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Sample records for human astrocytoma cell

  1. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

  2. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of neonatal Nav1.5 in human brain astrocytoma and its effect on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, Deguang; Wang, Jun; Ou, Shaowu; Wang, Yunjie; Qiu, Bo; Ding, Daling; Guo, Feng; Gao, Qinghua

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, we designed and conducted a series of assays to determine the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) neonatal isoform Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) in human brain astrocytoma and its effect on the proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of astrocytoma U251 cells. The results showed that nNav1.5 mRNA and protein were expressed in both human brain astrocytoma and normal brain tissues, but their expression levels in astrocytoma were significantly higher (P<0.05). In astrocytomas, nNav1.5 mRNA and protein levels were also different (P<0.05) and were correlated with pathological grades. The immunofluorescence confocal microscopy observations demonstrated that nNav1.5 protein was expressed in the nucleus, cytoplasm and membrane of the astrocytoma cells. After transfection, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to nNav1.5 significantly reduced the expression levels of SCN5A/nNav1.5 mRNA and protein by 57.2% (P<0.05) and 66.6% (P<0.05), respectively. The MTT, wound healing, Matrigel invasion and flow cytometric assays confirmed that following siRNA downregulation of the expression of the SCN5A/nNav1.5 gene, the in vitro proliferation and in vitro invasiveness of the U251 cells were significantly reduced (P<0.05 for both comparisons), and the apoptosis rate was significantly increased (P<0.05). These results revealed that nNav1.5 expression in human brain astrocytoma was upregulated, and its expression was positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. Additionally, reduced nNav1.5 expression significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasiveness of astrocytoma cells, indicating a new target in the molecular diagnosis and therapy of astrocytoma.

  4. Exposure to ELF-pulse modulated X band microwaves increases in vitro human astrocytoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castejón, C; Pérez-Bruzón, R N; Llorente, M; Pes, N; Lacasa, C; Figols, T; Lahoz, M; Maestú, C; Vera-Gil, A; Del Moral, A; Azanza, M J

    2009-12-01

    Common concern about the biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) is increasing with the expansion of X-band microwaves (MW). The purpose of our work was to determine whether exposure to MW pulses in this range can induce toxic effects on human astrocytoma cells. Cultured astrocytoma cells (Clonetics line 1321N1) were submitted to 9.6 GHz carrier, 90% amplitude modulated by extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMF pulses inside a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell (GTEM-cell). Astrocytoma cultures were maintained inside a GTEM-incubator in standard culture conditions at 37+/-0.1 degrees C, 5% CO2, in a humidified atmosphere. Two experimental conditions were applied with field parameters respectively of: PW 100-120 ns; PRF 100-800 Hz; PRI 10-1.25 ms; power 0.34-0.60 mW; electric field strength 1.25-1.64 V/m; magnetic field peak amplitude 41.4-54.6 microOe. SAR was calculated to be 4.0 x 10-4 W/Kg. Astrocytoma samples were grown in a standard incubator. Reaching 70-80% confluence, cells were transferred to a GTEM-incubator. Experimental procedure included exposed human astrocytoma cells to MW for 15, 30, 60 min and 24 h and unexposed sham-control samples. Double blind method was applied. Our results showed that cytoskeleton proteins, cell morphology and viability were not modified. Statistically significant results showed increased cell proliferation rate under 24h MW exposure. Hsp-70 and Bcl-2 antiapoptotic proteins were observed in control and treated samples, while an increased expression of connexin 43 proteins was found in exposed samples. The implication of these results on increased proliferation is the subject of our current research.

  5. Dual effects of mastoparan on intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, N.; Ishimoto, H.; Mizuno, K.; Ohizumi, Y.; Nakanishi, H.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of mastoparan, a wasp venom toxin, on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was examined in human astrocytoma cells. Mastoparan inhibited [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol (100 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, consistent with our previous results showing that mastoparan inhibits phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells. 2. In contrast, mastoparan itself increased [Ca2+]i and augmented carbachol-induced increase in the [Ca2+]i in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that mastoparan elicited Ca2+ influx from the extracellular medium. The increase appeared to be maximum at extracellular Ca2+ concentrations of 0.1-0.2 mM. The higher concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ depressed the influx. 3. Pertussis toxin did not affect mastoparan-induced inhibition of [Ca2+]i in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, consistent with the previous results that pertussis toxin did not affect mastoparan-induced inhibition of phosphoinositide hydrolysis. 4. Pertussis toxin augmented mastoparan-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that pertussis toxin substrate(s) seems to be inhibitory for Ca2+ influx induced by mastoparan. 5. Verapamil, nifedipine and diltiazem (each 10 microM), L-type Ca2+ antagonists, did not affect mastoparan-induced Ca2+ influx. However, verapamil (10 microM) slightly inhibited the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol in the presence of mastoparan. 6. The results obtained in the present study indicate that mastoparan has two opposite effects on [Ca2+]i in human astrocytoma cells and possibly has at least two sites of action. PMID:8032654

  6. MicroRNA-542-3p Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion via Targeting AKT Pathway in Human Astrocytoma*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Junchao; Zhao, JingJing; Zhang, Nu; Xu, Xiaonan; Li, Rong; Yi, Yang; Fang, Lishan; Zhang, Le; Li, Mengfeng; Wu, Jueheng; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying constitutive activation of AKT signaling, which plays essential roles in astrocytoma progression, is not fully characterized. Increasing numbers of studies have reported that microRNAs are involved in the malignant behavior of astrocytoma cells via directly targeting multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Here, we found that microRNA (miR)-542-3p expression was decreased in glioblastoma cell lines and astrocytoma tissues, and reduced levels of miR-542-3p expression correlated with high histopathological grades and poor prognosis of astrocytoma patients. Exogenous miR-542-3p suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion through not only targeting AKT1 itself but also directly down-regulating its two important upstream regulators, namely, integrin-linked kinase and PIK3R1. Notably, overexpressing miR-542-3p decreased AKT1 phosphorylation and directly and indirectly repressed nuclear translocation and transactivation activity of β-catenin to exert its anti-invasive effect. Furthermore, the miR-542-3p expression level negatively correlated with AKT activity as well as levels of integrin-linked kinase and PIK3R1 in human astrocytoma specimens. These findings suggest that miR-542-3p acts as a negative regulator in astrocytoma progression and that miR-542-3p down-regulation contributes to aberrant activation of AKT signaling, leaving open the possibility that miR-542-3p may be a potential therapeutic target for high grade astrocytoma. PMID:26286747

  7. Mastoparan-induced phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, K.; Nakahata, N.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of mastoparan on phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was examined in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Mastoparan (3-30 microM) caused an accumulation of diacylglycerol (DG) and phosphatidic acd (PA) accompanied by choline release in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. 2. In the presence of 2% n-butanol, mastoparan (3-100 microM) induced phosphatidylbutanol (PBut) accumulation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, suggesting that mastoparan activates phospholipase D (PLD). Propranolol (30-300 microM), a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase inhibitor, inhibited DG accumulation induced by mastoparan, supporting this idea. 3. Depletion of extracellular free calcium ion did not alter the effect of mastoparan on PLD activity. 4. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin C (1 microM), did not inhibit mastoparan-induce PLD activation but the ability of mastoparan to stimulate phospholipase D activity was decreased in the PKC down regulated cells. 5. PLD activity stimulated by mastoparan was not prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin (PT) or C3 ADP-ribosyltransferase. Furthermore, guanine nucleotides did not affect PLD activity stimulation by mastoparan in membrane preparations. 6. Mastoparan stimulated PLD in several cell lines such as RBL-2H3, RBL-1, HL-60, P388, endothelial cells, as well as 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. 7. These results suggest that mastoparan induces phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis by activation of PLD, not by activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC); mastoparan-induced PLD activation is not mediated by G proteins. PMID:8640350

  8. Effect of brefelamide on HGF-induced survival of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Honma, Shigeyoshi; Takasaka, Sachina; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibuya, Takahiro; Mitazaki, Satoru; Abe, Sumiko; Yoshida, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by their high level of resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy and new treatment options are urgently required. We previously demonstrated that brefelamide, an aromatic amide isolated from methanol extracts of cellular slime molds Dictyostelium brefeldianum and D. giganteum, had antiproliferative effects on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells, a model of glioma. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which brefelamide inhibited 1321N1 and PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell proliferation. When cells were cultured in serum-free medium, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased survival of 1321N1 cells but not PC12 cells. HGF receptor, c-MET, was strongly expressed in 1321N1 cells, but not in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of 1321N1 cells with brefelamide inhibited both HGF-induced cell survival and expression of c-MET. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT was increased by HGF, but these changes were inhibited by brefelamide pretreatment. Moreover, HGF mRNA levels and secretion were reduced by brefelamide. These results suggest that brefelamide reduces survival of 1321N1 cells via multiple effects including suppression of HGF receptor expression and HGF secretion and inhibition of ERK and AKT phosphorylation.

  9. Infective capacity of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in a human astrocytoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Olave, M C; Vargas-Zambrano, J C; Celis, A M; Castañeda, E; González, J M

    2017-07-01

    Pathogenesis of cryptococcosis in the central nervous system (CNS) is a topic of ongoing research, including the mechanisms by which this fungus invades and infects the brain. Astrocytes, the most common CNS cells, play a fundamental role in the local immune response. Astrocytes might participate in cryptococcosis either as a host or by responding to fungal antigens. To determine the infectivity of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and Cryptococcus gattii in a human astrocytoma cell line and the induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. A glioblastoma cell line was infected with C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii blastoconidia labelled with FUN-1 fluorescent stain. The percentage of infection and expression of HLA class I and II molecules were determined by flow cytometry. The interactions between the fungi and cells were observed by fluorescence microscopy. There was no difference between C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii in the percentage infection, but C. neoformans var. grubii induced higher expression of HLA class II than C. gattii. More blastoconidia were recovered from C. neoformans-infected cells than from C. gattii infected cells. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii may have different virulence mechanisms that allow its survival in human glia-derived cells. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the 1321N1 human astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of muscarinic agonists, partial agonists and antagonists to muscarinic receptors of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells was studied. Binding was studied in both intact cells and cell lysates. Partial agonists and antagonists exhibited similar apparent affinities in intact cell competition binding assays with either the lipophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)QNB or the hydrophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)NMS. In contrast, full agonists exhibited markedly lower apparent affinities in intact cells with ({sup 3}H)QNB than with ({sup 3}H)NMS. Treatment of cells with antimycin A to deplete intracellular ATP prevented agonist-induced internalization of muscarinic receptors as assessed by sucrose density gradient assays of receptor subcellular distribution. In ATP-depleted cells, the apparent affinities of full agonists vs ({sup 3}H)QNB were markedly higher. The apparent affinities of partial agonists and of antagonists were unaffected by ATP depletion. In other studies, the effects of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) on muscarinic receptor downregulation and internalization in 1321N1 cells were determined. PMA alone did not induce muscarinic receptor downregulation but instead decreased both the rate and final extent of downregulation induced by the agonist carbachol. The specificity of other protein kinase C activators for inhibiting carbachol-induced downregulation indicated involvement of protein kinase C. Furthermore, the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine prevented the inhibitory effect of PMA on downregulation. However, staurosporine did not inhibit agonist-induced downregulation.

  11. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment.

  12. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment. PMID:26309132

  13. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  14. Progesterone Induces the Growth and Infiltration of Human Astrocytoma Cells Implanted in the Cerebral Cortex of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Germán-Castelán, Liliana; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, Joaquín; González-Arenas, Aliesha; González-Morán, María Genoveva; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) promotes cell proliferation in several types of cancer, including brain tumors such as astrocytomas, the most common and aggressive primary intracerebral neoplasm in humans. In this work, we studied the effects of P4 and its intracellular receptor antagonist, RU486, on growth and infiltration of U373 cells derived from a human astrocytoma grade III, implanted in the motor cortex of adult male rats, using two treatment schemes. In the first one, fifteen days after cells implantation, rats were daily subcutaneously treated with vehicle (propylene glycol, 160 μL), P4 (1 mg), RU486 (5 mg), or P4 + RU486 (1 mg and 5 mg, resp.) for 21 days. In the second one, treatments started 8 weeks after cells implantation and lasted for 14 days. In both schemes we found that P4 significantly increased the tumor area as compared with the rest of the treatments, whereas RU486 blocked P4 effects. All rats treated with P4 showed tumor infiltration, while 28.6% and 42.9% of the animals treated with RU486 and P4 + RU486, respectively, presented it. Our data suggest that P4 promotes growth and migration of human astrocytoma cells implanted in the motor cortex of the rat through the interaction with its intracellular receptor. PMID:24982875

  15. H/sub 1/-histamine receptors regulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahata, N.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Activation of H/sub 1/-histamine receptors on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells resulted in a rapid formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), IP/sub 3/, IP/sub 2/, and IP/sub 1/. Histamine-induced mobilization of Ca/sup + +/ and stimulated of a Ca/sup + +/ calmodulin-regulated phosphodiesterase occurred concurrently with histamine-stimulated InsP formation. The K/sub 0.5/ values for histamine for activation of phosphodiesterase, mobilization of Ca/sup + +/, and stimulation of InsP formation were 3,4, and 10 ..mu..M, respectively. The K/sub i/ for histamine determined in competition binding experiments with the H/sub 1/-receptor antagonist, /sup 3/H-mepyramine, was 11 ..mu..M. As with muscarinic receptor-mediated effects in these cells, inactivation of G/sub i/ with pertussis toxin had no effect on H/sub 1/-receptor mediated responses. Both histamine and muscarinic receptor stimulation resulted in the formation of Ins 1,4,5P/sub 3/ and Ins 1,3,4P/sub 3/. In contrast to muscarinic receptor stimulation, which results in a linear accumulation of InsP for greater than 30 min, histamine-stimulated formation of InsP rapidly desensitized.

  16. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Freshney, R I; Darling, J L; Thomas, D G; Celik, F

    1983-02-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs.

  17. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D.; Freshney, R. I.; Darling, J. L.; Thomas, D. G.; Celik, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:6297528

  18. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRalpha and ERRgamma proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC(50) and IC(50) values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRalpha and ERRgamma are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity.

  19. Telomerase activity in human brain tumors: astrocytoma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-05-01

    Somatic cells do not have telomerase activity but immortalized cell lines and more than 85 % of the cancer cells show telomerase activation to prevent the telomere from progressive shortening. The activation of this enzyme has been found in a variety of human tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, but only few studies on telomerase activity in human brain tumors have been reported. Here, we evaluated telomerase activity in different grades of human astrocytoma and meningioma brain tumors. In this study, assay for telomerase activity performed on 50 eligible cases consisted of 26 meningioma, 24 astrocytoma according to the standard protocols. In the brain tissues, telomerase activity was positive in 39 (65 %) of 50 patients. One sample t test showed that the telomerase activity in meningioma and astrocytoma tumors was significantly positive entirely (P < 0.001). Also, grade I of meningioma and low grades of astrocytoma (grades I and II) significantly showed telomerase activity. According to our results, we suggest that activation of telomerase is an event that starts mostly at low grades of brain including meningioma and astrocytoma tumors.

  20. Astrocytoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Astrocytoma— These grade II astrocytomas tend to invade surrounding tissue and grow at a relatively slow pace. ... to have tentacle-like projections that grow into surrounding tissue, making them difficult to completely remove during ...

  1. The MicroRNA and MessengerRNA Profile of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex in Human Primary Astrocyte and Astrocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Joanna J.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2010-01-01

    Background GW/P bodies are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein-rich foci involved in microRNA (miRNA)-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) silencing and degradation. The mRNA regulatory functions within GW/P bodies are mediated by GW182 and its binding partner hAgo2 that bind miRNA in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). To date there are no published reports of the profile of miRNA and mRNA targeted to the RISC or a comparison of the RISC-specific miRNA/mRNA profile differences in malignant and non-malignant cells. Methodology/Principal Findings RISC mRNA and miRNA components were profiled by microarray analysis of malignant human U-87 astrocytoma cells and its non-malignant counterpart, primary human astrocytes. Total cell RNA as well as RNA from immunoprecipitated RISC was analyzed. The novel findings were fourfold: (1) miRNAs were highly enriched in astrocyte RISC compared to U-87 astrocytoma RISC, (2) astrocytoma and primary astrocyte cells each contained unique RISC miRNA profiles as compared to their respective cellular miRNA profiles, (3) miR-195, 10b, 29b, 19b, 34a and 455-3p levels were increased and the miR-181b level was decreased in U-87 astrocytoma RISC as compared to astrocyte RISC, and (4) the RISC contained decreased levels of mRNAs in primary astrocyte and U-87 astrocytoma cells. Conclusions/Significance The observation that miR-34a and miR-195 levels were increased in the RISC of U-87 astrocytoma cells suggests an oncogenic role for these miRNAs. Differential regulation of mRNAs by specific miRNAs is evidenced by the observation that three miR34a-targeted mRNAs and two miR-195-targeted mRNAs were downregulated while one miR-195-targeted mRNA was upregulated. Biological pathway analysis of RISC mRNA components suggests that the RISC plays a pivotal role in malignancy and other conditions. This study points to the importance of the RISC and ultimately GW/P body composition and function in miRNA and mRNA deregulation in astrocytoma cells and possibly in

  2. Expression of aquaporin8 in human astrocytomas: Correlation with pathologic grade

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shu-juan; Wang, Ke-jian; Gan, Sheng-wei; Xu, Jin; Xu, Shi-ye; Sun, Shan-quan

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •AQP8 is mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of human astrocytoma cells. •AQP8 over-expressed in human astrocytomas, especially glioblastoma. •The up-regulation of AQP8 is related to the pathological grade of human astrocytomas. •AQP8 may contribute to the growth and proliferation of astrocytomas. -- Abstract: Aquaporin8 (AQP8), a member of the aquaporin (AQP) protein family, is weakly distributed in mammalian brains. Previous studies on AQP8 have focused mainly on the digestive and the reproductive systems. AQP8 has a pivotal role in keeping the fluid and electrolyte balance. In this study, we investigated the expression changes of AQP8 in 75 cases of human brain astrocytic tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that AQP8 was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of astrocytoma cells. The expression levels and immunoreactive score of AQP8 protein and mRNA increased in low-grade astrocytomas, and further increased in high-grade astrocytomas, especially in glioblastoma. Therefore, AQP8 may contribute to the proliferation of astrocytomas, and may be a biomarker and candidate therapy target for patients with astrocytomas.

  3. Glutamate involvement in calcium-dependent migration of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamadi, Abdelkader; Giannone, Grégory; Takeda, Kenneth; Rondé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca(2+) oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca(2+) oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca(2+) oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca(2+)]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Our data demonstrate that glutamate increases migration

  4. The interaction of bee products with temozolomide in human diffuse astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme and astroglia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borawska, Maria H; Markiewicz-Żukowska, Renata; Naliwajko, Sylwia K; Moskwa, Justyna; Bartosiuk, Emilia; Socha, Katarzyna; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Kochanowicz, Jan; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of extracts from Salix spp. honey (ESH), beebread (EBB), and royal jelly (ERJ) with and without temozolomide (TMZ) on cell lines derived from a patient with diffuse astrocytoma (DASC), human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), and normal human astroglia (SVGp12). DASC was identified by immunocytochemistry. TMZ (20 μM) in combination with ESH (30 μg/mL), EBB (50 μg/mL), and ERJ (30 μg/mL) has stronger cytotoxic activity on U87MG cells after 72 h (20.0, 26.5, and 29.3% of control, respectively) than TMZ alone (about 6% of control). An increase of the cytotoxic effect and inhibition of DNA synthesis in SVGp12 were detected after administering TMZ with the studied extracts. NF-κB p50 subunit was reduced in U87MG cells after treatment with ESH (70.9%) and ESH + TMZ (74.7%). A significant decline of MMP-9 and MMP-2 secretion in cultured U87MG was detected after incubation with EBB (42.9% and 73.0%, respectively) and EBB + TMZ (38.4% and 68.5%, respectively). In conclusion, the use of bee products may increase the cytotoxic effect of TMZ in U87MG but also in SVGp12 cell line. It is important to note that the U87MG cells were sensitive to natural bee products, although there was no influence of natural bee products on the DASC cells.

  5. Comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) on human neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yongchang; Venkatraj, Jijayanagaram; Barhoumi, Rola; Pal, Ranadip; Datta, Aniruddha; Wild, James R.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn . E-mail: ecastiglioni@cvm.tamu.edu

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon, which is acutely neurotoxic, and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), which induces OPIDN, in the human neuroblastoma SY5Y and the human astrocytoma cell line CCF-STTG1. SY5Y cells have been studied extensively as a model for OP-induced neurotoxicity, but CCF cells have not previously been studied. We conducted a preliminary human gene array assay of OP-treated SY5Y cells in order to assess at the gene level whether these cells can distinguish between OP compounds that do and do not cause OPIDN. Paraoxon and DFP induced dramatically different profiles of gene expression. Two genes were upregulated and 13 downregulated by at least 2-fold in paraoxon-treated cells. In contrast, one gene was upregulated by DFP and none was downregulated at the 2-fold threshold. This finding is consistent with current and previous observations that SY5Y cells can distinguish between OPs that do or do not induce OPIDN. We also examined gene array results for possible novel target proteins or metabolic pathways for OP neurotoxicity. Protein levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) revealed that paraoxon exposure at 3 {mu}M for 24 h significantly reduced GRP78 levels by 30% in neuroblastoma cells, whereas DFP treatment had no effect. In comparison with SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, paraoxon and DFP (3 {mu}M for 24 h) each significantly increased GRP78 levels by 23-24% in CCF astrocytoma cells. As we have previously evaluated intracellular changes in Ca{sup 2+} levels in SY5Y cells, we investigated the effects of paraoxon and DFP on cellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in CCF by studying cytosolic and mitochondrial basal calcium levels. A significant decrease in the ratio of mitochondrial to cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence was detected in CCF cultures treated for either 1 or 3 days with 1, 3, 10, or 30 {mu}M paraoxon. In contrast, treatment with DFP for 1 day had no significant effect

  6. Effects of prolactin on ionic membrane conductances in the human malignant astrocytoma cell line U87-MG.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Thomas; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Vacher, Pierre

    2004-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is involved in numerous biological processes in peripheral tissues and the brain. Although numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the signal transduction pathways associated with the PRL receptor, very few have examined the role of ion conductances in PRL actions. We used the patch-clamp technique in "whole cell" configuration and microspectrofluorimetry to investigate the effects of PRL on membrane ion conductances in the U87-MG human malignant astrocytoma cell line, which naturally expresses the PRL receptor. We found that a physiological concentration (4 nM) of PRL exerted a biphasic action on membrane conductances. First, PRL activated a Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current that was sensitive to CTX and TEA. This current depended on PRL-induced Ca(2+) mobilization, through a JAK2-dependent pathway from a thapsigargin- and 2-APB-sensitive Ca(2+) pool. Second, PRL also activated an inwardly directed current, mainly due to the stimulation of calcium influx via nickel- and 2-APB-sensitive calcium channels. Both phases resulted in membrane hyperpolarizations, mainly through the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. As shown by combined experiments (electrophysiology and microspectrofluorimetry), the PRL-induced Ca(2+) influx increased with cell membrane hyperpolarization and conversely decreased with cell membrane depolarization. Thus PRL-induced membrane hyperpolarizations facilitated Ca(2+) influx through voltage-independent Ca(2+) channels. Finally, PRL also activated a DIDS-sensitive Cl(-) current, which may participate in the PRL-induced hyperpolarization. These PRL-induced conductance activations are probably related to the PRL proliferative effect we have already described in U87-MG cells.

  7. Nitroproteins in Human Astrocytomas Discovered by Gel Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fang; Li, Jianglin; Guo, Tianyao; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Maoyu; Sang, Shushan; Li, Xuejun; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of highly fatal astrocytomas, a type of brain cancer. To understand the molecular mechanisms of astrocytomas and to discover new biomarkers/therapeutic targets, we sought to identify nitroproteins in human astrocytoma tissue. Anti-nitrotyrosine immunoreaction-positive proteins from a high-grade astrocytoma tissue were detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE)-based nitrotyrosine immunoblots, and identified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fifty-seven nitrotyrosine immunopositive protein spots were detected. A total of 870 proteins (nitrated and non-nitrated) in nitrotyrosine-immunopositive 2D gel spots were identified, and 18 nitroproteins and their 20 nitrotyrosine sites were identified with MS/MS analysis. These nitroproteins participate in multiple processes, including drug-resistance, signal transduction, cytoskeleton, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, immune response, phenotypic dedifferentiation, cell migration, and metastasis. Among those nitroproteins that might play a role in astrocytomas was nitro-sorcin, which is involved in drug resistance and metastasis and might play a role in the spread and treatment of an astrocytoma. Semiquantitative immune-based measurements of different sorcin expressions were found among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls, and a semiquantitative increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Nitro-β-tubulin functions in cytoskeleton and cell migration. Semiquantitative immunoreactivity of β-tubulin showed increased expression among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls and semiquantitatively increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Each nitroprotein was rationalized and related to the corresponding functional system to provide new insights into tyrosine nitration and its potential role in the

  8. Nitroproteins in Human Astrocytomas Discovered by Gel Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fang; Li, Jianglin; Guo, Tianyao; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Maoyu; Sang, Shushan; Li, Xuejun; Desiderio, Dominic M; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of highly fatal astrocytomas, a type of brain cancer. To understand the molecular mechanisms of astrocytomas and to discover new biomarkers/therapeutic targets, we sought to identify nitroproteins in human astrocytoma tissue. Anti-nitrotyrosine immunoreaction-positive proteins from a high-grade astrocytoma tissue were detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE)-based nitrotyrosine immunoblots, and identified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fifty-seven nitrotyrosine immunopositive protein spots were detected. A total of 870 proteins (nitrated and non-nitrated) in nitrotyrosine-immunopositive 2D gel spots were identified, and 18 nitroproteins and their 20 nitrotyrosine sites were identified with MS/MS analysis. These nitroproteins participate in multiple processes, including drug-resistance, signal transduction, cytoskeleton, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, immune response, phenotypic dedifferentiation, cell migration, and metastasis. Among those nitroproteins that might play a role in astrocytomas was nitro-sorcin, which is involved in drug resistance and metastasis and might play a role in the spread and treatment of an astrocytoma. Semiquantitative immune-based measurements of different sorcin expressions were found among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls, and a semiquantitative increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Nitro-β-tubulin functions in cytoskeleton and cell migration. Semiquantitative immunoreactivity of β-tubulin showed increased expression among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls and semiquantitatively increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Each nitroprotein was rationalized and related to the corresponding functional system to provide new insights into tyrosine nitration and its potential role in the

  9. Predominant role of plasma membrane monoamine transporters in monoamine transport in 1321N1, a human astrocytoma-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Fumito; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Iida, Tomomitsu; Harada, Ryuichi; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Miura, Yamato; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters should be immediately removed from the synaptic cleft to avoid excessive neuronal activity. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes and neurons are involved in monoamine removal. However, the mechanism of monoamine transport by astrocytes is not entirely clear. We aimed to elucidate the transporters responsible for monoamine transport in 1321N1, a human astrocytoma-derived cell line. First, we confirmed that 1321N1 cells transported dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and histamine in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Kinetics analysis suggested the involvement of low-affinity monoamine transporters, such as organic cation transporter (OCT) 2 and 3 and plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT). Monoamine transport in 1321N1 cells was not Na(+) /Cl(-) dependent but was inhibited by decynium-22, an inhibitor of low-affinity monoamine transporters, which supported the importance of low-affinity transporters. RT-PCR assays revealed that 1321N1 cells expressed OCT3 and PMAT but no other neurotransmitter transporters. Another human astrocytoma-derived cell line, U251MG, and primary human astrocytes also exhibited the same gene expression pattern. Gene-knockdown assays revealed that 1321N1 and primary human astrocytes could transport monoamines predominantly through PMAT and partly through OCT3. These results might indicate that PMAT and OCT3 in human astrocytes are involved in monoamine clearance.

  10. Caveolin-1 Regulates the P2Y2 Receptor Signaling in Human 1321N1 Astrocytoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Alondra M.; Martinez, Magdiel; Martinez-Rivera, Freddyson J.; Miranda, Jorge D.; Silva, Walter I.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the CNS can cause a differential spatio-temporal release of multiple factors, such as nucleotides, ATP and UTP. The latter interact with neuronal and glial nucleotide receptors. The P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) has gained prominence as a modulator of gliotic responses after CNS injury. Still, the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses in glia are not fully understood. Membrane-raft microdomains, such as caveolae, and their constituent caveolins, modulate receptor signaling in astrocytes; yet, their role in P2Y2R signaling has not been adequately explored. Hence, this study evaluated the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in modulating P2Y2R subcellular distribution and signaling in human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Recombinant hP2Y2R expressed in 1321N1 cells and Cav-1 were found to co-fractionate in light-density membrane-raft fractions, co-localize via confocal microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitate. Raft localization was dependent on ATP stimulation and Cav-1 expression. This hP2Y2R/Cav-1 distribution and interaction was confirmed with various cell model systems differing in the expression of both P2Y2R and Cav-1, and shRNA knockdown of Cav-1 expression. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Cav-1 expression decreased nucleotide-induced increases in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in 1321N1 and C6 glioma cells without altering TRAP-6 and carbachol Ca2+ responses. In addition, Cav-1 shRNA knockdown also decreased AKT phosphorylation and altered the kinetics of ERK1/2 activation in 1321N1 cells. Our findings strongly suggest that P2Y2R interaction with Cav-1 in membrane-raft caveolae of 1321N1 cells modulates receptor coupling to its downstream signaling machinery. Thus, P2Y2R/Cav-1 interactions represent a novel target for controlling P2Y2R function after CNS injury. PMID:27129210

  11. Caveolin-1 Regulates the P2Y2 Receptor Signaling in Human 1321N1 Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Namyr A; Ayala, Alondra M; Martinez, Magdiel; Martinez-Rivera, Freddyson J; Miranda, Jorge D; Silva, Walter I

    2016-06-03

    Damage to the CNS can cause a differential spatio-temporal release of multiple factors, such as nucleotides, ATP and UTP. The latter interact with neuronal and glial nucleotide receptors. The P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) has gained prominence as a modulator of gliotic responses after CNS injury. Still, the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses in glia are not fully understood. Membrane-raft microdomains, such as caveolae, and their constituent caveolins, modulate receptor signaling in astrocytes; yet, their role in P2Y2R signaling has not been adequately explored. Hence, this study evaluated the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in modulating P2Y2R subcellular distribution and signaling in human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Recombinant hP2Y2R expressed in 1321N1 cells and Cav-1 were found to co-fractionate in light-density membrane-raft fractions, co-localize via confocal microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitate. Raft localization was dependent on ATP stimulation and Cav-1 expression. This hP2Y2R/Cav-1 distribution and interaction was confirmed with various cell model systems differing in the expression of both P2Y2R and Cav-1, and shRNA knockdown of Cav-1 expression. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Cav-1 expression decreased nucleotide-induced increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in 1321N1 and C6 glioma cells without altering TRAP-6 and carbachol Ca(2+) responses. In addition, Cav-1 shRNA knockdown also decreased AKT phosphorylation and altered the kinetics of ERK1/2 activation in 1321N1 cells. Our findings strongly suggest that P2Y2R interaction with Cav-1 in membrane-raft caveolae of 1321N1 cells modulates receptor coupling to its downstream signaling machinery. Thus, P2Y2R/Cav-1 interactions represent a novel target for controlling P2Y2R function after CNS injury. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) degrades methylmercury to inorganic mercury in human astrocytoma cell line (CCF-STTG1).

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-09-05

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global pollutant that is affecting the health of millions of people worldwide. However, the mechanism of MeHg toxicity still remains somewhat elusive and there is no treatment. It has been known for some time that MeHg can be progressively converted to inorganic mercury (iHg) in various tissues including the brain. Recent work has suggested that cleavage of the carbon-metal bond in MeHg in a biological environment is facilitated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the oxyradical species that actually mediates this process has not been identified. Here, we provide evidence that superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) can convert MeHg to iHg. The calculated second-order rate constant for the degradation of 1μM MeHg by O2(-) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase was calculated to be 2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1). We were also able to show that this bioconversion can proceed in intact CCF-STTG1 human astrocytoma cells exposed to paraquat (PQ), a O2(-) generating viologen. Notably, exposure of cells to increasing amounts of PQ led to a dose dependent increase in both MeHg and iHg. Indeed, a 24h exposure to 500μM PQ induced a ∼13-fold and ∼18-fold increase in intracellular MeHg and iHg respectively. These effects were inhibited by superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBAP. In addition, we also observed that a 24h exposure to a biologically relevant concentration of MeHg (1μM) did not induce cell death, oxidative stress, or even changes in cellular O2(-) and H2O2. However, co-exposure to PQ enhanced MeHg toxicity which was associated with a robust increase in cell death and oxidative stress. Collectively our results show that O2(-) can bioconvert MeHg to iHg in vitro and in intact cells exposed to conditions that simulate high intracellular O2(-) production. In addition, we show for the first time that O2(-) mediated degradation of MeHg to iHg enhances the toxicity of MeHg by facilitating an accumulation of both MeHg and iHg in the intracellular

  13. Study of Anti Cancer Property of Scrophularia striata Extract on the Human Astrocytoma Cell Line (1321)

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshiry lajimi, Abdulreza; Rezaie-Tavirani, Mostafa; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Moghadamnia, Seyed Hasan; Rezaee, Mohamad Bagher

    2010-01-01

    There are considerable efforts to identify naturally occurring substances as new drugs in cancer therapy. Many components of medicinal plants have been identified that possess substantial anticancerous properties. This prompted us to investigate the effect of Scrophularia striata (an Iranian species belonging to the Scrophulariace family) extract on the growth of astrocyte cancer cell line (1321). The 1321 cell line were seeded in 96-well culture plates in the presence and absence of various concentrations of either leaf and seed filtered and unfiltered extract of Scrophularia striata to determine their probable anticancer effects in comparison with etoposide (chemical anticancer reagent). filtered leaf extract of S. Striata showed strong anticancer effect on 1321cell line as compared to control group (cells not exposed to extracts), and even the group (adenocarcinoma gastric cell line) exposed to etoposide. Unlike the leaf extract, the seed extract activated cell proliferation in all experiments. Flow cytometry findings indicated that apoptosis is the mechanism by which the leaf extract inhibits cell proliferation. Our findings indicate that both leaves and seeds of S. Striata contain both anti cancer and cell growth enhancing agents. PMID:24381605

  14. Hydrogen sulfide generation from l-cysteine in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG and neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja; Bentke, Anna; Wróbel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is endogenously synthesized from l-cysteine in reactions catalyzed by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22) and gamma-cystathionase (CSE, EC 4.4.1.1). The role of 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST, EC 2.8.1.2) in H2S generation is also considered; it could be important for tissues with low CTH activity, e.g. cells of the nervous system. The expression and activity of CBS, CTH, and MPST were detected in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma (U-87 MG) and neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. In both cell lines, the expression and activity of MPST were the highest among the investigated enzymes, suggesting its possible role in the generation of H2S. The RP-HPLC method was used to determine the concentration of cystathionine and alpha-ketobutyrate, products of the CBS- and CTH-catalyzed reactions. The difference in cystathionine levels between cell homogenates treated with totally CTH-inhibiting concentrations of dl-propargylglycine and without the inhibitor was used to evaluate the activity of CBS. The higher expression and activity of CBS, CTH and MPST in the neuroblastoma cells were associated with more intensive generation of H2S in the presence of 2 mM cysteine. A threefold higher level of sulfane sulfur, a potential source of hydrogen sulfide, was detected in the astrocytoma cells in comparison to the neuroblastoma cells.

  15. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lai, James C K; Ananthakrishnan, Gayathri; Jandhyam, Sirisha; Dukhande, Vikas V; Bhushan, Alok; Gokhale, Mugdha; Daniels, Christopher K; Leung, Solomon W

    2010-10-05

    Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival in a dose-related manner. The activities of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase in treated U87 cells were increased, possibly due to an energetic compensation in surviving cells. However, the expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded cytochrome C oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 and the cell signaling protein ERK and phosphorylated ERK were altered in the treated U87 cells, suggesting that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced disruption of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein expression, leading to

  16. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lai, James CK; Ananthakrishnan, Gayathri; Jandhyam, Sirisha; Dukhande, Vikas V; Bhushan, Alok; Gokhale, Mugdha; Daniels, Christopher K; Leung, Solomon W

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival in a dose-related manner. The activities of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase in treated U87 cells were increased, possibly due to an energetic compensation in surviving cells. However, the expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded cytochrome C oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 and the cell signaling protein ERK and phosphorylated ERK were altered in the treated U87 cells, suggesting that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced disruption of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein expression, leading to

  17. Silencing GFAP isoforms in astrocytoma cells disturbs laminin-dependent motility and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Moeton, Martina; Kanski, Regina; Stassen, Oscar M J A; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Geerts, Dirk; van Tijn, Paula; Wiche, Gerhard; van Strien, Miriam E; Hol, Elly M

    2014-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes and neural stem cells. The GFAP gene is alternatively spliced, and expression of GFAP is highly regulated during development, on brain damage, and in neurodegenerative diseases. GFAPα is the canonical splice variant and is expressed in all GFAP-positive cells. In the human brain, the alternatively spliced transcript GFAPδ marks specialized astrocyte populations, such as subpial astrocytes and the neurogenic astrocytes in the human subventricular zone. We here show that shifting the GFAP isoform ratio in favor of GFAPδ in astrocytoma cells, by selectively silencing the canonical isoform GFAPα with short hairpin RNAs, induced a change in integrins, a decrease in plectin, and an increase in expression of the extracellular matrix component laminin. Together, this did not affect cell proliferation but resulted in a significantly decreased motility of astrocytoma cells. In contrast, a down-regulation of all GFAP isoforms led to less cell spreading, increased integrin expression, and a >100-fold difference in the adhesion of astrocytoma cells to laminin. In summary, isoform-specific silencing of GFAP revealed distinct roles of a specialized GFAP network in regulating the interaction of astrocytoma cells with the extracellular matrix through laminin.-Moeton, M., Kanski, R., Stassen, O. M. J. A., Sluijs, J. A., Geerts, D., van Tijn, P., Wiche, G., van Strien, M. E., Hol, E. M. Silencing GFAP isoforms in astrocytoma cells disturbs laminin dependent motility and cell adhesion. © FASEB.

  18. Effects of La0.2Ce0.6Eu0.2F3 nanoparticles capped with polyethylene glycol on human astrocytoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Nathan J.; Brandt, Yekaterina; Rivera, Antonio C.; Armijo, Leisha M.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Osiński, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Lanthanide fluoride colloidal nanocrystals offer a way to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer through the enhanced absorption of ionizing radiation, as well as providing visible luminescence. In order to explore this possibility, cytotoxicity assays need to be performed on mammalian cells in vitro, to show minimum levels of biocompatibility for future experiments. 20% lanthanum 60% cerium and 20% europium lanthanide fluoride nanocrystals were capped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of molecular weight 4000 and suspended in deionized water. These nanocrystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, muffle furnace ashing, absorbance spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Visible light microscopy and trypan blue staining was performed on the cells to assay the cytotoxicity of the nanocrystal on the human astrocytoma line U-87 MG, purchased from ATCC.

  19. A high throughput system for the evaluation of protein kinase C inhibitors based on Elk1 transcriptional activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T R; Sharif, M

    1999-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) designates a family of kinases that regulate many essential functions including cell growth and differentiation. The tight regulation of PKC activity is crucial for maintaining normal cellular proliferation and excessive activity leads to abnormal or uncontrolled cell growth. Recent reports indicate that malignant glioma cell lines express 100 to 1000-fold higher PKC activity when compared to non-neoplastic astrocytes. This high activity correlates well with the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro. We recently reported on the anti-proliferative properties of selective PKC inhibitors on the growth of U-373MG human astrocytoma cell line, and their ability to block mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway activated by substance P (SP) neuropeptide receptor signaling via a PKC-dependent mechanism. Therefore, inhibiting PKC activity by selective PKC inhibitors may present a promising approach for improving astroglial brain tumor therapy. For this purpose, we constructed a high throughput model cell system to evaluate the efficacy of PKC inhibitors. This system is based on the measurement of light production in U-373MG cells stably transfected with the luciferase reporter gene whose expression depends on the transcriptional activation of GAL4-Elk1 fusion protein by enzyme components of the MAP kinase pathway and the upstream activation of PKC (PKC activation-->MAP kinases-->GAL4-Elk1 phosphorylation-->luciferase expression-->luciferase activity). In brief, we have demonstrated that the PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced luciferase activity in this cell system is mediated via the MAP kinase pathway and can be blocked in the presence of MEK1 selective inhibitors (PD 098059 or U0126). We also demonstrated that TPA-induced luciferase activity in U-373MG stable clones can be blocked by PKC inhibitors (CGP 41251, Go 6976, and GF 109203X) in a concentration dependent manner. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF

  20. Immunohistochemical characterization of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M B; Altermatt, H J; Scheithauer, B W; Shepherd, C W; VandenBerg, S R

    1996-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is the most common neoplastic process involving the brain in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Morphologically, these tumors exhibit a wide range of cytoarchitecture with spindle and epithelioid cells resembling astrocytes, and also large, occasionally giant cells, some of which have a distinctly ganglion-like appearance. Unresolved questions regarding SEGAs center on: (a) their cytogenesis, i.e., whether they are derived from single or multiple precursors; and (b) their differentiating capacity along glial or neuronal lines. We sought to determine whether SEGAs represent truly mixed tumors or whether they consist of a single population of cells with a capacity for divergent differentiation. Twenty SEGAs were assessed for immunophenotypic features of either neuronal or glial differentiation or both. Only tumors from patients with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of TSC were included. Immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and/or S-100 protein was considered indicative of a glial phenotype, whereas the presence of neuronal differentiation was assessed by staining for cytoskeletal proteins [neurofilament epitopes, class III Beta-tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin], neurosecretory substances [serotonin, cholecystokinin, Beta-endorphin, substance P, somatostatin, metenkephalin, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and for the 28-kDa neuron-associated calcium binding protein calbindin. Of the tumors examined, 18 exhibited both glial and neuronal epitopes, the staining pattern being variable. In 19 tumors, the constituent spindle, polygonal and giant or ganglion-like cells showed variable immunoreactivity for GFAP and S-100 proteins both within the cell body and processes. Neuron-associated cytoskeletal proteins were present in 18 cases. Class III Beta-tubulin immunoreactivity was demonstrated in 17 tumors, both within the bodies of all three

  1. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-b in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gollmer, J. C.; Ladoux, A.; Gioanni, J.; Paquis, P.; Dubreuil, A.; Chatel, M.; Frelin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of human malignant gliomas is stringently dependent on an angiogenic process that probably involves vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Expressions of mRNA coding for the different forms of VEGF were analyzed in surgical specimens from human astrocytomas. Low levels of placental growth factor (PGF) and VEGFC mRNA were observed in polymerase chain reaction, but not in Northern blot experiments. VEGF mRNA was found in some but not all grade and grade IV astrocytomas. VEGFB mRNA was observed in all tissue samples analyzed irrespective of the tumor grade. A new splice variant of VEGFB (VEGFB155) that lacks exons 5 and 6 is described. Expressions of VEGF mRNA in cultured glioblastomas cells were upregulated by hypoxia, but the sensitivity of the cells to hypoxia was reduced as compared with normal rat astrocytes. VEGF expression was depressed by dexamethasone. Expressions of VEGFB mRNA were affected neither by hypoxia nor by dexamethasone. The results indicate a coexpression of VEGF mRNA and VEGFB mRNA in human astrocytomas. Expression of VEGFB is markedly different from that of VEGF. Possible roles of VEGFB as a cofactor for hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in human astrocytomas are discussed. PMID:11303624

  2. Ketamine suppresses the substance P-induced production of IL-6 and IL-8 by human U373MG glioblastoma/astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Murakami, Taisuke; Someya, Akimasa; Inada, Eiichi; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-03-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is an important mediator of neurogenic inflammation within the central and peripheral nervous systems. SP has been shown to induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the human brain via the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, functions as a competitive antagonist of the excitatory neurotransmission N-methyl-D‑aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and also antagonizes the NK-1R by interfering with the binding of SP. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ketamine on the SP-induced activation of a human astrocytoma cell line, U373MG, which expresses high levels of NK-1R. The results from our experiments indicated that ketamine suppressed the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 by the U373MG cells. Furthermore, ketamine inhibited the SP-induced activation of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Taken together, these observations suggest that ketamine may suppress the SP-induced activation (IL-6 and IL-8 production) of U373MG cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of signaling molecules (namely ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB), thereby exerting anti‑inflammatory effects. Thus, ketamine may modulate SP-induced inflammatory responses by NK-1R‑expressing cells through the suppression of signaling molecules (such as ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB).

  3. D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation of adenylate cyclase in a clone derived from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM.

    PubMed

    Balmforth, A J; Ball, S G; Freshney, R I; Graham, D I; McNamee, H B; Vaughan, P F

    1986-09-01

    Clones have been isolated from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM. Homogenates of clone D384 contain an adenylate cyclase that is stimulated by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine), noradrenaline, and isoprenaline with Ka apparent values of 4, 56, and 2.7 microM, respectively. The Ka apparent value for dopamine was increased by the D-1 antagonist cis-flupenthixol, 25 and 100 nM, to 23 and 190 microM, respectively, but was unaffected by propranolol (1 microM). Noradrenaline stimulation of adenylate cyclase was only partially inhibited by either propranolol (10 microM) or cis-flupenthixol (1 microM). Propranolol (10 microM), but not cis-flupenthixol (1 microM), prevented stimulation by isoprenaline. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine and noradrenaline remained unchanged in the presence of phentolamine (1 microM) and sulpiride (1 microM). These results suggest that clone D384 contains both D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. Dopamine stimulates D384 adenylate cyclase through D-1 receptors, isoprenaline via beta-receptors, and noradrenaline through both receptors.

  4. Hydrogel Environment Supports Cell Culture Expansion of a Grade IV Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Jogalekar, Manasi P; Cooper, Leigh G; Serrano, Elba E

    2017-06-07

    Malignant astrocytomas are aggressive cancers of glial origin that can develop into invasive brain tumors. The disease has poor prognosis and high recurrence rate. Astrocytoma cell lines of human origin are an important tool in the experimental pathway from bench to bedside because they afford a convenient intermediate system for in vitro analysis of brain cancer pathogenesis and treatment options. We undertook the current study to determine whether hydrogel culture methods could be adapted to support the growth of astrocytoma cell lines, thereby facilitating a system that may be biologically more similar to in vivo tumor tissue. Our experimental protocols enabled maintenance of Grade IV astrocytoma cell lines in conventional monolayer culture and in the extracellular matrix hydrogel, Geltrex(™). Light and fluorescence microscopy showed that hydrogel environments promoted cellular reorganization from dispersed cells into multilayered aggregates. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the prevalence of autophagy and nuclear membrane distortions in both culture systems. Analysis of microarray Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) DataSets highlighted expression of genes implicated in pathways for cancer progression and autophagy. A pilot quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis of the autophagic biomarkers, Beclin 1 (BECN1) and microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B), with two reference genes (beta actin, ACTB; glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GAPDH), uncovered a relative increase of BECN1 and LC3B in hydrogel cultures of astrocytoma as compared to the monolayer. Taken together, results establish that ultrastructural and molecular characteristics of autophagy are features of this astrocytoma cell line, and that hydrogel culture systems can afford novel opportunities for in vitro studies of glioma.

  5. Metal binding of metallothioneins in human astrocytomas (U87 MG, IPDDC-2A).

    PubMed

    Znidaric, Magda Tusek; Pucer, Anja; Fatur, Tanja; Filipic, Metka; Scancar, Janez; Falnoga, Ingrid

    2007-10-01

    Astroglia cells structurally and nutritionally support neurons in the central nervous system. They play an important role in guiding the construction of the nervous system and controlling the chemical and ionic environment of neurons. They also represent the major sites for accumulation and immobilisation of toxic metal ions most probably connected with metallothioneins. For this reason astroglia cells possess high cytosolic levels of metallothioneins I, II and III (MT-I,II,III). Our aim was to establish the inducibility and metal binding of MTs in two human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 MG (astrocytoma-glioblastoma, grade IV) and IPDDC-2A (astrocytoma, grade II), on exposure to cadmium chloride (1 microM). MTs were identified by molecular weight (size exclusion chromatography) and their metal content (Cd, Zn and Cu) to follow the interactions between metals. We showed that MTs are constitutively expressed in both human astrocytoma cell lines. In accordance with the higher malignancy grade of U87 MG, the amount of MTs was higher in U87 MG than in IPDDC-2A cells. After 24 hours of exposure to Cd their expression greatly increased in both cell lines and they were capable of immobilising almost all water soluble Cd. Induction of MTs in U87 MG cells was additionally followed up to 48 hours with exposure to different concentrations of CdCl(2) (1, 10 microM). Induction was a time dependent process throughout the period. Isoform III (identified by chromatographic separation of isoform III from I/II) was present at all exposure times, but only in traces with respect to the prevailing amounts of MT-I/II isoforms. So induction can be attributed to isoform I/II only.

  6. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 is coupled to muscarinic receptors in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1: characterization of the transducing mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Bayon, Y; Hernandez, M; Alonso, A; Nuñez, L; Garcia-Sancho, J; Leslie, C; Sanchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The cholinergic agonist carbachol induced the release of arachidonic acid in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line, and this was blocked by atropine, suggesting the involvement of muscarinic receptors. To assess the mechanisms of signalling involved in the response to carbachol, a set of compounds characterized by eliciting responses through different mechanisms was tested. A combination of 4beta-phorbol 12beta-myristate 13alpha-acetate and thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endomembrane Ca2+-ATPase that induces a prolonged elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, induced an optimal response, suggesting at first glance that both protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca2+ mobilization were involved in the response. This was consistent with the observation that carbachol elicited Ca2+ mobilization and PKC-dependent phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2; phosphatide sn-2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) as measured by a decrease in electrophoretic mobility. Nevertheless, the release of arachidonate induced by carbachol was unaltered in media containing decreased concentrations of Ca2+ or in the presence of neomycin, a potent inhibitor of phospholipase C which blocks phosphoinositide turnover and Ca2+ mobilization. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate added to the cell-free homogenate induced both [3H]arachidonate release and cPLA2 translocation to the cell membrane fraction in the absence of Ca2+, thus suggesting the existence of an alternative mechanism of cPLA2 translocation dependent on G-proteins and independent of Ca2+ mobilization. From the combination of experiments utilizing biochemical and immunological tools the involvement of cPLA2 was ascertained. In summary, these data indicate the existence in the astrocytoma cell line 1321N1 of a pathway involving the cPLA2 which couples the release of arachidonate to the occupancy of receptors for a neurotransmitter, requires PKC activity and G-proteins and might operate in the absence of Ca2+ mobilization. PMID:9173894

  7. The inhibitory effect of CIL-102 on the growth of human astrocytoma cells is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of ERK1/2 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Chih-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Cheng, Ho-Chen; Wang, Ting-Chung; Sze, Chun-I

    2012-08-15

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata, with multiple pharmacological activities, including anticancer effects and promotion of apoptosis. The mechanism by which CIL-102 inhibits growth remains poorly understood in human astrocytoma cells. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 affects the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle G2/M arrest in glioma cells. Treatment of U87 cells with 1.0 μM CIL-102 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, and cdk1), and phosphorylation of cdk1Tyr{sup 15} and Cdc25cSer{sup 216}. Furthermore, treatment with the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 abolished CIL-102-induced Cdc25cSer{sup 216} expression and reversed CIL-102-inhibited cdk1 activation. In addition, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an ROS scavenger, blocked cell cycle G2/M arrest and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} in U87 cells. CIL-102-mediated ERK1/2 and ROS production, and cell cycle arrest were blocked by treatment with specific inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a novel CIL-102-inhibited proliferation in U87 cells by activating the ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} cell cycle-related proteins and inducing ROS production; this might be a new mechanism in human astrocytoma cells. -- Highlights: ► We show the effects of CIL-102 on the G2/M arrest of human astrocytoma cells. ► ROS and the Ras/ERK1/2 triggering pathways are involved in the CIL-102 treatment. ► CIL-102 induces sustained activation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25c and ROS are required.

  8. Ammonium-induced calcium mobilization in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmann, Petra; Koese, Meryem; Soehl, Kristina; Mueller, Christa E.

    2008-02-15

    High blood levels of ammonium/ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3}) are associated with severe neurotoxicity as observed in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Astrocytes are the main targets of ammonium toxicity, while neuronal cells are less vulnerable. In the present study, an astrocytoma cell line 1321N1 and a neuroblastoma glioma hybrid cell line NG108-15 were used as model systems for astrocytes and neuronal cells, respectively. Ammonium salts evoked a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytoma (EC{sub 50} = 6.38 mM), but not in NG108-15 cells. The ammonium-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was due to an intracellular effect of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} and was independent of extracellular calcium. Acetate completely inhibited the ammonium effect. Ammonium potently reduced calcium signaling by G{sub q} protein-coupled receptors (H{sub 1} and M3) expressed on the cells. Ammonium (5 mM) also significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. While mRNA for the mammalian ammonium transporters RhBG and RhCG could not be detected in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, both transporters were expressed in NG108-15 cells. RhBG and RhBC in brain may promote the excretion of NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} from neuronal cells. Cellular uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} was mainly by passive diffusion of NH{sub 3}. Human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells appear to be an excellent, easily accessible human model for studying HE, which can substitute animal studies, while NG108-15 cells may be useful for investigating the role of the recently discovered Rhesus family type ammonium transporters in neuronal cells. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of pathologic ammonium effects in different brain cells, and to the treatment of hyperammonemia.

  9. Promotion of astrocytoma cell invasion by micro RNA-22 targeting of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Kinoshita, Manabu; Shinzawa, Koei; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Diffuse astrocytomas (DAs) have a high recurrence rate due to diffuse infiltration into the brain and spinal cord. Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to complementary sequences of target messenger RNA (mRNA). It has been reported that miRNA-22 (miR-22) is involved in the invasion of some cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to identify the biological effects of miR-22 in regard to the invasion of human DAs. METHODS The authors evaluated whether the level of miR-22 is elevated in human spinal DAs by using miRNA chips. Next, the role of miR-22 in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells was investigated. Finally, to elucidate whether miR-22 promotes invasion by astrocytoma cells in vivo, the authors transplanted miR-22 overexpressed astrocytoma cells into mouse thoracic spinal cord. RESULTS The miR-22 significantly upregulated the invasion capacity of 1321N1 cells. Computational in silico analysis predicted that tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP2) is a target gene of miR-22. This was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, which showed that miR-22 inhibited TIMP2 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-22 directly bound the 3'-untranslated regions of TIMP2. The authors further showed that miR-22 promoted invasiveness in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells when transplanted into mouse spinal cord. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that miR-22 acts to regulate invasion of 1321N1 astrocytoma cells by targeting TIMP2 expression. Additional studies with more cases and cell lines are required to elucidate the findings of this study for a novel treatment target for spinal DAs.

  10. miRNA regulation of Sirtuin-1 expression in human astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Sara Giovanna; Conti, Alfredo; Polito, Francesca; Tomasello, Chiara; Barresi, Valeria; La Torre, Domenico La; Cucinotta, Maria; Angileri, Flavio Filippo; Bartolotta, Marcello; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Aguennouz, M'Hammed

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a family of 7 histone deacetylases largely involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival and death. The role of sirtuins in tumorigenesis and cancer progression has been previously studied in certain cancer types. Few studies have investigated sirtuin expression in gliomas, with controversial results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) in diffuse astrocytoma [low grade astrocytoma (LGA)], anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and in primary glioma cell lines: PLGAC (primary LGA cells); PAAC (primary AA cells); and PGBMC (primary GBM cells). Tumor samples were obtained from patients who underwent craniotomy for microsurgical tumor resection at the Neurosurgery Unit of the University of Messina between 2011 and 2014. Sirt-1 expression was qualitatively analyzed in 30 human glial tumor samples and 5 non-neoplastic brain tissue (NBT) specimens using immunohistochemistry and western blotting techniques. Sirt-1 expression was quantitatively analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In addition, Sirt-1 expression in primary cell lines was investigated by immunoblotting and RT-qPCR. Sirt-1 expression was downregulated in gliomas compared to NBTs. Sirt-1 levels also varied among different tumor grades, with more evident downregulation in high-grade (P<0.001) than low-grade tumors (P<0.01). These data were confirmed in cell lines, with the exception of upregulation of protein level in the highest malignancy grade cell lines. The present results suggest a role for miRNA-34a, miRNA-132 and miRNA-217 in the epigenetic control of Sirt-1 during gliomagenesis and progression, and demonstrate the different implications of Sirt-1 in human tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, the present results reveal that Sirt-1 may be an intrinsic regulator of tumor progression and the regulation of Sirt-1 involves complex molecular pathways. However, the

  11. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy.

  12. Nuclear phosphorylated Y142 β-catenin accumulates in astrocytomas and glioblastomas and regulates cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Náger, Mireia; Santacana, Maria; Bhardwaj, Deepshikha; Valls, Joan; Ferrer, Isidre; Nogués, Pere; Cantí, Carles; Herreros, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a fast growing brain tumor characterized by extensive infiltration into the surrounding tissue and one of the most aggressive cancers. GBM is the most common glioma (originating from glial-derived cells) that either evolves from a low grade astrocytoma or appears de novo. Wnt/β-catenin and Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling are hyperactive in human gliomas, where they regulate cell proliferation, migration and stem cell behavior. We previously demonstrated that β-catenin is phosphorylated at Y142 by recombinant c-Met kinase and downstream of HGF signaling in neurons. Here we studied phosphoY142 (PY142) β-catenin and dephospho S/T β-catenin (a classical Wnt transducer) in glioma biopsies, GBM cell lines and biopsy-derived glioma cell cultures. We found that PY142 β-catenin mainly localizes in the nucleus and signals through transcriptional activation in GBM cells. Tissue microarray analysis confirmed strong nuclear PY142 β-catenin immunostaining in astrocytoma and GBM biopsies. By contrast, active β-catenin showed nuclear localization only in GBM samples. Western blot analysis of tumor biopsies further indicated that PY142 and active β-catenin accumulate independently, correlating with the expression of Snail/Slug (an epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker) and Cyclin-D1 (a regulator of cell cycle progression), respectively, in high grade astrocytomas and GBMs. Moreover, GBM cells stimulated with HGF showed increasing levels of PY142 β-catenin and Snail/Slug. Importantly, the expression of mutant Y142F β-catenin decreased cell detachment and invasion induced by HGF in GBM cell lines and biopsy-derived cell cultures. Our results identify PY142 β-catenin as a nuclear β-catenin signaling form that downregulates adhesion and promotes GBM cell invasion. PMID:26654598

  13. Surgical treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in tuberous sclerosis complex patients.

    PubMed

    Kotulska, Katarzyna; Borkowska, Julita; Roszkowski, Marcin; Mandera, Marek; Daszkiewicz, Paweł; Drabik, Krzysztof; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Nowak, Katarzyna; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Domańska-Pakieła, Dorota; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2014-04-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma is a brain tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex. There are two treatment options for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas: surgery or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. The analysis of outcome of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma surgery may help characterize the patients who may benefit from pharmacotherapy. Sixty-four subependymal giant cell astrocytoma surgeries in 57 tuberous sclerosis complex patients with at least a 12-month follow-up were included in the study. The tumor size, age of the patients, mutation in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, indication for the surgery, and postsurgical complications were analyzed. The mean age of patients at surgery was 9.7 years. Mean follow-up after surgery was 63.7 months. Thirty-seven (57.8%) tumors were symptomatic and 27 (42.2%) were asymptomatic. Patients with TSC2 mutations developed subependymal giant cell astrocytoma at a significantly younger age than individuals with TSC1 mutations. Four patients (6.2% of all surgeries) died after surgery. Surgery-related complications were reported in 0%, 46%, 83%, 81%, and 67% of patients with tumors <2 cm, between 2 and 3 cm, between 3 and 4 cm, >4 cm, and bilateral subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, respectively, and were most common in children younger than 3 years of age. The most common complications included hemiparesis, hydrocephalus, hematoma, and cognitive decline. Our study indicates that subependymal giant cell astrocytoma surgery is associated with significant risk in individuals with bilateral subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, tumors bigger than 2 cm, and in children younger than 3 years of age. Therefore, tuberous sclerosis complex patients should be thoroughly screened for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma growth, and early treatment should be considered in selected patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Manganese treatment modulates the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Alfred Orina; Kawikova, Ivana; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Daniels, Christopher K; Lai, James C K

    2006-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play roles in neural cells by regulating energy balance, cell proliferation and anti-oxidant responses although the molecular mechanisms underlying such roles are unclear. Chronic exposure to excess manganese (Mn) leads to neurotoxicity, although Mn-induced neurotoxic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized Mn neurotoxicity differentially alters the expression of PPARs. We investigated the effects of manganese chloride treatment (0.01-4 mM) on protein expression of PPAR isoforms (alpha, beta, and gamma) in human astrocytoma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) cells. The two cell types expressed the 3 PPAR isoforms differentially: their expression of the PPARs was altered by Mn-treatment. Furthermore, nuclear and cytosolic fractions derived from the 2 cell types, with and without Mn-treatment, exhibited marked differences in the protein content of PPARs. Our results constitute the first demonstration that the PPAR signaling pathway may assume pathophysiological importance in Mn neurotoxicity.

  15. Effects of dexamethasone and betamethasone on in vitro cultures from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Guner, M; Freshney, R I; Morgan, D; Freshney, M G; Thomas, D G; Graham, D I

    1977-04-01

    Cultures of human astrocytoma have been derived by collagenase digestion and are presumed, from their aneuploid karyotypes, to be predominantly neoplastic. Early passage cultures in proliferative phase have been cloned in the presence of dexamethasone and betamethasone, both commonly used in management of patients with brain tumours. These steroids raise both the cloning efficiency and the proliferative capacity of cells within each clone. Inhibition was detected only in very high steroid concentrations (25-50 microng/ml). Since these concentrations are unlikely to be attained in vivo it is concluded that anticipated physiological levels of these steroids enhance cell survival at low densities in culture. The significance of this in vivo is discussed.

  16. Effects of dexamethasone and betamethasone on in vitro cultures from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Guner, M.; Freshney, R. I.; Morgan, D.; Freshney, M. G.; Thomas, D. G.; Graham, D. I.

    1977-01-01

    Cultures of human astrocytoma have been derived by collagenase digestion and are presumed, from their aneuploid karyotypes, to be predominantly neoplastic. Early passage cultures in proliferative phase have been cloned in the presence of dexamethasone and betamethasone, both commonly used in management of patients with brain tumours. These steroids raise both the cloning efficiency and the proliferative capacity of cells within each clone. Inhibition was detected only in very high steroid concentrations (25-50 microng/ml). Since these concentrations are unlikely to be attained in vivo it is concluded that anticipated physiological levels of these steroids enhance cell survival at low densities in culture. The significance of this in vivo is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2(a) Fig. 2(b) PMID:869982

  17. Temozolomide, quercetin and cell death in the MOGGCCM astrocytoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Langner, Ewa; Wertel, Iwona; Piersiak, Tomasz; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2010-10-06

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Temozolomide (an alkylating chemotherapeutic agent) and quercetin (natural flavonoid) on cell death in the human astrocytoma cell line MOGGCCM (WHO grade III). Our results indicate that Temozolomide induces autophagy, while quercetin promotes severe necrosis in the cell line in a manner dependent on the drug concentration. We demonstrated for the first time that combinations of both drugs were much more effective in programmed cell death induction in glioma cells. At a low (5muM) drug concentration, quercetin potentiated a pro-autophagic effect of Temozolomide, while after treatment with a higher drug concentration (30muM), autophagy switched to apoptosis. Temozolomide attenuated the toxic effect of quercetin. Apoptosis was mediated by the mitochondrial pathway and the activation of caspase 3 and cytochrome C release, but no changes in caspase 8 expression was observed. It was accompanied by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of Hsp27 and Hsp72 expression. Autophagy was correlated with an increased level of LC3II. Temozolomide and quercetin also inhibited migratory phenotype of MOGGCCM cells and changed the nuclei morphology from a circular to an irregular shape. Our results indicate that quercetin acts in synergy with Temozolomide and when used in combination rather than in separate pharmacological application, both drugs are more effective in programmed cell death induction. Temozolomide administered with quercetin seems to be a potent and promising combination which might be useful in glioma therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Coexpression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF-receptor genes by primary human astrocytomas may contribute to their development and maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, M; Naber, S P; Wolfe, H J; Galanopoulos, T; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Black, P M; Antoniades, H N

    1990-01-01

    The present studies investigated the expression of the two PDGF genes (c-sis/PDGF-2 and PDGF-1) and the PDGF-receptor b gene (PDGF-R) in 34 primary human astrocytomas. Northern blot analysis demonstrated the coexpression of the c-sis/PDGF-2 protooncogene and the PDGF-R gene in all astrocytomas examined. The majority of the tumors also expressed the PDGF-1 gene. There was no correlation between the expression of the two PDGF genes. Nonmalignant human brain tissue expressed the PDGF-R and PDGF-1 genes but not the c-sis/PDGF-2 protooncogene. In situ hybridization of astrocytoma tissue localized the expression of the c-sis and PDGF-R mRNA's in tumor cells. Capillary endothelial cells also expressed c-sis mRNA. In contrast, nonmalignant human brain tissue expressed only PDGF-R mRNA but not c-sis/PDGF-2 mRNA. The coexpression of a potent mitogenic growth factor protooncogene (c-sis) and its receptor gene in astrocytoma tumor cells suggests the presence of an autocrine mechanism that may contribute to the development and maintenance of astrocytomas. The expression of c-sis mRNA in tumor cells but not in nonmalignant brain cells may serve as an additional diagnostic criterion for the detection of astrocytomas in small tissue specimen using in situ hybridization for the detection of c-sis mRNA and/or immunostaining for the recognition of its protein product. Images PMID:2164040

  19. EGR-1 is regulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor stimulation and associated with patient survival in human high grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Mittelbronn, Michel; Harter, Patrick; Warth, Arne; Lupescu, Adrian; Schilbach, Karin; Vollmann, Henning; Capper, David; Goeppert, Benjamin; Frei, Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Weller, Michael; Meyermann, Richard; Lang, Florian; Simon, Perikles

    2009-04-01

    Early growth response-1 (EGR-1) is considered a central regulator in tumor cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis and a promising candidate for gene therapy in human astrocytomas. However, conflicting data have been reported suggesting that both tumor promoting and anti-tumor activity of EGR-1 and its regulation, expression and prognostic significance still remain enigmatic. Our study explored EGR-1 expression and regulation in astrocytomas and its association with patient survival. As we detected two EGR-1 mRNA variants, one containing a N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (NMDA-R) responsive cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE), further experiments were performed to determine the functional role of this pathway. After NMDA stimulation of SV-FHAS and neoplastic astrocytes, real-time polymerase chain reaction showed an increase of the CPE, containing EGR-1 splice variant only in astrocytoma cells. The surface expression and functionality of NMDA-R were demonstrated by flow cytometric analysis and measurement of increased intracellular Ca(2+). EGR-1 was mainly restricted to tumor cells expressing NMDA-R and significantly up-regulated in astrocytic tumors compared with normal brain. Further, EGR-1 expression was significantly (P < 0.007) associated with enhanced patient survival and was an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis in high grade astrocytomas. The NMDA-R-mediated EGR-1 expression, therefore, seems to be a promising target for novel clinical approaches to astrocytoma treatment.

  20. Everolimus Treatment for an Early Infantile Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Minagawa, Kimio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are benign tumors often observed with tuberous sclerosis complex. These tumors are rarely diagnosed during fetal life or early infancy. Until recently, the only available treatment has been surgical resection. Current clinical research has demonstrated that everolimus can induce these tumors' regression. We report a 19-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis complex. At 2 months of age, he presented with congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that was complicated by refractory epilepsy and severe mental retardation. Treatment with everolimus was started when he was 10 months old. Three months after initiating everolimus, the tumor was significantly reduced in size, and the reduction was subsequently maintained. His seizures decreased and he showed cognitive and developmental improvement. No severe adverse events have been observed to date. Everolimus has promise as an effective alternative to surgery for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas during early infancy.

  1. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: diagnosis, screening, and treatment. Recommendations from the International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference 2012.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jonathan; Roach, E Steve; Bartels, Ute; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Koenig, Mary Kay; Weiner, Howard L; Franz, David N; Wang, Henry Z

    2013-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant disorder predisposing to the development of benign lesions in different body organs, mainly in the brain, kidney, liver, skin, heart, and lung. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are characteristic brain tumors that occur in 10% to 20% of tuberous sclerosis complex patients and are almost exclusively related to tuberous sclerosis complex. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas usually grow slowly, but their progression ultimately leads to the occlusion of the foramen of Monro, with subsequent increased intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus, thus necessitating intervention. During recent years, secondary to improved understanding in the biological and genetic basis of tuberous sclerosis complex, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, becoming an alternative therapeutic option to surgery. In June 2012, an International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference was convened, during which an expert panel revised the diagnostic criteria and considered treatment options for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. This article summarizes the subpanel's recommendations regarding subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors have been shown to be an effective treatment of various aspects of tuberous sclerosis complex, including subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. Both mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and surgery have a role in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. Various subependymal giant cell astrocytoma-related conditions favor a certain treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and vascular endothelial growth factor in association with neovascularization in human primary astrocytoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jian-wei; Zhan, Ren-ya; Tong, Ying; Zhou, Yong-qing; Zhang, Ming

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenesis in primary astrocytoma. Methods: Thirty-seven primary astrocytomas and 4 astrocytic hyperplasia samples were collected and divided into three groups according to histological grade. The expression of eNOS, VEGF and factor VIII related antigen (FVIIIRAg) were assayed by immunohistochemistry. Microvascular density was assessed by FVIIIRAg immunoreactivity. The intensity of immunoreactivity was graded according to the percentage of positive tumor cells. Results: No eNOS and VEGF were expressed in the astrocytes and vascular endothelium in astrocytic hyperplasia. The expression of eNOS or VEGF was light in low-grade astrocytoma and strong in glioblastoma. eNOS expression in astrocytoma was very positively correlated with VEGF. eNOS and VEGF expression in anaplastic astrocytoma was median in contrast to the low grade astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Lower microvascular density was found in low grade astrocytoma than that in higher grade malignant ones. The expressions of eNOS and VEGF were correlated with microvascular density and tumor malignancy. Conclusion: This finding suggests that eNOS and VEGF may have cooperative effect in tumor angiogenesis and play an important role in the pathogenesis of primary astrocytoma. PMID:15973775

  3. Differential expression of two fibroblast growth factor-receptor genes is associated with malignant progression in human astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, F.; Saya, H.; Bruner, J.M.; Morrison, R.S. )

    1994-01-18

    Malignant astrocytomas, which are highly invasive, vascular neoplasms, compose the majority of nervous system tumors in humans. Elevated expression of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in astrocytomas has implicated the FGF family of mitogens in the initiation and progression of astrocyte-derived tumors. In this study, the authors demonstrated that human astrocytomas undergo parallel changes in FGF-receptor (FGFR) expression during their progression from a benign to a malignant phenotype. FGFR type 2 (BEK) expression was abundant in normal white matter and in all low-grade astrocytomas but was not seen in malignant astrocytomas. Conversely, FGFR type 1 (FLG) expression was absent or barely detectable in normal white matter but was significantly elevated in malignant astrocytomas. Malignant astrocytomas also expressed an alternatively spliced form of FGFR-1 (FGFR-1[beta]) containing two immunoglobulin-like disulfide loops, whereas normal human adult and fetal brains expressed a receptor form (FGFR-1[alpha]) containing three immunoglobulin-like disulfide loops. Intermediate grades of astrocytic tumors exhibited a gradual loss of FGFR-2 and a shift in expression from FGFR-1[alpha] to FGFR-2 and a shift in expression from FGFR-1[alpha] to FGFR-1[beta] as they progressed from benign to malignant phenotype. These results suggest that differential expression and alternative splicing of FGFRs may be critical in the malignant progression of astrocytic tumors.

  4. Novel Dual-Reporter Preclinical Screen for Anti-Astrocytoma Agents Identifies Cytostatic and Cytotoxic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Jessica J.; Nerva, John D.; Reilly, Karlyne M.

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytoma/glioblastoma is the most common malignant form of brain cancer and is often unresponsive to current pharmacological therapies and surgical interventions. Despite several potential therapeutic agents against astrocytoma and glioblastoma (1), there are currently no effective therapies for astrocytoma, creating a great need for the identification of effective anti-tumor agents. We have developed a novel dual-reporter system in Trp53/Nf1-null astrocytoma cells to simultaneously and rapidly assay cell viability and cell cycle progression as evidenced by activity of the human E2F1 promoter in vitro. The dual-reporter high-throughput assay was used to screen experimental therapeutics for activity in Trp53/Nf1-null astrocytoma. Several compounds were identified demonstrating selectivity for astrocytoma over primary astrocytes. The dual-reporter system described here may be a valuable tool for identifying potential anti-tumor treatments that specifically target astrocytoma. PMID:18664715

  5. Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox interacting protein 1 is overexpressed in astrocytoma and promotes tumor cell growth and migration

    PubMed Central

    van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Aronica, Eleonora; Hulleman, Esther; Wedekind, Laurine E.; Biesmans, Dennis; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Bugiani, Marianna; Geerts, Dirk; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Würdinger, Thomas; van der Stoop, Petra P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glial brain tumors cause considerable mortality and morbidity in children and adults. Innovative targets for therapy are needed to improve survival and reduce long-term sequelae. The aim of this study was to find a candidate tumor-promoting protein, abundantly expressed in tumor cells but not in normal brain tissues, as a potential target for therapy. Methods In silico proteomics and genomics, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence microscopy validation were performed. RNA interference was used to ascertain the functional role of the overexpressed candidate target protein. Results In silico proteomics and genomics revealed pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) interacting protein 1 (PBXIP1) overexpression in adult and childhood high-grade glioma and ependymoma compared with normal brain. PBXIP1 is a PBX-family interacting microtubule-binding protein with a putative role in migration and proliferation of cancer cells. Immunohistochemical studies in glial tumors validated PBXIP1 expression in astrocytoma and ependymoma but not in oligodendroglioma. RNAi-mediated PBXIP1-knockdown in glioblastoma cell lines strongly reduced proliferation and migration and induced morphological changes, indicating that PBXIP1 knockdown decreases glioma cell viability and motility through rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, expression of PBXIP1 was observed in radial glia and astrocytic progenitor cells in human fetal tissues, suggesting that PBXIP1 is an astroglial progenitor cell marker during human embryonic development. Conclusion PBXIP1 is a novel protein overexpressed in astrocytoma and ependymoma, involved in tumor cell proliferation and migration, that warrants further exploration as a novel therapeutic target in these tumors. PMID:24470547

  6. A GATA4-regulated tumor suppressor network represses formation of malignant human astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Wolf, Amparo; Munoz, Diana M.; Smith, Christopher J.; Gajadhar, Aaron; Restrepo, Andres; Clarke, Ian D.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Kesari, Santosh; Dirks, Peter B.; McGlade, C. Jane; Stanford, William L.; Aldape, Kenneth; Mischel, Paul S.; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal primary human brain tumor, exhibits multiple molecular aberrations. We report that loss of the transcription factor GATA4, a negative regulator of normal astrocyte proliferation, is a driver in glioma formation and fulfills the hallmarks of a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). Although GATA4 was expressed in normal brain, loss of GATA4 was observed in 94/163 GBM operative samples and was a negative survival prognostic marker. GATA4 loss occurred through promoter hypermethylation or novel somatic mutations. Loss of GATA4 in normal human astrocytes promoted high-grade astrocytoma formation, in cooperation with other relevant genetic alterations such as activated Ras or loss of TP53. Loss of GATA4 with activated Ras in normal astrocytes promoted a progenitor-like phenotype, formation of neurospheres, and the ability to differentiate into astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Re-expression of GATA4 in human GBM cell lines, primary cultures, and brain tumor–initiating cells suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo through direct activation of the cell cycle inhibitor P21CIP1, independent of TP53. Re-expression of GATA4 also conferred sensitivity of GBM cells to temozolomide, a DNA alkylating agent currently used in GBM therapy. This sensitivity was independent of MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase), the DNA repair enzyme which is often implicated in temozolomide resistance. Instead, GATA4 reduced expression of APNG (alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase), a DNA repair enzyme which is poorly characterized in GBM-mediated temozolomide resistance. Identification and validation of GATA4 as a TSG and its downstream targets in GBM may yield promising novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21464220

  7. A GATA4-regulated tumor suppressor network represses formation of malignant human astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Wolf, Amparo; Munoz, Diana M; Smith, Christopher J; Gajadhar, Aaron; Restrepo, Andres; Clarke, Ian D; Fuller, Gregory N; Kesari, Santosh; Dirks, Peter B; McGlade, C Jane; Stanford, William L; Aldape, Kenneth; Mischel, Paul S; Hawkins, Cynthia; Guha, Abhijit

    2011-04-11

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal primary human brain tumor, exhibits multiple molecular aberrations. We report that loss of the transcription factor GATA4, a negative regulator of normal astrocyte proliferation, is a driver in glioma formation and fulfills the hallmarks of a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). Although GATA4 was expressed in normal brain, loss of GATA4 was observed in 94/163 GBM operative samples and was a negative survival prognostic marker. GATA4 loss occurred through promoter hypermethylation or novel somatic mutations. Loss of GATA4 in normal human astrocytes promoted high-grade astrocytoma formation, in cooperation with other relevant genetic alterations such as activated Ras or loss of TP53. Loss of GATA4 with activated Ras in normal astrocytes promoted a progenitor-like phenotype, formation of neurospheres, and the ability to differentiate into astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Re-expression of GATA4 in human GBM cell lines, primary cultures, and brain tumor-initiating cells suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo through direct activation of the cell cycle inhibitor P21(CIP1), independent of TP53. Re-expression of GATA4 also conferred sensitivity of GBM cells to temozolomide, a DNA alkylating agent currently used in GBM therapy. This sensitivity was independent of MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase), the DNA repair enzyme which is often implicated in temozolomide resistance. Instead, GATA4 reduced expression of APNG (alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase), a DNA repair enzyme which is poorly characterized in GBM-mediated temozolomide resistance. Identification and validation of GATA4 as a TSG and its downstream targets in GBM may yield promising novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. A dangerous liaison: Leptin and sPLA2-IIA join forces to induce proliferation and migration of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rubén; Cordova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour, shows worse prognosis linked to diabetes or obesity persistence. These pathologies are chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by altered profiles of inflammatory mediators, including leptin and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA). Both proteins, in turn, display diverse pro-cancer properties in different cell types, including astrocytes. Herein, to understand the underlying relationship between obesity and brain tumors, we investigated the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with sPLA2-IIA on astrocytoma cell functions. sPLA2-IIA induced up-regulation of leptin receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Leptin, as well as sPLA2-IIA, increased growth and migration in these cells, through activation/phosphorylation of key proteins of survival cascades. Leptin, at concentrations with minimal or no activating effects on astrocytoma cells, enhanced growth and migration promoted by low doses of sPLA2-IIA. sPLA2-IIA alone induced a transient phosphorylation pattern in the Src/ERK/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/rS6 pathway through EGFR transactivation, and co-addition of leptin resulted in a sustained phosphorylation of these signaling regulators. Mechanistically, EGFR transactivation and tyrosine- and serine/threonine-protein phosphatases revealed a key role in this leptin-sPLA2-IIA cross-talk. This cooperative partnership between both proteins was also found in primary astrocytes. These findings thus indicate that the adipokine leptin, by increasing the susceptibility of cells to inflammatory mediators, could contribute to worsen the prognosis of tumoral and neurodegenerative processes, being a potential mediator of some obesity-related medical complications.

  9. A dangerous liaison: Leptin and sPLA2-IIA join forces to induce proliferation and migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rubén; Cordova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour, shows worse prognosis linked to diabetes or obesity persistence. These pathologies are chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by altered profiles of inflammatory mediators, including leptin and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA). Both proteins, in turn, display diverse pro-cancer properties in different cell types, including astrocytes. Herein, to understand the underlying relationship between obesity and brain tumors, we investigated the effect of leptin, alone or in combination with sPLA2-IIA on astrocytoma cell functions. sPLA2-IIA induced up-regulation of leptin receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Leptin, as well as sPLA2-IIA, increased growth and migration in these cells, through activation/phosphorylation of key proteins of survival cascades. Leptin, at concentrations with minimal or no activating effects on astrocytoma cells, enhanced growth and migration promoted by low doses of sPLA2-IIA. sPLA2-IIA alone induced a transient phosphorylation pattern in the Src/ERK/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/rS6 pathway through EGFR transactivation, and co-addition of leptin resulted in a sustained phosphorylation of these signaling regulators. Mechanistically, EGFR transactivation and tyrosine- and serine/threonine-protein phosphatases revealed a key role in this leptin-sPLA2-IIA cross-talk. This cooperative partnership between both proteins was also found in primary astrocytes. These findings thus indicate that the adipokine leptin, by increasing the susceptibility of cells to inflammatory mediators, could contribute to worsen the prognosis of tumoral and neurodegenerative processes, being a potential mediator of some obesity-related medical complications. PMID:28249041

  10. The burden of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas associated with tuberous sclerosis complex: results of a patient and caregiver survey.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, Anne M; Rentz, Anne M; Liu, Zhimei; Wheless, James W; Pelletier, Corey L; Dunn, David W; Frost, Michael D; Nakagawa, JoAnne; Magestro, Matthew; Prestifilippo, Judith; Pashos, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder characterized by benign tumor growth including lesions in the ventricular system of the brain known as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. This analysis focuses on the clinical presentation, management, and associated burden of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex in the United States. An institutional review board-approved web-based survey of tuberous sclerosis complex patients and caregivers collected information, and descriptive analyses were conducted on age-based subgroups. A total of 116 tuberous sclerosis complex-subependymal giant cell astrocytoma patients or caregivers responded (17% of the total tuberous sclerosis complex sample). Mean and median patient ages were 25.5 and 23.5 years. Besides subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, patients also experienced skin lesions (72%), seizures (65%), and cognitive concerns (60%). Forty-five percent reported having brain surgery (22% for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma). In the past year, 42% of patients were admitted at least once to the hospital whereas 39% went to the emergency department. Results demonstrate that tuberous sclerosis complex-subependymal giant cell astrocytoma is associated with significant clinical burden, resource utilization, and decreased well-being. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. An acid phosphatase in the plasma membranes of human astrocytoma showing marked specificity toward phosphotyrosine protein.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Kaplan, N O

    1982-11-01

    The plasma membrane from the human tumor astrocytoma contains an active acid phosphatase activity based on hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Other acid phosphatase substrates--beta-glycerophosphate, O-phosphorylcholine, and 5'-AMP--are not hydrolyzed significantly. The phosphatase activity is tartrate insensitive and is stimulated by Triton X-100 and EDTA. Of the three known phosphoamino acids, only free O-phosphotyrosine is hydrolyzed by the membrane phosphatase activity. Other acid phosphatases tested from potato, wheat germ, milk, and bovine prostate did not show this degree of specificity. The plasma membrane activity also dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine histone at a much greater rate than did the other acid phosphatases. pH profiles for free O-phosphotyrosine and phosphotyrosine histone showed a shift toward physiological pH, indicating possible physiological significance. Phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation activity was nearly 10 times greater than that seen for phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation, and Km values were much lower for phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (0.5 microM vs. 10 microM). Fluoride and zinc significantly inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation. Vanadate, on the other hand, was a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (50% inhibition at 0.5 microM) but not of phosphoserine histone. ATP stimulated phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (160-250%) but inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation (95%). These results suggest the existence of a highly specific phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity associated with the plasma membrane of human astrocytoma.

  12. Natural Triterpenic Diols Promote Apoptosis in Astrocytoma Cells through ROS-Mediated Mitochondrial Depolarization and JNK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rubén; Ibeas, Elvira; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Hernández, Marita; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Nieto, María Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Background Triterpene alcohols and acids are multifunctional compounds widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom that exhibit a variety of beneficial health properties, being synthetic analogs of oleanolic acid under clinical evaluation as anti-tumoral therapeutic agents. However, the antineoplastic activity of two natural occuring triterpenoid alcohols extracted from olive oil, erythrodiol (an intermediate from oleanolic acid), and its isomer, uvaol, has barely been reported, particularly on brain cancer cells. Astrocytomas are among the most common and aggressive type of primary malignant tumors in the neurological system lacking effective treatments, and in this study, we addressed the effect of these two triterpenic diols on the human 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line. Principal Findings Erythrodiol and uvaol effectively affected cell proliferation, as well as cell cycle phases and induced 1321N1 cell death. Both triterpenes successfully modulated the apoptotic response, promoting nuclear condensation and fragmentation. They caused retraction and rounding of cultured cells, which lost adherence from their supports, while F-actin and vimentin filaments disappeared as an organized cytoplasmic network. At molecular level, changes in the expression of surface proteins associated with adhesion or death processes were also observed. Moreover, triterpene exposure resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and correlated with the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). The presence of catalase reversed the triterpenic diols-induced mitochondrial depolarization, JNK activation, and apoptotic death, indicating the critical role of ROS in the action of these compounds. Conclusions Overall, we provide a significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of erythrodiol and uvaol that may have a potential in prevention and treatment of brain tumors and other cancers. PMID:19543395

  13. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex: considerations for surgical or pharmacotherapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Wheless, James W; Klimo, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene that can result in the growth of hamartomas in multiple organ systems. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are slow-growing brain tumors associated primarily with tuberous sclerosis complex. They are usually located in the ventricles, often near the foramen of Monro, where they can cause an obstruction if they grow too large, leading to increased intracranial pressure. Surgery to remove a tumor has been the mainstay of treatment but can be associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. Not all tumors and/or patients are suitable for surgery. The recent development of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors that target the pathway affected by TSC1/TSC2 mutations offers a novel pharmacotherapeutic option for these patients. We review the timing and use of surgery versus pharmacotherapy for the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Aquaporin Positron Emission Tomography Differentiates Between Grade III and IV Human Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuji; Nakamura, Yukihiro; Yamada, Kenichi; Kurabe, Satoshi; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Aoki, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hiroki; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Fujii, Yukihiko; Huber, Vincent J; Igarashi, Hironaka; Kwee, Ingrid L; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2017-06-21

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels play a significant role in mesenchymal microvascular proliferation and infiltrative growth. AQPs are highly expressed in malignant astrocytomas, and a positive correlation is observed between their expression levels and histological tumor grade. To examine the utility of aquaporin positron emission tomography (PET) for differentiating between astrocytoma grade III and grade IV using the AQP radioligand [ 11 C]TGN-020. Fifteen astrocytoma patients, grade III (n = 7) and grade IV (n = 8), and 10 healthy volunteers underwent [ 11 C]TGN-020 aquaporin PET imaging. Surgical tissues of astrocytoma patients were examined for histopathological grading using the WHO classification standard and expression of AQP1 and AQP4 immunohistochemically. Mean standardized uptake values of astrocytoma grade III and IV (0.51 ± 0.11 vs 1.50 ± 0.44, respectively) were higher than normal white matter (0.17 ± 0.02, P < .001) for both tumor grades. Importantly, mean standardized uptake values of astrocytoma grade IV were significantly higher than grade III ( P < .01). Our study demonstrated that [ 11 C]TGN-020 aquaporin PET imaging differentiated between astrocytoma grades III and IV. We suggest its clinical application as a noninvasive diagnostic tool would lead to advancements in the management of these malignant brain tumors.

  15. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Dadey, David Y A; Kamath, Ashwin A; Leuthardt, Eric C; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although open resection remains the standard therapy, complication rates remain high. To minimize morbidity, less invasive approaches, such as endoscope-assisted resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy with mTOR pathway inhibitors, are also used to treat these lesions. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a relatively new modality that is increasingly used to treat a variety of intracranial lesions. In this report, the authors describe two pediatric cases of SEGA that were treated with LITT. In both patients the lesion responded well to this treatment modality, with tumor shrinkage observed on follow-up MRI. These cases highlight the potential of LITT to serve as a viable minimally invasive therapeutic approach to the management of SEGAs in the pediatric population.

  16. Identification of death receptors DR4 and DR5 in HTB-12 astrocytoma cell lines and determination of TRAIL sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Riddick, Elenia; Evans, Shavonda; Rousch, Jeffrey; Gwebu, Ephraim; Banerjee, Hirendra Nath

    2013-12-01

    Astrocytomas are tumors which arise from astrocytes, cells that form the blood-brain barrier. There are very few drugs that successfully treat brain tumors. In this study, the cytotoxic effects on the HTB-12 astrocytoma cell line by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) were studied. The presence of the TRAIL receptors, Death receptor 4 (DR4) and Death receptor 5 (DR5), were detected in HTB-12 cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity assay by Trypan Blue Exclusion Method showed effective cell killing by TRAIL treatment. Thus, the presence of death receptors and TRAIL efficacy raises the therapeutic potential for this type of brain tumor.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of F-Actin Redistribution in Astrocytoma Cells Treated with Candidate Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Stephen; Verma, Chrissie; Brafman, Alla; Gudla, Prabhakar; Nandy, Kaustav; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Fuchs, Philip L.; Jaja, Joseph; Reilly, Karlyne M.; Beutler, John; Turbyville, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Actin fibers (F-actin) control the shape and internal organization of cells, and generate force. It has been long appreciated that these functions are tightly coupled, and in some cases drive cell behavior and cell fate. The distribution and dynamics of F-actin is different in cancer versus normal cells and in response to small molecules, including actin-targeting natural products and anticancer drugs. Therefore, quantifying actin structural changes from high resolution fluorescence micrographs is necessary for further understanding actin cytoskeleton dynamics and phenotypic consequences of drug interactions on cells. We applied an artificial neural network algorithm, which used image intensity and anisotropy measurements, to quantitatively classify F-actin subcellular features into actin along the edges of cells, actin at the protrusions of cells, internal fibers and punctate signals. The algorithm measured significant increase in F-actin at cell edges with concomitant decrease in internal punctate actin in astrocytoma cells lacking functional neurofibromin and p53 when treated with three structurally-distinct anticancer small molecules: OSW1, Schweinfurthin A (SA) and a synthetic marine compound 23′-dehydroxycephalostatin 1. Distinctly different changes were measured in cells treated with the actin inhibitor cytochalasin B. These measurements support published reports that SA acts on F-actin in NF1−/− neurofibromin deficient cancer cells through changes in Rho signaling. Quantitative pattern analysis of cells has wide applications for understanding mechanisms of small molecules, because many anticancer drugs directly or indirectly target cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, quantitative information about the actin cytoskeleton may make it possible to further understand cell fate decisions using mathematically testable models. Published 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc.† PMID:24515854

  18. Quantitative analysis of F-actin redistribution in astrocytoma cells treated with candidate pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Stephen; Verma, Chrissie; Brafman, Alla; Gudla, Prabhakar; Nandy, Kaustav; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Fuchs, Philip L; Jaja, Joseph; Reilly, Karlyne M; Beutler, John; Turbyville, Thomas J

    2014-06-01

    Actin fibers (F-actin) control the shape and internal organization of cells, and generate force. It has been long appreciated that these functions are tightly coupled, and in some cases drive cell behavior and cell fate. The distribution and dynamics of F-actin is different in cancer versus normal cells and in response to small molecules, including actin-targeting natural products and anticancer drugs. Therefore, quantifying actin structural changes from high resolution fluorescence micrographs is necessary for further understanding actin cytoskeleton dynamics and phenotypic consequences of drug interactions on cells. We applied an artificial neural network algorithm, which used image intensity and anisotropy measurements, to quantitatively classify F-actin subcellular features into actin along the edges of cells, actin at the protrusions of cells, internal fibers and punctate signals. The algorithm measured significant increase in F-actin at cell edges with concomitant decrease in internal punctate actin in astrocytoma cells lacking functional neurofibromin and p53 when treated with three structurally-distinct anticancer small molecules: OSW1, Schweinfurthin A (SA) and a synthetic marine compound 23'-dehydroxycephalostatin 1. Distinctly different changes were measured in cells treated with the actin inhibitor cytochalasin B. These measurements support published reports that SA acts on F-actin in NF1(-/-) neurofibromin deficient cancer cells through changes in Rho signaling. Quantitative pattern analysis of cells has wide applications for understanding mechanisms of small molecules, because many anti-cancer drugs directly or indirectly target cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, quantitative information about the actin cytoskeleton may make it possible to further understand cell fate decisions using mathematically testable models. Published 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of

  19. Congenital segmental lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis complex with associated subependymal giant cell astrocytomas treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prato, Giulia; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Janis, Sara; Vercellino, Nadia; Rossi, Andrea; Consales, Alessandro; Raso, Alessandro; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic, multisystemic disorder characterized by circumscribed benign lesions (hamartomas) in several organs, including brain. This is the result of defects in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 tumor suppressor genes, encoding the hamartin-tuberin complex that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Specific inhibitors of this pathway have been shown to reduce the volume of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Congenital lymphedema is rarely seen in association with tuberous sclerosis, with only a few reported cases. Although this association can be coincidental, the dysgenetic lymphatic system can represent a hamartia as a consequence of gene mutation. We describe a child with congenital lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis and associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma who experienced lymphangitis under treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Because our patient did not show worsening of lymphedema, congenital lymphedema does not seem to be a contraindication for this therapy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Everolimus: in patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Curran, Monique P

    2012-02-01

    Everolimus is an orally administered inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Everolimus (starting dosage 3.0 mg/m(2)) was associated with a significant reduction in the volume of the largest subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) in 28 patients aged ≥3 years with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in a phase II trial (C2485). At 6 months, 32% of patients treated with everolimus had a ≥50% reduction in the volume of their largest SEGA lesion (assessed via an independent central radiology review); 75% had a ≥30% reduction. No patients developed new lesions. During the extension phase of this trial (median duration 34 months), the reduction in SEGA volume was maintained, with no everolimus recipient requiring surgery or other therapy for SEGA or hydrocephalus. In a phase III trial (EXIST-1) in 117 patients with SEGA associated with TSC, 35% of everolimus recipients (starting dosage 4.5 mg/m(2)) versus none of the placebo recipients (p < 0.0001) had an overall response (a reduction in the sum of all target SEGA volumes of ≥50% relative to baseline, nonworsening of non-target SEGA lesions, no new SEGA lesions, and no new/worsening hydrocephalus). Everolimus was generally well tolerated in patients with SEGA associated with TSC; most drug-related adverse reactions were mild to moderate in severity.

  1. Prognostic value of coexistence of abnormal expression of micro-RNA-200b and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein 1 in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-qing; Yao, Qing-he; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Li-bin; Huang, Hai-dong; Cheng, Jing-ming; Yang, Tao; Liu, En-yu; Liang, Liang; Fan, Ke-xia; Zhao, Kai; Xia, Xun; Gu, Jian-wen

    2014-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the expression of micro-RNA-200b (miR-200b) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 (CREB-1) in astrocytoma and its efficacy for predicting outcome. Both miR-200b and CREB-1 messenger RNA expression was measured in 122 astrocytomas and 30 nonneoplastic brain specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of miR-200b was significantly lower in astrocytoma than in nonneoplastic brain (P < .001), whereas CREB-1 messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the tumors (P < .001). Both miR-200b down-regulation and CREB-1 up-regulation were significantly associated with advanced pathologic grade (P = .002 and P = .006, respectively). Low miR-200b expression correlated negatively with Karnofsky performance score (P = .03), and high CREB-1 expression correlated positively with mean tumor diameter (P = .03). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, low miR-200b, high CREB-1, and coexistence of abnormal miR-200b and CREB-1 expression (low miR-200b/high CREB-1) were predictive of shorter progression-free survival and overall survival in both grade III and grade IV astrocytoma. By multivariate analysis, only low miR-200b/high CREB-1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in astrocytoma of advanced grade. Both miR-200b and CREB-1 may play important cooperative roles in the progression of human astrocytoma. The efficacy of miR-200b and CREB-1 together as a predictor of prognosis in astrocytoma patients is shown for the first time.

  2. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a genetically negative tuberous sclerosis complex adult: Case report.

    PubMed

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Jayarao, Mayur; Skrade, Jami; Giannini, Caterina; Workman, Michael J; Morgan, Chad J

    2016-11-01

    The well-described entity of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma (SEGA) in the setting of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is profound in current literature. It has been described in children as well as adults with or without identifiable clinical presentations of tuberous sclerosis. To our knowledge there has not been any report of a negative genetic workup of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex in an adult patient presenting with an isolated SEGA. We present a case of a 25-year-old female with no medical history who presented to the emergency room for headaches. Further workup included gadolinium enhanced MRI of the brain which revealed a homogenously enhancing mass in the left lateral ventricle with eccentric calcification and resultant obstructive hydrocephalus. A left frontal craniotomy with an interhemispheric transcallosal approach was taken for complete removal of the mass. Final pathological diagnosis was SEGA with suggestive cell population, positive GFAP and positive synaptophysin. Genetic testing included TSC1 (MLPA, DNA Sequencing) and TSC2 (MLPA, DNA Sequencing), which were all negative. The panel did not identify mutations associated with Tuberous Sclerosis. Rare cases of isolated SEGA have been reported in patients who do not have typical features of tuberous sclerosis, and may represent minimal penetrance of the disease with an attenuated phenotype. Negative genetic testing, as demonstrated, can be seen in adults with isolated SEGA. With a negative genetic workup of TSC, regular follow up may still be necessary; however this may prove to be low yield for identifying any TSC features in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delays caspase activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Stefin B (cystatin B) is an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases localized in the nucleus and the cytosol. Loss-of-function mutations in the stefin B gene (CSTB) gene were reported in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1). Our previous results showed that thymocytes isolated from stefin B-deficient mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor staurosporin (STS) than the wild-type control cells. We have also shown that the increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delayed cell cycle progression through the S phase. In the present study we examined if the nuclear or cytosolic functions of stefin B are responsible for the accelerated induction of apoptosis observed in the cells from stefin B-deficient mice. We have shown that the overexpression of stefin B in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of astrocytoma T98G cells, delayed caspase-3 and -7 activation. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone completely inhibited caspase activation, while treatment with the inhibitor of calpains- and papain-like cathepsins (2S,3S)-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester did not prevent caspase activation. We concluded that the delay of caspase activation in T98G cells overexpressing stefin B in the nucleus is independent of cathepsin inhibition. PMID:23049497

  4. Pilocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Miriam; Frappaz, Didier; Packer, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common pediatric brain tumor in children. PAs are a distinct histologic and biologic subset of glioma that have a slow growth rate and may even spontaneously regress. These tumors tend to arise in the cerebellum and chiasmatic/hypothalamic region, but can also occur in other regions of the central nervous system. Dissemination is uncommon, but may occur in newly diagnosed PAs. Alterations in the Ras/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (Ras/ERK) have been discovered in a majority of PAs, with KIAA1549-BRAF fusions being the most commonly identified alteration. Children with neurofibromatosis 1 are predisposed to developing PAs, primarily within the optic pathway. When required, treatment consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation, although new molecular agents targeting the Ras/ERK and related signaling pathways are promising new approaches. The 10-year survival rates are greater than 90% in pediatric patients; however, they are poorer in adults. Tumors that are amenable to complete resection (i.e., cerebellum and cortex) have the best overall survival. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Guanine nucleotide-dependent, pertussis toxin-insensitive, stimulation of inositol phosphate formation by carbachol in a membrane preparation from astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hepler, J.R.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), InsP/sub 3/, InsP/sub 2/, and InsP/sub 1/ was increased in a concentration dependent manner (K/sub 0.5/ approx. 5 ..mu..M) by GTP..sigma..S in washed membranes prepared from /sup 3/H-inositol-prelabelled 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Both GTP..gamma..S and GppNHp stimulated InsP formation by 2-3 fold over control; GTP and GDP were much less efficacious and GMP had no effect. Although the muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol had no effect in the absence of guanine nucleotide, in the presence of 10 ..mu..M GTP..gamma..S, carbachol stimulated (K/sub 0.5/ approx. 10 ..mu.. M) the formation of InsP above the level achieved with GTP..gamma..S alone. The effect of carbachol was completely blocked by atropine. The order of potency for a series of nucleotides for stimulation of InsP formation in the presence of 500 ..mu..M carbachol was GTP..gamma..S > GppNHp > GTP = GDP. Pertussis toxin, at concentrations that fully ADP-ribosylate and functionally inactivate G/sub i/, had no effect on InsP formation in the presence of GTP..gamma..S or GTP..gamma..S plus carbachol. Histamine and bradykinin also stimulated InsP formation in the presence of GTP..gamma..S in washed membranes from 1321N1 cells. These data are consistent with the idea that a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that is not G/sub i/ is involved in receptor-mediated stimulation of InsP formation in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

  6. The importance of cell density in the interpretation of growth factor effects on collagenase IV activity release and extracellular matrix production from C6 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, M; McDonald, W; Del Maestro, R F

    1998-09-01

    We have examined the influence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the release of collagenase type IV activity and the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules using C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer culture. Collagenase type IV activity was significantly increased in a dose dependent manner in the low cell density group by treatment with FGF-2 and VEGF but significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion in the high cell density group. These results were corroborated using Western blot technique with an antibody to gelatinase A. Addition of exogenous laminin and fibronectin to the media decreased collagenase type IV activity in a dose dependent fashion with the minimum concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml. Laminin and fibronectin reached a concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml in only the high cell density group after treatment with the growth factors tested. These findings indicate that C6 astrocytoma cells appear to have two regulatory mechanisms for collagenase type IV activity which are dependent on cell density. In a low cell density, C6 astrocytoma cells respond to the dominant effect of FGF-2 and VEGF by increasing the release of collagenase IV activity. In a high cell density collagenase type IV activity is decreased due to it's down regulation by released ECM molecules in response to FGF-2 and VEGF. These regulatory mechanisms may be crucial to the understanding of the coordination of tumor-associated angiogenesis by malignant glial cells.

  7. Everolimus in the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, angiomyolipomas, and pulmonary and skin lesions associated with tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Franz, David Neal

    2013-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by inactivating mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. It is characterized by the development of multiple, benign tumors in several organs throughout the body. Lesions occur in the brain, kidneys, heart, liver, lungs, and skin and result in seizures and epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, and renal and pulmonary organ system dysfunction, as well as other complications. Elucidation of the molecular pathways and etiological factors responsible for causing TSC has led to a paradigm shift in the management and treatment of the disease. TSC1 or TSC2 mutations lead to constitutive upregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which affects many cellular processes involved in tumor growth. By targeting mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, an orally active rapamycin derivative, clinically meaningful and statistically significant reductions in tumor burden have been achieved for the main brain (subependymal giant cell astrocytoma) and renal manifestations (angiomyolipoma) associated with TSC. This review provides an overview of TSC, everolimus, and the clinical trials that led to its approval for the treatment of TSC-associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma and renal angiomyolipoma. PMID:24143074

  8. Demonstration of separate phosphotyrosyl- and phosphoseryl- histone phosphatase activities in the plasma membranes of a human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Knowles, A F; Kaplan, N O

    1985-06-01

    A plasma membrane preparation from a human astrocytoma contained p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), phosphotyrosyl histone, and phosphoseryl histone hydrolysis activities. The pNPPase and phosphotyrosyl histone phosphatase activities were inhibited by vanadate, whereas the phosphoseryl histone phosphatase activity was not; the latter activity was inhibited by pyrophosphate and nucleoside di- and triphosphates. When the membranes were solubilized by Triton X-100 and the solubilized proteins were subjected to column chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex, Sepharose 6B-C1, and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose 4B columns, the pNPPase activity from the phosphoseryl histone phosphatase activity. The results from column chromatography also indicated that there may be multiple phosphotyrosyl and phosphoseryl protein phosphatases in the plasma membranes.

  9. VRK2 identifies a subgroup of primary high-grade astrocytomas with a better prognosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Irene; Vázquez-Cedeira, Marta; Santos-Briz, Angel; García, Juan L; Fernández, Isabel F; Gómez-Moreta, Juan A; Martin-Vallejo, Javier; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Lazo, Pedro A

    2013-10-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors and one of the most lethal among human cancers despite optimal treatment. Therefore, the characterization of molecular alterations underlying the aggressive behavior of these tumors and the identification of new markers are thus an important step towards a better patient stratification and management. VRK1 and VRK2 (Vaccinia-related kinase-1, -2) expression, as well as proliferation markers, were determined in a tissue microarray containing 105 primary astrocytoma biopsies. Kaplan Meier and Cox models were used to find clinical and/or molecular parameters related to overall survival. The effects of VRK protein levels on proliferation were determined in astrocytoma cell lines. High levels of both protein kinases, VRK1 or VRK2, correlated with proliferation markers, p63 or ki67. There was no correlation with p53, reflecting the disruption of the VRK-p53-DRAM autoregulatory loop as a consequence of p53 mutations. High VRK2 protein levels identified a subgroup of astrocytomas that had a significant improvement in survival. The potential effect of VRK2 was studied by analyzing the growth characteristics of astrocytoma cell lines with different EGFR/VRK2 protein ratios. High levels of VRK2 resulted in a lower growth rate suggesting these cells are more indolent. In high-grade astrocytomas, VRK2 expression constitutes a good prognostic marker for patient survival.

  10. VRK2 identifies a subgroup of primary high-grade astrocytomas with a better prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors and one of the most lethal among human cancers despite optimal treatment. Therefore, the characterization of molecular alterations underlying the aggressive behavior of these tumors and the identification of new markers are thus an important step towards a better patient stratification and management. Methods and results VRK1 and VRK2 (Vaccinia-related kinase-1, -2) expression, as well as proliferation markers, were determined in a tissue microarray containing 105 primary astrocytoma biopsies. Kaplan Meier and Cox models were used to find clinical and/or molecular parameters related to overall survival. The effects of VRK protein levels on proliferation were determined in astrocytoma cell lines. High levels of both protein kinases, VRK1 or VRK2, correlated with proliferation markers, p63 or ki67. There was no correlation with p53, reflecting the disruption of the VRK-p53-DRAM autoregulatory loop as a consequence of p53 mutations. High VRK2 protein levels identified a subgroup of astrocytomas that had a significant improvement in survival. The potential effect of VRK2 was studied by analyzing the growth characteristics of astrocytoma cell lines with different EGFR/VRK2 protein ratios. Conclusion High levels of VRK2 resulted in a lower growth rate suggesting these cells are more indolent. In high-grade astrocytomas, VRK2 expression constitutes a good prognostic marker for patient survival. PMID:24079673

  11. [Astrocytoma and epilepsy. Clinical case].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; Miranda-Fernández, Karen Alejandra; García Gutiérrez, Mónica; Vázquez-Estrada, Norma; Müller-Grohmann, Stephanie; Flores-Vázquez, Fabiola

    2016-07-11

    Pilocytic astrocytoma is a rare tumour, usually occurring in paediatric ages, and mainly located in the posterior fossa. It can cause hydrocephalus and intracranial hypertension and, less frequently, seizures, or a focal neurological deficit. The main imaging study by magnetic resonance imaging, which shows a tumour with solid and cystic components without peri-lesional swelling. The election treatment is surgical, and the patient is considered cured if a total resection is accomplished. The case is presented of 22-year-old female patient with a supratentorial pilocytic astrocytoma and epilepsy. Histopathology reported a low grade glial proliferation, with an extensive fibrillar matrix, small cells without atypia, extensive calcifications and piloid areas consisting of bipolar fusiform cells, and some Rosenthal fibres. There were also spongiotic areas consisting of multipolar cells and associated microcysts. The final report was a pilocytic astrocytoma. Pilocytic astrocytoma is more frequent in paediatric patients and in the posterior fossa. The case presented is of a young female adult with supratentorial location, making it a special case. The surgery achieved a total resection. The long-term prognosis is good, but it is necessary to perform a follow-up, particularly in adult patients because of a higher risk of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential expression of Notch family members in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Yu, Shizhu; Jiang, Rongcai; Kang, Chunsheng; Wang, Guangxiu; Jiang, Hao; Pu, Peiyu

    2009-12-01

    Notch signaling pathway plays an integral role in determining cell fates in development. Growing evidence demonstrates that Notch signaling pathway has versatile effects in tumorigenesis depending on the tumor type, grade and stage. Notch signaling pathway is deregulated in some brain tumors. To examine the differential expression of Notch family members (Notch1, 2, 3, 4) in human astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, and to evaluate their roles in the development of both tumor types. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to detect Notch1, 2, 3, 4 expression in tissue microarray and freshly resected tissue samples of normal brain, astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. Notch family members were not expressed or barely detectable in normal brain tissues. Notch1, 3, 4 were highly expressed but Notch2 was not expressed in astrocytomas. The percentage of immunopositive tumor cells and level of Notch1 expression was increased with tumor grade. In addition, overexpression of Notch2 was detected in medulloblastomas in contrast to low or no expression of Notch1, 3, 4. Differential expression of Notch1, 2, 3, 4 is detected in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, that may be related to their different roles playing in the development of brain tumors.

  13. Cytomegalovirus-mediated induction of antisense mRNA expression to UL44 inhibits virus replication in an astrocytoma cell line: identification of an essential gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ripalti, A; Boccuni, M C; Campanini, F; Landini, M P

    1995-01-01

    We have used an antisense RNA approach in the analysis of gene function in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). An astrocytoma cell line (U373-MG) that is permissive for virus replication was permanently transfected with a construct bearing sequence from HCMV UL44 (coding for the major late DNA-binding protein, ppUL44, also known as pp52 or ICP36) in an antisense orientation and under the control of the immediate-early enhancer-promoter element. Upon HCMV infection at a high multiplicity, we found a marked reduction in UL44 protein products (the ICP36 family of proteins) in established cell transfectants and a strong inhibition of virus yield in infected-cell supernatants at two weeks postinfection, while herpes simplex virus replication was not affected. In infected cells, viral DNA replication was strongly inhibited. While gene products such as pUS22 and pUL32 were also inhibited, pUL123 and pUL82 accumulated in the infected cells over time. Our data suggest an essential role for the UL44 family of proteins in HCMV replication and represent a model of virus inhibition by virus-induced antisense RNA synthesis in genetically modified cells. PMID:7884850

  14. The effect of guggulipid and nimesulide on MPTP-induced mediators of neuroinflammation in rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Rajasekar, N; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2012-12-05

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its mechanism is still not properly explored. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition has also been known a major neuroprotective strategy in the various 1-methyl-4-phenyl 1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced models of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its role in astrocytes is still not properly understood. The present study demonstrated that, guggulipid and nimesulide (preferentially selective COX-2 inhibitor) treatment of rat astrocytoma cells, C6 for 24 h significantly decreased MPTP (400 μM) induced nitrative and oxidative stress and intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) level. Guggulipid and nimesulide also deactivated MPTP-induced P-p38 MAPK (Phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) and down regulated expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and CHOP (C/EBP, homologous protein 10). At transcriptional level of inflammatory cytokine genes, guggulipid and nimesulide down regulated MPTP-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expressions with up regulations in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) mRNA expressions. In addition to this, guggulipid and nimesulide inhibited translocation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) from cytosol to nucleus. In conclusion, our findings elucidated the potential antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory effect of guggulipid and nimesulide in rat astrocytoma cells C6, which may suggest the use of these drugs in the management of neuroinflammation associated pathophysiology of PD.

  15. Neutral metoclopramide sensitizes cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in SCID mice xenografted with a human brain astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Olsson, A R; Pero, R W

    1997-12-10

    A formulation of metoclopramide (MCA) conformationally altered by neutralization of pH (nMCA, Neu-Sensamide) has been shown to have the same efficacy of enhancing the cytotoxicity of a single dose of 1 Gy radiation as acidic formulations (e.g., Primperan, Sensamide) in a human lung adenocarcinoma (H2981) xenografted into SCID mice. In the present study, 2 x 1 Gy radiation was combined with 2 x 2 mg nMCA/kg body weight injected 2 hr before radiation treatment for evaluation of radiosensitization in SCID mice xenografted with a human brain astrocytoma (T24). Given in this treatment schedule, nMCA alone at 2 mg/kg showed no cytotoxic effect on tumor growth in vivo. When combined with 2 x 1 Gy of radiation, however, the cytotoxicity was significantly increased as measured by tumor growth delay over the radiation-only-treated group. Furthermore, nMCA was absorbed into brains of mice and rats as efficiently as acidic MCA (aMCA) when analyzed 45 min after i.m. injection by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  16. Expression of cytokines by human astrocytomas following stimulation by C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins: specific increase in interleukin-6 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sayah, S; Ischenko, A M; Zhakhov, A; Bonnard, A S; Fontaine, M

    1999-06-01

    C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins are two proinflammatory peptides generated during complement activation that act through distinct Gi protein-coupled receptors named C3aR and C5aR, respectively. We have demonstrated previously that human astrocytes expressed C3aR and C5aR constitutively and were able to produce a functional complement. In this study, we examined the effect of an anaphylatoxin stimulation on cytokine expression by human astrocyte cell lines. Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Whereas IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA levels remained unchanged, stimulation of astrocytoma cells (T98G, CB193, U118MG) by C3a, C5a, and peptidic C3aR and C5aR agonists induced an increase in the IL-6 mRNA level. The amount of IL-6 was markedly increased at 3 and 6 h and returned to the basal level at 9 h of stimulation. This response was specific, because pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin or with polyclonal anti-C3aR or anti-C5aR antibodies completely blocked the IL-6 mRNA increase. The IL-6 response was also investigated at the protein level, but IL-6 protein was detected neither in cell lysates nor in supernatants of stimulated cells. The anaphylatoxin-mediated transcriptional activation of IL-6 gene suggests that C3a and C5a could play a role in priming glial cells during the inflammatory process in the brain.

  17. Binding of NIR-conPK and NIR-6T to Astrocytomas and Microglial Cells: Evidence for a Protein Related to TSPO

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Michelle; Woodruff, Grace; Cudaback, Eiron; Kreitzer, Faith R.; Xu, Cong; Lin, Yi Hsing; Möller, Thomas; Bai, Mingfeng; Manning, H. Charles; Bornhop, Darryl; Stella, Nephi

    2009-01-01

    PK 11195 and DAA1106 bind with high-affinity to the translocator protein (TSPO, formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor). TSPO expression in glial cells increases in response to cytokines and pathological stimuli. Accordingly, [11C]-PK 11195 and [11C]-DAA1106 are recognized molecular imaging (MI) agents capable of monitoring changes in TSPO expression occurring in vivo and in response to various neuropathologies. Here we tested the pharmacological characteristics and TSPO-monitoring potential of two novel MI agents: NIR-conPK and NIR-6T. NIR-conPK is an analogue of PK 11195 conjugated to the near-infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophore: IRDye 800CW. NIR-6T is a DAA1106 analogue also conjugated to IRDye 800CW. We found that NIR-6T competed for [3H]-PK 11195 binding in astrocytoma cell homogenates with nanomolar affinity, but did not exhibit specific binding in intact astrocytoma cells in culture, indicating that NIR-6T is unlikely to constitute a useful MI agent for monitoring TSPO expression in intact cells. Conversely, we found that NIR-conPK did not compete for [3H]-PK 11195 binding in astrocytoma cell homogenate, but exhibited specific binding in intact astrocytoma cells in culture with nanomolar affinity, suggesting that NIR-conPK binds to a protein distinct, but related to, TSPO. Accordingly, treating intact astrocytoma cells and microglia in culture with cytokines led to significant changes in the amount of NIR-conPK specific binding without corresponding change in TSPO expression. Remarkably, the cytokine-induced changes in the protein targeted by NIR-conPK in intact microglia were selective, since IFN-γ (but not TNFα and TGFβ) increased the amount of NIR-conPK specific binding in these cells. Together these results suggest that NIR-conPK binds to a protein that is related to TSPO, and expressed by astrocytomas and microglia. Our results also suggest that the expression of this protein is increased by specific cytokines, and thus allows for

  18. Sodium butyrate increases the effect of the photodynamic therapy: a mechanism that involves modulation of gene expression and differentiation in astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Carrazco, José; Castro-Leyva, Violeta; García-Gomez, Fanny; Solís-Paredes, Mario; Ramon-Gallegos, Eva; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; Arenas-Huertero, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to sodium butyrate (NaBu), its effectiveness in U373-MG and D54-MG astrocytoma cell lines was evaluated. Cells were exposed to delta-aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA) as a precursor to endogenous photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). In both astrocytoma cells, an important increase by ALA was observed in uroporphyrinogen synthetase gene expression: 1.8- and 52-fold for D54-MG and U373-MG cells, respectively. After irradiation, they showed 16.67 and 28.9% of mortality in U373-MG and D54-MG, respectively. These mortalities increased to 70.62 and 96.7% when U373-MG and D54-MG cells, respectively, were exposed 24 h to 8 mM NaBu, before to PpIX induction. NaBu induced expression of caspase-3, caspase-9, and Bcl-2 and increased Bax in U373-MG cells. ALA-induced morphological changes are compatible to differentiation. Genes and differentiation induced mainly by NaBu improve cell death performed by PDT in astrocytoma cells. These facts prove the synergistic effect of NaBu on cytotoxic damage induced by PDT.

  19. Knockdown of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) reveals that its activity is essential for survival in astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Allegrini, Simone; Pesi, Rossana; Camici, Marcella; Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2008-08-01

    IMP preferring cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) is an ubiquitous nucleotide hydrolysing enzyme. The enzyme is widely distributed and its amino acid sequence is highly conserved among vertebrates. Fluctuations of cN-II activity have been associated with the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. The enzyme appears to be involved in the regulation of the intracellular availability of the purine precursor IMP and also of GMP and AMP, but the contribution of this activity and of its regulation to cell metabolism and to CNS cell functions remains uncertain. To address this issue, we used a vector based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strategy to knockdown cN-II activity in human astrocytoma cells. Our results demonstrated that 53 h after transduction, cN-II mRNA was reduced to 17.9+/-0.03% of control cells. 19 h later enzyme activity was decreased from 0.7+/-0.026 mU/mg in control ADF cells to 0.45+/-0.046 mU/mg, while cell viability (evaluated by the MTT reduction assay) decreased up to 0.59+/-0.01 (fold vs control) and caspase 3 activity increased from 136+/-5.8 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) in control cells to 639+/-37.5 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) in silenced cells, thus demonstrating that cN-II is essential for cell survival. The decrease of enzyme activity causes apoptosis of the cultured cells without altering intracellular nucleotide and nucleoside concentration or energy charge. Since cN-II is highly expressed in tumour cells, our finding offers a new possible therapeutical approach especially against primary brain tumours such as glioblastoma, and to ameliorate chemotherapy against leukemia.

  20. Cathepsin L silencing increases As2O3 toxicity in malignantly transformed pilocytic astrocytoma MPA58 cells by activating caspases 3/7.

    PubMed

    Primon, Monika; Huszthy, Peter C; Motaln, Helena; Talasila, Krishna M; Miletic, Hrvoje; Atai, Nadia A; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Lah Turnšek, Tamara

    2017-07-01

    Low-grade, pilocytic astrocytomas are treated by resection, but additional therapy is necessary for those tumors with anaplastic features. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is emerging as an effective chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme, where Cathepsin L silencing enables lower, less harmful As2O3 concentrations to achieve the desired cytotoxic effect. Here, we evaluated the effects of As2O3 combined with stable Cathepsin L shRNA silencing on cell viability/metabolic activity, and apoptosis in primary cultures of recurrent malignantly transformed pilocytic astrocytoma (MPA). These cells expressed high Cathepsin L levels, and when grown as monolayers and spheroids, they were more resistant to As2O3 than the U87MG glioblastoma cell line. Caspases 3/7 activity in MPA58 spheroids was not significantly affected by As2O3, possibly due to higher chemoresistance of primary biopsy tissue of less malignant astrocytoma versus the malignant U87MG cell line. However, As2O3 treatment was cytotoxic to MPA spheroids after silencing of Cathepsin L expression. While Cathepsin L silencing only slightly decreased the live/dead cell ratio in As2O3-treated MPA-si spheroids under our experimental conditions, there was an increase in As2O3-mediated apoptosis in MPA-si spheroids, as indicated by elevated caspases 3/7 activity. Therefore, Cathepsin L silencing by gene manipulation can be applied when a more aggressive approach is needed in treatment of pilocytic astrocytomas with anaplastic features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of formyl peptide receptor in high-grade astrocytoma by CHemotaxis Inhibitory Protein of S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Boer, J C; Domanska, U M; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Boer, I G J; de Haas, C J C; Joseph, J V; Kruyt, F A E; de Vries, E G E; den Dunnen, W F A; van Strijp, J A G; Walenkamp, A M E

    2013-02-19

    High-grade astrocytomas are malignant brain tumours that infiltrate the surrounding brain tissue and have a poor prognosis. Activation of formyl peptide receptor (FPR1) on the human astrocytoma cell line U87 promotes cell motility, growth and angiogenesis. We therefore investigated the FPR1 inhibitor, Chemotaxis Inhibitory Protein of S. aureus (CHIPS), as a potential anti-astrocytoma drug. FPR1 expression was studied immunohistochemically in astrocytomas WHO grades I-IV. With intracellular calcium mobilisation and migration assays, human ligands were tested for their ability to activate FPR1 on U87 cells and on a cell line derived from primary astrocytoma grade IV patient material. Thereafter, we selectively inhibited these ligand-induced responses of FPR1 with an anti-inflammatory compound called Chemotaxis Inhibitory Protein of S. aureus (CHIPS). U87 xenografts in NOD-SCID mice served to investigate the effects of CHIPS in vivo. FPR1 was expressed in 29 out of 32 (90%) of all grades of astrocytomas. Two human mitochondrial-derived formylated peptides, formyl-methionil-leucine-lysine-isoleucine-valine (fMLKLIV) and formyl-methionil-methionil-tyrosine-alanine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMMYALF), were potent activators of FPR1 on tumour cells. Ligand-induced responses of FPR1-expressing tumour cells could be inhibited with FPR1 inhibitor CHIPS. Treatment of tumour-bearing mice with CHIPS slightly reduced tumour growth and improved survival as compared to non-treated animals (P=0.0019). Targeting FPR1 with CHIPS reduces cell motility and tumour cell activation, and prolongs the survival of tumour-bearing mice. This strategy could be explored in future research to improve treatment results for astrocytoma patients.

  2. Deguelins, Natural Product Modulators of NF1-Defective Astrocytoma Cell Growth Identified by High-Throughput Screening of Partially Purified Natural Product Extracts.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Curtis J; Cartner, Laura K; Wilson, Jennifer A; Fuller, Richard W; Rizzo, Anthony E; Reilly, Karlyne M; McMahon, James B; Gustafson, Kirk R

    2015-11-25

    A high-throughput screening assay for modulators of Trp53/NF1 mutant astrocytoma cell growth was adapted for use with natural product extracts and applied to a novel collection of prefractionated/partially purified extracts. Screening 68 427 samples identified active fractions from 95 unique extracts, including the terrestrial plant Millettia ichthyotona. Only three of these extracts showed activity in the crude extract form, thus demonstrating the utility of a partial purification approach for natural product screening. The NF1 screening assay was used to guide purification of active compounds from the M. ichthyotona extract, which yielded the two rotenones deguelin (1) and dehydrodeguelin (2). The deguelins have been reported to affect growth of a number of cancer cell lines. They potently inhibited growth of only one of a panel of NF1/Trp53 mutant murine astrocytoma cell lines, possibly related to epigenetic factors, but had no effect on the growth of normal astrocytes. These results suggest the potential utility of deguelins as tools for further investigating NF1 astrocytoma cell growth. These bioprobes were identified only as a result of screening partially purified natural product extracts.

  3. AUTOCOUNTER, an ImageJ JavaScript to analyze LC3B-GFP expression dynamics in autophagy-induced astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fassina, L; Magenes, G; Inzaghi, A; Palumbo, S; Allavena, G; Miracco, C; Pirtoli, L; Biggiogera, M; Comincini, S

    2012-10-11

    An ImageJ JavaScript, AUTOCOUNTER, was specifically developed to monitor and measure LC3B-GFP expression in living human astrocytoma cells, namely T98G and U373-MG. Discrete intracellular GFP fluorescent spots derived from transduction of a Baculovirus replication-defective vector (BacMam LC3B-GFP), followed by microscope examinations at different times. After viral transgene expression, autophagy was induced by Rapamycin administration and assayed in ph-p70S6K/p70S6K and LC3B immunoblotting expression as well as by electron microscopy examinations. A mutated transgene, defective in LC3B lipidation, was employed as a negative control to further exclude fluorescent dots derived from protein intracellular aggregation. The ImageJ JavaScript was then employed to evaluate and score the dynamics changes of the number and area of LC3B-GFP puncta per cell in time course assays and in complex microscope examinations. In conclusion, AUTOCOUNTER enabled to quantify LC3B-GFP expression and to monitor dynamics changes in number and shapes of autophagosomal-like vesicles: it might therefore represent a suitable algorithmic tool for in vitro autophagy modulation studies.

  4. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias; Pichon, Chantal; Benedetti, Helene

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  5. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  6. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M.; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C.; Burns, Dennis K.; White, Charles L.; Whitworth, L. Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A.; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n=50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p=0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III). PMID:24519516

  7. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Hu, Tianshen; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C; Burns, Dennis K; White, Charles L; Whitworth, L Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n = 50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p = 0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III).

  8. Novel Proteins Regulated by mTOR in Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytomas of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and New Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Magdalena Ewa; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Pokarowski, Piotr; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Kucharska, Joanna; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Roszkowski, Maciej; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Kaminska, Bozena

    2010-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) are rare brain tumors associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disease caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2, resulting in enhancement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, dysregulation of cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Signaling via mTOR plays a role in multifaceted genomic responses, but its effectors in the brain are largely unknown. Therefore, gene expression profiling on four SEGAs was performed with Affymetrix Human Genome arrays. Of the genes differentially expressed in TSC, 11 were validated by real-time PCR on independent tumor samples and 3 SEGA-derived cultures. Expression of several proteins was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The differentially-regulated proteins were mainly involved in tumorigenesis and nervous system development. ANXA1, GPNMB, LTF, RND3, S100A11, SFRP4, and NPTX1 genes were likely to be mTOR effector genes in SEGA, as their expression was modulated by an mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in SEGA-derived cells. Inhibition of mTOR signaling affected size of cultured SEGA cells but had no influence on their proliferation, morphology, or migration, whereas inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways led to significant alterations of these processes. For the first time, we identified genes related to the occurrence of SEGA and regulated by mTOR and demonstrated an effective modulation of SEGA growth by pharmacological inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways, which could represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:20133820

  9. Pilocytic Astrocytoma of the Optic Pathway: A Tumour Deriving from Radial Glia Cells with a Specific Gene Signature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchoghandjian, Aurelie; Fernandez, Carla; Colin, Carole; El Ayachi, Ikbale; Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Fina, Frederic; Scavarda, Didier; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Intagliata, Dominique; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Fraslon-Vanhulle, Caroline; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are WHO grade I gliomas that occur predominantly in childhood. They share features of both astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages. These tumours affect preferentially the cerebellum (benign clinical course) and the optic pathway, especially the hypothalamo-chiasmatic region (poor prognosis). Understanding the molecular…

  10. Pilocytic Astrocytoma of the Optic Pathway: A Tumour Deriving from Radial Glia Cells with a Specific Gene Signature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchoghandjian, Aurelie; Fernandez, Carla; Colin, Carole; El Ayachi, Ikbale; Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Fina, Frederic; Scavarda, Didier; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Intagliata, Dominique; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Fraslon-Vanhulle, Caroline; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are WHO grade I gliomas that occur predominantly in childhood. They share features of both astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages. These tumours affect preferentially the cerebellum (benign clinical course) and the optic pathway, especially the hypothalamo-chiasmatic region (poor prognosis). Understanding the molecular…

  11. Unique findings of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma within cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex: a histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joel S; Frankel, Hyman; Ma, Tracy; Zagzag, David; Liechty, Benjamin; Zeev, Bruria Ben; Tzadok, Michal; Devinsky, Orrin; Weiner, Howard L; Roth, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is associated with three central nervous system pathologies: cortical/subcortical tubers, subependymal nodules (SENs), and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs). Tubers are associated with epilepsy, which is often medication-resistant and often leads to resective surgery. Recently, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) have been shown to be effective reducing seizure burden in some patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-related refractory epilepsy. mTORi have also been shown to be an alternative for surgery treating SEGAs. We describe several cases of resected tubers that contained SEGA tissue without an intraventricular SEGA. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, we retrospectively reviewed the surgical-pathological data for all TSC patients who underwent cortical resections for treatment of refractory epilepsy at NYU Langone Medical Center and Tel Aviv Medical Center between 2003 and 2013. Data included demographics, epilepsy type, MRI characteristics, epilepsy outcome, and histopathological staining. We reviewed cortical resections from 75 patients with complete pathological studies. In three patients, cortical lesions demonstrated histopathological findings consistent with a SEGA within the resected tuber tissue, with no intraventricular SEGA. All lesions were cortically based and none had any intraventricular extension. No patient had been treated before surgery with an mTORi. Two of the three patients remain Engel grade I-II. All lesions stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin, and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN). This is the first description of cortical tubers harboring SEGA tissue. This observation though preliminary may suggest a subgroup of patients with intractable epilepsy in whom mTORi may be considered before surgical intervention.

  12. Pilocytic astrocytoma: A rare presentation as intraventricular tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Sidra; Akhunzada, Naveed Z.; Javed, Gohar; Uddin, Zeeshan; Khan, Yasir A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most prevalent central nervous system (CNS) tumor in pediatric population and accounts for an approximate of 5–6% of all gliomas. This neoplasm can occur at all levels of the neuraxis, with majority (67%) arising in the cerebellum and optic pathway. PAs are World Health Organization Grade I tumors and are the most benign of all astrocytomas characterized by an excellent prognosis. Other differentials include subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA), ependymoma, meningioma, and low-grade gliomas such as pilocytic or diffuse astrocytoma; calcification is more commonly regarded as a feature of benign or slow-growing tumors. Case Description: We present a case of a 17-year-old female presenting with an unusual cause of hydrocephalus, a rare case of a calcified pilocytic astrocytoma as an intraventricular tumor. Conclusion: PA rarely presents as an intraventricular tumor and should be included in the differential diagnosis of a large mass with massive intratumoral calcification. PMID:28680735

  13. Quantifying the astrocytoma cell response to candidate pharmaceutical from F-ACTIN image analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chi; JaJa, Joseph; Turbyville, Thomas; Beutler, John; Gudla, Prabhakar; Nandy, Kaustav; Lockett, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The distribution, directionality and motility of the actin fibers control cell shape, affect cell function and are different in cancer versus normal cells. Quantification of actin structural changes is important for further understanding differences between cell types and for elucidation of the effects and dynamics of drug interactions. We have developed an image analysis framework for quantifying F-actin organization patterns in confocal microscope images in response to different candidate pharmaceutical treatments. The main problem solved was to determine which quantitative features to compute from the images that both capture the visually-observed F-actin patterns and correlate with predicted biological outcomes. The resultant numerical features were effective to quantitatively profile the changes in the spatial distribution of F-actin and facilitate the comparison of different pharmaceuticals. The validation for the segmentation was done through visual inspection and correlation to expected biological outcomes. This is the first study quantifying different structural formations of the same protein in intact cells. Preliminary results show uniquely significant increases in cortical F-actin to stress fiber ratio for increasing doses of OSW-1 and Schweinfurthin A(SA) and a less marked increase for cephalostatin 1 derivative (ceph). This increase was not observed for the actin inhibitors: cytochalasin B (cytoB) and Y-27632 (Y). Ongoing studies are further validating the algorithms, elucidating the underlying molecular pathways and will utilize the algorithms for understanding the kinetics of the F-actin changes. Since many anti-cancer drugs target the cytoskeleton, we believe that the quantitative image analysis method reported here will have broad applications to understanding the mechanisms of action of candidate pharmaceuticals.

  14. Differential proteomics analysis of low- and high-grade of astrocytoma using iTRAQ quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tong; Lin, Shide; Wang, Zhongfeng; Shang, Aijia

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytoma is one of the most common types of brain tumor, which is histologically and clinically classified into four grades (I–IV): I (pilocytic astrocytoma), II (diffuse astrocytoma), III (anaplastic astrocytoma), and IV (glioblastoma multiforme). A higher grade astrocytoma represents a worse prognosis and is more aggressive. In this study, we compared the differential proteome profile of astrocytoma from grades I to IV. The protein samples from clinical specimens of grades I, II, III, and IV astrocytoma were analyzed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and quantification. A total of 2,190 proteins were identified. Compared to grade I astrocytoma, 173 (12.4%), 304 (14%), and 462 (21.2%) proteins were aberrantly expressed in grades II, III, and IV, respectively. By bioinformatics analysis, the cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis-related pathways increase from low- to high-grade of astrocytoma. Five differentially expressed proteins were validated by Western blot. Within them, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 were upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme group; whereas fibulin-2 and -5 were downregulated in grade II/III/IV astrocytoma, and the negative expression was significantly associated with advanced clinical stage. Functional analysis showed that both fibulin-2 and -5 may exert an antitumor effect by inhibiting cell proliferation, in vitro migration/invasion in glioma cells. New molecular biomarkers are likely to be used for accurate classification of astrocytoma and likely to be the target for drug development. PMID:27713642

  15. Dissemination patterns of pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Faria, Andréia V; Azevedo, Geovani C A; Zanardi, Verônica A; Ghizoni, Enrico; Queiroz, Luciano S

    2006-09-01

    Two patients with multifocal pilocytic astrocytoma diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirmed by histopathological examination are reported. They presented distinct sites and mechanisms of metastasis: to distant ventricles through the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in patient 1 and to contralateral parenchyma, possibly through white matter tracts, in patient 2, a pathway not so far reported in pilocytic astrocytoma. Early detection of multifocal pilocytic astrocytoma by MRI may change treatment strategies and improve prognosis.

  16. A pilot study of autologous cancer cell vaccination and cellular immunotherapy using anti-CD3 stimulated lymphocytes in patients with recurrent grade III/IV astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Wood, G W; Holladay, F P; Turner, T; Wang, Y Y; Chiga, M

    2000-06-01

    The study objectives were to determine; (1) whether activated T cells could be generated from peripheral blood of patients immunized with their own cancer cells, (2) whether adoptive transfer of the activated T cells to patients had toxic effects and (3) whether the infused cells produced clinical responses. Study patients had recurrent, surgically accessible grade III/IV astrocytomas. The patients were tapered off steroids after total surgical resection and immunized with autologous cancer cells plus Bacillus, Calmette and Guerin (BCG). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were activated with anti-CD3, expanded with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and reinfused to patients. The number of activated T cells that was given back to patients varied between 10(10) and 10(11). Side effects that were observed following immunization and adoptive cell transfer included mainly transient flu-like symptoms. One patient's tumor partially regressed, but there was no effect on survival. Two other patients' tumors regressed, and the patients are apparently disease-free more than 5 and 4 years later. The other six patients' tumors were apparently unaffected by the treatment. Patient age, tumor grade and CD4/CD8 composition of infused cells were positively correlated with clinical responses. Cellular immunotherapy is feasible and is associated with minimal toxicity. Additional appropriately controlled studies will be required to determine whether cellular immunotherapy could be used as a treatment for central nervous system malignancy. Additional studies also will be required to determine the underlying immunological mechanisms.

  17. Somatic neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) inactivation characterizes NF1-associated pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, David H; McLellan, Michael D; Hussain, Ibrahim; Wallis, John W; Fulton, Lucinda L; Fulton, Robert S; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Wylie, Todd; Kandoth, Cyriac; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Guha, Abhijit; Miller, Christopher A; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R

    2013-03-01

    Low-grade brain tumors (pilocytic astrocytomas) arising in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) inherited cancer predisposition syndrome are hypothesized to result from a combination of germline and acquired somatic NF1 tumor suppressor gene mutations. However, genetically engineered mice (GEM) in which mono-allelic germline Nf1 gene loss is coupled with bi-allelic somatic (glial progenitor cell) Nf1 gene inactivation develop brain tumors that do not fully recapitulate the neuropathological features of the human condition. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that, while loss of neurofibromin function is necessary for NF1-associated low-grade astrocytoma development, additional genetic changes may be required for full penetrance of the human brain tumor phenotype. To identify these potential cooperating genetic mutations, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of three NF1-associated pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) tumors. We found that the mechanism of somatic NF1 loss was different in each tumor (frameshift mutation, loss of heterozygosity, and methylation). In addition, tumor purity analysis revealed that these tumors had a high proportion of stromal cells, such that only 50%-60% of cells in the tumor mass exhibited somatic NF1 loss. Importantly, we identified no additional recurrent pathogenic somatic mutations, supporting a model in which neuroglial progenitor cell NF1 loss is likely sufficient for PA formation in cooperation with a proper stromal environment.

  18. Effects of dexamethasone on C6 astrocytoma radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lordo, C.D.; Stroude, E.C.; Del Maestro, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    Brain-tumor patients often undergo radiation therapy while receiving corticosteroids for the treatment of cerebral edema. Studies have demonstrated that dexamethasone is radioprotective in a number of cell lines. The C6 astrocytoma cell line is well established in vitro and is modulated by dexamethasone treatment. It has therefore been hypothesized that dexamethasone-treated C6 astrocytoma cells would be more resistant to radiation-induced damage. The present study was carried out to assess this hypothesis using both the in vitro C6 astrocytoma monolayer and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. Dexamethasone was inhibitory to the C6 astrocytoma cells in the monolayer preparation, increasing their doubling time by 13%. In the spheroid cultures, dexamethasone treatment decreased the number of cells per spheroid by 46%. Dexamethasone did not affect the plating efficiency of either the cells from the monolayer experiment or those dissociated from spheroids, however, suggesting that the inhibitory effect was not tumoricidal. At a clinical concentration (1.94 x 10(-5) M), dexamethasone did not significantly influence plating efficiency of irradiated C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer or three-dimensional spheroid cultures.

  19. Expression pattern and sub-cellular distribution of phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C enzymes after treatment with U-73122 in rat astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Panetta, Barbara; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Cocco, Lucio

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes interfere with the metabolism of inositol phospholipids (PI), molecules involved in signal transduction, a complex process depending on various components. Many evidences support the hypothesis that, in the glia, isoforms of PI-PLC family display different expression and/or sub cellular distribution under non-physiological conditions such as the rat astrocytes activation during neurodegeneration, the tumoural progression of some neoplasms and the inflammatory cascade activation after lipopolysaccharide administration, even if their role remains not completely elucidated. Treatment of a cultured established glioma cell line (C6 rat astrocytoma cell line) induces a modification in the pattern of expression and of sub cellular distribution of PI-PLCs compared to untreated cells. Special attention require PI-PLC beta3 and PI-PLC gamma2 isoforms, whose expression and sub cellular localization significantly differ after U-73122 treatment. The meaning of these modifications is unclear, also because the use of this N-aminosteroid compound remains controversial, inasmuch it has further actions which might contribute to the global effect recorded on the treated cells.

  20. The tachykinin peptide neurokinin B binds copper forming an unusual [CuII(NKB)2] complex and inhibits copper uptake into 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Russino, Debora; McDonald, Elle; Hejazi, Leila; Hanson, Graeme R; Jones, Christopher E

    2013-10-16

    Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides that have neuroinflammatory, neuroimmunological, and neuroprotective functions. In a neuroprotective role, tachykinins can help protect cells against the neurotoxic processes observed in Alzheimer's disease. A change in copper homeostasis is a clear feature of Alzheimer's disease, and the dysregulation may be a contributory factor in toxicity. Copper has recently been shown to interact with neurokinin A and neuropeptide γ and can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species and peptide degradation, which suggests that copper may have a place in tachykinin function and potentially misfunction. To explore this, we have utilized a range of spectroscopic techniques to show that NKB, but not substance P, can bind Cu(II) in an unusual [Cu(II)(NKB)2] neutral complex that utilizes two N-terminal amine and two imidazole nitrogen ligands (from each molecule of NKB) and the binding substantially alters the structure of the peptide. Using 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, we show that copper can enter the cells and subsequently open plasma membrane calcium channels but when bound to neurokinin B copper ion uptake is inhibited. This data suggests a novel role for neurokinin B in protecting cells against copper-induced calcium changes and implicates the peptide in synaptic copper homeostasis.

  1. Reduced TSC2 RNA and protein in sporadic astrocytomas and ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Wienecke, R; Guha, A; Maize, J C; Heideman, R L; DeClue, J E; Gutmann, D H

    1997-08-01

    Individuals affected with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) develop several benign and malignant tumors at increased frequency, including astrocytomas. Tuberin, the protein product of the tuberous sclerosis complex-2 (TSC2) tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to directly inhibit cell growth and is expressed at high levels in normal central nervous system neurons and astrocytes. To determine whether TSC2 RNA and protein are reduced in astrocytomas from individuals without tuberous sclerosis, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses were performed on 49 adult astrocytomas, 10 pediatric astrocytomas, and 13 ependymomas. Eighteen of 40 (45%) high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grade III/IV) astrocytomas and 4 of 8 (50%) adult low-grade (WHO grade II) astrocytomas demonstrated reduced or absent TSC2 expression, including 1 giant cell astrocytoma, whereas none of the 10 pediatric low-grade astrocytomas analyzed showed a reduction in TSC2 expression. Reduced or absent tuberin was observed in 2 of 6 (33%) ependymomas analyzed. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that reduced or absent TSC2 expression may represent one of the critical genetic events associated with the development of sporadic adult, but not pediatric, astrocytomas.

  2. Guggulipid and nimesulide differentially regulated inflammatory genes mRNA expressions via inhibition of NF-kB and CHOP activation in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2011-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases. Lipo-polysacharide (LPS) induces reactive astrogliosis, the cellular manifestation of neuroinflammation, in various models of neurological diseases, but its mechanism of action is still not properly known. The effect of guggulipid and nimesulide on LPS-induced neuroinflammatory changes is also not properly understood. This work demonstrated the mechanism of actions of guggulipid and nimesulide on inflammatory genes expressions in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6. We observed that LPS (10 μg/ml) treatment of rat astrocytoma cells, C6, for 24 h significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) ion and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB), C/EBP homologous protein 10 (CHOP), c-fos, and c-jun proteins. At transcriptional stage, LPS upregulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-6 with downregulation in IL-1α, IL-1β, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) through activating NF-kB translocation. Treatment with guggulipid reversed these LPS-induced changes in rat astrocytoma cells. Treatment with nimesulide also attenuated LPS-induced Ca(2+) ion, iNOS, NF-kB, and c-fos expressions, but does not significantly influence CHOP, c-jun protein expressions, and mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and mPGES-1 genes. In conclusion, our findings elucidated the molecular mechanism of neuroinflammation in response to LPS and its modulation by guggulipid and nimesulide in rat astrocytoma cells (C6), which suggest the use of these drugs in the treatment of neuroinflammation-associated disorders.

  3. Regression of grade III astrocytoma during the treatment of CML with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Sooriabalan, Danushan; Indulkar, Shalaka; Kim, Hyun Ho; Matin, Abu; Maini, Archana

    2006-01-01

    Astrocytomas are central nervous system neoplasms, which are derived predominately from astrocytes. On the basis of the histopathologic characteristics astrocytomas are graded from I to IV. The cells that demonstrate the greatest degree of anaplasia are used to determine the histologic grade of the tumor. The mean age of survival are approximately 10 years from the time of diagnosis for pilocystic astrocytomas (World Health Organization grade I), more than 5 years for patients with low-grade diffuse astrocytomas (WHO grade II), 2 to 5 years for those with anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade III), and less than 1 year for patients with glioblastoma (WHO grade IV). The treatment is a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy depending of the grade of astrocytoma. We present a case of 31-year-old man with grade III astrocytoma with subsequent chronic myelogenous leukemia treated with imatinib mesylate as part of his chronic myelogenous leukemia treatment failing to show recurrence of the astrocytoma 10 years after standard treatment for astrocytoma.

  4. From the Cover: Vulnerability of C6 Astrocytoma Cells After Single-Compound and Joint Exposure to Type I and Type II Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Romero, Delfina M; Berardino, Bruno G; Wolansky, Marcelo J; Kotler, Mónica L

    2017-01-01

    A primary mode-of-action of all pyrethroid insecticides (PYRs) is the disruption of the voltage-gated sodium channel electrophysiology in neurons of target pests and nontarget species. The neurological actions of PYRs on non-neuronal cells of the nervous system remain poorly investigated. In the present work, we used C6 astrocytoma cells to study PYR actions (0.1-50 μM) under the hypothesis that glial cells may be targeted by and vulnerable to PYRs. To this end, we characterized the effects of bifenthrin (BF), tefluthrin (TF), α-cypermethrin (α-CYP), and deltamethrin (DM) on the integrity of nuclear, mitochondrial, and lysosomal compartments. In general, 24- to 48-h exposures produced concentration-related impairment of cell viability. In single-compound, 24-h exposure experiments, effective concentration (EC)15s 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay) were computed as follows (in μM): BF, 16.1; TF, 37.3; α-CYP, 7.8; DM, 5.0. We found concentration-related damage in several C6-cell subcellular compartments (mitochondria, nuclei, and lysosomes) at ≥ 10(-1) μM levels. Last, we examined a mixture of all PYRs (ie, Σ individual EC15) using MTT assays and subcellular analyses. Our findings indicate that C6 cells are responsive to nM levels of PYRs, suggesting that astroglial susceptibility may contribute to the low-dose neurological effects caused by these insecticides. This research further suggests that C6 cells may provide relevant information as a screening platform for pesticide mixtures targeting nervous system cells by expected and unexpected toxicogenic pathways potentially contributing to clinical neurotoxicity.

  5. Transcriptional analysis of aggressiveness and heterogeneity across grades of astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjing; Funk, Cory C; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common glioma, accounting for half of all primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Late detection and the aggressive nature of high-grade astrocytomas contribute to high mortality rates. Though many studies identify candidate biomarkers using high-throughput transcriptomic profiling to stratify grades and subtypes, few have resulted in clinically actionable results. This shortcoming can be attributed, in part, to pronounced lab effects that reduce signature robustness and varied individual gene expression among patients with the same tumor. We addressed these issues by uniformly preprocessing publicly available transcriptomic data, comprising 306 tumor samples from three astrocytoma grades (Grade 2, 3, and 4) and 30 non-tumor samples (normal brain as control tissues). Utilizing Differential Rank Conservation (DIRAC), a network-based classification approach, we examined the global and individual patterns of network regulation across tumor grades. Additionally, we applied gene-based approaches to identify genes whose expression changed consistently with increasing tumor grade and evaluated their robustness across multiple studies using statistical sampling. Applying DIRAC, we observed a global trend of greater network dysregulation with increasing tumor aggressiveness. Individual networks displaying greater differences in regulation between adjacent grades play well-known roles in calcium/PKC, EGF, and transcription signaling. Interestingly, many of the 90 individual genes found to monotonically increase or decrease with astrocytoma grade are implicated in cancer-affected processes such as calcium signaling, mitochondrial metabolism, and apoptosis. The fact that specific genes monotonically increase or decrease with increasing astrocytoma grade may reflect shared oncogenic mechanisms among phenotypically similar tumors. This work presents statistically significant results that enable better characterization of different human astrocytoma grades

  6. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  7. Coupling of the thrombin receptor to G12 may account for selective effects of thrombin on gene expression and DNA synthesis in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Post, G R; Collins, L R; Kennedy, E D; Moskowitz, S A; Aragay, A M; Goldstein, D; Brown, J H

    1996-01-01

    In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, thrombin, but not carbachol, induces AP-1-mediated gene expression and DNA synthesis. To understand the divergent effects of these G protein-coupled receptor agonists on cellular responses, we examined Gq-dependent signaling events induced by thrombin receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation. Thrombin and carbachol induce comparable changes in phosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, diglyceride generation, and redistribution of protein kinase C; thus, activation of these Gq-signaling pathways appears to be insufficient for gene expression and mitogenesis. Thrombin increases Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation to a greater extent than carbachol in 1321N1 cells. The effects of thrombin are not mediated through Gi, since ribosylation of Gi/Go proteins by pertussis toxin does not prevent thrombin-induced gene expression or thrombin-stimulated DNA synthesis. We recently reported that the pertussis toxin-insensitive G12 protein is required for thrombin-induced DNA synthesis. We demonstrate here, using transfection of receptors and G proteins in COS-7 cells, that G alpha 12 selectively couples the thrombin receptor to AP-1-mediated gene expression. This does not appear to result from increased mitogen-activated protein kinase activity but may reflect activation of a tyrosine kinase pathway. We suggest that preferential coupling of the thrombin receptor to G12 accounts for the selective ability of thrombin to stimulate Ras, mitogen-activated protein kinase, gene expression, and mitogenesis in 1321N1 cells. Images PMID:8930892

  8. (-)(125I)-iodopindolol, a new highly selective radioiodinated beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist: measurement of beta-receptors on intact rat astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barovsky, K.; Brooker, G.

    1980-01-01

    (-)-Pindolol, one of the most potent beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, was radioiodinated using chloramine-T oxidation of carrier-free Na 125I and separated from unreacted pindolol to yield 2200 Ci/mmole (-)-(125I)-iodopindolol ((-)-(125I)-IPin). Mass and ultraviolet spectra confirmed that the iodination occurred on the indole ring, presumably at the 3 position. The binding of radiolabeled (-)-(125I)-IPin to beta-adrenergic receptors has been studied using intact C6 rat astrocytoma cells (2B subclone) grown in monolayer cultures. Binding of (-)(125IPin was saturable with time and concentration. Using 13 pM (-)-(125I)IPin, binding equilibrium was reached in 90 min at 21-22 degrees C. The reverse rate constant was 0.026 min-1 at 21/sup 0/C. Specific binding (expressed as 1 microM(-)-propranolol displaceable counts) of (-)-(125I)-IPin was 95% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of (-)-(125I)-I)Pin binding revealed approximately 4300 receptors/cell and a dissociation constant of 30 pM. This was in excellent agreement with the kinetically determined dissociation constant of 35 pM. Displacement by propranolol and isoproterenol showed that (-)-(125I)-IPin binding sites were pharmacologically and stereospecifically selective. These results indicate that (-)-(125I)-IPin, a pure (-)-stereoisomer, high specific activity radioligand, selectively binds to beta-adrenergic receptors in whole cells with a high percentage of specific binding and should therefore be useful in the study and measurement of cellular beta-adrenergic receptors.

  9. The molecular biology of WHO grade I astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Marko, Nicholas F; Weil, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) grade I astrocytomas include pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA). As technologies in pharmacologic neo-adjuvant therapy continue to progress and as molecular characteristics are progressively recognized as potential markers of both clinically significant tumor subtypes and response to therapy, interest in the biology of these tumors has surged. An updated review of the current knowledge of the molecular biology of these tumors is needed. We conducted a Medline search to identify published literature discussing the molecular biology of grade I astrocytomas. We then summarized this literature and discuss it in a logical framework through which the complex biology of these tumors can be clearly understood. A comprehensive review of the molecular biology of WHO grade I astrocytomas is presented. The past several years have seen rapid progress in the level of understanding of PA in particular, but the molecular literature regarding both PA and SEGA remains nebulous, ambiguous, and occasionally contradictory. In this review we provide a comprehensive discussion of the current understanding of the chromosomal, genomic, and epigenomic features of both PA and SEGA and provide a logical framework in which these data can be more readily understood.

  10. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid and furan fatty acids on cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay biomarkers in astrocytoma cell lines under conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chua, Ann; Thomas, Philip; Wijesundera, Chakra; Clifton, Peter; Fenech, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids from fish such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with improved brain function, whereas furan fatty acids (FFAs) also found in fish oil at low levels (1%) are thought to have antioxidant properties. Understanding their effects in astrocytes is important as these cells are responsible for maintaining healthy neurons via lipid homeostasis and distribution within the brain, and their decline with aging is a possible cause of dementia. We investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of DHA and FFA using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay in in vitro cultures of U87MG (APOE ɛ3/ɛ3) and U118MG (APOE ɛ2/ɛ4) astrocytoma cell lines with and without a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 µM) challenge. U118MG was found to be more sensitive to the cytostatic, cytotoxic (i.e., apoptosis), and DNA damaging effects [micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), and nuclear buds (NBUDs)] of H2O2 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001) when compared with U87MG. DHA at 100 µg/mL significantly affected cytostasis (P < 0.05) and increased DNA damage in the form of NPBs and MNi (P < 0.05) in both cell lines, whereas it decreased necrosis (P = 0.0251) in U87MG. Significant DHA-H2O2 interactions were observed for decreased necrosis (P = 0.0033) and DNA damage biomarkers (P < 0.0001) in the U87MG cell line and increased cytostasis (P < 0.0001) in the U118MG cell line. The effects of FFA also varied between the cell lines, with significant effects observed in decreased cytostasis (P = 0.0022) in the U87MG cell line, whereas increasing cytostasis (P = 0.0144) in the U118MG cell line. Overall, FFA exerted minimal effects on DNA damage biomarkers.

  11. The emerging role of m-TOR up-regulation in brain Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Biagioni, Francesca; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Lenzi, Paola; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition. A special section is dedicated to the prominent role of autophagy in mediating the effects of mTOR in glioblastoma. In detail, autophagy inhibition produced by mTOR up-regulation determines the fate of cancer stem cells. On the other hand, biochemical findings disclose the remarkable effects of autophagy activators as powerful inducers of cell differentiation with a strong prevalence towards neuronal phenotypes. Thus, mTOR modulation acts on the neurobiology of glioblastoma just like it operates in vivo at the level of brain stem cell niches by altering autophagy-dependent cell differentiation. In the light of such a critical role of autophagy we analyzed the ubiquitin proteasome system. The merging between autophagy and proteasome generates a novel organelle, named autophagoproteasome which is strongly induced by mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, when mTOR is maximally inhibited the proteasome component selectively moves within autophagy vacuoles, thus making the proteasome activity dependent on the entry within autophagy compartment.

  12. Notch signaling activation in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William D; Schreck, Karisa C; Bar, Eli E; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-02-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in the development, stem cell biology, and pathogenesis of several cancers, but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomic sites compared with non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res186 and Res259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable, but significant, reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target.

  13. Notch Signaling Activation in Pediatric Low-Grade Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, William D.; Schreck, Karisa C.; Bar, Eli E.; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in development, stem cell biology, and the pathogenesis of several cancers but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomical sites compared to non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res 186 and Res 259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable but significant reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target. PMID:25575134

  14. A Pilocytic Astrocytoma Mimicking a Clinoidal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S.; Lehman, Norman L.; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas and meningiomas are benign, primary brain tumors that may involve the optic tract. Classically, the presence of a dural “tail” sign may differentiate a meningioma from other intracranial lesions. In this report, we describe a mass with the typical appearance of a clinoidal meningioma on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but postoperatively diagnosed as a pilocytic astrocytoma. This case illustrates the rare occurrence of a pilocytic astrocytoma mimicking a meningioma on MRI. PMID:24744944

  15. Unexpected expression of intermediate filament protein genes in human oligodendroglioma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kashima, Tsuyoshi; Vinters, H.V.; Campagnoni, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    From a human oligodendroglioma cell line cDNA library, ten intermediate filament (IF) cDNA clones were isolated. Five clones corresponded to vimentin mRNA, two corresponded to cytokeratin K7 mRNA, and two corresponded to cytokeratin K8 mRNA. One clone encoded a novel IF mRNA. The expression of these and other IF protein genes was examined in five cell lines derived from human oligodendroglioma, astrocytoma and neuroblastoma tumors. Vimentin mRNA and K18 mRNA were expressed in all the cell lines. The K7 and K8 genes were expressed only in the oligodendroglioma cell lines. Surprisingly, nestin mRNA was expressed in the astrocytoma lines and the neuroblastoma line, but was not expressed in the oligodendroglioma lines. These results indicate that oligodendroglioma cell lines express Types I and II cytokeratin genes. This pattern of IF gene expression was different from that of the astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines, which expressed IF genes usually associated with the mature cell types or with differentiating fetal neural precursor cells, i.e. GFAP and neurofilament-L. The results also suggest that the oligodendroglioma cell lines are more epithelial in character and do not reflect the gene expression of mature oligodendrocytes. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-08

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. New study tests the safety and efficacy of combination therapy in adults with astrocytoma and glioblastoma | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    A two-part clinical trial of a multikinase inhibitor plus chemotherapy in patients with two types of brain tumors is enrolling in Bethesda, MD. The study will be open to patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, an uncommon malignant brain tumor that develops from star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes and glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of astrocytoma. Learn more...

  18. Classification of subpopulations of cells within human primary brain tumors by single cell gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Möllerström, Elin; Rydenhag, Bertil; Andersson, Daniel; Lebkuechner, Isabell; Puschmann, Till B; Chen, Meng; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Ståhlberg, Anders; Malmgren, Kristina; Pekny, Milos

    2015-02-01

    Brain tumors are heterogeneous with respect to genetic and histological properties of cells within the tumor tissue. To study subpopulations of cells, we developed a protocol for obtaining viable single cells from freshly isolated human brain tissue for single cell gene expression profiling. We evaluated this technique for characterization of cell populations within brain tumor and tumor penumbra. Fresh tumor tissue was obtained from one astrocytoma grade IV and one oligodendroglioma grade III tumor as well as the tumor penumbra of the latter tumor. The tissue was dissociated into individual cells and the expression of 36 genes was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR followed by data analysis. We show that tumor cells from both the astrocytoma grade IV and oligodendroglioma grade III tumor constituted cell subpopulations defined by their gene expression profiles. Some cells from the oligodendroglioma grade III tumor proper shared molecular characteristics with the cells from the penumbra of the same tumor suggesting that a subpopulation of cells within the oligodendroglioma grade III tumor consisted of normal brain cells. We conclude that subpopulations of tumor cells can be identified by using single cell gene expression profiling.

  19. Effect of Aster tataricus on production of inflammatory mediators in LPS stimulated rat astrocytoma cell line (C6) and THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Tian, Miao; He, Qiao-Wei; Chi, Nan; Xiu, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun-Bo

    2017-03-01

    Neuroinflammation is the commonest cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Present investigation evaluates the inhibitory effect of ethanolic root extract of Aster tataricus (AS) on inflammatory mediators production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated C6 cells. C6 cells were treated with AS (20 and 40 mg/kg) and nimesulide (NSL, 1.5 μg/ml) for 1 day. Thereafter various parameters such as production of ROS, release of nitrite, MDA, glutathione level and NF-κB translocation were estimated in C6 cell lines. Effect of AS was estimated on the expressions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) of human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). It was observed that AS (20 and 40 mg/ml) treated group shows significant (p < 0.01) decrease in production of ROS, Nitrite release and MDA level in LPS activated C6 cell lines compared to negative control group. Moreover, treatment with it decreases glutathione level and inhibits the translocation of NF-κB in LPS activated C6 cell lines compared to negative control group. There were significant (p < 0.01) decreases in expression of TNF-α in AS treated group compared to negative control group in THP-1 cell lines. Present investigation concludes the anti neuroinflammatory effect of ethanolic extract of AS root by decreasing oxidative stress and attenuates the cytokine.

  20. Everolimus for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex: 2-year open-label extension of the randomised EXIST-1 study.

    PubMed

    Franz, David Neal; Belousova, Elena; Sparagana, Steven; Bebin, E Martina; Frost, Michael; Kuperman, Rachel; Witt, Olaf; Kohrman, Michael H; Flamini, J Robert; Wu, Joyce Y; Curatolo, Paolo; de Vries, Petrus J; Berkowitz, Noah; Anak, Oezlem; Niolat, Julie; Jozwiak, Sergiusz

    2014-12-01

    In the EXIST-1 trial, initiated on Aug 10, 2009, more than 35% of patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with tuberous sclerosis complex had at least 50% reduction in SEGA volume after 9·6 months of treatment with everolimus. In this Article, we report interim data (up to Jan 11, 2013) to support longer-term tolerability and efficacy of everolimus from the continuing 4-year extension phase of EXIST-1. We assessed data from a prospective, open-label extension of a multicentre, phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex who had SEGA that was growing and needed treatment. In this extension study, we included all patients who had been assigned everolimus during the double-blind, randomised phase of the trial and those patients who crossed over from the placebo group to receive everolimus during the randomised phase or at the start of the extension phase. All patients received oral everolimus at a starting dose of 4·5 mg/m(2) per day. Everolimus dose was subsequently adjusted subject to tolerability to attain blood trough concentrations of 5-15 ng/mL. An independent central radiology review team assessed SEGA response (at least a 50% reduction from baseline in total volume of all target SEGAs; the primary endpoint) by MRI at 12, 24, and 48 weeks, then every year thereafter in all patients who received at least one dose of everolimus. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00789828. Of the original 117 randomly assigned patients, 111 were given everolimus between Aug 20, 2009, and Jan 11, 2013 (date of data cutoff); we included these patients in our longer-term analysis. Median duration of everolimus exposure was 29·3 months (IQR 19·4-33·8). Median follow-up was 28·3 months (IQR 19·3-33·0). 54 (49%) patients had a response of 50% or greater reduction in SEGA volume (95% CI 39·0-58·3), and duration of response was between 2·1 and 31·1 months (median

  1. PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status.

    PubMed

    Roodakker, Kenney R; Elsir, Tamador; Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Hägerstrand, Daniel; Carlson, Joseph; Lysiak, Malgorzata; Henriksson, Roger; Pontén, Fredrik; Rosell, Johan; Söderkvist, Peter; Stupp, Roger; Tchougounova, Elena; Nistér, Monica; Malmström, Annika; Smits, Anja

    2016-11-08

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing low-grade tumors and harbor IDH mutations.

  2. PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status

    PubMed Central

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D.; Hägerstrand, Daniel; Carlson, Joseph; Lysiak, Malgorzata; Henriksson, Roger; Pontén, Fredrik; Rosell, Johan; Söderkvist, Peter; Stupp, Roger; Tchougounova, Elena; Nistér, Monica; Malmström, Annika; Smits, Anja

    2016-01-01

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing low-grade tumors and harbor IDH mutations. PMID:27626492

  3. Low-grade astrocytomas of childhood.

    PubMed

    Rekate, H L; Rakfal, S M

    1991-05-01

    Low-grade astrocytomas are the single most common form of pediatric brain tumor, representing 28% of the total. Prolonged survival and even cures can be expected in a substantial proportion of patients who present with these tumors. For a variety of reasons, the overall oncologic management of children with low-grade astrocytomas is extremely controversial. This article analyzes the available information related to the management of various forms of low-grade astrocytoma in childhood while awaiting the performance of a long-term national cooperative study on the natural history and management of this common pediatric brain tumor.

  4. Practical molecular pathologic diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Reis, Gerald F; Tihan, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    The pilocytic astrocytoma is predominantly a tumor of childhood and the most common type of circumscribed astrocytoma. The indolent nature of this tumor allows for prolonged survival for most patients, rendering the disease a rather "chronic" one, with potential long-term sequelae that are occasionally related to treatment. Two critical features of this tumor are its tendency to remain dormant, or involute even after subtotal resection, and the exceptional anaplastic transformation, sometimes following adjuvant therapy. The biological behavior of pilocytic astrocytoma can often be related to molecular alterations in the MAPK pathway.

  5. The expression of moesin in astrocytoma: correlation with pathologic grade and poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Liu, Ding-Yang; Yuan, Xian-Rui; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Xin-Jun; Yuan, Dun; Huang, Jun; Li, Xue-Jun; Yang, Zhi-Quan

    2013-03-01

    Moesin, a member of the ERM family, acts as a linker between the actin cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane and plays a key role in the control of cell morphology, motility, adhesion and other processes of tumourigenesis. The expression pattern and clinical significance of moesin in astrocytoma remain unknown. In this study, we used RT-PCR to systematically investigate the expression of moesin in 49 astrocytomas of different pathological grade and 6 normal brain tissues. We found that the mRNA expression levels of moesin in astrocytomas were significantly higher in comparison with normal brain tissues. Furthermore, moesin up-regulation was correlated with pathological grade of astrocytomas. Subsequently, we tested 112 astrocytomas and 14 normal brain tissues by immunohistochemistry. Similar results were also confirmed. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis were used to determine the correlations of moesin expression with overall survival and progression-free survival. Our results showed the expression of moesin was strongly negatively correlated with the patient progression-free survival and overall survival. These results suggest moesin protein involved in the genesis and progression of astrocytomas and might be regarded as an independent predictor of poor prognosis.

  6. Cystic cerebellar astrocytomas in childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Beaufait, D; Blasko, J C

    1979-07-01

    Thirty-nine patients with low grade cystic cerebellar astrocytomas were treated at the University of Washington and Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle, Washington, between 1955 and 1977; 29 were treated with partial or complete resection alone, and 10 received radiation therapy after various types of surgical procedures. With a mean follow-up time of 7 years, the survival rate for patients who had complete resections of their primary disease was 100%. The relapse-free survival rate was 82%. The relapse-free survival rate for patients treated primarily with partial resection alone was 36%. Postoperative irradiation after partial resection for both primary and recurrent disease resulted in a relapse-free survival rate of 83%. If complete tumor excision is not possible, postoperative radiation therapy is recommended following partial resection.

  7. MiR-181b-5p downregulates NOVA1 to suppress proliferation, migration and invasion and promote apoptosis in astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Feng; Wang, Qiang; Deng, Danni; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Rong; Xue, Lian; Wang, Suinuan; Xia, Xiwei; Yang, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, short noncoding RNAs that modulate the expression of numerous genes by targeting their mRNA. Numerous abnormal miRNA expression patterns are observed in various human malignancies, and certain miRNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Astrocytoma, the most common neuroepithelial cancer, represents the majority of malignant brain tumors in humans. In our previous studies, we found that the downregulation of miR-181b-5p in astrocytomas is associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional role of miR-181b-5p and its possible target genes. miR-181b-5p was significantly downregulated in astrocytoma specimens, and the reduced expression of miR-181b-5p was inversely correlated with the clinical stage. The ectopic expression of miR-181b-5p inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion and induced apoptosis in astrocytoma cancer cells in vitro. The NOVA1 (neuro-oncological ventral antigen 1) gene was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b-5p. Specifically, miR-181b-5p bound directly to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of NOVA1 and suppressed its expression. In clinical specimens, NOVA1 was overexpressed, and its protein levels were inversely correlated with miR-181b-5p expression. Furthermore, the changing level of NOVA1 was significantly associated with a poor survival outcome. Similar to restoring miR-181b-5p expression, downregulating NOVA1 inhibited cell growth, migration and invasion. Overexpression of NOVA1 reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-181b-5p. Our results indicate that miR-181b-5p is a tumor suppressor in astrocytoma that inhibits tumor progression by targeting NOVA1. These findings suggest that miR-181b-5p may serve as a novel therapeutic target for astrocytoma.

  8. Frontal lobe astrocytoma following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.S.; Kushner, M.J.; Dell, S.

    1981-05-01

    A young woman had a frontal lobe astrocytoma 14 years after successful treatment of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma by surgery and whole-neuraxis irradiation. The association of these two tumors is rare, and it is unlikely that the second tumor was the result of metastasis and differentiation of residual or recurrent medulloblastoma. We review the evidence supporting this view and also the likelihood that the astrocytoma was induced by the prior radiation.

  9. Evaluation of Akt and RICTOR Expression Levels in Astrocytomas of All Grades.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Arthur William; Machado, Luis Eduardo; Rodrigues, Bruna Roz; Lupinacci, Fernanda Cristina Sulla; Sanemastu, Paulo; Matta, Eduardo; Roffé, Martín; Torres, Luís Fernando Bleggi; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Martins, Vilma Regina; Hajj, Glaucia Noeli Maroso

    2017-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) binds to several protein partners and forms two complexes, termed mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2), that differ in components, substrates, and regulation. mTORC2 contains the protein Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR (RICTOR); phosphorylates kinases of the AGC family, such as Akt; and controls the cytoskeleton. Even though the regulation of mTORC2 activity remains poorly understood, the hyperactivation of this signaling pathway has been shown to contribute to the oncogenic properties of gliomas in experimental models. In this work, we evaluated expression and phosphorylation of Akt, and expression of RICTOR and Ki-67 in 195 human astrocytomas of different grades (38 cases of grade I, 49 grade II, 15 grade III, and 93 grade IV) and 30 normal brains. Expression and phosphorylation of Akt increased with histological grade and correlated with a worse overall survival in glioblastomas (GBMs). RICTOR was overexpressed in grade I and II astrocytomas and demonstrated a shift to nuclear localization in GBMs. Nuclear RICTOR was associated to increased proliferation in GBMs. Our results point to an increase in total and phosphorylated Akt in high-grade gliomas and to a possible role of RICTOR in proliferations of high-grade GBM cells.

  10. Roles of the functional loss of p53 and other genes in astrocytoma tumorigenesis and progression.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, M.; Tada, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Zhang, C. L.; Sawamura, Y.; Abe, H.; Ishii, N.; Van Meir, E. G.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of function of the p53 tumor suppressor gene due to mutation occurs early in astrocytoma tumorigenesis in about 30-40% of cases. This is believed to confer a growth advantage to the cells, allowing them to clonally expand due to loss of the p53-controlled G1 checkpoint and apoptosis. Genetic instability due to the impaired ability of p53 to mediate DNA damage repair further facilitates the acquisition of new genetic abnormalities, leading to malignant progression of an astrocytoma into anaplastic astrocytoma. This is reflected by a high rate of p53 mutation (60-70%) in anaplastic astrocytomas. The cell cycle control gets further compromised in astrocytoma by alterations in one of the G1/S transition control genes, either loss of the p16/CDKN2 or RB genes or amplification of the cyclin D gene. The final progression process leading to glioblastoma multiforme seems to need additional genetic abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 10; one of which is deletion and/or functional loss of the PTEN/MMAC1 gene. Glioblastomas also occur as primary (de novo) lesions in patients of older age, without p53 gene loss but with amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) genes. In contrast to the secondary glioblastomas that evolve from astrocytoma cells with p53 mutations in younger patients, primary glioblastomas seem to be resistant to radiation therapy and thus show a poorer prognosis. The evaluation and design of therapeutic modalities aimed at preventing malignant progression of astrocytomas and glioblastomas should now be based on stratifying patients with astrocytic tumors according to their genetic diagnosis. PMID:11550308

  11. Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy associated with cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma: coincidence or genetic relationship?

    PubMed

    Sobottka, S B; Huebner, A; Haase, M; Ahrens, W; Rupprecht, E; Schackert, H K; Schackert, G

    2001-01-01

    Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a rare inherited disease characterized by skeletal abnormalities, short stature, and, in some cases, resistance to parathyroid hormone, resulting in pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). Heterozygous inactivating mutations of the GNAS1 gene are responsible for reduced activity of the alpha subunit of the Gs protein (G(Salpha)), a protein that mediates hormone signal transduction across cell membranes. G(salpha) is also known to have oncogenic potentials, leading to the development of human pituitary tumors and Leydig cell tumors. Here, we report the 1st case, a 3.5-year-old girl, with classic AHO phenotype and PHP type 1A associated with a cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Coincidence or genetic relationships of both diseases are discussed according to molecular findings and current literature. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. Brown, Paul D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Krauss, William E.; Wright, Michael P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  13. Mitotic recombination of chromosome 17 in astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.D.; Carlbom, E.; Nordenskjold, M.; Collins, V.P.; Cavenee, W.K. )

    1989-04-01

    Allelic combinations at seven loci on human chromosome 17 defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in tumor and normal tissues from 35 patients with gliomas. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity at one or more of these loci was observed in 8 of the 24 tumors displaying astrocytic differentiation and in the single primitive neuroectodermal tumor examined. The astrocytomas showing these losses included examples of each adult malignancy grade of the disease, including glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV), and seven of them demonstrated concurrent maintenance of heterozygosity for at least one chromosome 17 locus. Determination of allele dosage together with the genotypic data indicated that the tumor chromosomes 17 were derived by mitotic recombination in 7 of the 9 cases with shared homozygosity of the region 17p11.2-ptr in all cases. In contrast, tumors of oligodendrocytic, ependymal, or mixed cellular differentiation did not exhibit loss of alleles at any of the loci examined. These data suggest that the somatic attainment of homozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p is frequently associated with the oncogenesis of central nervous system tumors, particularly those showing solely astrocytic differentiation, and that mitotic recombination mapping is a useful approach towards the subregional localization of a locus whose rearrangement is involved in this disease.

  14. Relationship between CacyBP/SIP expression and prognosis in astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chunlin; Wang, Junyu; Ge, Aiqing; Li, Yiming; Li, Weiqing; Lu, Yicheng

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of calcyclin-binding protein (also known as Siah-1-interacting protein [CacyBP/SIP]) in astrocytoma and to determine its prognostic value in overall survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Tissue specimens were obtained from 77 Chinese patients who had undergone surgery for astrocytoma. The expression of CacyBP/SIP was examined by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between CacyBP/SIP and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PCNA) expression was investigated, and the prognostic value of CacyBP/SIP expression in patients with astrocytomas was analyzed. Of 77 tumors, 49 (63.6%) were negative for CacyBP/SIP expression. Loss of CacyBP/SIP expression was significantly associated with a high histological grade and with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. Cox multivariable analysis showed that loss of CacyBP/SIP expression correlated with poor prognosis in patients with astrocytomas and was an independent prognostic factor (p<0.05). The mean survival time of patients with tumors that had lost expression of CacyBP/SIP was 25.58months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.36-25.81months), compared to a mean survival time of 36.37months (95% CI, 27.90-44.84months) for patients with CacyBP/SIP-expressing tumors. CacyBP/SIP expression was also negatively correlated with PCNA expression in astrocytoma tissue (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that CacyBP/SIP may have an important role as a negative regulator of astrocytoma development and progression, and that CacyBP/SIP might be a useful molecular marker for predicting the prognosis of astrocytoma.

  15. Proliferative and Invasive Effects of Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) is a progesterone (P4) regulated protein expressed in different types of high proliferative cells including astrocytomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. It has been shown that PIBF increases the number of human astrocytoma cells. In this work, we evaluated PIBF regulation by P4 and the effects of PIBF on proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells, both derived from human glioblastomas. PIBF mRNA expression was upregulated by P4 (10 nM) from 12 to 24 h. Glioblastoma cells expressed two PIBF isoforms, 90 and 57 kDa. The content of the shorter isoform was increased by P4 at 24 h, while progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (10 μM) blocked this effect. PIBF (100 ng/mL) increased the number of U87 cells on days 4 and 5 of treatment and induced cell proliferation on day 4. Wound-healing assays showed that PIBF increased the migration of U87 (12–48 h) and U251 (24 and 48 h) cells. Transwell invasion assays showed that PIBF augmented the number of invasive cells in both cell lines at 24 h. These data suggest that PIBF promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells. PMID:28168193

  16. Is Upregulation of Aquaporin 4-M1 Isoform Responsible for the Loss of Typical Orthogonal Arrays of Particles in Astrocytomas?

    PubMed Central

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Nieser, Maike; Wenzel, Ulrike; Ritz, Rainer; Noell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic endfoot membranes of the healthy blood-brain barrier—contacting the capillary—are covered with a large number of the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4). They form orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs), which consist of AQP4 isoform M1 and M23. Under pathologic conditions, AQP4 is distributed over the whole cell and no or only small OAPs are found. From cell culture experiments, it is known that cells transfected only with AQP4-M1 do not form OAPs or only small ones. We hypothesized that in astrocytomas the situation may be comparable to the in vitro experiments expecting an upregulation of AQP4-M1. Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of different graded astrocytomas revealed an upregulation of both isoforms AQP4 M1 and M23 in all astrocytomas investigated. In freeze fracture replicas of low-grade malignancy astrocytomas, more OAPs than in high-grade malignancy astrocytomas were found. In vitro, cultured glioma cells did not express AQP4, whereas healthy astrocytes revealed a slight upregulation of both isoforms and only a few OAPs in freeze fracture analysis. Taken together, we found a correlation between the decrease of OAPs and increasing grade of malignancy of astrocytomas but this was not consistent with an upregulation of AQP4-M1 in relation to AQP4 M23. PMID:27483250

  17. Fragile X mental retardation protein promotes astrocytoma proliferation via the MEK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Hao, Zhuofang; Long, Yuesheng; Chen, Shengqiang; Su, Hang; Yuan, Zhongmin; Xu, Meng; Chen, Jingqi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression and astrocytoma characteristics. Methods Pathologic grade and expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Ki67 (proliferation marker), and FMRP were determined in astrocytoma specimens from 74 patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was undertaken. Pathologic grade and protein levels of FMRP were determined in 24 additional patients with astrocytoma and 6 controls (cerebral trauma). In cultured U251 and U87 cell lines, the effects of FMRP knock-down on cell proliferation, AKT/mTOR/GSK-3β and MEK/ERK signaling were studied. The effects of FMRP knock-down on the volumes and weights of U251 cell-derived orthotopic tumors in mice were investigated. Results In patients, FMRP expression was increased in grade IV (5.1-fold, P<0.01) and grade III (3.2-fold, P<0.05) astrocytoma, compared with controls. FMRP and Ki67 expressions were positively correlated (R2=0.877, P<0.001). Up-regulation of FMRP was associated with poorer survival among patients with FMRP integrated optical density >30 (P<0.01). In astrocytoma cell lines, FMRP knock-down slowed proliferation (P<0.05), inhibited total MEK levels P<0.05, and reduced phosphorylation of MEK (Ser217/221) and ERK (Thr202/Tyr204) (P<0.05). In mice with orthotopic tumors, FMRP knock-down decreased FMRP and Ki67 expressions, and reduced tumor volume and weight (36.3% or 61.5% on day 15, both P<0.01). Also, phosphorylation of MEK (Ser217/221) and ERK (Thr202/Tyr204), and total MEK in xenografts were decreased in sh-FMRP xenografts compared with non-transfected ones (all P<0.05). Conclusion Enhanced FMRP expression in astrocytoma may promote proliferation through activation of MEK/ERK signaling. PMID:27683117

  18. Diffuse pontine astrocytoma with lipocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Craver, Randall; Arcement, Christopher; Chrisentery Singleton, Tammuella

    2012-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy was treated with radiation and chemotherapy for a diffuse pontine glioma. At autopsy, 8 months after diagnosis, the tumor was a diffuse grade II fibrillary astrocytoma with prominent lipocytic differentiation. Literature review suggests that lipocytic differentiation in low-grade astrocytomas occurs in a variety of patient ages, anatomic sites, grades, and astrocytic subtypes. Although the majority of low-grade lipoastrocytomas have behaved benignly, this child's lipoastrocytoma was the underlying cause of death. This outcome suggests that the outcomes of low-grade lipoastrocytic tumors may be expected to be the same as the underlying tumor subtype.

  19. Spinal cord astrocytoma mimicking multifocal myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Neutel, Dulce; Teodoro, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Pimentel, José; Albuquerque, Luísa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differential diagnosis of acute/subacute intrinsic spinal cord lesions can be challenging. In addition, intramedullary neoplasms typically show gadolinium enhancement, mass effect, and cord expansion. Case report We report a patient with spinal cord and brain stem lesions resembling multifocal myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no spinal cord enlargement or gadolinium enhancing. Treatment of myelitis was undertaken without stopping the progression of the disease. Biopsy was made and led to a histological diagnosis of astrocytoma. Discussion Astrocytoma must remain as a possible diagnosis of spinal cord lesions, even without typical characteristics of neoplasms. Furthermore, biopsy should always be considered when diagnosis is uncertain. PMID:24621037

  20. Pilocytic astrocytoma of the velum interpositum.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, M; Nishizaki, T; Harada, K; Kwak, T; Murakami, T; Ito, H

    1998-05-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with a pilocytic astrocytoma in the velum interpositum manifesting as a 5-day history of dizziness attacks and unstable gait. Computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement demonstrated a small, homogeneously enhanced mass in the velum interpositum. The tumor was removed subtotally, and the structure of the splenium was intact. The histological diagnosis was pilocytic astrocytoma. The MIB-1 growth fraction was 5%. The tumor may have originated from the splenium or the thalamus. The aggressive histology indicates the need for close neuroimaging follow-up.

  1. Tandem duplication producing a novel oncogenic BRAF fusion gene defines the majority of pilocytic astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David T. W.; Kocialkowski, Sylvia; Liu, Lu; Pearson, Danita M.; Bäcklund, L. Magnus; Ichimura, Koichi; Collins, V. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Brain tumours are the commonest solid tumours of childhood, and pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are the most common central nervous system tumour in 5-19 year-olds. Little is known about the genetic alterations underlying their development. Here we describe a tandem duplication of ∼2Mb at 7q34 occurring in 66% of pilocytic astrocytomas. This rearrangement, which was not observed in a series of 244 higher-grade astrocytomas, results in an in-frame fusion gene incorporating the kinase domain of the BRAF oncogene. We further show that the resulting fusion protein has constitutive BRAF kinase activity, and is able to transform NIH3T3 cells. This is the first report of BRAF activation through rearrangement as a frequent feature in a sporadic tumor. The frequency and specificity of this change underline its potential both as a therapeutic target and a diagnostic tool. PMID:18974108

  2. Synchronous double malignancy: adenocarcinoma of lung and malignant astrocytoma induced by asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, T; Hashimoto, H; Ono, T; Okada, K

    1992-01-01

    A 54-year-old male died of cerebellar herniation induced by brain tumor. Radiological examination of this case showed two separate tumorous lesions in the brain and lung. Autopsy proved malignant astrocytoma in the brain and coincidental alveolar cell carcinoma in the lung. He had a history of asbestos exposure for 8 years doing piping work in a shipyard. Furthermore, we detected a large number of asbestos bodies in the lung and one asbestos body in the brain. Therefore, this rare case of double cancer (malignant astrocytoma and lung cancer) might have been induced by asbestos exposure.

  3. Amyloid-β(25-35) induces a permanent phosphorylation of HSF-1, but a transitory and inflammation-independent overexpression of Hsp-70 in C6 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Calvillo, Minerva; Diaz, Alfonso; Limon, Daniel I; Mayoral, Miguel Angel; Chánez-Cárdenas, María Elena; Zenteno, Edgar; Montaño, Luis F; Guevara, Jorge; Espinosa, Blanca

    2013-10-01

    Two hallmarks of Alzheimer diseases are the continuous inflammatory process, and the brain deposit of Amyloid b (Aβ), a cytotoxic protein. The intracellular accumulation of Aβ(25-35) fractions, in the absence of Heat Shock proteins (Hsṕs), could be responsible for its cytotoxic activity. As, pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide control the expression of Hsṕs, our aim was to investigate the effect of Aβ(25-35) on the concentration of IL-1β, TNF-α and nitrite levels, and their relation to pHSF-1, Hsp-60, -70 and -90 expressions, in the rat C6 astrocyte cells. Interleukin-specific ELISA kits, immunohistochemistry with monoclonal anti-Hsp and anti pHSF-1 antibodies, and histochemistry techniques, were used. Our results showed that Aβ25-35 treatment of C6 cells increased, significantly and consistently the concentration of IL-1β, TNF-α and nitrite 3 days after initiating treatment. The immunoreactivity of C6 cells to Hsp-70 reached its peak after 3 days of treatment followed by an abrupt decrease, as opposed to Hsp-60 and -90 expressions that showed an initial and progressive increase after 3 days of Aβ(25-35) treatment. pHSF-1 was identified throughout the experimental period. Nevertheless, progressive and sustained cell death was observed during all the treatment times and it was not caspase-3 dependent. Our results suggest that Hsp-70 temporary expression serves as a trigger to inhibit casapase-3 pathway and allow the expression of Hsp-60 and -90 in C6 astrocytoma cells stimulated with Aβ(25-35).

  4. Bilateral Birdshot Retinochoroiditis and Retinal Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yun; Bell, Dugald

    2017-01-01

    Background. This case highlights the importance of recognising multiple pathologies within the eye which may not necessarily be linked. Both birdshot retinochoroiditis and astrocytoma are rare conditions. The case underlines the need for early identification and treatment of birdshot retinochoroiditis with steroids and disease modifying drugs. Astrocytoma in the absence of tuberous sclerosis is also uncommon. Case Presentation. A 36-year-old male presented with 3-month history of bilateral progressive flashing lights and floaters. He was systemically well with no significant past medical history. Fundal examination revealed retinal vasculitis and active creamy lesions in the choroid radiating from the optic nerve. In the supranasal periphery of the right eye there was a raised white, jagged lesion protruding into the vitreous. Fluorescein angiogram and indocyanine green showed marked venous vasculitis, hypofluorescence, and disc leakage in keeping with birdshot retinochoroiditis. The supranasal lesion features were in keeping with astrocytoma and this was thought to be a coincidental finding. Conclusions. Retinal astrocytoma may be present as an isolated ocular finding; however, patients must still be investigated for tuberous sclerosis which is the most common association. Birdshot retinochoroiditis typically responds well to steroid therapy, and disease modifying drugs should be considered as soon as possible. PMID:28321351

  5. A 16-Gene Signature Distinguishes Anaplastic Astrocytoma from Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Soumya Alige Mahabala; Srinivasan, Sujaya; Patric, Irene Rosita Pia; Hegde, Alangar Sathyaranjandas; Chandramouli, Bangalore Ashwathnarayanara; Arimappamagan, Arivazhagan; Santosh, Vani; Kondaiah, Paturu; Rao, Manchanahalli R. Sathyanarayana; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA; Grade III) and glioblastoma (GBM; Grade IV) are diffusely infiltrating tumors and are called malignant astrocytomas. The treatment regimen and prognosis are distinctly different between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma patients. Although histopathology based current grading system is well accepted and largely reproducible, intratumoral histologic variations often lead to difficulties in classification of malignant astrocytoma samples. In order to obtain a more robust molecular classifier, we analysed RT-qPCR expression data of 175 differentially regulated genes across astrocytoma using Prediction Analysis of Microarrays (PAM) and found the most discriminatory 16-gene expression signature for the classification of anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma. The 16-gene signature obtained in the training set was validated in the test set with diagnostic accuracy of 89%. Additionally, validation of the 16-gene signature in multiple independent cohorts revealed that the signature predicted anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples with accuracy rates of 99%, 88%, and 92% in TCGA, GSE1993 and GSE4422 datasets, respectively. The protein-protein interaction network and pathway analysis suggested that the 16-genes of the signature identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway as the most differentially regulated pathway in glioblastoma compared to anaplastic astrocytoma. In addition to identifying 16 gene classification signature, we also demonstrated that genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in distinguishing glioblastoma from anaplastic astrocytoma. PMID:24475040

  6. Detection of a novel point mutation in the p53 gene in grade II astrocytomas by PCR-SSCP analysis with additional Klenow treatment.

    PubMed

    Chawengchao, B; Petmitr, S; Ponglikitmongkol, M; Chanyavanich, V; Sangruji, T; Theerapuncharoen, V; Hayashi, K; Thangnipon, W

    2001-01-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) with additional Klenow treatment and direct sequencing mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene were analyzed from 21 cases of human astrocytomas. Three cases had p53 gene mutations: two of them were glioblastomas showing a point mutation, one in exon 5 and the other in 6. The last one was a gemistocytic astrocytoma showing a point mutation in exon 5. The frequency of p53 gene mutations in the astrocytomas examined was 14.3% (3 out of 21). No SSCP alterations were observed in any of the p53 fragments amplified from WHO grade I pilocytic astrocytomas and WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytomas. Further examination by direct sequencing showed that two mutations of glioblastomas had single-base substitutions resulting in silent and missense mutations, whereas one of the gemistocytic astrocytomas had a double-base substitution resulting in a missense mutation. The present studies revealed that all mutations were located outside the hot spots and, interestingly, one of them disclosed a missense mutation in exon 5 at codon 166, which was first detected in a grade II astrocytoma (gemistocytic type). It is possible that the missense mutation at this codon may be associated with special risk factors for the development of astrocytic tumors in Thai patients.

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as an Angiogenic Marker in Malignant Astrocytoma and Oligodendroglioma: An Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Vokuda, Ramya S; Srinivas, Bheemanathi Hanuman; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in angiogenesis has been extensively studied in gliomas, such as astrocytoma and oligodendrogliomas, worldwide. However, there is limited information available with regard to the Indian population. Aim To study, whether VEGF is expressed in the Indian population in a pattern similar to that in other population. Materials and Methods In this prospective study approved by the Institute Ethics Committee for Human Studies at Jawaharlal Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER) the patients operated for glioma in 2014 and 2015 (n = 60) were included. Tumours were graded as per the World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. VEGF expression in various grades was analysed using immunohistochemistry. Results Of the 60 patients included in this study, 15 were Grade II- (diffuse astrocytomas – 12; oligodendrogliomas- 3), 15 were Grade III-(anaplastic astrocytomas- 2; anaplastic oligodendrogliomas – 13) and 30 were Grade IV-glioblastomas. For VEGF antibody staining, two patients (3.33%) showed negative results and 58 patients (96%) showed positive results. VEGF positivity was 100% in Grade II and III, while it was 93.3% (28/30) in Grade IV tumours (p=0.012). Conclusion The expression of VEGF was associated with the grade of tumour, which gradually increased from Grade II to Grade IV. We conclude that VEGF-regulated angiogenesis plays an important role in tumour progression of astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas in the Indian population as observed worldwide.

  8. IDH1 Mutations Are Early Events in the Development of Astrocytomas and Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takuya; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Kleihues, Paul; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    IDH1 encodes isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, which participates in the citric acid cycle and was recently reported to be mutated in 12% of glioblastomas. We assessed IDH1 mutations in 321 gliomas of various histological types and biological behaviors. A total of 130 IDH1 mutations was detected, and all were located at amino acid residue 132. Of these, 91% were G→A mutations (Arg→His). IDH1 mutations were frequent in low-grade diffuse astrocytomas (88%) and in secondary glioblastomas that developed through progression from low-grade diffuse or anaplastic astrocytoma (82%). Similarly, high frequencies of IDH1 mutations were found in oligodendrogliomas (79%) and oligoastrocytomas (94%). Analyses of multiple biopsies from the same patient (51 cases) showed that there were no cases in which an IDH1 mutation occurred after the acquisition of either a TP53 mutation or loss of 1p/19q, suggesting that IDH1 mutations are very early events in gliomagenesis and may affect a common glial precursor cell population. IDH1 mutations were co-present with TP53 mutations in 63% of low-grade diffuse astrocytomas and with loss of heterozygosity 1p/19q in 64% of oligodendrogliomas; they were rare in pilocytic astrocytomas (10%) and primary glioblastomas (5%) and absent in ependymomas. The frequent presence of IDH1 mutations in secondary glioblastomas and their near-complete absence in primary glioblastomas reinforce the concept that despite their histological similarities, these subtypes are genetically and clinically distinct entities. PMID:19246647

  9. [Pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebrum presenting in an elderly patient: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuya; Tsukada, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebrum presenting in an elderly patient. A 76-year-old man was admitted to our department due to the development of dysarthria. MRI showed a cystic mass with an enhanced small mural nodule in the left frontal lobe. At surgery, the cyst contents were aspirated, and the mural nodule was excised. Histological examination showed a pattern that is usually seen in pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebellum, including loose and compact areas composed of pilocytic and stellate cells, a few eosinophilic granular bodies, but not Rosenthal fibers. Pilocytic astrocytoma is a common type of pediatric brain tumor that can arise within either the cerebellum or the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region, but rarely seen in the cerebral hemisphere at an advanced age. To our knowledge, only 45 cases of pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebrum developing in an adult are reported. In those cases, the symptoms of the disease developed during the third decade of life. The onset at a most advanced age as in the present case is thought to be extremely rare.

  10. Medium-grade astrocytoma in a cougar (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirotaka; Leone, Angelique M; Erlacher-Reid, Claire; Gary, Joy; Kiupel, Matti; Farina, Lisa L; Abbott, Jeffrey R

    2012-12-01

    A 17-year-old, male castrated cougar (Puma concolor) was presented minimally responsive and severely depressed, with bilateral mydriasis and absent pupillary light response. On gross examination of the brain, there was a tan-to-gray, invasive mass with a central cavitation on the ventral aspect in the left cerebral hemisphere, rostral to the caudate nucleus. On histopathologic examination, the mass was composed of sheets of medium-sized, round-to-polygonal cells that were multifocally separated by islands of neuropil. Approximately 80% of the neoplastic cells showed strong cytoplasmic labeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein. These findings were consistent with a medium-grade astrocytoma. To the authors' knowledge, neoplastic disease of the central nervous system has not been previously reported in cougars.

  11. Control of cell proliferation in human glioma by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R I; Sherry, A; Hassanzadah, M; Freshney, M; Crilly, P; Morgan, D

    1980-06-01

    Survival and proliferation of cell cultures from human anaplastic astrocytomas were shown to be enhanced by glucocorticoids with an optimal concentration of approximately 2.5 x 10(-5)M (10 micrograms/ml). The stimulation of proliferation was only observed in a clonal growth assay and was reversed as the size of individual colonies reached approximately 50 cells. Above this size, and in regular monolayer cultures, glucocorticoids were found to inhibit cell proliferation as measured by direct cell counting and incorporation of [3H] thymidine. Cultures grown to maximum cell densities in non-limiting medium conditions reached a lower terminal cell density, and had a reduced labelling index with [3H] thymidine in the presence of glucocorticoids. Although there was little difference between the actions of beta-methasone, dexamethasone and ethyl prednisolone, methyl prednisolone was found to be more effective, both in terms of stimulation of clonal growth and inhibition of growth at high cell densities. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity with glucocorticoids up to 5 x 10(-5)M (20 micrograms/ml) and it is suggested that glucocorticoids act via a normal regulatory process, perhaps enhancing cell-cell recognition.

  12. Control of cell proliferation in human glioma by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Freshney, R. I.; Sherry, A.; Hassanzadah, M.; Freshney, M.; Crilly, P.; Morgan, D.

    1980-01-01

    Survival and proliferation of cell cultures from human anaplastic astrocytomas were shown to be enhanced by glucocorticoids with an optimal concentration of approximately 2.5 x 10(-5)M (10 micrograms/ml). The stimulation of proliferation was only observed in a clonal growth assay and was reversed as the size of individual colonies reached approximately 50 cells. Above this size, and in regular monolayer cultures, glucocorticoids were found to inhibit cell proliferation as measured by direct cell counting and incorporation of [3H] thymidine. Cultures grown to maximum cell densities in non-limiting medium conditions reached a lower terminal cell density, and had a reduced labelling index with [3H] thymidine in the presence of glucocorticoids. Although there was little difference between the actions of beta-methasone, dexamethasone and ethyl prednisolone, methyl prednisolone was found to be more effective, both in terms of stimulation of clonal growth and inhibition of growth at high cell densities. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity with glucocorticoids up to 5 x 10(-5)M (20 micrograms/ml) and it is suggested that glucocorticoids act via a normal regulatory process, perhaps enhancing cell-cell recognition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7426310

  13. Oxygen-dependent regulation of NDRG1 in human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Said, Harun M; Stein, Susanne; Hagemann, Carsten; Polat, Buelent; Staab, Adrian; Anacker, Jelena; Schoemig, Beate; Theobald, Matthias; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    NDRG1 is a member of the N-myc downregulated gene (NDRG) family. Its induction occurs via diverse physiological and pathological conditions (hypoxia, cellular differentiation, heavy metal, N-myc, neoplasia) which modulate NDRG1 transcription, mRNA stability and translation. Hypoxia, among other factors, induces NDRG1 expression and plays an important role in its regulation of expression. To date, the complete detailed function of this protein in humans remains unknown. Hypoxia represents a common feature of solid tumors. In our study, differences in NDRG1 expression between different WHO grades of astrocytic tumors were comparatively examined in vivo in human low-grade astrocytoma (WHO grade 2) and glioblastoma (WHO grade 4) at both the protein and mRNA level by Western blot analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Furthermore, the same proteins were determined in vitro in U373, U251 and GaMG human glioblastoma cells using the same methods. HIF-1alpha protein and mRNA regulation under hypoxia was also determined in vitro in U251, U373 and GaMG cells. This regulation was shown at the same levels in vivo in human low-grade astrocytoma (WHO grade 2) and glioblastoma which showed a higher NDRG1 overexpression level in glioblastoma than in low-grade astrocytoma. siRNA- and iodoacetate (IAA)-mediated downregulation of NDRG1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro in human glioblastoma cell lines showed a nearly complete inhibition of NDRG1 expression when compared to the results obtained due to the inhibitory role of glycolysis inhibitor IAA. Hypoxia responsive elements (HREs) bound by nuclear HIF-1alpha in human glioblastoma cells in vitro under different oxygenation conditions and the clearly enhanced binding of nuclear extracts from glioblastoma cell samples exposed to extreme hypoxic conditions confirmed the HIF-1 Western blotting results. Due to its clear regulatory behavior under hypoxic condition in human tumor cells, NDRG1 represents an additional

  14. The Characteristics of Astrocytomas and Oligodendrogliomas Are Caused by Two Distinct and Interchangeable Signaling Formats1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chengkai; Lyustikman, Yelena; Shih, Alan; Hu, Xiaoyi; Fuller, Gregory N; Rosenblum, Marc; Holland, Eric C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Chronic platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling in glial progenitors leads to the formation of oligodendrogliomas in mice, whereas chronic combined Ras and Akt signaling leads to astrocytomas. Different histologies of these tumors imply that the pathways activated by these two oncogenic stimulations are different, and that the apparent lineage of the tumor cells may result from specific signaling activity. Therefore, we have investigated the signaling effects of PDGF in culture and in gliomas in vivo. In culture, PDGF transiently activates ERK1/2 and Akt, and subsequently elevates p21 and PCNA expression similar to chronic PDGF autocrine signaling in cultured astrocytes and PDGF-induced oligodendrogliomas in vivo. Culture experiments show that autocrine PDGF stimulation, and combined active Ras and Akt generate signaling patterns that are in some ways mutually exclusive. Furthermore, forced Akt activity in the context of chronic PDGF stimulation results in cells with an astrocytic differentiation pattern both in culture and in vivo. These data imply that these two interconvertible signaling motifs are distinct in mice and lead to gliomas resembling the two major glioma histologies found in humans. The ability of signaling activity to convert tumor cells from one lineage to another presents a mechanism for the development of tumors apparently comprised of cells from multiple lineages. PMID:15967117

  15. Expression and prognostic impact of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Hermansen, Simon K.; Kristensen, Bjarne W.

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors in adults, and despite aggressive treatment patients often experience recurrence. Survival decreases with increasing tumor grade, and especially patients with grade IV glioblastoma have poor prognosis due to the aggressive character of this tumor. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an extracellular matrix degrading enzyme which has been shown to play important roles in different cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic potential of MMP-2 in astrocytomas. Tissue samples from 89 patients diagnosed with diffuse astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma were stained immunohistochemically using a monoclonal MMP-2 antibody. The MMP-2 intensity in cytoplasm/membrane was quantified by a trained software-based classifier using systematic random sampling in 10% of the tumor area. We found MMP-2 expression in tumor cells and blood vessels. Measurements of MMP-2 intensity increased with tumor grade, and MMP-2 expression was found to be significantly higher in glioblastomas compared to normal brain tissue (p<0.001), diffuse astrocytomas (p<0.001) and anaplastic astrocytomas (p<0.05). MMP-2 expression was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with grade II-IV astrocytic tumors (HR 1.60; 95% CI 1.03–2.48; p = 0.036). In glioblastoma, high MMP-2 was associated with poorer prognosis in patients who survived longer than 8.5 months independent of age and gender (HR 2.27; 95% CI 1.07–4.81; p = 0.033). We found a positive correlation between MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and combined MMP-2 and TIMP-1 had stronger prognostic value than MMP-2 alone also when adjusting for age and gender (HR 2.78; 95% CI 1.30–5.92; p = 0.008). These findings were validated in bioinformatics databases. In conclusion, this study indicates that MMP-2 is associated with aggressiveness in astrocytomas and may hold an unfavorable prognostic value in

  16. α-Synuclein potentiates interleukin-1β-induced CXCL10 expression in human A172 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tousi, Neda Saffarian; Buck, Daniel J; Curtis, J Thomas; Davis, Randall L

    2012-01-24

    Neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been attributed in part to glial-mediated events. Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and abnormal accumulation of the neuronal protein, α-synuclein in the brain are also characteristic of PD. While increasing evidence suggests that astrocytes contribute to neuroinflammation and dopaminergic neuronal degeneration associated with PD, there remains much to learn about these astroglial-mediated events. Therefore, we investigated the in vitro effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and α-synuclein on astroglial expression of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 (CXCL10), a proinflammatory and neurotoxic chemokine. IL-1β-induced CXCL10 protein expression was potentiated by co-exposure to α-synuclein. α-Synuclein did not significantly affect IL-1β-induced CXCL10 mRNA expression, but did mediate increased CXCL10 mRNA stability, which may explain, in part, the increased levels of secreted CXCL10 protein. Future investigations are warranted to more fully define the mechanism by which α-synuclein enhances IL-1β-induced astroglial CXCL10 expression. These findings highlight the importance of α-synuclein in modulating inflammatory events in astroglia. These events may be particularly relevant to the pathology of CNS disorders involving α-synuclein accumulation, including PD and HIV-1 associated dementia.

  17. Differences in vasculature between pilocytic and anaplastic astrocytomas of childhood.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Klement, Giannoula; Senger, Christof; Kerbel, Robert; Kieran, Mark; Baruchel, Sylvain; Becker, Laurence

    2003-12-01

    The clinical manifestations of childhood pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) markedly differ, especially in the time to progression and prognosis. Because of the aggressive course and poor survival rate of AA, one would expect it to be associated with a high angiogenic index. Counterintuitively, we often find higher microvessel density counts in PA than in AA. We examined the differences in type or density of microvasculature between the two neoplasms. To differentiate established, mature vessels from immature growing ones, we used antibodies to Factor VIII (FVIII) to stain endothelial cells (ECs) of blood vessels and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) antibodies to stain vessels supported by adventitia. We found that large, mature, alpha-SMA-positive vessels predominated in PA, and small, immature, alpha-SMA-negative vessels in AA. The vessel maturation index was 54.5% for PA, and 6.1% for AA. Immunostaining with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-flt-1/VEGF receptor-1 antibodies showed distinct tissue patterns. VEGF immunoreactivity occurred mainly in the processes of the tumor astrocytes in PA; the opposite was observed in AA. flt-1/VEGFR-1 was detected in the tumor cells of AA but not in those of PA. We propose that the predominance of small, alpha-SMA-negative vessels in AA represents immature, unstable vasculature with a potentially greater susceptibility to anti-angiogenic therapy. The expression of both flt-1 and VEGF by AA tumor cells also suggests a possible autocrine growth-promoting function for VEGF in addition to its role as paracrine pro-angiogenic growth factor for activated ECs, thus making anti-angiogenesis an attractive therapeutic target in the treatment of AA. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I–IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN). Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP. Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  19. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with an astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, Clare; Forman, Kate M; Smith, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of an 8-year-old girl with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a short history suggestive of raised intracranial pressure. Urgent computed tomography scan of the head showed a large bleed into a left cerebellar lesion. She underwent treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and steroids to increase her platelet count, followed by excision of the lesion, which was found to be a benign pilocytic astrocytoma. The patient made a complete recovery and shortly afterwards underwent splenectomy, following which there was complete resolution of her thrombocytopenia. PMID:22419950

  20. An Achilles tendinosis masking an intramedullary astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Stappers, Jeroen; Herregods, Piet; Chappel, Rudi; Surgeloose, Didier De; Stassijns, Gaëtane

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old male with a right Achilles tendinosis, who complains about a mild gait disorder starting after walking several kilometers. In the following months he develops neurological symptoms. MRI lumbar spine shows an intramedullary tumor at level Th12. A biopsy confirms the diagnosis of an intramedullary astrocytoma. Primary intramedullary tumors are relatively rare. Clinical presentation is often insidious. The authors want to make a point to reconsider a diagnosis in case it does not explain completely the anamnestic or clinical findings. According to the literature there is no optimal approach to the management of these tumors.

  1. Cannabinoid and cannabinoid-like receptors in microglia, astrocytes and astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nephi

    2010-01-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors are activated by a plethora of cannabinoid compounds, be they endogenously-produced, plant-derived or synthetic. These receptors are expressed by microglia, astrocytes and astrocytomas, and their activation regulates these cells’ differentiation, functions and viability. Recent studies show that glial cells also express cannabinoid-like receptors, and that their activation regulates different cell functions, but also control cell viability. This review summarizes this evidence, and discusses how selective compounds targeting cannabinoid-like receptors constitute promising therapeutics to manage neuroinflammation and eradicate malignant astrocytomas. Importantly, the selective targeting of cannabinoid-like receptors should provide therapeutic relieve without inducing the typical psychotropic effects and possible addictive properties associated with the use of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic ingredient produced by the plant Cannabis sativa. PMID:20468046

  2. Human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  3. An infant with hyperalertness, hyperkinesis, and failure to thrive: a rare diencephalic syndrome due to hypothalamic anaplastic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Stival, Alessia; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Farina, Silvia; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Castiglione, Francesca; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio; Sardi, Iacopo

    2015-09-04

    Diencephalic Syndrome is a rare clinical condition of failure to thrive despite a normal caloric intake, hyperalertness, hyperkinesis, and euphoria usually associated with low-grade hypothalamic astrocytomas. We reported an unusual case of diencephalic cachexia due to hypothalamic anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO-grade III). Baseline endocrine function evaluation was performed in this patient before surgery. After histological diagnosis, he enrolled to a chemotherapy program with sequential high-dose chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell rescue. The last MRI evaluation showed a good response. The patient is still alive with good visual function 21 months after starting chemotherapy. Diencephalic cachexia can rarely be due to high-grade hypothalamic astrocytoma. We suggest that a nutritional support with chemotherapy given to high doses without radiotherapy could be an effective strategy for treatment of a poor-prognosis disease.

  4. Radiation Therapy for Pilocytic Astrocytomas of Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, David B.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; King, Allison A.; Hollander, Abby S.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Park, T.S.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Though radiation therapy is generally considered the most effective treatment for unresectable pilocytic astrocytomas in children, there are few data to support this claim. To examine the efficacy of radiation therapy for pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients 18 years old or younger with unresectable tumors and without evidence of neurofibromatosis have been treated since 1982. Patients were treated with local radiation fields to a median dose of 54 Gy. Six patients were treated with radiosurgery to a median dose of 15.5 Gy. Five patients were treated with initial chemotherapy and irradiated after progression. Results: All patients were alive after a median follow-up of 5.0 years. However, progression-free survival was 68.7%. None of 11 infratentorial tumors progressed compared with 6 of 20 supratentorial tumors. A trend toward improved progression-free survival was seen with radiosurgery (80%) compared with external beam alone (66%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Eight of the 9 patients progressing after therapy did so within the irradiated volume. Conclusions: Although the survival of these children is excellent, almost one third of patients have progressive disease after definitive radiotherapy. Improvements in tumor control are needed in this patient population, and the optimal therapy has not been fully defined. Prospective trials comparing initial chemotherapy to radiation therapy are warranted.

  5. A tissue microarray study of toll-like receptor 4, decoy receptor 3, and external signal regulated kinase 1/2 expressions in astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Kung; Ting, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) functions as a death decoy inhibiting apoptosis mediated by the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. It is highly expressed in many tumors and its expression can be regulated by the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and ERK is a vital member of this pathway. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is expressed on immune cells. Increased TLR4 expression has been associated with various types of cancers. The study was conducted to investigate the expression of DcR3, ERK1/2, and TLR4 in astrocytomas and evaluate if they are validating markers for discriminating glioblastoma from anaplastic astrocytoma in limited surgical specimen. Expression of DcR3, ERK1/2, and TLR4 was determined by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarray from 48 paraffin-embedded tissues. A binary logistic regression method was used to generate functions that discriminate between anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas. The expression of TLR4 and DcR3 was significantly higher in glioblastomas than in anaplastic astrocytomas. DcR3 could discriminate anaplastic astrocytomas from glioblastomas with high sensitivity (93.8%), specificity (90%), and accuracy (92.3%). Our results suggest that DcR3 may be a useful marker for discriminating anaplastic astrocytomas from glioblastomas.

  6. Molecular analysis of pediatric brain tumors identifies microRNAs in pilocytic astrocytomas that target the MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tania A; Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Forshew, Tim; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Lawson, Andrew R J; Patel, Sheena N; Doctor, Gabriel T; Mumin, Muhammad A; Picker, Simon R; Phipps, Kim P; Michalski, Antony; Jacques, Thomas S; Sheer, Denise

    2015-12-18

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are slow-growing tumors that usually occur in the cerebellum or in the midline along the hypothalamic/optic pathways. The most common genetic alterations in pilocytic astrocytomas activate the ERK/MAPK signal transduction pathway, which is a major driver of proliferation but is also believed to induce senescence in these tumors. Here, we have conducted a detailed investigation of microRNA and gene expression, together with pathway analysis, to improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in pilocytic astrocytomas. Pilocytic astrocytomas were found to have distinctive microRNA and gene expression profiles compared to normal brain tissue and a selection of other pediatric brain tumors. Several microRNAs found to be up-regulated in pilocytic astrocytomas are predicted to target the ERK/MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways as well as genes involved in senescence-associated inflammation and cell cycle control. Furthermore, IGFBP7 and CEBPB, which are transcriptional inducers of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), were also up-regulated together with the markers of senescence and inflammation, CDKN1A (p21), CDKN2A (p16) and IL1B. These findings provide further evidence of a senescent phenotype in pilocytic astrocytomas. In addition, they suggest that the ERK/MAPK pathway, which is considered the major driver of these tumors, is regulated not only by genetic aberrations but also by microRNAs.

  7. MiRNA expression profiling in human gliomas: upregulated miR-363 increases cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Conti, Alfredo; Romeo, Sara G; Cama, Annamaria; La Torre, Domenico; Barresi, Valeria; Pezzino, Gaetana; Tomasello, Chiara; Cardali, Salvatore; Angileri, Filippo F; Polito, Francesca; Ferlazzo, Guido; Di Giorgio, Rosamaria; Germanò, Antonino; Aguennouz, M'hammed

    2016-10-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in glioma biology is increasingly recognized. To investigate the regulatory mechanisms governing the malignant signature of gliomas with different grades of malignancy, we analyzed miRNA expression profiles in human grade I-IV tumor samples and primary glioma cell cultures. Multiplex real-time PCR was used to profile miRNA expression in a set of World Health Organization (WHO) grade I (pilocytic astrocytoma), II (diffuse fibrillary astrocytoma), and IV (glioblastoma multiforme) astrocytic tumors and primary glioma cell cultures. Primary glioma cell cultures were used to evaluate the effect of transfection of specific miRNAs and miRNA inhibitors. miRNA microarray showed that a set of miRNAs was consistently upregulated in all glioma samples. miR-363 was upregulated in all tumor specimens and cell lines, and its expression correlated with tumor grading. The transfection of glioma cells with the specific inhibitor of miR-363 increased the expression level of tumor suppressor growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43). Transfection of miR-363 induced cell survival, while inhibition of miR-363 significantly reduced glioma cell viability. Furthermore, miRNA-363 inhibition induced the downregulation of AKT, cyclin-D1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and Bcl-2 and upregulation of caspase 3. Together, these data suggest that the upregulation of miR-363 may play a role in malignant glioma signature.

  8. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET. PMID:27695565

  9. Fast neutrons and misonidazole for malignant astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, P.D.; Pajak, T.F.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Nelson, J.S.; Mansell, J.; Cohen, L.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-five patients with proven malignant supratentorial astrocytomas were entered into a Phase I/II study of misonidazole combined with neutron radiation at Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) between August 1979 and April 1981. The main objectives were to determine tissue tolerance in terms of acute and late effects, and to estimate tumor clearance and survival rates. The total dose was 18.0 Gy given in weekly fractions of 3.0 Gy over 39 days. Four hours before each irradiation, 2.5 gm/m/sup 2/ misonidazole was administered orally. The median survival for the whole group was 12.0 months; 25% were alive at 18 months with some neurological compromise. Acute toxicity was within tolerable limits. Details of toxicity and tissue analysis from post mortems and second craniotomy samples are presented.

  10. A modern reproducible method for the histologic grading of astrocytomas with statistical classification tools.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Norbert; Iglesias-Rozas, José R; Weidl, Galia

    2008-02-01

    To investigate whether statistical classification tools can infer the correct World Health Organization (WHO) grade from standardized histologic features in astrocytomas and how these tools compare with GRADO-IGL, an earlier computer-assisted method. A total of 794 human brain astrocytomas were studied between January 1976 and June 2005. The presence of 50 histologic features was rated in 4 categories from 0 (not present) to 3 (abundant) by visual inspection of the sections under a microscope. All tumors were also classified with the corresponding WHO grade between I and IV. We tested the prediction performance of several statistical classification tools (learning vector quantization [LVQ], supervised relevance neural gas [SRNG], support vector machines [SVM], and generalized regression neural network [GRNN]) for this data set. The WHO grade was predicted correctly from histologic features in close to 80% of the cases by 2 modern classifiers (SRNG and SVM), and GRADO-IGL was predicted correctly in > 84% of the cases by a GRNN. A standardized report, based the 50 histologic features, can be used in conjunction with modern classification tools as an objective and reproducible method for histologic grading of astrocytomas.

  11. Paradoxical activation and RAF inhibitor resistance of BRAF protein kinase fusions characterizing pediatric astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Angela J.; Lang, Shih-Shan; Boucher, Katie L.; Madsen, Peter J.; Slaunwhite, Erin; Choudhari, Namrata; Kellet, Meghan; Storm, Phillip B.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common type of brain tumors in children. Activated BRAF protein kinase mutations are characteristic of pediatric astrocytomas with KIAA1549-BRAF fusion genes typifying low-grade astrocytomas and V600EBRAF alterations characterizing distinct or higher-grade tumors. Recently, BRAF-targeted therapies, such as vemurafenib, have shown great promise in treating V600E-dependent melanomas. Like V600EBRAF, BRAF fusion kinases activate MAPK signaling and are sufficient for malignant transformation; however, here we characterized the distinct mechanisms of action of KIAA1549-BRAF and its differential responsiveness to PLX4720, a first-generation BRAF inhibitor and research analog of vemurafenib. We found that in cells expressing KIAA1549-BRAF, the fusion kinase functions as a homodimer that is resistant to PLX4720 and accordingly is associated with CRAF-independent paradoxical activation of MAPK signaling. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that KIAA1549-BRAF fusion-mediated signaling is diminished with disruption of the BRAF kinase dimer interface. In addition, the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion displays increased binding affinity to kinase suppressor of RAS (KSR), an RAF relative recently demonstrated to facilitate MEK phosphorylation by BRAF. Despite its resistance to PLX4720, the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion is responsive to a second-generation selective BRAF inhibitor that, unlike vemurafenib, does not induce activation of wild-type BRAF. Our data support the development of targeted treatment paradigms for BRAF-altered pediatric astrocytomas and also demonstrate that therapies must be tailored to the specific mutational context and distinct mechanisms of action of the mutant kinase. PMID:23533272

  12. [Leptomeningeal spread of an intramedullary cervical pilocytic astrocytoma: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Jusué-Torres, I; Alcázar-Vaquerizo, L; Gómez-Angulo, J C; Navarro-Torres, R; López-Serrano, R; García-Miralles, N

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND. The rarest location of pilocytic astrocytoma is intramedullary. Gliomas represent up to 24 - 30% of intramedullary tumors in adulthood and are second only after ependymomas. Leptomeningeal dissemination through cerebrospinal fluid is unusual and occurs predominantly in medulloblastomas, ependymoblastomas, central neuroblastomas, ependymomas, germ cell tumors and high-grade gliomas. The majority of spinal cord gliomas reporting metastasis were anaplastic astrocytomas or glioblastomas multiforme and relatively few were low-grade gliomas. The incidence of leptomeningeal spread of low-grade tumors is rare. A rare cranial extension of brain leptomeningeal dissemination in an intramedullary pilocytic astrocytoma during adulthood is reported. CASE REPORT. A 51 year-old-man with a recurrent intramedullary mass at C5-C7 level operated 4 times with all pathological anatomy reports describing the lesion as Pilocytic Astrocytoma developed, after 15 years from the diagnosis, visual hallucinations and his level of consciousness worsened to Glasgow coma score 13/15. The MRI showed highly enhanced cranial and spinal leptomeninges and paquimeninges with a micro nodular-granulomatous aspect associated with intense affectation of basal cisterns, subarachnoid spaces and convexity of both cerebral hemispheres suggestive of leptomeningeal spread of the spinal mass. The patient expired after three days. CONCLUSION. Leptomeningeal spread is a rare phenomenon and when it happens usually doesn't change the primary tumor's behavior. In our case the aggressiveness could be explained by a potential malignization of the primary tumor that it was not documented because of the partial resections from the lasts surgeries or instead the tumor was actually a monomorphous pilomyxoid tumor.

  13. Tumor Grade versus Expression of Invasion-Related Molecules in Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Virga, József; Bognár, László; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Zahuczky, Gábor; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Tóth, Judit; Hutóczki, Gábor; Reményi-Puskár, Judit; Steiner, László; Klekner, Almos

    2017-02-04

    Peritumoral infiltration is characteristic of astrocytomas even in low-grade tumors. Tumor cells migrate to neighbouring tissue and cause recurrence. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a role in tumor invasion; expression levels of its components' have been linked to tumor invasion. This study determines the mRNA and protein expression of 20 invasion-related ECM components by examining non-tumor brain; grade I-II-III astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples. Expression levels were measured by QRT-PCR and mass-spectroscopy. The connection between the expression pattern and tumor grade is statistically analyzed. During the analysis of data, key molecules (brevican, cadherin-12, fibronectin and integrin-β1) correlating the most with tumor grade were selected. While the mRNA level of brevican, ErbB2, fibronectin, integrin-β1 and versican discriminates low-grade from high-grade gliomas, of proteins RHAMM, integrin-α1 and MMP2 seems important. The expression pattern was found to be distinctive for tumor grade, as statistical classifiers are capable of identifying an unknown sample's grade using them. Furthermore, normal brain and glioma expression patterns, along with low-grade astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples, differ the most. Determining the invasion-related molecules' expression profile provides extra information regarding the tumor's clinical behavior. Additionally, identifying molecules playing a key role in glioma invasion could uncover potential therapeutic targets in the future.

  14. High Cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 Expression in Astrocytomas Are Associated with Worse Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinxu; Yan, Yong; Li, Weiqing; Yu, Hongyu; Hu, Guohan; Ding, Xuehua; Chen, Juxiang; Lu, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    FOXO1 is at a convergence point of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, which is one of the three core pathways implicated in glioblastoma. It was recently shown that FOXO1 can effectively induce glioma cell death and inhibit tumor growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We therefore evaluated FOXO1 and pFOXO1 protein expression in 181 primary astrocytoma samples and 16 normal brain samples. Astrocytoma samples expressed higher cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 than normal brain samples. Nuclear pFOXO1 level was significantly higher than nuclear FOXO1 in astrocytomas. High cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression was associated with older onset age (P = 0.001) and higher WHO grade (P = 0.001). The trend was also observed between cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression and WHO grade although not significant. Univariate survival analysis showed that both high cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression indicated a significantly shorter median overall survival and progression-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis revealed cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression, cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression, WHO grade, gender, extent of resection and radiotherapy to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival and progression-free survival. Thus, our data suggested that cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression may serve as valuable prognostic variables in astrocytomas and may have significant implications for the development and application of targeted therapy. PMID:23874926

  15. High cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression in astrocytomas are associated with worse surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Xu, Tao; Zhou, Jinxu; Yan, Yong; Li, Weiqing; Yu, Hongyu; Hu, Guohan; Ding, Xuehua; Chen, Juxiang; Lu, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    FOXO1 is at a convergence point of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, which is one of the three core pathways implicated in glioblastoma. It was recently shown that FOXO1 can effectively induce glioma cell death and inhibit tumor growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We therefore evaluated FOXO1 and pFOXO1 protein expression in 181 primary astrocytoma samples and 16 normal brain samples. Astrocytoma samples expressed higher cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 than normal brain samples. Nuclear pFOXO1 level was significantly higher than nuclear FOXO1 in astrocytomas. High cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression was associated with older onset age (P = 0.001) and higher WHO grade (P = 0.001). The trend was also observed between cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression and WHO grade although not significant. Univariate survival analysis showed that both high cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression indicated a significantly shorter median overall survival and progression-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis revealed cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression, cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression, WHO grade, gender, extent of resection and radiotherapy to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival and progression-free survival. Thus, our data suggested that cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression may serve as valuable prognostic variables in astrocytomas and may have significant implications for the development and application of targeted therapy.

  16. Freezing human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-10-12

    Here we demonstrate how our lab freezes HuES human embryonic stem cell lines. A healthy, exponentially expanding culture is washed with PBS to remove residual media that could otherwise quench the Trypsin reaction. Warmed 0.05% Trypsin-EDTA is then added to cover the cells, and the plate allowed to incubate for up to 5 mins at room temperature. During this time cells can be observed rounding, and colonies lifting off the plate surface. Gentle repeated pipetting will remove cells and colonies from the plate surface. Trypsinized cells are placed in a standard conical tube containing pre-warmed hES cell media to quench remaining trypsin, and then spun. Cells are resuspended growth media at a concentration of approximately one million cells in one mL of media, a concentration such that one frozen aliquot is sufficient to resurrect a culture on a 10 cm plate. After cells are adequately resuspended, ice cold freezing media is added at equal volume. Cell suspensions are mixed thoroughly, aliquoted into freezing vials, and allowed to slowly freeze to -80 C over 24 hours. Frozen cells can then moved to the vapor phase of liquid nitrogen for long term storage, or remain at -80 for approximately six months.

  17. The chemokine receptor CXCR7 is highly expressed in human glioma cells and mediates antiapoptotic effects.

    PubMed

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Held-Feindt, Janka; Lucius, Ralph; Müerköster, Susanne Sebens; Penfold, Mark E T; Schall, Thomas J; Mentlein, Rolf

    2010-04-15

    The chemokine CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 play a major role in tumor invasion, proliferation, and metastasis. Recently, CXCR7 was identified as a novel, alternate receptor for CXCL12 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Because both chemokines are expressed abundantly in human astrocytomas and glioblastomas, we investigated the occurrence and function of both receptors in astroglial tumors. In situ, CXCR7 is highly expressed on tumor endothelial, microglial, and glioma cells whereas CXCR4 has a much more restricted localization; CXCL12 is often colocalized with CXCR7. CXCR7 transcription in tumor homogenates increased with malignancy. In vitro, CXCR7 was highly expressed in all glioma cell lines investigated whereas CXCR4 was only scarcely transcribed on one of eight lines. In contrast, a tumor stem-like cell line preferentially expressed CXCR4 which diminished upon differentiation, whereas CXCR7 increased drastically. Stimulation of CXCR7-positive glioma cells (CXCR4- and CXCR3-negative) by CXCL12 induced transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases Erk1/2, indicating that the receptor is functionally active. The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 effectively inhibited Erk activation and suggests that the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is activated indirectly. Whereas proliferation and migration were little influenced, chemokine stimulation prevented camptothecin- and temozolomide-induced apoptosis. The selective CXCR7 antagonist CCX733 reduced the antiapoptotic effects of CXCL12 as shown by nuclear (Nicoletti) staining, caspase-3/7 activity assays, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Thus, CXCR7 is a functional receptor for CXCL12 in astrocytomas/glioblastomas and mediates resistance to drug-induced apoptosis. Whereas CXCR7 is found on "differentiated" glioma cells, the alternate receptor CXCR4 is also localized on glioma stem-like cells.

  18. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; McGovern, Naomi; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells are highly adapted to their role of presenting antigen and directing immune responses. Developmental studies indicate that DCs originate independently from monocytes and tissue macrophages. Emerging evidence also suggests that distinct subsets of DCs have intrinsic differences that lead to functional specialisation in the generation of immunity. Comparative studies are now allowing many of these properties to be more fully understood in the context of human immunology. PMID:23621371

  20. New world primates as a model of viral-induced astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Houff, S A; London, W T; Zu Rhein, G M; Padgett, B L; Walker, D L; Sever, J L

    1983-01-01

    Owl and squirrel monkeys are susceptible to the oncogenic effects of JCV. These species of New World monkeys can be safely inoculated intracerebrally. Care must be taken with owl monkeys since they have an inherited clotting abnormality. Incubation times for the development of tumors range from 14 to 30 months. Anorexia was the first clinical sign of tumor development. The clinical course is rapid with death within two to three days. This model provides a means for studying diagnostic, virological, immunological and therapeutic techniques which are applicable to human patients with astrocytomas.

  1. The role of connexin43-Src interaction in astrocytomas: A molecular puzzle.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, A; Gangoso, E; Jaraíz-Rodríguez, M; Medina, J M

    2016-05-26

    Connexin43 (Cx43) as a building block of gap junction channels and hemichannels exerts important functions in astrocytes. When these cells acquire a malignant phenotype Cx43 protein but not mRNA levels are downregulated, being negligible in high-grade astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and deadliest of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Some microRNAs associated to glioma target Cx43 and could explain the lack of correlation between mRNA and protein levels of Cx43 found in some high-grade astrocytomas. More importantly, these microRNAs could be a promising therapeutic target. A great number of studies have confirmed the relationship between cancer and connexins that was proposed by Loewenstein more than 40years ago, but these studies have also revealed that this is a very complex relationship. Indeed, restoring Cx43 to glioma cells reduces their rate of proliferation and their tumorigenicity but this tumor suppressor effect could be counterbalanced by its effects on invasiveness, adhesion and migration. The mechanisms underlying these effects suggest the participation of a great variety of proteins that bind to different regions of Cx43. The present review focuses on an intrinsically disordered region of the C-terminal domain of Cx43 in which converges the interaction of several proteins, including the proto-oncogene Src. We summarize data that indicate that Cx43-Src interaction inhibits the oncogenic activity of Src and promotes a conformational change in the structure of Cx43 that allosterically modifies the binding to other important signaling proteins. As a consequence, crucial cell functions, such as proliferation or migration, could be strongly affected. We propose that the knowledge of the structural basis of the antitumorigenic effect of Cx43 on astrocytomas could help to design new therapies against this incurable disease. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human mast cell transcriptome project.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Nakajima, T; Matsumoto, K

    2001-05-01

    After draft reading of the human genome sequence, systemic analysis of the transcriptome (the whole transcripts present in a cell) is progressing especially in commonly available cell types. Until recently, human mast cells were not commonly available. We have succeeded to generate a substantial number of human mast cells from umbilical cord blood and from adult peripheral blood progenitors. Then, we have examined messenger RNA selectively transcribed in these mast cells using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Many unexpected but important transcripts were selectively expressed in human mast cells. We discuss the results obtained from transcriptome screening by introducing our data regarding mast-cell-specific genes.

  3. Autocrine regulation of glioblastoma cell cycle progression, viability and radioresistance through the VEGF-VEGFR2 (KDR) interplay.

    PubMed

    Knizetova, Petra; Ehrmann, Jiri; Hlobilkova, Alice; Vancova, Iveta; Kalita, Ondrej; Kolar, Zdenek; Bartek, Jiri

    2008-08-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a crucial role in angiogenesis and progression of malignant brain tumors. Given the significance of tumor microenvironment in general, and the established role of paracrine VEGF signaling in glioblastoma (GBM) biology in particular, we explored the potential autocrine control of human astrocytoma behavior by VEGF. Using a range of cell and molecular biology approaches to study a panel of astrocytoma (grade III and IV/GBM)-derived cell lines and a series of clinical specimens from low- and high-grade astrocytomas, we show that co-expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) occurs commonly in astrocytoma cells. We found VEGF secretion and VEGF-induced biological effects (modulation of cell cycle progression and enhanced viability of glioblastoma cells) to function in an autocrine manner. Morevover, we demonstrated that the autocrine VEGF signaling is mediated via VEGFR2 (KDR), and involves co-activation of the c-Raf/MAPK, PI3K/Akt and PLC/PKC pathways. Blockade of VEGFR2 by the selective inhibitor (SU1498) abrogated the VEGF-mediated enhancement of astrocytoma cell growth and viability under unperturbed culture conditions. In addition, such interference with VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling potentiated the ionizing radiation-induced tumor cell death. In clinical specimens, both VEGFRs and VEGF were co-expressed in astroglial tumor cells, and higher VEGF expression correlated with tumor progression, thereby supporting the relevance of functional VEGF-VEGFR signaling in vivo. Overall, our results are consistent with a potential autocrine role of the VEGF-VEGFR2 (KDR) interplay as a factor contributing to malignant astrocytoma growth and radioresistance, thereby supporting the candidacy of this signaling cascade as a therapeutic target, possibly in combination with radiotherapy.

  4. Alterations of the RRAS and ERCC1 genes at 19q13 in gemistocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takashi; Kim, Young-Ho; Oh, Ji-Eun; Satomi, Kaishi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Keyvani, Kathy; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Mittelbronn, Michel; Paulus, Werner; Vital, Anne; Yokoo, Hideaki; McDonald, Kerrie; Kleihues, Paul; Nazaret, Nicolas; Barbet, Fabienne; Lachuer, Joel; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2014-10-01

    Gemistocytic astrocytoma (World Health Organization grade II) is a rare variant of diffuse astrocytoma that is characterized by the presence of neoplastic gemistocytes and has a significantly less favorable prognosis. Other than frequent TP53 mutations (>80%), little is known about its molecular profile. Here, we show that gemistocytic astrocytomas carry a lower frequency of IDH mutations than fibrillary astrocytomas (74% vs 92%; p = 0.0255) but have profiles similar to those of fibrillary astrocytomas with respect to TERT promoter mutations (5% vs 0%), 1p/19q loss (10% vs 8%), and loss of heterozygosity 10q (10% vs 12%). Exome sequencing in 5 gemistocytic astrocytomas revealed homozygous deletion of genes at 19q13 (i.e. RRAS [related RAS viral oncogene homolog; 2 cases] and ERCC1 [excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency, complementation group 1; 1 case]). Further screening showed RRAS homozygous deletion in 7 of 42 (17%) gemistocytic astrocytomas and in 3 of 24 (13%) IDH1 mutated secondary glioblastomas. Patients with gemistocytic astrocytoma and secondary glioblastoma with an RRAS deletion tended to have shorter survival rates than those without deletion. Differential polymerase chain reaction and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed an ERCC1 homozygous deletion or promoter methylation in 10 of 42 (24%) gemistocytic astrocytomas and in 8 of 24 (33%) secondary glioblastomas. Alterations in RRAS and ERCC1 appear to be typical in gemistocytic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas, since they were not present in 49 fibrillary astrocytomas or 30 primary glioblastomas.

  5. Malignant astrocytoma in elderly patients: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Stupp, Roger; Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Age is inversely correlated with clinical outcome and a strong prognostic factor for the course of most primary brain tumors including malignant astrocytoma, i.e. anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma. We here review available clinical outcome data and discuss future directions of clinical research. The standard of care in patients with malignant astrocytoma above the range of 65-70 years was considered radiotherapy, preferentially using a hypofractionated regimen (15 × 2.66 Gy). Two phase III clinical trials, the NOA-08 and Nordic trials, demonstrated that temozolomide (TMZ) therapy alone was not inferior to radiotherapy alone, and methylation of the O-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter was predictive with a methylated MGMT promoter indicating a benefit from TMZ chemotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials in this patient population include the National Cancer Institute of Canada/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer intergroup trial, investigating the combination of hypofractionated radiotherapy and TMZ chemotherapy, and the Swiss ARTE trial, investigating the combination of bevacizumab and hypofractionated radiotherapy. Recent translational studies indicate that prognostically favorable factors in malignant astrocytoma from younger patients are virtually absent in the elderly. Current standard of care for elderly patients with malignant astrocytoma involves a treatment strategy based on the MGMT gene promoter methylation status. The role of combined radiotherapy and TMZ chemotherapy and a potential role for the addition of anti-VEGF therapy to radiotherapy are currently addressed in ongoing trials. The lack of favorable prognostic factors in tumor tissue might in part explain the poorer clinical outcome of elderly patients.

  6. Anorexia: an early sign of fourth ventricle astrocytoma in children.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Baroncini, Marc; Delestret, Isabelle; Florent, Vincent; Vinchon, Matthieu

    2014-12-01

    Paediatric low-grade astrocytomas of the fourth ventricle are rare tumours, generally revealed by hydrocephalus. However, some patients present with a history of severe anorexia. It might be a harbinger, which if recognized, could lead to earlier diagnosis. We decided to examine our database in order to evaluate the incidence and signification of anorexia in this context. Retrospective monocentric study of cases of low-grade astrocytomas of the fourth ventricle operated between 1991 and 2012 in our paediatric neurosurgery department. We particularly observed the clinical presentation and long-term clinical, oncological and radiological evolution. Non-parametrical tests were used (Mann-Whitney, Fisher). We reviewed 34 cases, 31 pilocytic astrocytomas and 3 diffuse astrocytomas, 16 boys and 18 girls, (M/F ratio 0.89). Mean age at diagnosis was 8 years old. Seven presented with notable anorexia, the average BMI in this group was ≤2 standard deviation (SD); with clinical signs evolving for 11.5 months. Twenty-seven children had no anorexia; average BMI in this group was +1 SD, with clinical evolution for 6 months on an average of p < 0.05. We found no significant difference regarding hydrocephalus or tumour location. In all children with anorexia, body mass index improved markedly in the postoperative follow-up, which lasted, on average, for 6 years. Anorexia with stunted body weight curve is a non-exceptional presentation in children with low-grade astrocytomas of the fourth ventricle. Unexplained or atypical anorexia with negative etiologic assessment should prompt cerebral imaging. Clinical improvement after surgical resection, could suggest a possible interaction between tumour tissue and appetite-suppressing peptide secretion.

  7. Insulin-like growth factor-1 content and pattern of expression correlates with histopathologic grade in diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, H.; Lopes, M. B.; Laws, E. R.; Asakura, T.; Goto, M.; Carpenter, J. E.; Karns, L. R.; VandenBerg, S. R.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of experimental tumorigenesis have strongly implicated signaling of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) as a key component in astrocytic neoplasia; however, its role in the growth of low-grade and malignant human tumors is not well understood. Correlative analyses of IGF-1, p53, and Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) mRNA expression were performed to examine the cellular pattern of IGF-1 signaling in 39 cases of astrocytoma (World Health Organization grades II-IV). Tumor cells expressing IGF-1 and IGF-1R were present in all tumor grades. The proportion of tumor cells that expressed IGF-1 correlated with both histopathologic grade and Ki-67 labeling indices, while expression of IGF-1R mRNA correlated with Ki-67 indices. In cases where stereotactic tissue sampling could be identified with a specific tumor area by neuroimaging features, the numbers of IGF-1 immunoreactive cells correlated with the tumor zones of highest cellularity and Ki-67 labeling. In glioblastomas, the localization of IGF-1 immunoreactivity was notable for several features: frequent accentuation in the perivascular tumor cells surrounding microvascular hyperplasia; increased levels in reactive astrocytes at the margins of tumor infiltration; and selective expression in microvascular cells exhibiting endothelial/pericytic hyperplasia. IGF-1R expression was particularly prominent in tumor cells adjacent to both microvascular hyperplasia and palisading necrosis. These data suggest that IGF-1 signaling occurs early in astroglial tumorigenesis in the setting of cell proliferation. The distinctive correlative patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R expression in glioblastomas also suggest that IGF-1 signaling has an association with the development of malignant phenotypes related to aberrant angiogenesis and invasive tumor interactions with reactive brain. PMID:11550306

  8. Genome engineering in human cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Fast-Migrating Human Glioma Cells in the Progression of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Vivian; Schmitt, Anne Dorothée; Flüh, Charlotte; Synowitz, Michael; Hattermann, Kirsten; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2017-03-13

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. The most malignant form, the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; WHO IV), is characterized by an invasive phenotype, which enables the tumor cells to infiltrate into adjacent brain tissue. When investigating GBM migration and invasion properties in vitro, in most cases GBM cell lines were analyzed. Comprehensive investigations focusing on progression-dependent characteristics of migration processes using fresh human glioma samples of different malignancy grades do not exist. Thus, we isolated fast-migrating tumor cells from fresh human glioma samples of different malignancy grades (astrocytomas WHO grade II, grade III, GBM, and GBM recurrences) and characterized them with regard to the transcription of genes involved in the migration and invasion, tumor progression, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and stemness. In addition, we transferred our results to GBM cell lines and glioma stem-like cells and examined the influence of temozolomide on the expression of the above-mentioned genes in relation to migratory potential. Our results indicate that "evolutionary-like" expression alterations occur during glioma progression when comparing slow- and fast-migrating cells of fresh human gliomas. Furthermore, a close relation between migratory and stemness properties seems to be most likely. Variations in gene expression were also identified in GBM cell lines, not only when comparing fast- and slow-migrating cells but also regarding temozolomide-treated and untreated cells. Moreover, these differences coincided with the expression of stem cell markers and their migratory potential. Expression of migration-related genes in fast-migrating glioma cells is not only regulated in a progression-dependent manner, but these cells are also characterized by specific stem cell-like features.

  10. Effect of cognitive rehabilitation in a case of thalamic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Lo Buono, Viviana; Corallo, Francesco; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Chillemi, Antonino; Grugno, Rosario; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We describe the effectiveness of rehabilitative training for a neuropsychological deficit following the removal and treatment of a fibrillary astrocytoma (Grade II) in a young man. The rehabilitative training was based on cognitive and motivational techniques and has been carried out for a period of 3 months (2 times per week). The results, even if limited to a single case, seem to support the idea that cognitive rehabilitation should facilitate the brain's reorganization of basic cognitive functions in the neuro-oncologic field.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  13. Quantitative chromatin pattern description in Feulgen-stained nuclei as a diagnostic tool to characterize the oligodendroglial and astroglial components in mixed oligo-astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; Lopes, B S; Gordower, L; Camby, I; Cras, P; Martin, J J; Kiss, R; VandenBerg, S R; Salmon, I

    1997-04-01

    The oligoastrocytoma, as a mixed glioma, represents a nosologic dilemma with respect to precisely defining the oligodendroglial and astroglial phenotypes that constitute the neoplastic cell lineages of these tumors. In this study, cell image analysis with Feulgen-stained nuclei was used to distinguish between oligodendroglial and astrocytic phenotypes in oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas and then applied to mixed oligoastrocytomas. Quantitative features with respect to chromatin pattern (30 variables) and DNA ploidy (8 variables) were evaluated on Feulgen-stained nuclei in a series of 71 gliomas using computer-assisted microscopy. These included 32 oligodendrogliomas (OLG group: 24 grade II and 8 grade III tumors according to the WHO classification), 32 astrocytomas (AST group: 13 grade II and 19 grade III tumors), and 7 oligoastrocytomas (OLGAST group). Initially, image analysis with multivariate statistical analyses (Discriminant Analysis) could identify each glial tumor group. Highly significant statistical differences were obtained distinguishing the morphonuclear features of oligodendrogliomas from those of astrocytomas, regardless of their histological grade. When compared with the 7 mixed oligoastrocytomas under study, 5 exhibited DNA ploidy and chromatin pattern characteristics similar to grade II oligodendrogliomas, I to grade III oligodendrogliomas, and I to grade II astrocytomas. Using multifactorial statistical analyses (Discriminant Analysis combined with Principal Component Analysis). It was possible to quantify the proportion of "typical" glial cell phenotypes that compose grade II and III oligodendrogliomas and grade II and III astrocytomas in each mixed glioma. Cytometric image analysis may be an important adjunct to routine histopathology for the reproducible identification of neoplasms containing a mixture of oligodendroglial and astrocytic phenotypes.

  14. An intrinsic DFF40/CAD endonuclease deficiency impairs oligonucleosomal DNA hydrolysis during caspase-dependent cell death: a common trait in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Martínez-Escardó, Laura; Granados-Colomina, Carla; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Pascual-Guiral, Sònia; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Velasco, Roser; Plans, Gerard; Vidal, Noemi; Tortosa, Avelina; Barcia, Carlos; Bruna, Jordi; Yuste, Victor J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) or grade IV astrocytoma is one of the most devastating human cancers. The loss of DFF40/CAD, the key endonuclease that triggers oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, has been linked to genomic instability and cell survival after radiation. Despite the near inevitability of GBM tumor recurrence after treatment, the relationship between DFF40/CAD and GBM remains unexplored. Methods We studied the apoptotic behavior of human GBM-derived cells after apoptotic insult. We analyzed caspase activation and the protein levels and subcellular localization of DFF40/CAD apoptotic endonuclease. DFF40/CAD was also evaluated in histological sections from astrocytic tumors and nontumoral human brain. Results We showed that GBM cells undergo incomplete apoptosis without generating oligonucleosomal DNA degradation despite the correct activation of executioner caspases. The major defect of GBM cells relied on the improper accumulation of DFF40/CAD at the nucleoplasmic subcellular compartment. Supporting this finding, DFF40/CAD overexpression allowed GBM cells to display oligonucleosomal DNA degradation after apoptotic challenge. Moreover, the analysis of histological slices from astrocytic tumors showed that DFF40/CAD immunoreactivity in tumoral GFAP-positive cells was markedly reduced when compared with nontumoral samples. Conclusions Our data highlight the low expression levels of DFF40/CAD and the absence of DNA laddering as common molecular traits in GBM. These findings could be of major importance for understanding the malignant behavior of remaining tumor cells after radiochemotherapy. PMID:26755073

  15. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  16. Patients with IDH1 wild type anaplastic astrocytomas exhibit worse prognosis than IDH1-mutated glioblastomas, and IDH1 mutation status accounts for the unfavorable prognostic effect of higher age: implications for classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christian; Hentschel, Bettina; Wick, Wolfgang; Capper, David; Felsberg, Jörg; Simon, Matthias; Westphal, Manfred; Schackert, Gabriele; Meyermann, Richard; Pietsch, Torsten; Reifenberger, Guido; Weller, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; von Deimling, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    WHO grading of human brain tumors extends beyond a strictly histological grading system by providing a basis predictive for the clinical behavior of the respective neoplasm. For example, patients with glioblastoma WHO grade IV usually show a less favorable clinical course and receive more aggressive first-line treatment than patients with anaplastic astrocytoma WHO grade III. Here we provide evidence that the IDH1 status is more prognostic for overall survival than standard histological criteria that differentiate high-grade astrocytomas. We sequenced the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1) at codon 132 in 382 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma from the NOA-04 trial and from a prospective translational cohort study of the German Glioma Network. Patients with anaplastic astrocytomas carried IDH1 mutations in 60%, and patients with glioblastomas in 7.2%. IDH1 was the most prominent single prognostic factor (RR 2.7; 95% CI 1.6-4.5) followed by age, diagnosis and MGMT. The sequence from more favorable to poorer outcome was (1) anaplastic astrocytoma with IDH1 mutation, (2) glioblastoma with IDH1 mutation, (3) anaplastic astrocytoma without IDH1 mutation and (4) glioblastoma without IDH1 mutation (p < 0.0001). In this combined set of anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas both, IDH1 mutation and IDH1 expression status were of greater prognostic relevance than histological diagnosis according to the current WHO classification system. Our data indicate that much of the prognostic significance of patient age is due to the predominant occurrence of IDH1 mutations in younger patients. Immunohistochemistry using a mutation-specific antibody recognizing the R132H mutation yielded similar results. We propose to complement the current WHO classification and grading of high-grade astrocytic gliomas by the IDH1 mutation status and to use this combined histological and molecular classification in future clinical trials.

  17. Human natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of human natural killer (NK) cell development lags far behind that of human B- or T-cell development. Much of our recent knowledge of this incomplete picture comes from experimental animal models that have aided in identifying fundamental in vivo processes, including those controlling NK cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and the generation of a diverse NK cell repertoire. However, it has been difficult to fully understand the mechanistic details of NK cell development in humans, primarily because the in vivo cellular intermediates and microenvironments of this developmental pathway have remained elusive. Although there is general consensus that NK cell development occurs primarily within the bone marrow (BM), recent data implicate secondary lymphoid tissues as principal sites of NK cell development in humans. The strongest evidence stems from the observation that the newly described stages of human NK cell development are naturally and selectively enriched within lymph nodes and tonsils compared with blood and BM. In the current review, we provide an overview of these recent findings and discuss these in the context of existing tenets in the field of lymphocyte development.

  18. The Effects of Thermal Preconditioning on Oncogenic and Intraspinal Cord Growth Features of Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Han, Inbo; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; Aljuboori, Zaid; Anderson, Jamie E; Chi, John H; Zafonte, Ross D; Teng, Yang D

    2016-12-13

    The adult rodent spinal cord presents an inhibitory environment for donor cell survival, impeding efficiency for xenograft-based modeling of gliomas. We postulated that mild thermal preconditioning may influence the fate of the implanted tumor cells. To test this hypothesis, high-grade human astrocytoma G55 and U87 cells were cultured under 37C and 38.5C to mimic regular experimental or core body temperatures of rodents, respectively. In vitro, the 38.5C-conditioned cells, relative to 37C, grew slightly faster. Compared to U87 cells, G55 cells demonstrated a greater response to the temperature difference. Hyperthermal culture markedly increased production of Hsp27 in most G55 cells, but only promoted transient expression of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in a small cell subpopulation. We subsequently transplanted G55 cells following 37C or 38.5C culture into the C2 or T10 spinal cord of adult female immunodeficient rats (3 rats/each locus/per temperature; total: 12 rats). Systematic analyses revealed that 38.5C-preconditioned G55 cells grew more malignantly at either C2 or T10 as determined by tumor size, outgrowth profile, resistance to bolus intratumor administration of 5-fluorouracil (0.1 mol), and posttumor survival (p0.05; n=6/group). Therefore, thermal preconditioning of glioma cells may be an effective way to influence the in vitro and in vivo oncological contour of glioma cells. Future studies are needed for assessing the potential oncogenic modifying effect of hyperthermia regimens on glioma cells.

  19. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  20. Cells of human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Zimny, Malgorzata; Kaminska-El-Hassan, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Human milk is a complex fluid that has developed to satisfy the nutritional requirements of infants. In addition to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and other biologically active components, breast milk contains a diverse microbiome that is presumed to colonize the infant gastrointestinal tract and a heterogeneous population of cells with unclear physiological roles and health implications. Noteworthy cellular components of breast milk include progenitor/stem cells. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of breast milk cells, including leukocytes, epithelial cells, stem cells and potentially probiotic bacteria.

  1. Outcome of Patients With Pilocytic Astrocytoma and Leptomeningeal Dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloom, Ali; Hodges, Joseph C.; Teh, Bin S.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics of patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language studies pertaining to PA with LMD was performed using a combination of keywords that included juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, low-grade astrocytoma, low-grade glioma, leptomeningeal dissemination, neuraxis spread, and radiotherapy. We found 26 studies with 58 patients between 1976 and 2005 that met these criteria. Results: The median survival for PA patients with LMD was 65 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 81.1%, 75.7%, and 55.5%. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 69.3%, 66.5%, and 34.6%, respectively. Age, gender, primary site location, timing of LMD presentation (synchronous vs. metachronous), and LMD location did not significantly influence OS or PFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS or PFS between the chemotherapy and radiotherapy groups. Likewise, no difference was found in OS or PFS according to the use of craniospinal irradiation vs. less extensive RT fields. Conclusions: Approximately one-half of PA patients were alive 5 years after the diagnosis of LMD. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy have efficacy against LMD. Although the use of craniospinal irradiation did not have an effect on PFS, the patient numbers were small and a larger number treated with craniospinal irradiation is needed to determine its efficacy.

  2. Selective control of human glioma cell proliferation by specific cell interaction.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Freshney, R I; Hart, E; Graham, D I

    1985-01-01

    Cells cultured from anaplastic astrocytoma (Kernohan and Sayre, grades III and IV) will proliferate on confluent monolayers of normal glia, while cells cultured from normal brain will not. The growth of a cell line containing a high proportion of well-differentiated glioma cells (G-CCM) was partially inhibited, though not as much as normal glia, while the growth of a cell line made up of less differentiated cells (G-UVW) was enhanced by the normal glia. Although non-glial confluent monolayers also inhibited the growth of normal glia, this was less specific, as one normal glial line (N-DUT) grew on fibroblasts and intestinal epithelium, although it was unable to do so on normal glia. It is suggested that this may be a useful method for examining reduced density limitation of growth, discriminating between normal and malignant glia, and for separating glioma cells from contaminating normal cells.

  3. Management of Pediatric Spinal Cord Astrocytomas: Outcomes With Adjuvant Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Zachary D.; Moningi, Shalini; Jallo, George I.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Wharam, Moody D.; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Pediatric intramedullary spinal cord tumors are exceedingly rare; in the United States, 100 to 200 cases are recognized annually, of these, most are astrocytomas. The purpose of this study is to report the outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at a tertiary care center. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective single-institution study was performed for pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at our hospital from 1990 to 2010. The patients were evaluated on the extent of resection, progression-free survival (PFS), and development of radiation-related toxicities. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate regression model methods were used for analysis. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included in the study, 24 with grade 1 or 2 (low-grade) tumors and 5 with grade 3 or 4 (high-grade) tumors. The median follow-up time was 55 months (range, 1-215 months) for patients with low-grade tumors and 17 months (range, 10-52 months) for those with high-grade tumors. Thirteen patients in the cohort received chemotherapy. All patients underwent at least 1 surgical resection. Twelve patients received radiation therapy to a median radiation dose of 47.5 Gy (range, 28.6-54.0 Gy). Fifteen patients with low-grade tumors and 1 patient with a high-grade tumor exhibited stable disease at the last follow-up visit. Acute toxicities of radiation therapy were low grade, whereas long-term sequelae were infrequent and manageable when they arose. All patients with low-grade tumors were alive at the last follow-up visit, compared with 1 patient with a high-grade tumor. Conclusion: Primary pediatric spinal cord astrocytomas vary widely in presentation and clinical course. Histopathologic grade remains a major prognostic factor. Patients with low-grade tumors tend to have excellent disease control and long-term survival compared to those with high-grade tumors. This experience suggests that radiation therapy

  4. microRNA-182 inhibits the proliferation and migration of glioma cells through the induction of neuritin expression

    PubMed Central

    FENG, YA; LIU, TE; WU, YUNCHENG

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common type of glial tumors and carry a poor prognosis. However, the pathogenesis of astrocytomas remains to be elucidated. Neuritin, a novel member of the neurotrophic factors family, has been shown to be associated with tumor malignancy, via the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. In the present study, microRNA-182 (miR-182) was cloned and transfected into the U251 human astrocytoma cell line, in order to investigate its regulatory effects on the proliferation and migration of these cells, as well as its association with the expression of neuritin. The results showed that miR-182 specifically targets the gene encoding neuritin, NRN1, as demonstrated by a reduction in the protein and mRNA levels of NRN1. In addition, overexpression of miR-182 affected cell cycle regulation and cell migration capacity in vitro, which may have been associated with the promotion of apoptosis by this molecule. In conclusion, endogenous miR-182 may be involved in the pathogenesis of astrocytoma, which is associated with the miR-182-regulated gene, NRN1. PMID:26622652

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor is a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in human gliomas in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Karl H.; Breier, Georg; Weich, Herbert A.; Risau, Werner

    1992-10-01

    CLINICAL and experimental studies suggest that angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumour growth1,2. Several growth factors with mitogenic or chemotactic activity for endothelial cells in vitro have been described, but it is not known whether these mediate tumour vascularization in vivo3,4. Glioblastoma, the most common and most malignant brain tumour in humans, is distinguished from astrocytoma by the presence of necroses and vascular prolifer-ations5'6. Here we show that expression of an endothelial cell-specific mitogen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is induced in astrocytoma cells but is dramatically upregulated in two apparently different subsets of glioblastoma cells. The high-affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for VEGF, flt, although not expressed in normal brain endothelium, is upregulated in tumour endothelial cells in vivo. These observations strongly support the concept that tumour angiogenesis is regulated by paracrine mechanisms and identify VEGF as a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in vivo.

  6. Perspectives on human stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu Won

    2009-09-01

    Human stem cell research draws not only scientists' but the public's attention. Human stem cell research is considered to be able to identify the mechanism of human development and change the paradigm of medical practices. However, there are heated ethical and legal debates about human stem cell research. The core issue is that of human dignity and human life. Some prefer human adult stem cell research or iPS cell research, others hES cell research. We do not need to exclude any type of stem cell research because each has its own merits and issues, and they can facilitate the scientific revolution when working together.

  7. Unusual clinical presentation of astrocytoma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas have a varied biological behavior based upon histopathological characteristics, localization and related diseases. The objective of this study is to present the clinical case of a grade II (diffuse) astrocytoma in an adult with an atypical clinical presentation including initial hiccup and dysphagia in a patient without evidence of clinical primary gastroenterology pathology. We describe the case of a 51-year-old male with a 4-year history of hiccup, oropharyngeal dysphagia and neurological clinical elements of tongue fasciculations, quadriparesis, generalized hyperreflexia due to astrocytoma with atypical localization in the floor of the fourth ventricle and histopathological diagnosis of low-grade diffuse glioma. Hiccup is a nonspecific symptom infrequently associated with neurological disorders. Adequate semiology of oropharyngeal dysphagia would help us to identify neurological entities such as in the case presented here. Additionally, with signs of upper and lower motor neuron we should suspect the possibility of central nervous system abnormalities of functional and organic etiology. Computed axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are important elements for diagnosis.

  8. Clinico-pathological feature of pilomyxoid astrocytomas: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Nagaishi, Masaya; Yokoo, Hideaki; Hirato, Junko; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a newly identified variant of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). We report three cases of PMA with comparison to seven cases of PA in terms of their clinicopathological features. The three cases occurred at the ages of 2, 36 and 6 years, and their tumors were located in the left basal ganglia, the pineal gland, and the cerebellum, respectively. They were diagnosed PMA by surgical specimens that showed a characteristic monomorphous architecture with an angiocentric growth pattern and myxoid background. One patient developed localized relapse at 6 months after the surgery, but the other patients remained alive without tumor progression more than 5 years after treatment. In analysis of the immunohistochemical association in PMA and PA, no specific staining was found to be useful for differential diagnosis of PMA from PA. The expression of biomarkers including O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, p53, MIB-1, and EGF receptor neither distinguished PMA from PA nor correlated with outcome. But almost all PMA and PA that demonstrated prominent positivity for nestin showed a high MIB-1 labelling index (LI), and four of these five patients suffered a relapse in the early phase. These results suggest that immunohistochemical expression of nestin and MIB-1 LI may correlate with the aggressiveness of the tumor in PA and PMA.

  9. The interplay between intracellular progesterone receptor and PKC plays a key role in migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marquina-Sánchez, Brenda; González-Jorge, Jesús; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Wegman-Ostrosky, Talia; Baranda-Ávila, Noemi; Mejía-Pérez, Sonia; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; González-Arenas, Aliesha

    2017-09-01

    Intracellular progesterone receptors (PRs) and protein kinases C (PKCs) are known regulators of cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Both PRs and PKCs are found overexpressed in grade IV human astrocytomas, also known as glioblastomas, which are the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether PR activation by PKC induces the migration and invasion of glioblastoma derived cell lines and if PKCα and δ isoforms are involved in PR activation. We observed that PKC activation with tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) increases the migration and invasion capacity of two human glioblastoma derived human cell lines (U251 MG and U87) and that the treatment with the PR receptor antagonist RU486 blocks these processes. Interestingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the isoenzymes PKCα and PKCδ also resulted in a blocked PR transcriptional activity. Also, TPA-dependent PR activation increases the expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), a known PR target gene. These results hint to an existing cross-talk between PKCs and PRs in regulating the infiltration process of human glioblastomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffusion inside living human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijnse, N.; Jeon, J.-H.; Loft, S.; Metzler, R.; Oddershede, L. B.

    2012-04-01

    Naturally occurring lipid granules diffuse in the cytoplasm and can be used as tracers to map out the viscoelastic landscape inside living cells. Using optical trapping and single particle tracking we found that lipid granules exhibit anomalous diffusion inside human umbilical vein endothelial cells. For these cells the exact diffusional pattern of a particular granule depends on the physiological state of the cell and on the localization of the granule within the cytoplasm. Granules located close to the actin rich periphery of the cell move less than those located towards to the center of the cell or within the nucleus. Also, granules in cells which are stressed by intense laser illumination or which have attached to a surface for a long period of time move in a more restricted fashion than those within healthy cells. For granules diffusing in healthy cells, in regions away from the cell periphery, occurrences of weak ergodicity breaking are observed, similar to the recent observations inside living fission yeast cells [1].

  11. The Use of Three Long Non-Coding RNAs as Potential Prognostic Indicators of Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Feng; Wang, Qiang; Xue, Lian; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Rong; Deng, Danni; Wang, Suinuan; Xia, Xiwei; Yang, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are pervasively transcribed and play a key role in tumorigenesis. The aim of the study was to determine the lncRNA expression profile in astrocytomas and to assess its potential clinical value. We performed a three-step analysis to establish the lncRNA profile for astrocytoma: a) the lncRNA expression was examined on 3 astrocytomas as well as 3 NATs (normal adjacent tissues) using the lncRNA microarray; b) the top-hits were validated in 40 astrocytomas (WHO grade II-IV) by quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR); c) the hits with significant differences were re-evaluated using qRT-PCR in 90 astrocytomas. Finally, 7 lncRNAs were found to have a significantly different expression profile in astrocytoma samples compared to the NAT samples. Unsupervised clustering analysis further revealed the potential of the 7-lncRNA profile to differentiate between tumors and NAT samples. The upregulation of ENST00000545440 and NR_002809 was associated with advanced clinical stages of astrocytoma. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, we showed that the low expression of BC002811 or XLOC_010967, or the high expression of NR_002809 was significantly associated with poor patient survival. Moreover, Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that this prognostic impact was independent of other clinicopathological factors. Our results indicate that the lncRNA profile may be a potential prognostic biomarker for the prediction of post-surgical outcomes.

  12. Expression of AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors in astrocytomas is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, O; Pineda-Olvera, B; Guevara-Salazar, P; Hernández-Pedro, N; Morales-Espinosa, D; Cerón-Lizarraga, T L; González-De la Rosa, C H; Rembao, D; Segura-Pacheco, B; Sotelo, J

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytomas develop intense vascular proliferation, essential for tumour growth and invasiveness. Angiotensin II (ANGII) was initially described as a vasoconstrictor; recent studies have shown its participation in cellular proliferation, vascularisation, and apoptosis. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the expression of ANGII receptors – AT1 and AT2 – and their relationship with prognosis. We studied 133 tumours from patients with diagnosis of astrocytoma who underwent surgery from 1997 to 2002. AT1 and AT2 were expressed in 52 and 44% of the tumours, respectively, when determined by both reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Ten per cent of low-grade astrocytomas were positive for AT1, whereas grade III and IV astrocytomas were positive in 67% (P<0.001). AT2 receptors were positive in 17% of low-grade astrocytomas and in 53% of high-grade astrocytomas (P=0.01). AT1-positive tumours showed higher cellular proliferation and vascular density. Patients with AT1-positive tumours had a lower survival rate than those with AT1-negative (P<0.001). No association to survival was found for AT2 in the multivariate analysis. Expression of AT1 and AT2 is associated with high grade of malignancy, increased cellular proliferation, and angiogenesis, and is thus related to poor prognosis. These findings suggest that ANGII receptors might be potential therapeutic targets for high-grade astrocytomas. PMID:18594540

  13. Alterations of telomere length in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2011-09-01

    Telomeres at the ends of human chromosomes consist of tandem hexametric (TTAGGG)n repeats, which protect them from degradation. At each cycle of cell division, most normal somatic cells lose approximately 50-100 bp of the terminal telomeric repeat DNA. Precise prediction of growth and estimation of the malignant potential of brain tumors require additional markers. DNA extraction was performed from the 51 frozen tissues, and a non-radioactive chemiluminescent assay was used for Southern blotting. One sample t-test shows highly significant difference in telomere length in meningioma and astrocytoma with normal range. According to our results, higher grades of meningioma and astrocytoma tumors show more heterogeneity in telomere length, and also it seems shortening process of telomeres is an early event in brain tumors.

  14. Ki-67 immunostaining in astrocytomas: Association with histopathological grade – A South Indian study

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprasad, Nandish Vastrad; Satish, Suchitha; Ravishankar, Sunila; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Astrocytomas are the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The distinction between different tumor grades can be tested despite criteria given by the World Health Organization (WHO). Ki-67 is a potent biological marker used in grading of astrocytomas, which estimates growth of the neoplasm quantitatively and will help in predicting prognosis accurately. Objectives: The aim of this was to study the proliferative activity using Ki-67 immunostaining and to assess the relationship of Ki-67 staining with the histopathological grading of astrocytomas. Patients and Methods: Thirty cases of histologically proven astrocytomas were studied. The histopathological grade was assessed using the 2007 WHO criteria. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 was done on paraffin-embedded wax sections. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Thirty cases of astrocytomas studied showed a male preponderance (M:F = 1.72:1) with a mean age of 48.1 years. Of these, Grade I, (n = 1, 3.33%), Grade II, (n = 7, 23.3%), Grade III (n = 6, 20%), and Grade IV (n = 16, 53.3%) astrocytomas were analyzed. The mean Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in Grades I, II, III, and IV was 0.02, 0.81, 9.14, and 17.81, respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen in the Ki-67 LI of low-grade (Grade II) and high-grade astrocytomas (Grades III and IV). There was concordance between histopathological grading and Ki-67 LI in 27 (90%) and discordance in 3 (10%) cases. Conclusion: Ki-67 LI varies considerably in different grades of astrocytomas and considerable overlaps can be observed between them. It can be of great help in situations where there is a lack of correlation between clinical parameters and histopathological diagnosis. Determination of Ki-67 LI should constitute a part of routine investigations in patients with astrocytomas. PMID:27695229

  15. Ki-67 immunostaining in astrocytomas: Association with histopathological grade - A South Indian study.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, Nandish Vastrad; Satish, Suchitha; Ravishankar, Sunila; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbi

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The distinction between different tumor grades can be tested despite criteria given by the World Health Organization (WHO). Ki-67 is a potent biological marker used in grading of astrocytomas, which estimates growth of the neoplasm quantitatively and will help in predicting prognosis accurately. The aim of this was to study the proliferative activity using Ki-67 immunostaining and to assess the relationship of Ki-67 staining with the histopathological grading of astrocytomas. Thirty cases of histologically proven astrocytomas were studied. The histopathological grade was assessed using the 2007 WHO criteria. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 was done on paraffin-embedded wax sections. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Thirty cases of astrocytomas studied showed a male preponderance (M:F = 1.72:1) with a mean age of 48.1 years. Of these, Grade I, (n = 1, 3.33%), Grade II, (n = 7, 23.3%), Grade III (n = 6, 20%), and Grade IV (n = 16, 53.3%) astrocytomas were analyzed. The mean Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in Grades I, II, III, and IV was 0.02, 0.81, 9.14, and 17.81, respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen in the Ki-67 LI of low-grade (Grade II) and high-grade astrocytomas (Grades III and IV). There was concordance between histopathological grading and Ki-67 LI in 27 (90%) and discordance in 3 (10%) cases. Ki-67 LI varies considerably in different grades of astrocytomas and considerable overlaps can be observed between them. It can be of great help in situations where there is a lack of correlation between clinical parameters and histopathological diagnosis. Determination of Ki-67 LI should constitute a part of routine investigations in patients with astrocytomas.

  16. Prognostic significance of an apoptotic index and apoptosis/proliferation ratio for patients with high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Hiroko; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; O'Fallon, Judith R.; Iturria, N.; Sebo, Thomas; Schaefer, Paul L.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Buckner, Jan C.; Kuriyama, Nagato; Jenkins, Robert B.; Israel, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the association of spontaneous apoptosis and an apoptosis/proliferation index with survival to determine the potential of such measures to serve as predictive markers for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We examined the extent of spontaneous apoptosis in tumors from newly diagnosed patients, 75 with GBM and 21 with anaplastic astrocytoma, who were entered on treatment protocols of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. In the group of GBM patients, those with a higher apoptotic index tended to live longer ( P = 0.04; Cox proportional hazards model including performance score, age, and extent of resection in a multivariate model). We found that the apoptotic index values for anaplastic astrocytoma patients tended to be lower than those in the GBM patients, although with small sample sizes, the result was not statistically significant ( P = 0.1). We also examined expression of the Ki-67 cell proliferation antigen immunohistochemically using the MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. Ki-67 expression did not provide additional information regarding the survival of patients with GBM. In this group of GBM patients, those patients with higher apoptotic index/proliferation ratios had a better prognosis than did those with a low ratio ( P < 0.021, same model as above). These findings suggest that both apoptosis and a cell death/cell proliferation ratio are associated with patient survival, and they may be useful for either the clinical evaluation of patients with GBM or the stratification of patients for treatment evaluation. PMID:12084348

  17. Gelastic Seizures in a Patient with Right Gyrus Cinguli Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, G; Poparda, M; Popescu, BO

    2010-01-01

    Objective and importance: Gelastic seizure (GS) also known as ‘gelastic epilepsy’ is a rare type of seizure associated with several different conditions such as tumors–hypothalamic hamartromas, tuberous sclerosis, hemangiomas, post infectious foci, cortical temporal dysplasia. We report one case of this rare condition generated by a right gyrus cinguli gr. Ⅱ astrocytoma. Clinical presentation: A 27 years old, male, right handed, was admitted for a 2 years history of very frequent gelastic seizures accompanied sometimes by simple motor partial seizures in both arms, more often being involved his left arm, without impairment of his consciousness state. His neurological examination was normal. Diagnosis was made on native CT scan: minimal hypodense frontal right paramedian lesion, cerebral MRI showed a small right, parenchymal, homogeneous lesion (16/22/15mm), well delimited, involving gyrus cinguli, without perilesional edema and mass effect, hyperintense both on T1 and T2 MR sequences, non–enhancing after Gadolinium. The cerebral lesion was also documented on EEG and video–EEG recordings. Using an interhemispheric microsurgical approach, above the corpus callosum and the right pericallosal artery, at the level of gyrus cinguli, a yellow–gray, infiltrative tumour, having a moderate vascularisation, has been identified and totally removed. The anatomo–pathological analysis revealed a grade Ⅱ astrocytoma. The patient recovered very well, without deficits, no gelastic seizures or epileptic manifestations; three months after operation he is still free of seizures. Conclusion: A case of gelastic seizures accompanied by simple motor partial seizures in both arms, without impairment of his consciousness state induced by a gradeⅡright gyrus cinguli astrocytoma is described and documented by radiological and electrophysiological studies. Using microsurgical resection, the tumor was totally removed, the patient clinical condition improved. Without an

  18. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  19. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  20. Up-regulation of NG2 proteoglycan and interferon induced transmembrane proteins 1 and 3 in mouse astrocytoma: A membrane proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; Atwood, James A.; Xia, Qiangwei; Seyfried, Thomas N.; Orlando, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Although brain tumors are classified as if their lineage were well understood, the relationship between the molecular events that specify neural cell lineage and brain tumors remains enigmatic. Traditionally, cell surface membrane antigens have served as biomarkers that distinguish brain tumor origin and malignancy. In this study, membrane proteins were identified from a terminally differentiated mouse astrocyte (AC) and CT-2A astrocytoma (CT-2A) cell line using liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 321 and 297 protein groups with at least one unique peptide were identified in the AC and CT-2A cells. Using a label-free quantitative MS approach, 25 plasma membrane proteins in CT-2A were found significantly up- or down-regulated compared with those in AC. Three of the up-regulated proteins, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (Cspg4), interferon induced transmembrane protein-2 (IFITM2) and -3 (IFITM3) were further validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. In addition, a third member of the IFITM family, interferon induced transmembrane protein-1 (IFITM1) was also analyzed. Expression of Cspg4, IFITM1 and IFITM3 was significantly greater in the CT-2A cells than that in the AC cells. Interestingly, Cspg4, also known as neuronal/glial 2 (NG2) proteoglycan in human, is an oligodendrocyte progenitor marker. Therefore, our data suggests that the CT-2A tumor may be derived from NG2 glia rather than fully differentiated astrocytes. Moreover, the CT-2A cells also express a series of interferon-induced signature proteins that may be specific to this tumor. These data highlight the utility of LC-MS/MS for the identification of brain tumor membrane biomarkers. PMID:18281150

  1. Up-regulation of NG2 proteoglycan and interferon-induced transmembrane proteins 1 and 3 in mouse astrocytoma: a membrane proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Nicholas T; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Atwood, James A; Xia, Qiangwei; Seyfried, Thomas N; Orlando, Ron

    2008-05-18

    Although brain tumors are classified as if their lineage were well understood, the relationship between the molecular events that specify neural cell lineage and brain tumors remains enigmatic. Traditionally, cell surface membrane antigens have served as biomarkers that distinguish brain tumor origin and malignancy. In this study, membrane proteins were identified from a terminally differentiated mouse astrocyte (AC) and CT-2A astrocytoma (CT-2A) cell line using liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 321 and 297 protein groups with at least one unique peptide were identified in the AC and CT-2A cells. Using a label-free quantitative MS approach, 25 plasma membrane proteins in CT-2A were found significantly up- or down-regulated compared with those in AC. Three of the up-regulated proteins, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (Cspg4), interferon-induced transmembrane protein-2 (IFITM2) and -3 (IFITM3) were further validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. In addition, a third member of the IFITM family, interferon-induced transmembrane protein-1 (IFITM1) was also analyzed. Expression of Cspg4, IFITM1 and IFITM3 was significantly greater in the CT-2A cells than that in the AC cells. Interestingly, Cspg4, also known as neuronal/glial 2 (NG2) proteoglycan in human, is an oligodendrocyte progenitor marker. Therefore, our data suggest that the CT-2A tumor may be derived from NG2 glia rather than from fully differentiated astrocytes. Moreover, the CT-2A cells also express a series of interferon-induced signature proteins that may be specific to this tumor. These data highlight the utility of LC-MS/MS for the identification of brain tumor membrane biomarkers.

  2. Controlled study of CCNU and radiation therapy in malignant astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Reagan, T J; Bisel, H F; Childs, D S; Layton, D D; Rhoton, A L; Taylor, W F

    1976-02-01

    The authors report 63 patients with biopsy-proved malignant (Grades 3 and 4) astrocytomas who were randomly placed in one of three treatment schedules within 2 weeks of surgery. One group (22 patients) received radiation therapy alone; the second group (22 patients) received 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) orally at intervals of 8 weeks; and the third group (19 patients) received combined radiation and drug therapy. Patients who received radiation therapy, with or without the drug, had a significantly longer survival than did those who received the drug alone. There was no difference in survival between the two groups who received radiation. The nitrosourea derivative CCNU does not seem to be an effective agent in the therapy of primary malignant brain tumors.

  3. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  4. A Novel Syndrome of Generalized Lipodystrophy Associated With Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Patni, Nivedita; Alves, Crésio; von Schnurbein, Julia; Wabitsch, Martin; Tannin, Grace; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Context: A rare presentation of hypothalamic tumors in infants and young children is profound emaciation and generalized loss of sc adipose tissue, also known as “diencephalic syndrome.” Similar loss of sc fat can be observed in children with acquired generalized lipodystrophy or congenital generalized lipodystrophy. Precise diagnosis may be challenging early in the course of the disease, especially in the absence of metabolic abnormalities. Case Description: We report three males who presented with poor weight gain and generalized loss of sc fat at birth to 3 years of age consistent with generalized lipodystrophy, with subsequent development of pilocytic astrocytoma. Two of them had hypothalamic tumors, and one had a multicentric tumor with a large right parietal mass. Our patients are unique because the onset of lipodystrophy occurred 2.5 to 7.3 years before the diagnosis of brain tumor, and all of them gained body fat or weight after surgical removal and/or chemotherapy. One patient had hepatosplenomegaly and impaired glucose tolerance, and another patient had severe hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia during the course of the disease. Two patients presented with central precocious puberty and advanced bone age at the chronological age of 6 years. Conclusions: It is likely that pilocytic astrocytoma may induce generalized lipodystrophy by paraneoplastic antiadipocyte antibody formation or by excessive hormones or cytokine secretion resulting in excess lipolysis from adipocytes. We conclude that young children presenting with idiopathic acquired generalized lipodystrophy or atypical congenital generalized lipodystrophy, with or without metabolic abnormalities, should prompt investigation for brain tumors. PMID:26252356

  5. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-05

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  6. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. Methods We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Results Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63%) and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%), but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Conclusions Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes. PMID:21059263

  7. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  8. Embryonic stem cell patents and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2007-09-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells.

  9. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  10. MR spectroscopy differentiation between high and low grade astrocytomas: a comparison between paediatric and adult tumours.

    PubMed

    Porto, Luciana; Kieslich, Matthias; Franz, Kea; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Zanella, Friedhelm; Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke

    2011-05-01

    To investigate whether pathologically similar astrocytomas in adults and children may also show metabolic similarities in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and whether the MRS data could help to differentiate between low and high grade gliomas for the different groups. Twelve children (5 WHO II astrocytomas, 7 WHO III astrocytomas) and 37 adults (21 WHO II astrocytomas, 16 WHO III astrocytomas) were included in this study. MR spectroscopic data were evaluated retrospectively using normalized measures of total choline (tCho), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr). These metabolites were used to differentiate between WHO II and WHO III astrocytomas in children and adults. Histopathological grading was performed using WHO criteria. (1)H-MRS was carried out prior to the commencement of any treatment. Signal intensities of tCho, NAA and tCr were normalized to their values in contralateral brain tissue. The resulting concentration ratios were then used to calculate the change in the intratumoural ratio of NAA to tCho. A Mann-Whitney U-Test was performed to evaluate differences within the respective groups. In both groups, loss of NAA and increase of tCho were more pronounced in WHO III than in WHO II astrocytoma. The best discriminator to differentiate between low and high grade gliomas was found to be the ratio of NAA/tCho (p < 0.01). The normalized metabolite signal intensities ratio NAA to tCho is the most accurate in differentiating between low and high grade astrocytomas in both children and adults. Copyright © 2010 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. IDH1 R132H mutation in a pilocytic astrocytoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Felix; Steinhilber, Julia; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios; Schittenhelm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 72-year old female with a right cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma WHO grade I with an Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) R132H mutation. The patient is recurrence-free 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Only one single case with strikingly similar clinicopathological features has been reported before. Otherwise, IDH1/2 mutations are not seen in pilocytic astrocytomas. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26617931

  12. Neoplastic transformation of human cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rhim, J S

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to investigate the progression of events that lead normal human cells in culture to become neoplastic in response to carcinogenic agents have been aided by the development of the suitable in vitro model systems. For initial human cell transformation studies, a flat, nontumorigenic clonal line, originally derived from a human osteosarcoma (HOS), was used. When treated with chemical carcinogens such as N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and 3-methyl-cholanthrene (3MC), the HOS cells underwent morphological alterations and acquired tumorigenic properties. These cell lines were very useful inasmuch as a non-ras cellular transforming gene, met, and an activated H-ras oncogene have been isolated from MNNG-transformed and 3MC-transformed HOS lines, respectively, by DNA transfection procedure. Alteration of p53 gene in chemically transformed HOS cell lines has recently been shown. Although carcinogens cause human cancer, normal human cells in culture have proven difficult to achieve. Neoplastic transformation of human cells in culture has recently been achieved by a stepwise fashion-immortalization and conversion of the immortalized cells to tumorigenic cells. One of the critical initial events in the progression of normal human cells to tumor cells is the escape from cellular senescence. With few exceptions, normal human cells require immortalization to provide a practical system for transformation studies. Thus, the role of carcinogenic agents in the development of human cancers is now being defined using a variety of human cells. The neoplastic transformation in human cell cultures is reviewed. In doing so, this author attempts to put into perspective the history of human cell transformation by carcinogenic agents, and to discuss the current state of the art in transformation of human cells in culture; thus providing insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the conversion of normal cells to a neoplastic state of growth.

  13. An intrinsic DFF40/CAD endonuclease deficiency impairs oligonucleosomal DNA hydrolysis during caspase-dependent cell death: a common trait in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Martínez-Escardó, Laura; Granados-Colomina, Carla; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Pascual-Guiral, Sònia; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Velasco, Roser; Plans, Gerard; Vidal, Noemi; Tortosa, Avelina; Barcia, Carlos; Bruna, Jordi; Yuste, Victor J

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) or grade IV astrocytoma is one of the most devastating human cancers. The loss of DFF40/CAD, the key endonuclease that triggers oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, has been linked to genomic instability and cell survival after radiation. Despite the near inevitability of GBM tumor recurrence after treatment, the relationship between DFF40/CAD and GBM remains unexplored. We studied the apoptotic behavior of human GBM-derived cells after apoptotic insult. We analyzed caspase activation and the protein levels and subcellular localization of DFF40/CAD apoptotic endonuclease. DFF40/CAD was also evaluated in histological sections from astrocytic tumors and nontumoral human brain. We showed that GBM cells undergo incomplete apoptosis without generating oligonucleosomal DNA degradation despite the correct activation of executioner caspases. The major defect of GBM cells relied on the improper accumulation of DFF40/CAD at the nucleoplasmic subcellular compartment. Supporting this finding, DFF40/CAD overexpression allowed GBM cells to display oligonucleosomal DNA degradation after apoptotic challenge. Moreover, the analysis of histological slices from astrocytic tumors showed that DFF40/CAD immunoreactivity in tumoral GFAP-positive cells was markedly reduced when compared with nontumoral samples. Our data highlight the low expression levels of DFF40/CAD and the absence of DNA laddering as common molecular traits in GBM. These findings could be of major importance for understanding the malignant behavior of remaining tumor cells after radiochemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Human satellite cells: identification on human muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells, normally quiescent underneath the myofibre basal lamina, are skeletal muscle stem cells responsible for postnatal muscle growth, repair and regeneration. Since their scarcity and small size have limited study on transverse muscle sections, techniques to isolate individual myofibres, bearing their attendant satellite cells, were developed. Studies on mouse myofibres have generated much information on satellite cells, but the limited availability and small size of human muscle biopsies have hampered equivalent studies of satellite cells on human myofibres. Here, we identified satellite cells on fragments of human and mouse myofibres, using a method applicable to small muscle biopsies. PMID:22333991

  15. Fat cell turnover in humans.

    PubMed

    Arner, Peter; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-21

    Obesity is a condition where excess body fat accumulates to such an extent that one's health may be affected. Owing to the cardiovascular and metabolic disorders associated with obesity, and the epidemic of obesity facing most countries today, life expectancy in the developed world may start to decrease for the first time in recent history. Other conditions, such as anorexia nervosa and cachexia, are characterised by subnormal levels of adipose tissue and as with obesity lead to morbidity and mortality. Given the significant personal and economic costs of these conditions and their increasing prevalence in society, understanding the factors that determine the fat mass is therefore of prime interest and may lead to effective treatments and/or interventions for these disorders. Fat mass can be regulated in two ways. The lipid filling of pre-existing fat cells could be altered and the number of fat cells could be changed by the generation of new fat cells or the dying of old ones (i.e. adipocyte turnover). This review summarizes what is known about fat cell turnover in humans and the potential clinical implications. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  17. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of lysosomes in astrocytic brain tumors focussing also on the therapy resistant tumor stem cells. Expression of the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 112 formalin fixed paraffin embedded astrocytomas and compared with tumor grade and overall patient survival. Moreover, double immunofluorescence stainings were performed with LAMP-1 and the astrocytic marker GFAP and the putative stem cell marker CD133 on ten glioblastomas. Most tumors expressed the LAMP-1 protein in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells, while the blood vessels were positive in all tumors. The percentage of LAMP-1 positive tumor cells and staining intensities increased with tumor grade but variations in tumors of the same grade were also found. No association was found between LAMP-1 expression and patient overall survival in the individual tumor grades. LAMP-1/GFAP showed pronounced co-expression and LAMP-1/CD133 was co-expressed as well suggesting that tumor cells including the proposed tumor stem cells contain lysosomes. The results suggest that high amounts of lysosomes are present in glioblastomas and in the proposed tumor stem cells. Targeting of lysosomes may be a promising novel therapeutic strategy against this highly malignant neoplasm.

  18. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Neil R; Shaykhiev, Renat; Walters, Matthew S; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Ferris, Barbara; Witover, Bradley; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2011-05-04

    The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  19. The Human Airway Epithelial Basal Cell Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K.; Ferris, Barbara; Witover, Bradley; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. Methodology/Principal Findings Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the “human airway basal cell signature” as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. Conclusion/Significance The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-05-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus.

  1. The G-quadruplex-stabilising agent RHPS4 induces telomeric dysfunction and enhances radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; Siteni, S; Tanzarella, C; Stevens, M F; Sgura, A; Antoccia, A

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) interacting agents are a class of ligands that can bind to and stabilise secondary structures located in genomic G-rich regions such as telomeres. Stabilisation of G4 leads to telomere architecture disruption with a consequent detrimental effect on cell proliferation, which makes these agents good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. RHPS4 is one of the most effective and well-studied G4 ligands with a very high specificity for telomeric G4. In this work, we tested the in vitro efficacy of RHPS4 in astrocytoma cell lines, and we evaluated whether RHPS4 can act as a radiosensitising agent by destabilising telomeres. In the first part of the study, the response to RHPS4 was investigated in four human astrocytoma cell lines (U251MG, U87MG, T67 and T70) and in two normal primary fibroblast strains (AG01522 and MRC5). Cell growth reduction, histone H2AX phosphorylation and telomere-induced dysfunctional foci (TIF) formation were markedly higher in astrocytoma cells than in normal fibroblasts, despite the absence of telomere shortening. In the second part of the study, the combined effect of submicromolar concentrations of RHPS4 and X-rays was assessed in the U251MG glioblastoma radioresistant cell line. Long-term growth curves, cell cycle analysis and cell survival experiments, clearly showed the synergistic effect of the combined treatment. Interestingly the effect was greater in cells bearing a higher number of dysfunctional telomeres. DNA double-strand breaks rejoining after irradiation revealed delayed repair kinetics in cells pre-treated with the drug and a synergistic increase in chromosome-type exchanges and telomeric fusions. These findings provide the first evidence that exposure to RHPS4 radiosensitizes astrocytoma cells, suggesting the potential for future therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  3. Endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic astrocytoma causing gelastic epilepsy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Seok; Lee, Yun Ho; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2009-08-01

    The authors report on a case of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) and concomitant hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy that was successfully treated with endoscopic disconnection. This 6-year-old girl presented with prolonged, medically intractable gelastic seizures that were often followed by generalized tonic seizures. An enhancing, low-grade hypothalamic tumor was identified on MR images obtained when she was 11 months old, but no surgical intervention was attempted at that time apart from bur hole drainage of a chronic subdural hemorrhage. In the first surgery, performed when she was 6 years of age, the authors attempted disconnection and tumor sampling; the lesion was revealed to be a JPA. A second endoscopic disconnection was performed 1 year later to improve seizure control and obtain a pathological specimen from the nonenhancing contralateral side. The pathological results after the second surgery revealed that the enhancing mass was a spontaneously regressing JPA and the contralateral nonenhancing mass was an HH. The HH was found as latent tumor and the JPA was the mass causing gelastic epilepsy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with a spontaneously regressing JPA and concomitant HH, both of which were treated by endoscopic disconnection.

  4. Thallium-201 imaging and estimation of residual high grade astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford-Schuck, K.; Mountz, J.M.; McKeever, P.; Taren, J.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1987-09-01

    Thallium-201 brain imaging was performed on five patients as a method to differentiate persistent and/or recurrent viable Grades III and IV astrocytoma tissue from necrosis or post-therapy changes. Planar images of the head and heart were obtained in order to calculate the ratio of tumor counts to cardiac counts. The heart was chosen as the internal reference organ, as thallium uptake dynamics are reproducible under ordinary circumstances. The numerical estimation of thallium uptake in the brain tumor, expressed in terms of the tumor/cardiac index, correlated well with the clinical course in all five patients. By visual inspection, the initial computed tomographic (CT) and thallium images suggested that the tumors were approximately the same size. Follow-up thallium images were discordant with follow-up CT images. Computed tomography, in general, appeared to depict image alterations suggesting more extensive regrowth of tumor than the actual clinical status or thallium brain scans demonstrated. Histologic examination best correlated with thallium images. In one patient's course of imaging they were able to detect tumor recurrence, by means of thallium imaging, 4 months prior to its appearance on CT. When performed serially, the tumor/cardiac index may provide an estimate of residual tumor burden, which can help distinguish tumor recurrence from changes secondary to therapy.

  5. Pre-irradiation chemotherapy for newly diagnosed high grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, N Tubiana; Genet, D; Labrousse, F; Bouillet, P; Denes, S Lavau; Martin, J; Labourey, J L; Venat, L; Clavere, P; Moreau, J J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the response rate and toxicity of a combination of Carmustine and Cisplatin administered before radiation in patients with newly diagnosed high grade astrocytoma. A good response rate has been published with this association in primary cerebral high grade tumor. This protocol was administered in a homogeneous population of 37 adult patients with measurable tumor on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scan. After biopsy or subtotal resection, the patients received BCNU 40 mg/m2/d and CODP 40 mg/m2/d, for 3 days every 28 days for 3 cycles. Evaluation was performed before each cycle. Radiation therapy began 4 weeks after completing the chemotherapy or immediately if there was evidence of tumor progression on chemotherapy. Seven out of 37 (19%) demonstrated tumor regression with a median duration to progression of 11 months. Median survival was 6 months. Myelosuppression was the predominant but manageable toxicity. This work indicated that the first chemotherapy protocol gave poor results in a homogeneous group of patients, with bad prognosis.

  6. Cloning and characterization of human RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of RTVP-1 in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Cunli; Sarid, Ronit; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Lee, Hae-Kyung; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya

    2007-10-26

    Here, we report the cloning and characterization of RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of human RTVP-1, which was isolated from the U87 glioma cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that RTVP-1b contains an additional 71 base exon between exons 2 and 3 that is missing in RTVP-1, leading to a frame-shift and a different putative protein. The deduced protein was 237 amino acids in length, sharing the N-terminal 141 amino acids with RTVP-1. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that RTVP-1b was expressed in a wide range of tissues and that its expression was different from that of RTVP-1. In contrast, RTVP-1 and RTVP-1b showed similar patterns of expression in astrocytic tumors; highly expressed in glioblastomas as compared to normal brains, low-grade astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Overexpression of RTVP-1b increased glioma cell proliferation but did not affect cell migration. Our results suggest that RTVP-1b represents a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in gliomas.

  7. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    PubMed

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Accumulation of wild-type p53 protein in astrocytomas is not mediated by MDM2 gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, M.P.; Louis, D.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1993-05-01

    The authors have previously described ten cases of astrocytoma (three WHO grade II, four grade III and four grade IV) with seemingly contradictory results on immunohistochemical analysis of the p53 protein and molecular genetic analysis of the p53 gene. Fixed, embedded tissues from these cases were immunohistochemically positive with the PAb 1801 antibody, which supposedly implies the presence of mutant protein. These ten cases, however, did not have mutations in exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene, the conserved regions in which almost all human mutations have been described. The authors suggested that these cases might either represent overexpression of wild-type p53 protein (since the PAb 1801 antibody reacts with both wild-type and mutant p53 protein) or mutations in less conserved regions of the gene. To investigate these possibilities further, they performed single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing on p53 exons 4, 9 and 10 in the nine cases with available DNA, since rare mutations have been noted at these loci. None of the cases showed alterations, making it highly unlikely that these tumors harbor mutations in exons of the p53 gene. They also performed immunohistochemistry on frozen sections from seven available tumors, using the mutant-specific antibody PAb 240 in addition to PAb 1801. All tumors continued to show positive staining with PAb 1801, but only one tumor reacted with PAb 240. The results support the hypothesis that the accumulated p53 protein in most cases is wild-type. Because the product of the MDM2 oncogene can bind to wild-type p53 protein, and because MDM2 amplification has recently been demonstrated in human tumors, the authors evaluated MDM2 amplification in the nine astrocytomas with available DNA. Using slot blot analysis with a 96-base pair, PCR-generated probe to the first exon of the MDM2 gene, they were unable to show MDM2 gene amplification in these tumors or in other assayed astrocytomas.

  9. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled‑related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Varošanec, Ana Maria; Marković, Leon; Krsnik, Željka; Njirić, Niko; Mrak, Goran

    2016-05-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the

  10. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled-related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    PEĆINA-ŠLAUS, NIVES; KAFKA, ANJA; VAROŠANEC, ANA MARIA; MARKOVIĆ, LEON; KRSNIK, ŽELJKA; NJIRIĆ, NIKO; MRAK, GORAN

    2016-01-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the cytoplasm an

  11. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  12. Recurrent somatic mutations in ACVR1 in pediatric midline high-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Fontebasso, Adam M; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gerges, Noha; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Bechet, Denise; Faury, Damien; De Jay, Nicolas; Ramkissoon, Lori A; Corcoran, Aoife; Jones, David T W; Sturm, Dominik; Johann, Pascal; Tomita, Tadanori; Goldman, Stewart; Nagib, Mahmoud; Bendel, Anne; Goumnerova, Liliana; Bowers, Daniel C; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Alden, Tord; Browd, Samuel; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah; Jallo, George; Cohen, Kenneth; Gupta, Nalin; Prados, Michael D; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Ellezam, Benjamin; Crevier, Louis; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklos; Myseros, John; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter M; Malkin, Hayley; Ligon, Azra H; Albrecht, Steffen; Pfister, Stefan M; Ligon, Keith L; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada; Kieran, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Pediatric midline high-grade astrocytomas (mHGAs) are incurable with few treatment targets identified. Most tumors harbor mutations encoding p.Lys27Met in histone H3 variants. In 40 treatment-naive mHGAs, 39 analyzed by whole-exome sequencing, we find additional somatic mutations specific to tumor location. Gain-of-function mutations in ACVR1 occur in tumors of the pons in conjunction with histone H3.1 p.Lys27Met substitution, whereas FGFR1 mutations or fusions occur in thalamic tumors associated with histone H3.3 p.Lys27Met substitution. Hyperactivation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-ACVR1 developmental pathway in mHGAs harboring ACVR1 mutations led to increased levels of phosphorylated SMAD1, SMAD5 and SMAD8 and upregulation of BMP downstream early-response genes in tumor cells. Global DNA methylation profiles were significantly associated with the p.Lys27Met alteration, regardless of the mutant histone H3 variant and irrespective of tumor location, supporting the role of this substitution in driving the epigenetic phenotype. This work considerably expands the number of potential treatment targets and further justifies pretreatment biopsy in pediatric mHGA as a means to orient therapeutic efforts in this disease.

  13. Recurrent somatic mutations in ACVR1 in pediatric midline high-grade astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Fontebasso, Adam M.; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gerges, Noha; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Bechet, Denise; Faury, Damien; De Jay, Nicolas; Ramkissoon, Lori; Corcoran, Aoife; Jones, David T W; Sturm, Dominik; Johann, Pascal; Tomita, Tadanori; Goldman, Stewart; Nagib, Mahmoud; Bendel, Anne; Goumnerova, Liliana; Bowers, Daniel C.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Alden, Tord; Browd, Samuel; Geyer, J. Russell; Leary, Sarah; Jallo, George; Cohen, Kenneth; Gupta, Nalin; Prados, Michael D.; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Ellezam, Benjamin; Crevier, Louis; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklos; Myseros, John; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter M.; Malkin, Hayley; Ligon, Azra; Albrecht, Steffen; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada; Kieran, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Midline pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (pHGAs) are incurable with few treatment targets identified. Most tumors harbor K27M mutations on histone 3 variants. In 40 treatment-naïve midline pHGAs, 39 analyzed by whole-exome sequencing, we find additional somatic mutations specific to tumor location. Gain-of-function mutations in ACVR1 occur in tumors of the pons in conjunction with H3.1 K27M, while FGFR1 mutations/fusions occur in thalamic tumors associated with H3.3 K27M. Hyper-activation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/ACVR1 developmental pathway in pHGAs harbouring ACVR1 mutations led to increased phospho-SMAD1/5/8 expression and up-regulation of BMP downstream early response genes in tumour cells. Global DNA methylation profiles were significantly associated with the K27M mutation regardless of the mutant H3 variant and irrespective of tumor location, supporting its role in driving the epigenetic phenotype. This significantly expands the potential treatment targets and further justifies pre-treatment biopsy in pHGA as a means to orient therapeutic efforts in this disease. PMID:24705250

  14. Farewell to oligoastrocytoma: in situ molecular genetics favor classification as either oligodendroglioma or astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Felix; Reuss, David; Koelsche, Christian; Capper, David; Schittenhelm, Jens; Heim, Stephanie; Jones, David T W; Pfister, Stefan M; Herold-Mende, Christel; Wick, Wolfgang; Mueller, Wolf; Hartmann, Christian; Paulus, Werner; von Deimling, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma are histologically and genetically well-defined entities. The majority of astrocytomas harbor concurrent TP53 and ATRX mutations, while most oligodendrogliomas carry the 1p/19q co-deletion. Both entities share high frequencies of IDH mutations. In contrast, oligoastrocytomas (OA) appear less clearly defined and, therefore, there is an ongoing debate whether these tumors indeed constitute an entity or whether they represent a mixed bag containing both astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. We investigated 43 OA diagnosed in different institutions employing histology, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization addressing surrogates for the molecular genetic markers IDH1R132H, TP53, ATRX and 1p/19q loss. In all but one OA the combination of nuclear p53 accumulation and ATRX loss was mutually exclusive with 1p/19q co-deletion. In 31/43 OA, only alterations typical for oligodendroglioma were observed, while in 11/43 OA, only indicators for mutations typical for astrocytomas were detected. A single case exhibited a distinct pattern, nuclear expression of p53, ATRX loss, IDH1 mutation and partial 1p/19q loss. However, this was the only patient undergoing radiotherapy prior to surgery, possibly contributing to the acquisition of this uncommon combination. In OA with oligodendroglioma typical alterations, the portions corresponding to astrocytic part were determined as reactive, while in OA with astrocytoma typical alterations the portions corresponding to oligodendroglial differentiation were neoplastic. These data provide strong evidence against the existence of an independent OA entity.

  15. Cytotoxicity of blended versus single medicinal mushroom extracts on human cancer cell lines: contribution of polyphenol and polysaccharide content.

    PubMed

    Durgo, Ksenija; Koncar, Mladen; Komes, Drazenka; Belscak-Cvitanovic, Ana; Franekic, Jasna; Jakopovich, Ivan; Jakopovich, Neven; Jakopovich, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The use of mushrooms contributes to human nutrition by providing low lipid content of lipids and high dietary fiber content, as well as significant content of other biologically active compounds such as polysaccharides, minerals, vitamins, and polyphenolic antioxidants. This study aimed to determine the content of polyphenols and polysaccharides, as well as the cytotoxic and antioxidative properties of several medicinal mushroom preparations. The content of total phenols and flavonoids of preparations of blended mushroom extracts (Lentifom, Super Polyporin, Agarikon, Agarikon Plus, Agarikon.1, and Mykoprotect.1) was evaluated quantitatively by using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy spectrophotometric methods. The antioxidant capacity of the preparations was evaluated using the ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assays. The content of water-soluble polysaccharides was determined using a specific gravimetric method, based on ethanol precipitation. To determine cytotoxic effects of single and blended mushroom extracts, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and neutral red assays were conducted using human small cell lung cancer, lung adenocarcinoma, colon cancer, and brain astrocytoma cancer cells. The obtained results suggest that due to the significant content of beneficial polyphenolic antioxidants and soluble polysaccharides, use of these mushroom preparations is beneficial in maintaining good health, as well as in the prevention and adjuvant biotherapy of various human pathological aberrations. These results reveal that these extracts exhibit different cytotoxic effects on tumor cells originating from different tissues. In addition, the comparison of investigated blended mushroom extracts with three well-known commercial mushroom products derived from single mushroom species or single mushroom compounds shows that blended mushroom extracts exhibit significantly stronger

  16. Interferon Production by Human Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Celsa A.; Chang, R. Shihman; Mishra, L.; Golden, H. Dean

    1972-01-01

    The relative capacity of several types of human cells and tissue to produce interferon was studied. Types of cells and tissue included were fibroblasts from embryos, foreskins, and biopsied skins; amnion cells; peripheral leukocytes; established lymphoid cell lines; established heteroploid cell lines; and chorioamniotic membrane. When Newcastle disease virus was used as the inducer, fibroblasts and amnion cells produced more interferon per 106 cells than leukocytes, lymphoid cells, and heteroploid cells. Only minor variations in interferon-producing capacity were observed among fibroblasts from 36 persons. Culture passage level, cell concentration, and inducer were factors that significantly affected interferon production. PMID:4344957

  17. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  18. Human embryonic stem cells: prospects for development.

    PubMed

    Pera, Martin F; Trounson, Alan O

    2004-11-01

    It is widely anticipated that human embryonic stem (ES) cells will serve as an experimental model for studying early development in our species, and, conversely, that studies of development in model systems, the mouse in particular, will inform our efforts to manipulate human stem cells in vitro. A comparison of primate and mouse ES cells suggests that a common underlying blueprint for the pluripotent state has undergone significant species-specific modification. As we discuss here, technical advances in the propagation and manipulation of human ES cells have improved our understanding of their growth and differentiation, providing the potential to investigate early human development and to develop new clinical therapies.

  19. Non-promoter hypermethylation of zygote arrest 1 (ZAR1) in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takao; Yachi, Kazunari; Ohta, Takashi; Fukushima, Takao; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi; Shinojima, Yui; Terui, Tadashi; Nagase, Hiroki

    2011-07-01

    Zygote arrest 1 (ZAR1) is a novel maternal-effect gene of crucial importance during the oocyte-to-embryo transition. Comprehensive methylation analysis of tumor-specific differently methylated regions in human malignant melanomas has recently led to the identification of non-promoter hypermethylation of the ZAR1 gene that had never been identified as an aberrant methylated region in any human tumor. Notably, ZAR1 hypermethylation was frequently observed in melanomas but was absent in benign nevi, and ZAR1 expression was found to be up-regulated in methylated tumors. These findings prompted us to screen for ZAR1 non-promoter methylation in various types of human brain tumors using MassARRAY EpiTYPER. Strikingly, hypermethylation of ZAR1 was observed frequently in diffuse astrocytomas (100%), anaplastic astrocytomas (94%), glioblastomas (93%), oligodendrogliomas (100%), anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (100%), and pituitary adenomas (90%), but not at all in pilocytic astrocytomas. For other tumor types ZAR1 hypermethylation was infrequent: 17% of vestibular schwannomas and 33% of meningothelial meningiomas. Detectable ZAR1 transcript was not found in any of hypermethylated glioma cell lines. Our results indicate that hypermethylation of the ZAR1 non-promoter is extremely frequent in diffuse gliomas and pituitary adenomas, although ZAR1 expression is unlikely to play a tumorigenic role.

  20. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluorine F 18 EF5 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Meningeal Melanocytoma

  1. Pediatric primary pilocytic astrocytoma of the cerebellopontine angle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mirone, G; Schiabello, L; Chibbaro, S; Bouazza, S; George, B

    2009-02-01

    We describe a rare case of pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma presented as a right cerebellopontine angle (CPA) mass, completely separated from the brain stem and arising from the proximal VIII nerve portion. A 12-year-old boy, with no evidence of neurofibromatosis type 2, presented with progressive hearing loss at the right ear and headache. An initial enhanced magnetic resonance examination suggested the diagnosis of schwannoma. The tumor was resected by a suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. Our case seems to be the first report of a primary pediatric CPA pylocitic astrocytoma arising from the VIII nerve complex and presenting internal auditory canal enlargement. It represents the third reported case of a primary CPA pilocytic astrocytoma (the second pediatric case with the first arising from V nerve) and the eighth report of primary CPA glioma, overall. We discuss the clinical, neuroradiological, and intraoperative findings, and we review the different hypothesis about the origin of these rare tumors.

  2. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Cléciton Braga; Gomes-Braga, Francisca das Chagas Sheyla Almeida; Costa-Silva, Danylo Rafhael; Escórcio-Dourado, Carla Solange; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Conde, Airton Mendes; da Conceição Barros-Oliveira, Maria; Sousa, Emerson Brandão; da Rocha Barros, Lorena; Martins, Luana Mota; Facina, Gil; da-Silva, Benedito Borges

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary central nervous system neoplasm. Astrocytomas are the most prevalent type of glioma and these tumors may be influenced by sex steroid hormones. A literature review for the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas was conducted in the PubMed database using the following MeSH terms: “estrogen receptor beta” OR “estrogen receptor alpha” OR “estrogen receptor antagonists” OR “progesterone receptors” OR “astrocytoma” OR “glioma” OR “glioblastoma”. Among the 111 articles identified, 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. The majority of reports showed the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas. Overall, higher tumor grades were associated with decreased estrogen receptor expression and increased progesterone receptor expression. PMID:27626480

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent or Unresectable Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Link, Michael J.; Brown, Paul D.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients with recurrent or unresectable pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 18 patients (20 lesions) with biopsy-confirmed PA having SRS at our institution from 1992 through 2005. Results: The median patient age at SRS was 23 years (range, 4-56). Thirteen patients (72%) had undergone one or more previous surgical resections, and 10 (56%) had previously received external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The median SRS treatment volume was 9.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.7-26.7). The median tumor margin dose was 15 Gy (range, 12-20). The median follow-up was 8.0 years (range, 0.5-15). Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 94%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. Tumor progression (local solid progression, n = 4; local solid progression + distant, n = 1; distant, n = 2; cyst development/progression, n = 4) was noted in 11 patients (61%). Progression-free survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 65%, 41%, and 17%, respectively. Prior EBRT was associated with inferior overall survival (5-year risk, 100% vs. 50%, p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (5-year risk, 71% vs. 20%, p = 0.008). Nine of 11 patients with tumor-related symptoms improved after SRS. Symptomatic edema after SRS occurred in 8 patients (44%), which resolved with short-term corticosteroid therapy in the majority of those without early disease progression. Conclusions: SRS has low permanent radiation-related morbidity and durable local tumor control, making it a meaningful treatment option for patients with recurrent or unresectable PA in whom surgery and/or EBRT has failed.

  4. Evidence for Human Lung Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Hall, Sean R.; Hosoda, Toru; D’Amario, Domenico; Sanada, Fumihiro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ogórek, Barbara; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Ferreira-Martins, João; Matsuda, Alex; Arranto, Christian; Goichberg, Polina; Giordano, Giovanna; Haley, Kathleen J.; Bardelli, Silvana; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Liu, Xiaoli; Quaini, Federico; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa; Perrella, Mark A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although progenitor cells have been described in distinct anatomical regions of the lung, description of resident stem cells has remained elusive. METHODS Surgical lung-tissue specimens were studied in situ to identify and characterize human lung stem cells. We defined their phenotype and functional properties in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS Human lungs contain undifferentiated human lung stem cells nested in niches in the distal airways. These cells are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent in vitro. After injection into damaged mouse lung in vivo, human lung stem cells form human bronchioles, alveoli, and pulmonary vessels integrated structurally and functionally with the damaged organ. The formation of a chimeric lung was confirmed by detection of human transcripts for epithelial and vascular genes. In addition, the self-renewal and long-term proliferation of human lung stem cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays. CONCLUSIONS Human lungs contain identifiable stem cells. In animal models, these cells participate in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. They have the undemonstrated potential to promote tissue restoration in patients with lung disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:21561345

  5. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  6. Isolation and generation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita; Archer, Gerald E; Tedder, Thomas F

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells (APC), which may be isolated or generated from human blood mononuclear cells. Although mature blood dendritic cells normally represent ∼0.2% of human blood mononuclear cells, their frequency can be greatly increased using the cell enrichment methods described in this unit. More highly purified dendritic cell preparations can be obtained from these populations by sorting of fluorescence-labeled cells. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be generated from monocytes by culture with the appropriate cytokines, as described here. In addition, a negative selection approach is provided that may be employed to generate cell preparations that have been depleted of dendritic cells to be used for comparison in functional studies.

  7. p53 protein in low-grade astrocytomas: a study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Iuzzolino, P.; Ghimenton, C.; Nicolato, A.; Giorgiutti, F.; Fina, P.; Doglioni, C.; Barbareschi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression of p53 protein (p53) was examined in 52 patients out of a series of 66 patients with low-grade astrocytomas with long-term follow-up. All patients were also evaluated for several clinical and histological features, among which only preoperative Karnofsky score and the extent of surgery were statistically significant parameters to predict outcome on multivariate analysis. p53 accumulation was seen in 46.1% of patients, with a wide range of percentage of positive cells. Median survival for p53-positive and p53-negative patients was 41 and 37 months respectively. The survival curves of p53-positive and -negative patients were not statistically different. However, the curves showed a trend towards a more aggressive course in p53-positive patients beginning 3-4 years after surgery. Five years after diagnosis the survival estimate with the Kaplan-Meier method was 21.2% for patients with p53-positive tumours and 45.9% for patients with p53-negative tumours. This trend is not due to different distribution of major clinical prognostic factors (age, incomplete resection or Karnofsky status). The trend could be related to the time needed by the p53-positive clone to outgrow the rest of the p53-negative neoplastic cell population. This hypothesis is further supported by the fact that the five recurrences which were surgically removed (one anaplastic astrocytoma and four glioblastomas) derived from p53-positive tumours and were themselves intensely p53 positive. Images Figure 1 PMID:8123492

  8. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma with involvement of the sella turcica in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Alimohamadi, Maysam; Bidabadi, Mohammad Shirani; Ayan, Zahra; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2009-12-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently described tumor typically occurring in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region of very young children. PMA is characterized by a more aggressive course than pilocytic astrocytoma and exhibits certain differing histological features. We report a PMA in an adolescent patient with visual field disturbance. Imaging studies revealed enlargement of the sella turcica due to a homogenously enhancing sellar and suprasellar mass identifiable both on CT scans and MRI. We believe that PMA may be included in the list of differential diagnoses of the lesions expanding the sella turcica.

  9. Prognostic relevance of gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma: gemistocytic component and MR imaging features compared to non-gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Jin; Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Ho Sung; Lee, Ji Ye; Nam, Soo Jeong; Jung, Seung Chai; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon

    2017-07-01

    To determine if gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma (GemA) and its MR imaging characteristics are associated with a shorter time-to-progression (TTP) compared with non-gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma (non-GemA). We enrolled 78 patients who were followed up more than 5 years (29 pathologically proven GemA and 49 non-GemA) during a 10-year period. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) and clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and MR imaging features were analyzed as possible prognostic factors of high-grade transformation, and multivariate analysis of TTP was performed using Cox proportional modeling. GemA showed more frequent high-grade features than non-GemA, including diffusion restriction (P < .001), increased choline/creatine (P = .02), and increased choline/NAA ratio (P = .015). Patients with GemA had a significantly shorter median TTP (53.1 vs 68 months; P < .001). A gemistocytic histopathology (hazard ratio = 3.42; P = .015) and low ADC (hazard ratio = 3.61; P = .001) were independently associated with a shorter TTP. GemA can present with MR imaging findings mimicking high-grade glioma at initial diagnosis and transforms to high-grade disease earlier than non-GemA. Low ADC on DWI might be useful in stratifying the risk of progression in patients with grade II astrocytoma. • Gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma (GemA) showed more frequent high-grade features than non-GemA. • Patients with GemA had a significantly shorter median TTP than non-GemA. • Gemistocytic histopathology and low ADC were independently associated with shorter TTP.

  10. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies.

  11. Competition between human cells by entosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Luo, Tianzhi; Ren, Yixin; Florey, Oliver; Shirasawa, Senji; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Robinson, Douglas N; Overholtzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Human carcinomas are comprised of complex mixtures of tumor cells that are known to compete indirectly for nutrients and growth factors. Whether tumor cells could also compete directly, for example by elimination of rivals, is not known. Here we show that human cells can directly compete by a mechanism of engulfment called entosis. By entosis, cells are engulfed, or cannibalized while alive, and subsequently undergo cell death. We find that the identity of engulfing (“winner”) and engulfed (“loser”) cells is dictated by mechanical deformability controlled by RhoA and actomyosin, where tumor cells with high deformability preferentially engulf and outcompete neighboring cells with low deformability in heterogeneous populations. We further find that activated Kras and Rac signaling impart winner status to cells by downregulating contractile myosin, allowing for the internalization of neighboring cells that eventually undergo cell death. Finally, we compute the energy landscape of cell-in-cell formation, demonstrating that a mechanical differential between winner and loser cells is required for entosis to proceed. These data define a mechanism of competition in mammalian cells that occurs in human tumors. PMID:25342560

  12. Differentiation between Solitary Cerebral Metastasis and Astrocytoma on the Basis of Subventricular Zone Involvement on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Ma, Jiaqi; Niu, Gang; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Zhe; Du, Yonghao; Yu, Bolang; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    To determine the relationship between the subventricular zone (SVZ) and astrocytoma based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whether SVZ involvement can be used to distinguish solitary cerebral metastases (SCMs) from astrocytomas. This retrospective study involved 154 patients with solitary low-grade astrocytoma (LGA), high-grade astrocytoma (HGA), and SCM, who underwent T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) T2WI. The spatial relationship between the tumor and SVZ was classified as "involvement" or "segregation" on contrast-enhanced T1WI for enhanced tumors and T2WI/FLAIR T2WI for non-enhanced tumors. Patient-based SVZ-contact rates were compared between the LGA, HGA, and SCM groups. The frequencies of involvement of various lateral ventricle regions by astrocytoma were compared. The correlation between SVZ involvement and tumor necrosis was analyzed. Patient-based SVZ-contact rates in SCM, LGA, and HGA were 24.1%, 68.8%, and 85.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the SVZ-contact rate was significantly different between SCM and astrocytoma (24.1% vs. 75.2% P < 0.001), also between LGA and HGA (68.1% vs. 85.4% P=0.037). After the tumor volume was adjusted as a covariate, SVZ-contact rates still differed between SCMs and astrocytomas (Odds ratio [OR]: 4.58, 95% Confidence interval [CI]: 1.65 to 12.8, P=0.004). Tumor volume differed between LGA and HGA (P< 0.001), and influenced the association between SVZ involvement and astrocytoma grade (P = 0.05). Among the lateral ventricle regions, the frontal horn was the most frequently involved by astrocytomas. SVZ-contact rates were higher in necrosis group compared with non-necrosis groups (83.9% vs. 50.0%, P < 0.001) among astrocytoma patients. Necrosis positively correlated with SVZ involvement in astrocytomas (rs = 0.342, P < 0.001), but did not correlate with SVZ involvement in SCMs (P = 0.193). Compared to SCMs

  13. Activin A programs human TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Locci, Michela; Wu, Jennifer; Arumemi, Fortuna; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Dahlberg, Carol; Miller, Andrew T.; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular helper T (TFH) cells are CD4+ T cells specialized in helping B cells and are associated both with protective antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. The promise of targeting TFH cells therapeutically has been limited by fragmentary understanding of extrinsic signals regulating human TFH cell differentiation. A screen of a human protein library identified activin A as new regulator of TFH cell differentiation. Activin A orchestrated expression of multiple TFH-associated genes, independently or in concert with additional signals. TFH programming by activin A was antagonized by the cytokine IL-2. Activin A’s capacity to drive TFH cell differentiation in vitro was conserved for non-human primates but not mice. Finally, activin A-induced TFH programming was dependent on SMAD2 and SMAD3 signaling and blocked by pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:27376469

  14. Human skin cells support thymus-independent T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.; Yamanaka, Kei-ichi; Bai, Mei; Dowgiert, Rebecca; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Thymic tissue has previously been considered a requirement for the generation of a functional and diverse population of human T cells. We report that fibroblasts and keratinocytes from human skin arrayed on a synthetic 3-dimensional matrix support the development of functional human T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells in the absence of thymic tissue. Newly generated T cells contained T cell receptor excision circles, possessed a diverse T cell repertoire, and were functionally mature and tolerant to self MHC, indicating successful completion of positive and negative selection. Skin cell cultures expressed the AIRE, Foxn1, and Hoxa3 transcription factors and a panel of autoantigens. Skin and bone marrow biopsies can thus be used to generate de novo functional and diverse T cell populations for potential therapeutic use in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:16224538

  15. Human embryonic stem cells derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-06-06

    Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state.

  16. Differentiation of Neural Lineage Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Philip H.; Brick, David J.; Stover, Alexander E.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Müller, Franz Josef

    2008-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells have the unique properties of being able to proliferate indefinitely in their undifferentiated state and to differentiate into any somatic cell type. These cells are thus posited to be extremely useful for furthering our understanding of both normal and abnormal human development, providing a human cell preparation that can be used to screen for new reagents or therapeutic agents, and generating large numbers of differentiated cells that can be used for transplantation purposes. Critical among the applications for the latter are diseases and injuries of the nervous system, medical approaches to which have been, to date, primarily palliative in nature. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into cells of the neural lineage, therefore, has become a central focus of a number of laboratories. This has resulted in the description in the literature of several dozen methods for neural cell differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells. Among these are methods for the generation of such divergent neural cells as dopaminergic neurons, retinal neurons, ventral motoneurons, and oligodendroglial progenitors. In this review, we attempt to fully describe most of these methods, breaking them down into five basic subdivisions: 1) starting material, 2) induction of loss of pluripotency, 3) neural induction, 4) neural maintenance and expansion, and 5) neuronal/glial differentiation. We also show data supporting the concept that undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells appear to have an innate neural differentiation potential. In addition, we evaluate data comparing and contrasting neural stem cells differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells with those derived directly from the human brain. PMID:18593611

  17. Assessment and prognostic significance of mitotic index using the mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 in low and intermediate-grade infiltrating astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Colman, Howard; Giannini, Caterina; Huang, Li; Gonzalez, Javier; Hess, Kenneth; Bruner, Janet; Fuller, Gregory; Langford, Lauren; Pelloski, Christopher; Aaron, Joann; Burger, Peter; Aldape, Ken

    2006-05-01

    Distinguishing between grade II and grade III diffuse astrocytomas is important both for prognosis and for treatment decision-making. However, current methods for distinguishing between grades based on proliferative potential are suboptimal, making identification of clear cutoffs difficult. In this study, we compared the results from immunohistochemical staining for phospho-histone H3 (pHH3), a specific marker of cells undergoing mitosis, with standard mitotic counts (number of mitoses/10 high-power fields) and MIB-1 labeling index values for assessing proliferative activity. We tested the relationship between pHH3 staining and tumor grade and prognosis in a retrospective series of grade II and III infiltrating astrocytomas from a single institution. The pHH3 index (per 1000 cells), MIB-1 index (per 1000 cells), and number of mitoses per 10 high-power fields were determined for each of 103 cases of grade II and III diffuse astrocytomas from patients with clinical follow-up. pHH3 staining was found to be a simple and reliable method for identifying mitotic figures, allowing a true mitotic index to be determined. The pHH3 mitotic index was significantly associated both with the standard mitotic count and with the MIB-1 index. Univariate analyses revealed that all 3 measurements of proliferation were significantly associated with survival. However, the pHH3 mitotic index accounted for a larger proportion of variability in survival than standard mitotic count or MIB-1/Ki-67 labeling index. After adjusting for age, extent of resection, and performance score, the pHH3 mitotic index remained an independent predictor of survival. Thus, pHH3 staining provides a simple and reliable method for quantifying proliferative potential and for the stratification of patients with diffuse astrocytomas into typical grade II and III groups. These results also suggest that pHH3 staining may be a useful method in other neoplasms in which accurate determination of proliferation potential

  18. Development of human mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Furitsu, T; Saito, H; Dvorak, A M; Schwartz, L B; Irani, A M; Burdick, J F; Ishizaka, K; Ishizaka, T

    1989-01-01

    Nucleated cells of human umbilical cord blood were cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts. After 7-8 weeks in culture, when the number of the other hematopoietic cells declined, metachromatic granule-containing mononuclear cells appeared in the cultures, and the number of the cells increased up to 12 weeks. After 11-14 weeks in culture, the metachromatic mononuclear cells comprised a substantial portion of the cultured cells. These cells contained 1.8-2 micrograms of histamine per 10(6) cells and bore receptors for IgE. All of the cells contained tryptase in their granules. Electron microscopic analysis showed that these cells were mature human mast cells, clearly different from the basophilic granulocytes or eosinophils that arise in a variety of circumstances in cord blood cell cultures. Most of the cultured mast cells expressed some granules with regular crystalline arrays and contained both tryptase and chymase, and thus resembled human skin mast cells. Images PMID:2532357

  19. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  20. Cells immunoreactive for neuropeptide in human thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Lauriola, L; Maggiano, N; Larocca, L M; Ranelletti, F O; Ricci, R; Piantelli, M; Capelli, A

    1990-01-01

    The presence of opioid peptides, bombesin, and substance P was investigated by immunohistochemistry in tissue sections from six human thymomas. The number of immunoreactive cells seemed to vary from one case to another. Ultrastructural investigation, showing the presence of desmosomes in labelled cells, allowed these cells to be classified as epithelial lineage cells. The occurrence of cells containing neuropeptide in thymomas suggest that peptide molecules could have modulated the behaviour of this tumour, given the reported influence of these molecules on immune functions and their growth promoting activity on several cell types, including mesenchymal and epithelial cells. Images PMID:1699978

  1. Reprogramming of human exocrine pancreas cells to beta cells.

    PubMed

    Staels, Willem; Heremans, Yves; Heimberg, Harry

    2015-12-01

    One of the key promises of regenerative medicine is providing a cure for diabetes. Cell-based therapies are proving their safety and efficiency, but donor beta cell shortages and immunological issues remain major hurdles. Reprogramming of human pancreatic exocrine cells towards beta cells would offer a major advantage by providing an abundant and autologous source of beta cells. Over the past decade our understanding of transdifferentiation processes greatly increased allowing us to design reprogramming protocols that fairly aim for clinical trials.

  2. Ex Vivo Expanded Human NK Cells Survive and Proliferate in Humanized Mice with Autologous Human Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Nham, Tina; Poznanski, Sophie M; Chew, Marianne V; Shenouda, Mira M; Lee, Dean; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-09-21

    Adoptive immune cell therapy is emerging as a promising immunotherapy for cancer. Particularly, the adoptive transfer of NK cells has garnered attention due to their natural cytotoxicity against tumor cells and safety upon adoptive transfer to patients. Although strategies exist to efficiently generate large quantities of expanded NK cells ex vivo, it remains unknown whether these expanded NK cells can persist and/or proliferate in vivo in the absence of exogenous human cytokines. Here, we have examined the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human cord blood-derived NK cells into humanized mice reconstituted with autologous human cord blood immune cells. We report that ex vivo expanded NK cells are able to survive and possibly proliferate in vivo in humanized mice without exogenous cytokine administration, but not in control mice that lack human immune cells. These findings demonstrate that the presence of autologous human immune cells supports the in vivo survival of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. These results support the application of ex vivo expanded NK cells in cancer immunotherapy and provide a translational humanized mouse model to test the lifespan, safety, and functionality of adoptively transferred cells in the presence of autologous human immune cells prior to clinical use.

  3. Preliminary observations on genetic alterations in pilocytic astrocytomas associated with neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Kenji; Kochi, Masato; Saya, Hideyuki; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Shiraishi, Shoji; Kamiryo, Takanori; Shinojima, Naoki; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2003-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes sufferers to various forms of neoplasia. Among affected individuals, 15%-20% develop astrocytomas, especially pilocytic astrocytomas (PA), which are benign and classified as grade I by the World Health Organization. They are generally well circumscribed, and their progression is slow. NF1-associated PAs (NF1-PAs) occasionally behave as aggressive tumors. To elucidate underlying genetic events in clinically progressive NF1-PAs, we performed molecular genetic analysis on 12 PAs, including 3 NF1-PAs, for pS3, p16, and epidermal growth factor receptor genes, as well as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 1p, 10, 17, and 19q. None of the obvious genetic alterations typically seen in higher grade astrocytomas were found in 9 sporadic PAs. However, in 2 of 3 NF1-PAs, microsatellite analysis showed LOH10, including the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) gene locus, despite the diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytoma;one of these also manifested homozygous deletion of the p16 gene. The other NF1-PA harbored only LOH of the NF1 gene locus (17q). Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that some NF1-PAs differ genetically from sporadic PAs. PMID:14565158

  4. Astrocytoma with involvement of medulla oblongata, spinal cord and spinal nerves in a raccoon (Procyon lotor)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neoplasms affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems of wild animals are extremely rare. Described are clinical signs, pathologic and immunohistochemical findings in an adult female raccoon (Procyon lotor) with an astrocytoma which involved brainstem, cervical spinal cord and roots of the ...

  5. Fluorescence guided resection with 5-aminolevulinic acid of a pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the third ventricle.

    PubMed

    Bernal García, Luis Miguel; Cabezudo Artero, Jose Manuel; García Moreno, Rafael; Marcelo Zamorano, Maria Bella; Mayoral Guisado, Carlos

    Fluorescence-guided resection with 5-aminolevulinic acid has been shown to be useful in the resection of certain brain tumors other than high grade gliomas, facilitating the intraoperative differentiation of neoplastic tissue. The technique enables the surgeon to ensure that no tumor fragments remain, thereby achieving higher rates of complete resection. Tihan first described pilomyxoid astrocytomas in 1999. They are currently classified as grade II astrocytoma according to the WHO classification system and, because of their tendency to recur and their dissemination through the cerebrospinal fluid pathways, they are considered to be more aggressive than pilocytic astrocytoma. As a result, management of these tumors must be more aggressive, always aiming for complete macroscopic resection whenever possible. In this article, we present a case of pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the third ventricle in which the use of fluorescence-guided resection with 5-ALA facilitated complete resection. Imaging tests performed after five years revealed no signs of recurrence and no adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy was required. This article also comprises a review of the literature concerning the characteristics and management of this tumor, which was recently considered to be a different histopathological entity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Diffuse Spinal Leptomeningeal Spread of a Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a 3-year-old Child.

    PubMed

    Alyeldien, Ameer; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Cheko, Azad; Höll, Tanja; Scholz, Martin; Petridis, Athanasios K

    2016-03-25

    Pilocytic astrocytomas correspond to low-grade gliomas and therefore metastasize exceedingly rare. However, pilocytic astrocytomas are able to and leptomeningeal dissemination may be seen. What are the treatment options of these cases? We present a case report of a 3-year-old child with a pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm with leptomeningeal dissemination of the spinal meninges. Partial resection of the cerebral tumor has been performed. Since the leptomeningeal dissemination was seen all over the spinal meninges, the child did not undergo further surgical treatment. A wait and watch strategy were followed. Chemotherapy was initiated, if a 25% tumor growth was seen. Leptomeningeal dissemination of a pilocytic astrocytoma is seen so infrequently that no standard therapy is established. Since these metastases may occur even up to 2 decades after primary tumor resection, long-term follow-up is indicated. In case of spinal metastases, surgical treatment should be performed if feasible. Otherwise observation should be possessed and/or chemotherapy should be initiated.

  7. Diffuse Spinal Leptomeningeal Spread of a Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a 3-year-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Alyeldien, Ameer; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Cheko, Azad; Höll, Tanja; Scholz, Martin; Petridis, Athanasios K.

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas correspond to low-grade gliomas and therefore metastasize exceedingly rare. However, pilocytic astrocytomas are able to and leptomeningeal dissemination may be seen. What are the treatment options of these cases? We present a case report of a 3-year-old child with a pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm with leptomeningeal dissemination of the spinal meninges. Partial resection of the cerebral tumor has been performed. Since the leptomeningeal dissemination was seen all over the spinal meninges, the child did not undergo further surgical treatment. A wait and watch strategy were followed. Chemotherapy was initiated, if a 25% tumor growth was seen. Leptomeningeal dissemination of a pilocytic astrocytoma is seen so infrequently that no standard therapy is established. Since these metastases may occur even up to 2 decades after primary tumor resection, long-term follow-up is indicated. In case of spinal metastases, surgical treatment should be performed if feasible. Otherwise observation should be possessed and/or chemotherapy should be initiated. PMID:27162602

  8. Impaired tooth root development after treatment of a cerebellar astrocytoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckles, T.A.; Kalkwarf, K.L.

    1989-10-01

    A young man, previously treated by surgical resection of a grade III cerebellar astrocytoma in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy, was found to display severe generalized root agenesis. This patient also exhibited secondary hypothyroidism and decreased levels of growth hormone. These factors are discussed in relation to their possible role in impaired root development.

  9. Human CD4+ T Cell Response to Human Herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Nastke, Maria-D.; Becerra, Aniuska; Yin, Liusong; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Gibson, Laura; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Following primary infection, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) establishes a persistent infection for life. HHV-6 reactivation has been associated with transplant rejection, delayed engraftment, encephalitis, muscular dystrophy, and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. The poor understanding of the targets and outcome of the cellular immune response to HHV-6 makes it difficult to outline the role of HHV-6 in human disease. To fill in this gap, we characterized CD4 T cell responses to HHV-6 using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and T cell lines generated from healthy donors. CD4+ T cells responding to HHV-6 in peripheral blood were observed at frequencies below 0.1% of total T cells but could be expanded easily in vitro. Analysis of cytokines in supernatants of PBMC and T cell cultures challenged with HHV-6 preparations indicated that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were appropriate markers of the HHV-6 cellular response. Eleven CD4+ T cell epitopes, all but one derived from abundant virion components, were identified. The response was highly cross-reactive between HHV-6A and HHV-6B variants. Seven of the CD4+ T cell epitopes do not share significant homologies with other known human pathogens, including the closely related human viruses human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers generated with these epitopes were able to detect HHV-6-specific T cell populations. These findings provide a window into the immune response to HHV-6 and provide a basis for tracking HHV-6 cellular immune responses. PMID:22357271

  10. Cell proliferation in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, D; Reidy, M A; Benditt, E P; Schwartz, S M

    1990-01-01

    Despite the lack of direct evidence for cell multiplication, proliferation of smooth muscle cells in human atherosclerotic lesions has been assumed to play a central role in ontogeny of the plaque. We used antibodies to cell cycle-related proteins on tissue sections of human arteries and coronary atherosclerotic plaques. Specific cell types were identified by immunochemical reagents for smooth muscle, monocyte-macrophages, and other blood cells. Low rates of smooth muscle cell proliferation were observed. Macrophages were also observed with rates of proliferation comparable to that of the smooth muscle. Additional replicating cells could not be defined as belonging to specific cell types with the reagents used in this study. These findings imply that smooth muscle replication in advanced plaques is indolent and raise the possibility of a role for proliferating leukocytes. Images PMID:1972277

  11. Th17 cells in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Tesmer, Laura A.; Lundy, Steven K.; Sarkar, Sujata; Fox, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the role of T cells in human disease is undergoing revision as a result of the discovery of T-helper 17 (Th17) cells, a unique CD4+ T-cell subset characterized by production of interleukin-17 (IL-17). IL-17 is a highly inflammatory cytokine with robust effects on stromal cells in many tissues. Recent data in humans and mice suggest that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of a diverse group of immune-mediated diseases, including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and asthma. Initial reports also propose a role for Th17 cells in tumorigenesis and transplant rejection. Important differences, as well as many similarities, are emerging when the biology of Th17 cells in the mouse is compared with corresponding phenomena in humans. As our understanding of human Th17 biology grows, the mechanisms underlying many diseases are becoming more apparent, resulting in a new appreciation for both previously known and more recently discovered cytokines, chemokines, and feedback mechanisms. Given the strong association between excessive Th17 activity and human disease, new therapeutic approaches targeting Th17 cells are highly promising, but the potential safety of such treatments may be limited by the role of these cells in normal host defenses against infection. PMID:18613831

  12. Enterovirus 71 VP1 activates calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and results in the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Haolong, Cong; Du, Ning; Hongchao, Tian; Yang, Yang; Wei, Zhang; Hua, Zhang; Wenliang, Zhang; Lei, Song; Po, Tien

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main causative agents of foot, hand and mouth disease. Its infection usually causes severe central nervous system diseases and complications in infected infants and young children. In the present study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection caused the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocytoma cells. The rearranged vimentin, together with various EV71 components, formed aggresomes-like structures in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy and viral RNA labeling indicated that the aggresomes were virus replication sites since most of the EV71 particles and the newly synthesized viral RNA were concentrated here. Further analysis revealed that the vimentin in the virus factories was serine-82 phosphorylated. More importantly, EV71 VP1 protein is responsible for the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II) which phosphorylated the N-terminal domain of vimentin on serine 82. Phosphorylation of vimentin and the formation of aggresomes were required for the replication of EV71 since the latter was decreased markedly after phosphorylation was blocked by KN93, a CaMK-II inhibitor. Thus, as one of the consequences of CaMK-II activation, vimentin phosphorylation and rearrangement may support virus replication by playing a structural role for the formation of the replication factories. Collectively, this study identified the replication centers of EV71 in human astrocyte cells. This may help us understand the replication mechanism and pathogenesis of EV71 in human.

  13. Human genome project and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Brenda J; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is one of the most common genetic blood disorders in the United States that affects 1 in every 375 African Americans. Sickle cell disease is an inherited condition caused by abnormal hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The Human Genome Project has provided valuable insight and extensive research advances in the understanding of the human genome and sickle cell disease. Significant progress in genetic knowledge has led to an increase in the ability for researchers to map and sequence genes for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of sickle cell disease and other chronic illnesses. This article explores some of the recent knowledge and advances about sickle cell disease and the Human Genome Project.

  14. ADAM 23/MDC3, a Human Disintegrin That Promotes Cell Adhesion via Interaction with the αvβ3 Integrin through an RGD-independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cal, Santiago; Freije, José M.P.; López, José M.; Takada, Yoshikazu; López-Otín, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    ADAM 23 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain)/MDC3 (metalloprotease, disintegrin, and cysteine-rich domain) is a member of the disintegrin family of proteins expressed in fetal and adult brain. In this work we show that the disintegrin-like domain of ADAM 23 produced in Escherichia coli and immobilized on culture dishes promotes attachment of different human cells of neural origin, such as neuroblastoma cells (NB100 and SH-Sy5y) or astrocytoma cells (U373 and U87 MG). Analysis of ADAM 23 binding to integrins revealed a specific interaction with αvβ3, mediated by a short amino acid sequence present in its putative disintegrin loop. This sequence lacks any RGD motif, which is a common structural determinant supporting αvβ3-mediated interactions of diverse proteins, including other disintegrins. αvβ3 also supported adhesion of HeLa cells transfected with a full-length cDNA for ADAM 23, extending the results obtained with the recombinant protein containing the disintegrin domain of ADAM 23. On the basis of these results, we propose that ADAM 23, through its disintegrin-like domain, may function as an adhesion molecule involved in αvβ3-mediated cell interactions occurring in normal and pathological processes, including progression of malignant tumors from neural origin. PMID:10749942

  15. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  16. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  17. Model-Based Evaluation of Spontaneous Tumor Regression in Pilocytic Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Buder, Thomas; Deutsch, Andreas; Klink, Barbara; Voss-Böhme, Anja

    2015-12-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common brain tumor in children. This tumor is usually benign and has a good prognosis. Total resection is the treatment of choice and will cure the majority of patients. However, often only partial resection is possible due to the location of the tumor. In that case, spontaneous regression, regrowth, or progression to a more aggressive form have been observed. The dependency between the residual tumor size and spontaneous regression is not understood yet. Therefore, the prognosis is largely unpredictable and there is controversy regarding the management of patients for whom complete resection cannot be achieved. Strategies span from pure observation (wait and see) to combinations of surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Here, we introduce a mathematical model to investigate the growth and progression behavior of PA. In particular, we propose a Markov chain model incorporating cell proliferation and death as well as mutations. Our model analysis shows that the tumor behavior after partial resection is essentially determined by a risk coefficient γ, which can be deduced from epidemiological data about PA. Our results quantitatively predict the regression probability of a partially resected benign PA given the residual tumor size and lead to the hypothesis that this dependency is linear, implying that removing any amount of tumor mass will improve prognosis. This finding stands in contrast to diffuse malignant glioma where an extent of resection threshold has been experimentally shown, below which no benefit for survival is expected. These results have important implications for future therapeutic studies in PA that should include residual tumor volume as a prognostic factor.

  18. Identification of human brain tumour initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Hawkins, Cynthia; Clarke, Ian D; Squire, Jeremy A; Bayani, Jane; Hide, Takuichiro; Henkelman, R Mark; Cusimano, Michael D; Dirks, Peter B

    2004-11-18

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that neoplastic clones are maintained exclusively by a rare fraction of cells with stem cell properties. Although the existence of CSCs in human leukaemia is established, little evidence exists for CSCs in solid tumours, except for breast cancer. Recently, we prospectively isolated a CD133+ cell subpopulation from human brain tumours that exhibited stem cell properties in vitro. However, the true measures of CSCs are their capacity for self renewal and exact recapitulation of the original tumour. Here we report the development of a xenograft assay that identified human brain tumour initiating cells that initiate tumours in vivo. Only the CD133+ brain tumour fraction contains cells that are capable of tumour initiation in NOD-SCID (non-obese diabetic, severe combined immunodeficient) mouse brains. Injection of as few as 100 CD133+ cells produced a tumour that could be serially transplanted and was a phenocopy of the patient's original tumour, whereas injection of 10(5) CD133- cells engrafted but did not cause a tumour. Thus, the identification of brain tumour initiating cells provides insights into human brain tumour pathogenesis, giving strong support for the CSC hypothesis as the basis for many solid tumours, and establishes a previously unidentified cellular target for more effective cancer therapies.

  19. Anaplastic astrocytoma mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis in 13-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Talathi, Saurabh; Gupta, Neha; Reddivalla, Naresh; Prokhorov, Sergey; Gold, Menachem

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common childhood brain tumor. Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) are high grade gliomas (HGG), found very rarely in pediatric patients. AA mainly results from a dedifferentiation of a low grade astrocytoma. Clinical features of supra-tentorial tumors vary according to their anatomic location, biologic aggressiveness and age of the patient. They can be either completely asymptomatic or present with signs of raised intracranial pressure, seizures (about 40% of cases), behavior changes, speech disorders, declining school performance, or hemiparesis. There have been published adult cases of brain tumor misdiagnosed as viral encephalitis. Due to variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of AA can be challenging. Here we report a case of a 13 year old girl who presented with clinical features suggestive of viral encephalitis, such as fever, headache, dizziness, and first seizure with postictal sleep and prolonged drowsiness. However, her brain MRI findings were consistent with long standing mass effect from the underlying intracranial contents and that coupled with her history of unusual taste led to further investigations and the diagnosis of the AA. In retrospect, this presentation could have been a temporal epileptic aura. High grade astrocytomas are particularly difficult to treat with a two-year survival rates range from 10% to 30%. The treatment is multimodal with gross total surgical resection of the tumor, followed by radiotherapy with or without nitrosourea-containing chemotherapy regimen. Recent promising results seen with the use of temozolamide in adults has not been yet demonstrated in the pediatric patients. The extent of tumor resection remains the most significant indicator of survival and early recognition of this tumor is essential. This case report emphasizes the fact that mass lesions in the temporal lobe, including high-grade astrocytoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of suspected herpes simplex encephalitis

  20. Immortalisation of human urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, J L; Leigh, I M; Duffy, P G; Sexton, C; Masters, J R

    1995-01-01

    A cell line derived from the urothelium lining the ureter of a 12-year-old girl was immortalised using a temperature-sensitive SV40 large T-antigen gene construct, and designated UROtsa. Following immortalisation, UROtsa cells expressed SV40 large T-antigen, but did not acquire characteristics of neoplastic transformation, including growth in soft agar or the development of tumours in nude mice. Metaphase spreads had a normal chromosomal appearance and number. UROtsa cells remained permissive for cell growth at 39 degrees C, indicating that they did not retain temperature sensitivity. UROtsa provides an in vitro model of "normal" urothelium.

  1. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  2. Decreased survival of glioma patients with astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) associated with long-term use of mobile and cordless phones.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-10-16

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a "possible", human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04-11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007-1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999-1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines.

  3. Nucleofection of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Siemen, Henrike; Nix, Michael; Endl, Elmar; Koch, Philipp; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Brüstle, Oliver

    2005-08-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells provide an important tool for the study of human development, disease, and tissue regeneration. Technologies for efficient genetic modification are required to exploit hES cells fully for these applications. Here we present a customized protocol for the transfection of hES cells with the Nucleofector technology and compare its efficiency with conventional electroporation and lipofection. Cell survival and transfection efficiency were quantified using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter construct. Our optimized nucleofection parameters yielded survival rates >70%. Under these conditions, 66% of the surviving cells showed transgene expression 24 h after nucleofection. Transfected cells maintained expression of the pluripotency- associated markers Tra-1-60, Tra-1-81, and Oct4 and could be expanded to stably transgene-expressing clones. The low quantities of hES cells and DNA required for nucleofection could make this method an attractive tool for miniaturized high throughput screening (HTS) applications.

  4. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types.

  5. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  6. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies.

  7. Cadmium increases human fetal germ cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Angenard, Gaëlle; Muczynski, Vincent; Coffigny, Hervé; Pairault, Catherine; Duquenne, Clotilde; Frydman, René; Habert, René; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Livera, Gabriel

    2010-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental pollutant and a major constituent of tobacco smoke. Adverse effects of this heavy metal on reproductive function have been identified in adults; however, no studies have examined its effects on human reproductive organs during development. Using our previously developed organ culture system, we investigated the effects of cadmium chloride on human gonads at the beginning of fetal life, a critical stage in the development of reproductive function. Human fetal gonads were recovered during the first trimester (711 weeks postconception) and cultured with or without Cd. We used different concentrations of Cd and compared results with those obtained with mouse fetal gonads at similar stages. Cd, at concentrations as low as 1 microM, significantly decreased the germ cell density in human fetal ovaries. This correlated with an increase in germ cell apoptosis, but there was no effect on proliferation. Similarly, in the human fetal testis, Cd (1 microM) reduced germ cell number without affecting testosterone secretion. In mouse fetal gonads, Cd increased only female germ cell apoptosis. This is the first experimental demonstration that Cd, at low concentrations, alters the survival of male and female germ cells in humans. Considering data demonstrating extensive human exposure, we believe that current environmental levels of Cd could be deleterious to early gametogenesis.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  9. Cell senescence in human aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Fossel, Michael

    2002-04-01

    The most common causes of death and suffering, even in most underdeveloped nations, are age-related diseases. These diseases share fundamental and often unappreciated pathology at the cellular and genetic levels, through cell senescence. In cancer, enforcing cell senescence permits us to kill cancer cells without significantly harming normal cells. In other age-related diseases, cell senescence plays a direct role, and we may be able to prevent and reverse much of the pathology. While aging is attributed to "wear and tear," genetic studies show that these effects are avoidable (as is the case in germ cell lines) and occur only when cells down-regulate active (and sufficient) repair mechanisms, permitting degradation to occur. Aging occurs when cells permit accumulative damage by wear and tear, by altering their gene expression rather than vice versa. Using telomerase in laboratory settings, we can currently reset this pattern and its consequences both within cells and between cells. Doing so resets not only cell behavior but the pathological consequences within tissues comprising such cells. We can currently grow histologically young, reconstituted human skin using old human skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts). Technically we could now test this approach in joints, vessels, the immune system, and other tissues. This model is consistent with all available laboratory data and known aging pathology. Within the next decade, we will be able to treat age-related diseases more effectively than ever before.

  10. Human Stem Cells for Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William Niall Alexander; Cameron, Malcolm Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Human stem cell research represents an exceptional opportunity for regenerative medicine and the surgical reconstruction of the craniomaxillofacial complex. The correct architecture and function of the vastly diverse tissues of this important anatomical region are critical for life supportive processes, the delivery of senses, social interaction, and aesthetics. Craniomaxillofacial tissue loss is commonly associated with inflammatory responses of the surrounding tissue, significant scarring, disfigurement, and psychological sequelae as an inevitable consequence. The in vitro production of fully functional cells for skin, muscle, cartilage, bone, and neurovascular tissue formation from human stem cells, may one day provide novel materials for the reconstructive surgeon operating on patients with both hard and soft tissue deficit due to cancer, congenital disease, or trauma. However, the clinical translation of human stem cell technology, including the application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in novel regenerative therapies, faces several hurdles that must be solved to permit safe and effective use in patients. The basic biology of hPSCs remains to be fully elucidated and concerns of tumorigenicity need to be addressed, prior to the development of cell transplantation treatments. Furthermore, functional comparison of in vitro generated tissue to their in vivo counterparts will be necessary for confirmation of maturity and suitability for application in reconstructive surgery. Here, we provide an overview of human stem cells in disease modeling, drug screening, and therapeutics, while also discussing the application of regenerative medicine for craniomaxillofacial tissue deficit and surgical reconstruction. PMID:24564584

  11. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  12. Interspecies chimeras for human stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hideki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2017-07-15

    Interspecies chimeric assays are a valuable tool for investigating the potential of human stem and progenitor cells, as well as their differentiated progeny. This Spotlight article discusses the different factors that affect interspecies chimera generation, such as evolutionary distance, developmental timing, and apoptosis of the transplanted cells, and suggests some possible strategies to address them. A refined approach to generating interspecies chimeras could contribute not only to a better understanding of cellular potential, but also to understanding the nature of xenogeneic barriers and mechanisms of heterochronicity, to modeling human development, and to the creation of human transplantable organs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Retrospective birth dating of cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Kirsty L; Bhardwaj, Ratan D; Buchholz, Bruce A; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2005-07-15

    The generation of cells in the human body has been difficult to study, and our understanding of cell turnover is limited. Testing of nuclear weapons resulted in a dramatic global increase in the levels of the isotope 14C in the atmosphere, followed by an exponential decrease after 1963. We show that the level of 14C in genomic DNA closely parallels atmospheric levels and can be used to establish the time point when the DNA was synthesized and cells were born. We use this strategy to determine the age of cells in the cortex of the adult human brain and show that whereas nonneuronal cells are exchanged, occipital neurons are as old as the individual, supporting the view that postnatal neurogenesis does not take place in this region. Retrospective birth dating is a generally applicable strategy that can be used to measure cell turnover in man under physiological and pathological conditions.

  14. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically.

  15. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Epithelial Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter D. Eirew CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: British Columbia Cancer Agency...NUMBER Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0702 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Abstract The mammary epithelium in normal adult female mice contains undifferentiated stem cells with extensive in vivo regenerative and self-renewal

  16. Human brain glial cells synthesize thrombospondin.

    PubMed Central

    Asch, A S; Leung, L L; Shapiro, J; Nachman, R L

    1986-01-01

    Thrombospondin, a 450-kDa multinodular glycoprotein with lectin-type activity, is found in human platelets, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, monocytes, and granular pneumocytes. Thrombospondin interacts with heparin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen, histidine-rich glycoprotein, and plasminogen. Recently, thrombospondin synthesis by smooth muscle cells has been reported to be augmented by platelet-derived growth factor. We present evidence that thrombospondin is present within and synthesized by astrocytic neuroglial cells. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of material derived from a human brain homogenate yielded a protein that, when reduced, had an apparent size of 180 kDa and comigrated with reduced platelet thrombospondin on NaDodSO4/PAGE. Immunoblot analysis with monospecific anti-thrombospondin confirmed the presence of immunoreactive thrombospondin. Indirect immunofluorescence of cultured human glial cells indicated the presence of thrombospondin. Metabolic labeling of glial cell cultures with [35S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with monospecific anti-thrombospondin revealed synthesis of a 180-kDa polypeptide that comigrated with platelet thrombospondin on NaDodSO4/PAGE. Cultured human glial cells were incubated for 48 hr in serum-free medium with purified platelet-derived growth factor at concentrations up to 50 ng/ml. Aliquots taken at intervals were analyzed by a quantitative double-antibody ELISA. The growth factor stimulated the release of thrombospondin into the culture medium by as much as 10-fold over control cultures. The presence of thrombospondin within glial cells of the central nervous system and the augmentation of its synthesis by platelet-derived growth factor suggest that thrombospondin may play an important role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during periods of cell division and growth. Images PMID:2939460

  17. Pancreastatin producing cell line from human pancreatic islet cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Jimi, A; Wakasugi, H; Ikeda, Y; Kono, A

    1990-04-30

    It has been characterized that cell line QGP-1 derived from human non-functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor produces human pancreastatin. Exponentially growing cultures produced 5.7 fmol of pancreastatin/10(6) cells/hr. Human pancreastatin immunoreactivities in plasma and tumor after xenografting with QGP-1 into nude mouse were 92.7 fmol/ml and 160.2 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. Immunocytochemical study revealed both chromogranin A and pancreastatin immunoreactive cells in the tumor. Gel filtrations of culture medium and tumor extract identified heterogenous molecular forms of PST-LI which eluted as large and smaller molecular species. These results suggest that plasma pancreastatin levels may be useful as a tumor marker of endocrine tumor of the pancreas, and the pancreastatin producing cell line may be useful for studies of the mechanism of secretions and processing of chromogranin A and pancreastatin.

  18. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greten, Tim F.; Manns, Michael P.; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described as a heterogeneous cell population with potent immune suppressor function in mice. Limited data are available on MDSC in human diseases. Interpretation of these data is complicated by the fact that different markers have been used to analyze human MDSC subtypes in various clinical settings. Human MDSC are CD11b+, CD33+, HLA-DRneg/low and can be divided into granulocytic CD14− and monocytic CD14+ subtypes. Interleukin 4Rα, VEGFR, CD15 and CD66b have been suggested to be more specific markers for human MDSC, however these markers can only be found on some MDSC subsets. Until today the best marker for human MDSC remains their suppressor function, which can be either direct or indirect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Immune suppressor activity has been associated with high arginase 1 and iNOS activity as well as ROS production by MDSC. Not only in murine models, but even more importantly in patients with cancer, different drugs have been shown to either reverse the immune suppressor function of MDSC or directly target these cells. Systemic treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid has been shown to mature human MDSC and reverse their immune suppressor function. Alternatively, MDSC can be targeted by treatment with the multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. In this review will provide a comprehensive summary of the recent literature on human MDSC. PMID:21237299

  19. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Freedman, Brett; Porter, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Otto, Michael; Schneewind, Olaf; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe’s success as a human pathogen. PMID:27711145

  20. Activation of human T cells in hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Hana A.; McMaster, William G.; Saleh, Mohamed A.; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P.; Kaszuba, Anna; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E.; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H.; Marshall, Andrew F.; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Madhur, Meena S.; Moore, Daniel J.; Harrison, David G.; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We employed a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 mm Hg vs. 116 mm Hg for sham treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45+) and T lymphocytes (CD3+ and CD4+) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3+/CD45RO+) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating IL-17A producing CD4+ T cells and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that produce IFN-γ in hypertensive compared to normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  1. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  2. Bone tissue engineering with human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of extensive bone defects requires autologous bone grafting or implantation of bone substitute materials. An attractive alternative has been to engineer fully viable, biological bone grafts in vitro by culturing osteogenic cells within three-dimensional scaffolds, under conditions supporting bone formation. Such grafts could be used for implantation, but also as physiologically relevant models in basic and translational studies of bone development, disease and drug discovery. A source of human cells that can be derived in large numbers from a small initial harvest and predictably differentiated into bone forming cells is critically important for engineering human bone grafts. We discuss the characteristics and limitations of various types of human embryonic and adult stem cells, and their utility for bone tissue engineering. PMID:20637059

  3. CD161-expressing human T cells.

    PubMed

    Fergusson, Joannah R; Fleming, Vicki M; Klenerman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Expression of the Natural Killer cell receptor CD161 has recently been identified on a subset of T cells, including both CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cells. Expression of this molecule within the adult circulation is restricted to those T cells with a memory phenotype. However, the distinct properties of these T cell populations is yet to be fully determined, although expression of CD161 has been related to the secretion of interleukin-17, and therefore to a type 17 phenotype. Recent studies have aimed to determine both the origin of these cells and the significance of CD161 expression as either a marker of specific cell types or as an effector and regulator of lymphocyte function, and hence to characterize the role of these CD161+ cells within a variety of human diseases in which they have been implicated.

  4. Local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Thomas; Xu, Hua; Siegel, Cory D; Krichevsky, Igor E

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell apoptosis contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in neuronal and lymphocytic cell lines. We examined the effects of chronic (48 h) local anesthetic treatment (lidocaine, bupivacaine and tetracaine) on human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. Apoptosis induction was assessed by detecting poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase fragmentation, caspase activation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, DNA laddering and by cellular morphology. Cell death was quantified by measuring neutral red dye uptake and lactate dehydrogenase released into the cell culture medium. All 3 local anesthetics caused concentration-dependent cell death, induced HK-2 cell apoptosis and potentiated TNF-alpha induced apoptosis. Local anesthetics induced HK-2 cell apoptosis by activation of caspases 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9. ZVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked the local anesthetic induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. Local anesthetics also inhibited the activities of anti-apoptotic kinases protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated mitrogen-activated protein kinase. Local anesthetic's pro-apoptotic effects are independent of sodium channel inhibition as tetrodotoxin, a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, failed to mimic local anesthetic-mediated induction or potentiation of HK-2 cell apoptosis. We conclude that local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptotic signaling by caspase activation and via inhibition of pro-survival signaling pathways.

  5. Polymorphisms in the matrix metalloproteinase-1, 3, and 9 promoters and susceptibility to adult astrocytoma in northern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongqiang; Cao, Yanyan; Wang, Yimin; Zhang, Qingjun; Zhang, Xianghong; Wang, Shuheng; Li, Yuehong; Xie, Huiling; Jiao, Baohua; Zhang, Jianhui

    2007-10-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) genes may influence tumor occurrence and progression via modifying mRNA transcription and protein expression. The study aims to explore the association of the SNPs in MMP-1, 3 and MMP-9 promoters with susceptibility to adult brain astrocytoma in northern China. Genotyping for the MMP-1 -1607 2G/1G, MMP-3 -1171 5A/6A, and MMP-9 -1562 C/T SNPs were performed by PCR-RFLP methods among 236 adult astrocytoma patients and 366 healthy controls. The results showed that the overall distribution of the MMP-1 allelotype and genotype among astrocytoma patients and healthy controls was significantly different (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). Compared with the 2G/2G genotype, the 1G/1G genotype significantly decreased the risk of astrocytoma development (adjusted OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.42-0.79). The similar results were obtained when stratified by gender and age at tumor diagnosis (< or =45 or >45 years). The association between MMP-3 -1171 5A/6A or MMP-9 -1562 C/T SNPs and susceptibility to astrocytoma was not observed in this study. However, MMP-1 1G-MMP-3 6A haplotype significantly reduced the risk of astrocytoma development when using MMP-1 2G-MMP-3 6A haplotype as a reference (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.29-0.67). The present study suggested that, the MMP-1 -1607 1G/1G genotype and MMP-1 1G-MMP-3 6A haplotype may play protective role in the development of adult astrocytoma in northern Chinese, whereas the MMP-3 -1171 5A/6A and MMP-9 -1562 C/T polymorphisms may not be independent factors to influence susceptibility to adult astrocytoma in this population.

  6. Identification of cells initiating human melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Natasha Y.; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Zhan, Qian; Jordan, Stefan; Duncan, Lyn M.; Weishaupt, Carsten; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Frank, Markus H.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour-initiating cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation, which are responsible for tumour growth, have been identified in human haematological malignancies1,2 and solid cancers3–6. If such minority populations are associated with tumour progression in human patients, specific targeting of tumour-initiating cells could be a strategy to eradicate cancers currently resistant to systemic therapy. Here we identify a subpopulation enriched for human malignant-melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) defined by expression of the chemoresistance mediator ABCB5 (refs 7, 8) and show that specific targeting of this tumorigenic minority population inhibits tumour growth. ABCB5+ tumour cells detected in human melanoma patients show a primitive molecular phenotype and correlate with clinical melanoma progression. In serial human-to-mouse xenotransplantation experiments, ABCB5+ melanoma cells possess greater tumorigenic capacity than ABCB5− bulk populations and re-establish clinical tumour heterogeneity. In vivo genetic lineage tracking demonstrates a specific capacity of ABCB5+ sub-populations for self-renewal and differentiation, because ABCB5+ cancer cells generate both ABCB5+ and ABCB5− progeny, whereas ABCB5− tumour populations give rise, at lower rates, exclusively to ABCB5− cells. In an initial proof-of-principle analysis, designed to test the hypothesis that MMIC are also required for growth of established tumours, systemic administration of a monoclonal antibody directed at ABCB5, shown to be capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in ABCB5+ MMIC, exerted tumour-inhibitory effects. Identification of tumour-initiating cells with enhanced abundance in more advanced disease but susceptibility to specific targeting through a defining chemoresistance determinant has important implications for cancer therapy. PMID:18202660

  7. Identification of cells initiating human melanomas.

    PubMed

    Schatton, Tobias; Murphy, George F; Frank, Natasha Y; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Zhan, Qian; Jordan, Stefan; Duncan, Lyn M; Weishaupt, Carsten; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C; Kupper, Thomas S; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Frank, Markus H

    2008-01-17

    Tumour-initiating cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation, which are responsible for tumour growth, have been identified in human haematological malignancies and solid cancers. If such minority populations are associated with tumour progression in human patients, specific targeting of tumour-initiating cells could be a strategy to eradicate cancers currently resistant to systemic therapy. Here we identify a subpopulation enriched for human malignant-melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) defined by expression of the chemoresistance mediator ABCB5 (refs 7, 8) and show that specific targeting of this tumorigenic minority population inhibits tumour growth. ABCB5+ tumour cells detected in human melanoma patients show a primitive molecular phenotype and correlate with clinical melanoma progression. In serial human-to-mouse xenotransplantation experiments, ABCB5+ melanoma cells possess greater tumorigenic capacity than ABCB5- bulk populations and re-establish clinical tumour heterogeneity. In vivo genetic lineage tracking demonstrates a specific capacity of ABCB5+ subpopulations for self-renewal and differentiation, because ABCB5+ cancer cells generate both ABCB5+ and ABCB5- progeny, whereas ABCB5- tumour populations give rise, at lower rates, exclusively to ABCB5- cells. In an initial proof-of-principle analysis, designed to test the hypothesis that MMIC are also required for growth of established tumours, systemic administration of a monoclonal antibody directed at ABCB5, shown to be capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in ABCB5+ MMIC, exerted tumour-inhibitory effects. Identification of tumour-initiating cells with enhanced abundance in more advanced disease but susceptibility to specific targeting through a defining chemoresistance determinant has important implications for cancer therapy.

  8. Histological Characterization of the Tumorigenic “Peri-Necrotic Niche” Harboring Quiescent Stem-Like Tumor Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Aya; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Kawano, Hiroo; Takubo, Keiyo; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the niches for stem-like tumor cells is important to understand and control the behavior of glioblastomas. Cell-cycle quiescence might be a common mechanism underlying the long-term maintenance of stem-cell function in normal and neoplastic stem cells, and our previous study demonstrated that quiescence induced by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is associated with a high long-term repopulation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells. Based on this, we examined human astrocytoma tissues for HIF-1α-regulated quiescent stem-like tumor cells as a candidate for long-term tumorigenic cells and characterized their niche histologically. Methods Multi-color immunohistochemistry was used to visualize HIF-1α-expressing (HIF-1α+) quiescent stem-like tumor cells and their niche in astrocytoma (WHO grade II–IV) tissues. This niche was modeled using spheroids of cultured glioblastoma cells and its contribution to tumorigenicity was evaluated by sphere formation assay. Results A small subpopulation of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like tumor cells was found in glioblastomas but not in lower-grade astrocytomas. These cells were concentrated in the zone between large ischemic necroses and blood vessels and were closer to the necrotic tissues than to the blood vessels, which suggested that a moderately hypoxic microenvironment is their niche. We successfully modeled this niche containing cells of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like phenotype by incubating glioblastoma cell spheroids under an appropriately hypoxic condition, and the emergence of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like cells was shown to be associated with an enhanced sphere-forming activity. Conclusions These data suggest that the “peri-necrotic niche” harboring HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like cells confers a higher tumorigenic potential on glioblastoma cells and therefore may be a therapeutic target to control the behavior of glioblastomas. PMID:26799577

  9. Human spleen and red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  10. Clinical translation of human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development. PMID:23987648

  11. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  12. Autophagy in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tra, Thien; Gong, Lan; Kao, Lin-Pin; Li, Xue-Lei; Grandela, Catarina; Devenish, Rodney J.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Prescott, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC. PMID:22110659

  13. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tra, Thien; Gong, Lan; Kao, Lin-Pin; Li, Xue-Lei; Grandela, Catarina; Devenish, Rodney J; Wolvetang, Ernst; Prescott, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  14. Mast cells in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    DeBruin, Erin J; Gold, Matthew; Lo, Bernard C; Snyder, Kimberly; Cait, Alissa; Lasic, Nikola; Lopez, Martin; McNagny, Kelly M; Hughes, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are primarily known for their role in defense against pathogens, particularly bacteria; neutralization of venom toxins; and for triggering allergic responses and anaphylaxis. In addition to these direct effector functions, activated mast cells rapidly recruit other innate and adaptive immune cells and can participate in "tuning" the immune response. In this review we touch briefly on these important functions and then focus on some of the less-appreciated roles of mast cells in human disease including cancer, autoimmune inflammation, organ transplant, and fibrosis. Although it is difficult to formally assign causal roles to mast cells in human disease, we offer a general review of data that correlate the presence and activation of mast cells with exacerbated inflammation and disease progression. Conversely, in some restricted contexts, mast cells may offer protective roles. For example, the presence of mast cells in some malignant or cardiovascular diseases is associated with favorable prognosis. In these cases, specific localization of mast cells within the tissue and whether they express chymase or tryptase (or both) are diagnostically important considerations. Finally, we review experimental animal models that imply a causal role for mast cells in disease and discuss important caveats and controversies of these findings.

  15. Laminin receptor on human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, V P; Rao, C N; Kalebic, T; Margulies, I M; Liotta, L A

    1983-01-01

    Human MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells possess a receptor-like moiety on their surface that has a high binding affinity (Kd = 2 nM) for laminin, a glycoprotein localized in basement membranes. Laminin preferentially stimulates (8-fold) MCF-7 cells to attach to type IV (basement membrane) collagen, whereas fibronectin stimulates attachment only 2-fold for these cells on type I collagen. The attachment properties of two other human breast carcinoma cell lines to type IV collagen were also studied. The attachment of ZR-75-1 cells was stimulated 4-fold by laminin and 5-fold by fibronectin, whereas T47-D cell attachment was stimulated 2-fold by laminin and 7-fold by fibronectin. By employing protease-derived fragments of laminin, the major domains of the laminin molecule that participate in MCF-7 cell attachment to type IV collagen were identified. The whole laminin molecule has the configuration of a four-armed cross with three short arms and one long arm. A major cell-binding domain was found to reside near the intersection point of the short arms, and the type IV collagen-binding domain was associated with the globular end regions of the short arms. The receptor for laminin on the surface of these tumor cells may be involved in the initial interaction of tumor cells via laminin with the vascular basement membrane to facilitate invasion and subsequent promotion of metastasis. Images PMID:6300843

  16. Cell mechanics and human disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Subra

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will provide summary of our very recent studies exploring the effects of biochemical factors, influenced by foreign organisms or in vivo processes, on intracellular structural reorganization, single-cell mechanical response and motility of a population of cells in the context of two human diseases: malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites that invade red blood cells, and gastrointestinal cancer metastasis involving epithelial cells. In both cases, particular attention will be devoted to systematic changes induced in specific molecular species in response to controlled alterations in disease state. The role of critical proteins in influencing the mechanical response of human red bloods during the intra-erythrocytic development of P. falciparum merozoites has also been assessed quantitatively using specific protein knock-out experiments by recourse to gene inactivation methods. Single-cell mechanical response characterization entails such tools as optical tweezers and mechanical plate stretchers whereas cell motility assays and cell-population biorheology characterization involves microfluidic channels. The experimental studies are accompanied by three-dimensional computational simulations at the continuum and mesoscopic scales of cell deformation. An outcome of such combined experimental and computational biophysical studies is the realization of how chemical factors influence single-cell mechanical response, cytoadherence, the biorheology of a large population of cells through microchannels representative of in vivo conditions, and the onset and progression of disease states.

  17. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Shekhar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how populations of human T cells leverage cellular heterogeneity, plasticity, and diversity to achieve a wide range of functional flexibility, particularly during dynamic processes such as development, differentiation, and antigenic response, is a core challenge that is well suited for single-cell analysis. Hypothesis-free evaluation of cellular states and subpopulations by transcriptional profiling of single T cells can identify relationships that may be obscured by targeted approaches such as FACS sorting on cell-surface antigens, or bulk expression analysis. While this approach is relevant to all cell types, it is of particular interest in the study of T cells for which classical phenotypic criteria are now viewed as insufficient for distinguishing different T cell subtypes and transitional states, and defining the changes associated with dysfunctional T cell states in autoimmunity and tumor-related exhaustion. This unit describes a protocol to generate single-cell transcriptomic libraries of human blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and also introduces the basic bioinformatic steps to process the resulting sequence data for further computational analysis. We show how cellular subpopulations can be identified from transcriptional data, and derive characteristic gene expression signatures that distinguish these states. We believe single-cell RNA-seq is a powerful technique to study the cellular heterogeneity in complex tissues, a paradigm that will be of great value for the immune system.

  18. Creation of human cardiac cell sheets using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Wada, Masanori; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Haraguchi, Yuji; Sato, Fumiko; Sugiyama, Kasumi; Konishi, Kanako; Shiba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Hinako; Tachibana, Aki; Ikeda, Uichi; Yamato, Masayuki; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Okano, Teruo

    2012-08-24

    Although we previously reported the development of cell-dense thickened cardiac tissue by repeated transplantation-based vascularization of neonatal rat cardiac cell sheets, the cell sources for human cardiac cells sheets and their functions have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we developed a bioreactor to expand and induce cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Bioreactor culture for 14 days produced around 8×10(7) cells/100 ml vessel and about 80% of cells were positive for cardiac troponin T. After cardiac differentiation, cardiomyocytes were cultured on temperature-responsive culture dishes and showed spontaneous and synchronous beating, even after cell sheets were detached from culture dishes. Furthermore, extracellular action potential propagation was observed between cell sheets when two cardiac cell sheets were partially overlaid. These findings suggest that cardiac cell sheets formed by hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes might have sufficient properties for the creation of thickened cardiac tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy and toxicity of the antisense oligonucleotide aprinocarsen directed against protein kinase C-α delivered as a 21-day continuous intravenous infusion in patients with recurrent high-grade astrocytomas1, 2

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Stuart A.; Alavi, Jane B.; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Priet, Regina; Dorr, F. Andrew; Grundy, John S.; Holmlund, Jon T.

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase C alpha (PKC-α) is a cytoplasmic serine threonine kinase involved in regulating cell differentiation and proliferation. Aprinocarsen is an antisense oligonucleotide against PKC-α that reduces PKC-α in human cell lines and inhibits a human glioblastoma tumor cell line in athymic mice. In this phase 2 study, aprinocarsen was administered to patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas by continuous intravenous infusion (2.0 mg/kg/day for 21 days per month). Twenty-one patients entered this trial. Their median age was 46 years (range, 28–68 years), median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60–100), median tumor volume was 58 cm3 (range, 16–254 cm3), and histology included glioblastoma multiforme (n = 16), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (n = 4), and anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 1). The number of prior chemotherapy regimens included none (n = 3), one (n = 10), and two (n = 8). No tumor responses were observed. Patients on this therapy rapidly developed symptoms of increased intracranial pressure with increased edema, enhancement, and mass effect on neuroimaging. The median time to progression was 36 days, and median survival was 3.4 months. The observed toxicities were mild, reversible, and uncommon (grade 3 thrombocytopenia [n = 3] and grade 4 AST [n = 1]), and no coagulopathy or CNS bleeding resulted from this therapy. Plasma concentrations of aprinocarsen during the infusion exhibited significant interpatient variability (mean = 1.06 μg/ml; range, 0.34–6.08 μg/ml). This is the first study to use an antisense oligonucleotide or a specific PKC-α inhibitor in patients with high-grade gliomas. No clinical benefit was seen. The rapid deterioration seen in these patients could result from tumor growth or an effect of aprinocarsen on blood-brain barrier integrity. PMID:15701280

  20. Leptomeningeal dissemination of pilocytic astrocytoma in a 17-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Jandaghi, Ali BabaeI; Bidabadi, Elham; Saadat, Seyed; Alijani, Babak; Daliri, Saeid; Reyhanian, Zoheir; Mashouf, Mehryar

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma with leptomeningeal dissemination is a rare phenomenon and can be associated with obstructive hydrocephalus and an unfavorable prognosis. Herein, we report a seventeen-year-old boy with a history of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt insertion due to severe hydrocephalus who presented with progressive headache and vomiting together with ocular and cerebellar signs and symptoms. Neuroimaging confirmed the presence of multiple intracranial masses in the cerebellum and thalamus. Intracranial dissemination of tumor to the the leptomeninges was seen during neuroendoscopy. Simultaneous biopsy and endoscopic third ventriculostomy were performed and the diagnosis of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma with leptomeningeal dissemination was made by histological examination. The patient underwent chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy to reduce the risk of reoccurrence of the primary tumor and was followed for one year.

  1. Stereotaxic gamma knife surgery in treatment of critically located pilocytic astrocytoma: preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Raef FA

    2007-01-01

    Background Low-grade gliomas are uncommon primary brain tumors, located more often in the posterior fossa, optic pathway, and brain stem and less commonly in the cerebral hemispheres. Case presentations Two patients with diagnosed recurrent cystic pilocytic astrocytoma critically located within the brain (thalamic and brain stem) were treated with gamma knife surgery. Gamma knife surgery (GKS) did improve the patient's clinical condition very much which remained stable later on. Progressive reduction on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the solid part of the tumor and almost disappearance of the cystic component was achieved within the follow-up period of 36 months in the first case with the (thalamic located lesion) and 22 months in the second case with the (brain stem located lesion). Conclusion Gamma knife surgery represents an alternate tool in the treatment of recurrent and/or small postoperative residual pilocytic astrocytoma especially if they are critically located PMID:17394660

  2. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the...

  3. Growth-Factor-Driven Rescue to Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) Inhibitors through Akt and Erk Phosphorylation in Pediatric Low Grade Astrocytoma and Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Sie, Mariska; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Lourens, Harm Jan; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Zomerman, Walderik W.; Kampen, Kim R.; Hoving, Eelco W.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, several clinical studies have been started investigating the relevance of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors upon progression free survival in various pediatric brain tumors. However, single targeted kinase inhibition failed, possibly due to tumor resistance mechanisms. The present study will extend our previous observations that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)β, Src, the epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB) family, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR/cMet) are potentially drugable targets in pediatric low grade astrocytoma and ependymoma with investigations concerning growth-factor-driven rescue. This was investigated in pediatric low grade astrocytoma and ependymoma cell lines treated with receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors e.g. sorafenib, dasatinib, canertinib and crizotinib. Flow cytometry analyses showed high percentage of cells expressing VEGFR-1, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-1, ErbB1/EGFR, HGFR and recepteur d’origine nantais (RON) (respectively 52-77%, 34-51%, 63-90%, 83-98%, 65-95%). Their respective inhibitors induced decrease of cell viability, measured with WST-1 cell viability assays. At least this was partially due to increased apoptotic levels measured by Annexin V/Propidium Iodide apoptosis assays. EGF, HGF and FGF, which are normally expressed in brain (tumor) tissue, showed to be effective rescue inducing growth factors resulting in increased cell survival especially during treatment with dasatinib (complete rescue) or sorafenib (partial rescue). Growth-factor-driven rescue was less prominent when canertinib or crizotinib were used. Rescue was underscored by significantly activating downstream Akt and/or Erk phosphorylation and increased tumor cell migration. Combination treatment showed to be able to overcome the growth-factor-driven rescue. In conclusion, our study highlights the extensive importance of environmentally

  4. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  5. The human mast cell: an overview.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Guha; Ajitawi, Omar; Chi, David S

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are fascinating, multifunctional, tissue-dwelling cells that have been traditionally associated with the allergic response. However, recent studies suggest these cells may be capable of regulating inflammation, host defense, and innate immunity. The purpose of this review is to present salient aspects of mast cell biology in the context of mast cell function in physiology and disease. After their development from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells that are primed with stem cell factor, mast cells continue their maturation and differentiation in peripheral tissue, developing into two well-described subsets of cells, MC(T) and MC(TC) cells. These cells can be distinguished on the basis of their tissue location, dependence on T lymphocytes, and their granule contents. Mast cells can undergo activation by antigens/allergens, superoxides, complement proteins, neuropeptides, and lipoproteins. After activation, mast cells express histamine, leukotrienes, and prostanoids, as well as proteases, and many cytokines and chemokines. These mediators may be pivotal to the genesis of an inflammatory response. By virtue of their location and mediator expression, mast cells may play an active role in many diseases, such as allergy, parasitic diseases, atherosclerosis, malignancy, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and arthritis. Recent data also suggest that mast cells play a vital role in host defense against pathogens by elaboration of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Mast cells also express the Toll-like receptor, which may further accentuate their role in the immune-inflammatory response. This chapter summarizes the many well-known and novel functional aspects of human mast cell biology and emphasizes their unique role in the inflammatory response.

  6. Antibacterial activity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effects of human NK cells on viability of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was investigated. PBLs depleted of glass- adherent cells showed a significant antibacterial activity that was increased as the concentration of NK cells became higher. Leu-11- enriched cells exhibited the most efficient bactericidal activity. Stimulation of NK cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B for 16 h produced a significant increase in the antibacterial activity of all NK cells tested. The antibacterial activity of monocyte-depleted cells and Leu-11-enriched cells was also enhanced after culturing in vitro for 16- 24 h without exogenous cytokines. Dependence of the antibacterial activity on the presence of serum in the culture medium was not found. Ultrastructural studies revealed close contact between NK cell membranes and bacteria, no evidence of phagocytosis, and extracellular bacterial ghosts, after incubation at 37 degrees C. Supernatants from purified NK cells exhibited potent bactericidal activity with kinetics and target specificity similar to that of effector cells. These results document the potent antibacterial activity of purified NK cells and suggest an extracellular mechanism of killing. PMID:2642532

  7. [Contribution of temozolomide chemotherapy for intramedullary grade II spinal cord astrocytomas in adults: Our experience].

    PubMed

    Chaskis, E; Minichini, V; Luce, S; Devriendt, D; Goldman, S; De Witte, O; Sadeghi, N; Lefranc, F

    2017-09-04

    Grade II intramedullary astrocytomas are rare tumors. Despite a well-defined role of adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy for brain gliomas, the contribution of this therapy for intramedullary gliomas is not yet clearly defined. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 5 adult patients treated with temozolomide between 2008 and 2015 for a grade II intramedullary astrocytoma with progression after surgery. Five patients from 19 to 70 years of age (median, 37years) underwent a second surgery for the progression of a grade II intramedullary astrocytoma (median progression-free survival 26months [8-90]). All tumors remained grade II. Due to a second clinical or/and radiological tumor progression, the patients were treated with temozolomide after a 37months median progression-free survival (5-66). All patients received at minimum 12 cycles (mean 14 ± 5; range 12-24) of temozolomide (150-200mg/m(2)/day, 5days/28days). All patients were alive after a 10-year median follow-up after diagnosis (6-13). All patients were able to walk except one, who was previously in McCormick autonomy grade IV before chemotherapy. The McCormick autonomy rating after temozolomide was stable for 4 patients and improved for 1 patient. The treatment was delayed once for hematological toxicity. Temozolomide stabilized all 5 patients without any major toxicity. Based on this experience that needs to be confirmed, we consider that temozolomide should be envisaged within the therapeutic arsenal for progressive intramedullary grade II astrocytomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. CLOSTRIDIUM SPORE ATTACHMENT TO HUMAN CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.; WARREN,J.

    1997-08-10

    This paper uses high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with a LaB6 gun and the newest commercial field emission guns, to obtain high magnification images of intact clostridial spores throughout the activation/germination/outgrowth process. By high resolution SEM, the clostridial exosporial membrane can be seen to produce numerous delicate projections (following activation), that extend from the exosporial surface to a nutritive substrate (agar), or cell surface when anaerobically incubated in the presence of human cells (embryonic fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells). Magnifications of 20,000 to 200,000Xs at accelerating voltages low enough to minimize or eliminate specimen damage (1--5 kV) have permitted the entire surface of C.sporogenes and C.difficile endospores to be examined during all stages of germination. The relationships between the spore and the agar or human cell surface were also clearly visible.

  9. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may predict early tumour progression in paediatric pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Mascelli, Samantha; Nozza, Paolo; Jones, David T.W.; Colin, Carole; Pistorio, Angela; Milanaccio, Claudia; Ravegnani, Marcello; Consales, Alessandro; Witt, Olaf; Morana, Giovanni; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Biassoni, Roberto; Pfister, Stefan M.; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Raso, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma and ganglioglioma may occur in inaccessible or surgically difficult areas. In case of incomplete resection, the availability of biological predictors of tumour progression could be particularly important. To this end, an analysis of p53 codon 72 polymorphism and assessment of its role as prognostic marker were performed. The status of the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was evaluated by pyrosequencing method in a multicenter cohort of 170 paediatric patients. Genotype/phenotype associations were investigated either by means of bivariate or multivariate analyses. In the partially resected pilocytic astrocytomas, the Arg/Arg variant predicts early tumour progression (median survival time: 23.1 months) and is associated with poor event-free survival (p value = 0.0009). This finding remains true also in case of adjuvant therapies, with a 5-year event-free survival of 30.6% for cases with Arg/Arg variant vs. 78.7% for those with other genotypes. There is no association between ganglioglioma and the polymorphism. The assessment of Arg/Arg variant could improve the management of pilocytic astrocytoma. TP53 codon 72 analysis could distinguish low-risk cases, in which surgery could be conservative, from high-risk cases needing an aggressive surgery plan. PMID:27374106

  10. Natural killer cells in human autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a critical role in early host defense against viruses. Through their cytolytic capacity and generation of cytokines and chemokines, NK cells modulate the activity of other components of the innate and adaptive immune systems and have been implicated in the initiation or maintenance of autoimmune responses. This review focuses on recent research elucidating a potential immunoregulatory role for NK cells in T-cell and B-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders in humans, with a particular focus on multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. A better understanding of the contributions of NK cells to the development of autoimmunity may lead to novel therapeutic targets in these diseases. PMID:23856014

  11. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  12. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  13. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-28

    format (96-,384-well) assays, 2) grow as adherent monolayers, and 3) possess a stable karyotype for multiple (>10) passages with a doubling time of ~36...derived neural progenitor cell line working stock has been amplified, characterized for karyotype and evaluated for the expression of neural progenitor...Orlando R, Stice SL. Membrane proteomic signatures of karyotypically normal and abnormal human embryonic stem cell lines and derivatives. Proteomics. 2011

  14. Photomodification of human immunocompetent blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krylenkov, V.A.; Ogurtsov, R.P.; Osmanov, M.A.; Kholmogorov, V.E.

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, processes of photomodification of lymphoid cells in human blood, developing immediately after exposure to visible radiation and also in the late stages after irradiation, were investigated by methods of spontaneous and immune rosette formation and the blast transformation test, combined with treatment with the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol and the radioactive assessment of spontaneous and stimulated DNA synthesis by tritium-thymidine-labelled cells.

  15. Quercetin Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion in Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Fan, Pan; Qian, Dongyang; Zhu, Jianwei; Bai, Bo

    2017-09-21

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor associated with high mortality; however, no effective therapies for the disease have been developed. Several studies have focused on elucidating the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma and have aimed to develop novel therapies for the disease. Quercetin is a vital dietary flavonoid that has been shown to have a variety of anticancer effects, as it induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation and is involved in cell adhesion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Herein, we aimed to investigate the effects of quercetin on osteosarcoma migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on osteosarcoma migration and invasion. Cell viability, cell cycle activity and cell apoptosis were measured using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, and cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of several proteins of interest were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, a nude mouse model of human osteosarcoma lung metastasis was established to assess the anti-metastatic effects of quercetin in vivo. We noted no significant differences in cell cycle activity and apoptosis between HOS and MG63 cells and control cells. Treatment with quercetin significantly attenuated cell migration and invasion in HOS and MG63 cells compared with treatment with control medium. Moreover HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP2, and MMP9 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly downregulated in HOS cells treated with quercetin compared with HOS cells treated with controls. Additionally, treatment with quercetin attenuated metastatic lung tumor formation and growth in the nude mouse model of osteosarcoma compared with treatment with controls. Our findings regarding the inhibitory effects of quercetin on cell migration and invasion suggest that quercetin may have potential as a therapy for human

  16. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  17. Standardized cryopreservation of human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Thomas V; Mathew, Aby J; Thompson, Maria L; Ehrhardt, Rolf O

    2014-09-02

    Cryopreservation is the use of low temperatures to preserve structurally intact living cells. The cells that survive the thermodynamic journey from the 37 °C incubator to the -196 °C liquid nitrogen storage tank are free from the influences of time. Thus, cryopreservation is a critical component of cell culture and cell manufacturing protocols. Successful cryopreservation of human cells requires that the cells be derived from patient samples that are collected in a standardized manner, and carefully handled from blood draw through cell isolation. Furthermore, proper equipment must be in place to ensure consistency, reproducibility, and sterility. In addition, the correct choice and amount of cryoprotectant agent must be added at the correct temperature, and a controlled rate of freezing (most commonly 1 °C/min) must be applied prior to a standardized method of cryogenic storage. This appendix describes how human primary cells can be frozen for long-term storage and thawed for growth in a tissue culture vessel.

  18. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  19. Human ES cells: starting culture from frozen cells.

    PubMed

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-11-09

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80 C freezer is sourced and quickly submerged in a 37 C water bath for quick thawing. Cells in freezing media are then removed from the vial and placed in a large volume of HuES media. The large volume of HuES media facilitates removal of excess serum and DMSO, which can cause HuES human embryonic stem cells to differentiate. Cells are gently spun out of suspension, and then re-suspended in a small volume of fresh HuES media that is then used to seed the MEF plate. It is considered important to seed the MEF plate by gently adding the HuES cells in a drop wise fashion to evenly disperse them throughout the plate. The newly established HuES culture plate is returned to the incubator for 48 hrs before media is replaced, then is fed every 24 hours thereafter.

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cell homing induced by SKOV3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dongmei; Xie, Xiaojuan; Qi, Pengwei; Yang, Xianan; Jin, Ximeng

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) homing is the migration of endogenous and exogenous hMSCS to the target organs and the subsequent colonization under the action chemotaxic factors. This is an important process involved in the repair of damaged tissues. However, we know little about the mechanism of hMSC homing. Stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a cytokine secreted by stromal cells. Its only receptor CXCR4 is widely expressed in blood cells, immune cells and cells in the central nervous system. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway plays an important role in hMSC homing and tissue repair. Human cbll1 gene encodes E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Hakai (also known as CBLL1) consisting of RING-finger domain that is involved in ubiquitination, endocytosis and degradation of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) as well as in the regulation of cell proliferation. We successfully constructed LV3-CXCR4 siRNA lentiviral vector, LV3-CBLL1 RNAi lentiviral vector and the corresponding cell systems which were used to induce hMSC homing in the presence of SKOV3 cells. Thus the mechanism of hMSC homing was studied. PMID:28337256

  1. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    PubMed

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  2. Csk-Induced Phosphorylation of Src at Tyrosine 530 is Essential for H2O2-Mediated Suppression of ERK1/2 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Kyung; Kwon, Kihwan; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2015-08-03

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal transducers involved in various cellular events such as growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Previous studies have reported that H2O2 leads to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), one of the MAPKs in endothelial cells. The current study shows that H2O2 suppressed ERK1/2 activation and phosphorylation at specific concentrations and times in human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not in immortalized mouse aortic endothelial cells or human astrocytoma cell line CRT-MG. Phosphorylation of other MAPK family members (i.e., p38 and JNK) was not suppressed by H2O2. The decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was inversely correlated with the level of phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 530. Using siRNA, it was found that H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 was dependent on Csk. Physiological laminar flow abrogated, but oscillatory flow did not affect, the H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In conclusion, H2O2-induced Csk translocation to the plasma membrane leads to phosphorylation of Src at the tyrosine 530 residue resulting in a reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Physiological laminar flow abrogates this effect of H2O2 by inducing phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 419. These findings broaden our understanding of signal transduction mechanisms in the endothelial cells against oxidative stress.

  3. Csk-Induced Phosphorylation of Src at Tyrosine 530 is Essential for H2O2-Mediated Suppression of ERK1/2 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Bo Kyung; Kwon, Kihwan; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal transducers involved in various cellular events such as growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Previous studies have reported that H2O2 leads to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), one of the MAPKs in endothelial cells. The current study shows that H2O2 suppressed ERK1/2 activation and phosphorylation at specific concentrations and times in human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not in immortalized mouse aortic endothelial cells or human astrocytoma cell line CRT-MG. Phosphorylation of other MAPK family members (i.e., p38 and JNK) was not suppressed by H2O2. The decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was inversely correlated with the level of phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 530. Using siRNA, it was found that H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 was dependent on Csk. Physiological laminar flow abrogated, but oscillatory flow did not affect, the H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In conclusion, H2O2-induced Csk translocation to the plasma membrane leads to phosphorylation of Src at the tyrosine 530 residue resulting in a reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Physiological laminar flow abrogates this effect of H2O2 by inducing phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 419. These findings broaden our understanding of signal transduction mechanisms in the endothelial cells against oxidative stress. PMID:26234813

  4. Human embryonic stem cells and cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip D; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with noncontractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain in the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges.

  5. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  6. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  7. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Kaushik Dilip; Sarda, Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic. PMID:18230169

  8. Phagocytosis of dying tumor cells by human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Britta Janina; Lindau, Dennis; Ripper, Dagmar; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Glatzle, Jörg; Witte, Maria; Beck, Henning; Keppeler, Hildegard; Lauber, Kirsten; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2011-05-15

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is an advanced form of metastatic disease characterized by cancer cell dissemination onto the peritoneum. It is commonly observed in ovarian and colorectal cancers and is associated with poor patient survival. Novel therapies consist of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, aiming at tumor cell death induction. The resulting dying tumor cells are considered to be eliminated by professional as well as semi-professional phagocytes. In the present study, we have identified a hitherto unknown type of 'amateur' phagocyte in this environment: human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HMCs). We demonstrate that HMCs engulf corpses of dying ovarian and colorectal cancer cells, as well as other types of apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric, confocal and electron microscopical analyses revealed that HMCs ingest dying cell fragments in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the internalized material subsequently traffics into late phagolysosomes. Regarding the mechanisms of prey cell recognition, our results show that HMCs engulf apoptotic corpses in a serum-dependent and -independent fashion and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that diverse opsonin receptor systems orchestrating dying cell clearance are expressed in HMCs at high levels. Our data strongly suggest that HMCs contribute to dying cell removal in the peritoneum, and future studies will elucidate in what manner this influences tumor cell dissemination and the antitumor immune response.

  9. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  10. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  11. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  12. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Henipavirus pathogenesis in human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection.

  14. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  15. [Telomerase, elixir of life for human cells?].

    PubMed

    Rufer, Nathalie; Nabholz, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes that in vertebrates constain hundreds to thousands of tandem repeats of the sequence TTAGGG. In most human somatic cells, telomeres shorten with each cell division, eventually triggering an irreversible arrest of proliferation called cellular senescence. These observations have led to a model in which telomere length reflects the mitotic history of somatic cells. Further support for this hypothesis has come from the discovery of telomerase, a unique reverse transcriptase ribonucleoprotein that has the ability to extend 3' end of telomeres. In fibroblasts, senescence is induced by telomere attrition and depends on p53 and pRb pathways triggered by one or a few critically short telomeres. Previous studies have shown that the replicative life span of various primary human cells can be prolonged by transduction of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. The hTERT expressing cells proliferate indefinitely, without undergoing any changes associated with transformation to malignancy. Rapid progress has been made towards the goal of using tumor-specific cytolytic CD8+ T lymphocytes for the immunotherapy of cancer. These cells can be expanded in vitro and, in principle, could be used for adoptive immunotherapy. One of the major problems that remains to be solved is the finite life span of normal human T lymphocytes. In an attempt to overcome this barrier three groups have introduced hTERT cDNA into human T lymphocytes and monitored its effect on their life span. In two of these studies, hTERT significantly extended the replicative life span of CD8+ T clones, whereas this was not the case in the third study using bulk T lymphocytes. Possible explanations for these discordant results are that better growth conditions avoided culture-induced stress in the study with clones, or that clones had undergone alterations leading, for example, to the inactivation of the pRb pathway during their

  16. Clinical potentials of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mora, Cristina; Serzanti, Marialaura; Consiglio, Antonella; Memo, Maurizio; Dell'Era, Patrizia

    2017-02-08

    Aging, injuries, and diseases can be considered as the result of malfunctioning or damaged cells. Regenerative medicine aims to restore tissue homeostasis by repairing or replacing cells, tissues, or damaged organs, by linking and combining different disciplines including engineering, technology, biology, and medicine. To pursue these goals, the discipline is taking advantage of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), a peculiar type of cell possessing the ability to differentiate into every cell type of the body. Human PSCs can be isolated from the blastocysts and maintained in culture indefinitely, giving rise to the so-called embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, since 2006, it is possible to restore in an adult cell a pluripotent ESC-like condition by forcing the expression of four transcription factors with the rejuvenating reprogramming technology invented by Yamanaka. Then the two types of PSC can be differentiated, using standardized protocols, towards the cell type necessary for the regeneration. Although the use of these derivatives for therapeutic transplantation is still in the preliminary phase of safety and efficacy studies, a lot of efforts are presently taking place to discover the biological mechanisms underlying genetic pathologies, by differentiating induced PSCs derived from patients, and new therapies by challenging PSC-derived cells in drug screening.

  17. Inhibition of MEK Confers Hypersensitivity to X-radiation in the context of BRAF mutation in a Model of Childhood Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Studebaker, Adam; Bondra, Kathryn; Seum, Star; Shen, Changxian; Phelps, Doris A.; Chronowski, Christopher; Leasure, Justin; Smith, Paul D.; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Mo, Xiaokui; Fouladi, Maryam; Houghton, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curative therapy for childhood glioma presents challenges when complete resection is not possible. Patients with recurrent low-grade tumors or anaplastic astrocytoma may receive radiation treatment, however, the long-term sequellae from radiation treatment can be severe. As many childhood gliomas are associated with activation of BRAF, we have explored the combination of ionizing radiation with MEK inhibition in a model of BRAF-mutant anaplastic astrocytoma. Experimental Design The regulation of TORC1 signaling by BRAF was examined in BT-40 (BRAF mutant) and BT-35 (BRAF wild type) xenografts, in a cell line derived from the BT-40 xenograft and two adult BRAF mutant glioblastoma cell lines. The effect of MEK inhibition (selumetinib), XRT (total dose10 Gy as 2 Gy daily fractions), or the combination of selumetinib and XRT was evaluated in subcutaneous BT-40 xenografts. Results Inhibition of MEK signaling by selumetinib, suppressed TORC1 signaling only in the context of the BRAF-mutant both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of MEK signaling in BT-40 cells or in xenografts lead to a complete suppression of FANCD2 and conferred hypersensitivity to XRT in BT-40 xenografts without increasing local skin toxicity. Conclusions Selumetinib suppressed TORC1 signaling in the context of BRAF mutation. Selumetinib caused a rapid downregulation of FANCD2 and markedly potentiated the effect of XRT. These data suggest the possibility of potentiating the effect of XRT selectively in tumor cells by MEK inhibition in the context of mutant BRAF or maintaining tumor control at lower doses of XRT that would decrease long-term sequelae. PMID:25981859

  18. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  19. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  20. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  1. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  2. Cell cycle regulation of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Logan, Philip C; Steiner, Michael; Ponnampalam, Anna P; Mitchell, Murray D

    2012-08-01

    Differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells is crucial for optimal endometrial receptivity. Data from our previous microarray study implied that expression of many cell cycle regulators are changed during decidualization and inhibition of DNA methylation in vitro. In this study, we hypothesized that both the classic progestin treatment and DNA methylation inhibition would inhibit stromal cell proliferation and cell cycle transition. The human endometrial stromal cell line (HESC) was treated from 2 days to 18 days with the DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA), a mixture of estradiol/progestin/cyclic adenosine monophosphate ([cAMP]; medroxy-progesterone acetate [MPA mix]) or both. Cell growth was measured by cell counting, cell cycle transition and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, expression of cell cycle regulators were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting, and change in DNA methylation profiles were detected by methylation-specific PCR. Both AZA and MPA mix inhibited the proliferation of HESC for at least 7 days. Treatment with MPA mix resulted in an early G0/G1 inhibition followed by G2/M phase inhibition at 18 days. In contrast, AZA treatment inhibited cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase throughout. The protein levels of p21(Cip1)and 14-3-3σ were increased with both AZA and MPA mix treatments without any change in the DNA methylation profiles of the genes. Our data imply that the decidualization of HESC is associated with cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase initially and G2/M phase at later stages. Our results also suggest that p53 pathway members play a role in the cell cycle regulation of endometrial stromal cells.

  3. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  4. Interdigitating reticulum cells in human renal grafts.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, T; Onoda, H

    1991-01-01

    Seventeen human renal graft biopsies taken 1 h to 50 days after transplantation and 3 human renal non-graft biopsies (2 minimal change and 1 non-tumour portion of angiomyolipoma) were investigated with immunoelectron microscopy in order to identify interdigitating reticulum cells (IDC) or dendritic cells (DC) in renal tissues. The antibodies used consisted of a rabbit polyclonal antibody of antihuman S100 beta protein, mouse monoclonal antibodies of antihuman HLA-DR, anti-CD3, and anti-CD1a. IDC or DC were identified in 11 renal grafts. They were found both in the glomerular and interstitial (peritubular) capillary lumens but not in the interstitium of 1 case: both were present in the interstitial capillary lumens and interstitium of another case, and in the interstitium only of 9 cases. In the remaining 6 grafts and 3 non-grafts they were not detected. These 6 grafts and 3 non-grafts did not show any pathological change except for foot process fusion of the glomerular epithelia in 2 cases of minimal change. These findings suggest that IDC or DC are not normally present in human renal tissues. The presence of the cell in the glomerular and peritubular capillary lumens of a biopsy taken after 1 h and their presence in the interstitial capillary lumens of another graft biopsy, suggest that the IDC or DC in human renal grafts are derived from recipients, not donors, and that they migrate from the circulating blood toward the interstitium.

  5. Concurrent TERT promoter and BRAF V600E mutation in epithelioid glioblastoma and concomitant low-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Nozomi; Nakajima, Nozomi; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Nagano, Takuro; Kagoshima, Kaie; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Ikota, Hayato; Yokoo, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    Epithelioid glioblastoma (E-GBM) is a rare variant of glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by epithelioid cells with eosinophilic round cytoplasm devoid of stellate cytoplasmic processes. A number of studies have demonstrated that more than half of E-GBMs harbor a valine to glutamic acid substitution at position 600 of the serine/threonine-protein kinase BRAF (BRAF V600E). However, there are no previous reports on E-GBM with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in addition to BRAF V600E mutation. Here, we report an E-GBM case in an 18-year-old man with BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations. The tumor composed of 80% E-GBM and 20% diffuse astrocytoma-like components, and BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations were detected in both. E-GBM generally arises as a primary lesion; however, a few previous cases have been demonstrated to accompany low-grade areas. Demonstration of concurrent BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in low- and high-grade lesions strongly suggested their identical origin, and acquisition of each mutation may be an early event, possibly playing a pivotal role in the genesis and subsequent progression to E-GBM.

  6. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    PubMed Central

    Macallan, Derek C.; Borghans, José A. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2017-01-01

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:28165397

  7. HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Folkman, Judah

    1974-01-01

    Human endothelial cells, obtained by collagenase treatment of term umbilical cord veins, were cultured using Medium 199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum. Small clusters of cells initially spread on plastic or glass, coalesced and grew to form confluent monolayers of polygonal cells by 7 days. Cells in primary and subcultures were identified as endothelium by the presence of Weibel-Palade bodies by electron microscopy. A morphologically distinct subpopulation of cells contaminating some primary endothelial cultures was selectively subcultured, and identified by ultrastructural criteria as vascular smooth muscle. Autoradiography of endothelial cells after exposure to [3H]thymidine showed progressive increases in labeling in growing cultures beginning at 24 h. In recently confluent cultures, labeling indices were 2.4% in central closely packed regions, and 53.2% in peripheral growing regions. 3 days after confluence, labeling was uniform, being 3.5 and 3.9% in central and peripheral areas, respectively. When small areas of confluent cultures were experimentally "denuded," there were localized increases in [3H]thymidine labeling and eventual reconstitution of the monolayer. Liquid scintillation measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation in primary and secondary endothelial cultures in microwell trays showed a similar correlation of DNA synthesis with cell density. These data indicate that endothelial cell cultures may provide a useful in vitro model for studying pathophysiologic factors in endothelial regeneration. PMID:4363161

  8. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View.

    PubMed

    Macallan, Derek C; Borghans, José A M; Asquith, Becca

    2017-02-04

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  9. Cardiogenesis from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mignone, John L; Kreutziger, Kareen L; Paige, Sharon L; Murry, Charles E

    2010-11-01

    Over the past decade, the ability to culture and differentiate human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has offered researchers a novel therapeutic that may, for the first time, repair regions of the damaged heart. Studies of cardiac development in lower organisms have led to identification of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily (eg, activin A and bone morphogenic protein 4) and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as key inducers of mesoderm and cardiovascular differentiation. These factors act in a context-specific manner (eg, Wnt/β-catenin is required initially to form mesoderm but must be antagonized thereafter to make cardiac muscle). Different lines of ESCs produce different levels of agonists and antagonists for these pathways, but with careful optimization, highly enriched populations of immature cardiomyocytes can be generated. These cardiomyocytes survive transplantation to infarcted hearts of experimental animals, where they create new human myocardial tissue and improve heart function. The grafts generated by cell transplantation have been small, however, leading to an exploration of tissue engineering as an alternate strategy. Engineered tissue generated from preparations of human cardiomyocytes survives poorly after transplantation, most likely because of ischemia. Creation of pre-organized vascular networks in the tissue markedly enhances survival, with human capillaries anastomosed to the host coronary circulation. Thus, pathways controlling formation of the human cardiovascular system are emerging, yielding the building blocks for tissue regeneration that may address the root causes of heart failure.

  10. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  11. Spectroscopy of untreated pilocytic astrocytomas: do children and adults share some metabolic features in addition to their morphologic similarities?

    PubMed

    Porto, Luciana; Kieslich, Matthias; Franz, Kea; Lehrbecher, Thomas; Vlaho, Stefan; Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke

    2010-06-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas may show heterogeneous histopathological and imaging features which are commonly attributed to malignant gliomas. Using magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, we assessed if pilocytic astrocytomas show increased choline (tCho), classically related to proliferation and malignancy of gliomas. Sixteen patients (five adults, age 20-55 years and 11 children, age 6 months-15 years) with histologically proven pilocytic astrocytomas were evaluated retrospectively. MR spectroscopy was performed prior to surgery or biopsy in all patients. Intensities of tCho and total creatine (tCr) signals were normalised to the respective signal intensity of contralateral brain tissue and statistically evaluated for group differences between adults and children. The tCho levels covered a wide range with a trend towards elevated values, especially in the adult group. tCho levels ranged from 0.78 to 2.92 in the paediatric group (mean 1.15) and from 1.15 to 3.03 in the adult group (mean 1.35). Diminished or normal tCr values were observed in all patients but one. The well-known positive correlation between increase of tCho and the grade of gliomas seems to be violated by WHO grade I pilocytic astrocytomas showing a wide range of tCho values with an even marked increase in some cases. No significant differences have been identified in the MR spectroscopy metabolite profiles between paediatric and adult pilocytic astrocytomas.

  12. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 11 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A method for... Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human mammary epithelial stem cells with in vivo regenerative ability...Abstracts Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turshvili, Sam Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves, “Identification of Human Mammary

  13. Cell phoney: human cloning after Quintavalle.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Derek; Ford, Mary

    2004-12-01

    Reproductive cloning has thrown up new scientific possibilities, ethical conundrums, and legal challenges. An initial question, considered by the English courts in 2003, was whether the technique presently available, that of cell nucleus replacement, falls outside the provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. If it does, the creation and use, including use in research protocols, of human embryos would be unregulated, disclosing a need to consider remedial legislation. The resolution by the courts of this legal question dramatically engages them in a resolution of fundamental ethical dilemmas, and discloses the possibilities and limitation of negotiating science policy through the processes of litigation.

  14. Mice engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells support a human myeloid cell inflammatory response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew; Deng, Chenliang; Eliceiri, Matthew H; Haghi, Fatima; Dang, Xitong; Coimbra, Raul; Costantini, Todd W; Torbett, Bruce E; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2016-11-01

    Mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (CD34(+) -HSPCs) have been used to study human infection, diabetes, sepsis, and burn, suggesting that they could be highly amenable to characterizing the human inflammatory response to injury. To this end, human leukocytes infiltrating subcutaneous implants of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponges were analyzed in immunodeficient NSG mice reconstituted with CD34(+) -HSPCs. It was reported that human CD45(+) (hCD45(+) ) leukocytes were present in PVA sponges 3 and 7 days postimplantation and could be localized within the sponges by immunohistochemistry. The different CD45(+) subtypes were characterized by flow cytometry and the profile of human cytokines they secreted into PVA wound fluid was assessed using a human-specific multiplex bead analyses of human IL-12p70, TNFα, IL-10, IL-6, IL1β, and IL-8. This enabled tracking the functional contributions of HLA-DR(+) , CD33(+) , CD19(+) , CD62L(+) , CD11b(+) , or CX3CR1(+) hCD45(+) infiltrating inflammatory leukocytes. PCR of cDNA prepared from these cells enabled the assessment and differentiation of human, mouse, and uniquely human genes. These findings support the hypothesis that mice engrafted with CD34(+) -HSPCs can be deployed as precision avatars to study the human inflammatory response to injury. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  15. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  16. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  17. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1. PMID:7229611

  19. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  20. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  1. Chromium oxidation state mapping in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Devès, G.; Susini, J.

    2003-03-01

    The widespread use of chromium in industrial applications such as chemical production of pigments, refractory brick production, tanning, metallurgy, electroplating, and combustion of fuels has lead to human occupational exposure and to its increased introduction into the environment. Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation is not known. Up to now, no microanalytical technique was sensitive enough to allow the observation of chromium distribution, and oxidation state identification, within isolated cells at carcinogenic concentrations. In this experiment, we used successfully the ID-21 X-ray microscope to map Cr(VI) and total Cr distributions in cells exposed in vitro to soluble, and insoluble, Cr(VI) compounds. Exposure to soluble compounds, weak carcinogens, resulted in a homogeneous intracellular distribution of Cr, confirming by in situ measurement that Cr is present in the cell nucleus. Cr(VI) was never detected in cells which suggests a mechanism of rapid intracellular reducticn. On the other hand, exposure to insoluble compounds, strong carcinogens, also resulted in a homogeneous distribution of reduced forms of Cr in cells, and their nucleus. However, in this case, Cr(VI)-rich structures were observed into the cells suggesting that carcinogenicity is enhanced when oxidation reactions due to Cr(VI) chronic exposure are associated to Cr-DNA alterations.

  2. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-03-12

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the "programming" and "reprogramming" of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart.

  3. TALEN-Induced Translocations in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Ghezraoui, Hind; Brunet, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Induction of chromosomal translocations in human cells is of a great interest to study tumorigenesis and genome instability. Here, we explain in detail a method to induce translocations using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We describe how to detect translocation formation by PCR, calculate translocation frequency by 96-well PCR screen, and analyze breakpoint junctions. When inducing cancer translocations, it is also possible to detect the fusion gene by FISH analysis or western blot.

  4. US policies on human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Richard O

    2008-12-01

    The United States is a federal union with separate state jurisdictions. In part owing to the sometimes heated debate about public support for human embryonic stem-cell (ESC) research, there has been restricted federal support and little central regulation of this research to date. Instead, guidelines developed by scientific organizations have set principles for oversight and good practice for this research. These guidelines are functioning well, have influenced developing state regulations and, one hopes, will affect any future federal regulation.

  5. Increased human hybridoma formation by electrofusion of human B cells with heteromyeloma SPAM-8 cells.

    PubMed

    Panova, I; Gustafsson, B

    1995-06-01

    A fusion protocol was designed for the optimal production of hybridomas following electrofusion of human B cells with cells of the heteromyeloma fusion partner SPAM-8. Peripheral blood lymphocytes showed an average fusion efficiency of 0.4 x 10(-4) whereas Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells showed fusion efficiencies ranging from 6.2 x 10(-4) to 9.0 x 10(-4). Similar results were obtained with bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. Trypsin treatment of the cells prior to electrofusion further increased the fusion efficiency to 12.3 x 10(-4). In comparison, conventional polyethylene glycol-induced fusion resulted in a fusion efficiency of 0.8 x 10(-4). Thus, electrofusion of human B cells with SPAM-8 heteromyeloma cells introduced a 15-fold increase in hybridoma formation as compared to the conventional fusion method.

  6. The core regulatory network in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sun; Kim, Dongsan; Kang, Nam Sook; Kim, Jeong-Rae

    2017-03-04

    In order to discover the common characteristics of various cell types in the human body, many researches have been conducted to find the set of genes commonly expressed in various cell types and tissues. However, the functional characteristics of a cell is determined by the complex regulatory relationships among the genes rather than by expressed genes themselves. Therefore, it is more important to identify and analyze a core regulatory network where all regulatory relationship between genes are active across all cell types to uncover the common features of various cell types. Here, based on hundreds of tissue-specific gene regulatory networks constructed by recent genome-wide experimental data, we constructed the core regulatory network. Interestingly, we found that the core regulatory network is organized by simple cascade and has few complex regulations such as feedback or feed-forward loops. Moreover, we discovered that the regulatory links from genes in the core regulatory network to genes in the peripheral regulatory network are much more abundant than the reverse direction links. These results suggest that the core regulatory network locates at the top of regulatory network and plays a role as a 'hub' in terms of information flow, and the information that is common to all cells can be modified to achieve the tissue-specific characteristics through various types of feedback and feed-forward loops in the peripheral regulatory networks. We also found that the genes in the core regulatory network are evolutionary conserved, essential and non-disease, non-druggable genes compared to the peripheral genes. Overall, our study provides an insight into how all human cells share a common function and generate tissue-specific functional traits by transmitting and processing information through regulatory network.

  7. Inner Ear Hair Cell-Like Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  8. Decreased Survival of Glioma Patients with Astrocytoma Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme) Associated with Long-Term Use of Mobile and Cordless Phones

    PubMed Central

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a “possible”, human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997–2003 and 2007–2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4–2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04–11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007–1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999–1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines. PMID:25325361

  9. The first recombinant human coagulation factor VIII of human origin: human cell line and manufacturing characteristics.

    PubMed

    Casademunt, Elisabeth; Martinelle, Kristina; Jernberg, Mats; Winge, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Maya; Biesert, Lothar; Knaub, Sigurd; Walter, Olaf; Schröder, Carola

    2012-08-01

    Since the early 1990s, recombinant human clotting factor VIII (rhFVIII) produced in hamster cells has been available for haemophilia A treatment. However, the post-translational modifications of these proteins are not identical to those of native human FVIII, which may lead to immunogenic reactions and the development of inhibitors against rhFVIII. For the first time, rhFVIII produced in a human host cell line is available. We describe here the establishment of the first human production cell line for rhFVIII and the manufacturing process of this novel product. A human cell line expressing rhFVIII was derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 F cells transfected with an FVIII expression plasmid. No virus or virus-like particles could be detected following extensive testing. The stringently controlled production process is completely free from added materials of animal or human origin. Multistep purification employing a combination of filtration and chromatography steps ensures the efficient removal of impurities. Solvent/detergent treatment and a 20 nm pore size nanofiltration step, used for the first time in rhFVIII manufacturing, efficiently eliminate any hypothetically present viruses. In contrast to hamster cell-derived products, this rhFVIII product does not contain hamster-like epitopes, which might be expected to be immunogenic. HEK 293 F cells, whose parental cell line HEK 293 has been used by researchers for decades, are a suitable production cell line for rhFVIII and will help avoid immunogenic epitopes. A modern manufacturing process has been developed to ensure the highest level of purity and pathogen safety. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells in humanized mouse models harboring a human immune system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heung-Mo; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Young-Sil; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Yong-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Sung-Joo; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2013-12-01

    Allogeneic transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives has the potential to elicit the patient's immune response and lead to graft rejection. Although hESCs and their derivatives have been shown to have advantageous immune properties in vitro, such observations could not be determined experimentally in vivo because of ethical and technical constraints. However, the generation of humanized mice (hu-mice) harboring a human immune system has provided a tool to perform in vivo immunologic studies of human cells and tissues. Using this model, we sought to examine the therapeutic potential of hESC-derived endothelial cells, human embryonic fibroblasts, and cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells in a human immune system environment. All cell types transplanted in hu-mice showed significantly reduced cell survival during the first 14 days post-transplantation compared with that observed in immunodeficient mice. During this period, no observable therapeutic effects were detected in the hindlimb ischemic mouse models. After this point, the cells demonstrated improved survival and contributed to a long-term improvement in blood perfusion. All cell types showed reduced therapeutic efficacy in hu-mice compared with NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout mice. Interestingly, the eventual improvement in blood flow caused by the hESC-derived endothelial cells in hu-mice was not much lower than that observed in NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout mice. These findings suggest that hESC derivatives may be considered a good source for cell therapy and that hu-mice could be used as a preclinical in vivo animal model for the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy to predict the outcomes of human clinical trials.

  12. Colony forming cell (CFC) assay for human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Nayan J; Takeda, Akiko; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-12-18

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells are usually obtained from bone marrow, cord blood, or peripheral blood and are used to study hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. They have the capacity to differentiate into lymphoid and myeloid lineages. The colony forming cell (CFC) assay is used to study the proliferation and differentiation pattern of hematopoietic progenitors by their ability to form colonies in a semisolid medium. The number and the morphology of the colonies formed by a fixed number of input cells provide preliminary information about the ability of progenitors to differentiate and proliferate. Cells can be harvested from individual colonies or from the whole plate to further assess their numbers and differentiation states using flow cytometry and morphologic evaluation of Giemsa-stained slides. This assay is useful for assessing myeloid but not lymphoid differentiation. The term myeloid in this context is used in its wider sense to encompass granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. We have used this assay to assess the effects of oncogenes on the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells derived from peripheral blood. For this purpose cells are transduced with either control retroviral construct or a construct expressing the oncogene of interest, in this case NUP98-HOXA9. We employ a commonly used retroviral vector, MSCV-IRES-GFP, that expresses a bicistronic mRNA that produces the gene of interest and a GFP marker. Cells are pre-activated by growing in the presence of cytokines for two days prior to retroviral transduction. After another two days, GFP+ cells are isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mixed with a methylcellulose-containing semisolid medium supplemented with cytokines and incubated till colonies appear on the surface, typically 14 days. The number and morphology of the colonies are documented. Cells are then removed from the plates, washed, counted, and subjected to flow cytometry and

  13. Report of effective trametinib therapy in 2 children with progressive hypothalamic optic pathway pilocytic astrocytoma: documentation of volumetric response.

    PubMed

    Miller, Catherine; Guillaume, Daniel; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Clark, H Brent; Moertel, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor in childhood, and astrocytomas account for the largest proportion of these tumors. Increasing sophistication in genetic testing has allowed for the detection of specific mutations within tumor subtypes that may represent targets for individualized tumor treatment. The mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and, more specifically, BRAF mutations have been shown to be prevalent in pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas and may represent one such area to target. Herein, the authors describe 2 cases of inoperable, chemotherapy-resistant pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas with a documented response to trametinib, an MAPK pathway inhibitor. While these cases were not treated in the setting of a clinical trial, their data support further ongoing clinical trial investigation to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this agent in pediatric low-grade gliomas.

  14. Immortalization of human myogenic progenitor cell clone retaining multipotentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Naohiro . E-mail: nao@nils.go.jp; Kiyono, Tohru; Wada, Michiko R.; Shimizu, Shirabe; Yasumoto, Shigeru; Inagawa, Masayo

    2006-10-06

    Human myogenic cells have limited ability to proliferate in culture. Although forced expression of telomerase can immortalize some cell types, telomerase alone delays senescence of human primary cultured myogenic cells, but fails to immortalize them. In contrast, constitutive expression of both telomerase and the E7 gene from human papillomavirus type 16 immortalizes primary human myogenic cells. We have established an immortalized primary human myogenic cell line preserving multipotentiality by ectopic expression of telomerase and E7. The immortalized human myogenic cells exhibit the phenotypic characteristics of their primary parent, including an ability to undergo myogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic terminal differentiation under appropriate culture conditions. The immortalized cells will be useful for both basic and applied studies aimed at human muscle disorders. Furthermore, immortalization by transduction of telomerase and E7 represents a useful method by which to expand human myogenic cells in vitro without compromising their ability to differentiate.

  15. Leksell Gamma Knife treatment for pilocytic astrocytomas: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Simonova, Gabriela; Kozubikova, Petra; Liscak, Roman; Novotny, Josef

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term treatment results, radiation-related toxicity, and prognostic factors for the progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with pilocytic astrocytomas treated by means of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife. METHODS A total of 25 patients with pilocytic astrocytomas underwent Gamma Knife surgery during the period 1992-2002. The median target volume was 2700 mm(3) (range 205-25,000 mm(3)). The 18 patients treated with 5 daily fractions received a median minimum target dose of 25 Gy. Doses for the 2 patients treated with 10 fractions over 5 days (2 fractions delivered on the same day at least 6 hours apart) were 23 and 28 Gy. For the 5 patients treated with a single fraction, the minimum target dose ranged from 13 to 20 Gy (median 16 Gy). RESULTS Complete regression occurred in 10 patients (40%) and partial regression in 10 patients (40%). The 10-year overall survival rate was 96% and the 10-year PFS rate was 80%. Target volume appeared to be a significant prognostic factor for PFS (p = 0.037). Temporary Grade 3 toxicity appeared in 2 patients (8%), and these patients were treated with corticosteroids for 2 months. Permanent Grade 4 toxicity appeared in 2 patients (8%) and was associated with neurocognitive dysfunction. In these 2 individuals, the neurocognitive dysfunction was also felt to be in part the result of the additional therapeutic interventions (4 in one case and 6 in the other) required to achieve durable control of their tumors. CONCLUSIONS Radiosurgery represents an alternative treatment modality for small residual or recurrent volumes of pilocytic astrocytomas and provides long-term local control. Target volume appears to be the most important factor affecting PFS.

  16. Transcriptional landscape of the human cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Chen, Sujun; Wang, Su; Soares, Fraser; Fischer, Martin; Meng, Feilong; Du, Zhou; Lin, Charles; Meyer, Clifford; DeCaprio, James A; Brown, Myles; Liu, X Shirley; He, Housheng Hansen

    2017-03-28

    Steady-state gene expression across the cell cycle has been studied extensively. However, transcriptional gene regulation and the dynamics of histone modification at different cell-cycle stages are largely unknown. By applying a combination of global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and histone-modification Chip sequencing (ChIP-seq), we depicted a comprehensive transcriptional landscape at the G0/G1, G1/S, and M phases of breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Importantly, GRO-seq and RNA-seq analysis identified different cell-cycle-regulated genes, suggesting a lag between transcription and steady-state expression during the cell cycle. Interestingly, we identified genes actively transcribed at early M phase that are longer in length and have low expression and are accompanied by a global increase in active histone 3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me2) and histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac) modifications. In addition, we identified 2,440 cell-cycle-regulated enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are strongly associated with differential active transcription but not with stable expression levels across the cell cycle. Motif analysis of dynamic eRNAs predicted Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a key regulator of G1/S transition, and this identification was validated experimentally. Taken together, our combined analysis characterized the transcriptional and histone-modification profile of the human cell cycle and identified dynamic transcriptional signatures across the cell cycle.

  17. Nicotinamide extends replicative lifespan of human cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Lee, Hyung Il; Hwang, Eun Seong

    2006-10-01

    We found that an ongoing application of nicotinamide to normal human fibroblasts not only attenuated expression of the aging phenotype but also increased their replicative lifespan, causing a greater than 1.6-fold increase in the number of population doublings. Although nicotinamide by itself does not act as an antioxidant, the cells cultured in the presence of nicotinamide exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage products associated with cellular senescence, and a decelerated telomere shortening rate without a detectable increase in telomerase activity. Furthermore, in the treated cells growing beyond the original Hayflick limit, the levels of p53, p21WAF1, and phospho-Rb proteins were similar to those in actively proliferating cells. The nicotinamide treatment caused a decrease in ATP levels, which was stably maintained until the delayed senescence point. Nicotinamide-treated cells also maintained high mitochondrial membrane potential but a lower respiration rate and superoxide anion level. Taken together, in contrast to its demonstrated pro-aging effect in yeast, nicotinamide extends the lifespan of human fibroblasts, possibly through reduction in mitochondrial activity and ROS production.

  18. Effect of puerarin on human choriocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lidao, Bao; Yi, Wang; Ruilian, Ma; Xianhua, Ren; Agula, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the effect of puerarin on human choriocarcinoma cells. Methods Survival rates under puerarin monotherapy, fluorouracil (5-FU) monotherapy and puerarin in combination with 5-FU were detected by MTT assay. Apoptotic morphology was observed with Hoechst 33258 staining. Apoptosis rates were detected with flow cytometry. Expressions of AKT, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and P70S6K mRNAs and phosphorylated proteins were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Tumor-bearing mice were administered puerarin and puerarin+5-FU, and serum levels of β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG) were measured. Results Proliferation inhibition and apoptosis rates of JEG-3 cells were positively correlated with puerarin concentration, which increased in the puerarin+5-FU group. Expression levels of AKT, mTOR, P70S6K mRNAs, and phosphorylated proteins decreased significantly after action of puerarin at different concentrations. With increasing puerarin concentration, expression of cleaved-caspase-3 in JEG-3 cells increased, whereas that of Bcl-2 decreased. Puerarin significantly inhibited tumor growth in choriocarcinoma-bearing SCID mice. Serum β-HCG levels were significantly lower than those of control group after administration. Magnitude of β-HCG decline was positively correlated with concentration.. Conclusion Puerarin+5-FU inhibited proliferation of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells and promoted their apoptosis, being associated with the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:28352705