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Sample records for hts squid array

  1. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  2. QRNT: A primary thermometer based on an HTS SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, John; Hao, Ling; Reed, Richard

    1997-08-01

    We propose a novel form of cryogenic primary thermometer based on flux quantisation in a HTS superconducting ring, interrupted by a Josephson junction which we call the Quantum Roulette Noise Thermometer (QRNT). Unlike other superconductivity-based noise thermometers this device is essentially dissipationless, requires no input or output connections and may be remotely interrogated. The QRNT has the potential to provide high accuracy with short measuring times.

  3. Development of Non-destructive Evaluation System Using an HTS-SQUID Gradiometer with an External Pickup Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, J.; Kawauchi, S.; Ishikawa, F.; Tanabe, K.

    We are developing a new eddy-current non-destructive evaluation (NDE) system using a high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (HTS-SQUID) gradiometer with the aim of applying it to power plants. Electric power facilities such as ducts and vessels are generally untransportable because of their size, and thus it is difficult to apply a conventional SQUID NDE system. The new NDE system employs an external Cu pickup coil which is supposed to be driven flexibly by a robot arm at room temperature and an HTS-SQUID chip which is placed in a magnetically shielded vessel. In the present research, we investigated the performance of an HTS-SQUID sensor connected with external pickup coils before mounting them to a robot arm. By varying the Cu coil conditions such as their sizes, the number of turns, and the diameter of wire, we qualitatively evaluated the frequency dependence of the effective area and the cutoff frequency.

  4. A HTS dc SQUID-NMR: fabrication of the SQUID and application to low-field NMR for fruit quality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Linus U.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have made the detection of low-field (LF) and ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) a reality. The latter has been proven to be a potential tool for non-destructive quality testing of horticultural products, amongst many other applications. High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) dc SQUIDS are likely to allow for the development of not only low-cost NMR systems but also prototypes that are mobile and easily maintainable. A HTS dc SQUID was manufactured on an YBCO thin film, using a novel laser based lithography method. The lithography was implemented by a new laser system developed in-house, as a model of low-cost lithography systems. The junctions of the dc SQUID were tested and displayed normal I-V characteristics in the acceptable range for the application. In order to determine the viability of low-field NMR for non-destructive quality measurement of horticultural products, a commercial HTS dc SQUID-NMR system was used to measure quality parameters of banana during ripening. The trend of color change and sugar increase of the banana during ripening were the most highly correlated attributes to the SQUID-NMR measured parameter, average T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time). Further studies were done, that involved processing of the NMR signal into relaxation time resolved spectra. A spectral signature of banana was obtained, where each peak is a T1 value corresponding to a proton pool, and is reported here. These results will potentially lead to deeper understanding of the quality of the samples under study.

  5. Towards large scale HTS Josephson detector arrays for THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Hellicar, A. D.; Leslie, K. E.; Nikolic, N.; Hanham, S. M.; Macfarlane, J. C.; Foley, C. P.

    2013-11-01

    We present the design and implementation of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Josephson junction detector array for terahertz (THz) imaging. The array device is made of ten YBa2Cu3Ox-7 (YBCO) step-edge junctions coupled to gold thin-film ring-slot antennas on a MgO substrate. The design and characterization of the detector array in response to a 0.6 THz signal are presented. The development of multi-channel biasing and read-out electronics and the system integration with a commercial cryocooler are also described.

  6. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth.

  7. Weld quality evaluation using a high temperature SQUID array

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. D.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N.; Lamb, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data for evaluating weld quality using high temperature SQUIDS. The SQUIDS are integrated into an instrument known as the SQUID Array Microscope, or SAMi. The array consists of ll SQUIDs evenly distributed over an 8.25 mm baseline. Welds are detected using SAMi by using an on board coil to induce eddy currents in a conducting sample and measuring the resulting magnetic fields. The concept is that the induced magnetic fields will differ in parts of varying weld quality. The data presented here was collected from three stainless steel parts using SAMi. Each part was either solid, included a good weld, or included a bad weld. The induced magnetic field's magnitude and phase relative to the induction signal were measured. For each sample considered, both the magnitude and phase data were measurably different than the other two samples. These results indicate that it is possible to use SAMi to evaluate weld quality.

  8. nSQUID arrays as conveyers of quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Qiang; Averin, D. V.

    2014-12-15

    We have considered the quantum dynamics of an array of nSQUIDs—two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms. Effective dual-rail structure of the array creates additional internal degree of freedom for the fluxons in the array, which can be used to encode and transport quantum information. Physically, this degree of freedom is represented by electromagnetic excitations localized on the fluxon. We have calculated the spatial profile and frequency spectrum of these excitations. Their dynamics can be reduced to two quantum states, so that each fluxon moving through the array carries with it a qubit of information. Coherence properties of such a propagating qubit in the nSQUID array are characterized by the dynamic suppression of the low-frequency decoherence due to the motion-induced spreading of the noise spectral density to a larger frequency interval.

  9. Development of a Two-Dimensional Micro-SQUID Array for Investigation of Magnetization Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Tomoya; Nago, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Kono, Kimitoshi; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for investigation of fine spatial distribution of magnetization in superconducting Sr2RuO4. Micrometer-sized SQUIDs based on homogeneously formed Al/AlOx/Al tunnel-type Josephson junctions were fabricated using shadow evaporation technique. Unnecessary electrodes formed by the shadow evaporation were removed by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, in order to realize a dense array of SQUIDs. We measured the magnetic modulation of the maximum Josephson current of each SQUID in the array and evaluated the interaction among the SQUIDs.

  10. High-Resolution Displacement Sensor Using a SQUID Array Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Barmatz, M.; Paik, Ho Jung

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in the measurement of displacement has profound implications for both exploration technologies and fundamental physics. For planetary exploration, the new SQUID-based capacitive displacement sensor will enable a more sensitive gravity gradiometer for mapping the interior of planets and moons. A new concept of a superfluid clock to be reported by Penanen and Chui at this workshop is also based on a high-resolution displacement sensor. Examples of high-impact physics projects that can benefit from a better displacement sensor are: detection of gravitational waves, test of the equivalence principle, search for the postulated "axion" particle, and test of the inverse square law of gravity. We describe the concept of a new displacement sensor that makes use of a recent development in the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. The SQUID array amplifier, invented by Welty and Martinis (IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconductivity 3, 2605, 1993), has about the same noise as a conventional SQUID; however, it can work at a much higher frequency of up to 5 MHz. We explain how the higher bandwidth can be translated into higher resolution using a bridge-balancing scheme that can simultaneously balance out both the carrier signal at the bridge output and the electrostatic force acting on the test mass.

  11. Characterization of large two-dimensional YBa2Cu3O7-δ SQUID arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, B. J.; Berggren, S. A. E.; O'Brien, M. C.; deAndrade, M. C.; Higa, B. A.; Leese de Escobar, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    Large two-dimensional SQUID arrays were made using the step-edge Josephson junction process. The performance of the arrays is analyzed with respect to determining the conditions under which the optimal performance is achieved. We find that optimization of the field-voltage transfer function V B is reached at a specific temperature and device current bias point, and arrive at an empirical expression describing the dependence of V B on the critical current and dynamic resistance of the SQUID array and as a function of temperature. The empirical expression for V B of the SQUID arrays is similar to that given by well known theoretical models for a single SQUID.

  12. Multichannel DC SQUID sensor array for biomagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, H.E.; Daalmans, G.M.; Bar, L.; Bommel, F.; Paulus, A.; Uhl, D.; Weisse, H.J. ); Schneider, S.; Seifert, H.; Reichenberger, H.; Abraham-Fuchs, K. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a biomagnetic multichannel system for medical diagnosis of brain and heart KRENIKON has been developed. 37 axial 2st order gradiometers - manufactured as flexible superconducting printed circuits - are arranged in a circular flat array of 19 cm diameter. Additionally, 3 orthogonal magnetometers are provided. The DC SQUIDs are fabricated in all-Nb technology, ten on a chip. The sensor system is operated in a shielded room with two layers of soft magnetic material and one layer of Al. The every day noise level is 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at frequencies above 10 Hz. Within 2 years of operation in a normal urban surrounding, useful clinical applications have been demonstrated (e.g. for epilepsy and heart arrhythmias).

  13. Characterization of large two-dimensional YBa2Cu3O7–δ SQUID arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, B. J.; Berggren, S. A. E.; O’Brien, M. C.; deAndrade, M. C.; Higa, B. A.; Leese de Escobar, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    Large two-dimensional SQUID arrays were made using the step-edge Josephson junction process. The performance of the arrays is analyzed with respect to determining the conditions under which the optimal performance is achieved. We find that optimization of the field-voltage transfer function V B is reached at a specific temperature and device current bias point, and arrive at an empirical expression describing the dependence of V B on the critical current and dynamic resistance of the SQUID array and as a function of temperature. The empirical expression for V B of the SQUID arrays is similar to that given by well known theoretical models for a single SQUID.

  14. Cryogenic time-domain multiplexer based on SQUID arrays and superconducting/normal conducting switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beev, N.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; Bruijn, M.; Brandel, O.; Linzen, S.; Fritzsch, L.; Ahoranta, J.; Penttilä, J.; Roschier, L.

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated the operation of a 12-channel Beyer-style SQUID-based time domain multiplexer. It was manufactured using a fabrication process that is cross-compatible between VTT and IPHT-Jena. The multiplexer consists of twelve 12-SQUID series arrays, each shunted by a Zappe-style interferometer array acting as a flux-controlled superconducting/normal conducting switch. By keeping all switches but one in the superconducting state, it is possible to select one active readout channel at a time. A flux feedback coil common to all SQUID arrays allows realization of a flux-locked loop. We present characteristics of the multiplexer and measurement data from experiments with a 25-pixel X-ray calorimeter array operated at T < 100 mK in a dilution refrigerator.

  15. The Multiplexed SQUID TES array at Ninety Gigahertz (MUSTANG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korngut, Phillip M.

    The Multiplexed SQUID/TES Array at Ninety Gigahertz (MUSTANG) is a bolometric continuum imaging camera designed to operate at the Gregorian focus of the 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in Pocahontas county, West Virginia. The combination of the GBT's large collecting area and the 8 x 8 array of transition edge sensors at the heart of MUSTANG allows for deep imaging at 10'' resolution at 90 GHz. The MUSTANG receiver is now a facility instrument of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory available to the general astronomical community. The 3.3 mm continuum passband is useful to access a large range of Galactic and extra-Galactic astrophysics. Sources with synchrotron, free-free and thermal blackbody emission can be detected at 3.3 mm. Of particular interest is the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect in clusters of galaxies, which arises from the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off hot electrons in the intra-cluster medium. In the MUSTANG band, the effect is observationally manifested as an artificial decrement in power on the sky in the direction of the cluster. There have been many experiments in the past two decades dedicated to measurements of the SZE, however, nearly all of them were accomplished with angular resolution larger than ˜ 1'. The massive primary of the GBT enables measurements of the SZE on 10'' scales. This provides a new technique to map pressure substructure in the plasma atmospheres of merging clusters of galaxies. By analyzing MUSTANG data along side X-ray data, spatially resolved measurements of the temperature, density and pressure of the ICM can be performed which can be used to infer the physics governing major mergers. This thesis details the design, commissioning and operation of the various components which comprise the MUSTANG receiver. This includes the sub-kelvin cryogenic cooling, the time domain multiplexed readout electronics and the array of transition edge sensor bolometers. Laboratory characterization of the detector array is

  16. Development of multielement SQUID arrays for magnetic source imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Casper, T.A.; Miller, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) were initially developed in the late 1960s as biomagnetic detectors to monitor electrical activity in the body. Research in this area has increased in recent years as electronics and computer diagnositcs have improved. The basis of this proposal was to asses: (1) the advantages of using this technique over other technologies and (2) the requirements for development of a complete system that would advance the state of the art. In our assessment of this technology, we collaborated with the Medical School at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), General Electric (GE), Biomagnetic Technologies (BTi), and Conductus, each of which has unqiue expertise in biomedical applications. UCSF is one of the foremost clinical institutions in the US developing imaging techniques. GE is the primary US supplier of medical imaging systems. Conductus is the major US supplier of SQUIDs and BTi is a developer of SQUID array systems.

  17. Quantum simulation of traversable wormhole spacetimes in a dc-SQUID array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabín, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    We present an analog quantum simulator of spacetimes containing traversable wormholes. A suitable spatial dependence in the external bias of a dc-SQUID array mimics the propagation of light in a 1D wormhole background. The impedance of the array places severe limitations on the type of spacetime that we are able to implement. However, we find that a wormhole throat radius in the submillimeter range is achievable. We show how to modify this spacetime in order to allow the existence of closed timelike curves. The quantum fluctuations of the phase associated to the finite array impedance might be seen as an analog of Hawking's chronology-protection mechanism.

  18. Development of a Microwave SQUID-Multiplexed TES Array for MUSTANG-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchfield, S. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, J.; Brevik, J. A.; Cho, H. M.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Dober, B.; Egan, D.; Ford, P.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Marganian, P.; Mason, B. S.; Mates, J. A. B.; McMahon, J.; Mello, M.; Mroczkowski, T.; Romero, C.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L.; White, S.; Whitehead, M.; Young, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    MUSTANG-2 is a 90 GHz feedhorn-coupled, microwave SQUID-multiplexed TES bolometer array in the final stages of development for operation on the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. We present the camera design and report the performance during the first season of observation, in which 64 of the available 215 pixels in the focal plane were populated. We highlight the microwave multiplexing readout technology, which is envisioned as a path to read out the next generation of large pixel-count cryogenic focal planes. In this regard, MUSTANG2 is a pathfinder for this multiplexing technology. We present noise spectra which show no detector noise degradation when read out with microwave SQUID multiplexing, and we present first light images of Jupiter and M87, which demonstrate the end-to-end system performance.

  19. Frequency multiplexed flux locked loop architecture providing an array of DC SQUIDS having both shared and unshared components

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Architecture for frequency multiplexing multiple flux locked loops in a system comprising an array of DC SQUID sensors. The architecture involves dividing the traditional flux locked loop into multiple unshared components and a single shared component which, in operation, form a complete flux locked loop relative to each DC SQUID sensor. Each unshared flux locked loop component operates on a different flux modulation frequency. The architecture of the present invention allows a reduction from 2N to N+1 in the number of connections between the cryogenic DC SQUID sensors and their associated room temperature flux locked loops. Furthermore, the 1.times.N architecture of the present invention can be paralleled to form an M.times.N array architecture without increasing the required number of flux modulation frequencies.

  20. Flux-coherent series SQUID array magnetometers operating above 77 K with superior white flux noise than single-SQUIDs at 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect

    Chesca, Boris John, Daniel; Mellor, Christopher J.

    2015-10-19

    A very promising direction to improve the sensitivity of magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is to build a series-array of N non-interacting SQUIDs operating flux-coherently, because in this case their voltage modulation depth, ΔV, linearly scales with N whereas the white flux noise S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} decreases as 1/N{sup 1/2}. Here, we report the realization of both these improvements in an advanced layout of very large SQUID arrays made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Specially designed with large area narrow flux focusers for increased field sensitivity and improved flux-coherency, our arrays have extremely low values for S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} between (0.25 and 0.44) μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2} for temperatures in the range (77–83) K. In this respect, they outperform niobium/aluminium trilayer technology-based single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K. Moreover, with values for ΔV and transimpedance in the range of (10–17) mV and (0.3–2.5) kΩ, respectively, a direct connection to a low-noise room temperature amplifier is allowed, while matching for such readout is simplified and the available bandwidth is greatly increased. These landmark performances suggest such series SQUID arrays are ideal candidates to replace single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K in many applications.

  1. Subranging scheme for SQUID sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A readout scheme for measuring the output from a SQUID-based sensor-array using an improved subranging architecture that includes multiple resolution channels (such as a coarse resolution channel and a fine resolution channel). The scheme employs a flux sensing circuit with a sensing coil connected in series to multiple input coils, each input coil being coupled to a corresponding SQUID detection circuit having a high-resolution SQUID device with independent linearizing feedback. A two-resolution configuration (course and fine) is illustrated with a primary SQUID detection circuit for generating a fine readout, and a secondary SQUID detection circuit for generating a course readout, both having feedback current coupled to the respective SQUID devices via feedback/modulation coils. The primary and secondary SQUID detection circuits function and derive independent feedback. Thus, the SQUID devices may be monitored independently of each other (and read simultaneously) to dramatically increase slew rates and dynamic range.

  2. SQUIDs: microscopes and nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are magnetic field sensores with unsurpassed sensitivity. They are amazingly versatile, being able to measure all physical quantities which can be converted to magnetic flux. They are routinely fabricated in thin film technology from two classes of superconducting materials: high-temperature superconductors (HTS) which are usually cooled to 77 K, and low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which have to be cooled to 4.2 K. SQUIDs have many applications, two of which shall be discussed in this paper. In SQUID microscopy, a SQUID scans a sample, which preferrably is at room temperature, and measures the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution at the surface of the sample. In order to achieve a relatively high spatial resolution, the stand-off distance between the sample and the SQUID is made as small as possible. SQUIDs show also promising results in the field of nondestructive testing of various materials. For example, ferromagnetic impurities in stainless steel formed by aging processes in the material can be detected with high probability, and cracks in conducting materials, for example aircraft parts, can be located using eddy current methods. Especially for the case of thick, highly conductive, or ferromagnetic materials, as well as sintered materials, it can be shown that a SQUID-based NDE system exhibits a much higher sensitivity compared to conventional eddy current NDE and ultrasonic testing.

  3. Application of HTS technology to cardiac dysrhythmia detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, A.L.; Avrin, W.F.

    1994-12-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design considerations and challenges for development of a contactless, mobile, single channel biomagnetic sensor system based on High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) and employing the Three-SQUID Gradiometer (TSG) concept. Operating in magnetically unshielded environments, as are encountered in many medical scenarios, this instrument class would monitor cardiac electrical activity with minimal patient preparation and intrusiveness, and would notionally be coupled with a clinically adaptive human-system interface (HSI).

  4. Low field electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with SQUID detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor); Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Cohen, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a flux transformer with a gradiometer pickup coil is magnetically coupled to a SQUID, and a SQUID array amplifier comprising a plurality of SQUIDs, connected in series, is magnetically coupled to the output of the SQUID. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) arrays for simultaneous magnetic measurements: calibration and source localization performance. Report for September 1986-February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, L.; Williamson, S.J.; Costa Ribeiro, P.

    1988-02-29

    Recently developed small arrays of SQUID-based magnetic sensors can, if appropriately placed, locate the position of a confined biomagnetic source without moving the array. The authors present a technique with a relative accuracy of about 2% for calibrating such sensors having detection coils with the geometry of a second-order gradiometer. The effects of calibration error and magnetic noise on the accuracy of locating an equivalent current dipole source in the human brain are investigated for 5- and 7-sensor probes and for a pair of 7-sensor probes. With a noise level of 5% of peak signal, uncertainties of about 20% in source strength and depth for a 5-sensor probe are reduced to 8% for a pair of 7-sensor probes, and uncertainties of about 15 mm in lateral position are reduced to 1 mm, for the configuration considered.

  6. First SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Arnold

    2014-03-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is the most sensitive magnetic flux sensor and the most widely applied superconductor electronic device, whose applications range from magnetocardiography to picovoltmeters, from digital logic to quantum computing, and from non-destructive testing to Gravity Probe B, a spaceborne test of Einstein's theory of gravity. In this presentation, I describe the initial experiments and device modeling at the Ford Scientific Laboratory that produced the early versions of the SQUID during the 1960's. That history originated in an anomalous observation during microwave ENDOR experiments and led to the first report of macroscopic quantum interference in superconductors in 1964 [Phys. Rev. Letters 12 (1964)]. The SQUID is based on London's electrodynamic theory of multiply-connected superconductors [Superfluids Wiley, New York (1950)], the magnetic flux quantum (h/2e=2.07E-15 Wb), and Josephson's theory of weakly-connected superconductors [Phys. Lett. 1 (1962)]. Physically, it incorporates Josephson tunnel junctions in a low inductance, superconducting ring. Two distinct types of SQUIDs were demonstrated: first the ``dc SQUID'' and then the ``rf SQUID.'' The former has two Josephson junctions and produces a dc frequency response; the latter has only one junction and responds only at rf and microwave frequencies. The first phase, conducted by Lambe, Jaklevic, Mercereau, and Silver, used type I thin film superconductors and Josephson tunnel junctions. The second phase, conducted by Silver and Zimmerman, used bulk niobium structures with ``cat whisker'' junction technology [Phys.Rev. 157 (1967)].

  7. Miniaturized HTS technologies - uHTS.

    PubMed

    Wölcke, J; Ullmann, D

    2001-06-01

    The transition from slow, manual, low-throughput screening to industrialized robotic ultra-high throughput screening (uHTS) in the past few years has made it possible to screen hundreds of thousands of chemical entities against a biological target in a short time-frame. The need to minimize the cost of screening has been addressed primarily by reducing the volume of sample to be screened. This, in turn, has resulted in the miniaturization of HTS technology as a whole. Miniaturization requires new technologies and strategies for compound handling, assay development, assay adaptation, liquid handling and automation in addition to refinement of the technologies used for detection systems and data management. This review summarizes current trends in the field of uHTS and illustrates the technological developments that are necessary to enable the routine application of miniaturized uHTS systems within an industrial environment.

  8. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  9. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  10. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward R.; Bryant, H. C.; Bergemann, Christian; Larson, Richard S.; Lovato, Debbie; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-04-01

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 10 5 cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy.

  11. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, Patrick; In, Visarath; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2011-04-19

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique 'anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical 'electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  12. Application of shielding current in bulk HTS to control magnetic field distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kii, T.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting shielding current is excited when external field is applied to superconductor. In case for field cooling of bulk superconductor, shielding current is an origin of strong trapped field. When external field is changed to a properly arranged bulk HTS array, various magnetic field distribution can be formed by an excited shielding current in each bulk HTS. This paper presents a simple intuitively method to design magnetic field distribution using supercurrents in bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) array. In this method, an ideal current path for intended field distribution is represented by shielding currents in bulk HTS array. Expected performance can be roughly estimated by using Biot-Savart law. As examples, Maxwell coil pair and helical field generator are designed. This method can be applied to design various magnet devices using bulk HTS array.

  13. The Squid Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillaume, Andrea M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an approach to the study of squid that helps students of all ages develop richer ideas about the structure of living things, how living things are adapted to their habitats, and how they interact with other organisms. Highlights include the external and internal features of the squid, squid statements and statistics, and writing…

  14. Meta-Atom Interactions and Coherent Response in RF SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and measured RF SQUID (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices) metamaterials and demonstrated their extreme tunability with temperature, DC magnetic field, and rf current. The SQUID metamaterial can be modelled as an array of weakly coupled oscillators with tunable resonant frequencies. An array of identical SQUIDs under identical conditions will have a coherent collective response regardless of the strength of the interactions between them. In the presence of disorder (nonuniform magnetic flux for instance) the individual SQUIDs in the array may or may not tune coherently. Since we are interested in metamaterial applications, the coherent response is desirable. In this talk we examine the conditions required for the SQUIDs to tune coherently, and compare to experimental data on tuning and nonlinearity in a variety of RF SQUID metamaterials. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI program through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  15. Calibration of a HTS Based LOX 400 mm Level Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.; Nadig, D. S.; Prasad, M. V. N.; Gour, Abhay S.; Pankaj, S.; Gowthaman, M.; Sudharshan, H.

    The measurement of the cryogen level in a cryostage of space crafts is crucial. At the same time the weight of the sensor should be small as it affects the payload fraction of the space craft. An attempt to develop a HTS based level sensor of 400 mm for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) measurement was made. In the initial phase of testing, loss of superconductivity of HTS wire in LOX inside a cryostat was noticed. Thus, a new four wall cryostat was designed to have a stable LOX level to provide thermal stability to the HTS based LOX sensor. The calibration of the developed sensor was carried out against capacitance level sensor which was pre calibrated using diode array to verify its linearity and performance for different current excitation levels. The calibrations were carried out without heater wires. The automatic data logging was accomplished using a program developed in LabVIEW 11.0.

  16. Development of Ultra-low Field SQUID-MRI System with an LC Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Toyota, H.; Kawagoe, S.; Hatta, J.; Tanaka, S.

    We are developing an Ultra-Low Field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS)-rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) for food inspection. The advantage of the ULF MRI system is that non-magnetic contaminants, which are difficult to be detected by a magnetic sensor, can be detected and localized. The system uses HTS-SQUID with high sensitivity that is independent of frequency, because the signal frequency is reduced in ULF. However the detection area of HTS-SQUID is difficult to be increased. Therefore, we studied to increase the detection area using an LC resonator. The LC resonator is composed of a coil (22.9 mH, Φ40 mm inner diameter) and a capacitor (the setting resonance frequency of 1890 Hz). The signal is detected by a copper wound coil of the resonator, and transferred to HTS-SQUID that inductively coupled to the coil immersed in liquid nitrogen at 77 K. We combined the LC resonator with the ULF MRI system, and obtained the 2D-MR images. The signal detector, with the SQUID and the LC resonator, provided a 1.5 times larger detection area. The size of 2D-MR image was near the size of the actual sample. Then we obtained 2D-MR images by a filtered back projection (FBP) method and a 2D-fast fourier transform (FFT) method. In the 2D-FFT method, the pixel size of the image was smaller than that of image by FBP method. As a result, the quality of the 2D-MR image by 2D-FFT method has been improved. There results suggested that the system we are proposing is feasible.

  17. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, D. F.; Fan, Chang-Xin; Ruan, J. Z.; Han, S. G.; Wong, K. W.; Sun, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A nondestructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUID's and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUID's. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  18. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z.

    1994-12-31

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  19. Measurement of a SQUID metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Anlage, Steven

    2013-03-01

    We report experimental results on a new type of superconducting metamaterial consisting of arrays of RF SQUIDs operating in the microwave frequency range with tunable properties (S parameters, effective permeability, effective permittivity, etc.). DC magnetic field is applied to bias the sample and to vary the Josephson inductance, thus tuning the resonant frequency over a multi-GHz range. The experiment is done in a magnetic-shielded cryostat where we examine the temperature, RF-field, and DC-field dependence of S parameters of this superconducting metamaterial. We also perform a cryogenic calibration to eliminate the effects of transmission lines on our results. From the calibrated S-matrix of this metamaterial, we are able to extract the effective permeability and its response to various stimuli. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI program through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  20. Chimera states and synchronization in magnetically driven SQUID metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Neofotistos, G.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional arrays of Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) form magnetic metamaterials exhibiting extraordinary properties, including tunability, dynamic multistability, negative magnetic permeability, and broadband transparency. The SQUIDs in a metamaterial interact through non-local, magnetic dipole-dipole forces, that makes it possible for multiheaded chimera states and coexisting patterns, including solitary states, to appear. The spontaneous emergence of chimera states and the role of multistability is demonstrated numerically for a SQUID metamaterial driven by an alternating magnetic field. The spatial synchronization and temporal complexity are discussed and the parameter space for the global synchronization reveals the areas of coherence-incoherence transition. Given that both one- and two-dimensional SQUID metamaterials have been already fabricated and investigated in the lab, the presence of a chimera state could in principle be detected with presently available experimental set-ups.

  1. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  2. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  3. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  4. Design, development and calibration of HTS wire based LOX level sensor probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.; Nadig, D. S.; Prasad, M. V. N.; Gour, A. S.; Gowthaman, M.; Deekshith, P.; Shrivastava, V.

    2014-01-01

    For space applications, the weight of the liquid level sensors are of major concern as they affect the payload fraction and hence the cost. An attempt is made to design and test a light weight High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) wire based liquid level sensor for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank used in the cryostage of the spacecraft. The total resistance value measured of the HTS wire is inversely proportional to the liquid level. A HTS wire (SF12100) of 12mm width and 2.76m length without copper stabilizer has been used in the level sensor. The developed HTS wire based LOX level sensor is calibrated against a discrete diode array type level sensor. Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) and LOX has been used as cryogenic fluid for the calibration purpose. The automatic data logging for the system has been done using LabVIEW11. The net weight of the developed sensor is less than 1 kg.

  5. SQUIDs: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    In 1964, Jaklevic, Lambe, Silver and Mercereau demonstrated quantum interference in a superconducting ring containing two Josephson tunnel junctions. This observation marked the birth of the SQUID--Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. The following year saw the appearance of the SLUG (Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer)--a blob of solder frozen around a length of niobium wire--that was used as a voltmeter with femtovolt resolution. Although extremely primitive by today's standards, the SLUG was used successfully in a number of ultrasensitive experiments. Today, the square washer dc SQUID, fabricated on a wafer-scale from thin films with an integrated input coil, finds a wide range of applications. One example is the use of a SQUID amplifier to read out ADMX--Axion Dark Matter eXperiment--at the University of Washington, Seattle. This experiment, which involves a cooled microwave cavity surrounded by a superconducting magnet, searches for the axion, a candidate for cold dark matter. In the presence of a magnetic field the axion is predicted to decay into a photon, which is detected by the SQUID. In another example, the combination of a SQUID with prepolarized proton spins enables one to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in magnetic fields of the order of 0.1 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI systems. In vivo images of the human brain acquired at these ultralow fields are able distinguish brain tissue, blood, cerebrospinal fluid and scalp fat using a combination of inversion recovery and multiple echo sequences. Potential clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  6. HTS High Gradient Magnetic Separation system

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Coulter, J.Y.; Hults, W.L.

    1996-09-01

    We report on the assembly, characterization and operation of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic separator. The magnet is made of 624 m of Silver/BSCCO superconducting wire and has overall dimensions of 18 cm OD, 15.5 cm height and 5 cm ID. The HTS current leads are designed to operate with the warm end at 75 K and the cold end cooled by a two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The upper stage of the cryocooler cools the thermal shield and two heat pipe thermal intercepts. The lower stage of the cryocooler cools the HTS magnet and the bottom end of the HTS current leads. The HTS magnet was initially characterized in liquid cryogens. We report on the current- voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HTS magnet at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 K. At 40 K the magnet can generate a central field of 2.0 T at a current of 120 A.

  7. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  8. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  9. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters with On-Chip dc-SQUID Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Ferring, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Wegner, M.; Enss, C.

    2016-07-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are low-temperature particle detectors that are typically read out by using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). But since MMCs are sensitive to the input circuitry and the noise performance of the SQUID, the energy resolution of MMCs have not yet reached their fundamental limit. A possible solution to overcome present limits is to maximize the flux coupling by minimizing parasitic inductance in the input circuit. To show the suitability of this approach, we realized a 64 pixel MMC detector array with integrated dc-SQUID readout, i.e., detector and SQUID are on the same chip. We observed an influence of the power dissipation of the SQUID on the detector temperature. We achieved a baseline energy resolution of Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} = 25 mathrm {eV} and Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} = 30 mathrm {eV} for X-rays with energies up to 6 mathrm {keV}.

  10. HTS nonlinearities in microwave disk resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Carlos; Mateu, Jordi; Shaw, Timothy J.; O'Callaghan, Juan M.

    2002-08-01

    This article describes a procedure for the calculation of the intermodulation behavior of the TM0 1 0 mode in high temperature superconducting (HTS) disk resonators from a description of the local HTS nonlinearities. Successful cross-checks are performed by comparing the theoretical results with experimental measurements and simulations based on the multiport harmonic balance algorithm for a specific model of HTS nonlinearity. The application of this procedure to the determination of nonlinear material parameters from disk resonator measurements is illustrated and compared to theoretical predictions.

  11. An integrated dc SQUID cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.

    1983-05-01

    An integrated tunnel junction dc SQUID cascade has been built and some of its operating characteristics measured. It is shown for the first time that good modulation can be achieved with a remote termination for the tunnel junction shunts. Response time of one of the SQUID's in the cascade was measured to be better than 5 nanoseconds. Maintenance of this high speed is an advantage of the cascade arrangement over other schemes for matching and reading-out dc tunnel junction SQUID's. True cascade operation was not obtained, due to coupling of Josephson oscillations from the first stage of the cascade to the second.

  12. A 128 Multiplexing Factor Time-Domain SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.; Decourcelle, T.; Perbost, C.; Chapron, C.; Rambaud, D.; Maestre, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.

    2016-07-01

    A cryogenic 128:1 Time-Domain Multiplexer (TDM) has been developed for the readout of kilo-pixel Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays dedicated to the Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology (QUBIC) instrument which aims to measure the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are usually used to read out TESs. Moreover, SQUIDs are used to build TDM by biasing sequentially the SQUIDs connected together—one for each TES. In addition to this common technique which allows a typical 32 multiplexing factor, a cryogenic integrated circuit provides a 4:1 second multiplexing stage. This cryogenic integrated circuit is one of the original part of our TDM achieving an unprecedented 128 multiplexing factor. We present these two dimension TDM stages: topology of the SQUID multiplexer, operation of the cryogenic integrated circuit, and integration of the full system to read out a TES array dedicated to the QUBIC instrument. Flux-locked loop operation in multiplexed mode is also discussed.

  13. Magnetic properties of Ni-based substrates for HTS tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claassen, J. H.; Thieme, C. L. H.

    2008-10-01

    Ni-W alloys are used as the substrate in the manufacture of HTS tape via the RABiTSTM process. Theoretical work has shown that the ferromagnetism in a substrate can affect the ac losses in the superconductor. This occurs in part because of the increased magnetic permeability, which alters the magnetic induction in the superconductor and thereby the loss. Magnetic hysteretic loss in the substrate is an additional contribution to overall ac loss. We report measurements of both permeability and magnetic loss as a function of frequency and magnetic induction for the standard alloy Ni-5W as well as composite substrates incorporating non-magnetic Ni-W alloys. The measurements are done using ac susceptibility at 77 K, at frequencies up to 104 Hz and inductions in the range 1-150 mT. It is shown how to use these results to predict total ac loss in isolated superconducting tape and wound coils. Some important magnetic parameters cannot be obtained with sufficient accuracy using a SQUID or vibrating sample magnetometer, since the size of a sample is limited in these measurements. This makes the demagnetizing factor large enough to degrade the accuracy of a permeability measurement.

  14. Development of REBCO HTS Power Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, O.; Ohkuma, T.; Masuda, T.; Ohya, M.; Mukoyama, S.; Yagi, M.; Saitoh, T.; Aoki, N.; Amemiya, N.; Ishiyama, A.; Hayakawa, N.

    A Japanese national project, called "Materials & Power applications of Coated Conductors (M-PACC)", started in FY2008. In this project, we are developing 66 kV/5 kA large current high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable and 275 kV/3 kA high voltage HTS cable using REBCO tapes. These HTS cables are expected as a compact size with large capacity and low loss power transmission. We have examined AC loss, thermal characteristics of the cables under over-current, the optimum cable design and so on. After the design studies and elemental tests are completed, long cable systems will be built for verification purposes. This paper described the overview and current status of these HTS cables development in the M-PACC project. (PACS: 84.71.Fk)

  15. Modular test facility for HTS insert coils

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, V; Bartalesi, A.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields in the range of 40-50 T. In this paper we will present a modular test facility developed for the purpose of investigating very high field levels with available 2G HTS superconducting materials. Performance of available conductors is presented, together with magnetic calculations and evaluation of Lorentz forces distribution on the HTS coils. Finally a test of a double pancake coil is presented.

  16. Development of HTS Magnet for Rotating Gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Kenji; Koyanagi, Kei; Takayama, S. Shigeki; Ishii, Yusuke; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Ogitsu, Toru; iwata, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    The effectiveness of heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment has been recognized by medical experts and the public. However, due to the large size of the equipment, this therapy has not been widely adopted. In particular, the rotating gantries used to irradiate patients with the heavy-ion beams from any direction may be as heavy as 600 tons in our estimation. By employing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires in these rotating gantries and increasing the magnetic field generated by the deflecting coils, the total weight of the rotating gantry can be reduced to around the weight of those used for proton radiotherapy. A project for developing an HTS deflecting magnet for heavy-ion radiotherapy has been underway since 2013, supported by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED). The aim of this project is to develop fundamental technologies for designing and fabricating HTS deflecting magnets, such as irregular magnetic field estimating techniques, design technology for HTS magnets, high-precision HTS coil winding technology, AC loss estimating techniques, and thermal runaway estimating techniques and to fabricate a small model of an HTS deflecting magnet and evaluate its performance. In this paper, the project's progress will be described.

  17. Improved Readout Scheme for SQUID-Based Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    An improved readout scheme has been proposed for high-resolution thermometers, (HRTs) based on the use of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to measure temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibilities. The proposed scheme would eliminate counting ambiguities that arise in the conventional scheme, while maintaining the superior magnetic-flux sensitivity of the conventional scheme. The proposed scheme is expected to be especially beneficial for HRT-based temperature control of multiplexed SQUIDbased bolometer sensor arrays. SQUID-based HRTs have become standard for measuring and controlling temperatures in the sub-nano-Kelvin temperature range in a broad range of low-temperature scientific and engineering applications. A typical SQUIDbased HRT that utilizes the conventional scheme includes a coil wound on a core made of a material that has temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of interest. The core and the coil are placed in a DC magnetic field provided either by a permanent magnet or as magnetic flux inside a superconducting outer wall. The aforementioned coil is connected to an input coil of a SQUID. Changes in temperature lead to changes in the susceptibility of the core and to changes in the magnetic flux detected by the SQUID. The SQUID readout instrumentation is capable of measuring magnetic-flux changes that correspond to temperature changes down to a noise limit .0.1 nK/Hz1/2. When the flux exceeds a few fundamental flux units, which typically corresponds to a temperature of .100 nK, the SQUID is reset. The temperature range can be greatly expanded if the reset events are carefully tracked and counted, either by a computer running appropriate software or by a dedicated piece of hardware.

  18. Occupational allergy to squid (Loligo vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Wiszniewska, M; Tymoszuk, D; Pas-Wyroślak, A; Nowakowska-Świrta, E; Chomiczewska-Skóra, D; Pałczyński, C; Walusiak-Skorupa, J

    2013-06-01

    Occupational allergy from exposure to squid has been rarely described, mainly as contact dermatitis or urticaria. Our report presents the first case of occupational asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis and contact urticaria to squid in a 33-year-old seafood production worker, with documented increased eosinophilia in the nasal and tear fluids after specific inhalation challenge test (SICT) with squid. IgE-mediated sensitization to squid was confirmed by positive skin prick test and opened skin test with squid extract. SICT demonstrated a direct and significant link between the exposure to squid and the allergic response from the respiratory system and conjunctiva.

  19. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  20. TES Detector Noise Limited Readout Using SQUID Multiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Khan, S. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) with large numbers of individual detector pixels requires multiplexers for efficient readout. The use of multiplexers reduces the number of wires needed between the cryogenic electronics and the room temperature electronics and cuts the number of required cryogenic amplifiers. We are using an 8 channel SQUID multiplexer to read out one-dimensional TES arrays which are used for submillimeter astronomical observations. We present results from test measurements which show that the low noise level of the SQUID multiplexers allows accurate measurements of the TES Johnson noise, and that in operation, the readout noise is dominated by the detector noise. Multiplexers for large number of channels require a large bandwidth for the multiplexed readout signal. We discuss the resulting implications for the noise performance of these multiplexers which will be used for the readout of two dimensional TES arrays in next generation instruments.

  1. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  2. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  3. Tracking Electromagnetic Energy With SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a gadget used to measure extremely weak signals, specifically magnetic flux. It can detect subtle changes in energy, up to 100 billion times weaker than the electromagnetic energy required to move a compass needle. SQUIDs are used for a variety of testing procedures where extreme sensitivity is required and where the test instrument need not come into direct contact with the test subject. NASA uses SQUIDs for remote, noncontact sensing in a variety of venues, including monitoring the Earth s magnetic field and tracking brain activity of pilots. Scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have been making extensive use of this technology, from astrophysical research, to tracking the navigational paths of bees in flight to determine if they are using internal compasses. These very sensitive measurement devices have a wide variety of uses within NASA and even more uses within the commercial realm.

  4. R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

  5. US effort on HTS power transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, S.

    2011-11-01

    Waukesha Electric Systems has been working in HTS power transformers development program under the auspices of US Government Department of Energy since 1994. This presentation will describe various milestones for this program and program history along with the lessons learned along the way. Our motivations for working on this development program based on man benefits offered by HTS power transformers to power delivery systems will be discussed. Based on various issues encountered during execution of many HTS projects, DOE has set up an independent program review process that is lead by team of experts. This team reviews are integral part of all DOE HTS projects. Success of all projects would be greatly enhanced by identifying critical issues early in the program. Requiring appropriate actions to mitigate the issues before processing further will lead to proactive interrogation and incorporation of expert’s ideas in the project plans. Working of this review process will be also described in this presentation. Waukesha Electric Systems team including: Superpower-Inc, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Houston Center for Superconductivity and Southern California Edison company was awarded a cost share grant by US Government in 2010 for development of a fault current limiting HTS power transformer. This multi year’s program will require design, manufacture, installation, and monitoring of a 28 MVA tree phase transformer installed at Irvine CA. Smart Grid demonstration site. Transformer specifications along with requirements for fault current limiting and site requirement will be discussed. Design and development of various sub systems in support of this program including: HTS conductor performance specification, Dielectric system design approach, Dewar development for containing phase assemblies, cryo-cooling system design approach, etc. will be described. Finally; overall program schedule, critical milestone events, test plans and progress to date will

  6. Hybrid Current Lead Design of HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, T.; Ren, L.; He, Q.; Jiao, F.; Dong, H.; Jin, T.; Zhou, S.

    In application of Superconducting magnetic energy storage device (SMES), current lead represents a key development component. This paper will focus on parameters and structure design of hybrid high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current lead in a SMES with 100 kJ/100 kW class. Based on the theoretical analysis, finite element simulation (FEA) has been used. It studies the thermal influence of variable cross-sectional area, HTS material and the connection between current lead and cryocooler. Some improvements have been proposed to reduce heat losses. At the end of this paper, a whole procedure about hybrid current lead design is given.

  7. Biomagnetic Measurements Using SQUID Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassi, D.; Zhuravlev, Y.

    2000-09-01

    Biomagnetic measurements involve the detection of the magnetic fields generated by physiological activity in living organisms. Because magnetic fields are sensed remotely, no physical contact with the subject is required, making the technique totally non-invasive Furthermore, only the magnetic fields originating within the body are measured. No external field is applied and it can therefore be confidently stated that the technique is completely safe. These characteristics make biomagnetometry an ideal tool for the investigation of physiological processes. The only magnetic field detector capable of measuring these extremely weak biomagnetic signals is the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). In the last thirty years SQUID-based ultrasensitive magnetometers have been widely used in the investigation of physiologically produced magnetic fields for diagnostic purposes. Owing to the numerous sources of noise and interference typical of an urban environment, it has until recently been considered almost impossible to operate a SQUID magnetometer in such a location without magnetic shielding. We have overcome these technical problems and have successfully used our specially developed unshielded SQUID systems in laboratory and hospital environments. This instrumentation is suitable for recording the biomagnetic fields in adults, neonates and fetuses, and has been applied in a number of clinical studies including fetal magnetocardiography.

  8. How the SQUID was born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Arnold H.

    2006-05-01

    I was asked to speak about the discovery and invention of the SQUID at the International Superconducting Electronics Conference (ISEC) 2005 banquet. This narrative is based on my personal recollections of the sequence of events and the motivations. I have edited the text and added figures for clarity. Although it is an old story, it may contain some useful lessons.

  9. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.C. |

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  10. Development of a brushless HTS exciter for a 10 kW HTS synchronous generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumby, Chris W.; Badcock, Rodney A.; Sung, Hae-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Min; Jiang, Zhenan; Pantoja, Andres E.; Bernardo, Patrick; Park, Minwon; Buckley, Robert G.

    2016-02-01

    HTS synchronous generators, in which the rotor coils are wound from high-T c superconducting wire, are exciting attention due to their potential to deliver very high torque and power densities. However, injection of the large DC currents required by the HTS rotor coils presents a technical challenge. In this paper we discuss the development of a brushless HTS exciter which operates across the cryostat wall to inject a superconducting DC current into the rotor coil circuit. This approach fundamentally alters the thermal load upon the cryogenic system by removing the need for thermally inefficient normal-conducting current leads. We report results from an experimental laboratory device and show that it operates as a constant voltage source with an effective internal resistance. We then discuss the design of a prototype HTS-PM exciter based on our experimental device, and describe its integration with a demonstration HTS generator. This 200 RPM, 10 kW synchronous generator comprises eight double pancake HTS rotor coils which are operated at 30 K, and are energised to 1.5 T field through the injection of 85 A per pole. We show how this excitation can be achieved using an HTS-PM exciter consisting of 12 stator poles of 12 mm YBCO coated-conductor wire and an external permanent magnet rotor. We demonstrate that such an exciter can excite the rotor windings of this generator without forming a thermal-bridge across the cryostat wall. Finally, we provide estimates of the thermal load imposed by our prototype HTS-PM exciter on the rotor cryostat. We show that duty cycle operation of the device ensures that this heat load can be minimised, and that it is substantially lower than that of equivalently-rated conventional current leads.

  11. From BCS to Hts and Rts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. W.

    2008-12-01

    Great progress has been made in high temperature superconductivity (HTS) science, material and technology in the 20 years since its discovery. The next grand challenge will be room temperature superconductivity (RTS). Room temperature superconductivity, if achieved, can change the world both scientifically and technologically. Unfortunately, it has long been considered by some to belong to the domain of science fiction and to occur only "at an astronomical temperature and at an astronomical distance". With the advent of HTS in 1987, the outlook for RTS has become much brighter. Currently, there appears to be no reason, either theoretical or experimental, why room temperature superconductivity should be impossible. BCS theory has provided the basic framework for the occurrence and understanding of superconductivity, but, since its inception, it has failed to show where and how to find superconductivity at higher temperatures. To date, empiricism remains the most effective way to discover superconductors with high transition temperatures. In this paper based on the talk given at the Professor Yang's 85th birthday celebration on October 31, 2007 in Singapore, I shall summarize the search for superconductors of higher Tc prior to and after the discovery of HTS, list the common features of HTS and describe some approaches toward RTS that we are currently pursuing.

  12. Current distribution among layers of single phase HTS cable conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. B.; Wang, Y. S.; Pi, W.; Ju, P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable shows high application prospect in modern power transmission, as it is superior over conventional transmission lines in high engineering current density and environmental friendliness. Its configuration is generally composed of several HTS layers designed with the principle of uniform current distribution, but there are few experimental results to verify the distribution. In this paper, a HTS cable model was designed based on the principle of uniform current, and the current distributions among layers in an HTS cable model were measured by Rogowski coils. The results provide an important basis for design of multi-layer HTS cable.

  13. Medical applications of SQUIDs in neuro- and cardiomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounasmaa, Olli V.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) are two completely non-invasive imaging techniques, suitable for basic and clinical studies of human subjects. Large SQUID arrays, operating at liquid helium temperatures, are employed for detecting and localizing magnetically the active regions, modelled by current dipoles, in the working brain or heart. The measurements must be performed in magnetically shielded rooms. Time resolution of both methods is 0.5 ms and spatial accuracy 5-6mm. Commercial multi-SQUID instruments are now available from several manufacturers. An adequate account of the theory and practice of both techniques is given. Three examples of brain studies and two investigations of the heart are described. The advantages and drawbacks of modern imaging techniques, including MRI and PET, are compared and the future of MEG and MCG is discussed.

  14. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  15. Nonlinear Behavior of a Shim Coil in an LTS/HTS NMR Magnet With an HTS Insert Comprising Double-Pancake HTS-Tape Coils.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seung-Yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bascuñán, Juan; Yao, Weijun; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports results, experimental and analytical, of the nonlinear behavior of a shim coil in the presence of an HTS coil assembled with double-pancake (DP) HTS-tape coils. The experimental results are from: 1) operation of a 700 MHz LTS/HTS NMR magnet (LH700) consisting of a 600 MHz LTS NMR magnet (L600) equipped with superconducting shim coils and a 100 MHz DP-assembled HTS insert (H100) and; 2) an experiment with a room-temperature (RT) Z1 shim coil coupled to a 50 MHz DP-as-sembled HTS insert (H50). A field mapping theory with a harmonic analysis is applied to interpret both results. Based on experimental results and analyses, we conclude that the screening-current-induced field (SCF) generated by a DP-assembled HTS insert is primarily responsible for the nonlinear behavior, including strength degradation, of a shim coil.

  16. Nonlinear Behavior of a Shim Coil in an LTS/HTS NMR Magnet With an HTS Insert Comprising Double-Pancake HTS-Tape Coils

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seung-yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bascuñán, Juan; Yao, Weijun; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports results, experimental and analytical, of the nonlinear behavior of a shim coil in the presence of an HTS coil assembled with double-pancake (DP) HTS-tape coils. The experimental results are from: 1) operation of a 700 MHz LTS/HTS NMR magnet (LH700) consisting of a 600 MHz LTS NMR magnet (L600) equipped with superconducting shim coils and a 100 MHz DP-assembled HTS insert (H100) and; 2) an experiment with a room-temperature (RT) Z1 shim coil coupled to a 50 MHz DP-as-sembled HTS insert (H50). A field mapping theory with a harmonic analysis is applied to interpret both results. Based on experimental results and analyses, we conclude that the screening-current-induced field (SCF) generated by a DP-assembled HTS insert is primarily responsible for the nonlinear behavior, including strength degradation, of a shim coil. PMID:20383282

  17. Meta-Atom Interactions and Coherent Response in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Koshelets, V. P.; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2015-03-01

    An rf SQUID (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device) metamaterial can be modeled as an array of coupled nonlinear oscillators with resonant frequencies that are extremely tunable with temperature, dc magnetic field, and rf current. The metamaterial is driven by an external rf field and its response to that field defines its metamaterial characteristics. In the presence of disorder (nonuniform applied dc magnetic flux for instance) the SQUIDs may or may not oscillate coherently in response to the external rf field. Since we are interested in metamaterial applications, a strong coherent response is desirable. The coherence is affected by a variety of factors including flux uniformity, array size, degree of coupling, strength of the driving field, and uniformity in SQUID parameters. In this talk we will present experimental and simulation results exploring the effect of these parameters on coherence. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through Grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  18. A study on the required performance of a 2G HTS wire for HTS wind power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hae-Jin; Park, Minwon; Go, Byeong-Soo; Yu, In-Keun

    2016-05-01

    YBCO or REBCO coated conductor (2G) materials are developed for their superior performance at high magnetic field and temperature. Power system applications based on high temperature superconducting (HTS) 2G wire technology are attracting attention, including large-scale wind power generators. In particular, to solve problems associated with the foundations and mechanical structure of offshore wind turbines, due to the large diameter and heavy weight of the generator, an HTS generator is suggested as one of the key technologies. Many researchers have tried to develop feasible large-scale HTS wind power generator technologies. In this paper, a study on the required performance of a 2G HTS wire for large-scale wind power generators is discussed. A 12 MW class large-scale wind turbine and an HTS generator are designed using 2G HTS wire. The total length of the 2G HTS wire for the 12 MW HTS generator is estimated, and the essential prerequisites of the 2G HTS wire based generator are described. The magnetic field distributions of a pole module are illustrated, and the mechanical stress and strain of the pole module are analysed. Finally, a reasonable price for 2G HTS wire for commercialization of the HTS generator is suggested, reflecting the results of electromagnetic and mechanical analyses of the generator.

  19. Foraging ecology and movement patterns of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John C.; Elliger, Carl; Baltz, Ken; Gillespie, Graham E.; Gilly, William F.; Ruiz-Cooley, R. I.; Pearse, Devon; Stewart, Julia S.; Matsubu, William; Walker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    From 2002 to 2010, the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) has been regularly encountered in large numbers throughout the California Current System (CCS). This species, usually found in subtropical waters, could affect coastal pelagic ecosystems and fisheries as both predator and prey. Neither the abundance of jumbo squid nor the optimal ocean conditions in which they flourish are well known. To understand better the potential impacts of this species on both commercial fisheries and on food-web structure we collected nearly 900 specimens from waters of the CCS, covering over 20° of latitude, over a range of depths and seasons. We used demographic information (size, sex, and maturity state) and analyzed stomach contents using morphological and molecular methods to best understand the foraging ecology of this species in different habitats of the CCS. Squid were found to consume a broad array of prey. Prey in offshore waters generally reflected the forage base reported in previous studies (mainly mesopelagic fishes and squids), whereas in more coastal waters (shelf, shelf break and slope habitats) squid foraged on a much broader mix that included substantial numbers of coastal pelagic fishes (Pacific herring and northern anchovy, as well as osmerids and salmonids in northern waters) and groundfish (Pacific hake, several species of rockfish and flatfish). We propose a seasonal movement pattern, based on size and maturity distributions along with qualitative patterns of presence or absence, and discuss the relevance of both the movement and distribution of jumbo squid over space and time. We find that jumbo squid are a generalist predator, which feeds primarily on small, pelagic or mesopelagic micronekton but also on larger fishes when they are available. We also conclude that interactions with and potential impacts on ecosystems likely vary over space and time, in response to both seasonal movement patterns and highly variable year-to-year abundance of the squid themselves.

  20. Series-Parallel Superconducting Quantum Interference Device Arrays Using High-TC Ion Damage Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Travis; Mukhanov, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    We have fabricated several designs of three junction series-parallel DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (BiSQUID) arrays in YBa2Cu3O7-x using 104 ion damage Josephson Junctions on a single 1 cm2 chip. A high aspect ratio ion implantation mask (30:1 ratio) with 30 nm slits was fabricated using electron beam lithography and low pressure reactive ion etching. Samples were irradiated with 60 keV helium ions to achieve a highly uniform damaged region throughout the thickness of the YBCO thin film as confirmed with Monte Carlo ion implantation simulations. Low frequency measurements of four different BiSQUID series-parallel SQUID array devices will be presented to investigate the effect of the BiSQUID design parameters on the linearity of the SQUID array in response to magnetic fields. BiSQUID arrays could provide a promising architecture for improved linearity transimpedance amplifiers with high linearity.

  1. A HTS scanning magnet and AC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, K.; Nakagawa, J.; Fukuda, M.; Yorita, T.; Saito, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Kawaguchi, T.; Noda, K.

    2010-04-01

    A scanning magnet using high-temperature superconductor (HTS) wire was designed, built, and tested for its suitability as a beam scanner. After successful cooling tests, the magnet performance was studied using DC and AC currents. With DC current the magnet was successfully operated to generate designed field distributions and effective length. In AC mode, the magnet was operated at frequencies of 30-59 Hz and a temperature of 77 K as well as 10-20 Hz and 20 K. The power losses dissipated in the coils were measured and compared with the model calculations. The observed losses per cycle were independent of the frequency and the scaling law of the transport current was consistent with theoretical predictions for hysteretic losses in HTS wires.

  2. RADIATION RESISTANT HTS QUADRUPOLES FOR RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; ANERELLA,M.; HARRISON,M.; ET AL.

    2004-10-03

    Extremely high radiation, levels with accumulated doses comparable to those in nuclear reactors than in accelerators, and very high heat loads ({approx}15 kw) make the quadrupole magnets in the fragment separator one of the most challenging elements of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Removing large heat loads, protecting the superconducting coils against quenching, the long term survivability of magnet components, and in particular, insulation that can retain its functionality in such a harsh environment, are the major challenges associated with such magnets. A magnet design based on commercially available high temperature superconductor (HTS) and stainless steel tape insulation has been developed. HTS will efficiently remove these large heat loads and stainless steel can tolerate these large radiation doses. Construction of a model magnet has been started with several coils already built and tested. This paper presents the basic magnet design, results of the coil tests, the status and the future plans. In addition, preliminary results of radiation calculations are also presented.

  3. Mobile conduction-cooled HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Shi, J.; Chen, L.; Guo, F.; Fang, J.; Wen, J.

    2010-11-01

    An immovable 35 kJ/7 kW high- Tc superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS SMES) system had been developed in the Electric Power System Dynamic Simulation Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology in 2005. In order to adapt for on-site experimental conditions, the mechanical configuration of the magnet is reinforced and the SMES system is assembled in a special container to be freighted to the actual power system for the feasibility study on different applications at different sites. The mobile HTS SMES system had withstood various kinds of poor road surfaces and then arrived at the experimental site on August 18, 2009. In this paper, the reconstructed configuration and the shock absorption of the magnet are presented. The field test results show that the mobile SMES system can operate on the power network at different locations and suppress effectively power fluctuation of the generator terminal.

  4. Designing HTS coils for magnetic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.G.; Jones, H.; Goodall, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    The authors discuss some of the main considerations involved in the design of HTS coils to operate in liquid nitrogen and provide ampere-turns for magnetic circuits in general, and then in particular for a small-scale electromagnetic (i.e, attractive) maglev demonstrator. The most important factor affecting design is the sensitive and strongly anisotropic dependence of HTS tape`s critical current on magnetic field. Any successful design must limit the field in the windings, especially components perpendicular to the tape`s surface (radial components in the case of solenoids), to acceptably low levels such that local critical currents nowhere fall below the operating current. This factor is relevant to the construction of HTS coils for all applications. A second important factor is that the presence of an iron magnetic circuit can greatly alter the flux distribution within the coils from that found when they are in free space. FE modelling has been used to calculate accurate field profiles in proposed designs for comparison with short sample I{sub c}(B) data. They present a design for a maglev demonstrator, illustrating how some of the problems, in particular the reduction of radial field components, may be addressed, and describe its predicted performance.

  5. Paleomagnetism with the SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Baudenbacher, F. J.; Wikswo, J. P.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    Rocks should preserve stable remanent magnetizations with useful directional and intensity information at levels down to ~10-15 Am2, about 1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best superconducting moment magnetometers. As a result, a more sensitive magnetometer could dramatically expand the range and variety of rock types amenable to paleomagnetic analysis. Just such an instrument is now on the horizon: the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope, designed by F. Baudenbacher and J. Wikswo of Vanderbilt University. The SQUID Microscope makes a map of the vertical component of the magnetic field above the surface of a sample held at room temperature and pressure. It achieves this with a spatial resolution of 250 μ m and a moment sensitivity 10,000 times that of the most recent 2G Enterprises Superconducting Rock Magnetometer (2G SRM). It can therefore provide data with a resolution comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques such as optical and electron microscopy. A major reason that the SQUID Microscope has such high sensitivity and resolution compared to the 2G SRM is that it has a much smaller pickup coil. Smaller coils are more sensitive to dipoles because they encompass less of the sample's fringing fields oriented in the opposite sense to its magnetization. Smaller coils also encompass a smaller area above the sample and so also provide higher spatial resolution. Our initial collaborative work on 30-μ m thin sections of Martian meteorite ALH84001 has already demonstrated that SQUID Microscopy will enable a whole a new class of paleomagnetic analyses. Conglomerate, baked contact, and fold tests can be performed on extremely small spatial scales, vastly expanding the utility of these critical geological field tests of magnetic stability. A suite of rock-magnetic and paleomagnetic experiments can be done on individual grains in standard petrographic thin sections at very high rates, allowing the observed

  6. Progress in development of high capacity magnetic HTS bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummeth, P.; Nick, W.; Neumueller, H.-W.

    2005-10-01

    HTS magnetic bearings are inherently stable without an active feedback system. They provide low frictional losses, no wear and allow operation at high rotational speed without lubrication. So they are very promising for use in motors, generators and turbines. We designed and constructed an HTS radial bearing for use with a 400 kW HTS motor. It consists of alternating axially magnetized permanent magnet rings on the rotor and a segmented YBCO stator. Stator cooling is performed by liquid nitrogen, the temperature of the stator can be adjusted by varying the pressure in the cryogenic vessel. At 68 K maximum radial forces of more than 3.7 kN were found. These results range within the highest radial bearing capacities reported worldwide. The encouraging results lead us to develop a large heavy load HTS radial bearing. Currently a high magnetic gradient HTS bearing for a 4 MVA synchronous HTS generator is under construction.

  7. Recent Progress in Electrical Insulation Techniques for HTS Power Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Naoki; Kojima, Hiroki; Hanai, Masahiro; Okubo, Hitoshi

    This paper describes the electrical insulation techniques at cryogenic temperatures, i.e. Cryodielectrics, for HTS power apparatus, e.g. HTS power transmission cables, transformers, fault current limiters and SMES. Breakdown and partial discharge characteristics are discussed for different electrical insulation configurations of LN2, sub-cooled LN2, solid, vacuum and their composite insulation systems. Dynamic and static insulation performances with and without taking account of quench in HTS materials are also introduced.

  8. Analytical derivation of DC SQUID response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Schegolev, A. E.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu

    2016-09-01

    We consider voltage and current response formation in DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with overdamped Josephson junctions in resistive and superconducting state in the context of a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. For simplicity we neglect the junction capacitance and the noise effect. Explicit expressions for the responses in resistive state were obtained for a SQUID which is symmetrical with respect to bias current injection point. Normalized SQUID inductance l=2{{eI}}{{c}}L/{\\hslash } (where I c is the critical current of Josephson junction, L is the SQUID inductance, e is the electron charge and ℏ is the Planck constant) was assumed to be within the range l ≤ 1, subsequently expanded up to l≈ 7 using two fitting parameters. SQUID current response in the superconducting state was considered for arbitrary value of the inductance. The impact of small technological spread of parameters relevant to low-temperature superconductor (LTS) technology was studied, using a generalization of the developed analytical approach, for the case of a small difference of critical currents and shunt resistances of the Josephson junctions, and inequality of SQUID inductive shoulders for both resistive and superconducting states. Comparison with numerical calculation results shows that developed analytical expressions can be used in practical LTS SQUIDs and SQUID-based circuits design, e.g. large serial SQIF, drastically decreasing the time of simulation.

  9. Study on Thrust Improvement and Ripple Suppression of HTS Linear Switched Reluctance Motor with Coreless HTS Excitation Windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oto, Satoshi; Hirayama, Tadashi; Kawabata, Shuma

    This paper describes a linear switched reluctance motor (LSRM) in which HTS tapes are used for coreless excitation windings in order to reduce the thrust ripple and normal force. This LSRM consists of a mover with saliency structure, coreless HTS coils and a stator back yoke. In this paper, we first describe the operating principle of the HTS-LSRM. Next, we calculate performances of the HTS-LSRM using 3-D FEM analysis. The effects of the motor structure on the thrust characteristic and normal force characteristics are clarified from the numerical results. Furthermore, we investigate the motor structure for thrust improvement, thrust ripple and normal force reduction.

  10. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  11. Commercialization of Medium Voltage HTS Triax TM Cable Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, David

    2012-12-31

    The original project scope that was established in 2007 aimed to install a 1,700 meter (1.1 mile) medium voltage HTS Triax{TM} cable system into the utility grid in New Orleans, LA. In 2010, however, the utility partner withdrew from the project, so the 1,700 meter cable installation was cancelled and the scope of work was reduced. The work then concentrated on the specific barriers to commercialization of HTS cable technology. The modified scope included long-length HTS cable design and testing, high voltage factory test development, optimized cooling system development, and HTS cable life-cycle analysis. In 2012, Southwire again analyzed the market for HTS cables and deemed the near term market acceptance to be low. The scope of work was further reduced to the completion of tasks already started and to testing of the existing HTS cable system in Columbus, OH. The work completed under the project included: • Long-length cable modeling and analysis • HTS wire evaluation and testing • Cable testing for AC losses • Optimized cooling system design • Life cycle testing of the HTS cable in Columbus, OH • Project management. The 200 meter long HTS Triax{TM} cable in Columbus, OH was incorporated into the project under the initial scope changes as a test bed for life cycle testing as well as the site for an optimized HTS cable cooling system. The Columbus cable utilizes the HTS TriaxTM design, so it provided an economical tool for these of the project tasks.

  12. Failure Analysis of CCD Image Sensors Using SQUID and GMR Magnetic Current Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felt, Frederick S.

    2005-01-01

    During electrical testing of a Full Field CCD Image Senor, electrical shorts were detected on three of six devices. These failures occurred after the parts were soldered to the PCB. Failure analysis was performed to determine the cause and locations of these failures on the devices. After removing the fiber optic faceplate, optical inspection was performed on the CCDs to understand the design and package layout. Optical inspection revealed that the device had a light shield ringing the CCD array. This structure complicated the failure analysis. Alternate methods of analysis were considered, including liquid crystal, light and thermal emission, LT/A, TT/A SQUID, and MP. Of these, SQUID and MP techniques were pursued for further analysis. Also magnetoresistive current imaging technology is discussed and compared to SQUID.

  13. Thermal analysis for the HTS stator consisting of HTS armature windings and an iron core for a 2.5 kW HTS generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Qu, T.-M.; Lai, L.-F.; Wu, M.-S.; Yu, X.-Y.; Han, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Most present demonstrations of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motors/generators are partially superconducting, only installing HTS coils on the rotor as excitation windings. The possible applicability of HTS armature windings is an interesting research topic because these windings can certainly increase the power density attributed to a potentially high armature loading capacity. In this study, we analysed the thermal behaviours of a developed 2.5 kW-300 rpm synchronous generator prototype that consists of an HTS stator with Bi-2223-Ag armature windings on an iron core and a permanent magnet (PM) rotor. The entire HTS stator, including the iron core, is cooled with liquid nitrogen through conduction cooling. The rated frequency is set at 10 Hz to reduce AC loss. The properties of the HTS windings and the iron core are characterized, and the temperatures in the HTS stator under different operation conditions are measured. The estimated iron loss is 11.5 W under operation in 10 Hz at liquid nitrogen temperature. Conduction cooling through the silicon iron core is sufficient to cool the iron core and to compensate for the temperature increment caused by iron loss. The stable running capacity is limited to 1.6 kW when the armature current is 12.6 A (effective values) due to the increasing temperature in the slots as a result of the AC loss in the HTS coils. The thermal contact between the HTS coils and the cooling media should be improved in the future to take away the heat generated by AC loss.

  14. Multiplexing of Hot-Electron Nanobolometers Using Microwave SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Day, Peter K.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the first data on the multiplexed operation of titanium hot-electron bolometers (HEB). Because of their low thermal conductance and small electron heat capacity nanobolometers are particularly interesting as sensors for far-infrared spectroscopy and mid- and near-IR calorimetry. However, the short time constant of these devices (approximately microseconds at 300-400 mK) makes time domain or audio-frequency domain multiplexing impractical. The Microwave SQUID (MSQUID) approach pursued in this work uses dc SQUIDs coupled to X-band microresonators which are, in turn, coupled to a transmission line. We used a 4-element array of Ti HEBs operated at 415 mK in a He3 dewar with an optical fiber access. The microwave signal exhibited 10-MHz wide resonances at individual MSQUD frequencies between 9 GHz and 10 GHz. The resonance depth is modulated by the current through the bolometer via a change of the SQUID flux state. The transmitted signal was amplified by a cryogenic amplifier and downconverted to baseband using an IQ mixer. A 1-dB per ??/2 responsivity was sufficient for keeping the system noise at the level of 2 pA/Hz1/2. This is more than an order of magnitude smaller than phonon noise in the HEB. The devices were able to detect single near- IR photons (1550 nm) with a time constant of 3.5 ?s. Follow-on work will scale the array to larger size and will address the microwave frequency signal generation and processing using a digital transceiver.

  15. Structural design of the toroidal configuration of the HTS SMES cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, H. K.; Koh, D. Y.; Ko, J. S.; Kim, H. B.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    The superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is working on around 30 K, because the magnet is made of high temperature superconductor. To maintain the cryogenic temperature, the superconducting coil is cooled by cryogen, helium gas or liquid neon. But there are some weak points in the cryogen cooling system. For example periodic charge of the cryogen and size is big and so on. So, we have designed the conduction cooling system for toroidal configuration HTS SMES. The toroidal type HTS SMES has some merits, so it is very small magnetic field leakage, and magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape surface can be reduced. Our system has 28 numbers of HTS double pancake coils and they are arrayed toroidal configuration. The toroidal inner radius is 162 mm, and outer radius is 599 mm, and height is about 162 mm. In this study, we have designed the cooling structure and analyzed temperature distribution of cooling path, thermal stress and deformation of the cooling structure.

  16. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes.

  17. Numerical models for ac loss calculation in large-scale applications of HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéval, Loïc; Zermeño, Víctor M. R.; Grilli, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Numerical models are powerful tools to predict the electromagnetic behavior of superconductors. In recent years, a variety of models have been successfully developed to simulate high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) coated conductor tapes. While the models work well for the simulation of individual tapes or relatively small assemblies, their direct applicability to devices involving hundreds or thousands of tapes, e.g., coils used in electrical machines, is questionable. Indeed, the simulation time and memory requirement can quickly become prohibitive. In this paper, we develop and compare two different models for simulating realistic HTS devices composed of a large number of tapes: (1) the homogenized model simulates the coil using an equivalent anisotropic homogeneous bulk with specifically developed current constraints to account for the fact that each turn carries the same current; (2) the multi-scale model parallelizes and reduces the computational problem by simulating only several individual tapes at significant positions of the coil’s cross-section using appropriate boundary conditions to account for the field generated by the neighboring turns. Both methods are used to simulate a coil made of 2000 tapes, and compared against the widely used H-formulation finite-element model that includes all the tapes. Both approaches allow faster simulations of large number of HTS tapes by 1-3 orders of magnitudes, while maintaining good accuracy of the results. Both models can therefore be used to design and optimize large-scale HTS devices. This study provides key advancement with respect to previous versions of both models. The homogenized model is extended from simple stacks to large arrays of tapes. For the multi-scale model, the importance of the choice of the current distribution used to generate the background field is underlined; the error in ac loss estimation resulting from the most obvious choice of starting from a uniform current distribution is revealed.

  18. SQUIDs in biomagnetism: a roadmap towards improved healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Rainer; Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Seton, Hugh; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Paetau, Ritva; Parkkonen, Lauri; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Riaz, Bushra; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Dong, Hui; Hwang, Seong-min; You, Lixing; Inglis, Ben; Clarke, John; Espy, Michelle A.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Magnelind, Per E.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Volegov, Petr L.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Höfner, Nora; Burghoff, Martin; Enpuku, Keiji; Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, Jen-Jei; Knuutila, Jukka; Laine, Petteri; Nenonen, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    problem with ULF MRI is that its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low compared with high-field MRI. Realistic solutions to this problem are proposed, including implementing sensors with a noise level of 0.1 fT Hz‑1/2. A logical and exciting prospect (chapter 5) is to combine MEG and ULF MRI into a single system in which both signal sources are detected with the same array of SQUIDs. A prototype system is described. The combination of MEG and ULF MRI allows one to obtain structural images of the head concurrently with the recording of brain activity. Since all MEG images require an MRI to determine source locations underlying the MEG signal, the combined modality would give a precise registration of the two images; the combination of MEG with high-field MRI can produce registration errors as large as 5 mm. The use of multiple sensors for ULF MRI increases both the SNR and the field of view. Chapter 6 describes another potentially far-reaching application of ULF MRI, namely neuronal current imaging (NCI) of the brain. Currently available neuronal imaging techniques include MEG, which is fast but has relatively poor spatial resolution, perhaps 10 mm, and functional MRI (fMRI) which has a millimeter resolution but is slow, on the order of seconds, and furthermore does not directly measure neuronal signals. NCI combines the ability of direct measurement of MEG with the spatial precision of MRI. In essence, the magnetic fields generated by neural currents shift the frequency of the magnetic resonance signal at a location that is imaged by the three-dimensional magnetic field gradients that form the basis of MRI. The currently achieved sensitivity of NCI is not quite sufficient to realize its goal, but it is close. The realization of NCI would represent a revolution in functional brain imaging. Improved techniques for immunoassay are always being sought, and chapter 7 introduces an entirely new topic, magnetic nanoparticles for immunoassay. These particles are bio

  19. Superconducting Pathways Through Kilopixel Backshort-Under-Grid Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhabvala, C. A.; Benford, D. J.; Brekosky, R. P.; Costen, N. P.; Datesman, A. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Maher, S. F.; Manos, G.; Miller, T. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Sharp, E. H.; Staguhn, J. G.; Wang, F.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have demonstrated in the laboratory multiple, fully functional, kilopixel, bolometer arrays for the upgraded instrument, the High-resolution airborne wideband camera plus (HAWC+), for the stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA). Each kilopixel array consists of three individual components assembled into a single working unit: (1) a filled, Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer array, (2) an infrared, back-termination, and (3) an integrated, two-dimensional superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. Kilopixel TES arrays are directly indium-bump-bonded to a 32 × 40 SQUID multiplexer (MUX) circuit. In order to provide a fully superconducting pathway from the TES to the SQUID readout, numerous superconductor-to-superconductor interfaces must be made. This paper focuses on the fabrication techniques needed to create the superconducting path from the TES, out of the detector membrane, through the wafer, and to the SQUID readout.

  20. DC SQUID Phase Qubit with LC Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeokshin; Przybysz, A. J.; Paik, Hanhee; Lewis, R. M.; Palomaki, T. A.; Dutta, S. K.; Cooper, B. K.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the use of an inductor-capacitor (LC) network to increase the isolation of a dc SQUID phase qubit from its current bias leads and thereby increase the dissipation time T1 and coherence time T2. One junction in the SQUID acts as an ideal phase qubit while the second junction and the SQUID loop inductance act as a broadband filter to isolate the first junction from the current bias leads. The LC-isolation network provides an additional isolation factor and allows flexibility in the choice of SQUID parameters. In addition to increasing the isolation from the leads, our design minimizes the effects of dielectric loss and two-level systems by using a relatively small Josephson junction, building the devices from Al/Al2O3/Al on sapphire, and only using insulating layers (SiNx) in external capacitors for the phase qubit junction and LC network. *Funding provided by JQI, CNAM and the DOD.

  1. Waveform control pulse magnetization for HTS bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Shigeuchi, Koji; Okuda, Sayo; Watasaki, Masahiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    For the past 10 years, we have studied high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnets for use in electromagnetic rotating machines. If the magnetic field effectively magnetizes the HTS bulk, then the size of the motor and generator can be reduced without a reduction in output. We showed that the melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O HTS bulk effectively traps a high magnetic field using waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM). WCPM makes it possible to generate any pulsed magnetic field waveform by appropriately changing the duty ratio of the pulse width modulation. By chopping so that the pulsed magnetic field has a period of about 1ms, the WCPM technology enables active control of the rise time and suppresses magnetic flux motion that decreases magnetization efficiency. This method is also useful for any HTS bulk magnet, and the high magnetic flux density is trapped in the HTS bulk by a single pulse magnetic field. We developed a magnetizer that has a feedback system from the penetrated magnetic flux density to realize WCPM. In this research, using only a single pulse magnetic field of WCPM method at 77K, an HTS bulk with a 45mm diameter and 19mm thickness trapped a maximum magnetic field of 1.63T, which is more than 90% of the trapped magnetic flux density by FC magnetization. This result suggests that the pulse magnetizing method can replace the conventional field-cooled method and promote the practical use of HTS magnets for electromagnetic power applications.

  2. Upgrade of SULTAN/EDIPO for HTS Cable Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesche, R.; Bruzzone, P.; Uglietti, D.; Bykovsky, N.; Lewandowska, M.

    CRPP hosts two unique conductor test facilities SULTAN (SUpraLeiter TestANlage) and EDIPO (European DIPOle). They allow the test of high current superconductors in high magnetic fields (SULTAN 11 T, EDIPO 12.5 T). In both facilities sample currents up to 100 kA can be supplied by means of a NbTi transformer. Presently the facilities are upgraded for the test of high current high-temperature superconductor (HTS) samples. For HTS conductor testing at temperatures between 20 and 50 K, the heat flux between the HTS sample under test and the NbTi transformer needs to be limited to around 10 W per conductor leg by means of an HTS adapter connecting them. The second required upgrade is the supply of intermediate temperature helium (20-50 K) to the HTS test conductor. It is mandatory that the helium gas coming from the HTS conductor under test can be returned to the cryoplant as cold gas (T < 20 K). To reach this goal a tube-in-tube heat exchanger has been manufactured in which 4.5 K helium coming from the cryoplant is in counter flow with the warm gas leaving the HTS test conductor.

  3. Efficient growth of HTS films with volatile elements

    DOEpatents

    Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Dominguez, F.

    1998-12-22

    A system is disclosed for applying a volatile element-HTS layer, such as Tl-HTS, to a substrate in a multiple zone furnace, said method includes heating at higher temperature, in one zone of the furnace, a substrate and adjacent first source of Tl-HTS material, to sublimate Tl-oxide from the source to the substrate; and heating at lower temperature, in a separate zone of the furnace, a second source of Tl-oxide to replenish the first source of Tl-oxide from the second source. 3 figs.

  4. Efficient growth of HTS films with volatile elements

    DOEpatents

    Siegal, Michael P.; Overmyer, Donald L.; Dominguez, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A system for applying a volatile element-HTS layer, such as Tl-HTS, to a substrate in a multiple zone furnace, said method includes heating at higher temperature, in one zone of the furnace, a substrate and adjacent first source of Tl-HTS material, to sublimate Tl-oxide from the source to the substrate; and heating at lower temperature, in a separate zone of the furnace, a second source of Tl-oxide to replenish the first source of Tl-oxide from the second source.

  5. Design and preliminary results from a high temperature superconducting SQUID milliscope used for non-destructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Atencio, L.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlashov, A.

    1998-12-31

    The authors present the design and preliminary results from a SQUID milliscope. The device was designed for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) as part of the Enhanced Surveillance Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory and uses a high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUID sensor to map magnetic fields induced in the sample. Eddy currents are induced in the conducting sample by a wire coil designed to produce minimal magnetic field at the SQUID when no sample is present. The features of interest are characterized by anomalies in the induced magnetic field. The goal of the instrument is sensitivity to small features generally buried under several intervening layers ({approximately}1--10 mm) of conducting and/or non-conducting materials and robustness of design (i.e., the ability to operate in a noisy, unshielded environment). The device has primarily focused on specific NDE problems such as the ability to detect buried seams in conducting materials and quantify the width of these seams. The authors present the design of the instrument, and some data to demonstrate its capabilities.

  6. Experimental Manufacture and Performance Evaluation of Linear Switched Reluctance Motor with HTS Excitation Windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Tadashi; Oto, Satoshi; Higashijima, Atsushi; Kawabata, Shuma

    This paper presents an experimental manufacture and performance evaluation of prototype linear switched reluctance motor with HTS excitation windings (HTS-LSRM). The Ag-alloy sheathed Bi-2223 tapes are used for HTS coils. We first present a structure of the prototype HTS-LSRM. Next, current-carrying properties of the HTS coils are measured. Furthermore, current and voltage waveforms are measured and we evaluation a control performance of the current and voltage.

  7. Recent advances of HTS power application research at IEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanwei; Lin, Liangzhen; Xiao, Liye

    2006-06-01

    Recent advances of high temperature superconductors (HTS) for power applications in the Institute of Electrical Engineering (IEE), Chinese academy of Sciences are presented. A 75 meter, 10.5 kV/1.5 kA three phase HTS transmission cable has been successfully demonstrated in a live distribution grid in northwest China. A 10.5 kV/200A bridge-type fault current limiter (FCL) prototype based on Bi-2223 tapes is being tested in a Hunan power plant since August 2005. A 400V/16V/26 kVA three phase HTS transformer was designed, built and tested, and the on site system installation of a 10.5 kV/400V/630 kVA HTS transformer will be finished at Tebian Electric Ltd. soon. In addition, the progress of design and test of SMES is also given.

  8. Prospects of long-distance HTS DC power transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashov, M. A.; Sytnikov, V. E.; Shakarian, Y. G.; Ivanov, Y. V.

    2014-05-01

    Continual improvement of technologies for the safe use of power resources is a key to sustainable development of a human society. In particular, high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) should be used to meet the growing needs of the electric-power industry. It is known that HTS power cables allow us to increase the level of transmitted energy to several GW at voltage of 66-110 kV. HTS power cables of a coaxial design are almost ideal non-polluting system shielding electromagnetic field. In the present work we have tried to analyze various configurations of HTS power transmission systems, estimate the cable transmission capacitance depending on distance, and characterize reliability and efficiency of the systems.

  9. SQUID: a program for the analysis and display of data from crystallography and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, T J

    1992-12-01

    SQUID is a flexible computer program that allows the analysis and display of molecular coordinates from crystallography, NMR, and molecular dynamics. The program can also display two-dimensional and three-dimensional data using many graph types, as well as perform array processing of data with numerous intrinsic functions. Graphics are based on the use of "move" and "draw" instructions, allowing easy development of new device drivers, including vector plotters.

  10. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and spacebased systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment 2 (HTSSE-2). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  11. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1994-12-31

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  12. HTS Thin Films: Passive Microwave Components and Systems Integration Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems, improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper, we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  13. Rotor compound concept for designing an industrial HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M.; Hosseina, M.; Sarrafan, K.; Darabi, A.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, producing power with smaller amount of losses become as a goal in our daily life. Today, large amount of energy waste in power networks all around the world. The main reason is “resistive electric equipments” of power networks. Since early 1980s, simultaneous with the development of high temperature superconductive (HTS) technology, superconductors gently attracted the mankind attentions. Using superconductive equipments instead of conventional resistive ones are result in salient electric loss reduction in power systems. Especially to reduce losses in power networks superconductive industrial rotating machines can potentially perform a significant role. In early recent century, first generation of HTS rotating machines was born. But unfortunately they have long way to penetrate the commercial markets yet. In HTS rotating machines the conventional copper made windings are replaced with the HTS superconductors. In this paper an industrial HTS synchronous motor with YBCO coated conductor field windings was designed. As a new approach, model was equipped with a compound rotor that includes both magnetic and non-magnetic materials. So, large amount of heavy iron made part was replaced by light non-magnetic material such as G-10 fiberglass. Furthermore, in this structure iron loss in rotor could be reduced to its lowest value. Also less weight and more air gap energy density were the additional advantages. Regarding zero electric loss production in field windings and less iron loss in rotor construction, this model potentially is more effective than the other iron made HTS motors.

  14. Electronics for a Next-Generation SQUID-Based Time-Domain Multiplexing System

    SciTech Connect

    Reintsema, C. D.; Doriese, W. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Krinsky, J. W.; Adams, J. S.; Baker, R.; Bandler, S. R.; Kelly, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Wikus, P.

    2009-12-16

    A decade has elapsed since the design, development and realization of a SQUID-based time-division multiplexer at NIST. During this time the system has been used extensively for low-temperature-detector-array measurements. Concurrently, there have been substantial advancements both in detector array and commercial electronic component technology. The relevance and applicability of the technology has blossomed as well, often accompanied by more demanding measurement requirements. These factors have motivated a complete redesign of the NIST room-temperature read-out electronics. The redesign has leveraged advancements in component technology to achieve new capabilities better suited to the SQUID multiplexers and detector arrays being realized today. As examples of specific performance enhancements, the overall system bandwidth has been increased by a factor of four (a row switching rate of 6.24 MHz), the compactness has been increased by over a factor of two (a higher number of detector columns and rows per circuit board), and there are two high speed outputs per column (allowing fast switching of SQUID offsets in addition to digital feedback). The system architecture, design implementations, and performance advantages of the new system will be discussed. As an application example, the science chain flight electronics for the Micro-X High Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket will be described as both a motivation for, and a direct implementation of the new system.

  15. Visually guided eye growth in the squid.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Philip R K; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John R

    2015-09-21

    Eyes with refractive error have reduced visual acuity and are rarely found in the wild. Vertebrate eyes possess a visually guided emmetropisation process within the retina which detects the sign of defocus, and regulates eye growth to align the retina at the focal plane of the eye's optical components to avoid the development of refractive error, such as myopia, an increasing problem in humans. However, the vertebrate retina is complex, and it is not known which of the many classes of retinal neurons are involved. We investigated whether the camera-type eye of an invertebrate, the squid, displays visually guided emmetropisation, despite squid eyes having a simple photoreceptor-only retina. We exploited inherent longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) to create disparate focal lengths within squid eyes. We found that squid raised under orange light had proportionately longer eyes and more myopic refractions than those raised under blue light, and when switched between wavelengths, eye size and refractive status changed appropriately within a few days. This demonstrates that squid eye growth is visually guided, and suggests that the complex retina seen in vertebrates may not be required for emmetropisation.

  16. Squid – a simple bioinformatics grid

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Paulo C; Glória, Rafael V; de Miranda, Antonio B; Degrave, Wim M

    2005-01-01

    Background BLAST is a widely used genetic research tool for analysis of similarity between nucleotide and protein sequences. This paper presents a software application entitled "Squid" that makes use of grid technology. The current version, as an example, is configured for BLAST applications, but adaptation for other computing intensive repetitive tasks can be easily accomplished in the open source version. This enables the allocation of remote resources to perform distributed computing, making large BLAST queries viable without the need of high-end computers. Results Most distributed computing / grid solutions have complex installation procedures requiring a computer specialist, or have limitations regarding operating systems. Squid is a multi-platform, open-source program designed to "keep things simple" while offering high-end computing power for large scale applications. Squid also has an efficient fault tolerance and crash recovery system against data loss, being able to re-route jobs upon node failure and recover even if the master machine fails. Our results show that a Squid application, working with N nodes and proper network resources, can process BLAST queries almost N times faster than if working with only one computer. Conclusion Squid offers high-end computing, even for the non-specialist, and is freely available at the project web site. Its open-source and binary Windows distributions contain detailed instructions and a "plug-n-play" instalation containing a pre-configured example. PMID:16078998

  17. Microstrip SQUID amplifiers for quantum information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defeo, M. P.; Plourde, B. L. T.

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in SQUID amplifiers suggests that these devices might approach quantum-limited sensitivity in the microwave range, thus making them a viable option for measurement of superconducting quantum systems. In the microstrip SQUID amplifier configuration, gains of around 20dB are possible at frequencies of several hundred MHz, and the gain is limited by the maximum voltage modulation available from the SQUID. One route for increasing the voltage modulation involves using larger resistive shunts, however maintaining non-hysteretic device operation requires smaller junction capacitances than is possible with conventional photolithographically patterned junctions. Operating at higher frequencies requires a shorter input coil which reduces mutual inductance between the coil and washer and therefore gain. We have fabricated microstrip SQUID amplifiers using submicron Al-AlOx-Al junctions and large shunts. The input coil and SQUID washer are optimized for producing high gain at frequencies in the gigahertz range. Recent measurements of gain and noise temperature will be discussed as well as demonstrations of these devices as a first stage of amplification for a superconducting system

  18. Lithographically patterned magnetic calorimeter X-ray detectors with integrated SQUID readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, B. L.; Irwin, K. D.; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P.; Ullom, J. N.; Huber, M. E.

    2004-03-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and performance of a fully lithographically patterned magnetic microcalorimeter X-ray detector. The detector is fabricated on the same chip as a low-noise SQUID that measures the change in the magnetic sensor film's magnetization as the film is heated by absorbed X-rays. Our proof-of-principle detectors use a 100 μm×100 μm-2 μm paramagnetic Au:Er film coupled to a low-noise on-chip SQUID via a meandering superconducting pickup loop that also provides the magnetic field bias to the film. Absorption of 6 keV X-rays in the film causes heating on the order of 1 mK with a decay time of 1 ms or less, the fastest reported using a magnetic calorimeter. However, the resolution is currently poor due to poor Au:Er film properties and non-optimized coupling to the SQUID. We describe the design and fabrication of this device and present measurements of the heat capacity, decay time constant and effective thermal conductance of the microcalorimeter as a function of temperature. Because the SQUID and calorimeter are lithographically patterned on the same substrate, this technology can be readily applied to the fabrication of arrays of multiplexed magnetic microcalorimeter detectors.

  19. Flux modulation scheme for direct current SQUID readout revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-02-01

    The flux modulation scheme (FMS) is the standard readout technique of dc SQUIDs, where a step-up transformer links the SQUID to the preamplifier. The transformer's primary winding shunts the SQUID via a large capacitor while the secondary winding connects it to the preamplifier. A modulation flux having a frequency of typically 100 kHz generates an ac voltage across the SQUID, stepped up by the transformer. The SQUID with FMS is customarily operated in the current bias mode, because a constant dc bias current flows only through the SQUID due to the capacitor isolation. With FMS, however, the transformer ac shunts the SQUID so that in reality the operating mode is neither purely current-biased nor voltage-biased but rather nominal current-biased or "mixed biased." Our objective is to experimentally investigate the consequences of ac shunting of the dc SQUID in FMS and the transformer's transfer characteristics. For different shunt values we measure the change in the SQUID bias current due to the ac shunt using another SQUID in the two-stage readout scheme, and simultaneously monitor the SQUID output voltage signal. We then explain our measurements by a simplified graphic analysis of SQUID intrinsic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Since the total current flowing through the SQUID is not constant due to the shunting effect of the transformer, the amplitude of SQUID flux-to-voltage characteristics V(Φ) is less as compared to the direct readout scheme (DRS). Furthermore, we analyze and compare V(Φ) obtained by DRS and FMS. We show that in FMS, the transfer characteristics of the SQUID circuit also depend on the isolation capacitance and the dynamic resistance of the SQUID.

  20. Comparative expression and tissue distribution analyses of astacin-like squid metalloprotease in squid and cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Takuya; Asakura, Masanori; Okiyama, Keisuke; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2008-01-01

    Astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM) is a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases. In the present study, we investigated the expression and tissue distribution of ALSM in bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) and golden cuttlefish (Sepia esculenta). Myosin heavy chain hydrolysis tests showed ALSM-I-like activity in both species. We isolated partial cDNA clones showing high sequence similarity to ALSM-I and -III, suggesting that ALSM is common to squid and cuttlefish. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ALSMs are classified into two clades: ALSM-I forms one clade, and ALSM-II and -III form the other. ALSM was expressed in several tissues in bigfin reef squid, though expression was confined to the liver in cuttlefish. ALSMs are distributed in digestive organs but not in mantle muscle of squid and cuttlefish. Immunofluorescence analysis further showed that cellular localization of ALSM is evident not only in hepatic cells but also in pancreatic cells of bigfin reef squid. Thus, ALSM is commonly expressed in squid and cuttlefish, but its expression levels and distribution are distinct.

  1. Development of HTS magnets for application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Yuusuke; Kamakura, Keita; Morita, Yoshiya; Yamane, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Takeo

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing magnets utilizing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires for this decade. We built three model magnets, a mirror coil for an ECR ion source, a set of coils for a scanning magnet and a super-ferric dipole magnet to generate magnetic field of 3 T. They were excited with AC/pulse currents as well as DC currents. Recently we fabricated a cylindrical magnet for a practical use which polarizes ultracold neutrons (UCN). It consists of 10 double pancakes and the field strength at the center is higher than 3.5 T which is required to fully polarize 210 neV neutrons. It was successfully cooled and excited. The magnet was used to polarized UCN generated by the RCNP-KEK superthermal UCN source, One dipole magnet has been manufactured which is used as a switching magnet after the RCNP ring cyclotron and is excited by pulse currents. It becomes possible to deliver beams to two experimental halls by time sharing. Their designs and performances are presented in the talk.

  2. Novel processing of HTS based conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D. S.; Venturini, E. L.; Kwak, J. F.; Baughman, R. J.; Bourcier, R. J.; Mitchell, M. A.; Morosin, B.; Halloran, J. W.; Neal, M. J.; Capone, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    Conductor development is one of the major long term goals in high temperature superconductor research. In this paper we report on two promising processing technologies that have been utilized to produce superconducting HTS conductors. First, melt spun YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} fibers rapid thermal processed for 1--8 sec at 950 to 1075{degree}C have {Tc}'s to 92 K, J{sub c}'s to 1100 A/cm{sup 2} and the orthorhombic twinned morphology typical for high quality YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. A processing matrix of time, temperature and composition for these fibers shows that slightly CuO-rich starting compositions give the best results. Second, silver tube encapsulated wires of Bi{sub 1.7}Pb{sub 0.3}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} have been made by extrusion, wire drawing and cold rolling. The resulting tapes show orientation of the crystallites, zero resistance up to 100K and improved magnetic hysteresis above 50 K. The combination of mechanical reprocessing and extended thermal anneals near 850{degree}C appears to significantly improve these materials. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  3. THE RHODOPSIN SYSTEM OF THE SQUID

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Ruth; St. George, Robert C. C.

    1958-01-01

    Squid rhodopsin (λmax 493 mµ)—like vertebrate rhodopsins—contains a retinene chromophore linked to a protein, opsin. Light transforms rhodopsin to lumi- and metarhodopsin. However, whereas vertebrate metarhodopsin at physiological temperatures decomposes into retinene and opsin, squid metarhodopsin is stable. Light also converts squid metarhodopsin to rhodopsin. Rhodopsin is therefore regenerated from metarhodopsin in the light. Irradiation of rhodopsin or metarhodopsin produces a steady state by promoting the reactions, See PDF for Equation Squid rhodopsin contains neo-b (11-cis) retinene; metarhodopsin all-trans retinene. The interconversion of rhodopsin and metarhodopsin involves only the stereoisomerization of their chromophores. Squid metarhodopsin is a pH indicator, red (λmax 500 mµ) near neutrality, yellow (λmax 380 mµ) in alkaline solution. The two forms—acid and alkaline metarhodopsin—are interconverted according to the equation, Alkaline metarhodopsin + H+ ⇌acid metarhodopsin, with pK 7.7. In both forms, retinene is attached to opsin at the same site as in rhodopsin. However, metarhodopsin decomposes more readily than rhodopsin into retinene and opsin. The opsins apparently fit the shape of the neo-b chromophore. When light isomerizes the chromophore to the all-trans configuration, squid opsin accepts the all-trans chromophore, while vertebrate opsins do not and hence release all-trans retinene. Light triggers vision by affecting directly the shape of the retinene chromophore. This changes its relationship with opsin, so initiating a train of chemical reactions. PMID:13491819

  4. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  5. Comparison between HTS nonlinearities in patterned and unpatterned thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, Jordi; Collado, Carlos; O'Callaghan, Juan M.; Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Team

    2004-03-01

    High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) materials exhibit a surface impedance dependence on the applied field. This behavior still remains not yet fully understood. To overcome this, many experiments have been carried out through the last decade. In general, the experimental work has been done measuring intermodulation products in patterned devices since most of practical devices are based on patterned structures. In this case the nonlinearities might come from many causes -- HTS properties, possible damage due to patterning, shape of resonator, etc.--, which need to be characterized. This raises the question of how representative of HTS properties are the experiments performed on patterned samples. To address this, we propose such a procedure, which is based on obtaining parameters describing the HTS nonlinearities from intermodulation measurements made on unpatterned and patterned thin films. As example, we have characterized the nonlinearities in a one side 10x10 mm^2 YBCO on MgO thin film by measuring the intermodulation products with a rutile-loaded cavity operating at TE_011 mode and a coplanar half-wave resonator. The intermodulation data in both type of measurements can be fitted using closed-form expressions and numerical techniques with identical nonlinear parameters of the HTS.

  6. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Mahdi; Bahadır Olcay, Ali; Gokçen, Gökhan; Heperkan, Hasan A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid's different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin). The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area) of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid's mantle cavity.

  7. Onshore-offshore movement of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) on the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Gilly, William F.; Field, John C.; Payne, John C.

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) have greatly extended their range in the California Current System, where they forage on a variety of ecologically and economically important species that inhabit both coastal and offshore mesopelagic regions. Swimming abilities and behavior are important factors in assessing the impacts of this range expansion, particularly in regard to foraging in conjunction with onshore-offshore movement over the continental shelf. Here we describe a study of horizontal movements by jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf off Washington, USA, using acoustic tags in association with the Census of Marine Life's Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Program (POST) receiver arrays. We detected frequent movements along the shelf break, movement onto the shelf at night, and no evidence of movement as a cohesive school. Our results demonstrate feasibility of using acoustic tags and arrays to document horizontal movements of jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf. This is important in order to determine how those movements overlap with those of other ecologically and commercially important fish species.

  8. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  9. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  10. Multichannel SQUID systems for brain research

    SciTech Connect

    Ahonen, A.I.; Hamalainen, M.S.; Kajola, M.J.; Knuutila, J.E.F.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Simola, J.T.; Vilkman, V.A. . Low Temperature Lab.); Tesche, C.D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reviews basis principles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and neuromagnetic instrumentation. The authors' 24-channel system, based on planar gradiometer coils and dc-SQUIDs, is then described. Finally, recent MEG-experiments on human somatotopy and focal epilepsy, carried out in the authors' laboratory, are presented.

  11. High Resolution LTS-SQUID Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudenbacher, Franz; Peters, Nicholas; Wikswo, John

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature samples with sub-millimeter resolution. In our design, hand wound niobium pickup coils were coupled to commercially available low-temperature SQUID sensors. The SQUID sensor and the pickup coil are in the vacuum space of the cryostat separated typically less than 50μm by a thin sapphire window from the room-temperature sample. A computerized non-magnetic scanning stage with sub-micron resolution in combination with a tripod leveling system allows samples to be scanned within 10μm of the sapphire window. For a 20-turn 500μm diameter pickup coil, we achieved a field sensitivity of 350fT\\cdotHz-1/2 for frequencies above 1 Hz, and 1pT\\cdotHz-1/2 for a 10-turn 250mm coil. The SQUID microscope was used to image the distribution of time-dependent stimulus and action currents in anisotropic cardiac tissue, the remanent magnetization of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 during thermal demagnetisation, and the magnetic susceptibility of biogenic magnetite in the beak of homing pigeons.

  12. Impact of Inhomogeneities in HTS Coated Conductors for Resistive FCLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangelo, Daniele; Memiaghe, Steeve; Lacroix, Christian; Sirois, Frédéric; Dutoit, Bertrand

    Several issues remain to be addressed for the commercial development of ResistiveFault Current Limiters based on superconducting technologies (RFCL). In particular, the inhomogeneity of high temperature superconducting coated conductors (HTS-CC) combined with the diffculty to predict RFCLs behaviour when interfaced with the existing electrical grid represents an important bottleneck that limits their competitiveness on the electrical market. In order to study the influence of the local inhomogeneity of the HTS tape on the global effective performance of an RFCL, a modular equivalent circuit model has been developed using SimPowerSystemsTM. The model implements an inhomogeneity distribution based on statistical data and takes into account the thermal conduction between different zones of the HTS-CC. It has been calibrated with experimental measurements and finite element simulations. The model can be used to study various scenarios common to power systems, such as transformer in-rush currents, motor starts, etc.

  13. Levitation force relaxation under reloading in a HTS Maglev system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingyong; Wang, Jiasu; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiansi; Dong, Hao; Wang, Yuxin; Shao, Senhao

    2009-02-01

    The loading capacity of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev vehicle is an important parameter in the practical application. It is closely related to the levitation force of the HTS bulk. Many papers reported that the levitation force showed the relaxation characteristic. Because different loads cause different levitation gaps and different applied magnetic fields, the levitation force relaxations under the different loads are not the same. In terms of cylindrical YBCO bulk levitated over the permanent magnetic guideway, the relationship between the levitation force relaxation and the reloading is investigated experimentally in this paper. The decrement, the decrement rate and the relaxation rate of the levitation force are calculated, respectively. This work might be helpful for studying the loading capacity of the HTS Maglev vehicle.

  14. The effect of temperature on pinning mechanisms in HTS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikova, A. P.; Rudnev, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    Pinning mechanism in samples of second generation tapes (2G) of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was studied The critical current and the pinning force were calculated from the magnetization curves measured in the temperature range of 4.2 - 77 K in magnetic fields up to 14 Tesla using vibration sample magnetometer. To determine the pinning mechanism the dependences of pinning force on magnetic field were constructed according to the Dew-Hughes model and Kramer's rule. The obtained dependences revealed a significant influence of the temperature on effectiveness of different types of pinning. At low temperatures the 2G HTS tapes of different manufacturers demonstrated an equal efficiency of the pinning centers but with temperature increase the differences in pinning mechanisms as well as in properties and effectiveness of the pinning centers become obvious. The influence of the pinning mechanism on the energy losses in HTS tapes was shown.

  15. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  16. Toward early cancer detection using superparamagnetic relaxometry in a SQUID-based ULF-MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnelind, P. E.; Kim, Y. J.; Matlashov, A. N.; Newman, S. G.; Volegov, P. L.; Espy, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    To detect cancer at a very early state it is essential to detect a very small quantity of cancerous cells. One very sensitive method relies on targeting the cancer cells using antibody labeled single-core magnetic nanoparticles and detecting the relaxation of the magnetization using instruments based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). However, the localization suffers from inverse-problem issues similar to those found in magnetoencephalography. On the other hand, the same magnetic nanoparticles can also work as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Through the combination of superparamagnetic relaxometry and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), in one and the same instrument, the accuracy of the magnetic moment localization can be enhanced and anatomical information can also be obtained. Results on superparamagnetic relaxometry and the dipole localization accuracy in our seven-channel low-Tc SQUID-gradiometer array are reported.

  17. Superconducting Nanobridge SQUID Magnetometers for Spin Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Natania

    As the cutting edge of science and technology pushes towards smaller length scales, sensing technologies with nanoscale precision become increasingly important. In this thesis I will discuss the optimization and application of a 3D nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for studying solid state spin systems, in particular for sensing impurity spins in diamond. Solid state spins have proposed applications in memory and computation for both classical and quantum computing. Isolated spins typically have longer coherence times, making them attractive qubit candidates, but necessitating the development of very sensitive detectors for readout. This 3D nanobridge SQUID combines the exquisite spatial sensitivity of a traditional nanoSQUID with a large non-linearity on par with a tunnel junction SQUID. This allows us to build a highly sensitive magnetometer which can act as both an efficient flux transducer as well as a nearly quantum limited lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier. We show that the device has a minimum flux noise of 17 +/- 0.9 nphi0/Hz1/2 with only a factor of ˜2.5 increase in flux noise up to 61 mT. A second generation device with a smaller capacitor achieves field tolerance up to 75 mT. The maximal bandwidth values range from 25-40 MHz in the parametric amplification regime to 70 MHz in the linear regime. This combination of large bandwidth, low flux noise, large flux coupling and field tolerance make this sensor a promising candidate for near-single-spin dynamics measurements. In the last part of this thesis we begin to demonstrate the utility of a nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for characterizing spin systems in the solid state. We use the magnetometer to measure the decay characteristics of P1 centers in diamond. We find that the spin-lattice relaxation time varies with temperature, with an order of magnitude decrease in the decay time between 25 mK and 370 mK.

  18. 50 CFR 648.23 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.23 Mackerel, squid, and...) Longfin squid fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing longfin squid harvested in...

  19. 50 CFR 648.23 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.23 Mackerel, squid, and...) Longfin squid fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing longfin squid harvested in...

  20. 50 CFR 648.23 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.23 Mackerel, squid, and...) Longfin squid fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing longfin squid harvested in...

  1. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF HTS CONDUCTORS FOR ELECTRIC POWER APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Rupich, M.

    2012-10-23

    Second generation (2G) technologies to fabricate high-performance superconducting wires developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were transferred to American Superconductor via this CRADA. In addition, co-development of technologies for over a decade was done to enable fabrication of commercial high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires with high performance. The massive success of this CRADA has allowed American Superconductor Corporation (AMSC) to become a global leader in the fabrication of HTS wire and the technology is fully based on the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) technology invented and developed at ORNL.

  3. Study of HTS Wires at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.J.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kikuchi, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is being considered for these magnets using Helium refrigeration. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors were performed at FNAL and at NIMS up to 28 T under magnetic fields at zero to 90 degree with respect to the sample face. A description of the test setups and results on a BSCCO-2223 tape and second generation (2G) coated conductors are presented.

  4. Protein crystallization: from HTS to kilogram-scale.

    PubMed

    Klyushnichenko, Vadim

    2003-11-01

    The first experiments on protein crystallization started randomly during the 19th century. This technique has been widely used for the determination of the tertiary structure of proteins since the 1950s, when an understanding of the physics of protein crystallization began to emerge. In the 1980s and 1990s, research focused on the study of protein crystal growth processes in microgravity environments, which were created in space shuttle experiments. High-throughput screening (HTS) systems were developed that later found broader laboratory applications. The combination of HTS with an engineering approach opens new opportunities for the protein crystallization process to become a robust, scalable, reproducible and economically viable industrial unit operation.

  5. Development of a 600 kJ HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, K. C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Sim, K. D.; Sohn, M. H.; Lee, E. Y.; Park, S. J.; Hahn, S. Y.; Park, M. W.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes an overview of development on a 600 kJ high-temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS SMES). Our final goal will be the commercialization of MJ class HTS SMES system for the increase of power quality within 5 years. Hence, for this purpose, we have developed the research and development in 3 years. The purpose of this research is to develop a pilot system, which can protect the sensitivity loads from a momentary power interruption or a voltage sag.

  6. Quench detection system for twin coils HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, A.; Tixador, P.; Simiand, G.; Exchaw, O.

    2010-10-01

    The quench detection and protection system is a critical element in superconducting magnets. After a short summary of the quench detection and protection issues in HTS magnets, an original detection system is presented. The main feature of this system is an active protection of the detection electronics during the discharges, making it possible to use standard electronics even if the discharge voltage is very high. The design of the detection system is therefore easier and it can be made very sensitive. An implementation example is presented for a twin coil HTS SMES prototype, showing the improvements when compared to classical detection systems during operation.

  7. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HTS tapes within an HTS magnet, weakened a field constant of the HTS magnet. The result may demonstrate that the screening current changes an overall current density distribution in HTS tapes and, as a consequence, the generated magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the screening current distribution in an HTS tape. This paper reports numerical simulation of the screening current distribution in an HTS tape of high field magnets using 2D finite element method with the E-J characteristic of the HTS tape taken into account. Self magnetic field distribution and its orientation to the HTS tape are also considered to compute critical currents and locally generated electric fields, two key components to figure out the distribution of screening currents.

  8. Test Results for a 25 Meter Prototype Fault Current Limiting Hts Cable for Project Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, C. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; Demko, J. A.; Ellis, A.; James, D. R.; Gouge, M. J.; Tuncer, E.

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has tested a 25-m long prototype High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cable with inherent Fault-Current Limiting (FCL) capability at its HTS cable test facility. The HTS-FCL cable and terminations were designed and fabricated by Ultera, which is a joint venture between Southwire and nkt cables. System integration and HTS wire were provided by American Superconductor Corporation who was the overall team leader of the project. The ultimate goal of the 25-m HTS-FCL cable test program was to verify the design and ensure the operational integrity for the eventual installation of a ˜200-m fully functional HTS-FCL cable in the Consolidated Edison electric grid located in downtown New York City. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable consisted of a three-phase (3-Φ) HTS Triax™ design with a cold dielectric between the phases. The HTS-FCL cable had an operational voltage of 13.8 kV phase-to-phase (7967 V phase-to-ground) and an operating current of 4000 Arms per phase, which is the highest operating current to date of any HTS cable. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable was subjected to a series of cryogenic and electrical tests. Test results from the 25-m HTS-FCL cable are presented and discussed.

  9. Jet flow in steadily swimming adult squid.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Erik J; Grosenbaugh, Mark A

    2005-03-01

    Although various hydrodynamic models have been used in past analyses of squid jet propulsion, no previous investigations have definitively determined the fluid structure of the jets of steadily swimming squid. In addition, few accurate measurements of jet velocity and other jet parameters in squid have been reported. We used digital particle imaging velocimetry (DPIV) to visualize the jet flow of adult long-finned squid Loligo pealei (mantle length, L(m)=27.1+/-3.0 cm, mean +/-S.D.) swimming in a flume over a wide range of speeds (10.1-59.3 cm s(-1), i.e. 0.33-2.06 L(m) s(-1)). Qualitatively, squid jets were periodic, steady, and prolonged emissions of fluid that exhibited an elongated core of high speed flow. The development of a leading vortex ring common to jets emitted from pipes into still water often appeared to be diminished and delayed. We were able to mimic this effect in jets produced by a piston and pipe arrangement aligned with a uniform background flow. As in continuous jets, squid jets showed evidence of the growth of instability waves in the jet shear layer followed by the breakup of the jet into packets of vorticity of varying degrees of coherence. These ranged from apparent chains of short-lived vortex rings to turbulent plumes. There was some evidence of the complete roll-up of a handful of shorter jets into single vortex rings, but steady propulsion by individual vortex ring puffs was never observed. Quantitatively, the length of the jet structure in the visualized field of view, L(j), was observed to be 7.2-25.6 cm, and jet plug lengths, L, were estimated to be 4.4-49.4 cm using average jet velocity and jet period. These lengths and an average jet orifice diameter, D, of 0.8 cm were used to calculate the ratios L(j)/D and L/D, which ranged from 9.0 to 32.0 and 5.5 to 61.8, respectively. Jets emitted from pipes in the presence of a background flow suggested that the ratio between the background flow velocity and the jet velocity was more

  10. An Analytical Technique to Elucidate Field Impurities From Manufacturing Uncertainties of an Double Pancake Type HTS Insert for High Field LTS/HTS NMR Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seung-yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bobrov, Emanuel Saul; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses adverse effects of dimensional uncertainties of an HTS insert assembled with double-pancake coils on spatial field homogeneity. Each DP coil was wound with Bi2223 tapes having dimensional tolerances larger than one order of magnitude of those accepted for LTS wires used in conventional NMR magnets. The paper presents: 1) dimensional variations measured in two LTS/HTS NMR magnets, 350 MHz (LH350) and 700 MHz (LH700), both built and operated at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory; and 2) an analytical technique and its application to elucidate the field impurities measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets. Field impurities computed with the analytical model and those measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets agree quite well, demonstrating that this analytical technique is applicable to design a DP-assembled HTS insert with an improved field homogeneity for a high-field LTS/HTS NMR magnet. PMID:20407595

  11. An Analytical Technique to Elucidate Field Impurities From Manufacturing Uncertainties of an Double Pancake Type HTS Insert for High Field LTS/HTS NMR Magnets.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seung-Yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bobrov, Emanuel Saul; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2009-06-01

    This paper addresses adverse effects of dimensional uncertainties of an HTS insert assembled with double-pancake coils on spatial field homogeneity. Each DP coil was wound with Bi2223 tapes having dimensional tolerances larger than one order of magnitude of those accepted for LTS wires used in conventional NMR magnets. The paper presents: 1) dimensional variations measured in two LTS/HTS NMR magnets, 350 MHz (LH350) and 700 MHz (LH700), both built and operated at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory; and 2) an analytical technique and its application to elucidate the field impurities measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets. Field impurities computed with the analytical model and those measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets agree quite well, demonstrating that this analytical technique is applicable to design a DP-assembled HTS insert with an improved field homogeneity for a high-field LTS/HTS NMR magnet.

  12. Large-scale HTS bulks for magnetic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, Frank N.; Floegel-Delor, Uta; Riedel, Thomas; Goebel, Bernd; Rothfeld, Rolf; Schirrmeister, Peter; Wippich, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems using high-Tc bulk magnets. A key feature in scaling-up is the fabrication of YBCO melts textured multi-seeded large bulks with three to eight seeds. Except of levitation, magnetization, trapped field and hysteresis, we review system engineering parameters of HTS magnetic linear and rotational bearings like compactness, cryogenics, power density, efficiency and robust construction. We examine mobile compact YBCO bulk magnet platforms cooled with LN2 and Stirling cryo-cooler for demonstrator use. Compact cryostats for Maglev train operation contain 24 pieces of 3-seed bulks and can levitate 2500-3000 N at 10 mm above a permanent magnet (PM) track. The effective magnetic distance of the thermally insulated bulks is 2 mm only; the stored 2.5 l LN2 allows more than 24 h operation without refilling. 34 HTS Maglev vacuum cryostats are manufactured tested and operate in Germany, China and Brazil. The magnetic levitation load to weight ratio is more than 15, and by group assembling the HTS cryostats under vehicles up to 5 t total loads levitated above a magnetic track is achieved.

  13. HTS DC Transmission Line for Megalopolis Grid Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S.; Sytnikov, V.; Bemert, S.; Ivanov, Yu; Krivetskiy, I.; Romashov, M.; Shakaryan, Yu; Keilin, V.; Shikov, A.; Patrikeev, V.; Lobyntsev, V.; Shcherbakov, V.

    2014-05-01

    Using of HTS AC and DC cables in electric power grids allows increasing of the transferred power, losses diminishing, decreasing of exclusion zone areas, the enhancement of the environmental conditions and fire/explosion safety of electric power systems. However, the use of DC superconducting cable lines together with converters brings additional advantages as reduction of losses in cables and suitable lowering of refrigerating plant capacity, as well as the realization of the function of short-circuit currents limitation by means of the appropriate setting of converter equipment. Russian Federal Grid Company and its R&D Center started the construction of the DC HTS power transmission line which includes the cable itself, cryogenic equipment, AC/DC converters, terminals and cable coupling boxes. This line will connect two substations in Saint-Petersburg - 330 kV "Centralnaya" and 220 kV "RP-9". The length of this HTS transmission line will be about 2500 meters. Nowadays are developed all the elements of the line and technologies of the cable manufacturing. Two HTS cable samples, each 30 m length, have been made. This paper describes the results of cables tests.

  14. Characteristics on electodynamic suspension simulator with HTS levitation magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Bae, D. K.; Sim, K.; Chung, Y. D.; Lee, Y.-S.

    2009-10-01

    High- Tc superconducting (HTSC) electrodynamic suspension (EDS) system basically consists of the HTSC levitation magnet and the ground conductor. The levitation force of EDS system is forms by the interaction between the moving magnetic field produced by the onboard levitation magnet and the induced magnetic field produced by eddy current in the ground conductor. This paper deals with the characteristics of the EDS simulators with high- Tc superconducting (HTS) levitation magnet. Two EDS simulator systems, rotating type EDS simulator and static type EDS simulator, were studied in this paper. The rotating type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet and a 1.5 m diameter rotating ground conductor, a motor, the supporting structure and force measuring devices. In the static type EDS simulator, instead of moving magnetic field, AC current was applied to the fixed HTS levitation magnet to induce the eddy current. The static type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet, a ground conductor, force measuring devices and supporting structure. The double-pancake type HTSC levitation magnet was designed, manufactured and tested in the EDS simulator.

  15. Scanning SQUID microscopy with single electron spin sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukov, Denis

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting interference devices (SQUIDs) have been traditionally used for studying fundamental properties of magnetic materials and superconductors. Although widely used in scanning magnetic microscopy, their progress towards detection of small magnetic moments was stagnating of late due to limitations imposed by conventional designs of planar SQUIDs and contemporary lithography techniques, restricting sample-to-sensor distance smaller than ~ 0.5 micron and SQUIDs diameters smaller than ~ 200 nm. These limitations were overcome by the invention of a SQUID-on-tip device, subsequent realization of a SQUID-on-tip microscope, and by creation of an ultra-small sensor with spatial resolution of 20 nm and sensitivity to a single electron spin per 1 Hz bandwidth. In this talk I will describe the principles of scanning SQUID magnetometry, its applications to study superconductors and its potential for magnetic nano-scale imaging of novel materials.

  16. A method for simulating a flux-locked DC SQUID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutt, G. M.; Kasdin, N. J.; Condron, M. R., II; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J. M.; Cromar, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a computationally efficient and accurate method for simulating a dc SQUID's V-Phi (voltage-flux) and I-V characteristics which has proven valuable in evaluating and improving various SQUID readout methods. The simulation of the SQUID is based on fitting of previously acquired data from either a real or a modeled device using the Fourier transform of the V-Phi curve. This method does not predict SQUID behavior, but rather is a way of replicating a known behavior efficiently with portability into various simulation programs such as SPICE. The authors discuss the methods used to simulate the SQUID and the flux-locking control electronics, and present specific examples of this approach. Results include an estimate of the slew rate and linearity of a simple flux-locked loop using a characterized dc SQUID.

  17. A sensor configuration for a 304 SQUID vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M; Hartwig, S; Petsche, F; Steinhoff, U; Drung, D; Koch, H

    2004-01-01

    A novel SQUID vector magnetometer system is introduced which has been specially designed for the use inside the strongly magnetically shielded room BMSR-2 of PTB. The system is housed in a dewar with a flat bottom and an inner diameter of Ø 250 mm. The SQUIDs are arranged so that in addition to the usually measured Z-component of the field the horizontal magnetic fields are measured too. A total of 304 DC-SQUID magnetometers are divided up into 19 identical modules. The 16 low-Tc SQUIDs of each module are located in such a way that an estimation of the magnetic field in all three dimensions is possible at three points inside the module. The 57 SQUIDs of the lowest Z plane of all modules form a hexagonal grid with a base length of 29 mm. The design criteria and the physical principle behind the complex SQUID arrangement are explained. PMID:16012698

  18. Numerical assessment of efficiency and control stability of an HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Wei; Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-06-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is designed and developed in Cambridge University. It is expected to become cost competitive with the conventional PMSM owing to its high efficiency, high power density, high torque density, etc. The structure and parameters of HTS PMSM are detailed. Both AC losses by transport current and applied filed in stator armature winding of HTS PMSM are also analyzed. Computed and simulated results of the characteristics of the HTS PMSM and conventional PMSM are compared. The improvement on stability of direct torque control (DTC) on the HTS PMSM is estimated, and proved by simulation on Matlab/Simulink.

  19. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  20. Supersensitive SQUID/magnetostrictor detecting system

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Tskhovrebov, Andrei M; Izmailov, G N

    2012-12-31

    It is shown that using the state-of-the-art quantum interferometer (SQUID) with the resolution 10{sup -6} {Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} = 2.07 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} Wb Hz{sup -1/2}, coupled to a magnetostrictor, playing the role of tensomagnetic transducer, it is possible to construct a system for detecting pressure variations with the ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -13} Pa Hz{sup -1/2} and for measuring specific elongation with the sensitivity of 10{sup -24} Hz{sup -1/2}. The analysis of physical grounds of the inverse magnetostriction effect demonstrates concrete ways to essentially higher efficiency of tensomagnetic conversion. The estimates performed demonstrate the possibility of using the SQUID/magnetostrictor system as a detector of gravitational waves. Other possibilities of using this system for solving both fundamental and applied problems are also considered. (experimental techniques)

  1. Practical SQUID Instrument for Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J. R.; Miller, John H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-Tc superconducting and A-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature.

  2. Practical SQUID instrument for nondestructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J.R.; Miller, J.H. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-T{sub c} superconducting and {mu}-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Investigation of noise sources in SQUID electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, T.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Purpura, J.W.; Allen, L.H.; Claassen, J.H.; Gubser, D.U.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of SQUID-based electronics outside a laboratory-controlled environment may be degraded from that found in laboratory operation. Investigations on superconducting tubes, wires, and sheets have been conducted to identify contributions to such noise. Results have been obtained for bulk and thin film samples utilizing both the conventional low temperature materials, as well as the new high temperature oxide materials. Experiments have been conducted to quantify flux redistribution and flux motion in superconducting samples subjected to temperature changes, temperature gradients, and magnetic field gradients. These investigations have been conducted at magnetic fields typical of many SQUID applications, with field intensities much smaller than the critical values H/sub cl/. Penetration depth effects, flux pinning effects, and flux motion effects have been observed. The various types of experiments conducted along with specific results are described.

  4. Digital filter design approach for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.C.; Ribeiro, P.C.

    1988-04-15

    A review of the traditional method for designing gradiometers is made. A nonrecursive digital filter model for the gradiometer is presented, giving a new set of parameters for the gradiometer identification. Some designs are analyzed using the proposed set. As an example, a true differentiator is designed to be used as the SQUID input coil. It is shown that the differentiator has the same noise rejection as the conventional gradiometer but provides more signal sensitivity.

  5. Ceramic HTSC SQUID-based galvanometer

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, S.V.; Hiep, L.H. )

    1992-06-01

    A highly sensitive galvanometer operating at liquid-nitrogen temperature for direct and low-frequency current measurements was developed on the basis of a HTSC SQUID. The direct-current sensitivity of the galvanometer is approximately 0.5 nA at an internal resistance of about 20 ohms. Its energy resolution in the white noise region is 2 x 10 exp 21 J/Hz. 11 refs.

  6. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  7. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  8. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is ~ 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current–applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  9. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is {approx} 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current-applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  10. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  11. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  12. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  13. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  14. Transparency and Coherence in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven; Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng

    We have developed active metamaterials capable of quickly tuning their electrical and magnetic responses over a wide frequency range. These metamaterials are based on superconducting elements to form low loss, physically and electrically small, highly tunable structures for fundamental studies of extraordinarily nonlinear media. The meta-atoms are rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that incorporate the Josephson effect. RF SQUIDs have an inductance which is strongly tunable with dc and rf magnetic fields and currents. The rf SQUID metamaterial is a richly nonlinear effective medium introducing qualitatively new macroscopic quantum phenomena into the metamaterials community, namely magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect. The coherent oscillation of the meta-atoms is strongly sensitive to the environment and measurement conditions, and we have developed several strategies to improve the coherence experimentally by exploiting ideas from nonlinear dynamics. The metamaterials also display a unique form of transparency whose development can be manipulated through multiple parametric dependences. We discuss these qualitatively new metamaterial phenomena. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE Programs through Grant No. ECCS-1158644 and the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  15. Axial ligand replacement mechanism in heme transfer from streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp to HtsA of the HtsABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yanchao; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Clubb, Robert T; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-17

    The heme-binding protein Shp of Group A Streptococcus rapidly transfers its heme to HtsA, the lipoprotein component of the HtsABC transporter, in a concerted two-step process with one kinetic phase. Heme axial residue-to-alanine replacement mutant proteins of Shp and HtsA (Shp(M66A), Shp(M153A), HtsA(M79A), and HtsA(H229A)) were used to probe the axial displacement mechanism of this heme transfer reaction. Ferric Shp(M66A) at high pH and Shp(M153A) have a pentacoordinate heme iron complex with a methionine axial ligand. ApoHtsA(M79A) efficiently acquires heme from ferric Shp but alters the reaction mechanism to two kinetic phases from a single phase in the wild-type protein reactions. In contrast, apoHtsA(H229A) cannot assimilate heme from ferric Shp. The conversion of pentacoordinate holoShp(M66A) into pentacoordinate holoHtsA(H229A) involves an intermediate, whereas holoHtsA(H229A) is directly formed from pentacoordinate holoShp(M153A). Conversely, apoHtsA(M79A) reacts with holoShp(M66A) and holoShp(M153A) in mechanisms with one and two kinetic phases, respectively. These results imply that the Met79 and His229 residues of HtsA displace the Met66 and Met153 residues of Shp, respectively. Structural docking analysis supports this mechanism of the specific axial residue displacement. Furthermore, the rates of the cleavage of the axial bond in Shp in the presence of a replacing HtsA axial residue are greater than that in the absence of a replacing HtsA axial residue. These findings reveal a novel heme transfer mechanism of the specific displacement of the Shp axial residues with the HtsA axial residues and the involvement of the HtsA axial residues in the displacement.

  16. Enhancements to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) Multiplexer Readout and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, J.; Benford, D. J.; Buchanan, E. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rebar, J.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark 111 system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided hooks in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark 111 system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  17. Peripheral injury alters schooling behavior in squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Megumi; di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Carroll, Julia; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T; Crook, Robyn J

    2016-07-01

    Animals with detectable injuries are at escalated threat of predation. The anti-predation tactic of schooling reduces individual predation risk overall, but it is not known how schooling behavior affects injured animals, or whether risks are reduced equally for injured animals versus other school members. In this laboratory study we examined the effects of minor fin injury on schooling decisions made by squid. Schooling behavior of groups of squid, in which one member was injured, was monitored over 24h. Injured squid were more likely to be members of a school shortly after injury (0.5-2h), but there were no differences compared with sham-injured squid at longer time points (6-24h). Overall, the presence of an injured conspecific increased the probability that a school would form, irrespective of whether the injured squid was a member of the school. When groups containing one injured squid were exposed to a predator cue, injured squid were more likely to join the school, but their position depended on whether the threat was a proximate visual cue or olfactory cue. We found no evidence that injured squid oriented themselves to conceal their injury from salient threats. Overall we conclude that nociceptive sensitization after injury changes grouping behaviors in ways that are likely to be adaptive. PMID:27108689

  18. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  19. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  20. HTS Fabry-Perot resonators for the far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Philipp; Prenninger, Martin; Pechen, Evgeny V.; Renk, Karl F.

    1996-06-01

    We report on far infrared (FIR) Fabry-Perot resonators (FPR) with high temperature superconductor (HTS) thin films as mirrors. For the fabrication of FPR we use two parallel MgO plates covered with YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films on adjacent sides. We have measured the far-infrared transmissivity at 10 K with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Very sharp resonances can be observed for frequencies below 6 THz where the MgO is transparent. The finesse (width of the first order resonance) is comparable to the FPR with metallic meshes as reflectors that are applied in the FIR spectroscopy and astronomy. We have also shown that thin films of gold are not adequate substitute to HTS thin films and not suitable for the fabrication of high-quality FPR due to the ohmic losses.

  1. High voltage insulation of bushing for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2012-12-01

    For the operation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) power equipments, it is necessary to develop insulating materials and high voltage (HV) insulation technology at cryogenic temperature of bushing. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is an attractive dielectric liquid. Also, the polymer insulating materials are expected to be used as solid materials such as glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP), polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon), Silicon (Si) rubber, aromatic polyamide (Nomex), EPDM/Silicon alloy compound (EPDM/Si). In this paper, the surface flashover characteristics of various insulating materials in LN2 are studied. These results are studied at both AC and impulse voltage under a non-uniform field. The use of GFRP and Teflon as insulation body for HTS bushing should be much desirable. Especially, GFRP is excellent material not only surface flashover characteristics but also mechanical characteristics at cryogenic temperature. The surface flashover is most serious problem for the shed design in LN2 and operation of superconducting equipments.

  2. Development of Prototype HTS Components for Magnetic Suspension Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldar, P.; Hoehn, J., Jr.; Selvamanickam, V.; Farrell, R. A.; Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A. N.; Peterson, E.; Salazar, K.

    1996-01-01

    We have concentrated on developing prototype lengths of bismuth and thallium based silver sheathed superconductors by the powder-in-tube approach to fabricate high temperature superconducting (HTS) components for magnetic suspension applications. Long lengths of mono and multi filament tapes are presently being fabricated with critical current densities useful for maglev and many other applications. We have recently demonstrated the prototype manufacture of lengths exceeding 1 km of Bi-2223 multi filament conductor. Long lengths of thallium based multi-filament conductor have also been fabricated with practical levels of critical current density and improved field dependence behavior. Test coils and magnets have been built from these lengths and characterized over a range of temperatures and background fields to determine their performance. Work is in progress to develop, fabricate and test HTS windings that will be suitable for magnetic suspension, levitation and other electric power related applications.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Variations of a Screening Current Induced Magnetic Field in a Double-Pancake HTS Insert of an LTS/HTS NMR Magnet

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Min Cheol; Yagai, Tsuyoshi; Hahn, Seungyong; Ando, Ryuya; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and simulation results of a screening current induced magnetic field (SCF) in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) insert that constitutes a low-/high-temperature superconductor (LTS/HTS) NMR magnet. In this experiment, the HTS insert, a stack of 50 double-pancake coils, each wound with Bi2223 tape, was operated at 77 K. A screening current was induced in the HTS insert by three magnetic field sources: 1) a self field from the HTS insert; 2) an external field from a 5-T background magnet; and 3) combinations of 1) and 2). For each field excitation, which induced an SCF, its axial field distribution and temporal variations were measured and compared with simulation results based on the critical state model. Agreement on field profile between experiment and simulation is satisfactory but more work is needed to make the simulation useful for designing shim coils that will cancel the SCF. PMID:20401187

  4. Test results of HTS magnet for SMES application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, J.; Majka, M.; Jaroszynski, L.; Janowski, T.; Kozak, S.; Kondratowicz – Kucewicz, B.; Wojtasiewicz, G.

    2010-06-01

    The magnet for a superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) conducting cooled by SRDK-408 cryocooler is described in this paper. The superconducting magnet consists of 7 double-pancake coils made of Bi-2223 HTS tape with the inner and outer diameters 210 mm, 315 mm respectively and height of 191 mm. The inductance of the magnet is approximately 1 H. In this paper we report the design improvements and the measurement results taken at the cooling of the magnet.

  5. Planar thin film SQUID with integral flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (Inventor); Sisk, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A thin film SQUID is disclosed having improved flux concentration combined with simplicity of design and fabrication. The SQUID starts with a wafer like substrate having simple planar geometry. A large area of superconducting film is coated on the substrate, with a small open or uncoated area remaining at its center to define a SQUID loop, and a gap in the film formed, beginning at the outer circumferential edge of the substrate and extending radially inward to the open area. A Josephson junction is formed across the gap near the open area to interrupt the electrical continuity of the SQUID loop. A coil is attached to the surface of the substrate, electrically insulated from the superconducting film, and is energized to induce flux within the SQUID which is concentrated within the open area.

  6. SQUID detection of magnetically-tagged microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Helene L.

    2001-03-01

    A fast and versatile technique has been developed for detecting small quantities of specific microorganisms or molecules. The target analytes are bound to a substrate and placed in the measurement cell of a ``microscope'' based on a high-transition temperature Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). A solution containing nanometer-size magnetite particles, coated with antibodies specific to the target, is added. The particles, which bind to the target via the antibody-antigen interaction, are superparamagnetic with a Néel relaxation time of ~ 1 s. A pulsed magnetic field aligns the dipole moments, and the SQUID measures the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound magnetic particles relax rapidly ( ~ 15 μs) by Brownian rotation and are not detected. On the other hand, particles bound to targets cannot rotate and instead relax slowly by the Néel mechanism. As a result, only bound particles contribute to the signal, allowing for quantification of the number of targets present without the need for a wash step. The current system can reproducibly detect as few as 5×10^4 magnetic particles - a sensitivity greater than that of the commonly used Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A new SQUID microscope has been designed and built, which may improve the sensitivity by up to two orders of magnitude. This technique could be used to detect a wide range of bacteria, viruses, and molecules, with potential applications in the food industry, clinical settings, or research laboratories. Supported by U.S. DOE Contract DE-AC03-76SF00098

  7. The Ubiquitous SQUID: From Axions to Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2011-03-01

    I briefly review the principles, practical implementation and applications of the dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device), an ultrasensitive detector of magnetic flux. Cosmological observations show that a major constituent of the universe is cold dark matter (CDM). A candidate particle for CDM is the axion which, in the presence of a magnetic field, is predicted to decay into a photon with energy given by the axion mass, ranging from 0.001 to 1 meV. The axion detector constructed at LLNL consists of a cooled, tunable cavity surrounded by a 7-T superconducting magnet. Photons from the axion decay would be detected by a cooled semiconductor amplifier. To search for the axion over an octave of frequency, however, would take two centuries. Now at the University of Washington, Seattle the axion detector will be upgraded by cooling it to 50 mK and installing a near-quantum limited SQUID amplifier. The scan time will be reduced by three orders of magnitude to a few months. In medical physics, we use an ultralow-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULFMRI) system with SQUID detection to obtain images in a magnetic field of 0.132 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI. An advantage of low fields is that different types of tissue exhibit much greater contrast in the relaxation time T1 than in high fields. We have measured T1 in ex vivo specimens of surgically removed healthy and malignant prostate tissue. The percentage of tumor in each specimen is determined with pathology. The MRI contrast between two specimens from a given patient scales with the difference in the percentage of tumor; in healthy tissue T1 is typically 50 percent higher than in a tumor. These results suggest that ULFMRI with T1-weighted contrast may have clinical applications to imaging prostate cancer and potentially other types of cancer. Supported by DOE BES and HEP, and NIH

  8. A Compact, Modular Superconducting Bolometer Array Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a detector package to house a superconducting bolometer array, SQUID multiplexers, bias and integration circuitry, optical filtering, electrical connectors, and thermal/mechanical interfaces. This package has been used successfully in the GISMO 2mm camera, a 128-pixel camera operating at a base temperature of 270mK. Operation at lower temperatures is allowed by providing direct heat sinking to the SQUIDS and bias resistors, which generate the bulk of the dissipation in the package. Standard electrical connectors provide reliable contact while enabling quick installation and removal of the package. Careful design has gone into the compensation for differing thermal expansions, the need for heat sinking of the bolometer array, and the placement of magnetic shielding in critical areas. In this presentation, we detail the design and performance of this detector package and describe its scalability to 1280- pixel arrays in the near future.

  9. Synchronous Generator with HTS-2G field coils for Windmills with output power 1 MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, K.; Kovalev, L.; Poltavets, V.; Samsonovich, S.; Ilyasov, R.; Levin, A.; Surin, M.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays synchronous generators for wind-mills are developed worldwide. The cost of the generator is determined by its size and weight. In this deal the implementation of HTS-2G generators is very perspective. The application of HTS 2G field coils in the rotor allows to reduce the size of the generator is 1.75 times. In this work the design 1 MW HTS-2G generator is considered. The designed 1 MW HTS-2G generator has the following parameters: rotor diameter 800 mm, active length 400 mm, phase voltage 690V, rotor speed 600 min-1 rotor field coils with HTS-2G tapes. HTS-2G field coils located in the rotating cryostat and cooled by liquid nitrogen. The simulation and optimization of HTS-2G field coils geometry allowed to increase feed DC current up to 50A. Copper stator windings are water cooled. Magnetic and electrical losses in 1 MW HTS-2G generator do not exceed 1.6% of the nominal output power. In the construction of HTS-2G generator the wave multiplier with ratio 1:40 is used. The latter allows to reduce the total mass of HTS-2G generator down to 1.5 tons. The small-scale model of HTS-2G generator with output power 50 kW was designed, manufactured and tested. The test results showed good agreement with calculation results. The manufacturing of 1 MW HTS-2G generator is planned in 2014. This work is done under support of Rosatom within the frames of Russian Project "Superconducting Industry".

  10. Test results of a HTS power transformer connected to a power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, H.; Honda, K.; Hayashi, H.; Tsutsumi, K.; Iwakuma, M.; Funaki, K.; Bohno, T.; Tomioka, A.; Yagi, Y.; Maruyama, H.; Ohashi, K.

    2002-08-01

    A 22 kV/6.9 kV-1 MVA high- Tc superconducting (HTS) power transformer has been developed as a prototype with single-phase part of a 3 MVA HTS power transformer. The prototype unit is cooled by a continuous subcooled liquid nitrogen (LN 2) supply system with cryocoolers. During the field tests, the HTS transformer was connected to a distribution line at Imajuku substation (Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc.) in Fukuoka, and inrush-current test and a long-term operation test were implemented. The test results demonstrated the HTS power transformer's applicability to a power grid.

  11. TEST RESULTS OF HTS COILS AND AN R AND D MAGNET FOR RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA, R.; ANERELLA, M.; HARRISON, M.; SCHMALZLE, J.; SAMPSON, W.; ZELLER, A.

    2005-05-16

    This paper presents the successful construction and test results of a magnetic mirror model for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) that is based on High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). In addition, the performance of thirteen coils (each made with {approx}220 meters of commercially available HTS tape) is also presented. The proposed HTS magnet is a crucial part of the R&D for the Fragment Separator region where the magnets are subjected to several orders of magnitude more radiation and energy deposition than typical beam line and accelerator magnets receive during their entire lifetime. A preliminary design of an HTS dipole magnet for the Fragment Separator region is also presented.

  12. The curvy photonics of squid camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Alison; Holt, Amanda; Daniel, Morse; Stramski, Dariusz

    2013-03-01

    Cephalopods (squids and octopuses) ubiquitously possess reflective structures in their skin composed of ``reflectin'' proteins. Although a few simple laminar, Bragg-stack type optical structures have been known in a handful of common squid species for some time, our extensive survey of optically active tissues of exotic deep-sea species has revealed complex, extended curvatures and topologies in dermal reflectors of these rarely-studied animals. Molecular deep-sequencing has revealed these structures also to be composed of reflectin-like proteins. Here we show a survey of some of these deep-sea reflector structures, and present evidence that each novel structure may be a transform of the radiance in the optical niche in the ocean where each of these species live, such that light reflecting off the sides of these animals in their specific ocean habitat resembles the light that would be transmitted through the animals if they were transparent, from many different viewing angles and possible ocean depths.

  13. Bicrystal YBCO dc squids with low noise

    SciTech Connect

    Miklich, A.H.; Koelle, D.; Dantsker, E.; Nemeth, D.T.; Kingston, J.J.; Kromann, R.F.; Clarke, J.

    1992-08-01

    We have fabricated 12 dc SQUIDs by laser depositing YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} on a SrTiO{sub 3} bicrystal substrate with a misorientation angle of 24*. At 77K all twelve devices had acceptable values of critical current, resistance and voltage modulation produced by an external magnetic field. The white noise energy of one device with an estimated inductance of 41 pH was 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}30} JHz{sup {minus}1}. The noise power scaled as 1/f at frequencies below about 1kHz, however, by using a bias current reversal scheme we were able to reduce this noise by two orders of magnitude at 1 Hz, to a value of about 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}29} JHz{sup {minus}1}. We made a magnetometer by coupling the SQUID to a flux transformer with a 5-turn input coil. The measured magnetic field gain was 60, and the white noise 36fT Hz{sup {minus}{1/2}}. However, the transformer produced relatively large levels of 1/f flux noise, not reduced by the bias reversal scheme, that limited the noise at 1 Hz to 1.7 pT Hz{sup {minus}{1/2}}. A single-layer magnetometer with a single-turn pick up loop is briefly described.

  14. Bicrystal YBCO dc squids with low noise

    SciTech Connect

    Miklich, A.H.; Koelle, D.; Dantsker, E.; Nemeth, D.T.; Kingston, J.J.; Kromann, R.F.; Clarke, J.

    1992-08-01

    We have fabricated 12 dc SQUIDs by laser depositing YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] on a SrTiO[sub 3] bicrystal substrate with a misorientation angle of 24*. At 77K all twelve devices had acceptable values of critical current, resistance and voltage modulation produced by an external magnetic field. The white noise energy of one device with an estimated inductance of 41 pH was 1.8 [times] 10[sup [minus]30] JHz[sup [minus]1]. The noise power scaled as 1/f at frequencies below about 1kHz, however, by using a bias current reversal scheme we were able to reduce this noise by two orders of magnitude at 1 Hz, to a value of about 1.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]29] JHz[sup [minus]1]. We made a magnetometer by coupling the SQUID to a flux transformer with a 5-turn input coil. The measured magnetic field gain was 60, and the white noise 36fT Hz[sup [minus][1/2

  15. Ribosomes in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Bleher, R; Martin, R

    2001-01-01

    Ribosome clusters, referred to as endoaxoplasmic plaques, were documented and quantitatively analyzed in the squid giant axon at the light and electron microscopic levels. The methods included nonspecific high affinity fluorescence staining of RNA by YOYO-1, specific immunofluorescence labeling of ribosomal RNA, electron energy loss spectroscopic mapping of ribosomal phosphorus, and conventional transmission electron microscopy. The endoaxoplasmic plaques were sharply defined, oval in shape, and less than 2 microm in diameter. While they were very numerous in the postsynaptic axonal area of the giant synapse, the frequency of occurrence was much lower in the peripheral giant axon, with a density of about 1 plaque/1000 microm3. Their distribution was random within axoplasm, with no preferential localization near the membrane. The several thousand ribosomes in a plaque usually were not membrane bound, but vesicular structures were observed in or near plaques; plaques were often surrounded by mitochondria. We conclude that ribosomes, a requisite machinery for protein synthesis, are present in the squid giant axon in discrete configurations.

  16. Sodium Extrusion by Internally Dialyzed Squid Axons

    PubMed Central

    Brinley, F. J.; Mullins, L. J.

    1967-01-01

    A method has been developed which allows a length of electrically excitable squid axon to be internally dialyzed against a continuously flowing solution of defined composition. Tests showed that diffusional exchange of small molecules in the axoplasm surrounding the dialysis tube occurred with a half-time of 2–5 min, and that protein does not cross the wall of the dialysis tube. The composition of the dialysis medium was (mM): K isethionate 151, K aspartate 151, taurine 275, MgCI2 4–10, NaCl 80, KCN 2, EDTA 0.1, ATP 5–10, and phosphoarginine 0–10. The following measurements were made: resting Na influx 57 pmole/cm2sec (n = 8); resting potassium efflux 59 pmole/ cm2sec (n = 4); stimulated Na efflux 3.1 pmole/cm2imp (n = 9); stimulated K efflux 2.9 pmole/cm2imp (n = 3); resting Na efflux 48 pmole/cm2sec (n = 18); Q10 Na efflux 2.2 (n = 5). Removal of ATP and phosphoarginine from the dialysis medium (n = 4) or external application of strophanthidin (n = 1) reversibly reduced Na efflux to 10–13 pmole/cm2sec. A general conclusion from the study is that dialyzed squid axons have relatively normal passive permeability properties and that a substantial fraction of the Na efflux is under metabolic control although the Na extrusion mechanism may not be working perfectly. PMID:6063685

  17. Base distance optimization for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Garachtchenko, A.; Matlashov, A.; Kraus, R.

    1998-12-31

    The measurement of magnetic fields generated by weak nearby biomagnetic sources is affected by ambient noise generated by distant sources both internal and external to the subject under study. External ambient noise results from sources with numerous origins, many of which are unpredictable in nature. Internal noise sources are biomagnetic in nature and result from muscle activity (such as the heart, eye blinks, respiration, etc.), pulsation associated with blood flow, surgical implants, etc. Any magnetic noise will interfere with measurements of magnetic sources of interest, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), in various ways. One of the most effective methods of reducing the magnetic noise measured by the SQUID sensor is to use properly designed superconducting gradiometers. Here, the authors optimized the baseline length of SQUID-based symmetric axial gradiometers using computer simulation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used as the optimization criteria. They found that in most cases the optimal baseline is not equal to the depth of the primary source, rather it has a more complex dependence on the gradiometer balance and the ambient magnetic noise. They studied both first and second order gradiometers in simulated shielded environments and only second order gradiometers in a simulated unshielded environment. The noise source was simulated as a distant dipolar source for the shielded cases. They present optimal gradiometer baseline lengths for the various simulated situations below.

  18. Broadband Tunable Transparency in rf SQUID Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a metamaterial with broadband tunable transparency in microwave electromagnetic fields. This metamaterial is made of Radio Frequency Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (rf SQUIDs). We show both experimentally and theoretically that the resonance of this metamaterial totally disappears when illuminated with electromagnetic waves of certain power ranges, so that waves can propagate through the metamaterial with little dissipation in a wide frequency spectrum. Unlike traditional electromagnetically induced transparency, high transmission through this metamaterial is due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of the rf SQUID. Transparency occurs when the metamaterial enters its bistability regime. We can control the metamaterial to be transparent or opaque by switching between the two states depending on the initial conditions and signal scanning directions. We also show that the degree of transparency can be tuned by temperature, power of the incident wave, and dc magnetic field and discuss analytical and numerical models that reveal how to systematically control the transparency regime. The metamaterial has potential application in fast tunable digital filter, power limiter and auto-cloaking. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  19. Extremely nonlinear and switchable SQUID metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental results on a superconducting metamaterial with remarkably nonlinear and switchable properties in the microwave range. The meta-atoms are RF Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), a superconducting loop interrupted by a single Josephson Junction. RF SQUIDs are similar to split-ring resonators except that the inductance is tunable due to the nonlinear Josephson inductance. This metamaterial has high tunability via DC magnetic field, temperature and applied RF power. Here we focus on the nonlinearity in our metamaterial due to the Josephson effect. The intermodulation measurements show a highly nonlinear response from the metamaterial. In an RF power dependence experiment we observed hysteretic behavior in transmission which indicates the metamaterial is a nonlinear multi-state system. As a result, we can control the transmission by switching between metastable states via manipulating the applied RF power. We also observe a unique self-induced transparency of meta-atoms in a certain applied RF power range. This extremely nonlinear metamaterial has potential application for next-generation digital RF receiver systems. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  20. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  1. Whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Matsui, T; Uchikawa, Y

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed a mobile whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield - a cylinder of high Tc superconductor BSCCO of 65 cm in diameter and 160 cm in length. We compared the noise spectra of several SQUID sensors of SNS Josephson junctions in the superconducting magnetic shield with those of the same SQUID sensors in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy. The SQUID sensors in the superconducting magnetic shield are more than 100 times more sensitive than those in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy below 1 Hz. We tested the whole-head SQUID system in the superconducting magnetic shield observing somatosensory signals evoked by stimulating the median nerve in the right wrist of patients by current pulses. We present data of 64 and 128 traces versus the common time axis for comparison. Most sensory responses of human brains phase out near 250 ms. However monotonic rhythms still remain even at longer latencies than 250 ms. The nodes of these rhythm are very narrow even at these longer latencies just indicating low noise characteristics of the SQUID system at low-frequencies. The current dipoles at the secondary somatosensory area SII are evoked at longer latencies than 250 ms contributing to a higher-level brain function. The SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield will also have advantages when it is used as a DC MEG to study very slow activities and function of the brain. PMID:16012595

  2. Squids old and young: Scale-free design for a simple billboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Squids employ a large range of brightness-contrast spatial frequencies in their camouflage and signalling displays. The 'billboard' of coloured elements ('spots'=chromatophore organs) in the skin is built autopoietically-probably by lateral inhibitory processes-and enlarges as much as 10,000-fold during development. The resulting two-dimensional array is a fractal-like colour/size hierarchy lying in several layers of a multilayered network. Dynamic control of the array by muscles and nerves produces patterns that recall 'half-tone' processing (cf. ink-jet printer). In the more sophisticated (loliginid) squids, patterns also combine 'continuous tones' (cf. dye-sublimation printer). Physiologists and engineers can exploit the natural colour-coding of the integument to understand nerve and muscle system dynamics, examined here at the level of the ensemble. Integrative functions of the whole (H) are analysed in terms of the power spectrum within and between ensembles and of spontaneous waves travelling through the billboard. Video material may be obtained from the author at the above address.

  3. Complex inductance, excess noise, and surface magnetism in dc SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Sendelbach, S; Hover, D; Mück, M; McDermott, R

    2009-09-11

    We have characterized the complex inductance of dc SQUIDs cooled to millikelvin temperatures. The SQUID inductance displays a rich, history-dependent structure as a function of temperature, with fluctuations of order 1 fH. At a fixed temperature, the SQUID inductance fluctuates with a 1/f power spectrum; the inductance noise is highly correlated with the conventional 1/f flux noise. The data are interpreted in terms of the reconfiguration of clusters of surface spins, with correlated fluctuations of effective magnetic moments and relaxation times.

  4. Dynamics of a SQUID with topologically nontrivial barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Dawood, R.

    2016-03-01

    The phase dynamics of a SQUID consisting of Josephson junctions with topologically nontrivial barriers has been studied. Its comparative analysis with the dynamics of a conventional SQUID has been performed. The current-voltage characteristics have been calculated. The dependence of the return current on the magnetic field has been found. It has been shown that the branch of the current-voltage characteristic corresponding to the resonance frequency in the case of the SQUID with nontrivial barriers is displaced by √ 2 over voltage. This effect can be used for the detection of Majorana fermions.

  5. Two junction effects in dc SQUID phase qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. K.; Kwon, H.; Przybysz, A. J.; Budoyo, R.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2011-03-01

    The dc SQUID phase qubit was designed to allow one isolation junction to filter bias current noise from a second junction operating as a single junction phase qubit. As junctions shrink to minimize dielectric loss, the Josephson inductances of each junction approach the coupling loop inductance and this single junction picture appears inadequate. We consider a two-junction model of the dc SQUID phase qubit, where the qubit now corresponds to one of the normal oscillatory modes of the full SQUID. We discuss applications of this model to sweet spots in various control parameters and unusual behavior in the tunneling state measurement. Funded by DOD, CNAM and JQI.

  6. Martian paleomagnetism with the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin Paul

    Rocks should preserve natural remanent magnetizations with stable directional and intensity information at levels ˜1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best moment magnetometers. The superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope is a new, high-resolution magnetometer that can now detect such weak signals. It maps the magnetic fields above samples with a spatial resolution of <100 mum and a moment sensitivity of <10 -15 Am2. It therefore provides data with a resolution directly comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques. This thesis describes applications of SQUID microscopy to a variety of problems in the planetary sciences. A SQUID microscope paleomagnetic conglomerate test demonstrates that ALH84001 has been cooler than ˜40°C since before its ejection from the surface of Mars at 15 Ma. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system. These and other data on panspermia demand a re-evaluation of the long-held assumption that terrestrial life evolved in isolation on Earth. Subsequent magnetic and textural studies of the meteorite show that 4 Ga ALH84001 carbonates containing magnetite and pyrrhotite carry a stable natural remanent magnetization. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology demonstrates that this magnetization originated at 3.9--4.1 Ga on Mars. This magnetization is the oldest known for a planetary rock, and its strong intensity suggests that Mars had generated a geodynamo at or before 4 Ga. The intensity of the field that magnetized ALH84001 was roughly within an order of magnitude of that at the surface of the present-day Earth, sufficient for magnetotaxis by the bacteria whose magnetofossils have been reported in ALH84001 and possibly for the production of the strong crustal anomalies. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology calculations also provide an explanation for why ALH84001 contains a sample of

  7. Glycine fluxes in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, P C; Lea, T J

    1978-05-01

    1. The influx of a number of amino acids into squid giant axons has been studied. Particular emphasis has been placed on glycine and to a lesser extent glutamate. 2. To facilitate the study of the uptake of 14C-labelled amino acids a technique was devised in which the 14C taken up was measured directly in the intact axon with a glass scintillator fibre. This technique gave results similar to the usual technique in which the axoplasm was extruded for the assay of radioactivity. 3. The changes in glycine influx with extracellular glycine concentration suggests that two saturating components are present, one with high affinity and one with low affinity. 4. The glycine influx does not seem normally to be sensitive to the removal of extracellular sodium by replacement with choline. A Na-sensitive component appeared, however, after a period of immersion in artificial sea water. There was also some depression of glycine influx if Na were replaced by Li. 5. Glutamate uptake was greatly reduced by removal of extracellular Na in confirmation of work by Baker & Potashner (1973). Orthophosphate uptake was also greatly reduced by removal of extracellular Na. 6. CN reversibly inhibited glycine uptake after a delay, indicating that part of the uptake mechanism may require ATP. 7. 14C-labelled glycine injected into squid axons was found not to exchange to any serious extent with other compounds over periods of a few hours. The glycine efflux could therefore be studied. This was found to be markedly increased by extracellular glycine and by certain other neutral amino acids applied extracellularly in the artificial sea water. 8. The enhanced glycine efflux in extracellular glycine was not affected by ouabain and CN. 9. It is suggested that glycine uptake in squid axons involves two components. One is sensitive to CN and ouabain and probably derives energy from ATP break-down. The other is probably an ATP independent exchange diffusion system in which other amino acids as well as

  8. RF-SQUID to DC-SQUID upgrade of a 28-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diekmann, V.; Jürgens, R.; Becker, W.; Elias, H.; Ludwig, W.; Vodel, W.

    1996-05-01

    A Dornier 28-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system equipped with RF-SQUIDs and control electronics made by CTF (Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada) was upgraded by replacing the RF-SQUIDs with DC-SQUIDs developed at the University of Jena, Germany. New preamplifiers were designed that emulate the function of the system's original RF amplifiers. This allowed the continuing use of the system's control electronics without any modification. Retaining these control devices was instrumental for preserving the system's unique ability to derive software-defined gradiometer measurements from its magnetometer signals, and also saved a considerable investment of control software tailored to the characteristics of these devices. The performance of the upgraded system compares favourably to that of other multichannel instruments; its software gradiometer channels typically attain an overall sensitivity of 0957-0233/7/5/017/img7 (an improvement by a factor of three over the original RF system) and suppress residual noise inside the shielded room by 40 to 60 dB. Also described are the procedures used to calibrate the system, to eliminate crosstalk between neighbouring channels, and to determine the coefficients for optimum suppression of ambient noise by the software gradiometer.

  9. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan; Yang, Xinsheng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-12-01

    HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate.

  10. BabySQUID: A mobile, high-resolution multichannel magnetoencephalography system for neonatal brain assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoshio; Pratt, Kevin; Atwood, Christopher; Mascarenas, Anthony; Reineman, Richard; Nurminen, Jussi; Paulson, Douglas

    2006-02-01

    We developed a prototype of a mobile, high-resolution, multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, called babySQUID, for assessing brain functions in newborns and infants. Unlike electroencephalography, MEG signals are not distorted by the scalp or the fontanels and sutures in the skull. Thus, brain activity can be measured and localized with MEG as if the sensors were above an exposed brain. The babySQUID is housed in a moveable cart small enough to be transported from one room to another. To assess brain functions, one places the baby on the bed of the cart and the head on its headrest with MEG sensors just below. The sensor array consists of 76 first-order axial gradiometers, each with a pickup coil diameter of 6mm and a baseline of 30mm, in a high-density array with a spacing of 12-14mm center-to-center. The pickup coils are 6±1mm below the outer surface of the headrest. The short gap provides unprecedented sensitivity since the scalp and skull are thin (as little as 3-4mm altogether) in babies. In an electromagnetically unshielded room in a hospital, the field sensitivity at 1kHz was ˜17fT/√Hz. The noise was reduced from ˜400to200fT/√Hz at 1Hz using a reference cancellation technique and further to ˜40fT/√Hz using a gradient common mode rejection technique. Although the residual environmental magnetic noise interfered with the operation of the babySQUID, the instrument functioned sufficiently well to detect spontaneous brain signals from babies with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of as much as 7.6:1. In a magnetically shielded room, the field sensitivity was 17fT/√Hz at 20Hz and 30fT/√Hz at 1Hz without implementation of reference or gradient cancellation. The sensitivity was sufficiently high to detect spontaneous brain activity from a 7month old baby with a SNR as much as 40:1 and evoked somatosensory responses with a 50Hz bandwidth after as little as four averages. We expect that both the noise and the sensor gap can be reduced further by

  11. The Basic Properties of PPLP for HTS DC Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, J. W.; Kim, S. H.

    In order to develop high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC cable, it is important to understand the cooling system, high voltage insulation and materials at cryogenic temperature. Especially, the basic properties of insulating materials must be solved for the long life, reliability and compact of system. In this paper, we will discuss mainly on the electrical and the mechanical properties of polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) in liquid nitrogen (LN2). The polarity effect of DC and impulse voltage, the volume resistivity and the space charge distribution and frost were studied. Furthermore, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength of PPLP at LN2 (77 K) and room temperature (300 K) were studied.

  12. Realizing and optimizing an atomtronic SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Mathey, L.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate with a movable barrier can be used to realize an atomtronic SQUID. The magnitude of the barrier height, which creates the analogue of an SNS junction, is of crucial importance, as well as its ramp-up and -down protocol. For too low of a barrier, the relaxation of the system is dynamically suppressed, due to the small rate of phase slips at the barrier. For a higher barrier, the phase coherence across the barrier is suppressed due to thermal fluctuations, which are included in our Truncated Wigner approach. Furthermore, we show that the ramp-up protocol of the barrier can be improved by ramping up its height first, and its velocity after that. This protocol can be further improved by optimizing the ramp-up and ramp-down time scales, which is of direct practical relevance for on-going experimental realizations.

  13. Realizing and optimizing an atomtronic SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Mathey, L.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how a toroidal Bose–Einstein condensate with a movable barrier can be used to realize an atomtronic SQUID. The magnitude of the barrier height, which creates the analogue of an SNS junction, is of crucial importance, as well as its ramp-up and -down protocol. For too low of a barrier, the relaxation of the system is dynamically suppressed, due to the small rate of phase slips at the barrier. For a higher barrier, the phase coherence across the barrier is suppressed due to thermal fluctuations, which are included in our Truncated Wigner approach. Furthermore, we show that the ramp-up protocol of the barrier can be improved by ramping up its height first, and its velocity after that. This protocol can be further improved by optimizing the ramp-up and ramp-down time scales, which is of direct practical relevance for on-going experimental realizations.

  14. Design and Development of a 100 MVA HTS Generator for Commercial Entry

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-07

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: (1) identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator; (2) develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology; (3) perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE's proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept; and (4) design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables. The design for the HTS generator was based on GE's warm iron rotor concept in which a cold HTS coil is wound around a warm magnetic iron pole. This approach for rotating HTS electrical machinery provides the efficiency benefits of the HTS technology while addressing the two most important considerations for power generators in utility applications: cost and reliability. The warm iron rotor concept uses the least amount of expensive HTS wire compared to competing concepts and builds on the very high reliability of conventional iron core stators and armature windings.

  15. Reduction of Thermal Loss in HTS Windings by Using Magnetic Flux Deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Koshiba, Y.; Izumi, M.; Umemoto, K.; Aizawa, K.; Yanamoto, T.

    Efforts on the generation of intensified magnetic flux have been made for the optimized shape of HTS winding applications. This contributes to the high efficiency of the rotating machines using HTS windings. Heat generation from the HTS windings requires to be suppressed as much as possible, when those coils are under operation with either direct or alternative currents. Presently, the reduction of such thermal loss generated by the applied currents on the HTS coils is reported with a magnetic flux deflection system. The HTS coils are fixed together with flattened magnetic materials to realize a kind of redirection of the flux pathway. Eventually, the magnetic flux density perpendicular to the tape surface (equivalent to the a-b plane) of the HTS tape materials is reduced to the proximity of the HTS coil. To verify the new geometry of the surroundings of the HTS coils with magnetic materials, a comparative study of the DC coil voltage was done for different applied currents in prototype field-pole coils of a ship propulsion motor.

  16. Magnetoencephalography using a Multilayer hightc DC SQUID Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Poppe, U.; Borkowski, R. E. Dunin; Schiek, M.; Boers, F.; Chocholacs, H.; Dammers, J.; Eich, E.; Shah, N. J.; Ermakov, A. B.; Slobodchikov, V. Yu.; Maslennikov, Yu. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    We describe tests of the use of a multilayer highTc DC SQUID magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and compare our measurements with results obtained using a lowTc SQUID sensor. The integration of bias reversal readout electronics for highTc DC SQUID magnetometry into a commercial MEG data acquisition system is demonstrated. Results of measurements performed on a salinefilled head phantom are shown and the detection of an auditory evoked magnetic response of the human cortex elicited by a stimulus is illustrated. Future modifications of highTc DC SQUID sensors for applications in MEG, in order to reach a resolution of 1 fT/√Hz at 77.5 K over a wide frequency band, are outlined.

  17. Brooding in a gonatid squid off northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Bower, John R; Seki, Katsunori; Kubodera, Tsunemi; Yamamoto, Jun; Nobetsu, Takahiro

    2012-12-01

    Brooding of egg masses by a squid in Japan is described. Brooding females were photographed in situ, and the females, their eggs, and their hatchlings were collected. The squid had all undergone gelatinous degeneration and swam slowly and continuously by undulating the fins and expelling water sporadically through the funnel. Eggs were held together by a dark, viscous material that formed a single-layer, sheet-like mass, from which hatchlings were seen to emerge. The annual appearance of brooding females in surface waters during spring suggests that they transport their egg masses from deep water to the surface before the eggs hatch. Genetic analyses identified the squid as Gonatus madokai (family Gonatidae), now the second gonatid and third squid known to brood.

  18. Squid as nutrient vectors linking Southwest Atlantic marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.

    2013-10-01

    Long-term investigations of three abundant nektonic squid species from the Southwest Atlantic, Illex argentinus, Doryteuthis gahi and Onykia ingens, permitted to estimate important population parameters including individual growth rates, duration of ontogenetic phases and mortalities. Using production model, the productivity of squid populations at different phases of their life cycle was assessed and the amount of biomass they convey between marine ecosystems as a result of their ontogenetic migrations was quantified. It was found that squid are major nutrient vectors and play a key role as transient 'biological pumps' linking spatially distinct marine ecosystems. I. argentinus has the largest impact in all three ecosystems it encounters due to its high abundance and productivity. The variable nature of squid populations increases the vulnerability of these biological conveyers to overfishing and environmental change. Failure of these critical biological pathways may induce irreversible long-term consequences for biodiversity, resource abundance and spatial availability in the world ocean.

  19. SQUID magnetometry applied as non-invasive electroanalytic chemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, B.D.; MacVicar, M.L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a SQUID magnetometer, employed as a highly sensitive ammeter, used to perform standard electroanalytic chemical measurements non- invasively. Specifically, the magnetic fields generated by the net ionic movement in the solution of a driven electrochemical system is detected by the gradiometer coils. The SQUID signal can then be compared to conventional current measurements. One such standard measurement investigated is Cyclic Voltametry (CV) which determines the I-V characteristics of an electrochemical system yielding critical kinetic parameters.

  20. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  1. Design and optimization of HTC DC SQUIDs for magnetometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, G.; Monaco, A. |; Camerlingo, C.; Russo, M.; Sarnelli, E.

    1999-04-20

    In order to optimize the magnetic field sensitivity, the authors have followed two different approaches. In the former they have analyzed the influence of the quality of YBCO films on the superconducting properties and noise characteristics of bicrystal grain boundary junctions and dc-SQUIDs. For this purpose they have studied and compared three different YBCO deposition processes. In the latter they have reported the different criteria for the design of SQUID magnetometers usable for applications in shielded and unshielded environment.

  2. High-T(c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    In our laboratory of high-T(sub c), a one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of a 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet, a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which the superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet, a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  3. Performance of Large Format Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Adams, J. A.; Bandler, S. B.; Busch, S. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Porst, J. P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have produced a variety of superconducting transition edge sensor array designs for microcalorimetric detection of x-rays. Arrays are characterized with a time division SQUID multiplexer such that greater than 10 devices from an array can be measured in the same cooldown. Designs include kilo pixel scale arrays of relatively small sensors (-75 micron pitch) atop a thick metal heatsinking layer as well as arrays of membrane-isolated devices on 250 micron and up to 600 micron pitch. We discuss fabrication and performance of microstripline wiring at the small scales achieved to date. We also address fabrication issues with reduction of absorber contact area in small devices.

  4. Development of REBCO HTS Magnet of Magnetic Bearing for Large Capacity Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukoyama, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Taro; Furukawa, Makoto; Nakao, Kengo; Nagashima, Ken; Ogata, Masafumi; Yamashita, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yoshizawa, Kazuhiro; Arai, Yuuki; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Horiuchi, Shinichi; Maeda, Tadakazu; Shimizu, Hideki

    A flywheel energy storage system (FESS) is a promising electrical storage system that moderates fluctuation of electrical power from renewable energy sources. The FESS can charge and discharge the surplus electrical power repetitively with the rotating energy. Particularly, the FESS that utilizes a high temperature superconducting magnetic bearing (HTS bearing) is lower loss than conventional FESS that has mechanical bearing, and has property of longer life operation than secondary batteries. The HTS bearing consists of a HTS bulk and double-pancake coils used 2nd generation REBCO wires. In the development, the HTS double-pancake coils were fabricated and were provided for a levitation test to verify the possibility of the HTS bearing. We successfully confirmed the magnetic field was achieved to design value, and levitation force in the configuration of one YBCO bulk and five double pan-cake coils was obtained to a satisfactory force of 39.2 kN (4 tons).

  5. [Biochemistry and functional characterization of squid mantle meat (Dosidicus gigas)].

    PubMed

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; María Pérez, L; Isabel Donghi, M

    2000-12-01

    A study for the characterization of frozen giant squid mantle (meat) protein stored at -25 degrees C for 8 month was started. In the present research, the following functional properties were investigate: emulsifying, water holding and gel forming capacities. Optimal conditions for the separation and differentiation of miofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic proteins were also studied. It was found that the unfrozen giant squid mantle meat es capable of emulifying 2.817,4 g of oil/g of protein and holding capacity was 3.64 g of water/g of protein. Related to the gel forming capacity, it was not obtain, probably due to excessive storage of the meat. With regard to miofibrilar protein obtention of the squid mantle meat, it was found that two low ionic strength washings (I = 0.05), the sarcoplasmic proteins were practically eliminated from the protein matrix. The differentiation of miofibrilar and sarcoplasmatic proteins was obtained by PAGE-SDS of the squid mantle meat extracted at two different ionic strength (I = 0.05 and I = 0.5). This work demonstrates that the giant squid mantle protein has a high emulsifying and water holding capacity, and it can be used, as a raw material, for the improvement of sausage products. About the gelling products, more studies will be necessary with fresh squid mantle meat to conclude about this functional property.

  6. High-{Tc} DC SQUID and flux transformer development

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, A.A.; Angus, V.; Betts, K.

    1994-12-31

    A description is presented of the fabrication and properties of high {Tc} DC SQUIDS and flux transformers fabricated by dry processing of pulsed laser ablated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) thin films. SQUIDs have been fabricated with either bicrystal substrate or step edge junctions. For all devices fabricated thus far, measurements indicate a similar character to the flux noise spectra with a significant 1/f noise component below 100--500 Hz. The transfer function and energy sensitivities as a function of SQUID inductances in the range 60--200 pH have been measured for bicrystal DC SQUIDs and compared with estimates. Various techniques have been employed to improve the magnetic field sensitivity of the uncoupled DC SQUID toward more practical levels including the use of large area washers, single layer magnetometers and 3-level flux transformers fabricated from trilayers of YBCO/SrTiO{sub 3}/YBCO. The properties of open input coils are presented as well as the performance of closed loop transformers coupled via flip chip geometry to the SQUID washer. A white magnetic noise level of {approx} 130 fT rms/{radical}Hz above 200 Hz has been reached with a flux transformer with a 15 turn input coil and pick-up loop area of 13 mm{sup 2}.

  7. Development of 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Yuan; Xie, Fei-Xiang; Meng, Shu-Chao; Dai, Yuan-Dong; Li, Zhuang-Zhi; Ma, Ping; Yang, Tao; Nie, Rui-Juan; Wang, Fu-Ren

    2004-01-01

    A new HTc rf SQUID working at around 1.3GHz has been developed to avoid electromagnetic interference such as growing mobile communication jamming. This new system works in a frequency range from 1.23 to 1.42GHz (centred at 1.3GHz), which is not occupied by commercial communication. The sensor used in the 1.3GHz rf SQUID is made of a HTc coplanar superconducting resonator and a large-area HTc superconducting film concentrator. We have achieved in the 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID system a minimal flux noise of 2.5×10-5Phi0/(Hz)1/2 and a magnetic field sensitivity of 38fT/(Hz)1/2 in white noise range, respectively. The effective area of the concentrator fabricated on a 15×15mm2 substrate is 1.35mm2. It is shown that the 1.3GHz rf SQUID system has a high field sensitivity. Design and implementation of 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID offers a promising direction of rf SQUID development for higher working frequency ranges.

  8. 5 MJ flywheel based on bulk HTS magnetic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltavets, V.; Kovalev, K.; Ilyasov, R.; Glazunov, A.; Maevsky, V.; Verzbitsky, L.; Akhmadyshev, V.; Shikov, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays the flywheel energy storage systems (FES) are developed intensively as uninterruptible power supply (UPS) devices for on-land and transport (especially airborne) applications worldwide. This work is devoted to the FES with magnetic suspension on the base of bulk HTS YBCO elements and permanent magnets. The developed FES is intended to be used as UPS in Russian atomic industry in case of an emergency. For the successful design of the FES the following questions should be solved: design of the motor/generator, design of the rotor (flywheel), design of the bearing system, design of the control system and system of power load matching, design of the cooling system. The developed small-scale FES with the stored energy 0.5 MJ was used to solve these basic questions. The elaborated FES consists of the synchronous electric machine with permanent magnets, the solid flywheel with axial magnetic suspension on the base of YBCO bulks and permanent magnets, the system of control and power load matching, and the system of liquid nitrogen cooling. The results of theoretical modeling of different schematics of magnetic suspension and experimental investigations of the constructed FES are presented. The design of the future full-scale FES with the stored energy ~5 MJ and output power up to 100 kW is described. The test results of the flywheel rotor and HTS magnetic suspension of 5 MJ FES are presented. This work is done under support of Rosatom within the frames of Russian Project "Superconducting Industry"

  9. HTS cables open the window for large-scale renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geschiere, A.; Willén, D.; Piga, E.; Barendregt, P.

    2008-02-01

    In a realistic approach to future energy consumption, the effects of sustainable power sources and the effects of growing welfare with increased use of electricity need to be considered. These factors lead to an increased transfer of electric energy over the networks. A dominant part of the energy need will come from expanded large-scale renewable sources. To use them efficiently over Europe, large energy transits between different countries are required. Bottlenecks in the existing infrastructure will be avoided by strengthening the network. For environmental reasons more infrastructure will be built underground. Nuon is studying the HTS technology as a component to solve these challenges. This technology offers a tremendously large power transport capacity as well as the possibility to reduce short circuit currents, making integration of renewables easier. Furthermore, power transport will be possible at lower voltage levels, giving the opportunity to upgrade the existing network while re-using it. This will result in large cost savings while reaching the future energy challenges. In a 6 km backbone structure in Amsterdam Nuon wants to install a 50 kV HTS Triax cable for a significant increase of the transport capacity, while developing its capabilities. Nevertheless several barriers have to be overcome.

  10. HTS Magnets for Advanced Magnetoplasma Space Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carte, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. Squire, J.P.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1999-07-12

    Plasma rockets are being considered for both Earth-orbit and interplanetary missions because their extremely high exhaust velocity and ability to modulate thrust allow very efficient use of propellant mass. In such rockets, a hydrogen or helium plasma is RF-heated and confined by axial magnetic fields produced by coils around the plasma chamber. HTS coils cooled by the propellant are desirable to increase the energy efficiency of the system. We describe a set of prototype high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils that are being considered for the VASIMR ( Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) thruster proposed for testing on the Radiation Technology Demonstration (RTD) satellite. Since this satellite will be launched by the Space Shuttle, for safety reasons liquid helium will be used as propellant and coolant. The coils must be designed to operate in the space environment at field levels of 1 T. This generates a unique set of requirements. Details of the overall winding geometry and current density, as well as the challenging thermal control aspects associated with a compact, minimum weight design will be discussed.

  11. Sub-Micron Long HTS Ho Electron Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harnack, 0.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The hot-electron bolometer mixer made from a high-T, superconductor (HTS) was introduced recently as an alternative to a Schottky mixer at THz frequencies. The performance of the mixer depends on the total thermal conductance for heat removal from the phonon sub-system due to either length-dependent phonon diffusion or phonon escape to the substrate. We have measured both the length and temperature dependencies of the IF bandwidth of the mixers fabricated from 25-35 mn thick YBCO films on MgO and sapphire substrates. The films were grown by a laser deposition technique and electron-beam lithography was used to define bridge lengths down to 50 nm. Mixer measurements were done using signal frequencies in the range of 1-100 GHz. For 50 nm and 400 nm long devices on MgO, the 3-dB bandwidth was about 100 MHz. At temperatures below 60 K, the hot-electron plateau was clearly seen starting around 2-3 GHz. At temperatures above 70 K, the flux-flow effects begin to dominate and the IF bandwidth increases to 1-8 GHz, while the conversion efficiency drops by several dB. This temperature dependence of the IF bandwidth can account for previously reported unexpectedly high bandwidth of HTS mixers.

  12. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect

    Waynert, J. A.; Boenig, H.; Mielke, C. H.; Willis, J. O.; Burley, B. L.

    2002-01-01

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  13. HTS compatible assay for antioxidative agents using primary cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaunitz, Frank; Heise, Kerstin

    2003-06-01

    We have used primary cultured rat hepatocytes to establish a system that is compatible with HTS for screening substance libraries for biologically active compounds. The hepatocytes were treated with t-BHP to induce oxidative stress, leading to the formation ROS. The involvement of ROS in oxidative stress and pathological alterations has been of major interest in recent years, and there is great demand to identify new compounds with antioxidant potential. In most HTS programs each compound is tested in duplicate, and may only be tested once. Because of this it is important to develop assays that can identify candidate compounds accurately and with high confidence. Using newly available cell-based assay systems, we have developed a system that can detect active compounds (hits) with a high degree of confidence. As an example of an agent that can be detected from a substance library, we analyzed the effect of fisetin as an antioxidative compound using this system. All measurements were performed using the newly developed and highly versatile Multilabel-Reader Mithras LB 940 (Berthold Technologies, Bad Wildbad, Germany). The data presented show that all Z' factors determined were highly reliable. Although the protocol is primarily designed to screen for substances with antioxidative potential, it can easily be adapted to screen for other biologically active substances.

  14. Twenty-GHz broadband microstrip array with electromagnetically coupled high-{Tc} superconducting feed network

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, J.S.; Poles, L.D.; Kenney, J.P.

    1996-07-01

    The use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) feed lines and phase shifters can substantially improve the performance of microwave and millimeter-wave printed phased array antennas. A novel antenna architecture is described that provides a broadband radiating aperture to be used as a scanning array with compatible low-loss HTS phase shifters. The approach follows an earlier design demonstrated at 12 GHz, and this work extends the approach to 20 GHz. The antenna design, radiation patterns, bandwidth measurements, and thermal analysis are reported. A prototype thermal isolator design is described that reduces the heat load of coaxial interconnections between cryocooled and room temperature systems.

  15. Nanoporous Structures Similar to Those Reported from Squid Sucker Teeth are also Present in Egg Shells of a Terrestrial Flatworm (Platyhelminthes; Rhabditophora; Geoplanidae) from Hachijojima (Izu Islands, Japan).

    PubMed

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Miinalainen, Ilkka

    2016-07-01

    Shells of the egg cocoon of a terrestrial planarian (Diversibipalium sp.) from Hachijojima were found to be composed of a lattice of parallel nanotubes of ca. 120 nm diameter oriented perpendicular to the shell's surface. The arrangement of the porous proteinaceous tubes closely resembles that has recently been reported from the sucker teeth of squid and to date is the only other example of this kind of structure. Although the array of nanotubes undoubtedly contributes to the stiffness of the shell and helps protecting the embryo, questions such as to how the planary worm produces the array of nanotubes and what exactly their chemical and physical properties are versus those of the squid sucker tooth still remain to be answered.

  16. Nanoporous Structures Similar to Those Reported from Squid Sucker Teeth are also Present in Egg Shells of a Terrestrial Flatworm (Platyhelminthes; Rhabditophora; Geoplanidae) from Hachijojima (Izu Islands, Japan).

    PubMed

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Miinalainen, Ilkka

    2016-07-01

    Shells of the egg cocoon of a terrestrial planarian (Diversibipalium sp.) from Hachijojima were found to be composed of a lattice of parallel nanotubes of ca. 120 nm diameter oriented perpendicular to the shell's surface. The arrangement of the porous proteinaceous tubes closely resembles that has recently been reported from the sucker teeth of squid and to date is the only other example of this kind of structure. Although the array of nanotubes undoubtedly contributes to the stiffness of the shell and helps protecting the embryo, questions such as to how the planary worm produces the array of nanotubes and what exactly their chemical and physical properties are versus those of the squid sucker tooth still remain to be answered. PMID:27278842

  17. High-throughput cell analysis using multiplexed array technologies.

    PubMed

    Beske, Oren E; Goldbard, Simon

    2002-09-15

    The desire for more biologically relevant data from primary screening has resulted in a dramatic increase of cell-based assays in HTS labs. Consequently, new cell-array technologies are being developed to increase the quality and quantity of data emerging from such screens. These technologies take the form of both positional and non-positional formats, each with their own advantages. Notably, screens using these technologies generate databases of high-quality data that can be analyzed in ways currently not possible. The power of cell-based assays combined with new array and analytical technologies will enable the condensation of serial drug discovery processes, thereby decreasing the time and cost of taking a hit compound into clinical trials. Here, we compare array strategies being developed towards the goal of integrating multiplexed cell-based assays into HTS. PMID:12546879

  18. Fetal cardiac activity analysis during twin pregnancy using a multi-channel SQUID system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Schleussner, E.; Kausch, S.; Grimm, B.; Schneider, A.; Hall Barbosa, C.; Haueisen, J.

    2001-05-01

    The use of SQUID magnetometers for non-invasive in utero assessment of cardiac electrical disturbances has already been shown to be a valuable clinical tool. In this way, its applicability also for the complicated case of twin pregnancy, in which the proximity of the cardiac magnetic source of each fetus can hamper the individual analysis of cardiac electrical activity, is of clinical interest. In this paper, we present fetal magnetocardiography performed on a mother pregnant of twins with 26 weeks gestational age, measured inside a magnetically shielded room, by using two identical 31-channel low- Tc SQUID magnetometer systems. Each sensor array has been positioned over one of the fetuses, according to its heart position previously assessed with the aid of ultrasound measurements. The raw data is initially averaged in time and, afterwards, analyzed by means of time plots and isofield maps. The time recordings allow the study of the morphology of each fetus’ cardiac signal and the cardiac time intervals. The resultant equivalent dipole obtained from the isofield maps indicates the position and orientation of each fetus heart. The results agree with the ultrasound analysis performed immediately before the measurements and used to obtain the approximate location of the fetuses’ hearts. Since a distinct analysis of the cardiac electrical activity of each fetus could be achieved, the results indicate the potential of the fetal magnetocardiography in the individual antenatal diagnosis of each one of the fetuses of a twin pregnancy.

  19. Retrapping Current in Bridge-Type Nano-SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, D.; Kirtley, J. R.; Hasselbach, K.

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to fabricate bridge-type nano-superconducting quantum interference devices (bridge-type nano-SQUIDs) that operate without hysteresis over a broad temperature range. Hysteresis—defined by the difference between switching and retrapping current—is one of the foremost constraints to operating nano-SQUIDs with low noise. The quantum behavior of the switching current has been explored in bridge-type nano-SQUIDs, but studies exploring the parameters ruling the retrapping current are rare. Here, we study the temperature and magnetic-field dependence of the retrapping current in two different kinds of bridge-type nano-SQUID: trilayer aluminum-niobium-tungsten bridge-type nano-SQUIDs and suspended-bridge nano-SQUIDs. Our study confirms previous works showing that the retrapping current decreases as the bath temperature increases and is insensitive to the magnetic field. Using a thermal model originally proposed by Skocpol, Beasley, and Tinkham [J. Appl. Phys. 45, 4054 (1974)], we account for, and suggest a simple formula which describes, the temperature dependence of the retrapping current. Our calculations show that the magnitude of the retrapping current is mainly dependent on the superconducting transition temperature and the effective resistance of the weak link and that the temperature dependence of the retrapping current is ruled by the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in the normal and superconducting state. Finally, we apply our calculation to newly fabricated shunted bridge-type nano-SQUIDs, which show nonhysteretic current-voltage characteristics down to at least 250 mK and display systematic voltage modulations as a function of externally applied magnetic fields.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  1. Development of the Current Bypassing Methods into the Transverse Direction in Non-insulation HTS Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Kim, S. B.; Ikoma, H.; Kanemoto, D.

    In the case of motors and generators, the benefits of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils can be represented by the reduction of 50% in both losses and sizes compared to conventional machines. However, it is hard to establish quench detection and protection devices for the HTS coils applied to the rotors of motors and generators. So, the stability of the coils is lower than for the quiescent coils applied to NMR, MRI and so on. Therefore, it is important to improve the self-protection ability of HTS coils. We have studied the methods to improve the self-protection ability of HTS coils by removing the layer-to-layer insulation and inserting metal tape instead of the electrical insulation. The operating current in the non-insulated HTS coil was bypassed into the transverse direction by the generated normal region because of their electrical contact among the winding. In this study, we examined the method to control the current bypassing on layer-to-layer for controlling the inductance of the non-insulated HTS coil. The current bypassing properties on non-insulated HTS coil wound with 2G wires will be discussed.

  2. Experimental Studies on Cryogenic System for 22.9 KV Hts Cable Sytem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, S. H.; Lim, J. H.; Yang, H. S.; Kim, D. L.; Ryoo, H. S.; Kim, C. D.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, S. K.; Hwang, S. D.

    2008-03-01

    In terms of high transmission capacity with lower voltage, a high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system is a very attractive challenge for utilities. However, the concomitant cryogenic system for the HTS cable system is one of the tantalizing problems in the operation. The reliability and maintainability of cryogenic system are the key issues to apply it to the real electric power grid. Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) is making an attempt to verify the applicability of the HTS cable system to improve the efficiency of electric power industry. Since May 2006, a 22.9-kV, 50-MVA, 3-phase, 100-m class HTS cable system with an open cooling system has been operated at the KEPCO Gochang test yard. Concurrently, another HTS cable verification test with the same electrical specification and an hybrid cooling system has been carried out by LS Cable (LSC) Ltd in close proximity to the KEPCO's HTS cable system within Gochang test yard. KEPCO conducts the operation of the open cooling system, and is evaluating the hybrid system of LSC with respect to facility performance and usability. This paper compares the cryogenic performance of both HTS cable systems and discusses cooling test results such as step response.

  3. Influence analysis of structural parameters and operating parameters on electromagnetic properties of HTS linear induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Sheng, L.; Li, D.; Zhao, J.; Li, Sh.; Qin, W.; Fan, Y.; Zheng, Q. L.; Zhang, W.

    A novel High Temperature Superconductor Linear Induction Motor (HTS LIM) is researched in this paper. Since the critical current and the electromagnetic force of the motor are determined mainly by the primary slot leakage flux, the main magnetic flux and eddy current respectively, in order to research the influence of structural parameters and operating parameters on electromagnetic properties of HTS LIM, the motor was analyzed by 2D transient Finite Element Method (FEM). The properties of the motor, such as the maximum slot leakage flux density, motor thrust, motor vertical force and critical current are analyzed with different structural parameters and operating parameters. In addition, an experimental investigation was carried out on prototype HTS motor. Electrical parameters were deduced from these tests and also compared with the analysis results from FEM. AC losses of one HTS coil in the motor were measured and AC losses of all HTS coils in HTS LIM were estimated. The results in this paper could provide reference for the design and research on the HTS LIM.

  4. Analysis on heat loss characteristics of a 10 kV HTS power substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yuping; Dai, Shaotao; Song, Naihao; Zhang, Jingye; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhiqin; Zhou, Weiwei; Wei, Zhourong; Lin, Liangzhen; Xiao, Liye

    2014-09-01

    A 10 kV High Temperature Superconducting power substation (10 kV HTS substation), supported by Chinese State 863 projects, was developed and has been running to supply power for several factories for more than two years at an industrial park of Baiyin, Gansu province in Northwest China. The system of the 10 kV HTS substation compositions, including a HTS cable, a HTS transformer, a SFCL, and a SMES, are introduced. The SMES works at liquid helium temperature and the other three apparatus operates under liquid nitrogen condition. There are mainly four types of heat losses existing in each HTS apparatus of the 10 kV HTS substation, including AC loss, Joule heat loss, conductive heat, and leak-in heat from cryostat. A small quantity of AC loss still exists due to the harmonic component of the current when it carries DC for HTS apparatus. The principle and basis for analysis of the heat losses are introduced and the total heat loss of each apparatus are calculated or estimated, which agree well with the test result. The analysis and result presented are of importance for the design of the refrigeration system.

  5. HTS Josephson heterodyne oscillator on a pulse-tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Macfarlane, J. C.; Lam, S. H. K.; Taylor, R.

    2009-10-01

    A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Josephson heterodyne oscillator based on step-edge junction technology has recently been developed (Du et al 2008 Appl. Phys. Lett. 93 033507, Macfarlane et al 2009 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 19 920). In this work, the implementation and characterization of such a heterodyne oscillator on a compact pulse-tube cryocooler (PTC) are presented. The rf performance of the oscillator cooled by the cryocooler is compared to that of the same device when cooled in the quiet gas phase of a liquid helium Dewar. Any measurable influence of additional electromagnetic noise and mechanical vibration of the cryocooler on the oscillator performance is assessed by measuring the linewidth broadening of the heterodyne oscillation. The cryocooled oscillator demonstrated excellent performance and negligible excess noise was observed when operating the PTC.

  6. Magnetizing of permanent magnets using HTS bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole which contains the HTS bulk magnet generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnet plate inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the "rewritten" magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated.

  7. Thermal property of insulation material for HTS power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeon Suk; Kim, D. L.; Shin, D. W.; Hwang, S. D.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal property of insulation material is essential in developing a high temperature superconductor (HTS) power cable operating at around liquid nitrogen temperature. The accurate estimate of the heat flux is difficult in the nonmetallic materials because nonmetallic materials have a high thermal resistance and low temperature gradient along the specimen. The objective of the present work is to develop a precise instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of insulating materials over a temperature range of 30 K to approximately the room temperature by using a cryocooler. The thermal conductivity of Teflon is measured and the accuracy confirmation is carried out by comparing published data. In addition, the experimental results of apparent thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) are presented and the temperature dependency is also discussed

  8. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B.; Janowski, T.; Kozak, S.; Kozak, J.; Wojtasiewicz, G.; Majka, M.

    2010-06-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  9. Simulation and Test for the Thermal Behaviour of a Prototype Synchronous Generator with HTS Armature Windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.-Y.; Qu, T.-M.; Song, P.; Li, L.-N.; Chen, D.-X.; Han, Z.

    A synchronous generator prototype with HTS armature windings and a permanent magnet rotor (HTS-PM) was developed. The temperature evolution during cooling and operation processes of the HTS coils was analyzed by finite element method (FEM). The simulated results coincided well with the temperature measurement data acquired by PT-100 sensors. Cooling time, terminal temperature, contact thermal conductivity, during cooling, as well as the proportion between real and calculated iron loss, contact thermal conductivity, at various rotating speeds during operation, were worked out using the FEM model.

  10. Design, Construction and Test of Cryogen-Free HTS Coil Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hocker, H.; Anerella, M.; Gupta, R.; Plate, S.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2011-03-28

    This paper will describe design, construction and test results of a cryo-mechanical structure to study coils made with the second generation High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). A magnet comprised of HTS coils mounted in a vacuum vessel and conduction-cooled with Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocoolers is used to develop and refine design and construction techniques. The study of these techniques and their effect on operations provides a better understanding of the use of cryogen free magnets in future accelerator projects. A cryogen-free, superconducting HTS magnet possesses certain operational advantages over cryogenically cooled, low temperature superconducting magnets.

  11. n value and Jc distribution dependence of AC transport current losses in HTS conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Jun; Sawai, Yusuke; Nakayama, Haruki; Tsukamoto, Osami; Miyagi, Daisuke

    2004-01-01

    Compared with LTS materials, HTS materials have some peculiarities affecting AC loss characteristics of the conductors. We measured the AC transport current losses in YBCO thin film coated conductors and a Bi2223/Ag sheathed tape. Comparing the measured data with analytical calculations, the dependence of the AC transport current losses on the n value and critical current density distributions are studied. It is shown that, considering the n values and Jc distributions, the peculiarities in the HTS materials can be taken into consideration and the transport current losses in HTS conductors can be calculated by the same analytical method used for LTS.

  12. Calibration of SQUID vector magnetometers in full tensor gradiometry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.-G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of magnetic vector or tensor quantities, namely of field or field gradient, delivers more details of the underlying geological setting in geomagnetic prospection than a scalar measurement of a single component or of the scalar total magnetic intensity. Currently, highest measurement resolutions are achievable with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based systems. Due to technological limitations, it is necessary to suppress the parasitic magnetic field response from the SQUID gradiometer signals, which are a superposition of one tensor component and all three orthogonal magnetic field components. This in turn requires an accurate estimation of the local magnetic field. Such a measurement can itself be achieved via three additional orthogonal SQUID reference magnetometers. It is the calibration of such a SQUID reference vector magnetometer system that is the subject of this paper. A number of vector magnetometer calibration methods are described in the literature. We present two methods that we have implemented and compared, for their suitability of rapid data processing and integration into a full tensor magnetic gradiometry, SQUID-based, system. We conclude that the calibration routines must necessarily model fabrication misalignments, field offset and scale factors, and include comparison with a reference magnetic field. In order to enable fast processing on site, the software must be able to function as a stand-alone toolbox.

  13. High-sensitivity SQUIDs with dispersive readout for scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, J. M.; Foroughi, F.; Arps, J.; Kammerloher, E.; Bethke, P.; Gibson, G. W., Jr.; Fung, Y. K. K.; Klopfer, B.; Nowack, K.; Kratz, P. A.; Huber, M. E.; Moler, K. A.; Kirtley, J. R.; Bluhm, H.

    2014-03-01

    In a scanning SQUID microscope, the high magnetic flux sensitivity is utilized to image magnetic properties of sample surfaces. As an alternative to the widely used DC SQUIDs, we present Nb SQUIDs for scanning with dispersive microwave readout, featuring significantly higher bandwidth and sensitivity. An on-chip shunt capacitor in parallel with the junction and flux pickup loops forms an LC resonator whose resonance depends on the flux in the SQUID. The readout utilizes a phase-sensitive detection of the reflected drive signal at the SQUID's resonance frequency. Highest sensitivities are achieved by making use of the inherent nonlinearity of the device at high excitation powers. We present a study of the characteristics and noise measurements of our sensors at 4 K. Extrapolations from our results to 300 mK indicate that flux sensitivities as low as 50 nΦ0Hz- 1 / 2 could be possible. Using high-resolution lithography, our sensors promise sub-micron spatial resolution. Integrated into a scanning microscope, they will provide a powerful tool for the study of weak magnetic effects and quantum coherent phenomena. This work was supported by NSF IMR-MIP grant No. 0957616 and the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach - Foundation.

  14. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  15. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  16. 50 CFR 648.25 - Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.25 Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish framework adjustments to...

  17. 50 CFR 648.22 - Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.22 Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications. (a) Initial recommended annual specifications. The...

  18. 50 CFR 648.25 - Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.25 Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish framework adjustments to...

  19. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  20. 50 CFR 648.22 - Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.22 Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications. (a) Initial recommended annual specifications. The...

  1. 50 CFR 648.25 - Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish framework adjustments to management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.25 Atlantic Mackerel, squid, and butterfish framework adjustments to...

  2. 50 CFR 648.22 - Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish... Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.22 Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish specifications. (a) Initial recommended annual specifications. The...

  3. Behavior of Double Junction SQUID of Y-Ba-Cu-O Bulk Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, N. D.; Tomar, V. S.; Ojha, V. N.; Kumar, Mukesh; Reddy, G. S. N.; Gupta, A. K.

    A dc SQUID like geometry with a ring and a pair of constrictions is carved out of bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor. The I—V curves exhibit hysteresis arising due to trapping of the self fields. The V—Φ curves show multiple flux periodicities with unequal amplitudes. There is twenty fold rise in the amplitude of voltage modulation in cooling from 77 to 4.2 K. The complications of presence of series and parallel arrays of granular junctions are attributed respectively to large and small periodicities observed in V—Φ curves. The modulation structure gets more resolved at 4.2 K due to reduction in thermal noise effects.

  4. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  5. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  6. Single sodium channels from the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, F

    1987-01-01

    Since the work of A. L. Hodgkin and A. F. Huxley (1952. J. Physiol. [Lond.].117:500-544) the squid giant axon has been considered the classical preparation for the study of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. In this preparation much data have been gathered on macroscopic and gating currents but no single sodium channel data have been available. This paper reports patch clamp recording of single sodium channel events from the cut-open squid axon. It is shown that the single channel conductance in the absence of external divalent ions is approximately 14 pS, similar to sodium channels recorded from other preparations, and that their kinetic properties are consistent with previous results on gating and macroscopic currents obtained from the perfused squid axon preparation. PMID:2447971

  7. Active polysomes in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Giuditta, A; Menichini, E; Perrone Capano, C; Langella, M; Martin, R; Castigli, E; Kaplan, B B

    1991-01-01

    Axons and axon terminals are widely believed to lack the capacity to synthesize proteins, relying instead on the delivery of proteins made in the perikaryon. In agreement with this view, axoplasmic proteins synthesized by the isolated giant axon of the squid are believed to derive entirely from periaxonal glial cells. However, squid axoplasm is known to contain the requisite components of an extra-mitochondrial protein synthetic system, including protein factors, tRNAs, rRNAs, and a heterogeneous family of mRNAs. Hence, the giant axon could, in principle, maintain an endogenous protein synthetic capacity. Here, we report that the squid giant axon also contains active polysomes and mRNA, which hybridizes to a riboprobe encoding murine neurofilament protein. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence that proteins (including the putative neuron-specific neurofilament protein) are also synthesized de novo in the axonal compartment.

  8. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  9. Robust chimera states in SQUID metamaterials with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the emergence of robust multiclustered chimera states in a dissipative-driven system of symmetrically and locally coupled identical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) oscillators. The "snakelike" resonance curve of the single SQUID is the key to the formation of the chimera states and is responsible for the extreme multistability exhibited by the coupled system that leads to attractor crowding at the geometrical resonance (inductive-capacitive) frequency. Until now, chimera states were mostly believed to exist for nonlocal coupling. Our findings provide theoretical evidence that nearest-neighbor interactions are indeed capable of supporting such states in a wide parameter range. SQUID metamaterials are the subject of intense experimental investigations, and we are highly confident that the complex dynamics demonstrated in this paper can be confirmed in the laboratory.

  10. Bio-application of high-Tc SQUID magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Aspanut, Zarina; Kurita, Hirofumi; Toriyabe, Chika; Hatuskade, Yoshimi; Katsura, Shinji

    2006-05-01

    We propose medical applications using ultra-small magnetic particles and a SQUID magnetic sensor. A high-Tc SQUID system for biological molecules (DNA) detection is one of that. This system is based on a hybridization process. Two strands in a DNA molecule are held together by hydrogen bonds between base pairs like a ladder. The two strands are referred to as being complementary to each other. One strand (sample DNA) was labeled with Fe 3O 4 ultra-small magnetic particles and the other (probe DNA) was anchored on a glass slide. Then they were hybridized each other on the slide. After washing the excess sample DNA, the hybridized DNA was evaluated in the presence of excitation AC field by high-Tc SQUID. The signal was initially proportional to the concentration of the sample DNA and then saturated. It means that the hybridization occurred successfully between the sample DNA and the probe DNA.

  11. Loss measurement and analysis for the prototype generator with HTS stator and permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Peng; Qu, Timing; Yu, Xiaoyu; Li, Longnian; Gu, Chen; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Dewen; Hu, Boping; Chen, Duxing; Han, Zhenghe

    2013-11-01

    A prototype HTS synchronous generator with a permanent magnet rotor and HTS armature windings was developed. The rated armature frequency is 10 Hz. The cryogenic Dewar is tightly surrounded outside the iron core. Both HTS coils and the iron core were cooled by using conduction cooling method. During the process of no-load running, the no-load loss power data were obtained through the torque measurement. The temperature evolution characteristics of the stator was measured by PT-100 temperature sensors. These results show that the no-load loss power at around 77 K are much larger than that at room temperature. The possible reason for the no-load loss increment is discussed. The ac loss power of one individual HTS coil used in this generator was also tested. Compared with the iron loss power, the ac loss power is rather small and could be neglected.

  12. Influence of Proton Irradiation on Angular Dependence of Second Generation (2G)HTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Greene, G.; Gupta, R.; Sampson, W.

    2011-05-01

    In the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) the quadrupoles in the fragment separator are exposed to very high radiation and heat loads. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are a good candidate for these magnets because they can be used at {approx}30-50 K and tolerate higher heat generation than Nb-Ti magnets. Radiation damage studies of HTS wires are crucial to ensure that they will survive in a high radiation environment. HTS wires from two vendors were studied. Samples of 2G HTS wires from SuperPower and American Superconductor (ASC) were irradiated with a 42 {mu}A, 142 MeV proton beam from the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP). The angular dependence of the critical current was measured in magnetic fields at 77K.

  13. Patch voltage clamp of squid axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Fishman, H M

    1975-12-01

    A small area (patch) of the external surface of a squid axon can be "isolated" electrically from the surrounding bath by means of a pair of concentric glass pipettes. The seawater-filled inner pipette makes contact with the axon and constitutes the external access to the patch. The outer pipette is used to direct flowing sucrose solution over the area surrounding the patch of membrane underlying the inner pipette. Typically, sucrose isolated patches remain in good condition (spike amplitude greater than 90 mV) for periods of approximately one half hour. Patches of axon membrane which had previously been exposed to sucrose solution were often excitable. Membrane survival of sucrose treatment apparently arises from an outflow of ions from the axon and perhaps satellite cells into the interstitial cell space surrounding the exolemma. Estimate of the total access resistance (electrode plus series resistance) to the patch is about 100 komega (7 omega cm2). Patch capacitance ranges from 10-100 pF, which suggests areas of 10(-4) to 10(-5) cm2 and resting patch resistances of 10-100 Momega. Shunt resistance through the interstitial space exposed to sucrose solution, which isolates the patch, is typically 1-2 Momega. These parameters indicate that good potential control and response times can be achieved on a patch. Furthermore, spatial uniformity is demonstrated by measurement of an exoplasmic isopotential during voltage clamp of an axon patch. The method may be useful for other preparations in which limited membrane area is available or in special instances such as in the measurement of membrane conduction noise. PMID:1214276

  14. Excitability of the squid giant axon revisited.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R

    1998-08-01

    The electrical properties of the giant axon from the common squid Loligo pealei have been reexamined. The primary motivation for this work was the observation that the refractoriness of the axon was significantly greater than the predictions of the standard model of nerve excitability. In particular, the axon fired only once in response to a sustained, suprathreshold stimulus. Similarly, only a single action potential was observed in response to the first pulse of a train of 1-ms duration current pulses, when the pulses were separated in time by approximately 10 ms. The axon was refractory to all subsequent pulses in the train. The underlying mechanisms for these results concern both the sodium and potassium ion currents INa and IK. Specifically, Na+ channel activation has long been known to be coupled to inactivation during a depolarizing voltage-clamp step. This feature appears to be required to simulate the pulse train results in a revised model of nerve excitability. Moreover, the activation curve for IK has a significantly steeper voltage dependence, especially near its threshold (approximately -60 mV), than in the standard model, which contributes to reduced excitability, and the fully activated current-voltage relation for IK has a nonlinear, rather than a linear, dependence on driving force. An additional aspect of the revised model is accumulation/depeletion of K+ in the space between the axon and the glial cells surrounding the axon, which is significant even during a single action potential and which can account for the 15-20 mV difference between the potassium equilibrium potential EK and the maximum afterhyperpolarization of the action potential. The modifications in IK can also account for the shape of voltage changes near the foot of the action potential.

  15. Mechanism of thickness dependence of critical current density in HTS YBCO film and its elimination using nano-engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang

    The most promising characteristic of a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is its ability to carry larger electrical current at liquid nitrogen boiling temperature and strong applied magnetic field with minimal dissipation. Numerous large scale applications such as HTS transmission cables, HTS magnets and HTS motors have been developed using HTS materials. The major limitation that prevents its wide commercialization is its high cost-to-performance ratio. However, the effort to further improve HTS current carrying capability is jeopardized by a mysterious thickness dependence of the critical current density (Jc) --- Jc monotonically decreases with increasing thickness (t) at 77 K and self-field (SF). This poses a great challenge for both HTS applications and the understanding of vortex dynamics. What further complicates this issue is the complex defect structure in HTS films as well as the creep nature of magnetic vortices at a finite temperature. After a systematic study of the temperature and magnetic field effects on Jc--t, we conclude that Jc--t is most likely the result of a collective pinning effect dictated by a random pinning potential. Besides that, thermal fluctuations also alter Jc--t in a predictable way. Therefore, by either modifying the vortex structure or pinning structure, J c--t can be eliminated. Indeed, a thin film J c has been restored in a HTS/insulator/HTS trilayer while the magnetic coupling is weakened. Moreover, Jc--t has been removed when the random distributed point pins are overpowered by strong linear defects.

  16. Cryogenic Cooling System for 5 kA, 200 μH Class HTS DC Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heecheol; Kim, Seokho; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon; Park, Taejun; Kim, A.-rong; Lee, Sangjin

    DC reactors, made by aluminum busbar, are used to stabilize the arc of an electric furnace. In the conventional arc furnace, the transport current is several tens of kilo-amperes and enormous resistive loss is generated. To reduce the resistive loss at the DC reactor, a HTS DC reactor can be considered. It can dramatically improve the electric efficiency as well as reduce the installation space. Similar with other superconducting devices, the HTS DC reactor requires current leads from a power source in room temperature to the HTS coil in cryogenic environment. The heat loss at the metal current leads can be minimized through optimization process considering the geometry and the transport current. However, the transport current of the HTS DC reactor for the arc furnace is much larger than most of HTS magnets and the enormous heat penetration through the current lead should be effectively removed to keep the temperature around 70∼77 K. Current leads are cooled down by circulation of liquid nitrogen from the cooling system with a stirling cryocooler. The operating temperature of HTS coil is 30∼40 K and circulation of gaseous helium is used to remove the heat generation at the HTS coil. Gaseous helium is transported through the cryogenic helium blower and a single stage GM cryocooler. This paper describes design and experimental results on the cooling system for current leads and the HTS coil of 5 kA, 200 μH class DC reactor as a prototype. The results are used to verify the design values of the cooling systems and it will be applied to the design of scale-up cooling system for 50 kA, 200 μH class DC reactor.

  17. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  18. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  19. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  20. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  1. Possible physical mechanisms of stochastic oscillations in RF SQUID's

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrenko, I.M.; Konotop, D.A.; Tsoi, G.M.; Shnyrkov, V.I.

    1985-03-01

    The processes of giant noise generation in RF SQUID's are studied experimentally. It is shown that the appearance of stochastic oscillations is due to different retardation mechanisms in a dynamic system, depending on the characteristics of the Josephson junctions and the external excitation. The retardation times in the SQUID's studied were determined by the recharging of the Josephson-junction capacitance (tau/sub R//sub C/), by quasiparticle relaxation processes (tau/sub epsilon-c/), and by the relaxation time of thermal processes in the junction (tau/sub T/).

  2. Design research on the conductor of 10 kA class HTS DC power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Dai, Shaotao; Zhang, Fengyuan; Huang, Tianbin; Wang, Yinshun; Lin, Yubao; Teng, Yuping; Zhang, Guomin; Xiao, Liye; Lin, Liangzhen

    2012-12-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) DC power cable shows a wide application prospect in the field of power transmission for its nearly lossless and rather high capacity. A 360 m/10 kA HTS DC power cable system, which connects the rectifier output of a substation with the bus bar of an electrolytic aluminium cell, will be put into operation at Henan Zhongfu Industrial Co., Ltd. As one of the items in this project, a 5 m/10 kA HTS DC power cable was developed, which is used to investigate the conductor design, fabrication, current-carrying capacity and stability of the 360 m/10 kA HTS power cable. The HTS DC power cable core consists of five conductor layers wound with spliced Bi-2223 wires with the length of 600 m. The cable core has five layers and 23 conductors in each layer with the outer diameter of 45.42 mm. The superconducting power cable is fabricated and tested. The critical current is about 14.3 kA at 77 K. The superconducting power cable is charged to 10 kA with rate of 10 A/s and operates at steady-state for 30 min. In this paper, the 10 kA HTS DC power cable design, fabrication and test are presented. The experimental research of the performance of spliced superconducting wire and charging, steady-state operating performance of the cable was carried out.

  3. The surface discharge and breakdown characteristics of HTS DC cable and stop joint box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, J. W.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-09-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC cable system consists of a HTS cable and cable joint. The HTS DC cable should be electrically connected in joint boxes because of the unit length of HTS cable is limited to several-hundred meters. In particular, the stop joint box (SJB) must be developed for a compact cooling system. Polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) and epoxy maybe used as insulating materials for HTS DC cable and SJB. To develop a HTS DC cable, it is necessary to develop the cryogenic insulation technology, materials and the joint methods. In this paper, we will mainly discuss on the DC and impulse characteristics of epoxy and PPLP in liquid nitrogen (LN2). The surface discharge characteristics of epoxy included fillers, PPLP and epoxy with PPLP composite (epoxy + PPLP) were measured under 0.4 MPa. Also, the PPLP-insulated mini-model cable was fabricated and then DC, impulse and DC polarity reversal breakdown strength of mini-model cable under 0.4 MPa were investigated.

  4. Heat Transfer Simulation to Liquid Nitrogen from HTS Tapes at the Overload Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, V. V.; Ryabov, S. M.; Fetisov, S. S.; Vysotsky, V. S.

    Knowledge of HTS materials behavior at overload currents is important to design fault current limiters or fault protection systems of electro-technical devices. There are sharp voltage peaks and voltage oscillations during rectangular current pulses (DC current) on HTS tapes cooled by liquid nitrogen. It is common knowledge that a homogeneous liquid can withstand certain amount of overheating before switching to the boiling phase. In the liquid nitrogen during the increase of the heat flux there is superheating (temperature overshoot) and boiling hysteresis takes place. We explain voltage peaks and voltage oscillations by the hysteresis phenomenon in boiling nitrogen during the increase and decrease of the heat flux in the nitrogen which is a result of current redistribution in the HTS tapes. Based on the measurements of voltage and temperature of the HTS tapes during current overload and numerical analysis of the process we estimated the heat-transfer characteristics from the HTS tapes to liquid nitrogen. We also obtained the information about limiting superheating of the liquid nitrogen. The influence of covers of the HTS tapes on superheating of the nitrogen is also discussed.

  5. Nonlinear buffer layers relevant for reduced nonlinear effects in HTS microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seron, D.

    2008-02-01

    Microwave devices made of a High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) exhibit a nonlinear response as the microwave power increases. The HTS nonlinearities generate a nonlinear inductance Ld(irf) and a nonlinear resistance Rd(irf) in a device. Ld(irf) and Rd(irf) are responsible for an increase of the device loss, a small frequency dispersion as well as the generation of spurious signals like Intermodulation Distortion (IMD). Nevertheless, the HTS nonlinearities in a microwave device can be reduced using a nonlinear dielectric like a ParaElectric Material (PEM). This assumption has recently been demonstrated theoretically. In a microwave device made of a HTS and a PEM, the nonlinear contribution to the capacitance Cd(vrf) from the PEM acts oppositely to the nonlinear contribution to Ld(irf). This may cancel the effect of the HTS inductive nonlinearities. The PEM also produces a nonlinear conductance Gd(vrf) in a device. All these nonlinear terms contribute to the IMD output power and the nonlinear quality factor (Q0) of a resonant passive microwave device. In this paper, the dependence of the different nonlinear contributions on frequency and applied dc bias voltage (Vdc) is investigated. The relevance to employ PEM in order to reduce the nonlinearities in HTS microwave devices is discussed.

  6. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a conduction cooled HTS magnet for SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, H. J.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.; Kim, H. M.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes design, fabrication, and evaluation of the conduction cooled high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES). The HTS magnet is composed of 22 of double pancake coils made of 4-ply conductors that stacked two Bi-2223 multi-filamentary tapes with the reinforced brass tape. Each double pancake coil consists of two solenoid coils with an inner diameter of 500 mm, an outer diameter of 691 mm, and a height of 10 mm. The aluminum plates of 3 mm thickness were arranged between double pancake coils for the cooling of the heat due to the power dissipation in the coil. The magnet was cooled down to 5.6 K with two stage Gifford McMahon (GM) cryocoolers. The maximum temperature at the HTS magnet in discharging mode rose as the charging current increased. 1 MJ of magnetic energy was successfully stored in the HTS magnet when the charging current reached 360A without quench. In this paper, thermal and electromagnetic behaviors on the conduction cooled HTS magnet for SMES are presented and these results will be utilized in the optimal design and the stability evaluation for conduction cooled HTS magnets.

  7. Focal Plane Arrays of Voltage-Biased Superconducting Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Michael J.; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J. M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Richards, P. L.; Schwan, Dan; Skidmore, J. T.; Spieler, Helmuth; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2001-01-01

    The 200-micrometer to 3-mm wavelength range has great astronomical and cosmological significance. Science goals include characterization of the cosmic microwave background, measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters, and observations of forming galaxies. Cryogenic bolometers are the most sensitive broadband detectors in this frequency range. Because single bolometer pixels are reaching the photon noise limit for many observations, the development of large arrays will be critical for future science progress. Voltage-biased superconducting bolometers (VSBs) have several advantages compared to other cryogenic bolometers. Their strong negative electrothermal feedback enhances their linearity, speed, and stability. The large noise margin of the SQUID readout enables multiplexed readout schemes, which are necessary for developing large arrays. In this paper, we discuss the development of a large absorber-coupled array, a frequency-domain SQUID readout multiplexer, and an antenna-coupled VSB design.

  8. Superconducting Digital Multiplexers for Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadin, Alan M.; Brock, Darren K.; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    2004-01-01

    Arrays of cryogenic microbolometers and other cryogenic detectors are being developed for infrared imaging. If the signal from each sensor is amplified, multiplexed, and digitized using superconducting electronics, then this data can be efficiently read out to ambient temperature with a minimum of noise and thermal load. HYPRES is developing an integrated system based on SQUID amplifiers, a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based on RSFQ (rapid single flux quantum) logic, and a clocked RSFQ multiplexer. The ADC and SQUIDs have already been demonstrated for other projects, so this paper will focus on new results of a digital multiplexer. Several test circuits have been fabricated using Nb Josephson technology and are about to be tested at T = 4.2 K, with a more complete prototype in preparation.

  9. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-11-22

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce.

  10. Scanning SQUID-on-tip microscopy of vortex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anahory, Yonathan; Embon, Lior; Vasyukov, Denis; Cuppens, Jo; Lachman, Ella; Halbertal, Dorri; Yaakobi, Elad; Uri, Aviram; Myasoedov, Yuri; Rappaport, Michael L.; Huber, Martin E.; Zeldov, Eli; Weizmann Institute of Science Team; University of Colorado at Denver Team

    2014-03-01

    We present a scanning nanoSQUID microscope with record spatial resolution, spin sensitivity, and operating magnetic fields for the study of vortex matter. The key element of the microscope is the SQUID-on-tip (SOT) device, which is fabricated by pulling a quartz tube into a sharp pipette, followed by three steps of thermal evaporation of a thin superconducting film onto the sides and the apex of the pipette. The devices operate at 4.2 K in applied fields of up to 1T and can be made with diameters down to 50 nm. The SQUIDs-on-tip display an extremely low flux noise of Φn = 50 nΦ0/Hz1/2 and corresponding spin sensitivity of better than 1 μB/Hz1/2, which is about two orders of magnitude improvement over any previous SQUID. Using this new tool we have investigated static and dynamic behavior of vortices in superconducting Pb films. By driving ac and dc transport current we can study vortex displacement and the vortex potential landscape with sub-atomic precision. Azrieli and Minerva Foundation, FQRNT(Quebec), ERC (Europe)

  11. A YBCO RF-SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luwei, Zhou; Jingwu, Qiu; Xienfeng, Zhang; Zhiming, Tank; Yongjia, Qian

    1990-01-01

    An applicable RF-superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID) magnetometer was made using a bulk sintered yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO). The temperature range of the magnetometer is 77 to 300 K and the field range 0 to 0.1T. At 77 K, the equivalent flux noise of the SQUID is 5 x 10 to minus 4 power theta sub o/square root of Hz at the frequency range of 20 to 200 Hz. The experiments show that the SQUID noise at low-frequency end is mainly from 1/f noise. A coil test shows that the magnetic moment sensitivity delta m is 10 to the minus 6th power emu. The RF-SQUID is shielded in a YBCO cylinder with a shielding ability B sub in/B sub ex of about 10 to the minus 6th power when external dc magnetic field is about a few Oe. The magnetometer is successfully used in characterizing superconducting thin films.

  12. Quorum sensing in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subhash C; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-08-07

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization.

  13. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John R.; Paulius, Lisa; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Spanton, Eric M.; Schiessl, Daniel; Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Huber, Martin E.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Gibson, Gerald W.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-09-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ0/Hz1/2. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  14. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  15. Crystallographic Study of the LUMI Intermediate of Squid Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Upon absorption of light, the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin isomerizes from the 11-cis to the trans configuration, initiating a photoreaction cycle. The primary photoreaction state, bathorhodopsin (BATHO), relaxes thermally through lumirhodopsin (LUMI) into a photoactive state, metarhodopsin (META), which stimulates the conjugated G-protein. Previous crystallographic studies of squid and bovine rhodopsins have shown that the structural change in the primary photoreaction of squid rhodopsin is considerably different from that observed in bovine rhodopsin. It would be expected that there is a fundamental difference in the subsequent thermal relaxation process between vertebrate and invertebrate rhodopsins. In this work, we performed crystallographic analyses of the LUMI state of squid rhodopsin using the P62 crystal. When the crystal was illuminated at 100 K with blue light, a half fraction of the protein was converted into BATHO. This reaction state relaxed into LUMI when the illuminated crystal was warmed in the dark to 170 K. It was found that, whereas trans retinal is largely twisted in BATHO, it takes on a more planar configuration in LUMI. This relaxation of retinal is accompanied by reorientation of the Schiff base NH bond, the hydrogen-bonding partner of which is switched to Asn185 in LUMI. Unlike bovine rhodopsin, the BATHO-to-LUMI transition in squid rhodopsin was accompanied by no significant change in the position/orientation of the beta-ionone ring of retinal.

  16. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Hoving, Hendrik J. T.; Robison, Bruce H.

    2012-01-01

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce. PMID:23015627

  17. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-11-22

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce. PMID:23015627

  18. Quorum Sensing in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subhash C.; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization. PMID:23965960

  19. Triaxial HTS Cable for the AEP Bixby Project

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, Jonathan A; Gouge, Michael J; Lindsay, David T; Roden, Mark L; Tolbert, Jerry Carlton

    2007-01-01

    Ultera has installed a single 200-meter long high temperature superconducting (HTS) 3-phase triaxial design cable at the American Electric Power (AEP) Bixby substation in Columbus, Ohio. The cable connects a 132/13.8 kV transformer to the distribution switchgear serving seven outgoing circuits. It was designed to carry 3000 Arms. Testing of 3- to 5-meter length prototype cables, including a 5-meter prototype with full scale terminations tested at ORNL was conducted prior to the manufacture and installation of the AEP triaxial cable. These prototypes were used to demonstrate the crucial operating conditions including steady state operation at the 3000 Arms design current, high voltage operation, high voltage withstand and 110 kV impulse, and overcurrent fault capability. A summary of the results from the thermal analysis and testing conducted by Ultera and ORNL will be presented. Some analysis of the cable thermal-hydraulic response based on the testing that were used to determine some of the cable cryogenic system requirements are also presented.

  20. Heat Transfer Study for HTS Power Transfer Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S.; Fesmire, J.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal losses are a key factor in the successful application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. Existing concepts and prototypes rely on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) systems that are subject to large variations in actual performance. The small space available for the thermal insulation materials makes the application even more difficult because of bending considerations, mechanical loading, and the arrangement between the inner and outer piping. Each of these mechanical variables affects the heat leak rate. These factors of bending and spacing are examined in this study. Furthermore, a maintenance-free insulation system (high vacuum level for 20 years or longer) is a practical requirement. A thermal insulation system simulating a section of a flexible FITS power cable was constructed for test and evaluation on a research cryostat. This paper gives experimental data for the comparison of ideal MLI, MLI on rigid piping, and MLI between flexible piping. A section of insulated flexible piping was tested under cryogenic vacuum conditions including simulated bending and spacers.

  1. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  2. Development of High Capacity Split Stirling Cryocooler for HTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kenta; Nakano, Kyosuke; Hiratsuka, Yoshikatsu

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) developed a high-power Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler for cooling high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, such as superconductor motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), and fault current limiters. The experimental results of a prototype pulse tube cryocooler were reported in September 2013. For a U-type expander, the cooling capacity was 151 W at 70 K with a compressor input power of 4 kW. Correspondingly, the coefficient of performance (COP) was about 0.038. However, the efficiency of the cryocooler is required to be COP > 0.1 and it was found that, theoretically, it is difficult to further improve the efficiency of a pulse tube cryocooler because the workflow generated at the hot end of the pulse tube cannot be recovered. Therefore, it was decided to change the expander to a free-piston type from a pulse tube type. A prototype was developed and preliminary experiments were conducted. A cooling capacity of 120 W at 70 K with a compressor input power of 2.15 kW with corresponding COP of 0.056, was obtained. The detailed results are reported in this paper.

  3. Novel Multiplexing Technique for Detector and Mixer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McGrath, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Future submillimeter and far-infrared space telescopes will require large-format (many 1000's of elements) imaging detector arrays to perform state-of-the-art astronomical observations. A crucial issue related to a focal plane array is a readout scheme which is compatible with large numbers of cryogenically-cooled (typically < 1 K) detectors elements. When the number of elements becomes of the order of thousands, the physical layout for individual readout amplifiers becomes nearly impossible to realize for practical systems. Another important concern is the large number of wires leading to a 0.1-0.3 K platform. In the case of superconducting transition edge sensors (TES), a scheme for time-division multiplexing of SQUID read-out amplifiers has been recently demonstrated. In this scheme the number of SQUIDs is equal to the number (N) of the detectors, but only one SQUID is turned on at a time. The SQUIDs are connected in series in each column of the array, so the number of wires leading to the amplifiers can be reduced, but it is still of the order of N. Another approach uses a frequency domain multiplexing scheme of the bolometer array. The bolometers are biased with ac currents whose frequencies are individual for each element and are much higher than the bolometer bandwidth. The output signals are connected in series in a summing loop which is coupled to a single SQUID amplifier. The total number of channels depends on the ratio between the SQUID bandwidth and the bolometer bandwidth and can be at least 100 according to the authors. An important concern about this technique is a contribution of the out-of-band Johnson noise which multiplies by factor N(exp 1/2) for each frequency channel. We propose a novel solution for large format arrays based on the Hadamard transform coding technique which requires only one amplifier to read out the entire array of potentially many 1000's of elements and uses approximately 10 wires between the cold stage and room temperature

  4. The Effect of Magnetic Field on HTS Leads What Happens when thePower Fails at RAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-02-14

    The key to being able to operate the MICE superconducting solenoids on small coolers is the use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) leads between the first stage of the cooler and the magnet, which operates at around 4.2 K. Because MICE magnets are not shielded, all of the MICE magnets have a stray magnetic field in the region where the coolers and the HTS leads are located. The behavior of the HTS leads in a magnetic field depends strongly on the HTS material used for the leads and the temperature of the cooler first stage temperature. The HTS leads can be specified to operate at the maximum current for the magnet. This report shows how the HTS leads can be specified for use the MICE magnets. MICE magnets take from 1.3 hours (the tracker solenoids) to 3.7 hours (the coupling magnet) to charge to the highest projected operating currents. If the power fails, the cooler and the upper ends of the HTS leads warm up. The question is how one can discharge the magnet to protect the HTS leads without quenching the MICE magnets. This report describes a method that one can use to protect the HTS leads in the event of a power failure at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL).

  5. Paleointensity of the Martian field from SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Fong, L. E.; Lima, E. A.; Baudenbacher, F. J.; Vali, H.

    2005-12-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies in the southern Martian hemisphere have intensities an order of magnitude larger than typical crustal anomalies on Earth. Two possible explanations for this difference are that compared to the present-day Earth, Mars has either (i) larger amounts of crustal ferromagnetic minerals or (ii) the crust was magnetized by a larger paleofield. ALH84001, the only pre-Amazonian Martian meteorite, possesses a stable magnetization dating to 4 Ga or earlier. Previous paleomagnetic studies with SQUID moment magnetometers on bulk ALH84001 grains have estimated that the paleointensity of the field which magnetized the meteorite was between 0.1-1 times that of the Earth's present field. However, these estimates may be lower limits on the true paleointensity because the orientation of the magnetization in ALH84001 is spatially heterogeneous on the submillimeter scale. This complication could have profound implications for hypothesis (ii) above. Here we first demonstrate that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy can recover the same magnetization intensity and direction of a well characterized modern-day terrestrial basalt as that measured with a 2G Enterprises SQUID moment magnetometer. A SQUID microscope paleointensity analysis of this basalt gives the expected present day field intensity of a few tens of microtesla. We further show that our new high resolution SQUID microscopy study of ALH84001, which has mapped its heterogeneous magnetization with the highest resolution yet (0.1 mm), favors the upper range of previous paleointensity estimates for the 4 Ga Martian paleofield (e.g., within a factor of several of that of the present-day Earth). However, this field, were it dynamo in origin, is still too weak to easily explain the intensity of the Martian magnetic anomalies.

  6. Development of Microreactor Array Chip-Based Measurement System for Massively Parallel Analysis of Enzymatic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Yosuke; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori

    Microarray chip technology such as DNA chips, peptide chips and protein chips is one of the promising approaches for achieving high-throughput screening (HTS) of biomolecule function since it has great advantages in feasibility of automated information processing due to one-to-one indexing between array position and molecular function as well as massively parallel sample analysis as a benefit of down-sizing and large-scale integration. Mostly, however, the function that can be evaluated by such microarray chips is limited to affinity of target molecules. In this paper, we propose a new HTS system of enzymatic activity based on microreactor array chip technology. A prototype of the automated and massively parallel measurement system for fluorometric assay of enzymatic reactions was developed by the combination of microreactor array chips and a highly-sensitive fluorescence microscope. Design strategy of microreactor array chips and an optical measurement platform for the high-throughput enzyme assay are discussed.

  7. Technology developments toward large format long wavelength bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2007-09-01

    We are developing a kilopixel, filled bolometer array for infrared astronomy. The array consists of three individual components, to be merged into a single, working unit; 1) a transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer array, operating in the milliKelvin regime, 2) quarter-wave resonance backshorts, and 3) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. The detector array is a filled, square-grid of suspended, silicon membrane bolometers with superconducting thermistors. The spacing of the backshort beneath the detector grid can be set from ~30-300 microns by adjusting two process parameters during fabrication. We have produced prototype, monolithic arrays having 1 mm and 2 mm pitch detectors. The key technologies required for kilopixel arrays of detectors to be hybridized to SQUID multiplexer readout circuits have been demonstrated. Mechanical models of large-format detector grids have been indium bump-bonded to dummy multiplexer readouts to study electrical continuity. A monolithic array of 1 mm pitch detectors has been mated to a backshort grid optimized for a 350 micron resonant wavelength. Through-wafer microvias, for electroplated, low-resistance electrical connection of detector elements, have been prototyped using deep reactive ion etching. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop large-format (thousands of pixels) bolometer array architecture with background-limited sensitivity, suitable for a wide range of long wavelengths and a wide range of astronomical applications such as imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry and applicable for ground-based, suborbital, and space-based instruments.

  8. Parametric study for the cooling of high temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Monika; Wesche, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of cooling of a binary HTS 20 kA current lead (CL) operating between 4.5 and 300 K has been carried out. Assuming that the HTS module is conduction-cooled, two cooling options for the copper heat exchanger (HEX) part of the CL have been considered, i.e. (1) cooling with a single flow of gaseous helium and (2) cooling with two flows of gaseous helium. The ideal refrigerator power required to cool the whole HTS CL has been calculated for both cooling scenarios and different values of input parameters and the thermodynamic optimization has been performed for both cooling options. The obtained results indicate that the cooling Option 2 cannot provide significant savings of the refrigerator power, as compared to the Option 1. However, it has been observed that at the same helium inlet temperature the temperature at the warm end of the HTS part, and the resulting number of HTS tapes, can be reduced in the Option 2 with respect to the Option 1.

  9. Electrical performance analysis of HTS synchronous motor based on 3D FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, S. K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Kim, H. M.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, Y. C.; Park, G. S.

    2010-11-01

    A 1-MW class superconducting motor with High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) field coil is analyzed and tested. This machine is a prototype to make sure applicability aimed at generator and industrial motor applications such as blowers, pumps and compressors installed in large plants. This machine has the HTS field coil made of Bi-2223 HTS wire and the conventional copper armature (stator) coils cooled by water. The 1-MW class HTS motor is analyzed by 3D electromagnetic Finite Element Method (FEM) to get magnetic field distribution, self and mutual inductance, and so forth. Especially excitation voltage (Back EMF) is estimated by using the mutual inductance between armature and field coils and compared with experimental result. Open and short circuit tests were conducted in generator mode while a 1.1-MW rated induction machine was rotating the HTS machine. Electrical parameters such as mutual inductance and synchronous inductance are deduced from these tests and also compared with the analysis results from FEM.

  10. MScreen: An Integrated Compound Management and High Throughput Screening (HTS) Data Storage and Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Renju T.; Larsen, Martha J.; Larsen, Scott D.; Kirchhoff, Paul D.; Sherman, David H.; Neubig, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has historically been used by the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly test hundreds of thousands of compounds to identify potential drug candidates. More recently, academic groups have used HTS to identify new chemical probes or small interfering RNA (siRNA) that can serve as experimental tools to examine the biology or physiology of novel proteins, processes, or interactions. HTS presents a significant challenge with the vast and complex nature of data generated. This report describes MScreen, a web-based, open-source cheminformatics application for chemical library and siRNA plate management, primary HTS and dose-response data handling, structure search, and administrative functions. Each project in MScreen can be secured with passwords or shared in an open information environment which enables collaborators to easily compare data from many screens, providing a useful means to identify compounds with desired selectivity. Unique features include compound, substance, mixture, and siRNA plate creation and formatting; automated dose-response fitting and quality control (QC); and user, target, and assay method administration. MScreen provides an effective means to facilitate HTS information handling and analysis in the academic setting so that users can efficiently view their screening data and evaluate results for follow-up. PMID:22706349

  11. Progress of 275 kV-3 kA YBCO HTS cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.; Mukoyama, S.; Amemiya, N.; Ishiyama, A.; Wang, X.; Aoki, Y.; Saito, T.; Ohkuma, T.; Maruyama, O.

    2011-11-01

    A 275 kV-3 kA high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable has been developed in the Materials & Power Applications of Coated Conductors (M-PACC) project. AC loss reduction of a two-layer HTS conductor was undertaken by removing the edges of YBCO tapes with low critical current density. The HTS conductor using these tapes was fabricated, and low loss of 0.235 W/m at 3 kA rms was achieved. The 275 kV-3 kA cable was designed, and the 2 m model cables were fabricated. This cable had 325 mm 2 copper stranded former inside the HTS conductor and a 310 mm 2 copper shield layer on the HTS shield layer for over-current protection. These cables withstood an over-current of 63.0 kA for 0.6 s, which is the worst situation for 275 kV systems. The partial discharge (PD) and V- t characteristics of a liquid nitrogen (LN 2)/polypropylene (PP) laminated paper composite insulation system have been integrated into the design of the insulation for the 275 kV cable. The results revealed that the PD inception stress (PDIE) did not depend on the insulation thickness, and that lifetime indices of V- t characteristics at PD inception were as high as about 80-100.

  12. Developing scientific confidence in HTS-derived prediction models: lessons learned from an endocrine case study.

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony; Popken, Douglas; Marty, M Sue; Rowlands, J Craig; Patlewicz, Grace; Goyak, Katy O; Becker, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    High throughput (HTS) and high content (HCS) screening methods show great promise in changing how hazard and risk assessments are undertaken, but scientific confidence in such methods and associated prediction models needs to be established prior to regulatory use. Using a case study of HTS-derived models for predicting in vivo androgen (A), estrogen (E), thyroid (T) and steroidogenesis (S) endpoints in endocrine screening assays, we compare classification (fitting) models to cross validation (prediction) models. The more robust cross validation models (based on a set of endocrine ToxCast™ assays and guideline in vivo endocrine screening studies) have balanced accuracies from 79% to 85% for A and E, but only 23% to 50% for T and S. Thus, for E and A, HTS results appear promising for initial use in setting priorities for endocrine screening. However, continued research is needed to expand the domain of applicability and to develop more robust HTS/HCS-based prediction models prior to their use in other regulatory applications. Based on the lessons learned, we propose a framework for documenting scientific confidence in HTS assays and the prediction models derived therefrom. The documentation, transparency and the scientific rigor involved in addressing the elements in the proposed Scientific Confidence Framework could aid in discussions and decisions about the prediction accuracy needed for different applications. PMID:24845243

  13. AC HTS Transmission Cable for Integration into the Future EHV Grid of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuijderduin, R.; Chevtchenko, O.; Smit, J. J.; Aanhaanen, G.; Melnik, I.; Geschiere, A.

    Due to increasing power demand, the electricity grid of the Netherlands is changing. The future grid must be capable to transmit all the connected power. Power generation will be more decentralized like for instance wind parks connected to the grid. Furthermore, future large scale production units are expected to be installed near coastal regions. This creates some potential grid issues, such as: large power amounts to be transmitted to consumers from west to east and grid stability. High temperature superconductors (HTS) can help solving these grid problems. Advantages to integrate HTS components at Extra High Voltage (EHV) and High Voltage (HV) levels are numerous: more power with less losses and less emissions, intrinsic fault current limiting capability, better control of power flow, reduced footprint, etc. Today's main obstacle is the relatively high price of HTS. Nevertheless, as the price goes down, initial market penetration for several HTS components is expected by year 2015 (e.g.: cables, fault current limiters). In this paper we present a design of intrinsically compensated EHV HTS cable for future grid integration. Discussed are the parameters of such cable providing an optimal power transmission in the future network.

  14. Integration of HTS Cables in the Future Grid of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuijderduin, R.; Chevtchenko, O.; Smit, J. J.; Aanhaanen, G.; Melnik, I.; Geschiere, A.

    Due to increasing power demand, the electricity grid of the Netherlands is changing. The future transmission grid will obtain electrical power generated by decentralized renewable sources, together with large scale generation units located at the coastal region. In this way electrical power has to be distributed and transmitted over longer distances from generation to end user. Potential grid issues like: amount of distributed power, grid stability and electrical loss dissipation merit particular attention. High temperature superconductors (HTS) can play an important role in solving these grid problems. Advantages to integrate HTS components at transmission voltages are numerous: more transmittable power together with less emissions, intrinsic fault current limiting capability, lower ac loss, better control of power flow, reduced footprint, less magnetic field emissions, etc. The main obstacle at present is the relatively high price of HTS conductor. However as the price goes down, initial market penetration of several HTS components (e.g.: cables, fault current limiters) is expected by year 2015. In the full paper we present selected ways to integrate EHV AC HTS cables depending on a particular future grid scenario in the Netherlands.

  15. Influence of radius of cylinder HTS bulk on guidance force in a maglev vehicle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Bulk superconductors had great potential for various engineering applications, especially in a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system. In such a system, the HTS bulks were always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which was generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, it was observed that the guidance force of the YBCO bulk over the NdFeB guideway used in the HTS maglev vehicle system was decayed by the application of the AC external magnetic field. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the radius of the cylinder HTS bulk exposed to an AC magnetic field perturbation on the guidance force in the maglev vehicle system. From the results, it was found that the guidance force was stronger for the bulk with bigger radius and the guidance force decay rates of the bulks were approximately equal despite of the different radius in the maglev vehicle system. Therefore, in order to obtain higher guidance force in the maglev vehicle system, we could use the cylinder HTS bulks with the bigger radius.

  16. Two-stage SQUID systems and transducers development for MiniGRAIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, L.; Podt, M.; Bassan, M.; Flokstra, J.; Karbalai-Sadegh, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Reinke, W.; Shumack, A.; Srinivas, S.; de Waard, A.; Frossati, G.

    2004-03-01

    We present measurements on a two-stage SQUID system based on a dc-SQUID as a sensor and a DROS as an amplifier. We measured the intrinsic noise of the dc-SQUID at 4.2 K. A new dc-SQUID has been fabricated. It was specially designed to be used with MiniGRAIL transducers. Cooling fins have been added in order to improve the cooling of the SQUID and the design is optimized to achieve the quantum limit of the sensor SQUID at temperatures above 100 mK. In this paper we also report the effect of the deposition of a Nb film on the quality factor of a small mass Al5056 resonator. Finally, the results of Q-factor measurements on a capacitive transducer for the current MiniGRAIL run are presented.

  17. The Role of HTS in Drug Discovery at the University of Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Martha J.; Larsen, Scott D.; Fribley, Andrew; Grembecka, Jolanta; Homan, Kristoff; Mapp, Anna; Haak, Andrew; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) is an integral part of a highly collaborative approach to drug discovery at the University of Michigan. The HTS lab is one of four core centers that provide services to identify, produce, screen and follow-up on biomedical targets for faculty. Key features of this system are: protein cloning and purification, protein crystallography, small molecule and siRNA HTS, medicinal chemistry and pharmacokinetics. Therapeutic areas that have been targeted include anti-bacterial, metabolic, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, anti-cancer and anti-viral. The centers work in a coordinated, interactive environment to affordably provide academic investigators with the technology, informatics and expertise necessary for successful drug discovery. This review provides an overview of these centers at the University of Michigan, along with case examples of successful collaborations with faculty. PMID:24409957

  18. Reliability Test of a 1-kW Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Hts Cable Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.-L.; Henzler, G. W.; Royal, J. H.; Billingham, J. F.

    2010-04-01

    The recent progress of a large Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler is reported based on 24/7 operation since August 2008 in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable application at American Electric Power's (AEP) Bixby Road substation in Columbus, OH. The 20-kW pressure wave generator (PWG) has been upgraded to a second generation design. The in-line configured pulse tube coldhead, rated at 1 kW at 77 K, was developed by Praxair. The objective of the continued testing at the HTS cable demonstration facility is to accumulate cryocooler operating hours and demonstrate system reliability. The cryocooler uses a parallel flow from the main vacuum subcooling refrigerator then both flows are supplied to the HTS cable inlet. The cryocooler operation has shown consistent results with satisfactory cooling performance. The field demonstrated thermodynamic efficiency is 15% of Carnot at 72 K.

  19. Low Temperature Performance of a Boost Converter with MPP and HTS Inductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature performance of a 150 W, 50 kHz, 24/48 V boost PWM dc-to-dc converter is reported. The efficiency of the converter using a molypermalloy powder (MPP) core based inductor went up from 94% at room temperature (23 C) to 95.9% at liquid nitrogen temperature (-196 C). A BSCCO based high temperature superconducting (HTS) inductor with a transition temperature of approximately -158 C was compared to a MPP core based inductor in terms of the power converter performance at liquid nitrogen temperature. The use of the HTS inductor in the converter tested yielded no significant performance improvement over the same converter with the MPP inductor. The experimental results are discussed along with the HTS inductor characteristics.

  20. A 1.3-GHz LTS/HTS NMR Magnet–A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Juan; Hahn, Seungyong; Park, Dong Keun; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present details of a 600 MHz HTS insert (H600) double pancake (DP) windings. It will first be operated in the bore of a 500 MHz LTS magnet, achieving a frequency of 1.1 GHz. Upon completion of H600, we will embark on the final phase (Phase 3B) of a 3-Phase program began in 2000: completion of a high resolution 1.3 GHz LTS/HTS magnet. In Phase 3B, the H600 will be coupled to a 700 MHz LTS magnet to achieve the ultimate frequency of 1.3 GHz. The HTS insert is composed of two concentric stacks of double pancakes, one wound with high strength BSCCO-2223 tape, the other with YBCO coated conductor. Details include conductor and coil parameters, winding procedure, DPs mechanical support and integration to the background 500 MHz LTS magnet. Test results of individual DPs in LN2 are also presented. PMID:22081752

  1. The Dynamic Characteristics on the Wall Traveling of the HTS Bulk Superconducting Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawae, M.; Kim, S. B.; Ozasa, S.; Nakano, H.; Kobayashi, H.

    The electric device applications of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk having stable levitation and suspension properties due to their strong flux pinning force have been proposed and developed. We have been investigating the three-dimensional (3-D) superconducting actuator using HTS bulk to develop the transportation device with non-contact and moves in free space. It is expected that our proposed 3-D superconducting actuator to be useful as a transporter used in clean room which manufactures the silicon wafer where dislikes mechanical contact and dust. Proposed the actuator consists of a field-cooled HTS bulk for mover and two-dimensional arranged multiple electromagnets as a stator. In our previous study, the dynamic characteristics on the floor traveling of the HTS bulk mover had been studied. Therefore in this study, a system for the wall traveling was proposed to use the limited space effectively. It is expected that the wall traveling system is very useful to apply the transporter used in the tunnels which flammable gas may be produced. In this paper, the optimal angle between electromagnets located at floor and wall for moving to the wall traveling from the floor traveling was investigated experimentally. The position displacement on the rotating of the HTS bulk during the wall traveling was measured. As a result, the bulk with initial gap of 2 mm could move to the wall traveling from the floor traveling. Also, the position displacement on the height direction during the rotating of the HTS bulk was 18 mm from the initial position because of its gravity,but it was possible to rotate by changing the pattern NSNS of the trapped magnetic field in near the initial position.

  2. Performance of the BG1Luc ER TA method in a qHTS format.

    PubMed

    Ceger, Patricia; Allen, David; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Casey, Warren

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the BG1Luc4E2 estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation (TA) method (BG1Luc ER TA) was accepted by U.S. regulatory agencies and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to detect substances with ER agonist activity. The method is now part of the Tier 1 testing battery in the Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The BG1Luc ER TA method uses the BG1 ovarian cell line that endogenously expresses full-length ER (α and β) and is stably transfected with a plasmid containing four estrogen responsive elements upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. To allow increased throughput and testing efficiency, the BG1Luc ER TA ("BG1 manual") method was adapted for quantitative high-throughput screening (BG1 qHTS) in the U.S. Tox21 testing program. The BG1 qHTS test method was used to test approximately 10,000 chemicals three times each, and concentration-response data (n=15) were analyzed to evaluate test method performance. The balanced accuracy of the BG1 qHTS test method (97% [32/33]) was determined by comparing results to ER TA performance standards for the BG1 manual method. Concordance between the BG1 manual and qHTS methods was 92% (57/62) when calculated for a larger set of non-reference chemicals tested in both methods. These data demonstrate that the performance of the BG1 qHTS is similar to the currently accepted BG1 manual method, thereby establishing the utility of the BG1 qHTS method for identifying ER active environmental chemicals. PMID:26117232

  3. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, Adam N; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films. PMID:27296586

  4. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughan, Adam N.; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-06-01

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films.

  5. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  6. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, Adam N; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-06-14

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films.

  7. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction

    PubMed Central

    McCaughan, Adam N.; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films. PMID:27296586

  8. Transport of cytoskeletal elements in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, M; Schmidek, A; Galbraith, J A; Gallant, P E; Reese, T S

    1995-01-01

    In order to explore how cytoskeletal proteins are moved by axonal transport, we injected fluorescent microtubules and actin filaments as well as exogenous particulates into squid giant axons and observed their movements by confocal microscopy. The squid giant axon is large enough to allow even cytoskeletal assemblies to be injected without damaging the axon or its transport mechanisms. Negatively charged, 10- to 500-nm beads and large dextrans moved down the axon, whereas small (70 kDa) dextrans diffused in all directions and 1000-nm beads did not move. Only particles with negative charge were transported. Microtubules and actin filaments, which have net negative charges, made saltatory movements down the axon, resulting in a net rate approximating that previously shown for slow transport of cytoskeletal elements. The present observations suggest that particle size and charge determine which materials are transported down the axon. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524791

  9. Transport of cytoskeletal elements in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, M; Schmidek, A; Galbraith, J A; Gallant, P E; Reese, T S

    1995-12-01

    In order to explore how cytoskeletal proteins are moved by axonal transport, we injected fluorescent microtubules and actin filaments as well as exogenous particulates into squid giant axons and observed their movements by confocal microscopy. The squid giant axon is large enough to allow even cytoskeletal assemblies to be injected without damaging the axon or its transport mechanisms. Negatively charged, 10- to 500-nm beads and large dextrans moved down the axon, whereas small (70 kDa) dextrans diffused in all directions and 1000-nm beads did not move. Only particles with negative charge were transported. Microtubules and actin filaments, which have net negative charges, made saltatory movements down the axon, resulting in a net rate approximating that previously shown for slow transport of cytoskeletal elements. The present observations suggest that particle size and charge determine which materials are transported down the axon.

  10. Excitability of the Clay model for squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, K; Kauffmann, Audrey; Mestivier, Denis

    2003-09-01

    The squid giant axon is the canonical experimental membrane prototype for the study of action potential generation. This work is concerned with Clay's model for this preparation, which implements the nonlinear dependence of sodium and potassium currents on voltage, a multicompartmental description of sodium channel kinetics that takes into account the dependence between activation and inactivation, revised potassium activation function, and potassium accumulation in the axoplasm and its uptake by glial cells. This model accounts better than the standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model for the response of squid giant axons to various stimuli. We systematically compare the responses of the Clay model and the standard HH model to pulse-like and constant current stimuli. We also analyze hybrid models that combine features from both models. These studies reveal that the differences between the sodium currents account for the main difference between the two models, namely the lower excitability of the Clay model.

  11. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-01-01

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. We also consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. The first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation. PMID:26641890

  12. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-12-07

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. Additionally, we consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. Furthermore, the first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation.

  13. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-12-07

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. Additionally, we consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. Furthermore, the first two regimes can be controlled bymore » the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation.« less

  14. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schönau, T; Zakosarenko, V; Schmelz, M; Stolz, R; Anders, S; Linzen, S; Meyer, M; Meyer, H-G

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz(1/2). The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  15. Scanning SQUID microscopy in a cryogen-free refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Brian T.; Low, David; Prawiroatmodjo, Guenevere E. D. K.; Nangoi, J. Kevin; Kim, Jihoon; Nowack, Katja C.

    With helium prices rising and supply becoming increasingly uncertain, it has become attractive to use dry cryostats with cryocoolers rather than liquid helium to reach low temperatures. However, a cryocooler introduces vibrations at the sample stage, making scanning probe experiments more challenging. Here, we report our progress on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope implemented for the first time in a compact, cryogen-free 5 K system. Our microscope is designed to reach submicron spatial resolution and a flux sensitivity of approximately 1 μΦ0 /√{ Hz} , where Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum. To enable height feedback while approaching and scanning samples, we mount the SQUID on a quartz tuning fork. Our system promises to meet the capabilities of similar systems implemented in helium cryostats.

  16. Multi-tone response of Nonlinear rf-SQUID metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Mukhanov, Oleg; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven

    We study the multi-tone response over a broad microwave frequency range of a nonlinear superconducting meta-atom and a metamaterial composed of Radio Frequency Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (rf-SQUIDs). Nonlinearity in the SQUID metamaterial gives rise to large-range tunable resonance via dc/rf magnetic field and temperature, it also results in signal mixing through intermodulation distortion (IMD). Our metamaterial responds to multi-frequency signals and generates strong higher order intermodulation signals in a certain range of applied rf power. However, our meta-atom and metamaterial show a reduced third-order IMD generation around the resonance, which is unusual for typical nonlinear systems. The numerical simulation predicts the same IMD gap feature as in experiment. A comprehensive analytical model is applied to explain the phenomena, and methods to enhance, or reduce, intermodulation levels are explored. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through Grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  17. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1984-03-13

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  18. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by squid gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1984-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  19. Reversible electrical breakdown of squid giant axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Benz, R; Conti, F

    1981-07-01

    Charge pulse relaxation experiments were performed on squid giant axon. In the low voltage range, the initial voltage across squid axon membrane was a linear function of the injected charge. For voltages of the order of 1 V this relationship between injected charge and voltage across the membrane changes abruptly. Because of a high conductance state caused by these large electric fields the voltage across the membrane cannot be made large enough to exceed a critical value, Vc, defined as the breakdown voltage, Vc has for squid axon membrane a value of 1.1 V at 12 degrees C. During breakdown the specific membrane conductance exceeds 1 S. cm-2. Electrical breakdown produced by charge pulses of few microseconds duration have no influence on the excitability of the squid axon membrane. The resealing process of the membrane is so fast that a depolarizing breakdown is followed by the falling phase of a normal action potential. Thus, membrane voltages close to Vc open the sodium channels in few microseconds, but do not produce a decrease of the time constant of potassium activation large enough to cause the opening of a significant percentage of channels in a time of about 10 mus. It is probable that the reversible electrical breakdown is mainly caused by mechanical instability produced by electrostriction of the membrane (electrochemical model), but the decrease in the Born energy for ion injection into the membrane, accompanying the decrease in membrane thickness, may play also an important role. Because of the high conductance of the membrane during breakdown it seems very likely that this results in pore formation.

  20. Absolute calibration and beam background of the Squid Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.M.; Cameron, P.R.; Shea, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of beam background in Squid Polarimetry is not without residual benefits. The authors may deliberately generate beam background by gently kicking the beam at the spin tune frequency. This signal may be used to accomplish a simple and accurate absolute calibration of the polarimeter. The authors present details of beam background calculations and their application to polarimeter calibration, and suggest a simple proof-of-principle accelerator experiment.

  1. Levitation or suspension: Which one is better for the heavy-load HTS maglev transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Kang, Dong; Yang, X. F.; Wang, Fei; Peng, G. H.; Zheng, Jun; Ma, G. T.; Wang, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    Because of the limitation of permanent magnet (PM), the efficient of bulk high-Tc superconductor (HTSC) in a high-Tc superconducting (HTS) maglev system is not very high. It is better to magnetize the bulk HTSC with a high trapped field to increase the force density. The different application type of magnetized bulk HTSC in a maglev system, namely, levitation or suspension type, will bring quite different operation performance. This paper discusses the influence of application type on operation performance of magnetized bulk HTSC by experiments and simulations. From the discussion, it can be found which application type is better for the heavy-load HTS maglev system.

  2. A computer-aided method for postproduction tuning of HTS filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Tao; Fang, Lan; Yan, Shaolin; Zhao, Xinjie; Zhou, Tiege; You, Shitou; Ma, Weigang; Yue, Hongwei; Xie, Qinglian

    2007-12-01

    The empirical tuning of high temperature superconducting (HTS) filters is usually time-consuming and expensive. A computer-aided tuning method is presented in this paper. By means of optimization, the method diagnoses detuning of individual resonators quantitatively in the tuning process, and then by using neural network models the method is able to give the operator a decision on how much the corresponding tuning screws should be tuned. So, compared with the empirical tuning method, this method can be used to tune the HTS filters accurately with less time and cost.

  3. A study on insulation characteristics according to cooling methods of the HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Cheon, H. G.; Choi, J. W.; Kim, H. J.; Seong, K. C.; Kim, S. H.

    2010-11-01

    The high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS SMES) stores electric power in the form of magnetic energy, and then converts it to electric energy. For the operation, the HTS SMES must have a cryogenic temperature. The cooling methods for a cryogenic temperature are divided into an immersed method and a conduction cooled method. The immersed method is a direct cooling method that immerses the superconducting magnet into a cryogen. On the other hand, the conduction cooled method is an indirect cooling method that cools a superconductor through thermal conduction with a cryocooler. This paper classified the structures of insulation according to cooling methods, and studied the insulation characteristics of each insulation factor.

  4. Nanobridge SQUIDs as calorimetric inductive particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, John; Cox, David; Hao, Ling

    2015-08-01

    Superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) have made dramatic progress since their invention some 65 years ago (Andrews et al 1949 Phys. Rev. 76 154-155 Irwin and Hilton 2005 Topics Appl. Phys. 99 63-149) until now there are major imaging arrays of TESs with as many as 7588 separate sensors. These are extensively used by astronomers for some ground-breaking observations (Hattori et al 2013 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 732 299-302). The great success of TES systems has tended to overshadow other superconducting sensor developments. However there are other types (Sobolewski et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 13 1151-7 Hadfield 2009 Nat. Photonics 3 696-705) which are discussed in papers within this special edition of the journal. Here we describe a quite different type of detector, also applicable to single photon detection but possessing possible advantages (higher sensitivity, higher operating temperature) over the conventional TES, at least for single detectors.

  5. Isolation and characteristics of trypsin inhibitor from the hepatopancreas of a squid (Todarodes pacificus).

    PubMed

    Kishimura, H; Saeki, H; Hayashi, K

    2001-08-01

    Trypsin inhibitor was purified from the hepatopancreas of squid (Todarodes pacificus). The final inhibitor preparation was nearly homogeneous by SDS-PAGE with an estimated molecular weight of approximately 6300. The squid trypsin inhibitor was acid- and heat-stable, and active against trypsins from the pyloric ceca of starfish (Asterias amurensis) and saury (Cololabis saira) and porcine pancreatic trypsin. Amino acid composition of the squid trypsin inhibitor was compared with other invertebrate trypsin inhibitors. The squid trypsin inhibitor inhibited the autolysis of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) myofibrillar proteins. PMID:11470450

  6. An integrated system of SQUIDs for the study of macroscopic quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmelli, C.; Castellano, M. G.; Leoni, R.; Torrioli, R.; Carelli, P.; Chiarello, F.

    2001-12-01

    The observation and study of macroscopic quantum coherence (MQC), i.e. the coherent superposition and evolution of macroscopically distinct quantum states, is of great importance for both our understanding of nature and for quantum engineering, for example in quantum computing. Recently a first indication of MQC in a system of SQUIDs has been indirectly observed by means of spectroscopic techniques. Applications like quantum computing, however, require the manipulation and the observation of the time evolution of the MQC states. We have realized a system of SQUIDs for the study of MQC. Our system, based on trilayer Nb/AlOx/Nb technology, consists of a double rf-SQUID, source of the MQC state, inductively coupled to a non-hysteretic dc-SQUID magnetometer and to a hysteretic dc-SQUID threshold detector, used for the read-out of the magnetic flux state. The magnetometer is used to test and monitor the rf-SQUID behaviour, while the hysteretic dc-SQUID is used to perform fast measurements with a reduced back action on the rf-SQUID. We present measurements performed at 4.2 K and at 20 mK to characterize the single devices and their overall behaviour, and a scheme for the use of a set of SQUIDs as a qubit system.

  7. Trophic niche of squids: Insights from isotopic data in marine systems worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Joan; Coll, Marta; Somes, Christoper J.; Olson, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    Cephalopods are an important prey resource for fishes, seabirds, and marine mammals, and are also voracious predators on crustaceans, fishes, squid and zooplankton. Because of their high feeding rates and abundance, squids have the potential to exert control on the recruitment of commercially important fishes. In this review, we synthesize the available information for two intrinsic markers (δ15N and δ13C isotopic values) in squids for all oceans and several types of ecosystems to obtain a global view of the trophic niches of squids in marine ecosystems. In particular, we aimed to examine whether the trophic positions and trophic widths of squid species vary among oceans and ecosystem types. To correctly compare across systems, we adjusted squid δ15N values for the isotopic variability of phytoplankton at the base of the food web provided by an ocean circulation-biogeochemistry-isotope model. Studies that focused on the trophic ecology of squids using isotopic techniques were few, and most of the information on squids was from studies on their predators. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic positions and exploit a large range of trophic resources, reflecting the versatility of their feeding behavior and confirming conclusions from food-web models. Clear differences in both trophic position and trophic width were found among oceans and ecosystem types. The study also reinforces the importance of considering the natural variation in isotopic values when comparing the isotopic values of consumers inhabiting different ecosystems.

  8. Telegraph-like noise in Y-Ba-Cu oxide thin-film dc SQUID's

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, M.; Kuriki, S.

    1988-08-15

    We have observed a telegraph-like noise in dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's) made of low-temperature synthesized superconducting Y-Ba-Cu oxide thin films. The voltage of the SQUID jumps among two to four discrete levels randomly with time, and exhibits a Lorentzian type frequency dependence in the power spectrum. Periodic modulations of the voltage with magnetic flux are observed in a SQUID having narrow bridges of submicrometer width. The flux noise of the SQUID is dominated by the telegraph-like noise at low frequencies.

  9. Hierarchical, Self-Similar Structure in Native Squid Pen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei-Chi; Peters, Robert; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Proteins, chitin and keratin form the elementary building blocks of many biomaterials. How these molecules assemble into larger, macroscopic structures with very different properties is the fundamental question we are trying to answer. Squid pen is a transparent backbone inside the squid, which supports the mantle of the squid. The pens show a hierarchical, self-similar structure under the microscope and the AFM with fibers from 500 μm to 0.2 μm in diameter. The chitin molecules form nano-crystallites of monoclinic lattice symmetry surrounded by a protein layer, resulting in β-chitin nano-fibrils. Signals corresponding to the α-coil protein phase and β-chitin were observed in X-ray experiments in-situ. The molecular structure is highly anisotropic with 90% of the α-coils and β-chitin crystallites oriented along the fiber-axis indicating a strong correlation between the structures on millimeters down to the molecular scale. This research was funded by NSERC, NRC, CFI, and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation.

  10. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of shunted μ-SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nikhil; Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2014-04-24

    In order to eliminate hysteresis, we have fabricated and characterized niobium based shunted micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUIDs). We find a wide temperature range where these μ-SQUIDs are non-hysteretic in nature and show a very good I{sub c} vs. B oscillations in hysteretic regime and V vs. B oscillations in non-hysteretic regime. Here we report the characteristics of a shunted- μ-SQUID (Wf38LS72D5). In this device we have achieved a large voltage modulation, in non-hysteretic regime, at various temperatures including such as 1.1 mV at 6.62 K with a transfer function V{sub Φ} = 7.2mV/Φ{sub 0}. The figures within the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, the article re-flowed and pagination increased from 3 to 4 pages. This article was updated on 14 May 2014 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged. Readers are advised that the replacement article PDF file contains an additional blank page to preserve the original pagination.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of shunted μ-SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2014-04-01

    In order to eliminate hysteresis, we have fabricated and characterized niobium based shunted micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUIDs). We find a wide temperature range where these μ-SQUIDs are non-hysteretic in nature and show a very good Ic vs. B oscillations in hysteretic regime and V vs. B oscillations in non-hysteretic regime. Here we report the characteristics of a shunted- μ-SQUID (Wf38LS72D5). In this device we have achieved a large voltage modulation, in non-hysteretic regime, at various temperatures including such as 1.1 mV at 6.62 K with a transfer function VΦ = 7.2mV/Φ0. The figures within the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, the article re-flowed and pagination increased from 3 to 4 pages. This article was updated on 14 May 2014 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged. Readers are advised that the replacement article PDF file contains an additional blank page to preserve the original pagination.

  13. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  15. Tunable Anomalous Supercurrent in a topological tri-junction SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurter, C.; Finck, A. D. K.; Ghaemi, P.; Hor, Y. S.; van Harlingen, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    There has been intense interest in realizing Majorana fermions (MFs) in solid-state systems. Circuits of Josephson junctions (JJs) made of closely spaced s-wave superconductors on 3D topological insulators have been proposed to host zero energy Andreev bound states (ABSs) that act like MFs. Here, we present signatures of an anomalous supercurrent carried by topologically non-trivial low energy ABSs in a Nb/Bi2Se3/Nb tri-junction SQUID where two of the three superconducting leads are connected by a loop. An electrostatic top gate allows strong modulation of the supercurrent despite a high bulk contribution to the normal state conductance. In response to a magnetic field threading flux within the superconducting loop, we find unconventional SQUID oscillations enclosed by an envelope associated with a clear diffraction pattern, indicating spatially uniform and symmetric JJs. At a critical gate voltage, when the trivial 2DEG at the surface is nearly depleted, we observe a sharp drop in the critical current, signaling a topological phase transition in which the nature of the supercurrent-carrying states is transformed. This transition is accompanied by qualitative changes in the SQUID oscillations, magnetic diffraction pattern, and temperature dependence of the critical current. We acknowledge funding from Microsoft Station-Q.

  16. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  17. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  18. Transparency and coherence in rf SQUID metamaterials (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven M.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed active metamaterials based on macroscopic quantum effects capable of quickly tuning their electrical and magnetic responses over a wide frequency range. These metamaterials are based on superconducting elements to form low insertion loss, physically and electrically small, highly tunable structures for the next generation rf electronics. The meta-atoms are rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that incorporate the Josephson effect. RF SQUIDs have an inductance which includes a contribution from the Josephson inductance of the junction. This inductance is strongly tunable with dc and rf magnetic fields and currents. The rf SQUID metamaterial is a richly nonlinear effective medium introducing qualitatively new macroscopic quantum phenomena into the metamaterials community, namely magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect. The coherence of the metamaterials is strongly sensitive to the environment and measurement conditions. The metamaterials also display a unique form of transparency whose development can be manipulated through multiple parametric dependences. Further features such as breathers, superradiance, and self-induced transparency, along with entry into the fully quantum limit, will yield qualitatively new metamaterial phenomena. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE Programs through Grant No. ECCS-1158644 and the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  19. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  20. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  1. Pathway Profiling and Tissue Modeling Using ToxCast HTS Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays are providing data-rich studies to probe and profile the direct cellular effects of thousands of chemical compounds in commerce or potentially entering the environment. In vitro profiling may compare unknown ...

  2. Predictive Signatures of Developmental Toxicity Modeled with HTS Data from ToxCast™ Bioactivity Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast™ research program uses a high-throughput screening (HTS) approach for predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. Phase-I contains 309 well-characterized chemicals which are mostly pesticides tested in over 600 assays of different molecular targets, cel...

  3. Anisotropy of 2G HTS racetrack coils in external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudy, Michal; Chen, Yiran; Zhang, Min; Coombs, T. A.

    2013-07-01

    Pancake or racetrack coils wound with second generation high-temperature superconductors (2G HTSs) are important elements for numerous applications of HTS. The applications of these coils are primarily in rotating machines such as motors and generators where they must withstand external magnetic fields from various orientations. The characterization of 2G HTS coils is mostly focused on AC loss assessment, critical current and maximum magnetic field evaluation. In this study, racetrack coils will be placed in different orientations of external magnetic fields—Jc (Ic) versus angle measurements will be performed and interpreted. Full attention is paid to studies of anisotropy Jc versus angle curves for short samples of 2G HTS tapes. As will be shown, the shape of the Jc versus angle curves for tapes has a strong influence on the Jc (Ic) versus angle curves for coils. In this work, a unique and unpredicted behavior of the Jc versus angle curves for the 2G HTS racetrack coils was found. This will be analyzed and fully explained.

  4. Nanomaterial (NM) bioactivity profiling by ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapidly increasing numbers of new NMs and their uses demand efficient tests of NM bioactivity for safety assessment. The EPA’s ToxCast program uses HTS assays to prioritize for targeted testing, identify biological pathways affected, and aid in linking NM properties and potential...

  5. Thermal Insulation Performance of Flexible Piping for Use in HTS Power Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cables that typically operate at temperatures below 80 K are being developed for power transmission. The practical application of HTS power cables will require the use of flexible piping to contain the cable and the liquid nitrogen coolant. A study of thermal performance of multilayer insulation (MLI) was conducted in geometries representing both rigid and flexible piping. This experimental study performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center provides a framework for the development of cost-effective, efficient thermal insulation systems that will support these long-distance flexible lines containing HTS power cables. The overall thermal performance of the insulation system for a rigid configuration and for a flexible configuration, simulating a flexible HTS power cable, was determined by the steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff method under the full range of vacuum levels. Two different cylindrically rolled material systems were tested: a standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI). Comparisons of ideal MLI, MLI on rigid piping, and MLI between flexible piping are presented.

  6. Assessment of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) electric motors for rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doernbach, Jay

    1990-01-01

    The successful development of high temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. Applications of high temperature superconductors have been envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft and solar powered aircraft. The potential of HTS electric motors and generators for providing primary shaft power for rotorcraft propulsion is examined. Three different sized production helicopters were investigated; namely, the Bell Jet Ranger, the Sikorsky Black Hawk and the Sikorsky Super Stallion. These rotorcraft have nominal horsepower ratings of 500, 3600, and 13400 respectively. Preliminary results indicated that an all-electric HTS drive system produces an improvement in rotorcraft Takeoff Gross Weight (TOGW) for those rotorcraft with power ratings above 2000 horsepower. The predicted TOGW improvements are up to 9 percent for the medium-sized Sikorsky Black Hawk and up to 20 percent for the large-sized Sikorsky Super Stallion. The small-sized Bell Jet Ranger, however, experienced a penalty in TOGW with the all-electric HTS drive system.

  7. Long-term operating characteristics of Japan's first in-grid HTS power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Tetsutaro; Maruyama, Osamu; Honjo, Shoichi; Watanabe, Michihiko; Masuda, Takato; Hirose, Masayuki; Shimoda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Naoko; Yaguchi, Hiroharu; Machida, Akito

    2015-11-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Company, Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd and Mayekawa Mfg. Co., Ltd have jointly conducted the first in-grid demonstration test of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable in Japan, from FY2007 to FY2013. The objective of this project is to evaluate the reliability, stability and other characteristics of the system. The cable structure used in this project is the type of three-in-one cable. As a coolant, sub-cooled liquid nitrogen flows through the gap between the corrugated cryostat and the three cable cores. This structure can realize compactness and reduce heat invasion compared with three single-core HTS cables housed in separate cryostats. The cooling system consists of six refrigerators, two circulation pumps and a reservoir tank. Each refrigerator has a cooling power of 1.0 kW at 77 K, 0.8 kW at 67 K. The number of operating refrigerators is controlled so that the coolant temperature at the cable inlet is kept to preset value. The HTS cable was connected to the live electricity grid from October 29, 2012 to December 25, 2013. In-grid operation continued for more than one year without any accidental interruption of operation or other operating issues. During this time, we studied the operating performance of the HTS cable in dependence on the sub-cooled LN2 temperature.

  8. Performance evolution of 60 kA HTS cable prototypes in the EDIPO test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovsky, N.; Uglietti, D.; Sedlak, K.; Stepanov, B.; Wesche, R.; Bruzzone, P.

    2016-08-01

    During the first test campaign of the 60 kA HTS cable prototypes in the EDIPO test facility, the feasibility of a novel HTS fusion cable concept proposed at the EPFL Swiss Plasma Center (SPC) was successfully demonstrated. While the measured DC performance of the prototypes at magnetic fields from 8 T to 12 T and for currents from 30 kA to 70 kA was close to the expected one, an initial electromagnetic cycling test (1000 cycles) revealed progressive degradation of the performance in both the SuperPower and SuperOx conductors. Aiming to understand the reasons for the degradation, additional cycling (1000 cycles) and warm up-cool down tests were performed during the second test campaign. I c performance degradation of the SuperOx conductor reached ∼20% after about 2000 cycles, which was reason to continue with a visual inspection of the conductor and further tests at 77 K. AC tests were carried out at 0 and 2 T background fields without transport current and at 10 T/50 kA operating conditions. Results obtained in DC and AC tests of the second test campaign are presented and compared with appropriate data published recently. Concluding the first iteration of the HTS cable development program at SPC, a summary and recommendations for the next activity within the HTS fusion cable project are also reported.

  9. Monitoring of HTS compound library quality via a high-resolution image acquisition and processing instrument.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Pierre; Scampavia, Louis; Einsteder, Ross; Hodder, Peter

    2011-06-01

    This report presents the high-resolution image acquisition and processing instrument for compound management applications (HIAPI-CM). The HIAPI-CM combines imaging spectroscopy and machine-vision analysis to perform rapid assessment of high-throughput screening (HTS) compound library quality. It has been customized to detect and classify typical artifacts found in HTS compound library microtiter plates (MTPs). These artifacts include (1) insufficient volume of liquid compound sample, (2) compound precipitation, and (3) colored compounds that interfere with HTS assay detection format readout. The HIAPI-CM is also configured to automatically query and compare its analysis results to data stored in a LIMS or corporate database, aiding in the detection of compound registration errors. To demonstrate its capabilities, several compound plates (n=5760 wells total) containing different artifacts were measured via automated HIAPI-CM analysis, and results compared with those obtained by manual (visual) inspection. In all cases, the instrument demonstrated high fidelity (99.8% empty wells; 100.1% filled wells; 94.4% for partially filled wells; 94.0% for wells containing colored compounds), and in the case of precipitate detection, the HIAPI-CM results significantly exceeded the fidelity of visual observations (220.0%). As described, the HIAPI-CM allows for noninvasive, nondestructive MTP assessment with a diagnostic throughput of about 1min per plate, reducing analytical expenses and improving the quality and stewardship of HTS compound libraries.

  10. Analysis of Iterative Screening with Stepwise Compound Selection Based on Novartis In-house HTS Data.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Bender, Andreas; Nigsch, Florian

    2016-05-20

    With increased automation and larger compound collections, the development of high-throughput screening (HTS) started replacing previous approaches in drug discovery from around the 1980s onward. However, even today it is not always appropriate, or even feasible, to screen large collections of compounds in a particular assay. Here, we present an efficient method for iterative screening of small subsets of compound libraries. With this method, the retrieval of active compounds is optimized using their structural information and biological activity fingerprints. We validated this approach retrospectively on 34 Novartis in-house HTS assays covering a wide range of assay biology, including cell proliferation, antibacterial activity, gene expression, and phosphorylation. This method was employed to retrieve subsets of compounds for screening, where selected hits from any given round of screening were used as starting points to select chemically and biologically similar compounds for the next iteration. By only screening ∼1% of the full screening collection (∼15 000 compounds), the method consistently retrieves diverse compounds belonging to the top 0.5% of the most active compounds for the HTS campaign. For most of the assays, over half of the compounds selected by the method were found to be among the 5% most active compounds of the corresponding full-deck HTS. In addition, the stringency of the iterative method can be modified depending on the number of compounds one can afford to screen, making it a flexible tool to discover active compounds efficiently. PMID:26878899

  11. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro; Kimura, Yosuke; Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2010-06-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  12. Improvement of levitation force characteristics in magnetic levitation type seismic isolation device composed of HTS bulk and permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Yagai, T.; Hamajima, T.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic levitation type seismic isolation device composed of HTS bulks and permanent magnets can theoretically remove horizontal vibration completely. It is, however, not easy to generate the large levitation force by using only the levitation system composed of HTS bulk and permanent magnet (HTS-PM system). We focused on a hybrid levitation system composed of the HTS-PM system and the PM-PM system composed of only permanent magnets and investigated the suitable arranging method of the hybrid system for improving levitation force and obtaining stable levitation. In order to clarify the most suitable permanent magnet arrangement in the PM-PM system for the levitation force improvement, repulsive force between permanent magnets was measured in various kinds of the PM-PM system. The maximum repulsive force per unit area in the PM-PM system was at least three times larger than the levitation force per unit area in the HTS-PM system, so that the levitation force in the hybrid system was larger than that of the HTS-PM system. Stable levitation was also achieved in the hybrid system. This is because repulsive force in the PM-PM system against horizontal displacement was much smaller than restoring force in the HTS-PM system.

  13. Characteristics of trapped magnetic fields in HTS bulk annuli with various axial spaces for compact NMR magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Imai, M.; Takano, R.; Kashima, K.; Hahn, S.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as a critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved. In consequence, various applications with HTS bulks such as motors, bearings, and flywheels are being investigated by many research groups; Compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of an HTS bulk more than 11.7 T, 500 MHz 1H NMR frequency, has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is far less expensive than those conventional NMR magnets and expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of those compact NMR magnets, the issues of spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of trapped magnetic fields in HTS bulk annuli are very important. In this paper, the characteristics of the trapped magnetic fields in a stack of assembled HTS bulk annuli were investigated with various axial spaces between HTS bulks, experimentally and analytically.

  14. Multi-channel Data Acquisition System for a 500 m DC HTS Power Cable in Ishikari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yury V.; Chikumoto, Noriko; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Takano, Hirohisa; Inoue, Noriyuki; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    Reduction of heat penetrating into the cryogenic region is the important method of optimization of superconducting devices. In the cases of short-range power transmission lines and compact HTS devices like magnets, the heat leakage through current leads is relatively large. In order to decrease this contribution, current leads equipped with Peltier elements can be used. The mentioned technology is being actively developed in the Chubu University. Commercial samples of Peltier current leads are installed at the terminals of 500-meter DC HTS cable in Ishikari (Hokkaido). This cable is designed for 5 kA. The inner conducting layer consists of 37 DI-BSCCO HTS tapes from Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. with a critical current of 180 A; and the outer one consists of 35 tapes of the same type. Each end of the cable's tape is connected to the individual Peltier current lead. Accordingly, each of the two terminals is equipped with 72 Peltier current leads, 144 pieces in total. In order to examine behavior of the current leads in detail, each piece is supplied with two thermocouples; there are also voltage taps on feedthrough and on HTS tape end. In addition, current through Peltier current lead can be measured by means of individual current transformer. The hardware part of the data acquisition system includes four Keithley 3706A multimeters equipped with 60-channel model 3724 FET multiplexer cards. Therefore, 144 data blocks are formed. Furthermore, there are 72 measurements of a voltage drop across HTS tape. Sampling period is set to be 3 s. The program part of the data acquisition system was written using LabVIEW software solution (National Instruments Corp.).

  15. An active homopolar magnetic bearing with high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils and ferromagnetic cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Dirusso, E.; Provenza, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in liquid nitrogen. A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 200 lb (890 N) radial load capacity (measured non-rotating) and supported a shaft to 14000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that in Cu in liquid nitrogen. Design compromises permitted use of circular coils with rectangular cross section. Conductor improvements will eventually permit coil shape optimization, higher current density and higher bearing load capacity. The bias coil, wound with non-twisted, multifilament HTS conductor, required negligible power to carry its direct current. The control coils were wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag. These dissipated negligible power for direct current (i.e. for steady radial load components). When an alternating current (AC) was added, the AC component dissipated power which increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. In fact at frequencies above about 2 hz, the effective resistance of the control coil conductor actually exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. This is at least qualitatively understandable in the context of a Bean-type model of flux and current penetration into a Type II superconductor. Fortunately the dynamic currents required for bearing stability are of small amplitude. These results show that while twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation, twisted multifilaments will be required to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads, such as those due to unbalance.

  16. 76 FR 51272 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Loligo was set at 3,384 mt (76 FR 8306, February 14, 2011). Due to an under harvest of the Trimester 1... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the 2011 Trimester 2 Directed Loligo Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...

  17. 77 FR 22678 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... percent of the quota (8,888 mt) (77 FR 16472, March 21, 2012). The regulations also require the... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Trimester 1 Longfin Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  18. 77 FR 67305 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... specifications (77 FR 16472; March 21, 2012). The total allowable level of foreign fishing (TALFF) for butterfish... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Specifications and Management Measures... butterfish fishery, which is managed as part of the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish...

  19. 75 FR 37739 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Butterfish Fisheries in the Federal Register on February 3, 2010 (75 FR 5537). The final rule modified... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Adjustment to the Loligo Trimester 2... Fishing Year (FY) Trimester 2 and 3 Loligo squid quotas. This action complies with the 2010...

  20. Production of valued materials from squid viscera by subcritical water hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M Salim; Ahn, Hyang-Min; Kishimura, Hideki; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2010-09-01

    Subcritical water hydrolysis was carried out to produce valued materials from squid viscera, the waste product of fish processing industries. The reaction temperatures for hydrolysis of rawand deoiled squid viscera were maintained from 180 to 280 degrees C for5 min. The ratio of material to water forhydrolysis was 1:50. Most of the proteins from deoiled squid viscera were recovered at high temperature. The protein yield in raw squid viscera hydrolyzate decreased with the rise of temperature. The reducing sugar yield was higher at high temperature in subcritical water hydrolysis of both raw and deoiled squid viscera. The highest yield of amino acids in raw and deoiled squid viscera hydrolyzates were 233.25 +/- 3.25 and 533.78 +/- 4.13 mg g(-1) at 180 and 280 degrees C, respectively. Most amino acids attained highest yield at the reaction temperature range of 180-220 degrees C and 260-280 degrees C for raw and deoiled samples, respectively. The recovery of amino acids from deoiled squid viscera was about 1.5 times higher than that of raw squid viscera.

  1. 75 FR 1024 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ..., 2003 (68 FR 27516), NMFS published, at the request of the Council, an ANPR indicating that the Council... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Control Date for Loligo and Illex Squid AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  2. 76 FR 39313 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... butterfish is 495 mt (76 FR 8306, February 14, 2011). Section 648.22 requires NMFS to close the directed... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed... under the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The procedures...

  3. 76 FR 74724 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... November 7, 2011 (76 FR 68642). Details regarding the measures in Amendment 11 are in the final rule and... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Amendment 11 AGENCY: National Marine... implementing Amendment 11 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan...

  4. 77 FR 40527 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... percent of the quota (8,888 mt) (77 FR 16472, March 21, 2012). Due to an underharvest of quota in... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the 2012 Trimester 2 Directed Longfin Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...

  5. A YBCO RF-squid variable temperature susceptometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Luwei; Qiu, Jinwu; Zhang, Xianfeng; Tang, Zhimin; Cai, Yimin; Qian, Yongjia

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) susceptibility using a high-temperature radio-frequency (rf) SQUID and a normal metal pick-up coil is employed in testing weak magnetization of the sample. The magnetic moment resolution of the device is 1 x 10(exp -6) emu, and that of the susceptibility is 5 x 10(exp -6) emu/cu cm.

  6. 75 FR 51683 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... FR 5537, February 3, 2010). Section 648.22 requires NMFS to close the directed butterfish fishery in... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed Butterfish..., Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The procedures for setting the annual...

  7. 75 FR 32745 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... meeting dates in a separate Federal Register notice published on May 27, 2010 (75 FR 29725). If the...; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Scoping Process AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...) for Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) and to prepare an EIS to analyze the impacts of...

  8. 77 FR 23635 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ..., 2011 (77 FR 16472). This action established catch levels for the 2012 fishing year for mackerel and... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Specifications and Management Measures... regulatory text in the final rule for 2012 Specifications for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and...

  9. Multi-terminal multi-junction dc SQUID for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Uri, Aviram; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is of major importance for the development of sensitive scanning nanoscale magnetometry tools. The high sensitivity of nanoSQUIDs is restricted, however, to only particular periodic values of the applied magnetic field, making accurate measurements at intermediate values of the field impossible. We present a theoretical investigation of a multi-terminal, multi-junction SQUID (mSQUID) that lifts this limitation by providing electrical means for a continuous shift of the quantum interference pattern with respect to the applied field. Analysis of 4-terminal, 4-junction and 3-terminal, 3-junction mSQUIDs shows that operation at maximum sensitivity can be obtained at any value of the magnetic field by applying control current to the extra terminals. The model describes the variation and the shift of the interference pattern as a function of the control currents, junction asymmetries, and the mSQUID inductance. The mSQUID is also shown to provide a direct measurement of the current-phase relations of superconducting junctions. The derived model provides a quantitative description of the recently developed multi-terminal nanoSQUID-on-tip.

  10. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  11. Technical and commerical challenges in high Tc SQUIDs and their industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device for measuring changes in magnetic flux. Since its discovery in the sixties, scientists have made consistent efforts to apply SQUID's to various applications. Instruments that are the most sensitive in their respective categories have been built, such as SQUID DC susceptometer that is now manufactured by Quantum Design, pico-voltmeter which could measure 10(exp -14) volts, and gravitational wave detectors. One of the most successful applications of SQUID's is in magnetoencephalography, a non-invasive technique for investigating neuronal activity in the living human brain. This technique employs a multi-channel SQUID magnetometer that maps the weak magnetic field generated by small current when information is processed in brain, and its performance is marvelous.

  12. The fabrication and characterization of nano-SQUIDs based on Nb thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xixi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    SQUIDs with nano-junctions (or nano-SQUIDs) are able to be miniaturized into nanoscale to measure a single Bohr magneton. Here, we reported the development of a fabrication process for Nb (niobium) nano-SQUIDs using the thin film deposition and the electron-beam lithography technology. The developed process started from a high-quality superconducting thin film so that it is compatible with a variety of film growing techniques. The as-fabricated nano-SQUIDs exhibited functional flux modulation depth up to 10.3% at 4.6 K, in agreement with the numerical simulation based on the Ginzburg-Landau equation. By further comparing the results from both experiments and simulations, we found that a small critical current below ∼50 μA played a leading role in order to obtain a decent flux-modulation depth for Nb nano-SQUIDs.

  13. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatridge, Michael Jonathan

    Information stored in magnetic fields plays an important role in everyday life. This information exists over a remarkably wide range of sizes, so that magnetometry at a variety of length scales can extract useful information. Examples at centimeter to millimeter length scales include measurement of spatial and temporal character of fields generated in the human brain and heart, and active manipulation of spins in the human body for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At micron length scales, magnetometry can be used to measure magnetic objects such as flux qubits; at nanometer length scales it can be used to study individual magnetic domains, and even individual spins. The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based magnetometer for two such applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nanoscale magnetometry, are the focus of this thesis. Conventional MRI has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body. This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of protons with the addition application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information. Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems. Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. The prepolarized, SQUID detected ultra-low field MRI (ULF MRI) developed by the Clarke group allows imaging in very weak fields (typically 132 muT, corresponding to a resonant frequency of 5.6 kHz). At these low field strengths, there is enhanced contrast in the longitudinal relaxation time of various tissue types, enabling imaging of objects which are not visible to conventional MRI, for instance prostate cancer. We are currently investigating the contrast between normal and cancerous

  14. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  15. Integration of a Cryocooler into a SQUID Magnetospinography System for Reduction of Liquid Helium Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Ogata, Hisanao; Uehara, Gen

    We are currently developing a magnetospinography (MSG) system for noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord. The MSG system is a device for observing a weak magnetic field accompanied by the neural activity of the spinal cord by using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic flux sensors. As in the case of other biomagnetic measurement systems such as the magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, the running cost of the MSG system is mainly dependent on the liquid helium (LHe) consumption of a dewar vessel. We integrated a cryocooler into the MSG system to reduce LHe consumption. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cooling power of 0.5Wat 4 K was placed adjacent to a magnetically shielded room and was directly connected to the thermal radiation shield of the dewar by an electrically isolated transfer tube. Cold helium gas was circulated between the cryocooler and the radiation shield. Consequently, the temperature of the radiation shield decreased below 40 K. Previous studies have shown that the detection of a weak magnetic field is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, the band of the MSG signals is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. Therefore, the noise can be filtered out and has a less detrimental effect on MSG measurement than on other biomagnetic field measurements such as MEG measurement. As a result, LHe consumption was reduced by 46%, with no increase in the noise floor.

  16. Front-end multiplexing—applied to SQUID multiplexing: Athena X-IFU and QUBIC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prele, D.

    2015-08-01

    As we have seen for digital camera market and a sensor resolution increasing to "megapixels", all the scientific and high-tech imagers (whatever the wave length - from radio to X-ray range) tends also to always increases the pixels number. So the constraints on front-end signals transmission increase too. An almost unavoidable solution to simplify integration of large arrays of pixels is front-end multiplexing. Moreover, "simple" and "efficient" techniques allow integration of read-out multiplexers in the focal plane itself. For instance, CCD (Charge Coupled Device) technology has boost number of pixels in digital camera. Indeed, this is exactly a planar technology which integrates both the sensors and a front-end multiplexed readout. In this context, front-end multiplexing techniques will be discussed for a better understanding of their advantages and their limits. Finally, the cases of astronomical instruments in the millimeter and in the X-ray ranges using SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) will be described.

  17. Optimum ion channel properties in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert K

    2004-04-01

    Evolutionary pressures are presumed to act so as to maximize the efficiency of biological systems. However, the utility of that premise is marred by the difficulties in defining and evaluating both the efficiency of systems and the character of the available variation space. Following Hodgkin and Adrian, we examine the character of voltage gated ion channels in the nonmyelinated giant axons of the squid and find that both the channel densities and channel transition rates have values that nearly optimize signal sensitivity as well as signal velocity.

  18. Optimum ion channel properties in the squid giant axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Robert K.

    2004-04-01

    Evolutionary pressures are presumed to act so as to maximize the efficiency of biological systems. However, the utility of that premise is marred by the difficulties in defining and evaluating both the efficiency of systems and the character of the available variation space. Following Hodgkin and Adrian, we examine the character of voltage gated ion channels in the nonmyelinated giant axons of the squid and find that both the channel densities and channel transition rates have values that nearly optimize signal sensitivity as well as signal velocity.

  19. Assessing the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems by means of food-web models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Marta; Navarro, Joan; Olson, Robert J.; Christensen, Villy

    2013-10-01

    We synthesized available information from ecological models at local and regional scales to obtain a global picture of the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems. First, static food-web models were used to analyze basic ecological parameters and indicators of squids: biomass, production, consumption, trophic level, omnivory index, predation mortality diet, and the ecological role. In addition, we developed various dynamic temporal simulations using two food-web models that included squids in their parameterization, and we investigated potential impacts of fishing pressure and environmental conditions for squid populations and, consequently, for marine food webs. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic levels in marine food webs and show a large trophic width, reflecting the versatility in their feeding behaviors and dietary habits. Models illustrated that squids are abundant organisms in marine ecosystems, and have high growth and consumption rates, but these parameters are highly variable because squids are adapted to a large variety of environmental conditions. Results also show that squids can have a large trophic impact on other elements of the food web, and top-down control from squids to their prey can be high. In addition, some squid species are important prey of apical predators and may be keystone species in marine food webs. In fact, we found strong interrelationships between neritic squids and the populations of their prey and predators in coastal and shelf areas, while the role of squids in open ocean and upwelling ecosystems appeared more constrained to a bottom-up impact on their predators. Therefore, large removals of squids will likely have large-scale effects on marine ecosystems. In addition, simulations confirm that squids are able to benefit from a general increase in fishing pressure, mainly due to predation release, and quickly respond to changes triggered by the environment. Squids may thus

  20. Kokkos Array

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards Daniel Sunderland, Harold Carter

    2012-09-12

    The Kokkos Array library implements shared-memory array data structures and parallel task dispatch interfaces for data-parallel computational kernels that are performance-portable to multicore-CPU and manycore-accelerator (e.g., GPGPU) devices.

  1. Systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.R.; McCabe, A.P.H.; Vrquhart, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Selected Contents of this book are: Efficient Systolic Arrays for the Solution of Toeplitz Systems, The Derivation and Utilization of Bit Level Systolic Array Architectures, an Efficient Systolic Array for Distance Computation Required in a Video-Codec Based Motion-Detection, On Realizations of Least-Squares Estimation and Kalman Filtering by Systolic Arrays, and Comparison of Systolic and SIMD Architectures for Computer Vision Computations.

  2. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  3. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  4. Identification and characterization of the heme-binding proteins SeShp and SeHtsA of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K; Liu, Mengyao; McClure, Michael J; Lei, Benfang

    2006-01-01

    Background Heme is a preferred iron source of bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi is a bacterial pathogen that causes strangles in horses. Whether S. equi has a heme acquisition transporter is unknown. Results An S. equi genome database was blasted with the heme binding proteins Shp and HtsA of Streptococcus pyogenes, and found that S. equi has the homologue of Shp (designated SeShp) and HtsA (designated SeHtsA). Tag-free recombinant SeShp and SeHtsA and 6xHis-tagged SeHtsA (SeHtsAHis) were prepared and characterized. Purified holoSeShp and holoSeHtsA bind Fe(II)-protoporphyrin IX (heme) and Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX (hemin) in a 1:1 stoichiometry, respectively, and are designated hemoSeShp and hemiSeHtsA. HemiSeShp and hemiSeHtsAHis can be reconstituted from apoSeShp and apoSeHtsAHis and hemin. HemoSeShp is stable in air and can be oxidized to hemiSeShp by ferricyanide. HemiSeHtsA can be reduced into hemoSeHtsA, which autoxidizes readily. HemoSeShp rapidly transfers its heme to apoSeHtsAHis. In addition, hemoSeShp can also transfer its heme to apoHtsA, and hemoShp is able to donate heme to apoSeHtsAHis. Conclusion The primary structures, optical properties, oxidative stability, and in vitro heme transfer reaction of SeShp and SeHtsA are very similar to those of S. pyogenes Shp and HtsA. The data suggest that the putative cell surface protein SeShp and lipoprotein SeHtsA are part of the machinery to acquire heme in S. equi. The results also imply that the structure, function, and functional mechanism of the heme acquisition machinery are conserved in S. equi and S. pyogenes. PMID:17007644

  5. Experimental study of the effects of alternating fields on HTS coils according to the winding insulation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Y. J.; Ahn, M. C.; Lee, T. S.; Lee, W. S.; Ko, T. K.

    2013-08-01

    This paper examines the effects of alternating fields on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils according to the winding insulation condition. Alternating fields can occur in synchronous machines (armature reaction, faults) and other devices. In superconducting synchronous machines, alternating fields affect the operational characteristics of the machine and the superconducting field coil. Therefore, a method of reducing the effects of alternating fields is necessary in superconducting synchronous design. In this study, the effects of alternating fields on the HTS field coil according to the winding insulation condition were experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that HTS coils made using the no-insulation technique can be a solution for reducing the effects of the alternating field. These results are expected to suggest useful data for applications of HTS field coils in superconducting synchronous machines.

  6. An HTS flux pump operated by directly driving a superconductor into flux flow region in the E– J curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianzhao; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    High-T c superconducting (HTS) flux pumps are capable of compensating the persistent current decay in HTS magnets without electrical contact. In this paper, following work on a low-T c superconducting self-switching flux pump, we propose a new HTS flux pump by directly driving a high-T c superconductor into the flux flow region in the E– J curve. The flux pump consists of a transformer which has a superconducting secondary winding shorted by an YBCO-coated conductor bridge. A high alternating current with a much higher positive peak value than the negative peak value is induced in the secondary winding. The current always drives the bridge superconductor into the flux flow region only at around its positive peak value, thus resulting in flux pumping. The proposed flux pump is much simpler than existing HTS flux pumps.

  7. Magnetic fields end-face effect investigation of HTS bulk over PMG with 3D-modeling numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujie; Lu, Yiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the magnetic fields end-face effect of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) is researched with 3D-modeling numerical method. The electromagnetic behavior of the bulk is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The framework is formulated by the magnetic field vector method (H-method). A superconducting levitation system composed of one rectangular HTS bulk and one infinite long PMG is successfully investigated using the proposed method. The simulation results show that for finite geometrical HTS bulk, even the applied magnetic field is only distributed in x-y plane, the magnetic field component Hz which is along the z-axis can be observed interior the HTS bulk.

  8. An HTS flux pump operated by directly driving a superconductor into flux flow region in the E- J curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianzhao; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    High-T c superconducting (HTS) flux pumps are capable of compensating the persistent current decay in HTS magnets without electrical contact. In this paper, following work on a low-T c superconducting self-switching flux pump, we propose a new HTS flux pump by directly driving a high-T c superconductor into the flux flow region in the E- J curve. The flux pump consists of a transformer which has a superconducting secondary winding shorted by an YBCO-coated conductor bridge. A high alternating current with a much higher positive peak value than the negative peak value is induced in the secondary winding. The current always drives the bridge superconductor into the flux flow region only at around its positive peak value, thus resulting in flux pumping. The proposed flux pump is much simpler than existing HTS flux pumps.

  9. SQUID-detected ultra-low field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle; Matlashov, Andrei; Volegov, Petr

    2013-04-01

    MRI remains the premier method for non-invasive imaging of soft-tissue. Since the first demonstration of ULF MRI the trend has been towards ever higher magnetic fields. This is because the signal, and efficiency of Faraday detectors, increases with ever higher magnetic fields and corresponding Larmor frequencies. Nevertheless, there are many compelling reasons to continue to explore MRI at much weaker magnetic fields, the so-called ultra-low field or (ULF) regime. In the past decade many excellent proof-of-concept demonstrations of ULF MRI have been made. These include combined MRI and magnetoencephalography, imaging in the presence of metal, unique tissue contrast, and implementation in situations where a high magnetic field is simply impractical. These demonstrations have routinely used pulsed pre-polarization (at magnetic fields from ∼10 to 100 mT) followed by read-out in a much weaker (1-100 μT) magnetic fields using the ultra-sensitive Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensor. Even with pre-polarization and SQUID detection, ULF MRI suffers from many challenges associated with lower magnetization (i.e. signal) and inherently long acquisition times compared to conventional >1 T MRI. These are fundamental limitations imposed by the low measurement and gradient fields used. In this review article we discuss some of the techniques, potential applications, and inherent challenges of ULF MRI.

  10. An analysis of conductance changes in squid axon.

    PubMed

    MULLINS, L J

    1959-05-20

    The membrane of the squid axon is considered on the basis of a pore model in which the distribution of the pore sizes strongly favors K(+) transfer when there is no potential. Electrical asymmetry causes non-penetrating ions on the membrane capacitor to exert a mechanical force on both membrane surfaces and this force results in a deformation of the membrane pore system such that it assumes a distribution of sizes favoring the ions exerting mechanical force. The ions involved appear to be Ca(++) on the outside of the membrane and isethionate(-), (i(-)) on the inside; as Ca(++) is equivalent in size to Na(+), the charged membrane is potentially able to transfer Na(+), when the ions deforming the membrane pore distribution are removed. A depolarization of the membrane leads to an opening of pores that will allow Na(+) penetration and a release of the membrane from deformation. The pores revert to the zero-potential pore size distribution hence the Na permeability change is a transient. Calculation shows that the potassium conductance vs. displacement of membrane potential curve for the squid axon and the "inactivation" function, h, can be obtained directly from the assumed membrane distortion without the introduction of arbitrary parameters. The sodium conductance, because it is a transient, requires assumptions about the time constants with which ions unblock pores at the outside and the inside of the membrane.

  11. Structural health monitoring of materials by high critical temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, M.; Ruosi, A.; Peluso, G.; Pepe, G. P.

    2002-08-01

    Nowadays, tailoring the material properties is essential for advanced product design in engineering systems. The need to provide key information about micro- and macro-structural behaviour of materials, without destructively sectioning the sample, has spurred the development of nondestructive evaluation methodologies. These techniques are required during material production, quality testing of components during manufacturing, and in-service inspection of structural integrity. To ensure the highest possible operational safety along with an economic efficiency, it is necessary to carry out inspections with a high sensitivity and a proven reliability. Due to its unparalleled magnetic field sensitivity over a wide frequency range and large dynamic range, SQUID-based nondestructive evaluation has unique advantages for materials and structures characterization. We will present an overview of eddy-current nondestructive analysis utilizing high Tc SQUIDs with an emphasis on examples relevant to the aeronautical industry. These include the detection of deep-lying defects in multi-layer structures of Al-Ti alloys and damage of extremely lightweight graphite/epoxy composites. Both of these can be successfully treated by this approach where conventional electromagnetic probes often fail. In addition some results based on the volume integral formulation, successfully developed to simulate the response of the system to different type of flaws in Al-alloy planar structures and to solve the inverse electromagnetic problem, will be shown.

  12. Anion conductances of the giant axon of squid Sepioteuthis.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, I

    1988-01-01

    Anion conductances of giant axons of squid, Sepioteuthis, were measured. The axons were internally perfused with a 100-mM tetraethylammonium-phosphate solution and immersed in a 100-mM Ca-salt solution (or Mg-salt solution) containing 0.3 microns tetrodotoxin. The external anion composition was changed. The membrane currents had a large amount of outward rectification due to anion influx across Cl- channels of the membrane (Inoue, 1985). The amount of outward rectification depended on the species of anion used and was strongly influenced by temperature and internal pH. In contrast to the anion conductances themselves, the conductance relative to Cl- (gA/gCl) was found to be quite stable against changes in the membrane potential, temperature, and pH. It is therefore suggested that each gA/gCl is an intrinsic quantity of the Cl- channel of the squid axon membrane. The sequence and values of gA/gCl obtained in this study were NO3- (1.80) greater than I- (1.40) greater than Br- (1.07) greater than Cl- (1.00) greater than MeSO3- (0.46) greater than H2PO2- (0.33) greater than CH3COO- (0.29) greater than SO4(2-) (0.06). PMID:3207836

  13. rf-SQUID qubit readout using a fast flux pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Douglas A.; Longobardi, Luigi; Patel, Vijay; Chen, Wei; Lukens, James E.

    2007-11-01

    We report on development of a set-up for measuring intrawell dynamics in a Nb-based rf-SQUID qubit described by a double well potential, by rapidly tilting the potential, allowing escape to the adjacent well with high probability for an excited state but low probability for the ground state. The rapid tilt of the double well potential is accomplished via a readout flux pulse inductively coupled to the qubit from a microstrip transmission line on a separate chip suspended above the qubit chip. The readout pulse is analogous to the current bias pulse used to readout phase qubits and hysteretic dc-SQUID magnetometers. The coupling between the transmission line and the qubit is carefully controlled via a window in the ground plane between the signal conductor of the microstrip and the qubit loop. Since the high frequency transmission lines are on a separate chip, they can be independently characterized and reused for different qubit samples. Clean flux pulses as short as 5 ns with rise times of 0.5 ns have been coupled to the qubit to measure escape rates higher than 108 s-1, the lifetime of the excited state, and coherent oscillations between the ground and excited states within the same well.

  14. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Penna, Stefania; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population.

  15. Scanning SQUID microscopy of local superconductivity in inhomogeneous combinatorial ceramics.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Mitra; Stir, Manuela; Kirtley, John R; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-11-24

    Although combinatorial solid-state chemistry promises to be an efficient way to search for new superconducting compounds, the problem of determining which compositions are strongly diamagnetic in a mixed-phase sample is challenging. By means of reactions in a system of randomly mixed starting components (Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Y, Pb, Bi, Tl, and Cu oxides), samples were produced that showed an onset of diamagnetic response above 115 K in bulk measurements. Imaging of this diamagnetic response in ceramic samples by scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM) revealed local superconducting areas with sizes down to as small as the spatial resolution of a few micrometers. In addition, locally formed superconducting matter was extracted from mixed-phase samples by magnetic separation. The analysis of single grains (d<80 μm) by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and bulk SQUID measurements allowed Tl2Ca3Ba2Cu4O12, TlCaBaSrCu2O(7-δ), BaPb(0.5)Bi(0.25)Tl(0.25)O(3-δ), TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9, Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8, and YBa2Cu3O7 phases to be identified. SSM, in combination with other diagnostic techniques, is therefore shown to be a useful instrument to analyze inhomogeneous reaction products in the solid-state chemistry of materials showing magnetic properties.

  16. SQUID-Detected In Vivo MRI at Microtesla Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Moble, Michael; Myers, Whittier R; Lee, SeungKyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2005-06-01

    We use a low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to perform in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at magnetic fields around 100 microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies of about 5 kHz. In such low fields, broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines due to inhomogeneous magnetic fields and susceptibility variations of the sample are minimized, enabling us to obtain high quality images. To reduce environmental noise the signal is detected by a second-order gradiometer, coupled to the SQUID, and the experiment is surrounded by a 3-mm thick Al shield. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we prepolarize the samples in a field up to 100 mT. Three-dimensional images are acquired in less than 6 minutes with a standard spin-echo phase-encoding sequence. Using encoding gradients of {approx}100 {micro}T/m we obtain three-dimensional images of bell peppers with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 8 mm{sup 3}. Our system is ideally suited to acquiring images of small, peripheral parts of the human body such as hands and arms. In vivo images of an arm, acquired at 132 {micro}T, show 24-mm sections of the forearm with a resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} and a SNR of 10. We discuss possible applications of MRI at these low magnetic fields.

  17. Progress toward observation of quantum interference of currents in an Atom SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Changhyun; Samson, E. Carlo; Boshier, Malcolm

    2016-05-01

    Quantum interference of currents was first observed in a superconducting loop with two Josephson junctions, leading to the name ``SQUID'' for this device. This interference effect has been used to develop extremely sensitive magnetometers. The Atom SQUID, an analogous device based on ultracold atoms, has been developed recently to study SQUID physics in a device offering a better understanding of the underlying microscopic dynamics. Although many exciting experiments have been done with Atom SQUIDs, the quantum interference of currents has not yet been observed. In analogy with the SQUID magnetometer, it should be possible to use the quantum interference effect in an Atom SQUID to measure rotation, which may lead to the development of a sensitive gyroscope. In a previous experiment, we showed Josephson effects with an atom SQUID by observing the change from the dc Josephson regime to the ac Josephson regime by measurement of the critical atom number for this transition. Quantum interference should cause this critical atom number to vary with rotation rate. We have simulated this system with the Gross-Pitaevski Equation and found the expected oscillatory change of the critical atom number. We will present this simulation result and report the current status of our experiment to

  18. Development of an image processing system in splendid squid quality classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunee, Niyada; Chaiprapat, Supapan; Waiyagan, Kriangkrai

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural products typically exhibit high variance in quality characteristics. To assure customer satisfaction and control manufacturing productivity, quality classification is necessary to screen off defective items and to grade the products. This article presents an application of image processing techniques on squid grading and defect discrimination. A preliminary study indicated that surface color was an efficient determinant to justify quality of splendid squids. In this study, a computer vision system (CVS) was developed to examine the characteristics of splendid squids. Using image processing techniques, squids could be classified into three different quality grades as in accordance with an industry standard. The developed system first sifted through squid images to reject ones with black marks. Qualified squids were graded on a proportion of white, pink, and red regions appearing on their bodies by using fuzzy logic. The system was evaluated on 100 images of squids at different quality levels. It was found that accuracy obtained by the proposed technique was 95% compared with sensory evaluation of an expert.

  19. Influence of Squid Liver Powder on Accumulation of Cadmium in Serum, Kidney and Liver of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Mok; Lee, Soo-Young; Jeong, In-Hak

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of squid liver powder intake on accumulation of cadmium in mice was investigated. Subjects were divided into 4 groups including the control group (CON), squid liver powder group with lipids not removed (SLP100), and squid liver powder groups with lipids removed (LFSLP50 and LFSLP100). Feed intake and food efficiency ratio of squid liver powder groups was significantly higher than the CON. As a result of investigating cadmium content in hair, serum, liver, and kidney during intake of squid liver powder, all groups showed increase in cadmium accumulation through consistent, long-term intake. Especially, cadmium content in liver and kidney of LFSLP100 was significantly higher than the content of SLP100 and CON. As a result of pathological observation on liver and kidney tissues according to squid liver powder diet, LFSLP100 showed most serious pathological symptoms. In case of kidney tissues, degeneration was significantly more severe in LFSLP100 compared to other groups. Such results suggest that cadmium concentration in human body can be increased by ingestion of whole squid including internal organs and that tissues can be damaged by increased cadmium concentration. More specific and systematic studies are deemed necessary. PMID:24471103

  20. Influence of squid liver powder on accumulation of cadmium in serum, kidney and liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung-Mok; Lee, Soo-Young; Jeong, In-Hak

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the effect of squid liver powder intake on accumulation of cadmium in mice was investigated. Subjects were divided into 4 groups including the control group (CON), squid liver powder group with lipids not removed (SLP100), and squid liver powder groups with lipids removed (LFSLP50 and LFSLP100). Feed intake and food efficiency ratio of squid liver powder groups was significantly higher than the CON. As a result of investigating cadmium content in hair, serum, liver, and kidney during intake of squid liver powder, all groups showed increase in cadmium accumulation through consistent, long-term intake. Especially, cadmium content in liver and kidney of LFSLP100 was significantly higher than the content of SLP100 and CON. As a result of pathological observation on liver and kidney tissues according to squid liver powder diet, LFSLP100 showed most serious pathological symptoms. In case of kidney tissues, degeneration was significantly more severe in LFSLP100 compared to other groups. Such results suggest that cadmium concentration in human body can be increased by ingestion of whole squid including internal organs and that tissues can be damaged by increased cadmium concentration. More specific and systematic studies are deemed necessary.

  1. Simulation of chain of quenches on toroidal HTS-SMES taking account of thermal and electromagnetic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oga, Y.; Noguchi, S.; Igarashi, H.

    When a temperature rise occurs at a local area inside a coil of toroidal HTS-SMES by any reason, a temperature hotspot which results in a thermal runaway appears at the local area. Subsequently, after appearing the local normal zone in the HTS coil, the transport current of the HTS coil decrease since the resistance of HTS coil appears and the current partially flows into a parallel-connecting shunt resistance. However, if the transport current of the normal-transitioned HTS coil is hardly changed, the temperature on the hotspot would rise more and then the normal zone would spread rapidly. It may cause a serious accident due to high stored energy. Therefore, using the numerical simulation, we have investigated the behaviors of the coil current, the critical current, and the temperature in the superconducting element coils of HTS-SMES. Consequently, the temperature of the superconducting element coils rises up extremely when a large heat is generated at a certain area of one of them by any reason. Moreover, there is a possibility that the shunt resister hardly functions for protection since the coil is burned out due to high inductances and low resistance of the superconducting element coil.

  2. Feasibility of a short-period superconducting undulator using 2G HTS tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H.; Doose, C. L.; Jaski, M. S.; Kasa, M. T. )

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a design concept of a planar-type superconducting undulator (SCU) using YBCO high-temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes. The SCU has a period length of 15 mm, and the tape conductor has dimensions of 4-mm width and 0.1-mm thickness. It has been shown that the conductor transition from one coil groove to the one in the next period is possible by making a semi-circular concave loop of the tape for continuous winding in the same direction. Non-uniform current distribution in the tape may cause field quality degradation. Assuming a uniform current density in the tape, the engineering critical-current density of the HTS in the coil for the design and the corresponding achievable on-axis peak field at 4.2 K were calculated.

  3. The study on stress-cone based on HTS cable terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y.; Fang, J.; Huang, X. H.; Lu, W. J.; Li, D.; Guo, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    Our research aims at improving the performance of 35 kV class stress-cone for HTS cable terminal. Firstly, the equivalent circuit model of a stress-cone is constructed for simulation. The relation between the sag voltage of each layer can be characterized by structural and material parameters, such as the stress-cone’s plate length, plate radius, insulating material thickness and dielectric constant. Secondly, the simulation based on ANSYS is developed for analyzing the electric field of stress cone of HTS cable terminal, by altering the length of step and insulation material parameter of stress cone, we get the voltage of each plate layer, horizontal electric field and vertical electric field, and the influence of stress-cone parameter on stress cone electric field is analyzed.

  4. Effect of corrugated characteristics on the liquid nitrogen temperature field of HTS cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. M.; Li, Y. X.; Zhao, Y. Q.; Gao, C.; Qiu, M.; Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    In the high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system, liquid nitrogen is usually chosen to be the coolant because of its low saturation temperature and large latent heat of vaporization. Thus, it is very important for superconducting cables that the liquid nitrogen temperature field keeps stable. However, the cryostat is usually made of flexible corrugated pipes and multi-layer insulation materials. The characteristics (e.g. wave pitch and wave depth) of corrugated pipes may have an effect on the heat exchange between cable and liquid nitrogen, even the whole temperature field of liquid nitrogen. In this paper, a two-dimensional model for 30 m long HTS cable has been modified to analyze the effect of corrugated characteristics on the temperature field of liquid nitrogen. The liquid nitrogen temperature difference between the outlet and the inlet of passage gradually increases as the wave pitch of the corrugated tube decreases and the wave depth increases.

  5. Temperature dependence of levitation force and its relaxation in a HTS levitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Xing-Yi; Zhou, You-He

    2010-03-01

    Using a modified Gifford-McMahon refrigerator to cool the cylindrical bulk YBaCuO superconductor within the region of 100-10 K, and using an updated high-temperature superconductor (HTS) maglev measurement system, the levitation force and its time relaxation at different temperatures between a YBaCuO bulk superconductor and a permanent magnet (PM) have been measured under zero-field cooling. It is found that decrease the cooling temperature of HTS can decrease the hysteresis of magnetization and increase the maximum levitation force of each hysteresis loop. For the relaxation of levitation force, if the temperature is continually lowered to 10 K after the relaxation measurement at given cooling temperature is performed for 600 s, the levitation force will continue to decrease sharply with the lowering of temperature even though it will get stable if the temperature is not lowered. Our results shown in this work are a benefit to the understanding of levitation systems.

  6. Influence of Off-Centre Operation on the Performance of HTS Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Y.; He, D.; Zheng, J.; Ye, C.; Xu, Y.; Sun, R.; Che, T.; Deng, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Owing to instinctive self-stable levitation characteristics, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev using bulk high-temperature superconductors attracts more and more attention from scientists and engineers around the world. In this paper, the levitation force relaxation and guidance force characteristics of a Y-Ba-Cu-O levitation unit with different eccentric distances (EDs) off the center of the permanent magnet guideway were experimentally investigated under field-cooling (FC) conditions. Experimental results indicate that the levitation force slightly increases at small EDs firstly, but degrades with further increasing of EDs. However, the maximum guidance force and its stiffness exhibit enhancement in moderate ED range. The results demonstrate that a properly designed initial FC eccentric distance is important for the practical applications of HTS maglev according to specific requirements like running in curve lines.

  7. Stability test of conduction-cooled LTS/HTS composite coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying Min; Wang, Yin Shun; Lv, Gang; Pi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A small LTS/HTS composite coil made of NbTi/Cu and YBCO, with an inner diameter of 80 mm, an outer diameter of 88mm, a height of 50 mm, and an inductance of 5.5 μH, was designed to test its heat disturbance performance in a GM cryocooler. For comparison, a conventional LTS coil of a similar size made of NbTi/Cu wire was also tested. Transport current was applied from 50 A to 700 A at 8 K and 8.5 K, respectively. The two coils’ heat disturbance, minimum quench energy and quench propagation velocity performance were investigated and simulated. The results indicate that the LTS/HTS composite coil shows better thermal stability and is more fit for operation in conductive cryocooler systems compared to LTS coils.

  8. A method to enhance the curve negotiation performance of HTS Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, T.; Gou, Y. F.; Deng, Z. G.; Zheng, J.; Zheng, B. T.; Chen, P.

    2015-09-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev has attracted more and more attention due to its special self-stable characteristic, and much work has been done to achieve its actual application, but the research about the curve negotiation is not systematic and comprehensive. In this paper, we focused on the change of the lateral displacements of the Maglev vehicle when going through curves under different velocities, and studied the change of the electromagnetic forces through experimental methods. Experimental results show that setting an appropriate initial eccentric distance (ED), which is the distance between the center of the bulk unit and the center of the permanent magnet guideway (PMG), when cooling the bulks is favorable for the Maglev system’s curve negotiation. This work will provide some available suggestions for improving the curve negotiation performance of the HTS Maglev system.

  9. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between

  10. Cryogen-free lkA-class Ic measurement system featuring an 8 T HTS magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, N. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Wimbush, S. C.; Pooke, D. M.; Huang, T.; Lazic, Z.; Chamritski, V.; Talantsev, E. F.; Long, N. J.; Tallon, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a cryogen-free critical-current (Ic) measuring system comprising a conduction-cooled 8 T HTS magnet and convection-cooled sample, both cooled by commercial cryocoolers. The sample can be rotated and transport currents of up to 800 A delivered with less than 0.5 K temperature rise during the Ic measurement. The system is automated with respect to variations in temperature (30-90 K), field (0-8 T), and field angle (0-360°). We have used this system to measure HTS wire samples, concentrating on metal-organic deposited YBCO on RABiTS substrates. Particular emphasis is given to the evolution of Ic anisotropy with temperature, and the dangers of extrapolating from 77 K to 30 K.

  11. A cryogen-free HTS Josephson junction detector for terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Smart, K.; Li, L.; Leslie, K. E.; Hanham, S. M.; Wang, D. H. C.; Foley, C. P.; Ji, F.; Li, X. D.; Zeng, D. Z.

    2015-08-01

    A cryogen-free terahertz (THz) imaging system based on a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Josephson junction detector is reported. The detector was made of a YBa2Cu3O7-x step-edge Josephson junction and integrated into an on-chip thin-film antenna. The HTS Josephson detector was cooled via a commercial mechanical cryocooler; an important step towards cryogen-free THz instrumentation, which is critical for industrial acceptance. In addition, it is shown that operating the detector in a cryocooler provides improved flexibility for optimizing the detector parameters and performance due to the ability to adjust the temperature compared to liquid nitrogen cooling methods. The dc and ac characteristics, the detector responsivity and the noise-equivalent power of the detector, and resulting image quality were studied as the function of operating temperatures.

  12. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Blowers, J.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-29

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s ramping rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0{sup 0} to 10{sup 0}, in steps of 1{sup 0}. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  13. HTS by NMR of Combinatorial Libraries: A Fragment-Based Approach to Ligand Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bainan; Zhang, Ziming; Noberini, Roberta; Barile, Elisa; Giulianotti, Marc; Pinilla, Clemencia; Houghten, Richard A.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fragment-based ligand design (FBLD) approaches have become more widely used in drug discovery projects from both academia and industry, and are even often preferred to traditional high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds (>105). A key advantage of FBLD approaches is that these often rely on robust biophysical methods such as NMR spectroscopy for detection of ligand binding, hence are less prone to artifacts that too often plague the results from HTS campaigns. In this article, we introduce a screening strategy that takes advantage of both the robustness of protein NMR spectroscopy as the detection method, and the basic principles of combinatorial chemistry to enable the screening of large libraries of fragments (>105 compounds) preassembled on a common backbone. We used the method to identify compounds that target protein-protein interactions. PMID:23352136

  14. Design, fabrication and testing of a dipole magnet made with 2G HTS wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, I. V.; Kozub, S. S.; Sytnik, V. V.; Terskiy, I. S.; Tkachenko, L. M.; Trusov, O. V.; Shirshov, L. S.; Smirnov, V. M.; Shuvalov, V. I.; Shcherbakov, P. A.; Molodyk, A. A.; Lee, S. R.; Samoilenkov, S. V.

    2016-10-01

    An HTS dipole magnet with a 1 T (at 77 K) central magnetic field in a 40 × 80 mm2 aperture has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet coils were wound with SuperOx 2G HTS wire. The paper describes the magnet design, properties of the magnet materials, and results of calculations and measurements. The central field in the dipole reached 1.12 T at 77 K and 1.66 T at 65 K. In a liquid helium bath the maximum input current of 847 A was limited by the capacity of the power supply, and in that case the central field was 3.03 T. The measurement data were in good agreement with the calculation results.

  15. Statistical characterization of voltage-biased SQUIDs with weakly damped junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Mück, Michael; Zhang, Shulin; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Yongliang; Kong, Xiangyan; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2013-06-01

    Recently, it has been shown that voltage-biased readout of SQUIDs with weakly damped junctions (large Stewart-McCumber parameter βc, due to high shunt resistance) is useful for suppression of preamplifier noise. We experimentally studied the characteristics of 53 planar niobium-SQUID magnetometers with junction shunt resistors RJ nominally of 30 Ω fabricated on 5 × 5 mm2 chips. The field-to-flux transfer coefficient ∂B/∂Φ of the magnetometers was 1.5 nT/Φ0, with a SQUID loop inductance Ls of about 350 pH. The distributions of important SQUID parameters, such as the current swing Iswing, the dynamic resistance Rd, and the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient ∂V/∂Φ, are given. Nearly all the SQUIDs could be stably operated in the voltage bias mode and their ∂V/∂Φ reached a large mean value of 380 μV/Φ0. In this case, the SQUIDs can be read out directly by a commercial operational amplifier without any additional means to suppress preamplifier noise. The mean flux noise of the SQUIDs was found to be 4.5 μΦ0 Hz-1/2, corresponding to a field resolution of 7 fT Hz-1/2. To demonstrate the applicability of these SQUIDs in the direct readout scheme, a simple four-channel SQUID gradiometer system was set up to perform magnetocardiography and magnetoencephalography measurements in a magnetically shielded room.

  16. Aminoglycoside-induced damage in the statocyst of the longfin inshore squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Scharr, Alexandra L; Mooney, T Aran; Schweizer, Felix E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2014-08-01

    Squid are a significant component of the marine biomass and are a long-established model organism in experimental neurophysiology. The squid statocyst senses linear and angular acceleration and is the best candidate for mediating squid auditory responses, but its physiology and morphology are rarely studied. The statocyst contains mechano-sensitive hair cells that resemble hair cells in the vestibular and auditory systems of other animals. We examined whether squid statocyst hair cells are sensitive to aminoglycosides, a group of antibiotics that are ototoxic in fish, birds, and mammals. To assess aminoglycoside-induced damage, we used immunofluorescent methods to image the major cell types in the statocyst of longfin squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). Statocysts of live, anesthetized squid were injected with either a buffered saline solution or neomycin at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 3.0 mmol l(-1). The statocyst hair cells of the macula statica princeps were examined 5 h post-treatment. Anti-acetylated tubulin staining showed no morphological differences between the hair cells of saline-injected and non-injected statocysts. The hair cell bundles of the macula statica princeps in aminoglycoside-injected statocysts were either missing or damaged, with the amount of damage being dose-dependent. The proportion of missing hair cells did not increase at the same rate as damaged cells, suggesting that neomycin treatment affects hair cells in a nonlethal manner. These experiments provide a reliable method for imaging squid hair cells. Further, aminoglycosides can be used to induce hair cell damage in a primary sensory area of the statocyst of squid. Such results support further studies on loss of hearing and balance in squid.

  17. The method of measuring the temperature dependence of the critical current of the HTS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkin, D. S.; Krasnoperov, E. P.; Brazhnik, P. A.; Kruglov, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    A new method of measurement of Ic(T) dependence for the HTS-2 tape is realized. In this method, the metal substrate of the tape is used as both a heater and a thermometer. Index n(T) was calculated from the measured current-voltage characteristics (CVC). For the tape manufactured by SuperPower Inc. the data of n-index temperature dependence in the range from 77 K up to 90 K are presented.

  18. Code-division-multiplexed readout of large arrays of TES microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, K. M.; Alpert, B. K.; Bennett, D. A.; Denison, E. V.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    Code-division multiplexing (CDM) offers a path to reading out large arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters with excellent energy and timing resolution. We demonstrate the readout of X-ray TESs with a 32-channel flux-summed code-division multiplexing circuit based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) amplifiers. The best detector has energy resolution of 2.28 ± 0.12 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV and the array has mean energy resolution of 2.77 ± 0.02 eV over 30 working sensors. The readout channels are sampled sequentially at 160 ns/row, for an effective sampling rate of 5.12 μs/channel. The SQUID amplifiers have a measured flux noise of 0.17 μΦ0/√Hz (non-multiplexed, referred to the first stage SQUID). The multiplexed noise level and signal slew rate are sufficient to allow readout of more than 40 pixels per column, making CDM compatible with requirements outlined for future space missions. Additionally, because the modulated data from the 32 SQUID readout channels provide information on each X-ray event at the row rate, our CDM architecture allows determination of the arrival time of an X-ray event to within 275 ns FWHM with potential benefits in experiments that require detection of near-coincident events.

  19. First results for a superconducting imaging-surface sensor array for magnetoencephalography

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Overton, W.; Espy, M.A.; George, J.S.; Matlachov, A.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-12-31

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) follows from the initial fundamental work of Cohen in 1968 and development by several groups, most notably at MIT and at NYU, based on the development of the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) using the Josephson effect. The SQUID`s incredible sensitivity to magnetic fields permits the measurement of the very weak magnetic fields emitted from the human brain due to intracellular neuronal currents. Current growth in MEG is dominated by multiple sensor arrays covering much of the head. These new large devices have primarily been developed and made commercially available by several companies including BTI in the US, CTF in Canada, and Neuromag in Finland. Large projects are also in place in Japan. These systems contain more than 100 sensors spaced at various intervals over the head using various configurations of magnetometers and gradiometers. The different designs available on the market are driven by factors such as detection efficiency, cost, and application. They now present a completely novel whole-head SQUID array system using a superconducting imaging-surface gradiometer concept derived at Los Alamos. Preliminary tests have demonstrated higher performance, lower noise, and additional shielding of background fields while using simpler fabrication techniques than existing whole-head MEG systems, which should reduce production costs.

  20. A SQUID-based microwave cavity search for dark-matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S J; Carosi, G; Hagmann, C; Kinion, D; van Bibber, K; Hotz, M; Rosenberg, L; Rybka, G; Hoskins, J; Hwang, J; Sikivie, P; Tanner, D B; Bradley, R; Clarke, J

    2009-10-21

    Axions in the {mu}eV mass range are a plausible cold dark matter candidate and may be detected by their conversion into microwave photons in a resonant cavity immersed in a static magnetic field. The first result from such an axion search using a superconducting first-stage amplifier (SQUID) is reported. The SQUID amplifier, replacing a conventional GaAs field-effect transistor amplifier, successfully reached axion-photon coupling sensitivity in the band set by present axion models and sets the stage for a definitive axion search utilizing near quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers.

  1. Magnetic calorimeter with a SQUID for detecting weak radiations and recording the ultralow energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Kuleshova, G V; Tskhovrebov, A M; Izmailov, G N

    2006-12-31

    The scheme of a magnetic calorimeter for recording extremely low energy releases is developed. The calorimeter is activated by the method of adiabatic demagnetisation and its response to the energy release is measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The estimate of the ultimate sensitivity of the calorimeter with the SQUID demonstrates the possibilities of its application for detecting ultralow radiation intensity, recording single X-ray quanta in the proportional regime and other events with ultralow energy releases. The scheme of the calorimeter with the SQUID on matter waves in superfluid {sup 4}He is proposed. (radiation detectors)

  2. A SQUID readout system for a superconducting gyroscope. [superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A design of a read out system for a superconducting gyroscope to be used in an orbiting gyroscope relativity experiment is discussed. The 'London Moment' of the superconducting rotor, which lies along the spin axis of the rotor, will be measured with a SQUID-type magnetometer. The SQUID will be built around the gyro rotor, with a very close spacing to give an inductance between 10 millionths and 1 millionth Hy. A SQUID of this design should resolve 2.07 times 10 to the minus 19th weber. The angular resolution of the gyroscope will then be 0.0035 arc-second, which is sufficient for the intended experiment.

  3. Protein synthesis in a solitary benthic cephalopod, the Southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica).

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris G; Lynch, Kerri A; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A

    2009-06-01

    Rates of protein synthesis were measured in the whole body and tissues of southern dumpling squid Euprymna tasmanica to validate the use of a flooding-dose of (3)H phenylalanine for the measurement of protein synthesis with different size squid and to make a preliminary investigation into the effects of feeding regime. In smaller (2.8+/-0.5 g, mean+/-SE) and larger (14.8+/-2.2 g) squid whole body fractional rates of protein synthesis were 9.45+/-1.21 and 1.49+/-0.29% d(-1), respectively. Differences in total whole body protein content meant there was no difference in absolute rates of whole body protein synthesis between the larger and smaller squid. In larger squid, fractional rates of protein synthesis were significantly higher in the digestive gland (9.24+/-1.63% d(-1)) than in the arm tissue (1.43+/-0.31% d(-1)), which were significantly higher than in the anterior (0.56+/-0.13% d(-1)) and posterior (0.36+/-0.04% d(-1)) mantle. In smaller squid there were no differences in protein synthesis between tissues and high individual variation, due to differences in feeding, was a likely cause. Consequently, the effect of feeding regime on protein synthesis was compared between two groups of individually held squid: daily-feeding and minimal-feeding squid. The daily-feeding squid had significantly higher feed intake, gained mass and had a significantly higher growth rate than the minimal-feeding squid which lost mass. Whole body protein synthesis was significantly higher in the daily-feeding squid as was the protein content of the digestive gland, anterior and posterior mantle. There were few other differences in indices of protein metabolism. Individual squid showed differences in growth and protein metabolism, and there were significant relationships between growth rate and both rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Thus, higher individual growth was a consequence of increased protein synthesis, decreased protein degradation and, therefore, increased

  4. Evaluation of the invasion heat for the HTS current lead using YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endoh, R.; Kato, H.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2003-10-01

    Current leads using high- TC superconductors (HTS current leads) are one of cryogenic key devices to assemble compact superconducting magnets such as applied for maglev trains etc. It is essential to evaluate effective thermal conductance through a HTS current lead package together with evaluating Joule heat and critical current for efficient design that has high current capacity and low heat invasion. We have designed the 500 A class HTS current lead package using a YBCO rod whose size is ∅ 3 × 30 mm, and developed an apparatus to measure its heat invasion. Temperature drop as a function of heat flow between the two ends of the package was measured by a conventional steady heat flow method. The quantity of heat invasion of the package under typical practical conditions, from 80 K hot end to 20 K cold end, was 163 mW. This value was simulated to the total value of 158 mW by counting contributions of all the component materials.

  5. Inhomogeneity effects in HTS coated conductors used as resistive FCLs in medium voltage grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangelo, Daniele; Dutoit, Bertrand

    2012-09-01

    For resistive fault current limiters (RFCLs) based on high temperature superconducting coated conductors (HTS-CCs), inhomogeneity, in terms of critical current and geometrical imperfections such as stabilizer and substrate thicknesses, plays a very important role and it may limit the penetration of such devices into the electrical market. This paper presents an electrothermal model, developed in SimPowerSystem™, able to describe the transient response of HTS-CC candidates with different degrees of inhomogeneity, both in terms of critical current and of stabilizer thickness. Critical current inhomogeneity has been modeled with Gaussian distributions. The layer thicknesses used in the simulations have been chosen by fitting the temperature dependence of real tape resistances. Our approach considers relative inhomogeneity positions as well as thermal conduction along the HTS-CC length. The model is tuned using experimental measurements made on ReBaCuO coated conductors. A new dynamical thermal calibration of the model is proposed using finite element method calculations. Inhomegeneity effects with different possible faults (e.g. three phase and single phase short-circuit) are presented.

  6. Passive radiative cooling of a HTS coil for attitude orbit control in micro-spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Ozaki, Naoya; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiative cooling system for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil for an attitude orbit control system in nano- and micro-spacecraft missions. These days, nano-spacecraft (1-10 kg) and micro-spacecraft (10-100 kg) provide space access to a broader range of spacecraft developers and attract interest as space development applications. In planetary and high earth orbits, most previous standard-size spacecraft used thrusters for their attitude and orbit control, which are not available for nano- and micro-spacecraft missions because of the strict power consumption, space, and weight constraints. This paper considers orbit and attitude control methods that use a superconducting coil, which interacts with on-orbit space plasmas and creates a propulsion force. Because these spacecraft cannot use an active cooling system for the superconducting coil because of their mass and power consumption constraints, this paper proposes the utilization of a passive radiative cooling system, in which the superconducting coil is thermally connected to the 3 K cosmic background radiation of deep space, insulated from the heat generation using magnetic holders, and shielded from the sun. With this proposed cooling system, the HTS coil is cooled to 60 K in interplanetary orbits. Because the system does not use refrigerators for its cooling system, the spacecraft can achieve an HTS coil with low power consumption, small mass, and low cost.

  7. Cryogenic and Electrical Test Results of 30 M Hts Power Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Fetisov, S. S.; Nosov, A. A.; Shakaryan, Yu. G.; Kochkin, V. I.; Kiselev, A. N.; Terentyev, Yu. A.; Patrikeev, V. M.; Zubko, V. V.

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of the Russian R&D Program for HTS power devices, 3×30 m cable with operating current of ˜1.5-2 kA and operating voltage of 20 kV was delivered by Russian Scientific R&D Cable Institute as the first stage of the HTS power cables project. Different basic HTS materials, cryostats and current leads were used for the cable design in this essentially research part of the project. The cable is being tested at special test facility for superconducting power devices developed at the R&D Center for Power Engineering. The cryogenic system for the test facility was provided by Stirling. The basic cryogenic system was equipped with a specially developed flow distribution unit. This unit permits variation and control of liquid nitrogen flows, pressures and temperatures in all three cable phases. Dependencies on temperature of critical currents of each phase were measured during cable tests. The results of the project]s first stage were used to develop and produce a 3×200 m cable system for Moscow distribution grid. In the paper results of cryogenic system tests and cable electrical tests are presented.

  8. Experimental Study of Local Micro-forming for Bi-HTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Pan; Lu Yongjin; Lei Liping; Qu Timing; Fang Gang

    2010-06-15

    The Bi-HTS (BSCCO high temperature superconductor) tape now has become the product in an industrial way, which has been available to apply in electric and electron fields. The main way to manufacture Bi-HTS tape is to use the technique of oxide powder in silver tube (OPIT), which involves the multi-step drawing and rolling with plastic deformation, which obviously belongs to a type of the micro-forming in macro-scale processing. There are two main characteristics founded: (a) contact and friction between silver and BSCCO surfaces, (b) interface between two materials. A series of micro-tensile experiments of silver foil with thicknesses of 0.03, 0.06 and 0.1 mm are designed to investigate the behaviors of silver with various scale of sizes. And the surface topography measurements have been carried out to analyze the changes in surface topography. Based upon experiments, some topics are researched which are referred to inhomogeneous, local effect, size effect, grain and micro-structure affecting, surface roughness, long-distance sausage phenomenon. Further the local breakdown of silver by Bi-HTS powder during process is analyzed through failure criterion. The results of this work will bring out an important exploration value to the theory and computation of micro-forming.

  9. Development of an HTS hydroelectric power generator for the hirschaid power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fair, Ruben; Lewis, Clive; Eugene, Joseph; Ingles, Martin

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the development and manufacture of a 1.7MW, 5.25kV, 28pole, 214rpm hydroelectric power generator consisting of superconducting HTS field coils and a conventional stator. The generator is to be installed at a hydro power station in Hirschaid, Germany and is intended to be a technology demonstrator for the practical application of superconducting technology for sustainable and renewable power generation. The generator is intended to replace and uprate an existing conventional generator and will be connected directly to the German grid. The HTS field winding uses Bi-2223 tape conductor cooled to about 30K using high pressure helium gas which is transferred from static cryocoolers to the rotor via a bespoke rotating coupling. The coils are insulated with multi-layer insulation and positioned over laminated iron rotor poles which are at room temperature. The rotor is enclosed within a vacuum chamber and the complete assembly rotates at 214rpm. The challenges have been significant but have allowed Converteam to develop key technology building blocks which can be applied to future HTS related projects. The design challenges, electromagnetic, mechanical and thermal tests and results are presented and discussed together with applied solutions.

  10. Design and development of 500 m long HTS cable system in the KEPCO power grid, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, S. H.; Lim, J. H.; Yang, B. M.; Lee, S. K.; Jang, H. M.; Kim, Y. H.; Yang, H. S.; Kim, D. L.; Kim, H. R.; Yim, S. W.; Won, Y. J.; Hwang, S. D.

    2010-11-01

    In Korea, two long-term field demonstrations for high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable have been carried out for several years; Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) and LS Cable Ltd. (LSC) independently. Encouraged at the result of the projects performed in parallel, a new project targeting the real grid operation was launched in the fourth quarter of 2008 with the Korean government’s financial support. KEPCO and LSC are jointly collaborating in the selection of substation, determination of cable specification, design of cryogenic system, and the scheme of protection coordination. A three phase 500 m long HTS cable at a distribution level voltage of 22.9 kV is to be built at 154/22.9 kV Icheon substation located in near Seoul. A hybrid cryogenic system reflecting the contingency plan is being designed including cryocoolers. The HTS cable system will be installed in the second quarter of 2010, being commissioned by the fall of 2010. This paper describes the objectives of the project and design issues of the cable and cryogenic system in detail.

  11. [Treating anisometric amblyopia with HTS Amblyopia iNet Software--preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Avram, Elena; Stănilă, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia or "lazy eye" represents a disorder of the visual system characterized by poor vision in an eye that is otherwise physically normal. Anisometropia, the condition in which the two eyes have an unequal refractive error, is considered the second most common cause of amblyopia. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficiency of HTS Amblyopia iNet Software by studying the progress of visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and stereopsis vision in anisometropic amblyopic children. 5 patients (age: 5-13 years), treated with HTS Amblyopia iNet Software at OftaTotal Clinic from Sibiu, between 2010-2013, participated in this clinical trial. Initially, visual acuity ranged from 0.25 to 0.8, contrast sensitivity from 1.35 to 1.65 Log. Unit. and 1 patient presented stereoscopic vision. After treatment, visual acuity ranged from 0.8 to 1, contrast sensitivity from 1.35 to 1.95 Log. Unit., also all patients presented stereoscopic vision. HTS Amblyopia iNet Software represents an effective modern approach in the treatment of anisometropic amblyopia.

  12. Comparison of measurements and simulations of series-parallel incommensurate area superconducting quantum interference device arrays fabricated from YBa2Cu3O7-δ ion damage Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybart, Shane A.; Dalichaouch, T. N.; Wu, S. M.; Anton, S. M.; Drisko, J. A.; Parker, J. M.; Harteneck, B. D.; Dynes, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    We have fabricated series-parallel (two-dimensional) arrays of incommensurate superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) using YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film ion damage Josephson junctions. The arrays initially consisted of a grid of Josephson junctions with 28 junctions in parallel and 565 junctions in series, for a total of 15 255 SQUIDs. The 28 junctions in the parallel direction were sequentially decreased by removing them with photolithography and ion milling to allow comparisons of voltage-magnetic field (V-B) characteristics for different parallel dimensions and area distributions. Comparisons of measurements for these different configurations reveal that the maximum voltage modulation with magnetic field is significantly reduced by both the self inductances of the SQUIDs and the mutual inductances between them. Based on these results, we develop a computer simulation model from first principles which simultaneously solves the differential equations of the junctions in the array while considering the effects of self inductance, mutual inductance, and non-uniformity of junction critical currents. We find that our model can accurately predict V-B for all of the array geometries studied. A second experiment is performed where we use photolithography and ion milling to split another 28 × 565 junction array into 6 decoupled arrays to further investigate mutual interactions between adjacent SQUIDs. This work conclusively shows that the magnetic fields generated by self currents in an incommensurate array severely reduce its performance by reducing the maximum obtainable modulation voltage.

  13. 2G HTS wires made on 30 μm thick Hastelloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, A.; Zhang, Y.; Knoll, A. R.; Abraimov, D.; Brownsey, P.; Kasahara, M.; Carota, G. M.; Nakasaki, R.; Cameron, J. B.; Schwab, G.; Hope, L. V.; Schmidt, R. M.; Kuraseko, H.; Fukushima, T.; Hazelton, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    REBCO (RE = rare earth) based high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires are now being utilized for the development of electric and electromagnetic devices for various industrial, scientific and medical applications. In the last several years, the increasing efforts in using the so-called second generation (2G) HTS wires for some of the applications require a further increase in their engineering current density (J e). The applications are those typically related to high magnetic fields where the higher J e of a REBCO wire, in addition to its higher irreversibility fields and higher mechanical strength, is already a major advantage over other superconducting wires. An effective way to increase the J e is to decrease the total thickness of a wire, for which using a thinner substrate becomes an obvious and attractive approach. By using our IBAD-MOCVD (ion beam assisted deposition-metal organic chemical vapor deposition) technology we have successfully made 2G HTS wires using a Hastelloy® C276 substrate that is only 30 μm in thickness. By using this thinner substrate instead of the typical 50 μm thick substrate and with a same critical current (I c), the J e of a wire can be increased by 30% to 45% depending on the copper stabilizer thickness. In this paper, we report the fabrication and characterization of the 2G HTS wires made on the 30 μm thick Hastelloy® C276 substrate. It was shown that with the optimization in the processing protocol, the surface of the thinner Hastelloy® C276 substrate can be readily electropolished to the quality needed for the deposition of the buffer stack. Same in the architecture as that on the standard 50 μm thick substrate, the buffer stack made on the 30 μm thick substrate showed an in-plane texture with a Δϕ of around 6.7° in the LaMnO3 cap layer. Low-temperature in-field transport measurement results suggest that the wires on the thinner substrate had achieved equivalent superconducting performance, most importantly the I

  14. Infrared-Bolometer Arrays with Reflective Backshorts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Abrahams, John; Allen, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated circuits that incorporate square arrays of superconducting-transition- edge bolometers with optically reflective backshorts are being developed for use in image sensors in the spectral range from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths. To maximize the optical efficiency (and, thus, sensitivity) of such a sensor at a specific wavelength, resonant optical structures are created by placing the backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometer plane. The bolometer and backshort arrays are fabricated separately, then integrated to form a single unit denoted a backshort-under-grid (BUG) bolometer array. In a subsequent fabrication step, the BUG bolometer array is connected, by use of single-sided indium bump bonding, to a readout device that comprises mostly a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer circuit. The resulting sensor unit comprising the BUG bolometer array and the readout device is operated at a temperature below 1 K. The concept of increasing optical efficiency by use of backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometers is not new. Instead, the novelty of the present development lies mainly in several features of the design of the BUG bolometer array and the fabrication sequence used to implement the design. Prior to joining with the backshort array, the bolometer array comprises, more specifically, a square grid of free-standing molybdenum/gold superconducting-transition-edge bolometer elements on a 1.4- m-thick top layer of silicon that is part of a silicon support frame made from a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The backshort array is fabricated separately as a frame structure that includes support beams and contains a correspond - ing grid of optically reflective patches on a single-crystal silicon substrate. The process used to fabricate the bolometer array includes standard patterning and etching steps that result in the formation of deep notches in the silicon support frame. These notches are designed to

  15. Lowering effect of firefly squid powder on triacylglycerol content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Morita, Ritsuko; Shirai, Yoko; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Terashima, Teruya; Ushikubo, Shun; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Effects of dietary firefly squid on serum and liver lipid levels were investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing 5% freeze-dried firefly squid or Japanese flying squid for 2 weeks. There was no significant difference in the liver triacylglycerol level between the control and Japanese flying squid groups, but the rats fed the firefly squid diet had a significantly lower liver triacylglycerol content than those fed the control diet. No significant difference was observed in serum triacylglycerol levels between the control and firefly squid groups. The rats fed the firefly squid had a significantly lower activity of liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the rats fed the control diet. There was no significant difference in liver fatty acid synthetase activity among the three groups. Hepatic gene expression and lipogenic enzyme activity were investigated; a DNA microarray showed that the significantly enriched gene ontology category of down-regulated genes in the firefly squid group was "lipid metabolic process". The firefly squid group had lower mRNA level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the controls. These results suggest that an intake of firefly squid decreases hepatic triacylglycerol in rats, and the reduction of mRNA level and enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might be related to the mechanisms.

  16. A Compact, Modular Package for Superconducting Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D.

    2008-01-01

    As bolometer arrays grow to ever-larger formats, packaging becomes a more critical engineering issue. We have designed a detector package to house a superconducting bolometer array, SQUID multiplexers, bias and filtering circuitry, and electrical connectors. The package includes an optical filter, magnetic shielding, and has well-defined thermal and mechanical interfaces. An early version of this package has been used successfully in the GISMO 2mm camera, a 128-pixel camera operating at a base temperature of 270mK. A more advanced package permits operation at lower temperatures by providing direct heat sinking to the SQUIDS and bias resistors, which generate the bulk of the dissipation in the package. Standard electrical connectors provide reliable contact while enabling quick installation and removal of the package. We describe how the design compensates for differing thermal expansions, allows heat sinking of the bolometer array, and features magnetic shielding in critical areas. We highlight the performance of this detector package and describe its scalability to 1280-pixel arrays in the near future.

  17. Experimental studies and micromagnetic simulations of electrodeposited Co nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Sachin; Singh, Sukhvinder; Gaur, Rajmani; Sharma, Manish

    2014-08-07

    Magnetic hollow nanotubes of cobalt forming close-packed arrays are synthesized by controlling the growth during electrodeposition in AAO template. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry is used to experimentally measure the static magnetization of the array of nanotubes. Excellent qualitative agreements of SQUID and micromagnetic simulations for static measurements are observed. This motivates us to evaluate dynamic response measurements via micromagnetic simulations. The coercivity simulated along the longitudinal axis of the nanotube is found increase with the length of isolated as well as for array of nanotubes. The effect of interactions is also clearly observed both in static as well as in dynamic evaluations. The interactions cause reduction in coercivity along with the switching which depends upon the length of the nanotubes. The calculation for FMR modes also indicates that propagation of the spin waves are greatly influenced by the hollow centre of nanotube as compare to nanowire and support to maintain the stable vortex configuration. For array of nanotubes, multiple peaks are found over larger number of frequencies which is anticipated due the interactions between nanotubes. Simulation for bias field and angular dependence of spin wave modes also yields a significant influenced by the presence of neighbouring nanotubes.

  18. Common Bias Readout for TES Array on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Maehisa, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    A transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array as an X-ray sensor for a scanning transmission electron microscope system is being developed. The technical challenge of this system is a high count rate of ˜ 5000 counts/second/array. We adopted a 64 pixel array with a parallel readout. Common SQUID bias, and common TES bias are planned to reduce the number of wires and the resources of a room temperature circuit. The reduction rate of wires is 44 % when a 64 pixel array is read out by a common bias of 8 channels. The possible degradation of the energy resolution has been investigated by simulations and experiments. The bias fluctuation effects of a series connection are less than those of a parallel connection. Simple calculations expect that the fluctuations of the common SQUID bias and common TES bias in a series connection are 10^{-7} and 10^{-3}, respectively. We constructed 8 SQUIDs which are connected to 8 TES outputs and a room temperature circuit for common bias readout and evaluated experimentally. Our simulation of crosstalk indicates that at an X-ray event rate of 500 cps/pixel, crosstalk will broaden a monochromatic line by about 0.01 %, or about 1.5 eV at 15 keV. Thus, our design goal of 10 eV energy resolution across the 0.5-15 keV band should be achievable.

  19. Synchronization of networked Jahn-Teller systems in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    We consider the nonlinear effects in a Jahn-Teller (JT) system of two coupled resonators interacting simultaneously with a flux qubit using coupled SQUIDs. A two-frequency description of JT system that inherits the networked structure of both nonlinear Josephson junctions and harmonic oscillators is employed to describe the synchronous structures in a multifrequency scheme. Eigenvalue spectrum is used to show the switch between the effective single mode and two mode configuration in terms of frequency difference. The Rabi supersplitting is investigated by the spectral response of JT systems in different coupling regimes. Second-order coherence functions are employed to investigate antibunching effects in resonator mode. Synchronous structure between correlations of privileged mode and qubit is obtained in localization-delocalization and photon blockade regime controlled by the population imbalance.

  20. Multimodal transition and stochastic antiresonance in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, L S

    2010-10-01

    The experimental data of Takahashi [Physica D 43, 318 (1990)], on the response of squid giant axons stimulated by periodic sequence of short current pulses is interpreted within the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The minimum of the firing rate as a function of the stimulus amplitude I0 in the high-frequency regime is due to the multimodal transition. Below this singular point only odd multiples of the driving period remain and the system is sensitive to noise. The coefficient of variation has a maximum and the firing rate has a minimum as a function of the noise intensity, which is an indication of the stochastic coherence antiresonance. The model calculations reproduce the frequency of occurrence of the most common modes in the vicinity of the transition. A linear relation of output frequency vs I0 above the transition is also confirmed.

  1. Optimization of the leak conductance in the squid giant axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Jeffrey; Crotty, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We report on a theoretical study showing that the leak conductance density, GL , in the squid giant axon appears to be optimal for the action potential firing frequency. More precisely, the standard assumption that the leak current is composed of chloride ions leads to the result that the experimental value for GL is very close to the optimal value in the Hodgkin-Huxley model, which minimizes the absolute refractory period of the action potential, thereby maximizing the maximum firing frequency under stimulation by sharp, brief input current spikes to one end of the axon. The measured value of GL also appears to be close to optimal for the frequency of repetitive firing caused by a constant current input to one end of the axon, especially when temperature variations are taken into account. If, by contrast, the leak current is assumed to be composed of separate voltage-independent sodium and potassium currents, then these optimizations are not observed.

  2. Multimodal transition and stochastic antiresonance in squid giant axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, L. S.

    2010-10-01

    The experimental data of Takahashi [Physica D 43, 318 (1990)]10.1016/0167-2789(90)90140-K, on the response of squid giant axons stimulated by periodic sequence of short current pulses is interpreted within the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The minimum of the firing rate as a function of the stimulus amplitude I0 in the high-frequency regime is due to the multimodal transition. Below this singular point only odd multiples of the driving period remain and the system is sensitive to noise. The coefficient of variation has a maximum and the firing rate has a minimum as a function of the noise intensity, which is an indication of the stochastic coherence antiresonance. The model calculations reproduce the frequency of occurrence of the most common modes in the vicinity of the transition. A linear relation of output frequency vs I0 above the transition is also confirmed.

  3. A presynaptic complex in the giant synapse of the squid.

    PubMed

    Martin, R; Miledi, R

    1975-04-01

    A presynaptic complex consisting of thin lamellae associated with vesicles was found frequently in presynaptic terminals of the squid giant synapse. The lamellae, made of osmiophilic material, had an average length and width of about 10 mum and a thickness of 30 nm; they were of rectangular shape. While most frequent in the axoplasm of the most distal, and largest, terminal of the presynaptic giant axon, the lamellae were found also in smaller terminal branches of this fibre; They have not been observed in the proximal parts of the presynaptic or postsynaptic giant axons. Vesicles the size of synaptic vesicles surrounded the sides of the lamellae. The presynaptic complex resembles the synaptic ribbons in sensory cells.

  4. Examination of a Digital FLL System Design for SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Koichiro; Simizu, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Masahito; Uchikawa, Yoshinori

    Biomagnetic field measurements in unshielded environment require both large dynamic range and high slew rate. Noise amplitudes at 50Hz and under 10 Hz of significantly more than 1μT are not at all exotic in an industrial or a hospital environment. A digital FLL (D-FLL) system for a SQUID magnetometer has high resolution and large dynamic range of magnetic field. Slew rate of a D-FLL system by using a double-counter is limited by its digital feedback loop. It can increase the slew rate that optimum feedback loop gain is divided into an analog preamplifier and a digital amplifier on a microcontroller. We show design method of their amplifiers. The slew rate of a D-FLL system with optimum amplifiers is 483 Φ0/s , and its noise level is about 50.0fT√Hz@120Hz.

  5. SQUID-Detected Microtesla MRI in the presence of Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Han, Song-I.; Myers, Whittier; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2006-09-06

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at fields of 1 T and above, the presence of a metal insert can distort the image because of susceptibility differences within the sample and modification of the radiofrequency fields by screening currents. Furthermore, it is not feasible to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or acquire a magnetic resonance image if the sample is enclosed in a metal container. Both problems can be overcome by substantially lowering the NMR frequency. Using a microtesla imaging system operating at 2.8 kHz, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the signal detector, we have obtained distortion-free images of a phantom containing a titanium bar and three-dimensional images of an object enclosed in an aluminum can; in both cases high-field images are inaccessible.

  6. A Planar Two-Dimensional Superconducting Bolometer Array for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chervenak, James A.; Chen, Tina C.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Supanich, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide high sensitivity rapid imaging at 3.3mm (90GHz) for the Green Bank Telescope - the world's largest steerable aperture - a camera is being built by the University of Pennsylvania, NASA/GSFC, and NRAO. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled detector array. We have designed and are fabricating a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture. Read out by SQUID multiplexers, the superconducting transition edge sensors will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. This will provide the first ever superconducting bolometer array on a facility instrument.

  7. Features governing symbiont persistence in the squid-vibrio association.

    PubMed

    Koch, Eric J; Miyashiro, Tim; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-03-01

    Experimental studies of the interaction between host and symbiont in a maturing symbiotic organ have presented a challenge for most animal-bacterial associations. Advances in the rearing of the host squid Euprymna scolopes have enabled us to explore the relationship between a defect in symbiont light production and late-stage development (e.g. symbiont persistence and tissue morphogenesis) by experimental colonization with specific strains of the symbiont Vibrio fischeri. During the first 4 weeks postinoculation of juvenile squid, the population of wild-type V. fischeri increased 100-fold; in contrast, a strain defective in light production (Δlux) colonized normally the first day, but exhibited an exponential decline to undetectable levels over subsequent weeks. Co-colonization of organs by both strains affected neither the trajectory of colonization by wild type nor the decline of Δlux levels. Uninfected animals retained the ability to be colonized for at least 2 weeks posthatch. However, once colonized by the wild-type strain for 5 days, a subsequent experimentally induced loss of the symbionts could not be followed by a successful recolonization, indicating the host's entry into a refractory state. However, animals colonized by the Δlux before the loss of their symbionts were receptive to recolonization. Analyses of animals colonized with either a wild-type or a Δlux strain revealed slight, if any, differences in the developmental regression of the ciliated light-organ tissues that facilitate the colonization process. Thus, some other feature(s) of the Δlux strain's defect also may be responsible for its inability to persist, and its failure to induce a refractory state in the host.

  8. The Form and Dimensions of the Giant Synapse of Squids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Miledi, R.

    1986-03-01

    A study was made of the distal giant synapse, and of proximal synapses, in the stellate ganglion of the squid, Loligo vulgaris. For this purpose we injected iontophoretically dyes or cobalt ions into the pre- or postsynaptic axon. The intra-axonal movement of visible dyes was measured. Both presynaptic fibres, the main second order giant axon and the largest accessory axon, branched to make multiple synaptic contacts on the giant motor axons from near the perikarya down to near the exit of the stellar nerves from the ganglion. There were considerable individual variations in the branching patterns of the presynaptic giant axon and in the course and number of the postsynaptic giant axons. More than one accessory axon made contact with the largest motor axon. Fine structural details of the synapse are presented. The size of the contact area made by the main presynaptic axon on the last postsynaptic axon of a medium-sized animal was estimated from low power electron micrographs. We measured and counted synaptic contacts, synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. The fine structure of proximal synapses was found to be very similar to that of the distal synapse. Cobalt- or dye-injected ganglia showed that the perikarya of the axons which fuse to form the postsynaptic giant axons are located in diffuse and overlapping areas of the giant fibre lobe. In freshly hatched larvae the giant synapse was well differentiated; a gradient of differentiation from brain to periphery was detectable. The distal giant synapses of the oegopsid squid Todarodes sagittatus and of Sepia officinalis differed from the Loligo synapse. In Todarodes and Sepia collaterals and processes from both the presynaptic and the postsynaptic giant fibres are shown to meet in numerous contacts in the enlarged sheath surrounding the third order axon. In several respects the Loligo giant fibre system appears to represent in phylogenetical order the more evolved neuronal network.

  9. Ionic conductances of squid giant fiber lobe neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The cell bodies of the neurons in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the squid stellate ganglion give rise to axons that fuse and thereby form the third-order giant axon, whose initial portion functions as the postsynaptic element of the squid giant synapse. We have developed a preparation of dissociated, cultured cells from this lobe and have studied the voltage-dependent conductances using patch-clamp techniques. This system offers a unique opportunity for comparing the properties and regional differentiation of ionic channels in somatic and axonal membranes within the same cell. Some of these cells contain a small inward Na current which resembles that found in axon with respect to tetrodotoxin sensitivity, voltage dependence, and inactivation. More prominent is a macroscopic inward current, carried by Ca2+, which is likely to be the result of at least two kinetically distinct types of channels. These Ca channels differ in their closing kinetics, voltage range and time course of activation, and the extent to which their conductance inactivates. The dominant current in these GFL neurons is outward and is carried by K+. It can be accounted for by a single type of voltage-dependent channel. This conductance resembles the K conductance of the axon, except that it partially inactivates during relatively short depolarizations. Ensemble fluctuation analysis of K currents obtained from excised outside-out patches is consistent with a single type of K channel and yields estimates for the single channel conductance of approximately 13 pS, independently of membrane potential. A preliminary analysis of single channel data supports the conclusion that there is a single type of voltage-dependent, inactivating K channel in the GFL neurons. PMID:2431097

  10. On the persistent sodium current in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Clay, John R

    2003-01-01

    R. F. Rakowski, D. C. Gadsby, and P. DeWeer have reported a persistent, tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium ion current (I(NaP)) in squid giant axons having a low threshold (-90 mV) and a maximal inward amplitude of -4 microA/cm(2) at -50 mV. This report makes the case that most of I(NaP) is attributable to an ion channel mechanism distinct from the classical rapidly activating and inactivating sodium ion current, I(Na), which is also tetrodotoxin sensitive. The analysis of the contribution of I(Na) to I(NaP) is critically dependent on slow inactivation of I(Na). The results of this gating process reported here demonstrate that inactivation of I(Na) is complete in the steady-state for V > -40 mV, thereby making it unlikely that I(NaP) in this potential range is attributable to I(Na). Moreover, -90 mV is well below I(Na) threshold, as demonstrated by the C. A. Vandenberg and F. Bezanilla model of I(Na) gating in squid giant axons. Their model predicts a persistent current having a threshold of -60 mV and a peak amplitude of -25 microA/cm(2) at -20 mV. Modulation of this component by the slow inactivation process predicts a persistent current that is finite in the -60- to -40-mV range having a peak amplitude of -1 microA/cm(-2) at -50 mV. Subtraction of this current from the I(NaP) measurements yields the portion of I(NaP) that appears to be attributable to an ion channel mechanism distinct from I(Na).

  11. Features governing symbiont persistence in the squid-vibrio association

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Eric J.; Miyashiro, Tim; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies of the interaction between host and symbiont in a maturing symbiotic organ have presented a challenge for most animal-bacterial associations. Advances in the rearing of the host squid Euprymna scolopes have enabled us to explore the relationship between a defect in symbiont light production and late-stage development (e.g., symbiont persistence and tissue morphogenesis) by experimental colonization with specific strains of the symbiont Vibrio fischeri. During the first four weeks post-inoculation of juvenile squid, the population of wild-type V. fischeri increased 100-fold; in contrast, a strain defective in light production (Δlux) colonized normally the first day, but exhibited an exponential decline to undetectable levels over subsequent weeks. Co-colonization of organs by both strains affected neither the trajectory of colonization by wild type, nor the decline of Δlux levels. Uninfected animals retained the ability to be colonized for at least two weeks post-hatch. However, once colonized by the wild-type strain for 5 days, a subsequent experimentally induced loss of the symbionts could not be followed by a successful recolonization, indicating the host’s entry into a refractory state. However, animals colonized by the Δlux before the loss of their symbionts were receptive to recolonization. Analyses of animals colonized with either a wild-type or a Δlux strain revealed slight, if any, differences in the developmental regression of the ciliated light-organ tissues that facilitate the colonization process. Thus, some other feature(s) of the Δlux strain’s defect also may be responsible for its inability to persist, and its failure to induce a refractory state in the host. PMID:24118200

  12. Squid giant axons. A model for the neuron soma?

    PubMed

    Ramón, F; Moore, J W; Joyner, R W; Westerfield, M

    1976-08-01

    Insertion of electrically floating wires along the axis of a squid giant axon produces an apparent increase in diameter in the region where the wire surface has been treated to give it a low resistance. The shape of action potentials propagating into this region depend upon the surface resistance (and the length) of the wire. As this segment's internal resistance is lowered by reducing the wire's surface resistance, the following characteristic sequence of changes in the action potential is seen at the transition region: (a) the duration increases; (b) two peaks develop, the first one generated in the normal axon region and the second one generated later in the axial wire region, and; (c) blockage occurs (for a very low resistance wire). Action potentials recorded at the membrane region near the tip of the axial wire in (b) resemble those recorded at the initial segment of neurons upon antidromic invasions. Squid axon action potentials propagated from a normal region into that containing the low resistance wire also resemble antidromic invasions recorded in neuron somas. Hyperpolarizing current pulses applied through the wire act as if the wire surface resistance was momentarily reduced. For example, the two components of the action potential recorded at the axial wire membrane region noted in (b) can be sequentially blocked by the application of increasing hyperpolarizing current through the wire. Similar effects are seen when hyperpolarizing currents are injected into motoneuron somas. It is concluded that the geometrical properties of the junction of a neuron axon with its soma may be in themselves sufficient to determine the shape of the action potentials usually recorded by microelectrodes.

  13. Ionic conductances of squid giant fiber lobe neurons.

    PubMed

    Llano, I; Bookman, R J

    1986-10-01

    The cell bodies of the neurons in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the squid stellate ganglion give rise to axons that fuse and thereby form the third-order giant axon, whose initial portion functions as the postsynaptic element of the squid giant synapse. We have developed a preparation of dissociated, cultured cells from this lobe and have studied the voltage-dependent conductances using patch-clamp techniques. This system offers a unique opportunity for comparing the properties and regional differentiation of ionic channels in somatic and axonal membranes within the same cell. Some of these cells contain a small inward Na current which resembles that found in axon with respect to tetrodotoxin sensitivity, voltage dependence, and inactivation. More prominent is a macroscopic inward current, carried by Ca2+, which is likely to be the result of at least two kinetically distinct types of channels. These Ca channels differ in their closing kinetics, voltage range and time course of activation, and the extent to which their conductance inactivates. The dominant current in these GFL neurons is outward and is carried by K+. It can be accounted for by a single type of voltage-dependent channel. This conductance resembles the K conductance of the axon, except that it partially inactivates during relatively short depolarizations. Ensemble fluctuation analysis of K currents obtained from excised outside-out patches is consistent with a single type of K channel and yields estimates for the single channel conductance of approximately 13 pS, independently of membrane potential. A preliminary analysis of single channel data supports the conclusion that there is a single type of voltage-dependent, inactivating K channel in the GFL neurons.

  14. Taming the SQUID: How a nuclear physics education (mostly) helped my career in applied physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    My degree is in experimental nuclear physics, specifically studying the interaction of pions with nuclei. But after graduation I accepted a post-doctoral research position with a team based on applications of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to the study of the human brain. Despite knowing nothing about the brain or SQUIDs to start with, I have gone on to enjoy a career in applications of the SQUID and other sensors to the detection of weak magnetic fields in a variety of problems from brain studies (magnetoencephalography) to ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance for detection of explosives and illicit material. In this talk I will present some background on SQUIDs and their application to the detection of ultra-weak magnetic fields of biological and non-biological origin. I will also provide a little insight into what it has been like to use a nuclear physics background to pursue other types of science.

  15. 78 FR 3346 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... rule for 2013 MSB specifications and management measures was published on November 19, 2012 (77 FR... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Specifications and Management Measures... measures for Atlantic mackerel, and 2013 specifications for butterfish. Specifications for longfin...

  16. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jin; Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HHP at 200, 400 or 600MPa) on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles during 10-day storage at 4°C were investigated. HHP increased the concentrations of Cl(-) and volatile compounds, reduced the level of PO4(3-), but did not affect the contents of 5'-uridine monophosphate (UMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in squids on Day 0. At 600MPa, squids had the highest levels of 5'-adenosine monophosphate, Cl(-) and lactic acid, but the lowest contents of CMP and volatile compounds on Day 10. Essential free amino acids and succinic acids were lower on Day 0 than on Day 10. HHP at 200MPa caused higher equivalent umami concentration (EUC) on Day 0, and the EUC decreased with increasing pressure on Day 10. Generally, HHP at 200MPa was beneficial for improving EUC and volatile compounds of squids.

  17. A shot in the dark: same-sex sexual behaviour in a deep-sea squid.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Bush, Stephanie L; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-04-23

    Little is known about the reproductive habits of deep-living squids. Using remotely operated vehicles in the deep waters of the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we have found evidence of mating, i.e. implanted sperm packages, on similar body locations in males and females of the rarely seen mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis deletron. Equivalent numbers of both sexes were found to have mated, indicating that male squid routinely and indiscriminately mate with both males and females. Most squid species are short-lived, semelparous (i.e. with a single, brief reproductive period) and promiscuous. In the deep, dark habitat where O. deletron lives, potential mates are few and far between. We suggest that same-sex mating behaviour by O. deletron is part of a reproductive strategy that maximizes success by inducing males to indiscriminately and swiftly inseminate every conspecific that they encounter. PMID:21937492

  18. Osmometrically determined characteristics of the cell membrane of squid and lobster giant axons.

    PubMed

    Freeman, A R; Reuben, J P; Brandt, P W; Grundfest, H

    1966-11-01

    Lobster and squid giant nerve fibers respond differently when subjected to osmotic challenges. The axons proper, as distinct from the total (fiber) complex formed by the axon and connective sheath, both behave as "fast" osmometers for changes in the concentration of NaCl, but the maximum degree of swelling in hyposmotic media is by about 60% in lobster and only by 20% in squid. The relative volume intercepts of the van't Hoff relation are about 0.2 for lobster and 0.4 for squid. The sheaths of both axons undergo only small, apparently passive changes in volume. Lobster axons are permeable to Cl, but squid axons are impermeable to this anion. Lobster axons are also permeable to glycerol. The implications of the data as to the nature of volume regulation of cells are discussed.

  19. Imaging of current density distributions with a Nb weak-link scanning nano-SQUID microscope

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are accepted as one of the highest magnetic field sensitive probes. There are increasing demands to image local magnetic fields to explore spin properties and current density distributions in a two-dimensional layer of semiconductors or superconductors. Nano-SQUIDs have recently attracting much interest for high spatial resolution measurements in nanometer-scale samples. Whereas weak-link Dayem Josephson junction nano-SQUIDs are suitable to miniaturization, hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics that is often observed in Dayem Josephson junction is not desirable for a scanning microscope. Here we report on our development of a weak-link nano-SQUIDs scanning microscope with small hysteresis in I-V curve and on reconstructions of two-dimensional current density vector in two-dimensional electron gas from measured magnetic field. PMID:26459874

  20. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    in MRI using laser polarized noble gases such as {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe (10-12). Hyperpolarized gases were used successfully to image the human lung in fields on the order of several mT (13-15). To overcome the sensitivity loss of Faraday detection at low frequencies, ultrasensitive magnetometers based on the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) (16) are used to detect NMR and MRI signals (17-24). Recently, SQUID-based MRI systems capable of acquiring in vivo images have appeared. For example, in the 10-mT system of Seton et al. (18) signals are coupled to a SQUID via a superconducting tuned circuit, while Clarke and coworkers (22, 25, 26) developed a system at 132 {micro}T with an untuned input circuit coupled to a SQUID. In a quite different approach, atomic magnetometers have been used recently to detect the magnetization (27) and NMR signal (28) of hyperpolarized gases. This technique could potentially be used for low-field MRI in the future. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of MRI in microtesla fields detected with SQUIDs. The principles of SQUIDs and NMR are briefly reviewed. We show that very narrow NMR linewidths can be achieved in low magnetic fields that are quite inhomogeneous, with illustrative examples from spectroscopy. After describing our ultralow-field MRI system, we present a variety of images. We demonstrate that in microtesla fields the longitudinal relaxation T{sub 1} is much more material dependent than is the case in high fields; this results in a substantial improvement in 'T{sub 1}-weighted contrast imaging'. After outlining the first attempts to combine microtesla NMR with magnetoencephalography (MEG) (29), we conclude with a discussion of future directions.

  1. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  2. Noise characterization of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometer systems in unshielded environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwala, A.; Kingman, J.; Stolz, R.; Schmelz, M.; Zakosarenko, V.; Linzen, S.; Bauer, F.; Starkloff, M.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2013-03-01

    To measure the noise performance of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometer systems directly is nearly impossible due to superimposed external noise. In magnetically unshielded environments in particular one needs sophisticated methods in order to get an estimate of the intrinsic noise. We compare different approaches to estimate the noise of our latest SQUID magnetometer systems in the Earth’s magnetic field and compare the results with measurements in magnetic (and superconductive) shielding.

  3. Characterization of the bacterial diversity in Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squid light organs.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo; Gorman, Clayton; Chavez, Alba A; Willie, Shantell; Nishiguchi, Michele K

    2013-01-01

    Loliginid and sepiolid squid light organs are known to host a variety of bacterial species from the family Vibrionaceae, yet little is known about the species diversity and characteristics among different host squids. Here we present a broad-ranging molecular and physiological analysis of the bacteria colonizing light organs in loliginid and sepiolid squids from various field locations of the Indo-West Pacific (Australia and Thailand). Our PCR-RFLP analysis, physiological characterization, carbon utilization profiling, and electron microscopy data indicate that loliginid squid in the Indo-West Pacific carry a consortium of bacterial species from the families Vibrionaceae and Photobacteriaceae. This research also confirms our previous report of the presence of Vibrio harveyi as a member of the bacterial population colonizing light organs in loliginid squid. pyrH sequence data were used to confirm isolate identity, and indicates that Vibrio and Photobacterium comprise most of the light organ colonizers of squids from Australia, confirming previous reports for Australian loliginid and sepiolid squids. In addition, combined phylogenetic analysis of PCR-RFLP and 16S rDNA data from Australian and Thai isolates associated both Photobacterium and Vibrio clades with both loliginid and sepiolid strains, providing support that geographical origin does not correlate with their relatedness. These results indicate that both loliginid and sepiolid squids demonstrate symbiont specificity (Vibrionaceae), but their distribution is more likely due to environmental factors that are present during the infection process. This study adds significantly to the growing evidence for complex and dynamic associations in nature and highlights the importance of exploring symbiotic relationships in which non-virulent strains of pathogenic Vibrio species could establish associations with marine invertebrates. PMID:22885637

  4. Molecular identification of anisakid nematodes third stage larvae isolated from common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyobudi, Eko; Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Choi, Kwangho; Lee, Sung Il; Lee, Chung Il; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of Genus Anisakis nematode larvae in marine fishes and cephalopods is epidemiologically important because Anisakis simplex larval stage can cause a clinical disease in humans when infected hosts are consumed raw. Common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) from Korean waters were investigated for anisakid nematodes infection during 2009˜2011. In total, 1,556 larvae were collected from 615 common squids and 732 of them were subsequently identified by PCR-RFLP analysis of ITS rDNA. Depending on the sampling locations, the nematode larvae from common squid showed different prevalence, intensity and species distribution. A high prevalence (P) and mean intensity (MI) of infection were observed in the Yellow Sea (n = 250, P = 86.0%, MI = 5.99 larvae/host) and the southern sea of Korea (n = 126, P = 57.1%, MI = 3.36 larvae/host). Anisakis pegreffii was dominantly found in common squid from the southern sea (127/ 140, 90.7%) and the Yellow Sea (561/565, 98.9%). In contrast, the P and MI of infection were relatively low in the East Sea (n = 239, P = 8.37%, MI = 1.25 larvae/host). A. pegreffii was not found from the East Sea and 52.0% (13/25) of the nematodes were identified as A. simplex. Most of them were found in the body cavity or digestive tract of common squid, which are rarely consumed raw by humans. Considering the differenences in anisakid nematode species distribution and their microhabitat in common squid, it remains unclear whether common squid plays an important role in the epidemiology of human anisakis infection in Korea. Further extensive identification of anisakid nematodes in common squid, with geographical and seasonal information will be necessary.

  5. A SQUID biomagnetometer system for measurement of spinal cord evoked magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Uehara, G.; Kawai, J.; Kawabata, S.; Okubo, H.; Komori, H.; Kado, H.

    2001-12-01

    We developed a 24-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) biomagnetometer system for the measurement of the evoked magnetic field from stimulated spinal cords. The system uses composite LTc SQUID gradiometers and can observe the three-dimensional components of the magnetic field. With the system, we could successfully record the evoked magnetic fields corresponding to neuronal signals transmitting in the spinal cord of a cat.

  6. Detection of Fatigue Damage Prior to Crack Initiation withScanning SQUID Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Morris Jr., J.W.; Lee, Seungkyun; Clarke, John

    2005-11-07

    The remanence fields of fatigued ferritic steel specimens were measured using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The results show an overall increase of remanence until dislocation density saturates and an additional local remanence increase after saturation during cyclic loading. Because of the combined magnetic and spatial resolution of the SQUID microscope, these local changes of dislocation structures can be detected before a crack actually initiates, and identify the sites where crack nucleation will occur.

  7. High-T(sub c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1990-01-01

    In the Laboratory a high-T(sub c) one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  8. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, R C; Nishiguchi, M K

    2007-10-01

    Luminescent bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (Bacteria: γ-Proteobacteria) are commonly found in complex, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We utilized sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA, luciferase α-subunit (luxA) and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapA) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships between 63 strains of Vibrio bacteria, which included representatives from different environments as well as unidentified luminescent isolates from loliginid and sepiolid squid from Thailand. A combined phylogenetic analysis was used including biochemical data such as carbon use, growth and luminescence. Results demonstrated that certain symbiotic Thai isolates found in the same geographic area were included in a clade containing bacterial species phenotypically suitable to colonize light organs. Moreover, multiple strains isolated from a single squid host were identified as more than one bacteria species in our phylogeny. This research presents evidence of species of luminescent bacteria that have not been previously described as symbiotic strains colonizing light organs of Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squids, and supports the hypothesis of a non-species-specific association between certain sepiolid and loliginid squids and marine luminescent bacteria. PMID:22707847

  9. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: I. General Properties andNoise Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate the characteristics and noise performance of rf Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) by solving the corresponding Langevin equations numerically and optimizing the model parameters with respect to noise energy. After introducing the basic concepts of the numerical simulations, we give a detailed discussion of the performance of the SQUID as a function of all relevant parameters. The best performance is obtained in the crossover region between the dispersive and dissipative regimes, characterized by an inductance parameter {beta}{prime}{sub L} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} {approx} 1; L is the loop inductance, I{sub 0} the critical current of the Josephson junction, and {phi}{sub 0} the flux quantum. In this regime, which is not well explored by previous analytical approaches, the lowest (intrinsic) values of noise energy are a factor of about 2 above previous estimates based on analytical approaches. However, several other analytical predictions, such as the inverse proportionality of the noise energy on the tank circuit quality factor and the square of the coupling coefficient between the tank circuit and the SQUID loop, could not be well reproduced. The optimized intrinsic noise energy of the rf SQUID is superior to that of the dc SQUID at all temperatures. Although for technologically achievable parameters this advantage shrinks, particularly at low thermal fluctuation levels, we give an example for realistic parameters that leads to a noise energy comparable to that of the dc SQUID even in this regime.

  10. Structural elements of the signal propagation pathway in squid rhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Minoru; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Suwa, Makiko

    2011-05-19

    Squid and bovine rhodopsins are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate Gq- and Gt-type G-proteins, respectively. To understand the structural elements of the signal propagation pathway, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of squid and bovine rhodopsins plus a detailed sequence analysis of class A GPCRs. The computations indicate that although the geometry of the retinal is similar in bovine and squid rhodopsins, the important interhelical hydrogen bond networks are different. In squid rhodopsin, an extended hydrogen bond network that spans ∼13 Å to Tyr315 on the cytoplasmic site is present regardless of the protonation state of Asp80. In contrast, the extended hydrogen bond network is interrupted at Tyr306 in bovine rhodopsin. Those differences in the hydrogen bond network may play significant functional roles in the signal propagation from the retinal binding site to the cytoplasmic site, including transmembrane helix (TM) 6 to which the G-protein binds. The MD calculations demonstrate that the elongated conformation of TM6 in squid rhodopsin is stabilized by salt bridges formed with helix (H) 9. Together with the interhelical hydrogen bonds, the salt bridges between TM6 and H9 stabilize the protein conformation of squid rhodopsin and may hinder the occurrence of large conformational changes that are observed upon activation of bovine rhodopsin.

  11. Identification of four squid species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaona; Dai, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Squids are distributed worldwide, including many species of commercial importance, and they are often made into varieties of flavor foods. The rapid identification methods for squid species especially their processed products, however, have not been well developed. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) systems based on specific primers and TaqMan probes have been established for rapid and accurate identification of four common squid species (Ommastrephes bartramii, Dosidicus gigas, Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus) in Chinese domestic market. After analyzing mitochondrial genes reported in GenBank, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene was selected for O. bartramii detection, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for D. gigas and T. Pacificus detection, ATPase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene for I. Argentinus detection, and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA) gene for designing Ommastrephidae-specific primers and probe. As a result, all the TaqMan systems are of good performance, and efficiency of each reaction was calculated by making standard curves. This method could detect target species either in single or mixed squid specimen, and it was applied to identify 12 squid processed products successfully. Thus, it would play an important role in fulfilling labeling regulations and squid fishery control.

  12. Squid-derived chitin oligosaccharides are a chemotactic signal during colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Mark J; Schaefer, Amy L; Brennan, Caitlin A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-07-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae ("vibrios"), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone.

  13. Material properties of Pacific hake, Humboldt squid, and two species of myctophids in the California Current.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kaylyn N; Warren, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    Material properties of the flesh from three fish species (Merluccius productus, Symbolophorus californiensis, and Diaphus theta), and several body parts of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) collected from the California Current ecosystem were measured. The density contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.9919-1.036), squid soft body parts (mantle, arms, tentacle, braincase, eyes; 1.009-1.057), and squid hard body parts (beak and pen; 1.085-1.459). Effects of animal length and environmental conditions on nekton density contrast were investigated. The sound speed contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.986-1.027) and Humboldt squid mantle and braincase (0.937-1.028). Material properties in this study are similar to values from previous studies on species with similar life histories. In general, the sound speed and density of soft body parts of fish and squid were 1%-3% and 1%-6%, respectively, greater than the surrounding seawater. Hard parts of the squid were significantly more dense (6%-46%) than seawater. The material properties reported here can be used to improve target strength estimates from acoustic scattering models, which could increase the accuracy of biomass estimates from acoustic surveys for these nekton.

  14. Development of a Low-Noise SQUID-Based Microtesla MRI System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Whittier; Mößle, Michael; Lee, Seungkyun; Keslo, Nathan; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an untuned Superconducting QUantum Intereference Device (SQUID) detector can produce 1-mm resolution images. The protons in the sample were prepolarized in a 0.3 T field, manipulated by ˜100 μT/m gradient fields for image encoding, and detected by the SQUID in the 130 μT measurement field. To reduce the effect of environmental noise, the input coil of the SQUID was connected to a superconducting second order gradiometer; both SQUID and gradiometer were contained in a low noise dewar. A 3-mm thick aluminum box enclosing the experiment further attenuated external noise. A superconducting weak link in series with the gradiometer protected the SQUID by limiting the current induced during polarizing pulses. Progressive improvements have reduced the system noise to below the 1.5 fT Hz-1/2 SQUID noise. A typical phase-encoded two-dimensional image taken in a 300 Hz imaging band has a signal to noise ratio of 15 and takes 100 s to acquire. Supported by USDOE.

  15. SQUID magnetometers for studying corrosion and corrosion protection in aircraft aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wikswo, J.P. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Studies at Vanderbilt and elsewhere have demonstrated that superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers can be utilized for quantitative measurements of both corrosion activity and material loss in aircraft aluminum alloys. SQUIDs provide sufficient spatial resolution the distribution of hidden corrosion currents can be mapped. The sensitivity of SQUIDs operating at 4 K in liquid helium is such that corrosion can be detected for salt concentrations as low as 1 part per million, and corrosion in 4% NaCl can be detected through 1.4 cm of aluminum. While measurements of the magnetic field from galvanic currents is straightforward in the laboratory, where ferromagnetic fasteners can be eliminated and low frequency noise and the earth`s magnetic field can be shielded, this technique has yet to be demonstrated on aircraft on the flight line. Advanced, low-frequency SQUID eddy current measurements utilizing sheet inducers and phase-sensitive detection offers a depth-selective technique to image material loss deep in aluminum structures. The size of the signal makes this approach highly suitable for implementation with 77 K, liquid- nitrogen cooled SQUIDs. Thus SQUIDs may be useful both for quantitative, laboratory assessment of the rate of hidden corrosion in aircraft samples, and for imaging the extent of second- and third-layer corrosion damage in aircraft. 56 refs.

  16. Development of yellow pigmentation in squid (Loligo peali) as a result of lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Thanonkaew, Amonrat; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Decker, Eric A

    2006-02-01

    The impact of lipid oxidation on yellow pigment formation in squid lipids and proteins was studied. When the squid microsomes were oxidized with iron and ascorbate, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were observed to increase simultaneously with b values (yellowness) and pyrrole compounds concomitantly with a decrease in free amines. Oxidized microsomes were not able to change the solubility, sulfhydryl content, or color of salt-soluble squid myofibrillar proteins. Aldehydic lipid oxidation products were able to decrease solubility and sulfhydryl content of salt-soluble squid myofibrillar proteins but had no impact on color. Aldehydic lipid oxidation products increased b values (yellowness) and pyrrole compounds and decreased free amines in both squid phospholipid and egg yolk lecithin liposomes. The ability of aldehydic lipid oxidation products to change the physical and chemical properties of egg yolk lecithin liposomes increased with increasing level of unsaturation and when the carbon number was increased from 6 to 7. These data suggest that off-color formation in squid muscle could be due to nonenzymatic browning reactions occurring between aldehydic lipid oxidation products and the amines on phospholipids headgroups. PMID:16448208

  17. Identification of Ige-binding proteins of raw and cooked extracts of Loligo edulis (white squid).

    PubMed

    Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohamad; Misnan, Rosmilah; Abdullah, Noormalin; Bakhtiar, Faizal; Arip, Masita; Murad, Shahnaz

    2010-05-01

    Allergy to different classes of mollusks, including squid, which are members of the class Cephalopods has been reported. Tropomyosin, a major muscle protein, is the only well-recognized allergen in squid. The aim of this study was to characterize IgE-binding proteins of local Loligo edulis (white squid) consumed in Malaysia. Protein profiles and IgE-binding proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from 23 patients with positive skin prick test to raw squid extract. SDS-PAGE of the raw extract exhibited 21 protein bands (10-170 kDa) but those ranging from 19 to 29 kDa and 41 to 94 kDa were not found in the cooked extract. Immunoblotting of raw extract demonstrated 16 IgE-binding bands, ranging from 13 to 170 kDa. A heat-resistant 36 kDa protein, corresponding to squid tropomyosin, was identified as the major allergen of both extracts. In addition, a 50 kDa heat-sensitive protein was shown to be a major allergen of the raw extract. Our findings indicate that the allergen extract used for diagnosis of squid allergy should contain both the 36 kDa and 50 kDa proteins.

  18. Deciphering enzyme function using peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Alexandra; Stangl, Gabriele I; Schutkowski, Mike

    2011-11-01

    Enzymes are key molecules in signal-transduction pathways. However, only a small fraction of more than 500 human kinases, 300 human proteases and 200 human phosphatases is characterised so far. Peptide microarray based technologies for extremely efficient profiling of enzyme substrate specificity emerged in the last years. This technology reduces set-up time for HTS assays and allows the identification of downstream targets. Moreover, peptide microarrays enable optimisation of enzyme substrates. Focus of this review is on assay principles for measuring activities of kinases, phosphatases or proteases and on substrate identification/optimisation for kinases. Additionally, several examples for reliable identification of substrates for lysine methyl-transferases, histone deacetylases and SUMO-transferases are given. Finally, use of high-density peptide microarrays for the simultaneous profiling of kinase activities in complex biological samples like cell lysates or lysates of complete organisms is described. All published examples of peptide arrays used for enzyme profiling are summarised comprehensively.

  19. Development of Magnetization Measurement Devices Using Micro-dc-SQUIDs and a Sr_2RuO_4 Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nago, Y.; Shinozaki, T.; Tsuchiya, S.; Ishiguro, R.; Kashiwaya, H.; Kashiwaya, S.; Nomura, S.; Kono, K.; Takayanagi, H.; Maeno, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We developed high-sensitivity magnetization measurement devices composed of micro-dc-SQUIDs and a superconducting Sr_2RuO_4 microplate, aiming to investigate novel magnetic properties related to a spin-triplet chiral p-wave superconductor with a mesoscopic size. Micron-sized dc-SQUID was fabricated by thin Al electrodes, and the SQUID structure was improved to prevent magnetic fluxes from intruding into SQUID electrodes. A Sr_2RuO_4 superconducting microplate was fabricated into the size as small as the SQUID loop using a focused ion beam and directly mounted on the SQUID with precise positioning for high-sensitivity magnetization measurements. In the preliminary magnetization measurements of this device, we observed vortices trapped into the plate and thus the lower critical field. The improved magnetization measurement device developed to exclude undesirable flux intrusion successfully enabled high-sensitivity detection of quantized vortex.

  20. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.