetic evidence that decreased Erk1/2 activation in the absence of RasGRP1 is compatible for γδT cell generation. Although RasGRP1 is dispensable for γδT cell generation, RasGRP1-deficient γδT cells are defective in proliferation following TCR stimulation. Additionally, RasGRP1-deficient γδT cells are impaired to produce IL-17 but not IFNγ. Together, these observations have revealed that RasGRP1 plays differential roles for γδ and αβ T cell development but is critical for γδT cell proliferation and production of IL-17. PMID:22623331

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Attachment to HeLa CD4 Cells Is CD4 Independent and gp120 Dependent and Requires Cell Surface Heparans

    PubMed Central

    Mondor, Isabelle; Ugolini, Sophie; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    1998-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Hx10) virions to two different cell lines was analyzed by using a novel assay based on the detection, by anti-HLA-DR-specific antibodies, of HLA-DR+ virus binding to HLA-DR− cells. Virion attachment to the CD4+-T-cell line A3.01 was highly CD4 dependent in that it was potently inhibited by CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), and little virus binding to the CD4− sister A2.01 line was observed. By contrast, virion binding to HeLa cells expressing moderate or high levels of CD4 was equivalent to, or lower than, binding to wild-type CD4− HeLa cells. Moreover, several CD4 MAbs did not reduce, but enhanced, HIV-1 attachment to HeLa-CD4 cells. CD4 was required for infection of HeLa cells, however, demonstrating a postattachment role for this receptor. MAbs specific for the V2 and V3 loops and the CD4i epitope of gp120 strongly inhibited virion binding to HeLa-CD4 cells, whereas MAbs specific for the CD4bs and the 2G12 epitopes enhanced attachment. Despite this, all gp120- and gp41-specific MAbs tested neutralized infectivity on HeLa-CD4 cells. HIV-1 attachment to HeLa cells was only partially inhibited by MAbs specific for adhesion molecules present on the virus or target cells but was completely blocked by polyanions such as heparin, dextran sulfate, and pentosan sulfate. Treatment of HeLa-CD4 cells with heparinases completely eliminated HIV attachment and infection, strongly implicating cell surface heparans in the attachment process. CD4 dependence for HIV-1 attachment to target cells is thus highly cell line specific and may be replaced by other ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:9557643

  18. A paracrine loop between tumor cells and macrophages is required for tumor cell migration in mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Wang, Weigang; Lin, Elaine Y; Wang, Yarong; Pixley, Fiona; Stanley, E Richard; Graf, Thomas; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2004-10-01

    Invasion of tumor cells into the surrounding connective tissue and blood vessels is a key step in the metastatic spread of breast tumors. Although the presence of macrophages in primary tumors is associated with increased metastatic potential, the mechanistic basis for this observation is unknown. Using a chemotaxis-based in vivo invasion assay and multiphoton-based intravital imaging, we show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells facilitates the migration of carcinoma cells in the primary tumor. Gradients of either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulate collection into microneedles of tumor cells and macrophages even though tumor cells express only EGF receptor and macrophages express only CSF-1 receptor. Intravital imaging shows that macrophages and tumor cells migrate toward microneedles containing either EGF or CSF-1. Inhibition of either CSF-1- or EGF-stimulated signaling reduces the migration of both cell types. This work provides the first direct evidence for a synergistic interaction between macrophages and tumor cells during cell migration in vivo and indicates a mechanism for how macrophages may contribute to metastasis.

  19. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  20. iNKT Cell Emigration out of the Lung Vasculature Requires Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Neupane, Arpan S; Wang, Jing; Krummel, Matthew F; Kubes, Paul

    2016-09-20

    iNKT cells are a subset of innate T cells that recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules and protect against bacterial infections, including S. pneumoniae. Using lung intravital imaging, we examined the behavior and mechanism of pulmonary iNKT cell activation in response to the specific iNKT cell ligand α-galactosylceramide or S. pneumoniae infection. In untreated mice, the major fraction of iNKT cells resided in the vasculature, but a small critical population resided in the extravascular space in proximity to monocyte-derived DCs. Administration of either α-GalCer or S. pneumoniae induced CD1d-dependent rapid recruitment of neutrophils out of the vasculature. The neutrophils guided iNKT cells from the lung vasculature via CCL17. Depletion of monocyte-derived DCs abrogated both the neutrophil and subsequent iNKT cell extravasation. Moreover, impairing iNKT cell recruitment by blocking CCL17 increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae infection, suggesting a critical role for the influx of iNKT cells in host defense.

  1. iNKT Cell Emigration out of the Lung Vasculature Requires Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Neupane, Arpan S; Wang, Jing; Krummel, Matthew F; Kubes, Paul

    2016-09-20

    iNKT cells are a subset of innate T cells that recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules and protect against bacterial infections, including S. pneumoniae. Using lung intravital imaging, we examined the behavior and mechanism of pulmonary iNKT cell activation in response to the specific iNKT cell ligand α-galactosylceramide or S. pneumoniae infection. In untreated mice, the major fraction of iNKT cells resided in the vasculature, but a small critical population resided in the extravascular space in proximity to monocyte-derived DCs. Administration of either α-GalCer or S. pneumoniae induced CD1d-dependent rapid recruitment of neutrophils out of the vasculature. The neutrophils guided iNKT cells from the lung vasculature via CCL17. Depletion of monocyte-derived DCs abrogated both the neutrophil and subsequent iNKT cell extravasation. Moreover, impairing iNKT cell recruitment by blocking CCL17 increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae infection, suggesting a critical role for the influx of iNKT cells in host defense. PMID:27653688

  2. Cell cycle requirements for transduction by foamy virus vectors compared to those of oncovirus and lentivirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Trobridge, Grant; Russell, David W

    2004-03-01

    Retroviral vectors based on foamy viruses (FV) are efficient gene delivery vehicles for therapeutic and research applications. While previous studies have shown that FV vectors transduce quiescent cell cultures more efficiently than oncoviral vectors, their specific cell cycle requirements have not been determined. Here we compare the transduction frequencies of FV vectors with those of onco- and lentiviral vectors in nondividing and dividing normal human fibroblasts by several methods. FV vectors transduced serum-deprived fibroblast cultures more efficiently than oncoretroviral vectors and at rates comparable to those of lentiviral vectors. However, in these cultures FV vectors only transduced a subpopulation of proliferating cells, as determined by bromodeoxyuridine staining for DNA synthesis. In contrast to lentiviral vectors, FV vectors were unable to transduce human fibroblasts arrested by aphidicolin (G(1)/S phase) or gamma-irradiation (G(2) phase), and a partial cell cycle that included mitosis but not DNA synthesis was required. We could not determine if mitosis facilitated nuclear entry of FV vectors, since cell-free vector preparations contained long terminal repeat circles, precluding their use as nuclear markers. In contrast to oncoviral vectors, both FV and lentiviral vectors efficiently transduced G(0) fibroblasts that were later stimulated to divide. In the case of FV vectors, this was due to the persistence of a stable transduction intermediate in quiescent cells. Our findings support the use of FV vectors as a safe and effective alternative to lentiviral vectors for ex vivo transduction of stem cells that are quiescent during culture but divide following transplantation.

  3. Sequential phosphorylation of SLP-76 at tyrosine 173 is required for activation of T and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Meirav; Bogin, Yaron; Beach, Dvora; Oellerich, Thomas; Lehne, Johanna; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Okumura, Mariko; Starosvetsky, Elina; Kosoff, Rachelle; Libman, Evgeny; Koretzky, Gary; Kambayashi, Taku; Urlaub, Henning; Wienands, Jürgen; Chernoff, Jonathan; Yablonski, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Cooperatively assembled signalling complexes, nucleated by adaptor proteins, integrate information from surface receptors to determine cellular outcomes. In T and mast cells, antigen receptor signalling is nucleated by three adaptors: SLP-76, Gads and LAT. Three well-characterized SLP-76 tyrosine phosphorylation sites recruit key components, including a Tec-family tyrosine kinase, Itk. We identified a fourth, evolutionarily conserved SLP-76 phosphorylation site, Y173, which was phosphorylated upon T-cell receptor stimulation in primary murine and Jurkat T cells. Y173 was required for antigen receptor-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) in both T and mast cells, and for consequent downstream events, including activation of the IL-2 promoter in T cells, and degranulation and IL-6 production in mast cells. In intact cells, Y173 phosphorylation depended on three, ZAP-70-targeted tyrosines at the N-terminus of SLP-76 that recruit and activate Itk, a kinase that selectively phosphorylated Y173 in vitro. These data suggest a sequential mechanism whereby ZAP-70-dependent priming of SLP-76 at three N-terminal sites triggers reciprocal regulatory interactions between Itk and SLP-76, which are ultimately required to couple active Itk to its substrate, PLC-γ1. PMID:21725281

  4. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  5. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M; Tripathi, Rati M; Layer, Justin H; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P

    2015-08-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis.

  6. Insulin-secreting β cells require a post-genomic concept.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2016-05-25

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β cells are essential in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis accomplished by highly specialized transcription of insulin gene, of which occupies up to 40% their transcriptome. Deficiency of these cells causes diabetes mellitus, a global public health problem. Although tremendous endeavors have been made to generate insulin-secreting cells from human pluripotent stem cells (i.e., primitive cells capable of giving rise to all cell types in the body), a regenerative therapy to diabetes has not yet been established. Furthermore, the nomenclature of β cells has become inconsistent, confusing and controversial due to the lack of standardized positive controls of developmental stage-matched in vivo cells. In order to minimize this negative impact and facilitate critical research in this field, a post-genomic concept of pancreatic β cells might be helpful. In this review article, we will briefly describe how β cells were discovered and islet lineage is developed that may help understand the cause of nomenclatural controversy, suggest a post-genomic definition and finally provide a conclusive remark on future research of this pivotal cell. PMID:27226815

  7. Insulin-secreting β cells require a post-genomic concept

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β cells are essential in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis accomplished by highly specialized transcription of insulin gene, of which occupies up to 40% their transcriptome. Deficiency of these cells causes diabetes mellitus, a global public health problem. Although tremendous endeavors have been made to generate insulin-secreting cells from human pluripotent stem cells (i.e., primitive cells capable of giving rise to all cell types in the body), a regenerative therapy to diabetes has not yet been established. Furthermore, the nomenclature of β cells has become inconsistent, confusing and controversial due to the lack of standardized positive controls of developmental stage-matched in vivo cells. In order to minimize this negative impact and facilitate critical research in this field, a post-genomic concept of pancreatic β cells might be helpful. In this review article, we will briefly describe how β cells were discovered and islet lineage is developed that may help understand the cause of nomenclatural controversy, suggest a post-genomic definition and finally provide a conclusive remark on future research of this pivotal cell. PMID:27226815

  8. T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; West, Erin E; Spolski, Rosanne; Robertson, Avril A B; Klos, Andreas; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Dutow, Pavel; Woodruff, Trent M; Yu, Zu Xi; O'Neill, Luke A; Coll, Rebecca C; Sher, Alan; Leonard, Warren J; Köhl, Jörg; Monk, Pete; Cooper, Matthew A; Arno, Matthew; Afzali, Behdad; Lachmann, Helen J; Cope, Andrew P; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-06-17

    The NLRP3 inflammasome controls interleukin-1β maturation in antigen-presenting cells, but a direct role for NLRP3 in human adaptive immune cells has not been described. We found that the NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in human CD4(+) T cells and initiates caspase-1-dependent interleukin-1β secretion, thereby promoting interferon-γ production and T helper 1 (T(H)1) differentiation in an autocrine fashion. NLRP3 assembly requires intracellular C5 activation and stimulation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1), which is negatively regulated by surface-expressed C5aR2. Aberrant NLRP3 activity in T cells affects inflammatory responses in human autoinflammatory disease and in mouse models of inflammation and infection. Our results demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome activity is not confined to "innate immune cells" but is an integral component of normal adaptive T(H)1 responses. PMID:27313051

  9. Regulatory requirements in the good manufacturing practice production of an epithelial cell graft for ocular surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sheth-Shah, Radhika; Vernon, Amanda J; Seetharaman, Shankar; Neale, Michael H; Daniels, Julie T

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, stem cell therapy has been increasingly employed for the treatment of various diseases. Subsequently, there has been a great interest in the manufacture of stem cells under good manufacturing practice, which is required by law for their use in humans. The cells for sight Stem Cell Therapy Research Unit, based at UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, delivers somatic cell-based and tissue-engineered therapies to patients suffering from blinding eye diseases at Moorfields Eye Hospital (London, UK). The following article is based on our experience in the conception, design, construction, validation and manufacturing within a good manufacturing practice manufacturing facility based in the UK. As such the regulations can be extrapolated to the 28 members stated within the EU. However, the principles may have a broad relevance outside the EU.

  10. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  11. Endodermal cell–cell contact is required for the spatial control of Casparian band development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Martinka, Michal; Dolan, Liam; Pernas, Monica; Abe, Jun; Lux, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Apoplasmic barriers in plants fulfil important roles such as the control of apoplasmic movement of substances and the protection against invasion of pathogens. The aim of this study was to describe the development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) in endodermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana primary root and during lateral root initiation. Methods Modifications of the endodermal cell walls in roots of wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler) and mutants with defective endodermal development – scarecrow-3 (scr-3) and shortroot (shr) – of A. thaliana plants were characterized by light, fluorescent, confocal laser scanning, transmission and cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Key Results In wild-type plant roots Casparian bands initiate at approx. 1600 µm from the root cap junction and suberin lamellae first appear on the inner primary cell walls at approx. 7000–8000 µm from the root apex in the region of developing lateral root primordia. When a single cell replaces a pair of endodermal and cortical cells in the scr-3 mutant, Casparian band-like material is deposited ectopically at the junction between this ‘cortical’ cell and adjacent pericycle cells. Shr mutant roots with an undeveloped endodermis deposit Casparian band-like material in patches in the middle lamellae of cells of the vascular cylinder. Endodermal cells in the vicinity of developing lateral root primordia develop suberin lamellae earlier, and these are thicker, compared wih the neighbouring endodermal cells. Protruding primordia are protected by an endodermal pocket covered by suberin lamellae. Conclusions The data suggest that endodermal cell–cell contact is required for the spatial control of Casparian band development. Additionally, the endodermal cells form a collet (collar) of short cells covered by a thick suberin layer at the base of lateral root, which may serve as a barrier constituting a ‘safety zone’ protecting the vascular cylinder

  12. NOTCH3 expression is induced in mural cells through an autoregulatory loop that requires endothelial-expressed JAGGED1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Kennard, Simone; Lilly, Brenda

    2009-02-27

    Endothelial cells and mural cells (smooth muscle cells, pericytes, or fibroblasts) are known to communicate with one another. Their interactions not only serve to support fully functional blood vessels but also can regulate vessel assembly and differentiation or maturation. In an effort to better understand the molecular components of this heterotypic interaction, we used a 3D model of angiogenesis and screened for genes, which were modulated by coculturing of these 2 different cell types. In doing so, we discovered that NOTCH3 is one gene whose expression is robustly induced in mural cells by coculturing with endothelial cells. Knockdown by small interfering RNA revealed that NOTCH3 is necessary for endothelial-dependent mural cell differentiation, whereas overexpression of NOTCH3 is sufficient to promote smooth muscle gene expression. Moreover, NOTCH3 contributes to the proangiogenic abilities of mural cells cocultured with endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that the expression of NOTCH3 is dependent on Notch signaling, because the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT blocked its upregulation. Furthermore, in mural cells, a dominant-negative Mastermind-like1 construct inhibited NOTCH3 expression, and endothelial-expressed JAGGED1 was required for its induction. Additionally, we demonstrated that NOTCH3 could promote its own expression and that of JAGGED1 in mural cells. Taken together, these data provide a mechanism by which endothelial cells induce the differentiation of mural cells through activation and induction of NOTCH3. These findings also suggest that NOTCH3 has the capacity to maintain a differentiated phenotype through a positive-feedback loop that includes both autoregulation and JAGGED1 expression.

  13. Nuclear removal during terminal lens fiber cell differentiation requires CDK1 activity: appropriating mitosis-related nuclear disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, Blake R.; Shang, Fu; Chang, Min-Lee; Clement, Tracy M.; Eddy, Edward M.; Wagner, Brad D.; Nakahara, Masaki; Nagata, Shigekazu; Robinson, Michael L.; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelial cells and early lens fiber cells contain the typical complement of intracellular organelles. However, as lens fiber cells mature they must destroy their organelles, including nuclei, in a process that has remained enigmatic for over a century, but which is crucial for the formation of the organelle-free zone in the center of the lens that assures clarity and function to transmit light. Nuclear degradation in lens fiber cells requires the nuclease DNase IIβ (DLAD) but the mechanism by which DLAD gains access to nuclear DNA remains unknown. In eukaryotic cells, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), in combination with either activator cyclins A or B, stimulates mitotic entry, in part, by phosphorylating the nuclear lamin proteins leading to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina and subsequent nuclear envelope breakdown. Although most post-mitotic cells lack CDK1 and cyclins, lens fiber cells maintain these proteins. Here, we show that loss of CDK1 from the lens inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear lamins A and C, prevented the entry of DLAD into the nucleus, and resulted in abnormal retention of nuclei. In the presence of CDK1, a single focus of the phosphonuclear mitotic apparatus is observed, but it is not focused in CDK1-deficient lenses. CDK1 deficiency inhibited mitosis, but did not prevent DNA replication, resulting in an overall reduction of lens epithelial cells, with the remaining cells possessing an abnormally large nucleus. These observations suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylations required for the initiation of nuclear membrane disassembly during mitosis are adapted for removal of nuclei during fiber cell differentiation. PMID:25139855

  14. T cells are required for the production of blister-inducing autoantibodies in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Sitaru, Ana Gabriela; Sesarman, Alina; Mihai, Sidonia; Chiriac, Mircea T; Zillikens, Detlef; Hultman, Per; Solbach, Werner; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-02-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a prototypical organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen of the dermal-epidermal junction. Although mechanisms of autoantibody-induced blister formation were extensively characterized, the initiation of autoantibody production in autoimmune blistering diseases is still poorly defined. In the current study, we addressed the role of T cells for the production of blister-inducing autoantibodies in mice immunized with type VII collagen. To detect autoreactive type VII collagen-specific T cells, lymph node cells from immunized SJL mice were stimulated in vitro with recombinant Ag, and their proliferation was measured by radioactive thymidine incorporation and flow cytometry analysis of CFSE-labeled cells. Interestingly, using synthetic peptides of the immunogen, partly different T and B cell epitopes in mice immunized with type VII collagen were demonstrated. In contrast to wild-type mice, immunization with type VII collagen of SJL athymic nude mice lacking T cells did not induce an autoimmune response and blistering phenotype. Importantly, SJL nude mice repleted with T cells from immunized wild-type mice showed a robust and durable autoantibody production resulting in subepidermal blistering disease in the recipients. Our present results demonstrate that T cells are required for the initiation of autoimmunity against type VII collagen in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and provide a basis for developing T cell-directed immunomodulatory strategies for this and related autoimmune diseases.

  15. The Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase ZAR1 Is Required for Zygote Asymmetric Division and Its Daughter Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Ying; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Jia, Peng-Fei; Tang, Jun; Li, Hong-Ju; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2016-03-01

    Asymmetric division of zygote is critical for pattern formation during early embryogenesis in plants and animals. It requires integration of the intrinsic and extrinsic cues prior to and/or after fertilization. How these cues are translated into developmental signals is poorly understood. Here through genetic screen for mutations affecting early embryogenesis, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zygotic arrest 1 (zar1), in which zygote asymmetric division and the cell fate of its daughter cells were impaired. ZAR1 encodes a member of the RLK/Pelle kinase family. We demonstrated that ZAR1 physically interacts with Calmodulin and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ, and ZAR1 kinase is activated by their binding as well. ZAR1 is specifically expressed micropylarly in the embryo sac at eight-nucleate stage and then in central cell, egg cell and synergids in the mature embryo sac. After fertilization, ZAR1 is accumulated in zygote and endosperm. The disruption of ZAR1 and AGB1 results in short basal cell and an apical cell with basal cell fate. These data suggest that ZAR1 functions as a membrane integrator for extrinsic cues, Ca2+ signal and G protein signaling to regulate the division of zygote and the cell fate of its daughter cells in Arabidopsis. PMID:27014878

  16. NK cell development requires Tsc1-dependent negative regulation of IL-15-triggered mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meixiang; Chen, Shasha; Du, Juan; He, Junming; Wang, Yuande; Li, Zehua; Liu, Guangao; Peng, Wanwen; Zeng, Xiaokang; Li, Dan; Xu, Panglian; Guo, Wei; Chang, Zai; Wang, Song; Tian, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of metabolic signalling by IL-15 is required for natural killer (NK) cell development. Here we show that Tsc1, a repressor of mTOR, is dispensable for the terminal maturation, survival and function of NK cells but is critical to restrict exhaustive proliferation of immature NK cells and activation downstream of IL-15 during NK cell development. Tsc1 is expressed in immature NK cells and is upregulated by IL-15. Haematopoietic-specific deletion of Tsc1 causes a marked decrease in the number of NK cells and compromises rejection of 'missing-self' haematopoietic tumours and allogeneic bone marrow. The residual Tsc1-null NK cells display activated, pro-apoptotic phenotype and elevated mTORC1 activity. Deletion of Raptor, a component of mTORC1, largely reverses these defects. Tsc1-deficient NK cells express increased levels of T-bet and downregulate Eomes and CD122, a subunit of IL-15 receptor. These results reveal a role for Tsc1-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 activation during immature NK cell development. PMID:27601261

  17. The Proteomic Landscape of Human Ex Vivo Regulatory and Conventional T Cells Reveals Specific Metabolic Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Procaccini, Claudio; Carbone, Fortunata; Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Faicchia, Deriggio; Marone, Gianni; Tramontano, Donatella; Corona, Marco; Alviggi, Carlo; Porcellini, Antonio; La Cava, Antonio; Mauri, Pierluigi; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+CD127− Treg and CD4+CD25−Foxp3− Tconv cell functions are governed by their metabolic requirements. Here we report a comprehensive comparative analysis between ex vivo human Treg and Tconv cells that comprises analyses of the proteomic networks in subcellular compartments. We identified a dominant proteomic signature at the metabolic level that primarily impacted the highly-tuned balance between glucose and fatty-acid oxidation in the two cell types. Ex vivo Treg cells were highly glycolytic while Tconv cells used predominantly fatty-acid oxidation (FAO). When cultured in vitro, Treg cells engaged both glycolysis and FAO to proliferate, while Tconv cell proliferation mainly relied on glucose metabolism. Our unbiased proteomic analysis provides a molecular picture of the impact of metabolism on ex vivo human Treg versus Tconv cell functions that might be relevant for therapeutic manipulations of these cells. PMID:26885861

  18. NK cell development requires Tsc1-dependent negative regulation of IL-15-triggered mTORC1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meixiang; Chen, Shasha; Du, Juan; He, Junming; Wang, Yuande; Li, Zehua; Liu, Guangao; Peng, Wanwen; Zeng, Xiaokang; Li, Dan; Xu, Panglian; Guo, Wei; Chang, Zai; Wang, Song; Tian, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of metabolic signalling by IL-15 is required for natural killer (NK) cell development. Here we show that Tsc1, a repressor of mTOR, is dispensable for the terminal maturation, survival and function of NK cells but is critical to restrict exhaustive proliferation of immature NK cells and activation downstream of IL-15 during NK cell<