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Sample records for human beta satellite

  1. Diversity and phylogeography of begomovirus-associated beta satellites of okra in India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus; family Malvaceae) is grown in temperate as well as subtropical regions of the world, both for human consumption as a vegetable and for industrial uses. Okra yields are affected by the diseases caused by phyopathogenic viruses. India is the largest producer of okra and in this region a major biotic constraint to production are viruses of the genus Begomovirus. Begomoviruses affecting okra across the Old World are associated with specific, symptom modulating satellites (beta satellites). We describe a comprehensive analysis of the diversity of beta satellites associated with okra in India. Results The full-length sequences of 36 beta satellites, isolated from okra exhibiting typical begomovirus symptoms (leaf curl and yellow vein), were determined. The sequences segregated in to four groups. Two groups correspond to the beta satellites Okra leaf curl beta satellite (OLCuB) and Bhendi yellow vein beta satellite (BYVB) that have previously been identified in okra from the sub-continent. One sequence was distinct from all other, previously isolated beta satellites and represents a new species for which we propose the name Bhendi yellow vein India beta satellite (BYVIB). This new beta satellite was nevertheless closely related to BYVB and OLCuB. Most surprising was the identification of Croton yellow vein mosaic beta satellite (CroYVMB) in okra; a beta satellite not previously identified in a malvaceous plant species. The okra beta satellites were shown to have distinct geographic host ranges with BYVB occurring across India whereas OLCuB was only identified in northwestern India. Okra infections with CroYVMB were only identified across the northern and eastern central regions of India. A more detailed analysis of the sequences showed that OLCuB, BYVB and BYVIB share highest identity with respect βC1 gene. βC1 is the only gene encoded by beta satellites, the product of which is the major pathogenicity determinant of begomovirus-beta

  2. The selectivity of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists at the human beta1, beta2 and beta3 adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jillian G

    2005-02-01

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists ("beta-blockers") are one of the most widely used classes of drugs in cardiovascular medicine (hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and increasingly in heart failure) as well as in the management of anxiety, migraine and glaucoma. Where known, the mode of action in cardiovascular disease is from antagonism of endogenous catecholamine responses in the heart (mainly at beta1-adrenoceptors), while the worrisome side effects of bronchospasm result from airway beta2-adrenoceptor blockade. The aim of this study was to determine the selectivity of beta-antagonists for the human beta-adrenoceptor subtypes. (3)H-CGP 12177 whole cell-binding studies were undertaken in CHO cell lines stably expressing either the human beta1-, beta2- or the beta3-adrenoceptor in order to determine the affinity of ligands for each receptor subtype in the same cell background. In this study, the selectivity of well-known subtype-selective ligands was clearly demonstrated: thus, the selective beta1 antagonist CGP 20712A was 501-fold selective over beta2 and 4169-fold selective over beta3; the beta2-selective antagonist ICI 118551 was 550- and 661-fold selective over beta1 and beta3, respectively, and the selective beta3 compound CL 316243 was 10-fold selective over beta2 and more than 129-fold selective over beta1. Those beta2-adrenoceptor agonists used clinically for the treatment of asthma and COPD were beta2 selective: 29-, 61- and 2818-fold for salbutamol, terbutaline and salmeterol over beta1, respectively. There was little difference in the affinity of these ligands between beta1 and beta3 adrenoceptors. The clinically used beta-antagonists studied ranged from bisoprolol (14-fold beta1-selective) to timolol (26-fold beta2-selective). However, the majority showed little selectivity for the beta1- over the beta2-adrenoceptor, with many actually being more beta2-selective. This study shows that the beta1/beta2 selectivity of most clinically used beta-blockers is

  3. beta-Catenin promotes self-renewal of skeletal-muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Ana; Ono, Yusuke; Gnocchi, Viola F; Zammit, Peter S

    2008-05-01

    Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle. As with all stem cells, how the choice between self-renewal or differentiation is controlled is central to understanding their function. Here, we have explored the role of beta-catenin in determining the fate of myogenic satellite cells. Satellite cells express beta-catenin, and expression is maintained as they activate and undergo proliferation. Constitutive retroviral-driven expression of wild-type or stabilised beta-catenin results in more satellite cells expressing Pax7 without any MyoD -- therefore, adopting the self-renewal pathway, with fewer cells undergoing myogenic differentiation. Similarly, preventing the degradation of endogenous beta-catenin by inhibiting GSK3beta activity also results in more Pax7-positive-MyoD-negative (Pax7(+)MyoD(-)) satellite-cell progeny. Consistent with these observations, downregulation of beta-catenin using small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the proportion of satellite cells that express Pax7 and augmented myogenic differentiation after mitogen withdrawal. Since a dominant-negative version of beta-catenin had the same effect as silencing beta-catenin using specific siRNA, beta-catenin promotes self-renewal via transcriptional control of target genes. Thus, beta-catenin signalling in proliferating satellite cells directs these cells towards the self-renewal pathway and, so, contributes to the maintenance of this stem-cell pool in adult skeletal muscle.

  4. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  5. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  6. The biology of beta human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-03-02

    The beta genus comprises more than 50 beta human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are suspected to be involved, together with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common form of human cancer. Two members of the genus beta, HPV5 and HPV8, were first identified in patients with a genetic disorder, epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), that confers high susceptibility to beta HPV infection and NMSC development. The fact that organ transplant recipients (OTRs) with an impaired immune system have an elevated risk of NMSC raised the hypothesis that beta HPV types may also be involved in skin carcinogenesis in non-EV patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that serological and viral DNA markers are weakly, but significantly, associated with history of NMSC in OTRs and the general population. Functional studies on mucosal high-risk (HR) HPV types have clearly demonstrated that the products of two early genes, E6 and E7, are the main viral oncoproteins, which are able to deregulate events closely linked to transformation, such as cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Studies on a small number of beta HPV types have shown that their E6 and E7 oncoproteins also have the ability to interfere with the regulation of key pathways/events associated with cellular transformation. However, the initial functional data indicate that the molecular mechanisms leading to cellular transformation are different from those of mucosal HR HPV types. Beta HPV types may act only at early stages of carcinogenesis, by potentiating the deleterious effects of other carcinogens, such as UV radiation.

  7. Molecular diversity of the DNA-beta satellites associated with tomato leaf curl disease in India.

    PubMed

    Sivalingam, P N; Malathi, V G; Varma, A

    2010-05-01

    DNA-beta satellites, referred to here as betasatellites, were found associated with tomato leaf curl disease (ToLCD) in India. The size of eight betasatellites isolated from different geographical locations in India varied from 1353 to 1424 nt; these molecules had an ORF beta C1, an adenine-rich region, and a satellite conserved region. Their nucleotide sequence identity varied from 45 to 93%. In phylogenetic analysis, these betasatellites grouped according to their geographic locations rather than the host species. Two new betasatellites, tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite and tomato leaf curl Maharashtra betasatellite, were identified.

  8. Human globin gene analysis for a patient with beta-o/delta beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ottolenghi, S; Lanyon, W G; Williamson, R; Weatherall, D J; Clegg, J B; Pitcher, C S

    1975-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared with RNA-dependent DNA polymerase from human globin messenger RNA (mRNA). Annealing and translation experimenta with total mRNA from circulating cells from a patient with heterozygous beta/heterozygous beta-delta-o thalassemia (beta-o/delta beta-o-thalassemia) demonstrated no detectable mRNA for beta-globin. cDNA enriched in sequences homologous to beta-globin mRNA was prepared by hydroxylapatite fractionation of hybrids formed between beta-o/delta beta-o-thalassemic mRNA and cDNA made from mRNA from a patient with alpha-thalassemia (hemoglobin H disease). The rate of annealing of this beta-enriched cDNA to normal human nuclear DNA was that of a sequence present as only a single copy per haploid genome. The beta-enriched cDNA annealed to the beta-o-delta beta-o-thalassemia total DNA with approximately the same kinetics as to normal DNA, indicating that no total gene deletion of beta-globin genes from the diploid genome has occurred, although the accuracy of the technique could not exclude with certainty a partial deletion or a deletion of a beta-globin gene from only one of the haploid genomes. This demonstrates that at least one of the beta-o- or the delta beta-o-thalassemia haploid genomes in this case contains a substantially intact beta-globin gene. PMID:49057

  9. Extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin-mediated myogenic satellite cell responsiveness to transforming growth factor-beta1 during cell proliferation and differentiation Decorin and transforming growth factor-beta1 in satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuehui; McFarland, Douglas C; Velleman, Sandra G

    2008-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent inhibitor of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Decorin, a small proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to TGF-beta1 and modulates the activity of TGF-beta1 during muscle cell growth and development. However, its interaction with TGF-beta1 and involvement in myogenesis is not well characterized. In the present study, chicken myogenic satellite cells, myogenic precursors for muscle growth and repair, were isolated from the pectoralis major muscle and used to investigate the biological function of TGF-beta1 and decorin during myogenesis. The over-expression of decorin in satellite cells significantly increased cell proliferation, compared to the control cells. Consistent with this result, reducing decorin expression decreased cell proliferation, which suggests a decorin-mediated mechanism is involved in the regulation of myogenic satellite cell proliferation. Satellite cells over-expressing decorin were less sensitive to TGF-beta1 during proliferation, which indicates that decorin may sequester TGF-beta1 leading to increased proliferation. During satellite cell differentiation, the over-expression of decorin induced differentiation by increasing the muscle specific creatine kinase concentration. However, the addition of TGF-beta1 diminished decorin-mediated cell responsiveness to TGF-beta1 during differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that decorin induces myogenic satellite cell proliferation and differentiation by regulating cellular responsiveness to TGF-beta1. An alternative TGF-beta1-independent pathway may be involved in the regulation of satellite cells by decorin.

  10. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  11. The lipolytic effect of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor activation in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, C A; Kendall, M J; Maxwell, S; Hughes, B

    1993-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of activation beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors on the process of lipolysis in human volunteers. Ten male subjects underwent a single-blind randomized cross-over trial using infusions of terbutaline (a specific beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), xamoterol (a partial beta 1-agonist with beta 2-adrenoceptor blocking activity) and saline (placebo control). The effect of these infusions on plasma potassium, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) (total and individual) and insulin levels was studied. 2. Terbutaline infusion induced a significant rise in plasma glucose and a fall in plasma potassium in keeping with its beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant properties. Xamoterol infusion had no significant effect on these values. Terbutaline infusion caused a greater rise in total and individual FFA than xamoterol, but both effects were significantly different from placebo. 3. The possible reasons for these results and their implications on the beta-adrenergic control of lipolysis are discussed. PMID:8383517

  12. The nucleotide sequence of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Lawn, R M; Efstratiadis, A; O'Connell, C; Maniatis, T

    1980-10-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of the human beta-globin gene. The purpose of this study is to obtain information necessary to study the evolutionary relationships between members of the human beta-like globin gene family and to provide the basis for comparing normal beta-globin genes with those obtained from the DNA of individuals with genetic defects in hemoglobin expression.

  13. Reprogramming of human exocrine pancreas cells to beta cells.

    PubMed

    Staels, Willem; Heremans, Yves; Heimberg, Harry

    2015-12-01

    One of the key promises of regenerative medicine is providing a cure for diabetes. Cell-based therapies are proving their safety and efficiency, but donor beta cell shortages and immunological issues remain major hurdles. Reprogramming of human pancreatic exocrine cells towards beta cells would offer a major advantage by providing an abundant and autologous source of beta cells. Over the past decade our understanding of transdifferentiation processes greatly increased allowing us to design reprogramming protocols that fairly aim for clinical trials.

  14. Transcriptional upregulation of retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta) expression by phenylacetate in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sidell, N; Chang, B; Yamashiro, J M; Wada, R K

    1998-02-25

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) has been shown to synergize with retinoic acid (RA) in inducing the differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells. Our studies indicated that NaPA can impact on the RA differentiation program by upregulating nuclear retinoic acid receptor-beta (RAR beta) expression. We have found that NaPA does not alter the half-life of RAR beta mRNA; thus, increased stability of mRNA levels does not contribute to NaPA induction. In contrast, NaPA was able to specifically activate a reporter gene construct (delta SV beta RE-CAT) which contains a retinoic acid response element (RARE beta) that is located in the RAR beta promoter. Activation of delta SV beta RE-CAT by NaPA also occurred in neuroblastoma cells cotransfected with a nuclear retinoic acid receptor expression vector, demonstrating the independence of this activation on cellular RAR levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that induction of RAR beta by NaPA is regulated at the level of transcription and mediated through the retinoic acid response element, RARE beta. This effect may account, at least in part, for the strong synergy between NaPA and RA in promoting neuroblastoma differentiation.

  15. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  16. Effects of (-)-RO363 at human atrial beta-adrenoceptor subtypes, the human cloned beta 3-adrenoceptor and rodent intestinal beta 3-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, P; Sarsero, D; Arch, J R; Kelly, J; Henson, S M; Kaumann, A J

    1997-01-01

    1. Chronic treatment of patients with beta-blockers causes atrial inotropic hyperresponsiveness through beta 2-adrenoceptors, 5-HT4 receptors and H2-receptors but apparently not through beta 1-adrenoceptors despite data claiming an increased beta 1-adrenoceptor density from homogenate binding studies. We have addressed the question of beta 1-adrenoceptor sensitivity by determining the inotropic potency and intrinsic activity of the beta 1-adrenoceptor selective partial agonist (-)-RO363 and by carrying out both homogenate binding and quantitative beta-adrenoceptor autoradiography in atria obtained from patients treated or not treated with beta-blockers. In the course of the experiments it became apparent that (-)-RO363 also may cause agonistic effects through the third atrial beta-adrenoceptor. To assess whether (-)-RO363 also caused agonistic effects through beta 3-adrenoceptors we studied its relaxant effects in rat colon and guinea-pig ileum, as well as receptor binding and adenylyl cyclase stimulation of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human beta 3-adrenoceptors. 2. beta-Adrenoceptors were labelled with (-)-[125I]-cyanopindolol. The density of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors was unchanged in the 2 groups, as assessed with both quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate binding. The affinities of (-)-RO363 for beta 1-adrenoceptors (pKi = 8.0-7.7) and beta 2-adrenoceptors (pKi = 6.1-5.8) were not significantly different in the two groups. 3. (-)-RO363 increased atrial force with a pEC50 of 8.2 (beta-blocker treated) and 8.0 (non-beta-blocker treated) and intrinsic activity with respect to (-)-isoprenaline of 0.80 (beta-blocker treated) and 0.54 (non-beta-blocker treated) (P < 0.001) and with respect to Ca2+ (7 mM) of 0.65 (beta-blocker treated) and 0.45 (non-beta-blocker treated) (P < 0.01). The effects of (-)-RO363 were resistant to antagonism by the beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118,551 (50 nM). The effects of 0.3-10 nM (-)-RO

  17. Human beta-mannosidase cDNA characterization and first identification of a mutation associated with human beta-mannosidosis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayat, A H; Kraemer, S A; Leipprandt, J R; Macek, M; Kleijer, W J; Friderici, K H

    1998-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme beta-mannosidase. Unlike the severe clinical manifestation of the disease in ruminants, in which it leads to neonatal death, the human disease phenotype is generally milder. In addition, the phenotypic manifestation among the reported cases of human beta-mannosidosis is variable, even among members of the same family. To understand the molecular basis of the human disease and the mechanisms for such clinical variability, we sequenced the entire coding region of the human beta-mannosidase gene using a combination of cDNA library screening, RT-PCR and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The composite cDNA is 3293 nt, consisting of an 87 nt 5'-untranslated region, 2640 nt coding region and 566 nt 3'-untranslated region. The gene was localized to human chromosome 4q22-25. Analysis of a multiple tissue northern blot demonstrated a single 3.7 kb transcript. Mutation analysis of a Czech gypsy family with two siblings differently affected with beta-mannosidosis demonstrated a homozygous A-->G transition 2 bp upstream of a splice acceptor site. The associated cryptic splice site activation and exon skipping caused by this mutation resulted in two abnormally spliced mutant mRNA species in both siblings.

  18. Expression of the beta 7 integrin by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brezinschek, R. I.; Brezinschek, H. P.; Lazarovits, A. I.; Lipsky, P. E.; Oppenheimer-Marks, N.

    1996-01-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors mediate fundamental intercellular interactions of many cell types as well as cellular interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. To date, the beta 7 integrin has been shown to be expressed by leukocyte subsets and to mediate interactions of these cells with extracellular matrix molecules as well as with endothelial and epithelial cells. The data presented here indicate that human endothelial cells also express the beta 7 integrin both in vitro and in situ. Analysis of cDNA indicated that endothelial beta 7 was identical to that expressed by leukocytes. Cell surface expression of beta 7 was increased by exposure of the endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta. In leukocytes, beta 7 complexes with alpha 4 or alpha E integrin chains. Endothelial cells also expressed a number of alpha-integrin chains, including alpha 4, but not alpha E. The expression and utilization of beta 7, presumably complexed with alpha 4, by endothelial cells may be instrumental in the maintenance of the function or phenotype of endothelial cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8909254

  19. Human transforming growth factor. beta. -. cap alpha. /sub 2/-macroglobulin complex is a latent form of transforming growth factor. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.S.; O'Grady, P.; Huang, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor ..beta.. (TGF..beta..) has been shown to be present as a high molecular weight latent form in human serum. Appearance of transforming growth factor activity, along with the change from high molecular weight form to low molecular weight form, was observed following treatment of the latent form of TGF..beta.. with acid or urea, suggesting that the latent form of TGF..beta.. is a complex of TGF..beta.. and a high molecular weight binding protein. Human ..cap alpha../sub 2/-M has been found to be a plasma binding protein for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in serum or plasma. TGF..beta.. and PDGF share similar properties. They, therefore, investigated the interaction between /sup 125/I-TGF..beta.. and ..cap alpha../sub 2/M. /sup 125/I-TGF..beta.. and purified human ..cap alpha../sub 2/M formed a complex as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Most of the /sup 125/I-TGF..beta..-..cap alpha../sub 2/M complex could be dissociated by acid or urea treatment. These results suggest that ..cap alpha../sub 2/M is a binding protein for TGF..beta.. and that TGF..beta..-..cap alpha../sub 2/M complex may be the latent form of TGF..beta.. in serum.

  20. Genetic basis of human complement C8[beta] deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, T.; Rittner, C.; Schneider, P.M. ); Haensch, G. ); Spaeth, P. ); Tedesco, F. )

    1993-06-01

    The eighth component of human complement (c8) is a serum protein consisting of three chains ([alpha], [beta], and [gamma]) and encoded by three different genes, C8A, C8B, and C8G. C8A and C8B are closely linked on chromosome 1p, whereas C8G is located on chromosome 9q. In the serum the [beta] subunit is non-covalently bound to the disulfide-linked [alpha]-[gamma] subunit. Patients with C8[beta] deficiency suffer from recurrent neisserial infections such as meningitis. Exon-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with primer pairs from the flanking intron sequences was used to amplify all 12 C8B exons separately. No difference regarding the exon sizes was observed in a C8[beta]-deficient patient compared with a normal person. Therefore, direct sequence analysis of all exon-specific PCR products from normal and C8[beta]-deficient individuals was carried out. As a cause for C8[beta] deficiency, we found a single C-T exchange in exon 9 leading to a stop codon. An allele-specific PCR system was designed to detect the normal and the deficiency allele simultaneously. Using this approach as well as PCR typing of the Taql polymorphism located in intron 11, five families with 7 C8[beta]-deficient members were investigated. The mutation was not found to be restricted to one of the two Taql RFLP alleles. The mutant allele was observed in all families investigated and can therefore be regarded as a major cause of C8[beta] deficiency in the Caucasian population. In addition, two C8[beta]-deficient patients were found to be heterozygous for the C-T exchange. The molecular basis of the alleles without this point mutation also causing deficiency has not yet been defined. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-beta 1 (PLC beta 1).

    PubMed

    Caricasole, A; Sala, C; Roncarati, R; Formenti, E; Terstappen, G C

    2000-12-15

    Phospholipase C-beta (PLC beta) catalyses the generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol (DAG) from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (IP(2)), a key step in the intracellular transduction of a large number of extracellular signals, including neurotransmitters and hormones modulating diverse developmental and functional aspects of the mammalian central nervous system. Four mammalian isozymes are known (PLC beta 1-4), which differ in their function and expression patterns in vivo. We have characterized the human PLC beta 1 genomic locus (PLC beta 1), cloned two distinct PLC beta 1 cDNAs (PLC beta 1a and b) and analysed their respective expression patterns in a comprehensive panel of human tissues using quantitative TaqMan technology. The two cDNAs derive from transcripts generated through alternative splicing at their 3' end, and are predicted to encode for PLC beta 1 isoforms differing at their carboxy-terminus. The human PLC beta 1 isoforms are co-expressed in the same tissues with a distinctly CNS-specific profile of expression. Quantitative differences in PLC beta 1 isoform expression levels are observed in some tissues. Transient expression of epitope-tagged versions of the two isoforms followed by immunofluorescence revealed localization of the proteins to the cytoplasm and the inner side of the cell membrane. Finally, we characterized the structure of the PLC beta 1 locus and confirmed its mapping to human chromosome 20.

  2. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P. Daniel; Hoffman, William Y.; Pomerantz, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications. PMID:26352798

  3. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P Daniel; Hoffman, William Y; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-08

    Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2-4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50-70 fiber-associated, or 1,000-5,000 FACS-enriched CD56(+)/CD29(+) human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  4. Identification of tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid in foodstuffs, human urine and human milk.

    PubMed

    Adachi, J; Mizoi, Y; Naito, T; Ogawa, Y; Uetani, Y; Ninomiya, I

    1991-05-01

    1-Methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (MTCA) and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (TCCA), both precursors of mutagenic N-nitroso compounds (N-nitrosamines, 1-methyl-2-nitroso-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid and 2-nitroso-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid), were detected in various food-stuffs, urine from healthy human subjects and human milk. A purification procedure, involving a chemically-bonded material followed by HPLC combined with fluorometric detection, was used for the quantitative determination of these compounds, allowing the separation of two diastereoisomers of MTCA. An HPLC and mass spectrometry method was also developed for their identification. Comparing the concentration of MTCA and TCCA in fermented products and raw materials suggested that tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may have been produced through fermentation or by condensation of tryptophan and acetaldehyde formed from ethanol added as a food preservative. This is the first report of excretion of tetrahydro-beta-carbolines in human urine and human milk. A comparison of the concentrations of tetrahydro-beta-carbolines in urine from human infants and human milk indicates that tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may be synthesized endogenously in humans. A possible pathway of tryptophan metabolism in plants and animals is presented.

  5. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled recombinant beta interferon (IFN-beta Ser17) to human cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, E.C.; Drummond, R.J.; Creasey, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    The authors investigated the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled beta interferon (IFN-beta Ser17), a nonglycosylated recombinant human fibroblast interferon in which cysteine at position 17 is replaced by serine by site-specific mutagenesis. An optimized chloramine T radiolabeling method produced a highly labeled, fully active /sup 125/I-IFN suitable for these studies. Unlike the case with the chloramine T method, incorporation of a single mole of Bolton-Hunter reagent into a mole of IFN-beta Ser17 led to nearly complete loss of biological activity. /sup 125/I-IFN-beta Ser17, prepared by the chloramine T method, bound specifically to human lymphoblastoid cells (Daudi) with a dissociation constant of 0.24 nM. The number of binding sites per cell was 4,000. In competition assays, unlabeled beta interferons (native, recombinant IFN-beta Cys17, and various preparations of IFN-beta Ser17) equally displaced labeled IFN-beta Ser17 on Daudi cells. Recombinant IFN-alpha-1 displaced /sup 125/I-IFN-beta binding to Daudi cells less efficiently than did unlabeled native or recombinant beta interferon. However, at the concentrations tested, native gamma interferon showed no competition with /sup 125/I-IFN. The results indicate that IFN-beta Ser17 and native IFN-beta posses similar binding properties.

  6. Inhibition of human and rat 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 by 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Lawrence, Harshani; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) plays an important role in regulating the cortisol availability to bind to corticosteroid receptors within specific tissue. Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of metabolic syndrome indicate that elevation of cortisol levels within specific tissues through the action of 11beta-HSD1 could contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, selective inhibitors of 11beta-HSD1 have been investigated as potential treatments for metabolic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 or obesity. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of some 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (18beta-GA) derivatives (2-5) and their inhibitory activities against rat hepatic11beta-HSD1 and rat renal 11beta-HSD2. Once the selectivity over the rat type 2 enzyme was established, these compounds' ability to inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 was also evaluated using both radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) methods. The 11-modified 18beta-GA derivatives 2 and 3 with apparent selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 showed a high percentage inhibition for human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 at 10 microM and exhibited IC50 values of 400 and 1100 nM, respectively. The side chain modified 18beta-GA derivatives 4 and 5, although showing selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 inhibited human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range.

  7. Monitoring the human beta1, beta2, beta3 adrenergic receptors expression and purification in Pichia pastoris using the fluorescence properties of the enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Talmont, Franck

    2009-01-01

    The three beta adrenergic receptor subtypes, beta1-, beta2- and beta3-, were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. These receptors were N-terminally fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and the fluorescent properties of EGFP were used: (1) to select the recombinant strains, (2) to monitor the expression of the fluorescent receptors, and (3) to monitor the purification of the receptors by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. We demonstrate here that Pichia pastoris can be an alternative host to express and purify milligram amounts of human beta adrenergic receptors.

  8. Sequence swapping does not result in conformation swapping for the beta4/beta5 and beta8/beta9 beta-hairpin turns in human acidic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaewon; Lee, Jihun; Brych, Stephen R; Logan, Timothy M; Blaber, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The beta-turn is the most common type of nonrepetitive structure in globular proteins, comprising ~25% of all residues; however, a detailed understanding of effects of specific residues upon beta-turn stability and conformation is lacking. Human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) is a member of the beta-trefoil superfold and contains a total of five beta-hairpin structures (antiparallel beta-sheets connected by a reverse turn). beta-Turns related by the characteristic threefold structural symmetry of this superfold exhibit different primary structures, and in some cases, different secondary structures. As such, they represent a useful system with which to study the role that turn sequences play in determining structure, stability, and folding of the protein. Two turns related by the threefold structural symmetry, the beta4/beta5 and beta8/beta9 turns, were subjected to both sequence-swapping and poly-glycine substitution mutations, and the effects upon stability, folding, and structure were investigated. In the wild-type protein these turns are of identical length, but exhibit different conformations. These conformations were observed to be retained during sequence-swapping and glycine substitution mutagenesis. The results indicate that the beta-turn structure at these positions is not determined by the turn sequence. Structural analysis suggests that residues flanking the turn are a primary structural determinant of the conformation within the turn.

  9. Human Beta-papillomavirus infection and keratinocyte carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quint, Koen D; Genders, Roel E; de Koning, Maurits N C; Borgogna, Cinzia; Gariglio, Marisa; Bouwes Bavinck, Jan Nico; Doorbar, John; Feltkamp, Mariet C

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of oncogenic human Alpha-papillomaviruses (HPVs) in the development of mucosal carcinomas at different body sites (eg cervix, anus, oropharynx) is fully recognized, a role for HPV in keratinocyte carcinomas (KCs; basal and squamous cell carcinomas) of the skin is not yet clear. KCs are the most common cancers in Caucasians, with the major risk factor being ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. A possible role for Beta-HPV types (BetaPV) in the development of KC was suggested several decades ago, supported by a number of epidemiological studies. Our current review summarizes the recent molecular and histopathological evidence in support of a causal association between BetaPV and the development of KC, and outlines the suspected synergistic effect of viral gene expression with UV radiation and immune suppression. Further insights into the molecular pathways and protein interactions used by BetaPV and the host cell is likely to extend our understanding of the role of BetaPV in KC.

  10. Human beta-hexosaminidase alpha chain: coding sequence and homology with the beta chain.

    PubMed Central

    Myerowitz, R; Piekarz, R; Neufeld, E F; Shows, T B; Suzuki, K

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone, p beta H alpha-5, from an adult human liver library that contains the entire coding sequence of the alpha chain of beta-hexosaminidase. The cDNA insert of p beta H alpha-5 is 1944 base pairs long and contains a 168-base-pair 5' untranslated region, a 186-base-pair 3' untranslated region, and an open reading frame of 1587 base pairs corresponding to 529 amino acids (Mr, 60,697). The first 17-22 amino acids satisfy the requirements of a signal sequence. A striking sequence homology with a published partial amino acid sequence for the beta chain [O'Dowd, B. F., Quan, F., Willard, H. F., Lamhonwah, A. M., Korneluk, R. G., Lowden, J. A., Gravel, R. A. & Mahuran, D. J. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 1184-1188] suggests that both chains may have evolved from a common ancestor. A shorter alpha-chain cDNA was found to hybridize to the long arm of chromosome 15, the known location for the alpha-chain gene. In addition, we isolated another alpha-chain cDNA clone, p beta H alpha-4, from a simian virus 40-transformed human fibroblast library that contained an extra 453-base-pair piece at its 3' end. A probe consisting of this additional sequence hybridized exclusively to a single mRNA species (2.6 kilobases) in mRNA preparations from cultured human fibroblasts. In contrast, p beta H alpha-5 hybridized to both a 2.1-kilobase major and a 2.6-kilobase minor mRNA species in these same mRNA preparations, indicating the presence of two distinct alpha-chain mRNA species differing at the 3' end. Fibroblasts from an Ashkenazi Jewish patient with classic Tay-Sachs disease were deficient in both species of mRNA, confirming their genetic relationship. Images PMID:2933746

  11. The genomic structure of the gene encoding the human transforming growth factor {beta} type II receptor (TGF-{beta} RII)

    SciTech Connect

    Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nagashima, Makoto; Gemma, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    The genomic structure of the human transforming growth factor-{beta} type II receptor gene (TGF-{beta} RII) was determined by two PCR-based methods, the {open_quotes}long distance sequencer{close_quotes} method and the {open_quotes}promoter finder{close_quotes} method. Genomic fragments containing exons and adjacent introns were amplified by PCR, and the nucleotide sequences were determined by direct sequencing and subcloning sequencing. The TGF-{beta} RII protein is encoded by 567 codons in 7 exons. This is the first report about the genomic structure of a gene that belongs to the serine/threonine kinase type II receptor subfamily. Knowledge of the genomic structure of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in normal human cells and of the aberrations occurring during carcinogenesis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Differential Regulation of Human Thymosin Beta 15 Isoforms by Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1

    PubMed Central

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Barrows, Courtney; Zetter, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified an additional isoform of human thymosin beta 15 (also known as NB-thymosin beta, gene name TMSB15A) transcribed from an independent gene, and designated TMSB15B. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these isoforms were differentially expressed and functional. Our data show that the TMSB15A and TMSB15B isoforms have distinct expression patterns in different tumor cell lines and tissues. TMSB15A was expressed at higher levels in HCT116, DU145, LNCaP and LNCaP-LN3 cancer cells. In MCF-7, SKOV-3, HT1080 and PC-3MLN4 cells, TMSB15A and TMSB15B showed approximately equivalent levels of expression, while TMSB15B was the predominant isoform expressed in PC-3, MDA-MB-231, NCI-H322 and Caco-2 cancer cells. In normal human prostate and prostate cancer tissues, TMSB15A was the predominant isoform expressed. In contrast, normal colon and colon cancer tissue expressed predominantly TMSB15B. The two gene isoforms are also subject to different transcriptional regulation. Treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with transforming growth factor beta 1 repressed TMSB15A expression but had no effect on TMSB15B. siRNA specific to the TMSB15B isoform suppressed cell migration of prostate cancer cells to epidermal growth factor, suggesting a functional role for this second isoform. In summary, our data reveal different expression patterns and regulation of a new thymosin beta 15 gene paralog. This may have important consequences in both tumor and neuronal cell motility. PMID:19296525

  13. Internal duplication in human alpha 1 and beta 1 interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, B W; May, L T; Sehgal, P B

    1984-01-01

    Metric analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the intron-free human interferon beta 1 (IFN-beta 1) gene by using the Sellers TT algorithm revealed that this gene contains two major repeated segments, which span the entire coding region. These repeats are each approximately 300 nucleotides in length and have 45% identical aligned nucleotides (common bases). When these metrically aligned DNA repeats were translated into amino acids, 9 (19%) of the 47 in-phase amino acid residues were identical (common acids). This internal duplication was also apparent on visual inspection of the amino acid sequence of IFN-beta 1. In addition, metric analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the intron-free IFN-alpha 1 gene showed that this gene also contains two repeats, each approximately 300 nucleotides long, having 47% common bases and 19% common acids. Since the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes are known to be related (by the present metric analysis they contain 53% common bases and 45% common acids), a consensus DNA sequence was derived from all four of these repeats. Manual alignment of the separate metric alignments corresponding to the two halves of the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes provided a composite alignment with 58% of the alignment positions having the same nucleotide in at least three of the four repeats. When this composite nucleotide alignment was translated to define a composite alignment of the four protein segments, 10 (31%) of the 32 in-phase amino acid residues contained the same amino acid in at least three of the four segments. These sequences relationships provide insight into the origin of the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes and furnish an additional basis for comparing them with other related genes. PMID:6594689

  14. Human circulating dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Warter, J M; Coquillat, G; Kurtz, D

    1975-01-01

    The activity of circulatory dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) in humans is shown to be lower in some epileptic subjects than in normal subjects. The activity of the enzymes was found to be dramatically low in subjects who experienced an epileptic seizure 24 hrs before DBH activity was determined. The activity varied through the course of epileptic seizures induced by a convulsant drugs and these variations might be due to the "en masse" changes of the sympathetic nervous system.

  15. Differential localization of TGF-beta-precursor isotypes in normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, M; Hashimoto, K; Kato, M; Miyazono, K; Yoshikawa, K

    1994-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) can act as a multi-functional regulator of both cell growth and differentiation. Three isotypes of TGF-beta s namely TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3, have been found in human tissues. Up to now, little is known about the distribution patterns of the TGF-beta isotypes in human skin. Using the TGF-beta-precursor (latency-associated peptides) specific antibodies to confirm the specificity, we studied the immunohistochemical distribution of TGF-beta 1-3 in human skin. TGF-beta 2 was found mainly in the intercellular space of all the layers of the epidermis as well as in the cytoplasm with a weak staining. In contrast, TGF-beta 3 was present in the subepidermal area of the dermis. TGF-beta 1 was observed obviously in neither epidermis nor dermis. These results showed the differential localization of TGF-beta isotypes in human skin, suggesting that the TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3 may regulate the human skin function in an epithelial autocrine or mesenchymal-epithelial interaction manner.

  16. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  17. Tissue distribution of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chain during embryonic and fetal human development.

    PubMed

    Roediger, Matthias; Miosge, Nicolai; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2010-04-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in all basement membranes. Previously, we showed that perlecan is present during human development. Although an overview of mRNA-expression of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chains in various developing fetal organs is already available, a systematic localization of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chains on the protein level during embryonic and fetal human development is missing. Therefore, we studied the immunohistochemical expression and tissue distribution of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chains in various developing embryonic and fetal human organs between gestational weeks 8 and 12. The laminin beta1 chain was ubiquitously expressed in the basement membrane zones of the brain, ganglia, blood vessels, liver, kidney, skin, pancreas, intestine, heart and skeletal system. Furthermore, the laminin beta2 chain was present in the basement membrane zones of the brain, ganglia, skin, heart and skeletal system. The findings of this study support and expand upon the theory that these two laminin chains are important during human development.

  18. Conformation and activity of recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta.

    PubMed

    Boublik, M; Moschera, J A; Wei, C; Kung, H F

    1990-04-01

    Conformation of highly purified recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta) was correlated with its biological activity. The extent of ordered secondary structure was determined by circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy in various buffer conditions to establish conditions of protein stability and its potential for helix formation. The highest "helicity" (about 50 +/- 5% of alpha-helices) and the highest antiviral activities (4-10 x 10(7) units/mg) were found in 50% ethylene glycol, 1 M NaCl and 0.05 M Na3PO4, pH 7.2 (Buffer I); 80 mM citric acid, 20 mM Na2HPO4, pH 2.9 (Buffer II); and 25 mM NH4OAc, 125 mM NaCl, pH 5.1 (Buffer III). Both helicity and antiviral activity of the IFN-beta decrease in parallel with denaturation by urea, heat, and/or by repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. Low pH (pH 2.9 Buffer II) exhibits a distinct stabilizing effect on the structure and antiviral activity of IFN-beta against heat denaturation.

  19. The human thyrotropin beta-subunit gene differs in 5' structure from murine TSH-beta genes.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Whitfield, G K; Porti, D; Kourides, I A

    1988-12-01

    The gene encoding the beta-subunit of human thyrotropin (hTSH-beta) was isolated, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene is 4.3 kb in length, consists of three exons and two introns, and is present as a single copy as determined by Southern blot analysis of total genomic DNA. The protein coding portion of the gene, which includes exons 2 and 3, was isolated from a human genomic phage library, while exon 1, which encodes only 5' untranslated mRNA sequence, was isolated from a plasmid library of size-selected genomic DNA fragments. Here we describe the isolation of the 5' untranslated exon of the hTSH-beta subunit and 5'-flanking region. The structure of the hTSH-beta gene is very similar to the previously characterized TSH-beta genes from mouse and rat. The genes from all three species have two distinct promoter regions, but while both promoters are utilized by the murine TSH-beta genes, the human TSH-beta gene apparently utilizes only the proximal promoter for transcription initiation. A striking difference in hTSH-beta gene structure compared to the murine genes is that exon 1 of the human gene is 36 nucleotides. An analysis of the mouse, rat, and human exon 1 and 5'-flanking region shows a high percentage of sequence homology, with the exception of a 9-nucleotide insertion 13 bases 3' from the proximal TATA box found in the human gene but not found in the other two species. We propose that this insertion results in the additional length of human exon 1 compared to the mouse and rat genes. By isolating the promoter region of the hTSH-beta gene, we can begin to identify specific sequences involved in the regulation of hTSH gene expression.

  20. Human-Centered Design for the Personal Satellite Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Gawdiak, Yuri; Thomas, Hans; Greaves, Mark; Clancey, William J.; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Personal Satellite Assistant (PSA) is a softball-sized flying robot designed to operate autonomously onboard manned spacecraft in pressurized micro-gravity environments. We describe how the Brahms multi-agent modeling and simulation environment in conjunction with a KAoS agent teamwork approach can be used to support human-centered design for the PSA.

  1. Growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer cells by human interferon-beta gene combined with gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Endou, Masato; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Takuya; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Norimoto; Tsuno, Takaya; Osawa, Hirokatsu; Kuno, Tomohiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Hatano, Manabu; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-02-01

    We examined the anti-tumor effect of cationic multilamellar liposome containing human IFN-beta (huIFN-beta) gene against cultured human pancreatic cancer cells. We also evaluated the combined effect of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine. Furthermore, we examined the anti-tumor mechanisms of the therapy, with emphasis on the Ras-related signal pathway. Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPc-1, MIAPaCa-2, and PANC-1) were used in this study. The growth inhibition together with the therapy were evaluated by WST-1 assay; the production of huIFN-beta protein was measured by ELISA; the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using a FACScan flow cytometer; the protein levels of Son of sevenless (SOS-1) and Ras-GAP were measured by Western blotting; and the activation of Ras-GTP was evaluated by the immunoprecipitation method. As a result, we found that huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes demonstrated a strong anti-tumor effect against human pancreatic cancer cells. The treatment that combined huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine was more effective than each treatment alone. Although gemcitabine remarkably reduced the level of SOS-1, the above combined therapy reduced the level of SOS-1 even more significantly. Both huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and the com-bination of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine increased the level of Ras-GAP, and decreased the activity of Ras-GTP. These results suggest that this combination therapy can induce strong anti-tumor activity against human pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of the Ras-related signal pathway.

  2. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 modulates beta 1 and beta 5 integrin receptors and induces the de novo expression of the alpha v beta 6 heterodimer in normal human keratinocytes: implications for wound healing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying the promotion of wound healing by TGF-beta 1 is incompletely understood. We report that TGF-beta 1 regulates the regenerative/migratory phenotype of normal human keratinocytes by modulating their integrin receptor repertoire. In growing keratinocyte colonies but not in fully stratified cultured epidermis, TGF-beta 1: (a) strongly upregulates the expression of the fibronectin receptor alpha 5 beta 1, the vitronectin receptor alpha v beta 5, and the collagen receptor alpha 2 beta 1 by differentially modulating the synthesis of their alpha and beta subunits; (b) downregulates the multifunctional alpha 3 beta 1 heterodimer; (c) induces the de novo expression and surface exposure of the alpha v beta 6 fibronectin receptor; (d) stimulates keratinocyte migration toward fibronectin and vitronectin; (e) induces a marked perturbation of the general mechanism of polarized domain sorting of both beta 1 and beta 4 dimers; and (f) causes a pericellular redistribution of alpha v beta 5. These data suggest that alpha 5 beta 1, alpha v beta 6, and alpha v beta 5, not routinely used by keratinocytes resting on an intact basement membrane, act as "emergency" receptors, and uncover at least one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the peculiar integrin expression in healing human wounds. Indeed, TGF-beta 1 reproduces the integrin expression pattern of keratinocytes located at the injury site, particularly of cells in the migrating epithelial tongue at the leading edge of the wound. Since these keratinocytes are inhibited in their proliferative capacity, these data might account for the apparent paradox of a TGF-beta 1-dependent stimulation of epidermal wound healing associated with a growth inhibitory effect on epithelial cells. PMID:7537276

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for the human. beta. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Frielle, T.; Collins, S.; Daniel, K.W.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a human placenta lambdagt11 library has led to the isolation of the cDNA for the human ..beta../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 1/AR). Used as the probe was the human genomic clone termed G-21. This clone, which contains an intronless gene for a putative receptor, was previously isolated by virtue of its cross hybridization with the human ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 2/AR). The 2.4-kilobase cDNA for the human ..beta../sub 1/AR encodes a protein of 477 amino acid residues that is 69% homologous with the avian ..beta..AR but only 54% homologous with the human ..beta../sub 2/AR. This suggests that the avian gene encoding ..beta..AR and the human gene encoding ..beta../sub 1/AR evolved from a common ancestral gene. RNA blot analysis indicates a message of 2.5 kilobases in rat tissues, with a pattern of tissue distribution consistent with ..beta../sub 1/AR binding. This pattern is quite distinct from the pattern obtained when the ..beta../sub 2/AR cDNA is used as a probe. Expression of receptor protein in Xenopus laevis oocytes conveys adenylate cyclase responsiveness to catecholamines with a typical ..beta../sub 1/AR specificity. This contrasts with the typical ..beta../sub 2/ subtype specificity observed when the human ..beta../sub 2/AR cDNA is expressed in this system. Mammalian ..beta../sub 1/AR and ..beta../sub 2/AR are thus products of distinct genes, both of which are apparently related to the putative G-21 receptor.

  4. A human factors approach to range scheduling for satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Cameron H. G.; Aitken, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Range scheduling for satellite control presents a classical problem: supervisory control of a large-scale dynamic system, with unwieldy amounts of interrelated data used as inputs to the decision process. Increased automation of the task, with the appropriate human-computer interface, is highly desirable. The development and user evaluation of a semi-automated network range scheduling system is described. The system incorporates a synergistic human-computer interface consisting of a large screen color display, voice input/output, a 'sonic pen' pointing device, a touchscreen color CRT, and a standard keyboard. From a human factors standpoint, this development represents the first major improvement in almost 30 years to the satellite control network scheduling task.

  5. Human alpha and beta papillomaviruses use different synonymous codon profiles.

    PubMed

    Cladel, Nancy M; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D

    2010-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study, we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field.

  6. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  7. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Human neocortical 15–29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  8. The contribution of classical (beta1/2-) and atypical beta-adrenoceptors to the stimulation of human white adipocyte lipolysis and right atrial appendage contraction by novel beta3-adrenoceptor agonists of differing selectivities.

    PubMed

    Sennitt, M V; Kaumann, A J; Molenaar, P; Beeley, L J; Young, P W; Kelly, J; Chapman, H; Henson, S M; Berge, J M; Dean, D K; Kotecha, N R; Morgan, H K; Rami, H K; Ward, R W; Thompson, M; Wilson, S; Smith, S A; Cawthorne, M A; Stock, M J; Arch, J R

    1998-06-01

    The role of beta3- and other putative atypical beta-adrenoceptors in human white adipocytes and right atrial appendage has been investigated using CGP 12177 and novel phenylethanolamine and aryloxypropanolamine beta3-adrenoceptor (beta3AR) agonists with varying intrinsic activities and selectivities for human cloned betaAR subtypes. The ability to demonstrate beta1/2AR antagonist-insensitive (beta3 or other atypical betaAR-mediated) responses to CGP 12177 was critically dependent on the albumin batch used to prepare and incubate the adipocytes. Four aryloxypropanolamine selective beta3AR agonists (SB-226552, SB-229432, SB-236923, SB-246982) consistently elicited beta1/2AR antagonist-insensitive lipolysis. However, a phenylethanolamine (SB-220646) that was a selective full beta3AR agonist elicited full lipolytic and inotropic responses that were sensitive to beta1/2AR antagonism, despite it having very low efficacies at cloned beta1- and beta2ARs. A component of the response to another phenylethanolamine selective beta3AR agonist (SB-215691) was insensitive to beta1/2AR antagonism in some experiments. Because no [corrected] novel aryloxypropanolamine had a beta1/2AR antagonist-insensitive inotropic effect, these results establish more firmly that beta3ARs mediate lipolysis in human white adipocytes, and suggest that putative 'beta4ARs' mediate inotropic responses to CGP 12177. The results also illustrate the difficulty of predicting from studies on cloned betaARs which betaARs will mediate responses to agonists in tissues that have a high number of beta1- and beta2ARs or a low number of beta3ARs.

  9. A simplified radioimmunological method for the determination of human beta-endorphin in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Przuntek, H; Stasch, J P; Graf, M; Pflughaupt, K W; Gropp, N; Witteler, M

    1981-01-01

    Human beta-endorphin-like immunoreactive substances (beta h-EI) in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were determined radioimmunologically. The cross reactivity of the antibodies to human beta-endorphin (beta h-E) amounted to 40% for human beta-lipotropin (beta h-LPH) whilst it was less than 1% for leu- and metenkephalin, alpha- and gamma-endorphin, fraction I and II [5], substance P and alpha-MSH. Prior to radioimmunological determination, an adsorbtion of beta h-EI from CSF with silicic acid was carried out and followed by a desorbtion, using a mixture of aceton/hydrochloric acid. This method was chosen because of the ratio of beta h-LPH to beta h-E in the desorbate can be shifted in favour of beta h-E owing to the variation in recoveries r (r beta h-LPH = 33%, r beta h-E = 64%). On the one hand, this enables a more specific determination of beta h-E and, on the other hand, and separation of any peptidase than may be present [9]. An adsorbtion/desorbtion of 2 ml CSF surfaces to prove the presence of 20-150 pg/ml (65-48 fmol/ml) of beta h-EI. The CSF of 28 patients with various neurological diseases was examined and 24 of them had concentrations of 20-70 pg/ml beta h-EI. The remaining four which had concentrations less than 20 pg/ml, came from meningitis patients undergoing corticoid therapy. A purchasable RIA kid was tested for its determination of beta h-E and was found to be unsuitable.

  10. Distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors on human lymphocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Pochet, R; Delespesse, G; Gausset, P W; Collet, H

    1979-01-01

    A technique is described allowing the quantification and the characterization of specific beta-adrenergic receptors in intact living human lymphocytes. 125I-Iodohydroxybenzylpindolol, a potent beta-adrenergic antagonist was used to label specific binding sites on unfractionated lymphoid cells and on purified subpopulations of T (F1 and F2) and B cells. F1 and F2 were obtained by filtration through nylon wool column as previously described (Delespesse et al., 1976), they differ in their response to mitogens, and in their interactions with adherent cells and B cells. 125I-HYP binding to unfractionated lymphocytes was a saturable, stereospecific and rapid process with a dissociation constant of 2.5 10(-10) M and a binding capacity of 400--600 sites/cell. Bindings on unfractionated lymphocytes, purified B cells and T cells of the F2 fraction were similar. No detectable binding was noted on T cells from the F1 fraction. Enriched T cells obtained by a rosetting technique displayed 200 receptors/cell. PMID:43789

  11. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  12. Leptin upregulates beta3-integrin expression and interleukin-1beta, upregulates leptin and leptin receptor expression in human endometrial epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R R; Leavis, P

    2001-10-01

    Human endometrium and endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) either cultured alone or cocultured with human embryos express leptin and leptin receptor. This study compares the effect of leptin with that of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) on the expression of beta3-EEC integrin, a marker of endometrial receptivity. Both cytokines increased the expression of beta3-EEC at concentrations in the range of 0.06-3 nM; however, leptin exhibited a significantly greater effect than IL-1beta. We also determined the regulatory effects of IL-1beta on leptin secretion and on the expression of leptin and leptin receptor at the protein level in both EEC and endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures. In EEC cultures, IL-1beta upregulated secretion of leptin and expression of both leptin and leptin receptors. No effect of IL-1beta was found in the ESC cultures. However, leptin exhibited marginal upregulation of leptin receptor. The upregulation of beta3-integrin and leptin/leptin receptor expression by IL-1beta in EEC cultures indicates that both cytokines may be implicated in embryonic-maternal cross-talk during the early phase of human implantation. Our present data also raise the possibility that leptin is an endometrial molecular effector of IL-1beta action on beta3-integrin upregulation. Thus, a new role for leptin in human reproduction as an autocrine/paracrine regulator of endometrial receptivity is proposed.

  13. Differential sensitivity to beta-cell secretagogues in cultured rat pancreatic islets exposed to human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S; Hallberg, A; Bendtzen, K; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1989-08-01

    The early stages of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are characterized by a selective inability to secrete insulin in response to glucose, coupled to a better response to nonnutrient secretagogues. The deficient glucose response may be a result of the autoimmune process directed toward the beta-cells. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been suggested to be one possible mediator of immunological damage of the beta-cells. In the present study we characterized the sensitivity of beta-cells to different secretagogues after human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) exposure. Furthermore, experiments were performed to clarify the biochemical mechanisms behind the defective insulin response observed in these islets. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and kept in tissue culture (medium RPMI-1640 plus 10% calf serum) for 5 days. The islets were subsequently exposed to 60 pM human recombinant IL-1 beta during 48 h in the same culture conditions as above and examined immediately after IL-1 exposure. The rIL-1 beta-treated islets showed a marked reduction of glucose-stimulated insulin release. Stimulation with arginine plus different glucose concentrations, and leucine plus glutamine partially counteracted the rIL-1 beta-induced reduction of insulin release. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were similar in control and IL-1-exposed islets. Treatment with IL-1 also did not impair the activities of NADH+- and NADPH+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-aspartate transaminase, glutamate-alanine transaminase, citrate synthase, and NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase. The oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose and L-[U-14C]leucine were decreased by 50% in IL-1-treated islets. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the ratios of [2-14C]pyruvate oxidation/[1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation and L-[U-14C]leucine oxidation/L-[1-14C]leucine decarboxylation, indicating that IL-1 decreases the proportion of

  14. The role of EKLF in human beta-globin gene competition.

    PubMed

    Wijgerde, M; Gribnau, J; Trimborn, T; Nuez, B; Philipsen, S; Grosveld, F; Fraser, P

    1996-11-15

    We have investigated the role of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) in expression of the human beta-globin genes in compound EKLF knockout/human beta-locus transgenic mice. EKLF affects only the adult mouse beta-globin genes in homozygous knockout mice; heterozygous mice are unaffected. Here we show that EKLF knockout mice express the human epsilon and gamma-globin genes normally in embryonic red cells. However, fetal liver erythropoiesis, which is marked by a period of gamma- and beta-gene competition in which the genes are alternately transcribed, exhibits an altered ratio of gamma- to beta-gene transcription. EKLF heterozygous fetal livers display a decrease in the number of transcriptionally active beta genes with a reciprocal increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes. beta-Gene transcription is absent in homozygous knockout fetuses with coincident changes in chromatin structure at the beta promoter. There is a further increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes and accompanying gamma gene promoter chromatin alterations. These results indicate that EKLF plays a major role in gamma- and beta-gene competition and suggest that EKLF is important in stabilizing the interaction between the Locus Control Region and the beta-globin gene. In addition, these findings provide further evidence that developmental modulation of globin gene expression within individual cells is accomplished by altering the frequency and/or duration of transcriptional periods of a gene rather than changing the rate of transcription.

  15. Satellite nighttime lights reveal increasing human exposure to floods worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, Serena; Laio, Francesco; Montanari, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    River floods claim thousands of lives every year, but effective and high-resolution methods to map human exposure to floods at the global scale are still lacking. We use satellite nightlight data to prove that nocturnal lights close to rivers are consistently related to flood damages. We correlate global data of economic losses caused by flooding events with nighttime lights and find that increasing nightlights are associated to flood damage intensification. Then, we analyze the temporal evolution of nightlights along the river network all over the world from 1992 to 2012 and obtain a global map of nightlight trends, which we associate with increasing human exposure to floods, at 1 km2 resolution. An enhancement of exposure to floods worldwide, particularly in Africa and Asia, is revealed, which may exacerbate the projected effects of climate change on flood-related losses and therefore argues for the development of valuable flood preparedness and mitigation strategies.

  16. Chromosome mapping of the human arrestin (SAG), {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase 2 (ADRBK2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G.; Sallese, M.; Stornaiuolo, A.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of proteins play a major role in determining homologous desensitization of G-coupled receptors: {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase ({beta}ARK), which phosphorylates the agonist-occupied receptor and its functional cofactor, {beta}-arrestin. Both {beta}ARK and {beta}-arrestin are members of multigene families. The family of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases includes rhodopsin kinase, {beta}ARK1, {beta}ARK2, IT11-A (GRK4), GRK5, and GRK6. The arrestin/{beta}-arrestin gene family includes arrestin (also known as S-antigen), {beta}-arrestin 1, and {beta}-arrestin 2. Here we report the chromosome mapping of the human genes for arrestin (SAG), {beta}arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results confirmed the assignment of the gene coding for arrestin (SAG) to chromosome 2 and allowed us to refine its localization to band q37. The gene coding for {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) was mapped to chromosome 17p13 and that coding for {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) to chromosome 22q11. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  17. No evidence of the human chorionic gonadotropin-beta gene 5 betaV79M polymorphism in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Lopez, Pablo; Diaz-Cueto, Laura; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Lopez-Valle, Miguel Angel; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian

    2008-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a placental hormone essential for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown a G to A transition in exon 3 of the hCGbeta gene 5, which changes the naturally occurring valine to methionine in codon 79. The frequency of this transition varies among different ethnic groups, being high in USA women, and less common, or absent, in various European populations. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of the betaV79M allelic variant of the beta-subunit of hCG in a Mexican population, and to compare this frequency with those found in other ethnic groups. Placental DNA from 161 pregnant Mexican women was genotyped for the betaV79M by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragments length polymorphism analysis. No polymorphic betaV79M alleles were identified in the population studied. The allele and genotypic frequencies of betaV79M polymorphism in Mexican Mestizo women were significantly different from those reported for the US population, but not from five different European populations. In contrast to what has been found in women from the USA, it seems that the hCGbeta V79M polymorphism is absent or extremely rare in Mexican Mestizo women.

  18. Protein binding elements in the human beta-polymerase promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Englander, E W; Wilson, S H

    1990-01-01

    The core promoter for human DNA polymerase beta contains discrete binding sites for mammalian nuclear proteins, as revealed by DNasel footprinting and gel mobility shift assays. Two sites correspond to sequences identical with the Sp1 factor binding element, and a third site includes an eight residue palindromic sequence, TGACGTCA, known as the CRE element of several cAMP responsive promoters; the 5 to 10 residues flanking this palindrome on each side have no apparent sequence homology with known elements in other promoters. Nuclear extract from a variety of tissues and cells were examined; these included rat liver and testes and cultured cells of human and hamster origin. The DNasel footprint is strong over and around the palindromic element for each of the extracts and is equivalent in size (approximately 22 residues); footprinting over the Sp1 binding sites is seen also. Two potential tissue-specific binding sites, present in liver but not in testes, were found corresponding to residues -13 to -10 and +33 to +48, respectively. Protein binding to the palindromic element was confirmed by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the core promoter as probe. Binding specificity of the 22 residue palindromic element, as revealed by oligonucleotide competition, is different from that of AP-1 binding element. Controlled proteolysis with trypsin was used to study structural properties of proteins forming the mobility shift bands. Following digestion with trypsin, most of the palindrome binding activity of each extract corresponded to a sharp, faster migrating band, potentially representing a DNA binding domain of the palindrome binding protein. Images PMID:2315044

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia inhibits satellite cell regenerative capacity through p38 alpha/beta MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Lominadze, David; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-07-15

    Chronic failure in maintenance and regeneration of skeletal muscles leads to lower muscle mass (sarcopenia), muscle weakness, and poor response to injury. Evidence suggests that aberrant p38 MAPK signaling undermines the repair process after injury in aged mice. Previous studies have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) has been associated with muscle weakness and lower than normal body weights. However, whether or not HHcy condition also compromises skeletal muscle regenerative capabilities is not clear. In the current study, we show that CBS-/+ mice, a model for HHcy condition, exhibited compromised regenerative function and cell proliferation upon injury. However, there was no significant difference in Pax7 expression levels in the satellite cells from CBS-/+ mouse skeletal muscles. Interestingly, the satellite cells from CBS-/+ mice not only exhibited diminished in vitro proliferative capabilities, but also there was heightened oxidative stress. In addition, there was enhanced p38 MAPK activation as well as p16 and p21 expression in the CBS-/+ mouse satellite cells. Moreover, the C2C12 myoblasts also exhibited higher p38 MAPK activation and p16 expression upon treatment with homocysteine in addition to enhanced ROS presence. Tissue engraftment potential and regeneration after injury were restored to some extent upon treatment with the p38-MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, in the CBS-/+ mice. These results together suggest that HHcy-induced diminished satellite cell proliferation involves excessive oxidative stress and p38 MAPK signaling. Our study further proposes that HHcy is a potential risk factor for elderly frailty, and need to be considered as a therapeutic target while designing the alleviation interventions/postinjury rehabilitation measures for adults with HHcy.

  20. Expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein Beta in Muscle Satellite Cells Inhibits Myogenesis in Cancer Cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Marchildon, François; Lamarche, Émilie; Lala-Tabbert, Neena; St-Louis, Catherine; Wiper-Bergeron, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a paraneoplastic syndrome that causes profound weight loss and muscle mass atrophy and is estimated to be the cause of up to 30% of cancer deaths. Though the exact cause is unknown, patients with cancer cachexia have increased muscle protein catabolism. In healthy muscle, injury activates skeletal muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, to differentiate and promote regeneration. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanism is inhibited in cancer cachexia due to persistent expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein beta (C/EBPβ) in muscle myoblasts. C/EBPβ is a bzip transcription factor that is expressed in muscle satellite cells and is normally downregulated upon differentiation. However, in myoblasts exposed to a cachectic milieu, C/EBPβ expression remains elevated, despite activation to differentiate, resulting in the inhibition of myogenin expression and myogenesis. In vivo, cancer cachexia results in increased number of Pax7+ cells that also express C/EBPβ and the inhibition of normal repair mechanisms. Loss of C/EBPβ expression in primary myoblasts rescues differentiation under cachectic conditions without restoring myotube size, indicating that C/EBPβ is an important inhibitor of myogenesis in cancer cachexia. PMID:26709824

  1. Effect of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor beta (TNF beta) on activation, proliferation and differentiation of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zola, H; Nikoloutsopoulos, A

    1989-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of B lymphocytes are processes controlled by T cells, and the control is mediated in part by the action of lymphokines derived from T cells. In this study we have examined the ability of tumour necrosis factor-beta (TNF beta), a T-cell product, to induce a state of activation in resting B cells, to induce proliferation of already activated B cells, and to stimulate differentiation. Recombinant tumour necrosis factor beta (rTNF beta) was used alone and in conjunction with known stimulators. As judged by several markers of activation (CD23, CDw40, LFA-1, 4F2, MHC class I and class II), rTNF beta did not contribute to the activation of resting B cells, either alone or in conjunction with anti-IgM and IL-4. However, the activation marker detected by the monoclonal antibody Leu 21 did show a greater degree of up-regulation by anti-IgM + IL-4 + rTNF beta when compared with anti-IgM + IL-4. rTNF beta induced proliferation of B cells, but only if activating stimuli were also present. Two other factors which induce proliferation of activated B cells, low molecular weight B-cell growth factor (LMW-BCGF) and IL-2, showed additive effects with rTNF beta. No evidence of changes in differentiation status of the B cells was seen. PMID:2787779

  2. Resistance of human squamous carcinoma cells to transforming growth factor beta 1 is a recessive trait.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, M; Muñoz-Antonia, T; Cowan, J M; Wilkins, P C; Zhou, Z L; Vellucci, V F

    1993-01-01

    Because most human squamous carcinoma cell lines of the aerodigestive and genital tracts are refractory to the antiproliferative action of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) in vitro, we have begun to identify the causes for resistance of squamous carcinoma cell lines to TGF beta 1 by using somatic cell genetics. Two stable hybrid cell lines (FaDu-HKc.1 and FaDu-HKc.2) were obtained by fusing a TGF beta 1-resistant human squamous carcinoma cell line, FaDu-HygR, with a human papilloma virus 16-immortalized, TGF beta 1-sensitive, human foreskin keratinocyte cell line, HKc-neoR. Whereas TGF beta 1 did not inhibit DNA synthesis in parental FaDu-HygR cells, it reduced DNA synthetic activity of HKc-neoR, FaDu-HKc.1, and FaDu-HKc.2 cells by 75-85% (IC50, 2-5 pM). Although squamous carcinoma cells express lower than normal levels of TGF beta 1 type II receptors on their cell surface, TGF beta 1 type II receptor mRNA was detected in all four cell lines. Recessive genes involved in TGF beta 1 signaling may be localized to the distal portion of chromosome 18q, as this was the sole chromosomal region of homozygous deletion in parental FaDu-HygR cells. Furthermore, our previous observation that mutant p53 decreases sensitivity of keratinocytes to TGF beta 1 was supported by the finding that the level of the mutant p53 protein expressed by the hybrid cell lines was greatly reduced. In summary, TGF beta 1 resistance of FaDu cells appears to be recessive and is presumably due to the loss of one or more post-receptor elements of the signaling pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8327510

  3. Satellite nighttime lights reveal increasing human exposure to floods worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, Serena; Laio, Francesco; Montanari, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    River floods are the first cause of human fatalities and economic losses among natural disasters. Floods claim thousands of lives every year, but effective and high-resolution methods to provide a spatially and temporally detailed analysis of the human exposure to floods at the global scale are still lacking. To this aim, we use satellite nightlight data to prove that nocturnal lights close to rivers are consistently related to flood damages. First, we analyse the temporal evolution of nightlights along the river network all over the world from 1992 to 2012 and obtain a global map of nightlight trends, which we associate with increasing human exposure to floods, at 1 km2 resolution. Then, we correlate global data of economic losses caused by flooding events with nighttime lights and find that increasing nightlights are associated to flood damage intensification. Our results show an enhancement of exposure to floods worldwide, particularly in Africa and Asia. Therefore our analysis argues for the development of valuable flood preparedness and mitigation strategies, also associated to the projected effects of climate change on flood-related losses.

  4. Changes of human plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity after intravenous administration of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Aunis, D; Mandel, P; Miras-Portugal, M T; Coquillat, G; Rohmer, F; Warter, J M

    1975-03-01

    The intravenous administration of theophylline to ten healthy human subjects produced either an increase of circulating plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase or no change. The rise of plasma enzyme activity may reflect the increased peripheral catecholamine release induced by theophylline.

  5. Benzothiazole derivatives as novel inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Ganeshapillai, Dharshini; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2006-03-27

    Selective inhibitors of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) have considerable potential as treatments for metabolic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 or obesity. Here, we report the discovery and synthesis of a series of novel benzothiazole derivatives and their inhibitory activities against 11beta-HSD1 from human hepatic microsomes measured using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. The benzothiazole derivatives 1 and 2 showed greater than 80% inhibition for 11beta-HSD1 at 10 microM and exhibited IC50 values in the low micromolar range. The preliminary SAR study suggested the introduction of a chlorine substituent at the 4 position of the benzothiazole ring greatly enhanced the inhibitory activities. Docking studies with the benzothiazole derivative 1 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 revealed how the molecule may interact with the enzyme and cofactor.

  6. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity in human cerebrospinal fluid: properties, relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity and variation in Parkinson's disease and congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, D T; Cervenka, J H; Stone, R A; Levine, G L; Parmer, R J; Franco-Bourland, R E; Madrazo, I; Langlais, P J; Robertson, D; Biaggioni, I

    1994-02-01

    1. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase is stored and released with catecholamines by exocytosis from secretory vesicles in noradrenergic neurons and chromaffin cells. Although dopamine beta-hydroxylase enzymic activity is measurable in cerebrospinal fluid, such activity is unstable, and its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity in humans is not clearly established. To explore the significance of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase, we applied a homologous human dopamine beta-hydroxylase radioimmunoassay to cerebrospinal fluid, in order to characterize the properties and stability of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase, as well as its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity and its variation in disease states such as hypertension, renal failure, Parkinsonism and congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency. 2. Authentic, physically stable dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity was present in normal human cerebrospinal fluid at a concentration of 31.3 +/- 1.4 ng/ml (range: 18.5-52.5 ng/ml), but at a 283 +/- 27-fold lower concentration than that found in plasma. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentrations were correlated (r = 0.67, P = 0.001). Some degree of local central nervous system control of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase was suggested by incomplete correlation with plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase (with an especially marked dissociation in renal disease) as well as the lack of a ventricular/lumbar cerebrospinal dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentration gradient. 3. Cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase was not changed by the central alpha 2-agonist clonidine at a dose that diminished cerebrospinal fluid noradrenaline, nor did cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase correspond between subjects to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of noradrenaline or methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol; thus, cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentration was not closely

  7. The prognostic significance of beta human chorionic gonadotrophin and its metabolites in women with cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R A; Iles, R K; Carter, P G; Caldwell, C J; Shepherd, J H; Chard, T

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To examine long term survival of women with primary and recurrent cervical carcinoma in relation to (1) excretion of beta-core (a urinary metabolite of beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta hCG)) and (2) beta hCG immunostaining of the tumours, to determine the suitability of these markers for assessing prognosis. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study undertaken in a gynaecological oncology centre: 57 women with primary cervical cancer and 42 with recurrent disease were recruited between January 1990 and September 1992. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with the log rank test was used to assess survival differences with survival rate given per year of follow up. RESULTS: In primary disease, the four year survival for the beta-core negative group was 79%, compared with 14% for the beta-core positive group (p = 0.001). This was still significant for early stage disease or squamous lesions alone. In recurrent disease, beta-core positivity was not prognostically significant. Immunohistochemistry was of no prognostic significance in either group. CONCLUSIONS: beta-core excretion appears to be useful in assessing prognosis of primary cervical cancer but not of recurrent disease. A large prospective study of urinary beta-core in early stage cervical cancer is needed to determine whether it can be used as an index for modifying treatment. PMID:9930074

  8. Age and Amyloid Effects on Human CNS Amyloid-Beta Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce W.; Elbert, Donald L.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Kasten, Tom; Ovod, Vitaliy; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Chott, Robert; Yarasheski, Kevin; Sigurdson, Wendy; Zhang, Lily; Goate, Alison; Phil, D.; Benzinger, Tammie; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Age is the single greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease with the incidence doubling every 5 years after age 65. However, our understanding of the mechanistic relationship between increasing age and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease is currently limited. We therefore sought to determine the relationship between age, amyloidosis, and amyloid-beta kinetics in the central nervous system (CNS) of humans Methods Amyloid-beta kinetics were analyzed in 112 participants and compared to the ages of participants and the amount of amyloid deposition. Results We found a highly significant correlation between increasing age and slowed amyloid-beta turnover rates (2.5-fold longer half-life over five decades of age). In addition, we found independent effects on amyloid-beta42 kinetics specifically in participants with amyloid deposition. Amyloidosis was associated with a higher (>50%) irreversible loss of soluble amyloid-beta42 and a 10-fold higher amyloid-beta42 reversible exchange rate. Interpretation These findings reveal a mechanistic link between human aging and the risk of amyloidosis which may be due to a dramatic slowing of amyloid-beta turnover, increasing the likelihood of protein misfolding that leads to deposition. Alterations in amyloid-beta kinetics associated with aging and amyloidosis suggest opportunities for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. More generally, this study provides an example of how changes in protein turnover kinetics can be used to detect physiologic and pathophysiologic changes and may be applicable to other proteinopathies. PMID:26040676

  9. Novel non-steroidal inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Nigel; Su, Xiangdong; Ganeshapillai, Dharshini; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) regulates glucocorticoid action at the pre-receptor stage by converting cortisone to cortisol. 11beta-HSD1 is selectively expressed in many tissues including the liver and adipose tissue where metabolic events are important. Metabolic syndrome relates to a number of metabolic abnormalities and currently has a prevalence of >20% in adult Americans. 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors are being investigated by many major pharmaceutical companies for type 2 diabetes and other abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome. In this area of intense interest a number of structural types of 11beta-HSD1 inhibitor have been identified. It is important to have an array of structural types as the physicochemical properties of the compounds will determine tissue distribution, HPA effects, and ultimately clinical utility. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of three structurally different series of novel 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors that inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 in the low micromolar range. Docking studies with 1-3 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 reveal how the molecules may interact with the enzyme and cofactor and give further scope for structure based drug design in the optimisation of these series.

  10. Coexistence of at least three distinct beta-adrenoceptors in human internal mammary artery.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, M; Omrani, G; Mahmoudian, M

    2000-01-01

    The internal mammary artery (IMA) is currently the preferred conduit for myocardial revascularization. However, perioperative vasospasm and a hypoperfusion state during maximal exercise may limit its use as a bypass graft. The mechanism of spasm has not been clearly defined. Since beta-adrenoceptor activation plays a major role in vasorelaxation, the present study was carried out to investigate the beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness of human IMA smooth muscle. Isoproterenol produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in endothelium-denuded IMA segments, precontracted with phenylephrine (maximal relaxation 46.33+/-5.45%). Atenolol (10(-6)M) and propranolol (2x10(-7)M) inhibited isoproterenol-induced relaxation. While atenolol produced partial inhibition, propranolol caused a complete inhibition in a majority of the segments and a partial inhibition in a minority. BRL 37344, a selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings of endothelium-denuded IMA (maximal relaxation 40.35+/-4.07%). Cyanopindolol, a beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist, produced a marked relaxation (58.65+/-6.2%) in endothelium-denuded IMA rings, precontracted with phenylephrine. Cyanopindolol-induced relaxation was resistant to blockade by propranolol (2x10(-7)M). Spontaneous contractions of IMA rings were also observed in some cases that were inhibited by isoproterenol and BRL 37344. This observation implies the important role of beta-adrenoceptor activation in prevention of human IMA spasm. The results obtained in present study indicate that human IMA smooth muscle possesses an atypical beta-adrenoceptor together with beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors. Regarding the relaxation induced in IMA rings by adding BRL 37344, the possible identical entities of IMA atypical beta-adrenoceptors and beta 3-adrenoceptors are suggested.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of mutant and wild-type human. beta. -actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, J.; Gunning, P.; Porreca, P.; Ng, S.Y.; Lin, C.H.; Kedes, L.

    1984-10-01

    There are more than 20 ..beta..-actin-specific sequences in the human genome, many of which are pseudogenes. To facilitate the isolation of potentially functional ..beta..-actin genes, they used the new method of B. Seed for selecting genomic clones by homologous recombination. A derivative of the ..pi..VX miniplasmid, ..pi..AN7..beta..1, was constructed by insertion of the 600-base-pair 3' untranslated region of the ..beta..-actin mRNA expressed in human fibroblasts. Five clones containing ..beta..-actin sequences were selected from an amplified human fetal gene library by homologous recombination between library phage and the miniplasmid. One of these clones contained a complete ..beta..-actin gene with a coding sequence identical to that determined for the mRNA of human fibroblasts. A DNA fragment consisting of mostly intervening sequences from this gene was then use to identify 13 independent recombinant copies of the analogous gene from two specially constructed gene libraries, each containing one of the two types of mutant ..beta..-actin genes found in a line of neoplastic human fibroblasts. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences encoded by the unmutated gene predict that a guanine-to-adenine transition is responsible for the glycine-to-aspartic acid mutation at codon 244 and would also result in the loss of a HaeIII site. Detection of this HaeIII polymorphism among the fibroblast-derived closed verified the identity of the ..beta..-actin gene expressed in human fibroblasts.

  12. Correction of human. beta. sup S -globin gene by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Shesely, E.G.; Hyungsuk Kim; Shehee, W.R.; Smithies, O. ); Papayannopoulou, T. ); Popovich, B.W. )

    1991-05-15

    As a step toward using gene targeting for gene therapy, the authors have corrected a human {beta}{sup S}-globin gene to the normal {beta}{sup A} allele by homologous recombination in the mouse-human hybrid cell line BSM. BSM is derived from a mouse erythroleukemia cell line and carries a single human chromosome 11 with the {beta}{sup S}-globin allele. A {beta}{sup A}-globin targeting construct containing a unique oligomer and a neomycin-resistance gene was electroporated into the BSM cells, which were then placed under G418 selection. Then 126 resulting pools containing a total {approx}29,000 G418-resistant clones were screened by PCR for the presence of a targeted recombinant: 3 positive pools were identified. A targeted clone was isolated by replating one of the positive pools into smaller pools and rescreening by PCR, followed by dilution cloning. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the isolated clone had been targeted as planned. The correction of the {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A} was confirmed both by allele-specific PCR and by allele-specific antibodies. Expression studies comparing the uninduced and induced RNA levels in unmodified BSM cells and in the targeted clone showed no significant alteration in the ability of the targeted clone to undergo induction, despite the potentially disrupting presence of a transcriptionally active neomycin gene 5{prime} to the human {beta}{sup A}-globin gene. Thus gene targeting can correct a {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A}, and the use of a selectable helper gene need not significantly interfere with the induction of the corrected gene.

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta stimulates the expression of fibronectin by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Persichitte, K A; Baskin, J B; Nielsen, L D; Clark, R A

    1988-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a 25-kD protein which has regulatory activity over a variety of cell types. It is distinct from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF analogs, and exerts its action via a distinct receptor. Its effect on proliferation or differentiation can be positive or negative depending on the cell type and the presence of other growth factors. It also modulates the expression of cellular products. TGF-beta causes fibroblasts to increase their production of the extracellular matrix components, fibronectin and collagen. Human keratinocytes (HK) are known to have TGF-beta receptors. We wished to study the effect of TGF-beta on the production of extracellular matrix proteins by human keratinocytes in culture. Human keratinocytes were grown in serum-free defined medium (MCDB-153) to about 70% confluence. Following a 16-h incubation in medium lacking EGF and TGF-beta, cells were incubated for 12 h in medium containing varying concentrations of EGF and TGF-beta. Cells were then labeled with 35S-methionine for 10 h in the same conditions. Labeled proteins from the medium were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. TGF-beta at 10 ng/ml induced a sixfold increase in the secretion of fibronectin, as well as an unidentified 50-kD protein. Thrombospondin production was also increased, but not over a generalized twofold increase in the production of all other proteins. EGF, at 10 ng/ml, caused a smaller additive effect. TGF-beta may be an important stimulator of extracellular matrix production by human keratinocytes.

  14. A peptide mimetic of human interferon (IFN)-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Atsushi; Sone, Saburo

    2003-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are used clinically as antiviral and antitumour agents. The interaction of IFNs with their heterodimeric type I IFN receptor comprised of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 is a first step to inducing biological actions. Here, we describe the successful mimicry of IFN-beta by a peptide isolated by phage-display screening using a neutralizing anti-IFN-beta monoclonal antibody. The 15-mer peptide, designated SYR6, was shown to compete with IFN-beta for binding to type I IFN receptor in a concentration-dependent manner, and was shown to elicit antiviral activity on cultured cells. This antiviral activity was not eliminated in the presence of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to IFN-alpha, -beta and -gamma, and a low concentration of soluble type I IFN receptor, suggesting that it was not due to IFN contamination or the induction of endogenous IFNs by SYR6. This peptide might be a potent agonist to provide a mechanism of activating heterodimeric cytokine receptors. PMID:12542398

  15. Modulation by presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors of noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerves in human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Parker, D A; Marino, V; Ivar, P M; de la Lande, I S

    1998-12-01

    This study was undertaken to test for the presence of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors on sympathetic nerves in human dental pulp and, if present, to investigate the subtype. Pulp was excised from freshly extracted teeth, incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (0.6 micromol/l) and subsequently superfused with Krebs solution. Sympathetic nerves were stimulated at 5 Hz for 100 sec. The non-specific beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline (1.0 micromol/l), and the selective beta2-agonist salbutamol (10 micromol/l) facilitated the release of [3H]-noradrenaline; isoprenaline, but not salbutamol, also facilitated this release in the presence of desipramine (DMI, 0.3 micromol/l), corticosterone (10 micromol/l) and rauwolscine (0.1 micromol/l). BRL 37344 (1.0 micromol/l), a beta3-agonist, had no effect on [3H]-noradrenaline release. The facilitatory effects of isoprenaline and salbutamol were inhibited by the non-specific beta-antagonist propranolol (1.0 micromol/l), while that of salbutamol was inhibited in the presence of ICI-188,551 (1.0 micromol/l), a selective beta2-antagonist, as well. The beta1-antagonist atenolol (1.0 micromol/l) potentiated the facilitatory effects of isoprenaline in the presence of DMI and corticosterone. Neither propranolol nor ICI-188,551 alone affected the release of [3H]-noradrenaline. These results establish the presence of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors on sympathetic nerves in human dental pulp. It is suggested that they are of the beta2-subtype, although a greater range of agonists and antagonists needs to be used to clarify the nature of the the beta-adrenoceptors.

  16. Expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrial stromal and decidual cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shiokawa, Shigetatsu; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakamura, Yukio

    1996-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoprecipitation. Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry demonstrated the greater expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 5} subunits of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured stromal cells from the midsecretory phase, than in those of the early proliferative phase. The addition of estradiol (E{sub 2}) and progesterone (P) to cultured stromal cells in the early proliferative phase increased the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in vitro. Flow cytometry also demonstrated the expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {alpha}{sub 6} subunits of {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured decidual cells, and the enriched-fraction of prolactin (PRL)-producing decidual cells isolated by Percoll gradients showed high levels of {beta}{sub 1} integrins expression. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the {beta}{sub 1} integrin cell surface phenotypes in cultured decidual cells observed by flow cytometry. In summary, the present study demonstrated that endometrial stromal and decidual cells expressed {beta}{sub 1} integrin subunits at their surfaces. The expression exhibited a variability throughout the menstrual cycles, being predominantly detected in the secretory phase, and was maintained highly in the decidua. Thus, {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua may be important in mediating the organization of extracellular matrix proteins derived from embryos during the early stage of implantation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Heat shock protein induction in rat pancreatic islets by recombinant human interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Helqvist, S; Polla, B S; Johannesen, J; Nerup, J

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 beta, potentiated by tumour necrosis factor alpha, is cytotoxic to pancreatic Beta cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that interleukin 1 beta induces oxygen free radicals in Beta cells. Since cytotoxicity induced by free radicals and by heat may activate the same cellular repair mechanism (the heat shock response), the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of protein synthesis in isolated islets after exposure to interleukin 1 beta (150 pg/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (50 ng/ml, 24 h) heat shock (43 degrees C, 30 min) and H2O2 (0.1 mmol/l, 20 min). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, autoradiography, Western-blot analysis and partial peptide mapping of 35S-methionine labelled islets, interleukin 1 beta was found to induce a 73 kilodalton protein belonging to the heat shock protein family heat shock protein 70, a heat shock protein 90, and haem oxygenase. A minor induction of heat shock protein 73 and haem oxygenase was seen after H2O2. Interleukin 1 beta did not induce heat shock proteins in rat thyroid cells, rat mesangial cells or in human monocytes. Tumour necrosis factor alpha did not induce selective protein synthesis. Pre-exposure of islets to heat, tumour necrosis factor alpha, or H2O2 did not prevent the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release seen after 24 h of interleukin 1 beta exposure. The data are compatible with free radical induction by interleukin 1 beta. However, the heat shock response is not specific for oxidative injury, and previous studies have shown discrepant effects as to a protective effect of free radical scavengers against interleukin 1 beta-mediated beta-cytotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The exon-intron organization of the human erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, K.M.; Forget, B.G. ); Scarpa, A.L.; Curtis, P.J. ); Winkelmann, J.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The human erythrocyte [beta]-spectrin gene DNA has been cloned from overlapping human genomic phage and cosmid recombinants. The entire erythroid [beta]-spectrin mRNA is encoded by 32 exons that range in size from 49 to 871 bases. The exon/intron junctions have been identified and the exons mapped. There is no correlation between intron positions and the repeat units of 106 amino acids within domain II of the [beta]-spectrin gene. The scatter of the introns over the 17 repeats argues against the 106-amino-acid unit representing a minigene that underwent repeated duplication resulting in the present [beta]-spectrin gene. In fact, the two largest exons, exon 14 (871 bp) and 16 (757 bp), extend over 4 and 3 repeat units of 106 amino acids, respectively, while repeat [beta]10 is encoded by 4 exons. No single position of an intron in the [beta]-spectrin gene is conserved between any of the 17 [beta]-spectrin and 22 [alpha]-spectrin repeat units. The nucleotide sequences of the exon/intron boundaries conform to the consensus splice site sequences except for exon 20, whose 5[prime] donor splice-site sequence begins with GC. The [beta]-spectrin isoform present in the human brain, the skeletal muscle, and the cardiac muscle is an alternatively spliced product of the erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene. This splice site is located within the coding sequences of exon 32 and its utilization in nonerythroid tissues leads to the use of 4 additional downstream exons with a size range of 44 to 530 bp. 55 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Mapping the human footprint from satellite measurements in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Matsushita, Bunkei; Yang, Wei; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2014-02-01

    Due to increasing global urbanization and climate change, the quantification of "human footprints" has become an urgent goal in the fields of biodiversity conservation and regional environment management. A human footprint is defined as the impact of a particular human activity on the Earth's surface, which can be represented mainly by impervious surfaces (related to industry and urbanization) and cropland (related to agriculture). Here we present a method called sorted temporal mixture analysis with post-classification (STMAP) for mapping impervious surfaces and cropland simultaneously at the subpixel level to fill the demand for precise human footprint information on a national scale. The STMAP method applies a four-endmember sorted temporal mixture analysis to provide the initial fractions of evergreen forests, deciduous forests, cropland, and impervious surfaces as a first step. Endmembers are selected from the sorted temporal profiles of the MODIS-normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), as guided by a principal component analysis. The yearly maximum land surface temperatures and averaged stable nighttime light are then statistically analyzed to provide the thresholds for post-classification to further separate cropland from deciduous forest and bare land from impervious surface. As the four outputs of STMAP, the fractions of forest, cropland, impervious surfaces and bare land are derived. We used the reference maps of impervious surfaces and cropland obtained from the Landsat/TM and ALOS precise land-use/land-cover map at the subpixel level to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, respectively. Historical satellite images with high spatial resolution were used to further evaluate the cropland results derived with the STMAP method. The results showed that the STMAP method has promising accuracy for estimating impervious surfaces and cropland in Japan. The root mean square errors obtained with the STMAP method were 6.3% for the estimation of

  20. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Trusselle, Melanie; Halem, Heather; Culler, Michael D; Potter, Barry V L

    2009-03-25

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSDs) are key enzymes regulating the pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoid hormones, which play essential roles in various vital physiological processes. The modulation of 11beta-HSD type 1 activity with selective inhibitors has beneficial effects on various conditions including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Therefore, inhibition of tissue-specific glucocorticoid action by regulating 11beta-HSD1 constitutes a promising treatment for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here we report the discovery of a series of novel adamantyl carboxamides as selective inhibitors of human 11beta-HSD1 in HEK-293 cells transfected with the HSD11B1 gene. Compounds 9 and 14 show inhibitory activity against 11beta-HSD1 with IC(50) values in 100nM range. Docking studies with the potent compound 8 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 (1XU9) reveals how the molecule may interact with the enzyme and cofactor.

  1. Mechanosensitivity of human osteosarcoma cells and phospholipase C {beta}2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hoberg, M. . E-mail: Maik.Hoberg@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Gratz, H.-H.; Noll, M.; Jones, D.B.

    2005-07-22

    Bone adapts to mechanical load by osteosynthesis, suggesting that osteoblasts might respond to mechanical stimuli. We therefore investigated cell proliferation and phospholipase C (PLC) expression in osteoblasts. One Hertz uniaxial stretching at 4000 {mu}strains significantly increased the proliferation rates of human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 and primary human osteoblasts. However, U-2/OS, SaOS-2, OST, and MNNG/HOS cells showed no significant changes in proliferation rate. We investigated the expression pattern of different isoforms of PLC in these cell lines. We were able to detect PLC {beta}1, {beta}3, {gamma}1, {gamma}2, and {delta}1 in all cells, but PLC {beta}2 was only detectable in the mechanosensitive cells. We therefore investigated the possible role of PLC {beta}2 in mechanotransduction. Inducible antisense expression for 24 h inhibited the translation of PLC {beta}1 in U-2/OS cells by 35% and PLC {beta}2 in MG-63 by 29%. Fluid shear flow experiments with MG-63 lacking PLC {beta}2 revealed a significantly higher level of cells losing attachment to coverslips and a significantly lower number of cells increasing intracellular free calcium.

  2. Interferon beta 2/interleukin 6 modulates synthesis of alpha 1-antitrypsin in human mononuclear phagocytes and in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, D H; May, L T; Sehgal, P B

    1989-01-01

    The cytokine IFN beta 2/IL-6 has recently been shown to regulate the expression of genes encoding hepatic acute phase plasma proteins. INF beta 2/IL-6 has also been shown to be identical to MGI-2, a protein that induces differentiation of bone marrow precursor cells toward mature granulocytes and monocytes. Accordingly, we have examined the effect of IFN beta 2/IL-6 on expression of the IL-1- and tumor necrosis factor-unresponsive acute phase protein alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1 AT) in human hepatoma-derived hepatocytes and in human mononuclear phagocytes. Purified human fibroblast and recombinant IFN beta 2/IL-6 each mediate a specific increase in steady-state levels of alpha 1 AT mRNA and a corresponding increase in net synthesis of alpha 1 AT in primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocytes as well as in HepG2 and Hep3B cells. Thus, the effect of IFN beta 2/IL-6 on alpha 1 AT gene expression in these cells is primarily due to an increase in accumulation of alpha 1 AT mRNA and can be distinguished from the direct, predominantly translational effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on expression of this gene in monocytes and macrophages. The results indicate that IFN beta 2/IL-6 regulates acute phase gene expression, specifically alpha 1 AT gene expression, in extrahepatic as well as hepatic cell types. Images PMID:2472425

  3. The effect of oxytocin on oestradiol-17 beta and testosterone secretion by cultured human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Clamagirand, C; Plevrakis, I; Bussenot, I; Parinaud, J; Vieitez, G; Grandjean, H

    1991-07-01

    The effect of oxytocin at different concentrations was tested on the secretion of oestradiol-17 beta and testosterone by cultured human granulosa cells obtained by follicular punctures during in-vitro fertilization (IVF) attempts. Oxytocin had no effect on testosterone secretion, either in the absence or the presence of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). It had no effect on oestradiol-17 beta in the absence of FSH. However, it decreased the FSH-stimulated secretion of oestradiol-17 beta in a certain number of cases. This inhibitory effect appears to be associated with cells more responsive to FSH and was identified in women found to be successful in achieving pregnancy during IVF attempts.

  4. Human beta-globin gene expression in transgenic mice is enhanced by a distant DNase I hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, P T; Liu, D P; Liu, W; Chang, J C; Kan, Y W

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that erythroid-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located far upstream of the human beta-globin gene are important in regulating beta-globin gene expression. We used the polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify and clone an 882-base-pair DNA fragment spanning one of these HS, designated HSII, which is located 54 kilobases upstream of the beta-globin gene. The cloned HSII fragment was linked to a human beta-globin gene in either the genomic (HSII-beta) or antigenomic (HSII-beta) orientation. These two constructs and a beta-globin gene alone (beta) were injected into fertilized mouse eggs, and expression was analyzed in liver and brain from day-16 transgenic fetuses. Five of 7 beta-transgenic fetuses expressed human beta-globin mRNA, but the level of expression per gene copy was low, ranging from 0.93 to 22.4% of mouse alpha-globin mRNA (average 9.9%). In contrast, 11 of 12 HSII-beta transgenic fetuses expressed beta-globin mRNA at levels per gene copy ranging from 31.3 to 336.6% of mouse alpha-globin mRNA (average 139.5%). Only three fetuses containing intact copies of the HSII-beta construct were produced. Two of three expressed human beta-globin mRNA at levels per gene copy of 179.2 and 387.1%. Expression of human beta-globin mRNA was tissue-specific in all three types of transgenic fetuses. These studies demonstrate that a small DNA fragment containing a single erythroid-specific HS can stimulate high-level human beta-globin gene expression in transgenic mice. Images PMID:2780563

  5. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  6. Structure of the gene for human. beta. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor: expression and promoter characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Emorine, L.J.; Marullo, S.; Delavier-Klutchko, C.; Kaveri, S.V.; Durieu-Trautmann, O.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-10-01

    The genomic gene coding for the human ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 2/AR) from A431 epidermoid cells has been isolated. Transfection of the gene into eukaryotic cells restores a fully active receptor/GTP-binding protein/adenylate cyclase complex with ..beta../sub 2/AR properties. Southern blot analyses with ..beta../sub 2/AR-specific probes show that a single ..beta../sub 2/AR gene is common to various human tissues and that its flanking sequences are highly conserved among humans and between man and rabbit, mouse, and hamster. Functional significance of these regions is supported by the presence of a promoter region (including mRNA cap sites, two TATA boxes, a CAAT box, and three G + C-rich regions that resemble binding sites for transcription factor Sp1) 200-300 base pairs 5' to the translation initiation codon. In the 3' flanking region, sequences homologous to glucocorticoid-response elements might be responsible for the increased expression of the ..beta../sub 2/AR gene observed after treatment of the transfected cells with hydrocortisone. In addition, 5' to the promoter region, an open reading frame encodes a 251-residue polypeptide that displays striking homologies with protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

  7. Modulation of interleukin-1beta mediated inflammatory response in human astrocytes by flavonoids: implications in neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Mishra, Mamata; Ghosh, Soumya; Tewari, Richa; Basu, Anirban; Seth, Pankaj; Sen, Ellora

    2007-06-15

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) contributes to inflammation and neuronal death in CNS injuries and neurodegenerative pathologies, and astrocytes have been implicated as the primary mediators of IL-1beta induced neuronal death. As astrocytes play an important role in supporting the survival and functions of neurons, we investigated the effect of plant flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, with known anti-inflammatory properties in modulating the response of human astrocytes to IL-1beta for therapeutic intervention. Flavonoids significantly decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from astrocytes stimulated with IL-1beta. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) and thioredoxin (TRX1)-mediators associated with protection against oxidative stress. Flavonoids not only modulated the expression of astrocytes specific molecules such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), and ceruloplasmin (CP) both in the presence and absence of IL-1beta but also decreased the elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-inducible protein (IP-10), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES from IL-1beta activated astrocytes. Significant decrease in neuronal apoptosis was observed in neurons cultured in conditioned medium obtained from astrocytes treated with a combination of IL-1beta and flavonoids as compared to that treated with IL-1beta alone. Our result suggests that by (i) enhancing the potential of activated astrocytes to detoxify free radical, (ii) reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and (iii) modulating expression of mediators associated with enhanced physiological activity of astrocyte in response to injury, flavonoids confer (iv) protection against IL-1beta induced astrocyte mediated neuronal damage.

  8. Response-Modality-Specific Encoding of Human Choices in Upper Beta Band Oscillations during Vibrotactile Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Herding, Jan; Ludwig, Simon; Blankenburg, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Perceptual decisions based on the comparison of two vibrotactile frequencies have been extensively studied in non-human primates. Recently, we obtained corresponding findings from human oscillatory electroencephalography (EEG) activity in the form of choice-selective modulations of upper beta band amplitude in medial premotor areas. However, the research in non-human primates as well as its human counterpart was so far limited to decisions reported by button presses. Thus, here we investigated whether the observed human beta band modulation is specific to the response modality. We recorded EEG activity from participants who compared two sequentially presented vibrotactile frequencies (f1 and f2), and decided whether f2 > f1 or f2 < f1, by performing a horizontal saccade to either side of a computer screen. Contrasting time-frequency transformed EEG data between both choices revealed that upper beta band amplitude (∼24–32 Hz) was modulated by participants’ choices before actual responses were given. In particular, “f2 > f1” choices were always associated with higher beta band amplitude than “f2 < f1” choices, irrespective of whether the choice was correct or not, and independent of the specific association between saccade direction and choice. The observed pattern of beta band modulation was virtually identical to our previous results when participants responded with button presses. In line with an intentional framework of decision making, the most likely sources of the beta band modulation were now, however, located in lateral as compared to medial premotor areas including the frontal eye fields. Hence, we could show that the choice-selective modulation of upper beta band amplitude is on the one hand consistent across different response modalities (i.e., same modulation pattern in similar frequency band), and on the other hand effector specific (i.e., modulation originating from areas involved in planning and executing saccades). PMID:28360848

  9. Satellite Perspectives on Highland - Lowland Human Interaction in Ancient Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lönnqvist, M.; Törmä, M.; Lönnqvist, K.; Nuñez, M.

    2012-08-01

    Nowadays we can travel by GoogleEarth 3D to Syria (http://www.worldcountries.info/GoogleEarth/GoogleEarth-Syria.php) and zoom in on the desert landscape of the mountainous region of Jebel Bishri between the Euphrates river and the Syrian Desert. This is the area, where the Finnish archaeological survey and mapping project SYGIS worked in 2000-2010 studying the relationship of humans with their environment from ancient times to the present. What kind of landscape views and visions did the ancients have and how did they utilize them? The present paper focuses on seeking answers for these questions by combining satellite data sources, such as imagery and radar data, with location information of archaeological remains collected on the ground. Landsat as well as QuickBird imagery have been fused with SRTM mission and ASTER DEM data in creating 3D landscape models and fly-over simulations. The oasis of El Kowm on the western piedmont of the mountain seems to have served as a base camp for early huntergatherers and pastoral nomads dwelling seasonally in the region of Jebel Bishri. According to the archaeological finds, the interaction between the lowland and the mountain people already started during the Palaeolithic era but was continued by pastoral nomads of the region from the Neolithic period onwards. The Upper Palaeolithic period meant a clear change in cognitive thinking and obviously in understanding the properties of landscape, visibility and perceiving sceneries in 3D. Mobility of hunter-gatherers and pastoral nomads is based on subsistence economy, but mobility also enhances visions and prospects of phenomena appearing in the horizon.

  10. Molecular basis of IgE cross-reactivity between human beta-casein and bovine beta-casein, a major allergen of milk.

    PubMed

    Bernard, H; Negroni, L; Chatel, J M; Clement, G; Adel-Patient, K; Peltre, G; Creminon, C; Wal, J M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty patients allergic to cow's milk proteins and with high levels of specific IgE directed against bovine whole casein were selected to evaluate reactivity of their IgE antibodies with human beta-casein. Highly purified human and bovine beta-caseins were prepared by selective precipitations and FPLC separation. Their identity and purity were assessed by HPLC, analysis of amino acid composition, sequencing of the five N-terminal amino acid residues and immunochemical tests. Direct and indirect ELISAs were performed using human and bovine beta-casein coated into microtiter plates and monoclonal anti-human IgE antibody AChE labelled for revelation. Seven sera contained specific IgE directed against human beta-casein. Inhibition studies using native human and bovine beta-caseins as well as bovine beta-casein-derived peptides demonstrated that, depending on the sera, one or several common epitopes located in different parts of the molecule were shared by the two homologous proteins.

  11. MISR Satellite Observations of Aerosol Types Affecting Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Franklin, M.; Garay, M. J.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based observations of pollutants and concentrations of particulate matter (PM), that includes small particles designated PM2.5 and dust-dominated PM10, are the gold standard in studies of environmental impacts on human health. However, because monitoring stations are costly, they typically provide only limited spatial coverage, especially in rural and remote areas. We will demonstrate how data from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument that has been flying on NASA's Terra Earth Observing System satellite since early 2000 can be used to provide estimates of surface PM types. The current MISR operational aerosol retrieval uses a combination of multi-spectral and multi-angle data to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property information (including dust AOD) globally at 17.6 km spatial resolution. Using the same algorithm with data collected in all 36-channels at 275 m resolution (Local Mode), which is available over greater Los Angeles area, and also was activated during 2013 DISCOVER-AQ California field campaign, high-resolution 4.4 km aerosol retrievals were performed in addition to the standard 17.6 km retrievals. The 4.4 km spatial resolution of the PM information data is fine enough to be able to resolve local differences in PM loading that may be important for understanding regional health effects of pollution in the region. In particular, we demonstrate that MISR high-resolution AOD retrievals are in better agreement with ground-based aerosol observations and reveal more details about the aerosol spatial variability compared to the MISR standard 17.6 km product. Then we will discuss techniques and show examples of the application of high-resolution MISR data to provide estimates of surface PM for the greater Los Angeles area in 2008 and for California San Joaquin Valley during the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign. Finally, we will discuss future NASA instruments that will provide new information allowing for better

  12. Correction of murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII by a human. beta. -glucuronidase transgene

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, J.W.; Vogler, C.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Sly, W.S. ); Birkenmeier, E.H.; Gwynn, B. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors recently described a murine model for mucopolysaccharidosis VII in mice that have an inherited deficiency of {beta}-glucuronidase. Affected mice, of genotype gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps}, present clinical manifestations similar to those of humans with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly syndrome) and are shown here to have secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes. The mucopolysaccharidosis VII phenotype in both species includes dwarfism, skeletal deformities, and premature death. Lysosome storage is visualized within enlarged vesicles and correlates biochemically with accumulation of undegraded and partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. In this report they describe the consequences of introducing the human {beta}-glucuronidase gene, GUSB, into gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice that produce virtually no murine {beta}-glucuronidase. Transgenic mice homozygous for the mucopolysaccharidosis VII mutation expressed high levels of human {beta}-glucuronidase activity in all tissues examined and were phenotypically normal. Biochemically, both the intralysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans and the secondary elevation of other acid hydrolases were corrected. These findings demonstrate that the GUSB transgene is expressed in gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice and that human {beta}-glucuronidase corrects the murine mucopolysaccharidosis storage disease.

  13. Comparison of the canine and human acid {beta}-galactosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern-Rindell, A.J.; Kretz, K.A.; O`Brien, J.S.

    1996-05-17

    Several canine cDNA libraries were screened with human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA as probe. Seven positive clones were isolated and sequenced yielding a partial (2060 bp) canine {beta}-galactosidase cDNA with 86% identity to the human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA. Preliminary analysis of a canine genomic library indicated conservation of exon number and size. Analysis by Northern blotting disclosed a single mRNA of 2.4 kb in fibroblasts and liver from normal dogs and dogs affected with GM1 gangliosidosis. Although incomplete, these results indicate canine GM1 gangliosidosis is a suitable animal model of the human disease and should further efforts to devise a gene therapy strategy for its treatment. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  15. Beta-carotene prevents x-ray induction of micronuclei in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, K; Ikegami, S; Inoue, K; Ichikawa, T; Kobayashi, S; Soeno, N; Tomabechi, K

    1994-02-01

    The effects of beta-carotene and ascorbic acid on spontaneous and x-ray-induced appearance of micronuclei (MNs) in human lymphocytes were studied. For 12 d, three groups of healthy volunteers were given beta-carotene-deficient meals containing 100 mg ascorbic acid. There was no supplementation in the first 6 d but, in the last 6 d, the respective groups were given beta-carotene (30 mg), ascorbic acid (300 mg), or placebo. Blood samples were drawn on days 7 and 13 before breakfast, exposed either to x-ray irradiation or left unexposed and were cultured. Lymphocytes containing MNs were then counted. On day 7 the three groups showed comparable MN frequencies. On day 13 lymphocytes containing x-ray-induced MNs became less frequent in the beta-carotene but not the ascorbic acid group. Both before and after the supplementation, the MN frequency of irradiated lymphocytes showed a significant inverse correlation with plasma beta-carotene. These results strongly suggest that beta-carotene protects human lymphocytes from x-ray-induced genetic damage.

  16. Expression of the human beta-globin gene after retroviral transfer into murine erythroleukemia cells and human BFU-E cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, M A; Miller, A D; Gelinas, R E

    1988-01-01

    Replication-defective amphotropic retrovirus vectors containing either the human beta-globin gene with introns or an intronless beta-globin minigene were constructed and used to study beta-globin expression following gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. The beta-globin genes were marked by introducing a 6-base-pair insertion into the region corresponding to the 5' untranslated region of the beta-globin mRNA to allow detection of RNA encoded by the new gene in human cells expressing normal human beta-globin RNA. Introduction of a virus containing the beta-globin gene with introns into murine erythroleukemia cells resulted in inducible expression of human beta-globin RNA and protein, while the viruses containing the minigene were inactive. The introduced human beta-globin gene was 6 to 110% as active as the endogenous mouse beta maj-globin genes in six randomly chosen cell clones. Introduction of the viruses into human BFU-E cells, followed by analysis of marked and unmarked globin RNAs in differentiated erythroid colonies, revealed that the introduced beta-globin gene was about 5% as active as the endogenous genes in these normal human erythroid cells and that again the minigene was inactive. These data are discussed in terms of the potential treatment of genetic disease by gene therapy. Images PMID:3288863

  17. Molten globule precursor states are conformationally correlated to amyloid fibrils of human beta-2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2010-07-14

    Misfolding intermediates play a key role in defining aberrant protein aggregation and amyloid formation in more than 15 different human diseases. However, their experimental characterization is challenging due to the transient nature and conformational heterogeneity of the involved states. Here, we demonstrate that direct carbon-detected NMR experiments allow observation, assignment, and structural analysis of molten globule amyloid intermediates that are severely broadened by conformational exchange. The method is used to characterize the structure and dynamics of partially unfolded intermediates of the 99-residue protein beta-2-microglobulin, which is the major component of insoluble aggregates occurring in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Comparison of the conformational properties of the molten globule-like intermediates with levels of deuterium incorporation into amyloid fibrils of beta-2-microglobulin revealed a close relationship between the conformational properties of the metastable intermediates and the beta-sheet-rich insoluble aggregates of beta-2-microglobulin.

  18. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  19. Contribution of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors of human atrium and ventricle to the effects of noradrenaline and adrenaline as assessed with (-)-atenolol.

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, H.; Schönell, H.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. (-)-Atenolol was used as a tool to assess the function of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in human heart. Right atrial and left ventricular preparations from patients undergoing open heart surgery were set up to contract isometrically. Membrane particles were prepared for beta-adrenoceptor labelling with [3H]-(-)-bupranolol and adenylate cyclase assays. 2. The positive inotropic effects of (-)-noradrenaline were antagonized to a similar extent by (-)-atenolol in atrial and ventricular preparations. (-)-Atenolol consistently antagonized the effects of (-)-adrenaline to a lesser extent than those of (-)-noradrenaline in atrial preparations. In ventricular preparations (-)-atenolol antagonized the effects of low concentrations of (-)-adrenaline to a lesser extent than those of high concentrations. 3. pKB values (M) of (-)-atenolol, estimated with non-linear analysis from the blockade of the positive inotropic effects of the catecholamines, were 7.4 for beta 1-adrenoceptors and 6.0 for beta 2-adrenoceptors. 4. (-)-Atenolol inhibited the binding of [3H]-(-)-bupranolol to ventricular beta 1-adrenoceptors with a pKD (M) of 5.9 and to ventricular beta 2-adrenoceptors with a pKD of 4.6. 5. (-)-Atenolol inhibited the catecholamine-induced adenylate cyclase stimulation in the atrium and ventricle with pKB values of 5.8-6.4 for beta 1- and pKB values of 4.7-5.7 for beta 2-adrenoceptors. The binding and cyclase assays suggest a partial affinity loss for (-)-atenolol inherent to membrane preparations. 6. beta 1-Adrenoceptors mediate the maximum positive inotropic effects of (-)-noradrenaline in both the atrium and ventricle of man. beta 2-Adrenoceptors appear to be capable of mediating maximal positive inotropic effects of (-)-adrenaline in atrium. In contrast, ventricular beta 2-adrenoceptors mediated only submaximal effects of (-)-adrenaline. PMID:2851354

  20. Glucose stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in islets transplanted into NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, H. E.; Cyphert, T. J.; Pascoe, J. L.; Hollern, D. A.; Abraham, N.; Lundell, R. J.; Rosa, T.; Romano, L. C.; Zou, B.; O’Donnell, C. P.; Stewart, A. F.; Garcia-Ocaña, A.; Alonso, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We determined whether hyperglycaemia stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in an islet transplant model Methods Human islets were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Blood glucose was measured serially during a 2 week graft revascularisation period. Engrafted mice were then catheterised in the femoral artery and vein, and infused intravenously with BrdU for 4 days to label replicating beta cells. Mice with restored normoglycaemia were co-infused with either 0.9% (wt/vol.) saline or 50% (wt/vol.) glucose to generate glycaemic differences among grafts from the same donors. During infusions, blood glucose was measured daily. After infusion, human beta cell replication and apoptosis were measured in graft sections using immunofluorescence for insulin, and BrdU or TUNEL. Results Human islet grafts corrected diabetes in the majority of cases. Among grafts from the same donor, human beta cell proliferation doubled in those exposed to higher glucose relative to lower glucose. Across the entire cohort of grafts, higher blood glucose was strongly correlated with increased beta cell replication. Beta cell replication rates were unrelated to circulating human insulin levels or donor age, but tended to correlate with donor BMI. Beta cell TUNEL reactivity was not measurably increased in grafts exposed to elevated blood glucose. Conclusions/interpretation Glucose is a mitogenic stimulus for transplanted human beta cells in vivo. Investigating the underlying pathways may point to mechanisms capable of expanding human beta cell mass in vivo. PMID:20936253

  1. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  2. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, D R; Martin-Morris, L; Luo, L Q; White, K

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development. Images PMID:2494667

  3. Cloning of human acetyl-CoA carboxylase-beta and its unique features.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, J; Lee, J K; Kim, K S; Witters, L A; Kim, K H

    1996-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which has a molecular mass of 265 kDa (ACC-alpha), catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids. In this study we report the complete amino acid sequence and unique features of an isoform of ACC with a molecular mass of 275 kDa (ACC-beta), which is primarily expressed in heart and skeletal muscles. In these tissues, ACC-beta may be involved in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation, rather than fatty acid biosynthesis. ACC-beta contains an amino acid sequence at the N terminus which is about 200 amino acids long and may be uniquely related to the role of ACC-beta in controlling carnitine palmitoyltransferase I activity and fatty acid oxidation by mitochondria. If we exclude this unique sequence at the N terminus the two forms of ACC show about 75% amino acid identity. All of the known functional domains of ACC are found in the homologous regions. Human ACC-beta cDNA has an open reading frame of 7,343 bases, encoding a protein of 2,458 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 276,638 Da. The mRNA size of human ACC-beta is approximately 10 kb and is primarily expressed in heart and skeletal muscle tissues, whereas ACC-alpha mRNA is detected in all tissues tested. A fragment of ACC-beta cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli and antibodies against the peptide were generated to establish that the cDNA sequence that we cloned is that for ACC-beta. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8876158

  4. Beta2-microglobulin causes abnormal phosphatidylserine exposure in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Barbara; Bucci, Sonia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Del Boccio, Piero; Di Rienzo, Marianna; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Sacchetta, Paolo; Di Ilio, Carmine; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea; Bonomini, Mario

    2011-03-01

    The exposure of the aminophospholipid phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of red blood cell plasma membrane can have several pathophysiological consequences with particular regard to the processes of cell phagocytosis, haemostasis and cell-cell interaction. A significant increase in phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes has been reported in chronic haemodialysis patients and found to be strongly influenced by the uraemic milieu. To identify uraemic compound(s) enhancing phosphatidylserine externalization in erythrocytes, we fractionated by chromatographic methods the ultrafiltrate obtained during dialysis, and examined by flow cytometry the effect of the resulting fractions on phosphatidylserine exposure in human red cells. Chromatographic procedures disclosed a homogeneous fraction able to increase erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure. The inducer of such externalization was identified by monodimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry investigations as beta2-microglobulin. To confirm the beta2-microglobulin effect and to examine the influence of protein glycation (as it occurs in uraemia) on phosphatidylserine erythrocyte exposure, erythrocytes from normal subjects were incubated with recombinant beta2-microglobulin (showing no glycation sites at mass analysis), commercial beta2-microglobulin (8 glycation sites), or with in vitro glycated recombinant beta2-microglobulin (showing multiple glycation sites). Elevated concentrations of beta2-microglobulin (corresponding to plasma levels reached in dialysis patients) increased slightly but significantly the protein's ability to externalize phosphatidylserine on human erythrocytes. Such an effect was markedly enhanced by glycated forms of the protein. Beta2-microglobulin is recognized as a surrogate marker of middle-molecule uraemic toxins and represents a key component of dialysis-associated amyloidosis. Our study adds further evidence to the potential pathophysiologic consequences of beta2

  5. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  6. Physical association and functional interaction between beta1 integrin and CD98 on human T lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Mitchell, Jason S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    CD98 is a cell surface protein previously characterized as a cell activation marker, an amino acid transporter, and has recently been implicated in integrin-related functions. Integrins are cell surface proteins, important for homotypic cell aggregation, cell adhesion, and coactivation of T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that the anti-CD98 mAb 80A10, when coimmobilized with anti-CD3 mAb OKT3, is able to mediate human T cell coactivation that is inhibited by anti-beta1 integrin specific mAb 18D3. These results indicated a functional association of CD98 and beta1 integrin signaling but left open the question of a physical association. We now show the induction of homotypic aggregation through CD98 among human T cells and this aggregation was inhibited by anti-beta1 integrin mAb. Therefore, CD98-dependent lymphocyte proliferation and adhesion may involve integrins. Competitive binding assays and fluorescence colocalization analysis suggested that CD98 and beta1 integrin were physically associated. Differential extraction techniques and immunoprecipitations provided the first evidence that the alpha4beta1 integrin and CD98 are specifically associated on human T lymphocytes.

  7. TGF-beta is specifically expressed in human dermal papilla cells and modulates hair folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keita; Aoi, Noriyuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Sato, Takahiro; Suga, Hirotaka; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2009-01-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in the mammalian hair follicle have been shown to develop hair follicles through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A cell therapy to regenerate human hair is theoretically possible by expanding autologous human DPCs (hDPCs) and transplanting them into bald skin, though much remains to be overcome before clinical success. In this study, we compared gene signatures of hDPCs at different passages and human dermal fibroblasts, and found transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(2) to be highly expressed in cultured hDPCs. Keratinocyte conditioned medium, which is known to help preserve the hair-inducing capacity of hDPCs, up-regulated TGF-beta(2) expression of hDPCs and also enhanced their alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a known index for hair-inductive capacity. Through screening of components secreted from keratinocytes, the vitamin D(3) analogue was found to promote TGF-beta(2) expression and ALP activity of hDPCs. In animal hair folliculogenesis models using rat epidermis and expanded hDPCs, inhibition of TGF-beta(2) signalling at the ligand or receptor level significantly impaired hair folliculogenesis and maturation. These results suggest an important role for TGF-beta(2) in hair follicle morphogenesis and provide insights into the establishment of future cell therapies for hair regrowth by transplanting expanded DPCs.

  8. A human beta cell line with drug inducible excision of immortalizing transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Benazra, Marion; Lecomte, Marie-José; Colace, Claire; Müller, Andreas; Machado, Cécile; Pechberty, Severine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Grenier-Godard, Maud; Solimena, Michele; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Czernichow, Paul; Ravassard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Access to immortalized human pancreatic beta cell lines that are phenotypically close to genuine adult beta cells, represent a major tool to better understand human beta cell physiology and develop new therapeutics for Diabetes. Here we derived a new conditionally immortalized human beta cell line, EndoC-βH3 in which immortalizing transgene can be efficiently removed by simple addition of tamoxifen. Methods We used lentiviral mediated gene transfer to stably integrate a tamoxifen inducible form of CRE (CRE-ERT2) into the recently developed conditionally immortalized EndoC βH2 line. The resulting EndoC-βH3 line was characterized before and after tamoxifen treatment for cell proliferation, insulin content and insulin secretion. Results We showed that EndoC-βH3 expressing CRE-ERT2 can be massively amplified in culture. We established an optimized tamoxifen treatment to efficiently excise the immortalizing transgenes resulting in proliferation arrest. In addition, insulin expression raised by 12 fold and insulin content increased by 23 fold reaching 2 μg of insulin per million cells. Such massive increase was accompanied by enhanced insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. We further observed that tamoxifen treated cells maintained a stable function for 5 weeks in culture. Conclusions EndoC βH3 cell line represents a powerful tool that allows, using a simple and efficient procedure, the massive production of functional non-proliferative human beta cells. Such cells are close to genuine human beta cells and maintain a stable phenotype for 5 weeks in culture. PMID:26909308

  9. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  10. Isolation of novel human cDNA (hGMF-gamma) homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta gene.

    PubMed

    Asai, K; Fujita, K; Yamamoto, M; Hotta, T; Morikawa, M; Kokubo, M; Moriyama, A; Kato, T

    1998-03-13

    A novel full-length human cDNA homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta (GMF-beta) gene was isolated. Sequence analysis of the entire cDNA revealed an open reading frame of 426 nucleotides with a deduced protein sequence of 142 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of its putative product is highly homologous to human GMF-beta (82% identity) and named for GMF-gamma. Northern blot analysis indicated that a message of 0.9 kb long, but not 4.1 kb of GMF-beta, is predominantly expressed in human lung, heart, and placenta.

  11. Tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenoceptor agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle: studies in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C; Conolly, M E

    1980-01-01

    In studies on human isolated peripheral airway smooth muscle; 1 A concentration dependent beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis was observed to isoprenaline. 2 Cross desensitization to other beta-adrenoceptor agonists was demonstrated. 3 The desensitization was reversible with time. Hydrocortisone appeared to accelerate the recovery from the desensitized state. Low concentration isoprenaline (10(-9) mol l-1) prevented recovery whereas cyclohexamide 1.8 x 10(-4) mol l-1 had no noticeable effect on recovery. Continued occupancy of the receptor appears to prevent recovery. The recovery from the desensitized state does not apparently require synthesis of new proteins. 4 Bronchial wall cyclic AMP response to isoprenaline was attenuated after isoprenaline induced desensitization whereas total phosphodiesterase activity of bronchial wall was not altered by desensitization. Thus by exclusion the adenylate cyclase receptor complex may be altered in human peripheral airway smooth muscle beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis. PMID:6108126

  12. A Synthetic Model of Human Beta-Thalassemia Erythropoiesis Using CD34+ Cells from Healthy Adult Donors

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Colleen; de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Noh, Seung-Jae; Rabel, Antoinette; Meier, Emily R.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Based upon the lack of clinical samples available for research in many laboratories worldwide, a significant gap exists between basic and clinical studies of beta-thalassemia major. To bridge this gap, we developed an artificially engineered model for human beta thalassemia by knocking down beta-globin gene and protein expression in cultured CD34+ cells obtained from healthy adults. Lentiviral-mediated transduction of beta-globin shRNA (beta-KD) caused imbalanced globin chain production. Beta-globin mRNA was reduced by 90% compared to controls, while alpha-globin mRNA levels were maintained. HPLC analyses revealed a 96% reduction in HbA with only a minor increase in HbF. During the terminal phases of differentiation (culture days 14–21), beta-KD cells demonstrated increased levels of insoluble alpha-globin, as well as activated caspase-3. The majority of the beta-KD cells underwent apoptosis around the polychromatophilic stage of maturation. GDF15, a marker of ineffective erythropoiesis in humans with thalassemia, was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from the beta-KD cells. Knockdown of beta-globin expression in cultured primary human erythroblasts provides a robust ex vivo model for beta-thalassemia. PMID:23861885

  13. Extension of the life span of pressure ulcer fibroblasts with recombinant human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Vande Berg, J. S.; Robson, M. C.; Mikhail, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 beta (rhuIL-1 beta) was investigated in a randomized, blinded placebo-controlled trial to evaluate its effect on the healing of chronic pressure ulcers. The influence of this topically applied cytokine to 26 pressure ulcer patients was correlated with tissue culture and electron microscopic evaluation. Cellular replication studies showed that low (0.01 micrograms/cm2/day) and medium (0.1 micrograms/cm2/day) concentrations of rhuIL-1 beta were not effective in extending replication in pressure ulcer fibroblasts, in vitro. Tissue culture measurements from pressure ulcer biopsies demonstrated that, after 29 days of a high level of rhuIL-1 beta treatment (1.0 micrograms/cm2/day), the cytokine was effective in extending the ability of pressure ulcer fibroblasts to replicate. Tissue culture and electron microscopy suggested that, although rhuIL-1 beta promoted increases in fibroblast numbers, the primary effect appeared to be development of the extracellular matrix. The possible direct and indirect influences of rhuIL-1 beta therapy on pressure ulcers are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:7747819

  14. Suppression of human monocyte interleukin-1beta production by ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Rossetti, Ronald G; Burstein, Sumner H; Bidinger, Bonnie

    2003-02-15

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, reduces joint tissue damage in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Because interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are central to the progression of inflammation and joint tissue injury in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated human monocyte IL-1beta and TNFalpha responses after the addition of AjA to cells in vitro. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid monocytes (PBM and SFM) were isolated from healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory arthritis, respectively, treated with AjA (0-30 microM) in vitro, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Cells were harvested for mRNA, and supernatants were collected for cytokine assay. Addition of AjA to PBM and SFM in vitro reduced both steady-state levels of IL-1beta mRNA and secretion of IL-1beta in a concentration-dependent manner. Suppression was maximal (50.4%) at 10 microM AjA (P<0.05 vs untreated controls, N=7). AjA did not influence TNFalpha gene expression in or secretion from PBM. Reduction of IL-1beta by AjA may help explain the therapeutic effects of AjA in the animal model of arthritis. Development of nonpsychoactive therapeutically useful synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents, such as AjA, may help resolve the ongoing debate about the use of marijuana as medicine.

  15. Effects of halothane on the human beta-adrenergic receptor of lymphocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, J.; Nivoche, Y.; Nimier, M.; Rocchiccioli, C.; Luscombe, F.; Henzel, D.; Loiseau, A.; Desmonts, J.M.

    1987-12-01

    The effects of halothane on beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist interaction were studied using the membranes of human lymphocytes as a model. Membrane preparations of lymphocytes were obtained from blood samples withdrawn from seven healthy young volunteers. Beta-receptor studies were performed using (-)/sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol (/sup 125/ICP) binding. Non-specific binding was determined in the presence of (-)isoproterenol. Beta-receptor density (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (KD) for /sup 125/ICP were determined from saturation curves. Beta-receptor affinity for agonists evaluated by the IC50 (the concentration of isoproterenol required to inhibit 50% of specific /sup 125/ICP binding) and the dissociation constant (KL) for isoproterenol was established from competition curves. The effect of halothane 1%, in an air oxygen mixture (oxygen fraction: 0.3) administered by tonometry during ligand membrane incubation, on beta-adrenergic receptor, was compared to that of control experiments not exposed to halothane. Halothane produced a moderate but significant decrease of Bmax (-10%) and a significant increase in non-specific binding (+30%), while KD, IC50, and KL were unchanged. The authors conclude that halothane, in vitro, decreases beta-adrenergic receptor density. This effect could be mediated by an alteration of the receptor in the membrane due to action of halothane on the lipid phase of the membrane.

  16. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  17. Effect of transforming growth factor beta on synthesis of glycosaminoglycans by human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dubaybo, B.A.; Thet, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The processes of lung growth, injury, and repair are characterized by alterations in fibroblast synthesis and interstitial distribution of extracellular matrix components. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), which is postulated to play a role in modulating lung repair, alters the distribution of several matrix components such as collagen and fibronectin. We studied the effect of TGF-beta on the synthesis and distribution of the various glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and whether these effects may explain its role in lung repair. Human diploid lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) were exposed to various concentrations of TGF-beta (0-5 nM) for variable periods of time (0-18 h). Newly synthesized GAGs were labeled with either (3H)glucosamine or (35S)sulfate. Individual GAGs were separated by size exclusion chromatography after serial enzymatic and chemical digestions and quantitated using scintillation counting. There was a dose-dependent increase in total GAG synthesis with maximal levels detected after 6 h of exposure. This increase was noted in all individual GAG types measured and was observed in both the cell associated GAGs (cell-matrix fraction) as well as the GAGs released into the medium (medium fraction). In the cell-matrix fraction, TGF-beta increased the proportion of heparan sulfate that was membrane bound as well as the proportion of dermatan sulfate in the intracellular compartment. In the medium fraction, TGF-beta increased the proportion of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate released. We conclude that the role of TGF-beta in lung growth and repair may be related to increased synthesis of GAGs by human lung fibroblasts as well as alterations in the distribution of individual GAGs.

  18. Constitutive activation of integrin alpha 4 beta 1 defines a unique stage of human thymocyte development

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Our understanding of thymocyte development and of the positive and negative selection events involved in shaping the repertoire of mature T lymphocytes has been greatly facilitated by the use of transgenic and gene knockout animals. Much less is known about the factors that control the homing and population of the thymus by T cell precursors and the subsequent migration of developing thymocytes through the thymic architecture. As the integrins represent a candidate group of cell surface receptors that may regulate thymocyte development, we have analyzed the expression and function of alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 5 beta 1 on human thymocytes. A major portion of double positive (CD4+ CD8+) human thymocytes express alpha 4 beta 1 in a constitutively active form and adhere to fibronectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. alpha 4 beta 1 expression is similar on adherent and nonadherent populations, thus, activity reflects the receptor state and not simple expression. The adherent cells are immature, expressing high levels of CD4/CD8 and low levels of CD3 and CD69. In contrast, nonadherent cells possess the phenotype of thymocytes after positive selection, expressing intermediate levels of CD4 and/or CD8 and high levels of CD3 and CD69. The adherent population fails to respond to activation with anti-CD3 and fibronectin, whereas nonadherents exhibit an alpha 5 beta 1- dependent proliferation. Differential regulation of alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 5 beta 1 receptors may provide a mechanism controlling cellular traffic, differentiation, and positive selection of thymocytes. PMID:8163937

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human beta-like globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, E F; Lawn, R M; Maniatis, T

    1980-04-01

    The genes encoding human embryonic (epsilon), fetal (G gamma, A gamma) and adult (delta, beta) beta-like globin polypeptides were isolated as a set of overlapping cloned DNA fragments from bacteriophage lambda libraries of high molecular weight (15-20 kb) chromosomal DNA. The 65 kb of DNA represented in these overlapping clones contains the genes for all five beta-like polypeptides, including the embryonic epsilon-globin gene, for which the chromosomal location was previously unknown. All five genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand and are arranged in the order 5'-epsilon-(13.3 kb)-G gamma-(3.5 kb)-A gamma-(13.9 kb)-delta-(5.4 kb)-beta-3'. Thus the genes are positioned on the chromosome in the order of their expression during development. In addition to the five known beta-like globin genes, we have detected two other beta-like globin sequences which do not correspond to known polypeptides. One of these sequences has been mapped to the A gamma-delta intergenic region while the other is located 6-9 kb 5' to the epsilon gene. Cross hybridization experiments between the intergenic sequences of the gene cluster have revealed a nonglobin repeat sequence (*) which is interspersed with the globin genes in the following manner: 5'-**epsilon-*G gamma-A gamma*-**delta-beta*-3'. Fine structure mapping of the region located 5' to the delta-globin gene revealed two repeats with a maximum size of 400 bp, which are separated by approximately 700 bp of DNA not repeated within the cluster. Preliminary experiments indicate that this repeat family is also repeated many times in the human genome.

  20. Changes of human plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity after intravenous administration of theophylline.

    PubMed Central

    Aunis, D; Mandel, P; Miras-Portugal, M T; Coquillat, G; Rohmer, F; Warter, J M

    1975-01-01

    The intravenous administration of theophylline to ten healthy human subjects produced either an increase of circulating plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase or no change. The rise of plasma enzyme activity may reflect the increased peripheral catecholamine release induced by theophylline. PMID:1137731

  1. Beta-cell metabolic alterations under chronic nutrient overload in rat and human islets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess multifactorial Beta-cell responses to metabolic perturbations in primary rat and human islets. Treatment of dispersed rat islet cells with elevated glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs, oleate:palmitate = 1:1 v/v) resulted in increases in the size and the number of ...

  2. Inhibition of human erythroid colony-forming units by tumor necrosis factor requires beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Means, R T; Krantz, S B

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that inhibition of human CFU-erythroid (E) colony formation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an indirect effect mediated by a soluble factor released from a fraction of marrow accessory cells which are predominantly stromal elements (Means, R. T., Jr., E. N. Dessypris, and S. B. Krantz. 1990. J. Clin. Invest. 86:538-541). Further studies reported here identify a mediator of this effect. The inhibitory effect of recombinant TNF on marrow CFU-E is ablated by neutralizing antibodies to human beta IFN, but not by antibodies to gamma IFN or IL-1. Anti-beta IFN also neutralizes the inhibitory effect of conditioned medium prepared from marrow cells exposed to TNF. Human beta IFN inhibits colony formation by unpurified marrow CFU-E as well as highly purified CFU-E generated from peripheral blood progenitors, and limiting dilution analysis shows that this is a direct inhibitory effect. TNF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the anemia of chronic diseases since blood TNF levels are elevated in many patients with this syndrome, and since exposure to TNF produces a similar anemia in either humans or mice. The present study demonstrates that beta IFN is a required mediator of this inhibitory effect on erythropoiesis. PMID:8432849

  3. Using the NCBI Genome Databases to Compare the Genes for Human & Chimpanzee Beta Hemoglobin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The beta hemoglobin protein is identical in humans and chimpanzees. In this tutorial, students see that even though the proteins are identical, the genes that code for them are not. There are many more differences in the introns than in the exons, which indicates that coding regions of DNA are more highly conserved than non-coding regions.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-[beta]2

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-{alpha}s and two liprin-{beta}s which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant subdomains within the liprin-{beta}1 and liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step toward determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions.

  5. Kinetics of Beta-14[14C] Carotene in a Human Subject Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dueker, S.R.; Lin, Y.; Follett, J.R.; Clifford, A.J.; Buchholz, B.A.

    2000-01-31

    {beta}-Carotene is a tetraterpenoid distributed widely throughout the plant kingdom. It is a member of a group of pigments referred to as carotenoids that have the distinction of serving as metabolic precursors to vitamin A in humans and many animals [1,2]. We used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [3] to determine the metabolic behavior of a physiologic oral dose of {beta}-[{sup 14}C]carotene (200 nanoCuries; 0.57 {micro}mol) in a healthy human subject. Serial blood specimens were collected for 210-d and complete urine and feces were collected for 17 and 10-d, respectively. Balance data indicated that the dose was 42% bioavailable. The absorbed {beta}-carotene was lost slowly via urine in accord with the slow body turnover of {beta}-carotene and vitamin A [4]. HPLC fractionation of plasma taken at early time points (0-24-h) showed the label was distributed between {beta}-carotene and retinyl esters (vitamin A) derived from intestinal metabolism.

  6. Functional analysis of alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villar, J J; Melero, I; Gismondi, A; Santoni, A; López-Botet, M

    1996-09-01

    Upon activation with interleukin (IL)-2 human natural killer (NK) cells acquire on their surface the alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrins and down-regulate the expression of alpha 6 beta 1. By employing alpha 1 beta 1-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HP-2B6, characterized in our laboratory, we examined the functional role of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in NK cells. Treatment with HP-2B6 mAb partially interfered with attachment of cultured NK cells to type I collagen, and combined with an anti-alpha 2 beta 1 (TEA 1/41) mAb, it completely abrogated cell adhesion to this extracelular matrix protein. In contrast, NK cell attachment to laminin was completely blocked by the anti-beta 1 LIA 1/2 mAb, but was unaffected by alpha 1 and alpha 2-specific mAb; as alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were undetectable, the data indicate that the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin binding sites for type I collagen and laminin are different. Incubation with anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 or its F(ab')2 fragments specifically induced a rapid homotypic aggregation of NK cells that was dependent on active metabolism, an intact cytoskeleton and the presence of divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+); homotypic cell adhesion was selectively blocked by anti-CD18, CD11a or CD54 mAb. In addition, stimulation of cultured NK cells with the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 enhanced TNF-alpha production and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity (tyrphostin 25 and herbimycin A) completely abrogated the functional effects induced by the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 mAb. Our data show that ligation of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin positively modulates IL-2-activated NK cell function via a PTK-dependent pathway.

  7. Promoters for the human beta-hexosaminidase genes, HEXA and HEXB.

    PubMed

    Norflus, F; Yamanaka, S; Proia, R L

    1996-02-01

    Human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidases are encoded by two genes, HEXA and HEXB, specifying an alpha- and a beta-subunit, respectively. The subunits dimerize to form beta-hexosaminidase A (alpha beta), beta-hexosaminidase B (beta beta), and beta-hexosaminidase S (alpha alpha). This enzyme system has the capacity to degrade a variety of cellular substrates: oligosaccharides, glycosaminoglycans, and glycolipids containing beta-linked N-acetylglucosaminyl or N-galactosaminyl residues. Mutations in either the HEXA gene or HEXB gene lead to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in neurons, resulting in the severe neurodegenerative disorders termed the GM2 gangliosidoses. To identify the DNA elements responsible for hexosaminidase expression, we ligated the 5'-flanking sequences of both the human and mouse hexosaminidase genes to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The resulting plasmids were transfected into NIH-3T3 cells and CAT activity was determined as a measure of promoter strength. By 5' deletion analysis, it was found that essential sequences for HEXA expression resided within a 40-bp region between 100 bp and 60 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. This area contained two potential estrogen response element half-sites as well as potential binding sites for transcription factors NF-E1 and AP-2. Similarly, important HEXB promoter sequences were localized to a 60-bp region between 150 bp and 90 bp upstream of the ATG codon. By performing scanning mutagenesis on a 60-bp region within the 150-bp HEXB construct, we defined an essential promoter element of 12 bp that contained two potential AP-1 sites. The mouse Hexa and Hexb 5'-flanking sequences were found to contain regions similar in sequence, location, and activity to the essential promoter elements defined in the cognate human genes. No sequence similarity was found, however, between 5'-flanking regions of the HEXA and HEXB genes. These essential promoter elements represent potential sites for HEXA and

  8. Frequency of M-cadherin-stained satellite cells declines in human muscles during aging.

    PubMed

    Sajko, Spela; Kubínová, Lucie; Cvetko, Erika; Kreft, Marko; Wernig, Anton; Erzen, Ida

    2004-02-01

    To answer the question of whether the satellite cell pool in human muscle is reduced during aging, we detected satellite cells in 30- microm-thick transverse sections under the confocal microscope by binding of M-cadherin antibody. The basal lamina was detected with laminin. Nuclei were stained with bisbenzimide or propidium iodide. Satellite cells were counted by applying the disector method and unbiased sampling design. To determine if there are age-related differences in muscle fiber types, morphometric characteristics of muscle fibers were examined on thin sections stained for myofibrillar ATPase. Autopsy samples of vastus lateralis muscle from six young (28.7 +/- 2.3 years) and six old (70.8 +/- 1.3 years) persons who had suffered sudden death were analyzed. Numbers of satellite cells per fiber length (Nsc/Lfib) and number of satellite cells per total number of nuclei (satellite cell nuclei + myonuclei) (Nsc/Nnucl) were significantly lower in the old group (p < 0.05). We demonstrate the importance of proper sampling and counting in estimation of sparsely distributed structures such as satellite cells. Our results support the hypothesis that the satellite cell fraction declines during aging.

  9. Gene encoding the human beta-hexosaminidase beta chain: extensive homology of intron placement in the alpha- and beta-chain genes.

    PubMed Central

    Proia, R L

    1988-01-01

    Lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52) is composed of two structurally similar chains, alpha and beta, that are the products of different genes. Mutations in either gene causing beta-hexosaminidase deficiency result in the lysosomal storage disease GM2-gangliosidosis. To enable the investigation of the molecular lesions in this disorder and to study the evolutionary relationship between the alpha and beta chains, the beta-chain gene was isolated, and its organization was characterized. The beta-chain coding region is divided into 14 exons distributed over approximately 40 kilobases of DNA. Comparison with the alpha-chain gene revealed that 12 of the 13 introns interrupt the coding regions at homologous positions. This extensive sharing of intron placement demonstrates that the alpha and beta chains evolved by way of the duplication of a common ancestor. PMID:2964638

  10. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    PubMed

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes.

  11. Effects of beta-adrenoceptor-blockade on stress-induced adrenocorticotrophin release in humans.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, R; Schürmeyer, T h; Jacobs, R; Benschop, R J; Sommer, B; Schmidt, R E; Schedlowski, M

    1998-05-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of stress-induced alterations in adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) release. Tandem parachutists received either a placebo or the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol prior to a first time parachute jump. Blood samples were drawn 4 h before, immediately after, and 1 h after the jump. Cortisol and catecholamine concentrations displayed a significant stress-induced increase in both groups. The ACTH plasma concentrations significantly increased in the placebo and the propranolol group, with significantly more pronounced changes in the propranolol-treated subjects compared to the placebo group. These data demonstrated a stress-induced increase of ACTH plasma concentrations in humans that was enhanced by beta-blockade.

  12. Beta Human Chorionic Gonadotropin - Induction of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    rehydrated, and digested with proteinase K (25 ug/ml in TBS) using standard 19 methods. After quenching with 3% hydrogen peroxide , sections were...the 19 Chemicon Mouse to Mouse detection kit. Endogenous peroxidase was blocked with 3% aqueous 20 hydrogen peroxide . Slides were incubated with...Agwarwal, M.L., Das, T., Sa, G., 2002. Curcumin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells through p53-dependent Bax induction. FEBS Lett. 512

  13. Probiotic E. coli treatment mediates antimicrobial human beta-defensin synthesis and fecal excretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Möndel, M; Schroeder, B O; Zimmermann, K; Huber, H; Nuding, S; Beisner, J; Fellermann, K; Stange, E F; Wehkamp, J

    2009-03-01

    Inducible epithelial human beta-defensins (hBD) play an important role in intestinal barrier function. In vitro studies showed that clinically effective probiotics induce antimicrobial hBD-2. Here, we aimed to assess the in vivo effect in healthy volunteers and also addressed how defensins affect probiotic survival. Symbioflor 2 containing one strain of several viable genotypes of Escherichia coli was administered to 23 healthy individuals. After 3 weeks, fecal hBD-2 peptide was increased in 78% (mean 3.7-fold; P<0.0001). Interestingly, the fecal hBD-2 peptide was still elevated 9 weeks after treatment (P=0.008). In vitro studies revealed that this effect was mediated by only one out of three tested E. coli genotypes and comparable to probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 (10- to 15-fold). Functional assays showed that all tested bacteria were similarly killed by defensins allowing to speculate about a suicidal character of this effect. Defensin induction seems to be a common and important mechanism of probiotic treatment.

  14. Phosphorylation of the human-transforming-growth-factor-beta-binding protein endoglin.

    PubMed Central

    Lastres, P; Martín-Perez, J; Langa, C; Bernabéu, C

    1994-01-01

    Endoglin is an homodimeric membrane antigen with capacity to bind transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Phosphorylation of human endoglin was demonstrated in endothelial cells as well as in mouse fibroblast transfectants expressing two isoforms, L-endoglin or S-endoglin, with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The extent of L-endoglin phosphorylation was found to be 8-fold higher than that of S-endoglin, and phosphopeptide analyses revealed at least three different phosphorylation sites for L-endoglin, whereas S-endoglin produces only one phosphopeptide. The immunoprecipitated L-endoglin was found to be phosphorylated mainly on serine, and, to a minor extent, on threonine, residues. Treatment of the cells with TGF-beta 1 or the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 resulted in a reduction of the levels of endoglin phosphorylation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8053900

  15. Beta-endorphin-induced inhibition and stimulation of insulin secretion in normal humans is glucose dependent.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Cozzolino, D; Salvatore, T; Torella, R; D'Onofrio, F

    1988-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of human beta-endorphin on pancreatic hormone levels and their responses to nutrient challenges in normal subjects. Infusion of 0.5 mg/h beta-endorphin caused a significant rise in plasma glucose concentrations preceded by a significant increase in peripheral glucagon levels. No changes occurred in the plasma concentrations of insulin and C-peptide. Acute insulin and C-peptide responses to intravenous pulses of different glucose amounts (0.33 g/kg and 5 g) and arginine (3 g) were significantly reduced by beta-endorphin infusion (P less than .01). This effect was associated with a significant reduction of the glucose disappearance rates, suggesting that the inhibition of insulin was of biological relevance. beta-Endorphin also inhibited glucose suppression of glucagon levels and augmented the glucagon response to arginine. To verify whether the modification of prestimulus glucose level could be important in these hormonal responses to beta-endorphin, basal plasma glucose concentrations were raised by a primed (0.5 g/kg) continuous (20 mg kg-1.min-1) glucose infusion. After stabilization of plasma glucose levels (350 +/- 34 mg/dl, t = 120 min), beta-endorphin infusion caused an immediate and marked increase in plasma insulin level (peak response 61 +/- 9 microU/ml, P less than .01), which remained elevated even after the discontinuation of opioid infusion. Moreover, the acute insulin response to a glucose pulse (0.33 g/kg i.v.) given during beta-endorphin infusion during hyperglycemia was significantly higher than the response obtained during euglycemia (171 +/- 32 vs. 41 +/- 7 microU/ml, P less than .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Control of human glioma cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Merzak, A.; McCrea, S.; Koocheckpour, S.; Pilkington, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    Factors involved in the control of the biological properties of gliomas, the major form of brain tumour in man, are poorly documented. We investigated the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in the control of proliferation of human glioma cell lines as well as normal human fetal brain cells. The data presented show that TGF-beta 1 exerts a growth-inhibitory action on both human fetal brain cells and three cell lines derived from human glioma of different grades of malignancy. In addition, this growth-inhibitory effect is dose dependent and serum independent. Since TGF-beta 1 is known to be involved in the control of cell migration during ontogenesis and oncogenesis, we investigated the role of this factor in the motile and invasive behaviour that characterises human gliomas in vivo. TGF-beta 1 was found to elicit a strong stimulation of migration and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro. In combination with recent data showing an inverse correlation between TGF-beta 1 expression in human gliomas and survival, these findings may suggest that TGF-beta 1 plays an important role in the malignant progression of gliomas in man. A study of the molecular mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative action and the invasion-promoting action of TGF-beta 1 may help to identify new targets in therapy for brain tumours. A combined antiproliferative and anti-invasive therapy could be envisaged. Images Figure 3 PMID:8054266

  17. The human ATP synthase beta subunit gene: sequence analysis, chromosome assignment, and differential expression.

    PubMed

    Neckelmann, N; Warner, C K; Chung, A; Kudoh, J; Minoshima, S; Fukuyama, R; Maekawa, M; Shimizu, Y; Shimizu, N; Liu, J D

    1989-11-01

    In humans, the functional F0F1-ATP synthase beta subunit gene is located on chromosome 12 in the p13----qter region. Other partially homologous sequences have been detected on chromosomes 2 and 17. The bona fide beta subunit gene has 10 exons encoding a leader peptide of 49 amino acids and a mature protein of 480 amino acids. Thirteen Alu family DNA repeats are found upstream from the gene and in four introns. The gene has four "CCAAT" sequences upstream and in close proximity to the transcriptional initiation site. A 13-bp motif is found in the 5' nontranscribed region of both the beta subunit gene and an ADP/ATP translocator gene that is expressed in high levels in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Analysis of the beta subunit mRNA levels reveals marked differences among tissues. The highest levels are found in heart, lower levels in skeletal muscle, and the lowest levels in liver and kidney. These findings suggest that the tissue-specific levels of ATP synthase beta subunit mRNA may be generated through transcriptional control.

  18. A POMC variant implicates beta-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the control of human energy balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung Seng; Challis, Ben G; Thompson, Darren A; Yeo, Giles S H; Keogh, Julia M; Madonna, Michael E; Wraight, Vicki; Sims, Matthew; Vatin, Vincent; Meyre, David; Shield, Julian; Burren, Christine; Ibrahim, Zala; Cheetham, Tim; Swift, Peter; Blackwood, Anthea; Hung, Chiao-Chien Connie; Wareham, Nicholas J; Froguel, Philippe; Millhauser, Glenn L; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2006-02-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) plays a critical role in the control of energy balance. Of its two pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived ligands, alpha- and beta-MSH, the majority of attention has focused on alpha-MSH, partly reflecting the absence of beta-MSH in rodents. We screened the POMC gene in 538 patients with severe, early-onset obesity and identified five unrelated probands who were heterozygous for a rare missense variant in the region encoding beta-MSH, Tyr221Cys. This frequency was significantly increased (p < 0.001) compared to the general UK Caucasian population and the variant cosegregated with obesity/overweight in affected family members. Compared to wild-type beta-MSH, the variant peptide was impaired in its ability to bind to and activate signaling from the MC4R. Obese children carrying the Tyr221Cys variant were hyperphagic and showed increased linear growth, both of which are features of MC4R deficiency. These studies support a role for beta-MSH in the control of human energy homeostasis.

  19. Promotion of human adipocyte precursor replication by 17beta-estradiol in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Roncari, D A; Van, R L

    1978-01-01

    The influence of 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-estradiol on adult human omental adipocyte precursors grown in a propagating culture system was studied. Cells were grown in subculture in the presence or absence of hormone. 17beta-estradiol resulted in significant promotion of adipocyte precursor replication, as determined by cell counting and incorporation of radioactive thymidine into DNA. The hormone stimulated cell multiplication in the concentration range 0.5--500 ng/ml growth medium. The highest level tested was 500 ng/ml. The maximal effects were obtained at 50 ng/ml (P less than 0.001 by paired t test, 48 h after hormone addition). All 10 cell strains (five were derived from men and five from women) that were tested responded similarly to the hormone. 17beta-estradiol did not affect cell size. 17alpha-estradiol did not promote the replication of adipocyte precursors, nor did it influence cell size. Thus, 17beta-estradiol, which is the active isomer in known target tissues, stimulates the multiplication of human adipocyte precursors in culture. Images PMID:690182

  20. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood samples and parvovirus B19 genotypes in plasma samples of patients with thalassemia major. The population consisted of 150 patients with beta-thalassemia major who attended the Zafar clinic in Tehran. Specimens were studied using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Results The prevalence of parvovirus B19 in our study population was 4%. Of 150 patients with thalassemia, six (4%) were positive for B19 DNA. There was no significant correlation between blood transfusion frequency and B19 DNA positivity. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of human parvovirus B19 revealed genotype I in these six patients. Conclusion In this study, acute B19 infections were detected in patients with beta thalassemia major. Screening of such high-risk groups can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection; thus, screening is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease-prevention measures.

  1. TGF-beta during human colorectal carcinogenesis: the shift from epithelial to mesenchymal signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, K; Seki, T; Okazaki, K

    2006-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (Tbeta RI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), converting the mediator Smad3 to two distinct phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). While Tbeta RI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells, the activated mesenchymal cells invade via JNK/pSmad3L pathway. During sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis, TGF-beta signaling confers a selective advantage upon tumor cells by shifting from epithelial Tbeta RI/pSmad3C pathway to mesenchymal JNK/pSmad3L pathway. Loss of epithelial homeostasis and acquisition of a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype are essential for tumor invasion. In a future, specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway will become a therapy for human colorectal cancer that restores the lost tumor-suppressive function observed in normal colorectal epithelial cells at the expense of effects promoting the aggressive behavior.

  2. The human and mouse sex-determining SRY genes repress the Rspol/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yun-Fai Chris; Li, Yunmin

    2009-04-01

    The sex-determining region Y (SRY) is the gene on the Y chromosome responsible for switching on male sex determination during mammalian embryogenesis. In its absence, ovaries develop in the embryo. Hence, ovarian determination and differentiation is considered to be a default, or passive, developmental pathway. Recently this classical paradigm of sex determination has been challenged with the discovery of the R-spondin 1 (RSPO1) as an active ovarian determinant. Mutations of RSPO1 cause a female-to-male sex reversal. RSPO1 synergizes with WNT4 in activating an ovarian development in the bipotential gonad via the canonical Wnt signaling. Early studies showed that SRY represses such Wnt signaling, but also generated discrepancies on whether only mouse Sry is capable of inhibiting such Wnt signaling and whether both human and mouse SRY proteins are able to interact with beta-catenin, the intracellular messenger responsible for executing the Wnt signals. Our studies show that both human SRY and mouse Sry are capable of repressing the Rspo1/Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. However, the repression activities vary among different SRY/Sry proteins and paradoxically related to the presence and/or size of an acidic/glutamine-rich domain. The HMG box of human SRY could bind directly to beta-catenin while the mouse Sry binds to beta-catenin via its HMG box and glutamine-rich domain. The results clarify some of the initial discrepancies, and raise the possibility that SRY interacts with beta-catenin in the nucleus and represses the transcriptional activation of the Rspo1/Wnt target genes involved in ovarian determination, thereby switching on testis determination.

  3. Induction of synthesis and secretion of interleukin 1 beta in the human monocytic THP-1 cells by human serum albumins modified with methylglyoxal and advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Westwood, M E; Thornalley, P J

    1996-04-01

    Human serum albumin modified with 1-2 methylglyoxal residues per molecule of protein (MGmin-HSA) stimulated the synthesis and secretion of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) from human monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. It was a more potent inducer of IL-1 beta synthesis than human serum albumin highly-modified with glucose-derived advanced glycation endproducts (AGE-HSA). With 20 microM ligand. IL-1 beta synthesis was (pg/10(6) cells): MGmin-HSA 484.5 +/- 50.3; AGE-HSA 30.6 +/- 2.0 (n = 3). IL-1 beta synthesis increased markedly with MGmin-HSA concentrations > 5 microM. IL-1 beta synthesis and secretion from monocytes in response to methylglyoxal-modified proteins in vivo may contribute to the development of macro- and micro-angiopathy, particularly in diabetes mellitus.

  4. Interferon alpha impairs insulin production in human beta cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Angela; Tomer, Yaron

    2017-02-23

    Despite substantial advances in the research exploring the pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain unknown. We hypothesized in this study that interferon alpha (IFNα) participates in the early stages of T1D development by triggering endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To verify our hypothesis, human islets and human EndoC-βH1 cells were exposed to IFNα and tested for ER stress markers, glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and insulin content. IFNα treatment induced upregulation of ER stress markers including Binding immunoglobulin Protein, phospho-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α, spliced- X-box binding protein-1, C/EBP homologous protein and activating transcription factor 4. Intriguingly, IFNα treatment did not impair GSIS but significantly decreased insulin production in both human islets and EndoC-βH1 cells. Furthermore, IFNα decreased the expression of both proinsulin convertase 1 and proinsulin convertase 2, suggesting an altered functional state of the beta cells characterized by a slower proinsulin-insulin conversion. Pretreatment of both human islets and EndoC-βH1 cells with chemical chaperones 4-phenylbutyric acid and tauroursodeoxycholic acid completely prevented IFNα effects, indicating an ER stress-mediated impairment of insulin production. We demonstrated for the first time that IFNα elicits ER stress in human beta cells providing a novel mechanistic role for this virus-induced cytokine in the development of T1D. Compounds targeting molecular processes altered in ER-stressed beta cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent IFNα-induced beta cell dysfunction in the early onset of T1D.

  5. A beta 1-integrin receptor for fibronectin in human kidney glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Kerjaschki, D.; Ojha, P. P.; Susani, M.; Horvat, R.; Binder, S.; Hovorka, A.; Hillemanns, P.; Pytela, R.

    1989-01-01

    The fibronectin receptor (FNR) is a transmembrane heterodimeric glycoprotein which shares a common beta 1-chain with several other members of the integrin family of adhesion receptors. The authors have prepared a membrane fraction of isolated human glomeruli, from which two proteins (apparent molecular weights 120 kd and 140 kd) bound to a fibronectin-column, and were selectively released by the synthetic peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. These molecules were labeled in immune overlays by an antibody raised against the FNR from human placenta that recognizes both the FNR-specific a-chain and the group-specific beta 1-integrin chain. In sections of normal human kidneys this antibody labeled predominately the mesangia and the peripheral capillary walls of glomeruli by an immunoperoxidase procedure. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy, using an indirect immunogold procedure, revealed a preferential localization along the cell membranes of mesangial, epithelial, and endothelial cells that face the mesangial matrix or the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In kidney biopsies from patients with various glomerular diseases (membranous and other forms of glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease) the distribution was similar to that in normal glomeruli. These findings indicate that a beta 1-integrin-related FNR is present in normal and diseased human glomeruli. Images Figure 1-4 Figure 5 Figure 6-10 Figure 11-16 PMID:2521774

  6. Satellites and Human Health: Potential for Tracking Cholera Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A. S.; Akanda, A. S.; Islam, S.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera continues to be a significant health threat across the globe. The pattern and magnitude of the seven global pandemics suggest that cholera outbreaks primarily originate in coastal regions and spread inland through secondary means. Cholera bacteria show strong association with zooplankton and phytoplankton abundance in coastal ecosystems. Characterization of space-time variability of chlorophyll, a surrogate for phytoplankton abundance, in Northern Bay of Bengal (BoB) is an essential step to develop any methodology for tracking cholera in the Bengal Delta from space. Using ten years of satellite data, this study (a) quantifies the space-time distribution of chlorophyll in BoB region and (b) presents a hypothesis as to how coastal plankton may be related with cholera outbreaks. Preliminary results suggest that variability of chlorophyll at daily scale, irrespective of spatial averaging, resembles white noise. At a monthly scale, chlorophyll shows distinct annual seasonality and chlorophyll values are significantly higher close to the coast than those in the offshore regions. At pixel level (9 km) on monthly scale, on the other hand, chlorophyll does not exhibit much persistence in time. With increased spatial averaging, temporal persistence of monthly chlorophyll increases and lag one autocorrelation stabilizes around 0.60 for 1200 km2 or larger areal averages. Spatial analyses of chlorophyll suggest that coastal region in BoB have a stable sill at 100 km range. Using satellite chlorophyll data, we observe that phytoplankton blooms occur every year in BoB, yet severe cholera outbreaks happen in certain years. This study provides a working hypothesis on how BoB coastal plankton blooms aided by regional hydroclimatic processes may lead to possible cholera outbreaks in Bengal Delta.

  7. Functional properties of an isolated. cap alpha beta. heterodimeric human placenta insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, S.M.; Swanson, M.L.; Wemmie, J.A.; Pessin, J.E.

    1988-05-03

    Treatment of human placenta membranes at pH 8.5 in the presence of 2.0 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) for 5 min, followed by the simultaneous removal of the DTT and pH adjustment of pH 7.6, resulted in the formation of a functional ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor complex from the native ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric disulfide-linked state. The membrane-bound ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric complex displayed similar curvilinear /sup 125/I-IGF-1 equilibrium binding compared to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric complex. /sup 125/I-IGF-1 binding to both the isolated ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric and ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric complexes demonstrated a marked straightening of the Scatchard plots, compared to the placenta membrane-bound IGF-1 receptors, with a 2-fold increase in the high-affinity binding component. IGF-1 stimulation of IGF-1 receptor autophosphorylation indicated that the ligand-dependent activation of ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric protein kinase activity occurred concomitant with the reassociation into a covalent ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric state. These data demonstrate that (i) a combination of alkaline pH and DTT treatment of human placenta membranes results in the formation of an ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complex, (ii) unlike the insulin receptor, high-affinity homogeneous IGF-1 binding occurs in both the ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric and ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric complexes, and (iii) IGF-1-dependent autophosphorylation of the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complex correlates wit an IGF-1 dependent covalent reassociation into an ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric disulfide-linked state.

  8. Simultaneous extraction of. beta. -endorphin and leu- and met-enkephalins from human and rat plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhathena, S.J.; Smith, P.M.; Kennedy, B.W. ); Voyles, N.R.; Recant, L. )

    1989-01-01

    A simple, rapid and reliable procedure is described to simultaneously concentrated and purify {beta}-endorphin, leu-and met-enkephalins from small volumes of human and rat plasma before radioimmunoassay is performed. It uses C{sub 18} Sep-Pak reverse phase cartridges. The effectiveness of different protease inhibitors in preventing degradation of opiates by plasma and different solvent systems for eluting opiates is also evaluated.

  9. Proteasome Dysfunction Mediates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rodent Beta Cells and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Broca, Christophe; Varin, Elodie; Armanet, Mathieu; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Bosco, Domenico; Dalle, Stéphane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS), a major cellular protein degradation machinery, plays key roles in the regulation of many cell functions. Glucotoxicity mediated by chronic hyperglycaemia is detrimental to the function and survival of pancreatic beta cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether proteasome dysfunction could be involved in beta cell apoptosis in glucotoxic conditions, and to evaluate whether such a dysfunction might be pharmacologically corrected. Therefore, UPS activity was measured in GK rats islets, INS-1E beta cells or human islets after high glucose and/or UPS inhibitor exposure. Immunoblotting was used to quantify polyubiquitinated proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through CHOP expression, and apoptosis through the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, whereas total cell death was detected through histone-associated DNA fragments measurement. In vitro, we found that chronic exposure of INS-1E cells to high glucose concentrations significantly decreases the three proteasome activities by 20% and leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. We showed that pharmacological blockade of UPS activity by 20% leads to apoptosis in a same way. Indeed, ER stress was involved in both conditions. These results were confirmed in human islets, and proteasome activities were also decreased in hyperglycemic GK rats islets. Moreover, we observed that a high glucose treatment hypersensitized beta cells to the apoptotic effect of proteasome inhibitors. Noteworthily, the decreased proteasome activity can be corrected with Exendin-4, which also protected against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings reveal an important role of proteasome activity in high glucose-induced beta cell apoptosis, potentially linking ER stress and glucotoxicity. These proteasome dysfunctions can be reversed by a GLP-1 analog. Thus, UPS may be a potent target to treat deleterious metabolic conditions leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:24642635

  10. Novel monoclonal antibody against beta 1 integrin enhances cisplatin efficacy in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Young; Cho, Woon-Dong; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Choi, Da Bin; Hong, Jeong Won; Kim, Soseul; Moon, Yoo Ri; Son, Seung-Myoung; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lee, Ho-Chang; Song, Hyung Geun

    2016-05-01

    The use of anti-beta 1 integrin monoclonal antibody in lung cancer treatment has proven beneficial. Here, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), called P5, by immunizing mice with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Its anti-tumor effect is now being tested, in a clinical phase III trial, in combinatorial treatments with various chemical drugs. To confirm that P5 indeed binds to beta 1 integrin, cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with commercial anti-beta 1 integrin mAb (TS2/16) and immunoblotted against P5 to reveal a 140 kDa molecular weight band, as expected. Immunoprecipitation with P5 followed by LC/MS protein sequence analysis further verified P5 antigen to be beta 1 integrin. Cisplatin treatment upregulated cell surface expression of beta 1 integrin in A549 cells, while causing inhibition of cell growth. When cells were co-treated with different concentrations of P5 mAb, the cisplatin-mediated inhibitory effect was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show that a combinatorial treatment of P5 mAb and cisplatin in A549 cells resulted in a 30% increase in apoptosis, compared to baseline, and significantly more when compared to either the cisplatin or P5 alone group. The entire peptide sequences in CDR from variable region of Ig heavy and light chain gene for P5 mAb are also disclosed. Together, these results provide evidence of the beneficial effect of P5 mAb in combinatorial treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  11. Influence of coding region polymorphism on the peripheral expression of a human TCR V[beta] gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vissinga, C.S.; Charmley, P.; Concannon, P. )

    1994-02-01

    A number of human TCR V[beta] gene segments are reported to be polymorphic, with alleles differing by one or a small number of amino acid substitutions. In the absence of detailed structural information regarding the interaction of specific positions in the TCR with Ag or MHC, the significance of such variation is difficult to assess. In this report the relative use of the two common alleles of the human V[beta]6.7 gene, 6.7a and 6.7b, which differ by two nonconservative amino acid substitutions, and the use of two common alleles of the V[beta]12.2 gene, which differ by only silent substitutions, were measured in PBL derived from individuals heterozygous for these alleles. Equal use of V[beta]12.2 alleles was observed, consistent with the inability of selection mechanisms to discriminate between the products of these alleles that are indistinguishable at the amino acid level. However, statistically significant skewing in the use of V[beta]6.7 alleles was observed in 15 of 16 individuals studied. Expression levels for each allele ranged from 16 to 84% of the total V[beta]6.7 signal in heterozygous individuals, with either the 6.7a or the 6.7b allele predominant in different individuals. Based on segregation studies in families, it seems unlikely that other unidentified polymorphism in the TCR[beta] locus, such as in the V[beta]6.7 promoter, was responsible for the differential allele expression. Family studies provided no evidence for an association between specific HLA haplotypes and V[beta]6.7 allele use. These results indicate that even modest allelic variation in human TCR V[beta] coding regions can have a significant impact on the expression of human V[beta] genes in the peripheral repertoire. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The opioid peptide beta-endorphin stimulates acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Urizar-Arenaza, I; Estomba, H; Muñoa-Hoyos, I; Matorras, R; Esposito, A; Candenas, L; Pinto, F M; Valdivia, A; Irazusta, J; Subirán, N

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome reaction occurs in vivo following sperm capacitation and is essential for the acquisition of sperm fertilization ability. However, little is known about the molecular identity of the physiological acrosome reaction regulators. In addition to progesterone, which is produced by cumulus oophorus cells and known to regulate acrosome reaction by activating the specific calcium channel CatSper, endogenous opioid peptides such as beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin are present at high concentrations in the follicular fluid suggesting that the opioid system may be involved in the mechanisms regulating the acrosome reaction in humans. By using Reverse Transcription-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence approaches, we described the presence and localization of the beta-endorphin precursor, pro-opiomelanocortinin the middle section and in flagellum of human spermatozoa, and inside the seminiferous tubules of human testis. Flow cytometry and intracellular calcium analyses showed that beta-endorphin causes an inversely dose-dependent increase in the percentage of acrosome-reacted sperm cells by a calcium-independent protein kinase C pathway. These findings are important for future studies of sperm physiology and provide new insight into the function of the opioid system as a target of fertility management.

  13. Beta-carotene is accumulated, metabolized, and possibly converted to retinol in human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7).

    PubMed

    Torres, Alexandre G; Borojevic, Radovan; Trugo, Nadia M F

    2004-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the uptake, accumulation, and metabolism of beta-carotene by the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Beta-carotene uptake was time- and dose-dependent, and independent of cell polarity. Beta-carotene accumulation in cells was linear as a function of its concentration in medium (1.3-4.1 micromol/L). It was accompanied by increasing amounts of retinol, which accumulated in cells following a sigmoid pattern, and by other four putative metabolites. Beta-apocarotenals, epoxides, endoperoxides, retinal, retinoic acid, and retinyl esters were not detected in cell extracts. Beta-carotene and its metabolites did not induce alterations in cell morphology or subcellular localization of epithelial mucins. Beta-carotene and retinol were released from cells that had previously accumulated beta-carotene, and were further incubated in beta-carotene- and retinol-free medium, but intracellular retinol content remained constant whereas beta-carotene decreased. In conclusion, beta-carotene added to culture medium in physiological concentrations (1-6 micromol/L) is taken up and metabolized in MCF-7 cells, and is possibly converted to retinol.

  14. A human integrin beta 1 subunit with a unique cytoplasmic domain generated by alternative mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Altruda, F; Cervella, P; Tarone, G; Botta, C; Balzac, F; Stefanuto, G; Silengo, L

    1990-11-15

    The integrin subunit (beta 1) is common to a group of plasma membrane glycoprotein heterodimers that include the fibronectin, laminin and collagen receptors. These receptors span the plasma membrane, providing a transmembrane linkage between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Here, we describe a variant of the human beta 1 differing from the previously described beta 1 in the cytoplasmic domain. The variant beta 1 transcript (beta 13'v) is present in different cell types and is synthesized at lower levels compared to the beta 1 mRNA. The cytoplasmic domain of the beta 13'v is characterized by a unique 12-amino acid C-terminal sequence. A Tyr residue present in this region, and known to be phosphorylated in the beta 1, is no longer part of a consensus sequence for phosphorylation by Tyr kinases. The integrin cytoplasmic domain anchors actin fibrils to the plasma membrane by interacting with cytoskeletal proteins such as talin and fibulin. The integrin beta 13'v with the variant cytoplasmic domain is likely to mediate a new type of membrane-cytoskeleton interaction during cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Analysis of genomic clones showed that the new sequences of the variant mRNA are identical to an intron located between the last two exons of the beta 1 gene, indicating that the alternative message is generated either by premature transcription termination or by lack of splicing at this site.

  15. Increased expression of human beta-defensin 3 in mollusca contagiosum.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hoffert, U; Schwarz, T; Schröder, J M; Gläser, R

    2010-03-01

    The human beta defensins (hBDs)-2 and -3 are inducible antimicrobial peptides present in human skin. Besides an important role in fighting bacteria, they also have an antiviral function. Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a cutaneous viral disease caused by the MC virus. Lesions show a tendency towards spontaneous regression, which might be caused by antiviral proteins such as defensins. We report a marked increase in hBD-3 immunoreactivity in MC lesions in contrast to hBD-2, which was only marginally increased. We suggest a role for the hBD-3 peptide in MC pathogenesis.

  16. Effects of transforming growth factor beta-1 on growth-regulatory genes in tumour-derived human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, I. C.; Patel, V.; Sandy, J. R.; Prime, S. S.; Yeudall, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1) on c-myc, RB1, junB and p53 expression together with pRb phosphorylation, in carcinoma-derived and normal human oral keratinocytes with a range of inhibitory responses to this ligand. Amplification of c-myc was observed in eight of eight tumour-derived cell lines and resulted in corresponding mRNA expression. The down-regulation of c-myc expression by TGF-beta 1 predominantly reflected growth inhibition by TGF-beta 1, but in two of eight tumour-derived cell lines which were partially responsive to TGF-beta 1 c-myc expression was unaltered by this ligand. While RB1 mRNA levels were unaltered by TGF-beta 1, the ligand caused the accumulation of the underphosphorylated form of the Rb protein in all cells irrespective of TGF-beta 1-induced growth arrest. junB expression was up-regulated by TGF-beta 1 in cells with a range of growth inhibitory responses. All cells contained mutant p53. TGF-beta 1 did not affect p53 mRNA expression in both tumour-derived and normal keratinocytes and there was no alteration in p53 protein levels in keratinocytes expressing stable p53 protein following TGF-beta 1 treatment. The data indicate that TGF-beta-induced growth control can exist independently of the presence of mutant p53 and the control of Rb phosphorylation and c-myc down-regulation. It may be that TGF-beta growth inhibition occurs via multiple mechanisms and that the loss of one pathway during tumour progression does not necessarily result in the abrogation of TGF-beta-induced growth control. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7547241

  17. Clonal analysis of human tumors with M27 beta, a highly informative polymorphic X chromosomal probe.

    PubMed Central

    Fey, M F; Peter, H J; Hinds, H L; Zimmermann, A; Liechti-Gallati, S; Gerber, H; Studer, H; Tobler, A

    1992-01-01

    The clonality of human tumors can be studied by X inactivation/methylation analysis in female patients heterozygous for X-linked DNA polymorphisms. We present a detailed study on clonal tumor analysis with M27 beta, a highly informative probe detecting a polymorphic X chromosomal locus, DXS255. The polymorphism detected at this locus is due to variable numbers of tandem repeats. The rate of constitutional heterozygosity detected by M27 beta was 88%. Normal tissue from gastrointestinal mucosa and thyroid showed random, hence polyclonal, patterns. Nonrandom clonal X inactivation was detected in all 22 malignant neoplasms that had been shown to be clonal by other DNA markers, such as antigen receptor gene rearrangements or clonal loss of heterozygosity at 17p and other loci. 16/48 normal blood leukocyte samples (33%) showed considerably skewed X inactivation patterns. Comparison of blood leukocytes and normal tissue indicated that in a given individual, X inactivation patterns may be tissue specific. M27 beta was used to study the clonal composition of 13 benign thyroid nodules from 12 multinodular goiters with rapid recent growth, traditionally termed "adenomas." Nine of them were clonal, whereas four nodules and tissue from a case of Graves' goiter were not, indicating that some, but not all, such thyroid nodules may represent true clonal neoplasms. The M27 beta probe permits one to study the clonal composition by the X inactivation approach of a wide variety of solid tumors from most female patients. As a control, normal tissue homologous to the tumor type of interest is preferable to DNA from blood leukocytes, since the latter may show nonrandom X inactivation patterns in a fairly high proportion of cases. M27 beta may, therefore, be of limited use for the clonal analysis of neoplasms derived from hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:1349026

  18. Molecular characterization of the gene for human interleukin-1[beta] converting enzyme (IL1BC)

    SciTech Connect

    Cerretti, D.P.; Hollingsworth, L.T.; Kozlosky, C.J.; Nelson, N. ); Valentine, M.B. ); Shapiro, D.N.; Morris, S.W. Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN )

    1994-04-01

    Interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]) mediates a wide range of immune and inflammatory responses. The active cytokine is generated by proteolytic cleavage of an inactive precursor by a protease called the IL-1[beta] converting enzyme (ICE). A cDNA encoding this protease was recently isolated. A human genomic clone containing the ICE gene (IL1BC) was isolated using the cDNA as a probe. The gene consists of 10 exons spanning at least 10.6 kb. 5[prime]-anchored polymerase chain reaction indicated a single transcription start site [approximately]33 bp upstream of the initiator Met codon. The 5[prime]-flanking region does not have an apparent TATA box but may contain an initiator (Inr) promotor element. However, transcriptional activity could not be detected with a fusion gene containing the 5[prime]-flanking region linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (CAT) when transfected into the human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. Using the genomic IL1BC clone, the authors have confirmed the localization of the gene to chromosome 11 band q22.2-q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, A M; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-10-15

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13-20 Hz) and high-beta (20-35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing.

  20. Perimovement decrease of alpha/beta oscillations in the human nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Rutledge, Robb B.; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C.; Kaufmann, Jörn; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The human nucleus accumbens is thought to play an important role in guiding future action selection via an evaluation of current action outcomes. Here we provide electrophysiological evidence for a more direct, i.e., online, role during action preparation. We recorded local field potentials from the nucleus accumbens in patients with epilepsy undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation. We found a consistent decrease in the power of alpha/beta oscillations (10–30 Hz) before and around the time of movements. This perimovement alpha/beta desynchronization was observed in seven of eight patients and was present both before instructed movements in a serial reaction time task as well as before self-paced, deliberate choices in a decision making task. A similar beta decrease over sensorimotor cortex and in the subthalamic nucleus has been directly related to movement preparation and execution. Our results support the idea of a direct role of the human nucleus accumbens in action preparation and execution. PMID:27486103

  1. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, AM; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-01-01

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13–20 Hz) and high-beta (20–35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing. PMID:16123109

  2. beta-Adrenergic modulation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel in isolated human ventricular myocytes. Alteration in channel response to beta-adrenergic stimulation in failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Koumi, S; Backer, C L; Arentzen, C E; Sato, R

    1995-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic modulation of the inwardly-rectifying K+ channel (IK1) was examined in isolated human ventricular myocytes using patch-clamp techniques. Isoproterenol (ISO) reversibly depolarized the resting membrane potential and prolonged the action potential duration. Under the whole-cell C1- -free condition, ISO applied via the bath solution reversibly inhibited macroscopic IdK1. The reversal potential of the ISO-sensitive current was shifted by approximately 60 mV per 10-fold change in the external K+ concentration and was sensitive to Ba2+. The ISO-induced inhibition of IK1 was mimicked by forskolin and dibutyrl cAMP, and was prevented by including a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (PKI) in the pipette solution. In single-channel recordings from cell-attached patches, bath applied ISO could suppress IK1 channels by decreasing open state probability. Bath application of the purified catalytic sub-unit of PKA to inside-out patches also inhibited IK1 and the inhibition could be antagonized by alkaline phosphatase. When beta-adrenergic modulation of IK1 was compared between ventricular myocytes isolated from the failing and the nonfailing heart, channel response to ISO and PKA was significantly reduced in myocytes from the failing heart. Although ISO inhibited IK1 in a concentration-dependent fashion in both groups, a half-maximal concentration was greater in failing (0.12 microM) than in nonfailing hearts (0.023 microM). These results suggest that IK1 in human ventricular myocytes can be inhibited by a PKA-mediated phosphorylation and the modulation is significantly reduced in ventricular myocytes from the failing heart compared to the nonfailing heart. Images PMID:8675658

  3. Low beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity and mutations in the human beta-glucuronidase gene in mild mucopolysaccharidosis type VII, pseudodeficiency and a heterozygote.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Gitzelmann, R; Bosshard, N; Maire, I; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1998-01-01

    Deficiency of beta-glucuronidase is the cause of the human lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). The wide interfamilial variation in the presentation of this disorder complicates clinical diagnosis. Since greatly reduced beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity may also be found in healthy individuals (pseudodeficiency), diagnosis based on the biochemical phenotype is also difficult. This is illustrated by the patients studied here, who had extremely mild symptoms confined to the spine, or tachycardia, or upper respiratory infection, and who had low beta-glucuronidase activity, and excessive granulation of granulocytes and monocytes on routine blood smears. Low enzyme activity was caused by mutations in the beta-glucuronidase gene in all cases. One patient was homozygous for the previously described D152N allele. Family information and 35SO4-uptake studies clearly demonstrated that he was pseudodeficient, with symptoms unrelated to his low beta-glucuronidase activity. Two patients of another family were compound heterozygotes for a C38G and a Y626H allele, and were probably extremely mild MPS VII patients. The low beta-glucuronidase activity in another mild MPS VII patient was due to reduced biosynthesis of stable mRNA from one allele, and a W446X mutation on the second. Extremely low beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity was also found in the serum of a carrier of a 1801deltaT allele, possibly as a consequence of a dominant-negative effect. A combination of investigations is necessary in order to differentiate between mild disease and pseudodeficiency in individuals with enzyme activities close to the threshold.

  4. Regulated expression of a complete human beta-globin gene encoded by a transmissible retrovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, R D; Weber-Benarous, A; Baorto, D; Mulligan, R C

    1987-01-01

    We introduced a human beta-globin gene into murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells by infection with recombinant retroviruses containing the complete genomic globin sequence. The beta-globin gene was correctly regulated during differentiation, steady-state mRNA levels being induced 5- to 30-fold after treatment of the cells with the chemical inducer dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies using vectors which yield integrated proviruses lacking transcriptional enhancer sequences indicated that neither retroviral transcription nor the retroviral enhancer sequences themselves had any obvious effect on expression of the globin gene. Viral RNA expression also appeared inducible, being considerably depressed in uninduced MEL cells but approaching normal wild-type levels after dimethyl sulfoxide treatment. We provide data which suggest that the control point for both repression and subsequent activation of virus expression in MEL cells lies in the viral enhancer element. Images PMID:3029570

  5. Alpha-satellite DNA and vector composition influence rates of human artificial chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Brenda R; Rhoades, Angela A; Willard, Huntington F

    2002-06-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have been proposed as a new class of potential gene transfer and gene therapy vector. HACs can be formed when bacterial cloning vectors containing alpha-satellite DNA are transfected into cultured human cells. We have compared the HAC-forming potential of different sequences to identify features critical to the efficiency of the process. Chromosome 17 or 21 alpha-satellite arrays are highly competent HAC-forming substrates in this assay. In contrast, a Y-chromosome-derived alpha-satellite sequence is inefficient, suggesting that centromere specification is at least partly dependent on DNA sequence. The length of the input array is also an important determinant, as reduction of the chromosome-17-based array from 80 kb to 35 kb reduced the frequency of HAC formation. In addition to the alpha-satellite component, vector composition also influenced HAC formation rates, size, and copy number. The data presented here have a significant impact on the design of future HAC vectors that have potential to be developed for therapeutic applications and as tools for investigating human chromosome structure and function.

  6. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II in the human endometrium: localization and activity during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E; Salamonsen, L A; Komesaroff, P A; Li, K X; Myles, K M; Lawrence, M; Krozowski, Z

    1997-12-01

    The 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II enzyme (11 beta HSD2) is a potent inactivator of glucocorticoids and is present in high amounts in the placental syncytiotrophoblast and sodium-transporting epithelia. Placental 11 beta HSD2 is thought to protect the fetus from high circulating levels of maternal glucocorticoids, whereas the renal enzyme is important in conferring aldosterone specificity on the mineralocorticoid receptor. An isoform of 11 beta HSD (11 beta HSD1) is also present in a wide range of tissues, but usually acts as an oxoreductase, converting the biologically inactive cortisone to cortisol. In the present study we have used an immunopurified antibody to the carboxy-terminus of human 11 beta HSD2 (HUH23) to demonstrate localization of the enzyme in luminal and glandular epithelia of human endometrium. In some specimens staining was uniformly distributed, but in others there was clear evidence of heterogeneity both between and within epithelia. Although 11 beta HSD2 was found mainly in the cytoplasm, some cells showed evidence of nuclear staining only. Western blot analysis showed a band at 41 kDa in endometrium and myometrium, confirming the presence of 11 beta HSD2. Measurement of activity throughout the menstrual cycle showed that mean levels (+/- SEM) of activity were 156 +/- 17 and 6.1 +/- 1.1 pmol product/min.g homogenate protein for 11 beta HSD2 and 11 beta HSD1, respectively. Patients taking combined estrogen/progesterone contraceptives had significantly lower activities of both enzymes (76 +/- 19 and 1.9 +/- 0.4; both P < 0.01) compared with the control group. 11 beta HSD2 activity was significantly higher in the secretory than in the proliferative phase of the cycle in controls (193 +/- 22 vs. 120 +/- 23; P < 0.05). All groups contained outliers with elevated enzyme activities, with some patients displaying 11 beta HSD2 levels comparable to those observed in human kidney (> 1000 pmol/min.g). Further analysis showed that there was a

  7. Andes virus recognition of human and Syrian hamster beta3 integrins is determined by an L33P substitution in the PSI domain.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Valery S; Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2010-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes a fatal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in humans and Syrian hamsters. Human alpha(v)beta(3) integrins are receptors for several pathogenic hantaviruses, and the function of alpha(v)beta(3) integrins on endothelial cells suggests a role for alpha(v)beta(3) in hantavirus directed vascular permeability. We determined here that ANDV infection of human endothelial cells or Syrian hamster-derived BHK-21 cells was selectively inhibited by the high-affinity alpha(v)beta(3) integrin ligand vitronectin and by antibodies to alpha(v)beta(3) integrins. Further, antibodies to the beta(3) integrin PSI domain, as well as PSI domain polypeptides derived from human and Syrian hamster beta(3) subunits, but not murine or bovine beta(3), inhibited ANDV infection of both BHK-21 and human endothelial cells. These findings suggest that ANDV interacts with beta(3) subunits through PSI domain residues conserved in both Syrian hamster and human beta(3) integrins. Sequencing the Syrian hamster beta(3) integrin PSI domain revealed eight differences between Syrian hamster and human beta(3) integrins. Analysis of residues within the PSI domains of human, Syrian hamster, murine, and bovine beta(3) integrins identified unique proline substitutions at residues 32 and 33 of murine and bovine PSI domains that could determine ANDV recognition. Mutagenizing the human beta(3) PSI domain to contain the L33P substitution present in bovine beta(3) integrin abolished the ability of the PSI domain to inhibit ANDV infectivity. Conversely, mutagenizing either the bovine PSI domain, P33L, or the murine PSI domain, S32P, to the residue present human beta(3) permitted PSI mutants to inhibit ANDV infection. Similarly, CHO cells transfected with the full-length bovine beta(3) integrin containing the P33L mutation permitted infection by ANDV. These findings indicate that human and Syrian hamster alpha(v)beta(3) integrins are key receptors for ANDV and that specific residues within the

  8. PPAR{gamma} agonists prevent TGF{beta}1/Smad3-signaling in human hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Caiyan; Chen, Wei; Yang Liu; Chen Lihong; Stimpson, Stephen A.; Diehl, Anna Mae . E-mail: annamae.diehl@duke.edu

    2006-11-17

    PPAR{gamma} agonists inhibit liver fibrosis, but the mechanisms involved are uncertain. We hypothesized that PPAR{gamma} agonists inhibit transforming growth factor (TGF){beta}1-activation of TGF{beta} receptor (TGF{beta}R)-1 signaling in quiescent stellate cells, thereby abrogating Smad3-dependent induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes, such as PAI-1 and collagen-1{alpha}I. To test this, human HSC were cultured to induce a quiescent phenotype, characterized by lipid accumulation and PPAR{gamma} expression and transcriptional activity. These adipocytic HSC were then treated with TGF{beta}1 {+-} a TGF{beta}R-1 kinase inhibitor (SB431542) or a PPAR{gamma} agonist (GW7845). TGF{beta}1 caused dose- and time-dependent increases in Smad3 phosphorylation, followed by induction of collagen and PAI-1 expression. Like the TGF{beta}R-1 kinase inhibitor, the PPAR{gamma} agonist caused dose-dependent inhibition of all of these responses without effecting HSC proliferation or viability. Thus, the anti-fibrotic actions of PPAR{gamma} agonists reflect their ability to inhibit TGF{beta}1-TGF{beta}R1 signaling that initiates ECM gene expression in quiescent HSC.

  9. Immunoreactivity of thymosin beta 4 in human foetal and adult genitourinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S.; Cabras, T.; Fanari, M.U.; Cau, F.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Manconi, B.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a member of the beta-thymosins family, a family of peptides playing essential roles in many cellular functions. Our recent studies suggested Tβ4 plays a key role in the development of human salivary glands and the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to analyse the presence of Tβ4 in the human adult and foetal genitourinary tract. Immunolocalization of Tβ4 was studied in autoptic samples of kidney, bladder, uterus, ovary, testicle and prostate obtained from four human foetuses and four adults. Presence of the peptide was observed in cells of different origin: in surface epithelium, in gland epithelial cells and in the interstitial cells. Tβ4 was mainly found in adult and foetal bladder in the transitional epithelial cells; in the adult endometrium, glands and stromal cells were immunoreactive for the peptide; Tβ4 was mainly localized in the glands of foetal prostate while, in the adults a weak Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the stroma. In adult and foetal kidney, Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to ducts and tubules with completely spared glomeruli; a weak positivity was observed in adult and foetal oocytes; immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the interstitial cells of foetal and adult testis. In this study, we confirm that Tβ4 could play a relevant role during human development, even in the genitourinary tract, and reveal that immunoreactivity for this peptide may change during postnatal and adult life. PMID:21263742

  10. Evaluation of the effect of static magnetic fields combined with human hepatocyte growth factor on human satellite cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Birk, Richard; Sommer, Ulrich; Faber, Anne; Aderhold, Christoph; Schulz, Johannes D; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Stern-Straeter, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising research field, which aims to create new functional muscle tissue in vitro, by utilizing the myogenic differentiation potential of human stem cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of static magnetic fields (SMF), combined with the use of the myogenic differentiation enhancing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), on human satellite cell cultures, which are one of the preferred stem cell sources in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. We performed almarBlue® proliferation assays and semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the following myogenic markers: desmin (DES), myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myogenic differentiation antigen 1 (MYOD1), myogenin (MYOG), myosin heavy chain (MYH) and α1 actin (ACTA1) to detect the effects on myogenic maturation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining (ICC) and fusion index (FI) determination as independent markers of differentiation were performed on satellite cell cultures stimulated with HGF and HGF + SMF with an intensity of 80 mT. ICC verified the muscle phenotype at all time points. SMF enhanced the proliferation of satellite cell cultures treated with HGF. RT-PCR analysis, ICC and FI calculation revealed the effects of HGF/SMF on the investigated differentiation markers and stimulation with HGF and SMF verified the continuing maturation, however no significant increase in analysed markers could be detected when compared with control cultures treated with serum cessation. In conclusion, HGF or HGF + SMF stimulation of human satellite cell cultures did not lead to the desired enhancement of myogenic maturation of human satellite cell cultures compared with cell cultures stimulated with growth factor reduction.

  11. Human neural stem cells transduced with IFN-beta and cytosine deaminase genes intensify bystander effect in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Natsume, A; Shimato, S; Ohno, M; Kato, T; Chansakul, P; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that the genetically modified human neural stem cells (NSCs) show remarkable migratory and tumor-tropic capability to track down brain tumor cells and deliver therapeutic agents with significant therapeutic benefit. Human NSCs that were retrovirally transduced with cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on the glioma cells after application of the prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) is known for its antiproliferative effects in a variety of cancers. In our pilot clinical trial in glioma, the IFN-beta gene has shown potent antitumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. In the present study, we sought to examine whether human NSCs genetically modified to express both CD and IFN-beta genes intensified antitumor effect on experimental glioma. In vitro studies showed that CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs exerted a remarkable bystander effect on human glioma cells after the application of 5-FC, as compared with parental NSCs and CD-expressing NSCs. In animal models with human glioma orthotopic xenograft, intravenously infused CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs produced striking antitumor effect after administration of the prodrug 5-FC. Furthermore, the same gene therapy regimen prolonged survival periods significantly in the experimental animals. The results of the present study indicate that the multimodal NSC-based treatment strategy might have therapeutic potential against gliomas.

  12. Crystal Structure of Human [Beta]-Hexosaminidase B: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Sandhoff and Tay-Sachs Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, Brian L.; Mahuran, Don J.; Cherney, Maia M.; Zhao, Dalian; Knapp, Spencer; James, Michael N.G.

    2010-12-01

    In humans, two major {beta}-hexosaminidase isoenzymes exist: Hex A and Hex B. Hex A is a heterodimer of subunits {alpha} and {beta} (60% identity), whereas Hex B is a homodimer of {beta}-subunits. Interest in human {beta}-hexosaminidase stems from its association with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease; these are prototypical lysosomal storage disorders resulting from the abnormal accumulation of G{sub M2}-ganglioside (G{sub M2}). Hex A degrades G{sub M2} by removing a terminal N-acetyl-D-galactosamine ({beta}-GalNAc) residue, and this activity requires the G{sub M2}-activator, a protein which solubilizes the ganglioside for presentation to Hex A. We present here the crystal structure of human Hex B, alone (2.4 {angstrom}) and in complex with the mechanistic inhibitors GalNAc-isofagomine (2.2 {angstrom}) or NAG-thiazoline (2.5 {angstrom}). From these, and the known X-ray structure of the G{sub M2}-activator, we have modeled Hex A in complex with the activator and ganglioside. Together, our crystallographic and modeling data demonstrate how {alpha} and {beta}-subunits dimerize to form either Hex A or Hex B, how these isoenzymes hydrolyze diverse substrates, and how many documented point mutations cause Sandhoff disease ({beta}-subunit mutations) and Tay-Sachs disease ({alpha}-subunit mutations).

  13. Crystal structure of human beta-hexosaminidase B: understanding the molecular basis of Sandhoff and Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don J; Cherney, Maia M; Zhao, Dalian; Knapp, Spencer; James, Michael N G

    2003-04-11

    In humans, two major beta-hexosaminidase isoenzymes exist: Hex A and Hex B. Hex A is a heterodimer of subunits alpha and beta (60% identity), whereas Hex B is a homodimer of beta-subunits. Interest in human beta-hexosaminidase stems from its association with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease; these are prototypical lysosomal storage disorders resulting from the abnormal accumulation of G(M2)-ganglioside (G(M2)). Hex A degrades G(M2) by removing a terminal N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (beta-GalNAc) residue, and this activity requires the G(M2)-activator, a protein which solubilizes the ganglioside for presentation to Hex A. We present here the crystal structure of human Hex B, alone (2.4A) and in complex with the mechanistic inhibitors GalNAc-isofagomine (2.2A) or NAG-thiazoline (2.5A). From these, and the known X-ray structure of the G(M2)-activator, we have modeled Hex A in complex with the activator and ganglioside. Together, our crystallographic and modeling data demonstrate how alpha and beta-subunits dimerize to form either Hex A or Hex B, how these isoenzymes hydrolyze diverse substrates, and how many documented point mutations cause Sandhoff disease (beta-subunit mutations) and Tay-Sachs disease (alpha-subunit mutations).

  14. Interferons alpha and beta down-regulate the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in human carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R K; Gutman, M; Bucana, C D; Sanchez, R; Llansa, N; Fidler, I J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the influence of interferons alpha, beta, and gamma (IFN-alpha, -beta, and -gamma) on the production of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) by human renal carcinoma cells. The human renal carcinoma cell metastatic line SN12PM6 was established in culture from a lung metastasis and SN12PM6-resistant cells were selected in vitro for resistance to the antiproliferative effects of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, but not IFN-gamma, down-regulated the expression of bFGF at the mRNA and protein levels by a mechanism independent of their antiproliferative effects. Down-regulation of bFGF required a long exposure (> 4 days) of cells to low concentrations (> 10 units/ml) of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. The withdrawal of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta from the medium permitted SN12PM6-resistant cells to resume production of bFGF. The incubation of human bladder, prostate, colon, and breast carcinoma cells with noncytostatic concentrations of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta also produced down-regulation of bFGF production. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7753843

  15. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  16. Current Characteristics and Trends of the Tracked Satellite Population in the Human Space Flight Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Since the end of the Apollo program in 1972, human space flight has been restricted to altitudes below 600 km above the Earth s surface with most missions restricted to a ceiling below 400 km. An investigation of the tracked satellite population transiting and influencing the human space flight regime during the past 11 years (equivalent to a full solar cycle) has recently been completed. The overall effects of satellite breakups and solar activity are typically less pronounced in the human space flight regime than other regions of low Earth orbit. As of January 2006 nearly 1500 tracked objects resided in or traversed the human space flight regime, although two-thirds of these objects were in orbits of moderate to high eccentricity, significantly reducing their effect on human space flight safety. During the period investigated, the spatial density of tracked objects in the 350-400 km altitude regime of the International Space Station demonstrated a steady decline, actually decreasing by 50% by the end of the period. On the other hand, the region immediately above 600 km experienced a significant increase in its population density. This regime is important for future risk assessments, since this region represents the reservoir of debris which will influence human space flight safety in the future. The paper seeks to put into sharper perspective the risks posed to human space flight by the tracked satellite population, as well as the influences of solar activity and the effects of compliance with orbital debris mitigation guidelines on human space flight missions. Finally, the methods and successes of characterizing the population of smaller debris at human space flight regimes are addressed.

  17. [Frequency of various mini- and micro-satellite sequences in DNA of human chromosome 13].

    PubMed

    Ryskov, A P; Kupriianova, N S; Kapanadze, B I; Nechvolodov, K K; Pozmogova, G E; Prosniak, M I; Iankovskiĭ, N K

    1993-10-01

    The frequency of specific mini- and micro-satellites known also as short tandem repeated sequences (STR) in the human 13 chromosome was estimated by hybridization of STR core oligonucleotides to recombinant cosmid clones transferred to a grid from a human 13 chromosome specific cosmid library ICRF Lawrist 4 C108 (DN L4/HS 13). Oligonucleotides: M13 and Jeffreys minisatellite core sequences and micro-satellite core sequences (TCC)5, (CAC)5, and (GACA)4 were [gamma-32P] end labeled and hybridized to membrane filters carrying good ordered cosmid clones. It was shown that great number of all these mini- and micro-satellite copies (besides of Jeffreys minisatellite) are spread independently along the 13th chromosome. It was also estimated that two or more (GACA)n blocks present in the same cosmid (i.e. on the stretch of 40-50 kb) forming similar groups of clustered micro-satellites. The interesting peculiarity has been recorded that some (GACA)n+ cosmids are also hybridizable to conservative 28SrDNA 3'-fragment that indicates that (GACA)n localization in the nucleoli area. As the result of it we began the creation of a new highly polymorphic markers collections for these chromosome.

  18. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Beta Interferon (rhINF-β) in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Human Interferon β (INF-β) is a member of cytokines family which different studies have shown its immunomodulatory and antiviral activities. In this study an expression vector was designed and constructed for expression of human INF-β-1b either in shake flasks or bench top bioreactor. The designed vector was constructed based upon pET-25b(+) with T7 promoter. Recombinant human beta interferon (rhINF-β) was codon optimized and overexpressed as a soluble, N-terminal pelB fusion protein and secreted into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sugar, Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used as a chemical inducer for rhINF-β production in the shake flasks and bench top bioreactor. Timing of beta interferon expression was controlled by using the T7 promoter. The rhINF-β protein was extracted from periplasmic space by osmotic shock treatment and the expression of the beta interferon encoding gene in random selected transformants, was confirmed by western and dot blot methods. The maximum of product formation achieved at the OD600nm = 3.42 was found to be 35 % of the total protein content of the strain which translates to 0.32 g L-1. The constructed vector could efficiently overexpress the rhINF-β into the periplasmic space of E. coli. The obtained yield of the produced rhINF-β was more than previous reports. The system is easily adapted to include other vectors, tags or fusions and therefore has the potential to be broadly applicable to express other recombinant proteins. PMID:24711841

  19. Current characteristics and trends of the tracked satellite population in the human space flight regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-06-01

    Since the end of the Apollo program in 1972, human space flight has been restricted to altitudes below 620 km above the Earth's surface with most missions restricted to a ceiling below 400 km. An investigation of the tracked satellite population transiting and influencing the human space flight regime during the past 11 years (equivalent to a full solar cycle) has recently been completed. The overall effects of satellite breakups and solar activity are typically less pronounced in the human space flight regime than other regions of low Earth orbit. As of January 2006 nearly 1500 tracked objects resided in or traversed the human space flight regime, although two-thirds of these objects were in orbits of moderate to high eccentricity. Since the beginning of the International Space Station era, the spatial density of tracked objects in the 350-400 km altitude regime has demonstrated a general decline, decreasing by 40% by the beginning of 2006. On the other hand, the region immediately above 600km experienced a significant increase in its population density. This regime is important for future risk assessments, since this region represents the reservoir of debris which will influence human space flight safety in the future. The paper seeks to put into sharper perspective the risks posed to human space flight by the tracked satellite population, as well as the influences of solar activity and the effects of compliance with orbital debris mitigation guidelines on human space flight missions. Finally, the methods and successes of characterizing the population of smaller debris in human space flight regimes are addressed.

  20. Association of the quadruply phosphorylated beta-casein from human milk with the nonphosphorylated form.

    PubMed

    Sood, S M; Slattery, C W

    2000-12-01

    Human beta-casein (beta-CN) is phosphorylated at levels from zero (beta-CN-0P) to five (beta-CN-5P). The major constituent is the 4P form (approximately 35%), whereas the 0P form (approximately 5%) has been implicated in the formation of a framework upon which the forms with higher levels of phosphorylation may aggregate. At 4 degrees C in 0.01 M imidazole and 0.02 M NaCl, pH 7, with a 1:1 (wt:wt) 0P:4P ratio and a total protein concentration of 3 mg/ml, the s20,w was 1.4 S (monomer). Laser light scattering gave a radius of approximately 4.5 nm. As the temperature, T, increased, s20,w increased to 2 S. At 25 degrees C, peaks of 9.5 S and 2 S were observed. This transition T was different from that of either form. At 37 degrees C, a single peak was again observed with s20,w of 17.5 S, compared with 42 S for the 0P and 14 S for the 4P form. Laser light scattering at 37 degrees C revealed a polymer of approximately 16 nm radius and D20,w of 1.55 cm2/s. A combination of D20,w and S20,w gave a relative molecular mass suggesting about 45 monomers per polymer. An incubation of 3 h or more at 37 degrees C caused further aggregation, characteristic of the 0P form, and supported the concept of framework formation. At pH 6.6, s20,w was 38 S compared with 1.4 S at pH 10.4. Hydrostatic pressure did not have a large effect but supported a soap micelle-like structure for the polymer. The turbidity of the mixture increased with the amount of CaCl2 and T until the protein precipitated. The properties of the 1:1 mixture of these human beta-CN are intermediate but probably more biased toward those for the 4P form.

  1. Shogaols from Zingiber officinale protect IMR32 human neuroblastoma and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells from beta-amyloid(25-35) insult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Darrick S H L; Kim, Dong-Seon; Oppel, Marissa N

    2002-04-01

    From the rhizome of Zingiber officinale L. (Zingiberaceae), four shogaols that protect IMR32 human neuroblastoma and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells from beta-amyloid(25 - 35) insult at EC50 = 4.5 - 81 microM were isolated. The efficacy of cell protection from beta-amyloid(25 - 35) insult by these shogaols was shown to improve as the length of the side chain increases.

  2. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  3. Expression of the human. beta. -globin gene following retroviral-mediated transfer into multipotential hematopoietic progenitors of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, S.; Bodine, D.M.; Perry, L.; Papayannopoulou, T.; Nienhuis, A.W. )

    1988-08-01

    Efficient transfer of the {beta}-globin gene into primitive hematopoietic progenitors was achieved with consistent and significant expression in the progeny of those cells. Retroviral vectors containing the intact genomic human {beta}-globin gene and the neomycin (G418)-resistance (neo{sup R}) gene were constructed. These gave titers of 10{sup 6} or more neo{sup R} colony-forming units/ml when packaged in {psi}2 cells. Mouse bone marrow cells were infected by coculture with producer cells and injected into lethally irradiated animals. Several parameters were varied to enhance infection frequency of colony-forming units, spleen (CFU-S); overall 41% of 116 foci studied contained an intact proviral genome. The human {beta}-globin gene was expressed in 31 of 35 CFU-S-derived spleen colonies that contained the intact vector genome at levels ranging from 1% to 5% of that of the mouse {beta}-globin genes. Infected bone marrow cells were also injected into genetically anemic W/W{sup v} recipients without prior irradiation. Human {beta}-globin chains were detected in circulating erythrocytes by immunofluorescent staining with a specific monoclonal antibody. All animals injected with donor cells that had been cultured in G418 (1 mg/ml) for 48 hr after retroviral infection had circulating erythrocytes containing human {beta}-globin chains between 3 and 8 weeks after transplantation.

  4. Human gamma X satellite DNA: an X chromosome specific centromeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Li, X; Jabs, E W; Court, D; Lin, C C

    1995-11-01

    The cosmid clone, CX16-2D12, was previously localized to the centromeric region of the human X chromosome and shown to lack human X-specific alpha satellite DNA. A 1.2 kb EcoRI fragment was subcloned from the CX16-2D12 cosmid and was named 2D12/E2. DNA sequencing revealed that this 1,205 bp fragment consisted of approximately five tandemly repeated DNA monomers of 220 bp. DNA sequence homology between the monomers of 2D12/E2 ranged from 72.8% to 78.6%. Interestingly, DNA sequence analysis of the 2D12/E2 clone displayed a change in monomer unit orientation between nucleotide positions 585-586 from a "tail-to-head" arrangement to a "head-to-tail" configuration. This may reflect the existence of at least one inversion within this repetitive DNA array in the centromeric region of the human X chromosome. The DNA consensus sequence derived from a compilation of these 220 bp monomers had approximately 62% DNA sequence similarity to the previously determined gamma 8 satellite DNA consensus sequence. Comparison of the 2D12/E2 and gamma 8 consensus sequences revealed a 20 bp DNA sequence that was well conserved in both DNA consensus sequences. Slot-blot analysis revealed that this repetitive DNA sequence comprises approximately 0.015% of the human genome, similar to that found with gamma 8 satellite DNA. These observations suggest that this satellite DNA clone is derived from a subfamily of gamma satellite DNA and is thus designated gamma X satellite DNA. When genomic DNA from six unrelated males and two unrelated females was cut with SstI or HpaI and separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed for either gamma X (2D12/E2) or gamma 8 (50E4) probes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the 2D12/E2 clone to the lateral sides of the primary constriction specifically on the human X chromosome.

  5. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    SciTech Connect

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  6. Human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and rat homologue NILE are ligands for integrin alpha v beta 3

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Integrin alpha v beta 3 is distinct in its capacity to recognize the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) in many extra-cellular matrix (ECM) components. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the recognition of ECM components, alpha v beta 3 can interact with the neural cell adhesion molecule L1-CAM; a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). M21 melanoma cells displayed significant Ca(++)-dependent adhesion and spreading on immunopurified rat L1 (NILE). This adhesion was found to be dependent on the expression of the alpha v-integrin subunit and could be significantly inhibited by an antibody to the alpha v beta 3 heterodimer. M21 cells also displayed some alpha v beta 3-dependent adhesion and spreading on immunopurified human L1. Ligation between this ligand and alpha v beta 3 was also observed to promote significant haptotactic cell migration. To map the site of alpha v beta 3 ligation we used recombinant L1 fragments comprising the entire extracellular domain of human L1. Significant alpha v beta 3-dependent adhesion and spreading was evident on a L1 fragment containing Ig-like domains 4, 5, and 6. Importantly, mutation of an RGD sequence present in the sixth Ig-like domain of L1 abrogated M21 cell adhesion. We conclude that alpha v beta 3-dependent recognition of human L1 is dependent on ligation of this RGD site. Despite high levels of L1 expression the M21 melanoma cells did not display significant adhesion via a homophilic L1-L1 interaction. These data suggest that M21 melanoma cells recognize and adhere to L1 through a mechanism that is primarily heterophilic and integrin dependent. Finally, we present evidence that melanoma cells can shed and deposit L1 in occluding ECM. In this regard, alpha v beta 3 may recognize L1 in a cell-cell or cell- substrate interaction. PMID:8636223

  7. Inefficiency in GM2 ganglioside elimination by human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase beta-subunit gene transfer to fibroblastic cell line derived from Sandhoff disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Tomohiro; Kuroki, Aya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Daisuke; Kawashita, Eri; Higashine, Yukari; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Yamanaka, Shoji; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-08-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive GM2 gangliosidosis caused by the defect of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase (Hex) beta-subunit gene associated with neurosomatic manifestations. Therapeutic effects of Hex subunit gene transduction have been examined on Sandhoff disease model mice (SD mice) produced by the allelic disruption of Hexb gene encoding the murine beta-subunit. We demonstrate here that elimination of GM2 ganglioside (GM2) accumulated in the fibroblastic cell line derived from SD mice (FSD) did not occur when the HEXB gene only was transfected. In contrast, a significant increase in the HexB (betabeta homodimer) activity toward neutral substrates, including GA2 (asialo-GM2) and oligosaccharides carrying the terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues at their non-reducing ends (GlcNAc-oligosaccharides) was observed. Immunoblotting with anti-human HexA (alphabeta heterodimer) serum after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE) revealed that the human HEXB gene product could hardly form the chimeric HexA through associating with the murine alpha-subunit. However, co-introduction of the HEXA encoding the human alpha-subunit and HEXB genes caused significant corrective effect on the GM2 degradation by producing the human HexA. These results indicate that the recombinant human HexA could interspeciesly associate with the murine GM2 activator protein to degrade GM2 accumulated in the FSD cells. Thus, therapeutic effects of the recombinant human HexA isozyme but not human HEXB gene product could be evaluated by using the SD mice.

  8. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Reuben H.; Lieberman, Mark B.; Lee, Rachel; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K.

    2010-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-{beta}-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15{sup INK4B}, and p57{sup KIP2}. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-{beta} receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-{beta} antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in NHOK.

  9. Beta-lipotropin is the major component of the plasma opioid response to surgical stress in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Porro, C.A.; Facchinetti, F.; Bertellini, E.; Petraglia, F.; Stacca, R.; Barbieri, G.C.; Genazzani, A.R.

    1987-12-07

    There is growing experimental evidence that beta-endorphin immunoreactivity is raised by surgical stress in patients undergoing general anesthesia. As the assay methods employed to date did not allow to fully discriminate between beta-endorphin and its immediate precursor, beta-lipotropin, the authors have investigated in the present study plasma levels of these two peptides by separating them by chromatography on plasma extracts prior to radioimmunoassay. Beta-lipotropin, but not beta-endorphin, plasma levels were found to be significantly elevated during surgery in the general anesthesia group, while no change was found in either peptide concentration in the spinal one. Cortisol plasma levels also increased significantly 90 minutes after the beginning of surgery. Although the sampling time they adopted may have prevented them from detecting an early peak of beta-endorphin during the first 30 minutes of surgery, the major component of the pituitary opioid response to surgical stress appears to be related to beta-lipotropin. This is in agreement with results of experimental work on various kinds of stress in animals and humans and seems to rule out a role for plasma beta-endorphin in post-operative analgesia. 38 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  10. Method for the simultaneous determination of retinol and beta-carotene concentrations in human tissues and plasma.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Jennine M; Zulim, Rebecca A; Dueker, Stephen R; Lin, Yumei; Flaig, Vicky; Schneider, Philip D; Wolfe, Bruce M; Clifford, Andrew J

    2002-05-01

    To understand differential tissue distribution of retinoids and carotenoids, as it might influence biological processes in humans, we developed and demonstrated a method for measuring them in selected human tissues. The method includes internal standards and a secondary reference standard to eliminate the need for external standard calibration and to minimize sample-handling errors. Tissues were digested (saponified) in ethanolic KOH. Retinol and beta-carotene were extracted with organic solvent containing internal standards. Analytes were separated using isocratic liquid chromatography and quantified at 325 nm for retinol and 450 nm for beta-carotene. Plasma was analyzed in a similar way but without saponification. Retinal-O-ethyloxime and beta-apo-12'-carotenal-O-t-butyloxime served as internal standards. Plasma, breast, and fat from breast surgery patients and colon, liver, muscle, and fat from colon surgery patients were analyzed. Within-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) for plasma were <0.04 for beta-carotene and <0.03 for retinol, between-day RSDs were <0.05 for beta-carotene and <0.04 for retinol. Saponification ensured complete extraction of retinol and beta-carotene and removal of triglycerides that "foul" chromatographic columns. It seems retinol and beta-carotene concentrations in tissues and blood of cancer patients are the same or higher than those in corresponding tissues of patients without these cancers.

  11. Cadmium reduces 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 activity and expression in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaiping; Julan, Laura; Rubio, Fran; Sharma, Anju; Guan, Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium, a common environmental pollutant and a major constituent of tobacco smoke, has been identified as a new class of endocrine disruptors with a wide range of detrimental effects on mammalian reproduction. During human pregnancy, maternal cadmium exposure, via the environment and/or cigarette smoking, leads to fetal growth restriction (FGR), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Although a substantial amount of evidence suggests that cadmium may affect fetal growth indirectly via the placenta, the molecular targets remain to be identified. Given that reduced placental 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11 beta-HSD2, encoded by HSD11B2 gene) is causally linked to FGR, the present study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that cadmium induces FGR in part by targeting placental HSD11B2. Using cultured human trophoblast cells as a model system, we showed that cadmium exposure resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in 11 beta-HSD2 activity, such that an 80% reduction was observed after 24-h treatment at 1 microM. It also led to a similar decrease in levels of 11 beta-HSD2 protein and mRNA, suggesting that cadmium reduced 11 beta-HSD2 expression. Furthermore, cadmium diminished HSD11B2 promoter activity, indicative of repression of HSD11B2 gene transcription. In addition, the effect of cadmium was highly specific, in that other divalent metals (Zn(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+)) as well as nicotine and cotinine (a major metabolite of nicotine) did not alter 11 beta-HSD2 activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that cadmium reduces human placental 11 beta-HSD2 expression and activity by suppressing HSD11B2 gene transcription. Thus the present study identifies placental 11 beta-HSD2 as a novel molecular target of cadmium. It also reveals a molecular mechanism by which this endocrine disruptor may affect human placental function and, consequently, fetal growth and development.

  12. Laminin on Toxoplasma gondii mediates parasite binding to the beta 1 integrin receptor alpha 6 beta 1 on human foreskin fibroblasts and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Furtado, G C; Cao, Y; Joiner, K A

    1992-11-01

    We investigated the role of parasite-bound laminin and the host cell beta 1 integrin receptors for this extracellular matrix protein in Toxoplasma gondii binding to fibroblasts. Laminin but not fibronectin was detected on extracellular tachyzoites by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Binding of parasites to CHO cells was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies to laminin and by a monoclonal antibody directed against the globular carboxyl-terminal portion of the long arm of laminin (at or near the suggested ligand-binding sites for alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1), but not by a monoclonal antibody directed against the lateral short arms of laminin near the cross region of the molecule. Antibodies to the alpha 6 but not the alpha 2, alpha 3, or alpha 5 chains of the beta 1 family of integrins blocked parasite attachment to human foreskin fibroblasts and CHO cells. Attachment of T. gondii to cells via laminin on the parasite surface and laminin receptors on the mammalian cell is consistent with the capacity of the parasite to invade almost all nucleated cells.

  13. Beta modulation reflects name retrieval in the human anterior temporal lobe: an intracranial recording study.

    PubMed

    Abel, Taylor J; Rhone, Ariane E; Nourski, Kirill V; Ando, Timothy K; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kovach, Christopher K; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Naming people, places, and things is a fundamental human ability that is often impaired in patients with language-dominant anterior temporal lobe (ATL) dysfunction or ATL resection as part of epilepsy treatment. Convergent lines of evidence point to the importance of the ATL in name retrieval. The physiologic mechanisms that mediate name retrieval in the ATL, however, are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the electrophysiologic responses of the human ATL during overt cued naming of famous people and objects. Eight neurosurgical patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy who underwent implantation of intracranial electrodes for seizure focus localization were the subjects of this study. Specialized coverage of the ATL was achieved in each subject. The subjects named pictures of U.S. presidents and images of common hand-held tools. Event-related band power was measured for each ATL recording site. Both the left and right ATL demonstrated robust and focal increases in beta-band (14-30 Hz) power during person and tool naming. The onset of this response typically occurred at 400 ms but sometimes as early as 200 ms. Visual naming of famous people and tools is associated with robust and localized modulation of the beta band in both the left and right ATL. Measurement of visual naming responses may provide the groundwork for future mapping modalities to localize eloquent cortex in the ATL.

  14. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin producing osteosarcoma of the sacrum in a 26-year-old woman: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Glass, Ryan; Asirvatham, Jaya Ruth; Kahn, Leonard; Aziz, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic secretion of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin is considered a poor prognostic marker in epithelial tumors. However, very few cases have been reported in sarcomas. We present the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with a metastatic osteosarcoma. She underwent usual testing prior to starting treatment and was found to have elevated levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin. As the patient was not pregnant, another source of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin secretion had to be considered. The tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin by immunohistochemistry, and serum levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were used to monitor tumor progression and response to chemotherapy. We review the literature and discuss a potential role of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin in the treatment of such patients.

  15. CENPT bridges adjacent CENPA nucleosomes on young human α-satellite dimers

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jitendra; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing the CenH3 (CENPA or CENP-A) histone variant replace H3 nucleosomes at centromeres to provide a foundation for kinetochore assembly. CENPA nucleosomes are part of the constitutive centromere associated network (CCAN) that forms the inner kinetochore on which outer kinetochore proteins assemble. Two components of the CCAN, CENPC and the histone-fold protein CENPT, provide independent connections from the ∼171-bp centromeric α-satellite repeat units to the outer kinetochore. However, the spatial relationship between CENPA nucleosomes and these two branches remains unclear. To address this issue, we use a base-pair resolution genomic readout of protein–protein interactions, comparative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing, together with sequential ChIP, to infer the in vivo molecular architecture of the human CCAN. In contrast to the currently accepted model in which CENPT associates with H3 nucleosomes, we find that CENPT is centered over the CENPB box between two well-positioned CENPA nucleosomes on the most abundant centromeric young α-satellite dimers and interacts with the CENPB/CENPC complex. Upon cross-linking, the entire CENPA/CENPB/CENPC/CENPT complex is nuclease-protected over an α-satellite dimer that comprises the fundamental unit of centromeric chromatin. We conclude that CENPA/CENPC and CENPT pathways for kinetochore assembly are physically integrated over young α-satellite dimers. PMID:27384170

  16. Insertion/deletion-related polymorphisms in the human T cell receptor beta gene complex

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Insertion/deletion related polymorphisms (IDRP) involving stretches of 15-30 kb within the human TCR-beta gene complex were revealed by pulse- field gel electrophoresis. Two independent IDRP systems were detected by analysis of Sfi I- and Sal I-digested human DNA samples using probes for TCR C and V region gene segments. The allelic nature of these systems was verified in family studies, and mapping data allowed localization of one area of insertion/deletion among the V gene segments and the other near the C region genes. All but one of 50 individuals tested could be typed for the two allelic systems, and gene frequencies for the two allelic forms were 0.37/0.61 and 0.46/0.54, indicating that these polymorphisms are widespread. PMID:2571667

  17. MicroRNA-26a modulates transforming growth factor beta-1-induced proliferation in human fetal lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Lian; Shen, Yongchun; Wang, Tao; Chen, Lei; Xu, Dan; Wen, Fuqiang

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Endogenous miR-26a inhibits TGF-beta 1 induced proliferation of lung fibroblasts. • miR-26a induces G1 arrest through directly targeting 3′-UTR of CCND2. • TGF indispensable receptor, TGF-beta R I, is regulated by miR-26a. • miR-26a acts through inhibiting TGF-beta 2 feedback loop to reduce TGF-beta 1. • Collagen type I and connective tissue growth factor are suppressed by miR-26a. - Abstract: MicroRNA-26a is a newly discovered microRNA that has a strong anti-tumorigenic capacity and is capable of suppressing cell proliferation and activating tumor-specific apoptosis. However, whether miR-26a can inhibit the over-growth of lung fibroblasts remains unclear. The relationship between miR-26a and lung fibrosis was explored in the current study. We first investigated the effect of miR-26a on the proliferative activity of human lung fibroblasts with or without TGF-beta1 treatment. We found that the inhibition of endogenous miR-26a promoted proliferation and restoration of mature miR-26a inhibited the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts. We also examined that miR-26a can block the G1/S phase transition via directly targeting 3′-UTR of CCND2, degrading mRNA and decreasing protein expression of Cyclin D2. Furthermore, we showed that miR-26a mediated a TGF-beta 2-TGF-beta 1 feedback loop and inhibited TGF-beta R I activation. In addition, the overexpression of miR-26a also significantly suppressed the TGF-beta 1-interacting-CTGF–collagen fibrotic pathway. In summary, our studies indicated an essential role of miR-26a in the anti-fibrotic mechanism in TGF-beta1-induced proliferation in human lung fibroblasts, by directly targeting Cyclin D2, regulating TGF-beta R I as well as TGF-beta 2, and suggested the therapeutic potential of miR-26a in ameliorating lung fibrosis.

  18. Enhanced translational efficiency of a novel transforming growth factor beta 3 mRNA in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arrick, B A; Grendell, R L; Griffin, L A

    1994-01-01

    The mRNA for transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) includes a long (1.1-kb) 5' noncoding region which exerts a potent inhibitory effect on translational efficiency. We now report that many human breast cancer cell lines (T47-D, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-1, and BT-474) express two mRNA species for TGF-beta 3: the 3.5-kb transcript previously described as the only TGF-beta 3 mRNA species in cells and a novel 2.6-kb transcript which lacks approximately 870 nucleotides from the 5' noncoding region. The 5' end of the shorter transcript was sequenced, establishing it to be a 5' truncation of the full-length TGF-beta 3 transcript. Estradiol decreased mRNA levels of both TGF-beta 3 mRNA transcripts to an equivalent degree in estrogen receptor-positive cells. In contrast, the synthetic progestin gestodene altered the relative abundance of the two transcripts, preferentially diminishing the expression of the 2.6-kb transcript. The potential for enhanced mRNA translation attributable to the shorter 5' noncoding region was evaluated by transfection of cells with chimeric plasmid constructs in which the transcription unit consisted of coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase downstream of the 5' noncoding sequence from TGF-beta 3. The translational efficiency of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-encoding mRNA containing the shorter 5' noncoding region of the 2.6-kb TGF-beta 3 transcript was approximately seven times greater than with the full-length 5' noncoding region of TGF-beta 3. Polysome analysis of TGF-beta 3 mRNA in SK-BR-3 cells supported the hypothesis that the 2.6-kb transcript was more actively engaged in translation. Images PMID:8264630

  19. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-01-01

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708766

  20. Characterization of commercial laminin preparations from human placenta in comparison to recombinant laminins 2 (alpha2beta1gamma1), 8 (alpha4beta1gamma1), 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1).

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Gorfu, Gezahegn; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Smirnov, Sergei; Yurchenco, Peter; Tryggvason, Karl; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2006-03-01

    Laminins, a family of large heterotrimeric (alphabetagamma) proteins, are major components of basement membranes implicated in a variety of cellular functions. Different commercial laminin preparations isolated from human placenta have been widely used in functional studies but their molecular properties are poorly known. In the present study, we characterized several of these preparations by ELISA, silver staining and Western blotting, in comparison to mouse laminin 1 (alpha1beta1gamma1), and recombinant human laminins 2 (alpha2beta1gamma1), 8 (alpha4beta1gamma1) and 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1). The cell migration-promoting activity of different batches was also tested. The placenta laminin preparations differed from one another and consisted of highly fragmented proteins, a mixture of laminin isoforms, and/or contaminating fibronectin. Major functional differences between batches were also observed, reflecting molecular heterogeneity. Previous data obtained in functional studies using these preparations need to be interpreted with caution and may require revision, and future functional studies demand prior molecular characterization of the laminins, particularly their alpha-chain.

  1. The overexpressed human 46-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor mediates endocytosis and sorting of. beta. -glucuronidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Grubb, J.H.; Sly, W.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The authors studied the function of the human small (46-kDa) mannose 6-phosphate receptor (SMPR) in transfected mouse L cells that do not express the larger insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Cells overexpressing human SMPR were studied for enzyme binding to cell surface receptors, for binding to intracellular receptors in permeabilized cells, and for receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human {beta}-glucuronidase. Specific binding to human SMPR in permeabilized cells showed a pH optimum between pH 6.0 and pH 6.5. Binding was significant in the present of EDTA but was enhanced by added divalent cations. Up to 2.3{percent} of the total functional receptor could be detected on the cell surface by enzyme binding. They present experiments showing that at very high levels of overexpression, and at pH 6.5, human SMPR mediated the endocytosis of {beta}-glucuronidase. At pH 7.5, the rate of endocytosis was only 14{percent} the rate seen at pH 6.5. Cells overexpressing human SMPR also showed reduced secretion of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase when compared to cells transfected with vector only, suggesting that overexpressed human SMPR can participate in sorting of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase and partially correct the sorting defect in mouse L cells that do not express the insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

  2. Isolation of human beta-interferon receptor by wheat germ lectin affinity and immunosorbent column chromatographies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.Q.; Fournier, A.; Tan, Y.H.

    1986-06-15

    Radioiodinated human beta-interferon-Ser 17 (Betaseron) was reversibly cross-linked to Daudi cells by dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate). The radioactive ligand was cross-linked to three macromolecules forming labeled complexes of apparent Mr values of 130,000, 220,000, and 320,000. Betaseron, human alpha-interferon, human interleukin 2 but not recombinant human gamma-interferon competed with the labeled ligand for binding to these putative receptor(s). Human leukocyte-produced gamma-interferon competed weakly with /sup 125/I-Betaseron for binding to Daudi cells. The Betaseron-receptor complex(es) was purified by passage through a wheat germ lectin column followed by chromatography on an anti-interferon immunosorbent column and semipreparative gel electrophoresis. The cross-linked ligand-receptor complex was shown to be highly purified by sodium dodecyl sulfate and acetic acid:urea:Triton X-100 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It can be dissociated into the labeled Betaseron (Mr = 17,000) ligand and a receptor moiety which has an apparent molecular weight of 110,000. The chromatographic behavior of the ligand-receptor complex on wheat germ lectin column suggests that the receptor is a glycoprotein. The described procedure yielded about 1 microgram of Betaseron receptor from 10(10) Daudi cells, estimated to contain a maximum of about 15 micrograms of the receptor.

  3. A phorbol ester response element within the human T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, H M; Wotton, D; Gegonne, A; Ghysdael, J; Wang, S; Speck, N A; Owen, M J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene enhancer is increased by activators of the protein kinase C pathway during T-cell activation. Analysis of mutant enhancer constructs identified two elements, beta E2 and beta E3, conferring phorbol ester inducibility. Multimerized beta E2 acted in isolation as a phorbol ester-responsive element. Both beta E2 and beta E3, which contain a consensus Ets-binding site, were shown to bind directly to the product of the c-ets-1 protooncogene. Both regions also bound a second factor, core-binding factor. Mutation of the beta E2 Ets site abolished the inducibility of the beta E2 multimer. beta E2 and beta E3 Ets site mutations also profoundly affected activity and inducibility of the enhancer. In contrast, enhancer activity but not its inducibility was affected by mutation of the beta E2 core-binding factor site. Cotransfection studies showed that Ets-1 specifically repressed activity of the multimerized beta E2 element and the complete T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer. These data show that the T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer responds to protein kinase C-mediated activation signals via a functional domain, composed of two elements, which contains binding sites for Ets transcription factors and which is negatively regulated by Ets-1. Images PMID:1409722

  4. A transgene coding for a human insulin analog has a mitogenic effect on murine embryonic beta cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M T; Carroll, R J; Hammer, R E; Chan, S J; Guz, Y; Steiner, D F; Teitelman, G

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the mitogenic effect of three mutant forms of human insulin on insulin-producing beta cells of the developing pancreas. We examined transgenic embryonic and adult mice expressing (i) human [AspB10]-proinsulin/insulin ([AspB10]ProIN/IN), produced by replacement of histidine by aspartic acid at position 10 of the B chain and characterized by an increased affinity for the insulin receptor; (ii) human [LeuA3]insulin, produced by the substitution of leucine for valine in position 3 of the A chain, which exhibits decreased receptor binding affinity; and (iii) human [LeuA3, AspB10]insulin "double" mutation. During development, beta cells of AspB10 embryos were twice as abundant and had a 3 times higher rate of proliferation compared with beta cells of littermate controls. The mitogenic effect of [AspB10]ProIN/IN was specific for embryonic beta cells because the rate of proliferation of beta cells of adults and of glucagon (alpha) cells and adrenal chromaffin cells of embryos was similar in AspB10 mice and controls. In contrast to AspB10 embryos, the number of beta cells in the LeuA3 and "double" mutant lines was similar to the number in controls. These findings indicate that the [AspB10]ProIN/IN analog increased the rate of fetal beta-cell proliferation. The mechanism or mechanisms that mediate this mitogenic effect remain to be determined. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7603977

  5. Distribution patterns of estrogen receptor alpha and beta in the human cortex and hippocampus during development and adulthood.

    PubMed

    González, Miriam; Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Pérez-García, Carlos G; Fraser, James D; López, Francisco J; Alonso, Rafael; Meyer, Gundela

    2007-08-20

    The expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the developing and adult human brain has not been clearly established, although estrogens are crucial for neuronal differentiation, synapse formation, and cognitive functions. By using immunohistochemistry, we have studied the distribution of ER alpha and ER beta in human cerebral cortex and hippocampus from early prenatal stages to adult life. ER alpha was detected in the cortex at 9 gestational weeks (GW), with a high expression in proliferating zones and the cortical plate. The staining intensity decreased gradually during prenatal development but increased again from birth to adulthood. In contrast, ER beta was first detected at 15 GW in proliferating zones, and at 16/17 GW, numerous ER beta immunopositive cells were also observed in the cortical plate. ER beta expression persisted in the adult cortex, being widely distributed throughout cortical layers II-VI. In addition, from around 15 GW to adulthood, ER alpha and ER beta were expressed in human hippocampus mainly in pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn and in the dentate gyrus. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in the adult cerebral cortex and hippocampus revealed lower protein expression of ER alpha compared with ER beta. Double immunostaining showed that during fetal life both ERs are expressed in neurons as well as in radial glia, although only ER alpha is expressed in the Cajal-Retzius neurons of the marginal zone. These observations demonstrate that the expression of ER alpha and ER beta displays different spatial-temporal patterns during human cortical and hippocampal development and suggest that both ERs may play distinct roles in several processes related to prenatal brain development.

  6. Haplotyping the human T-cell receptor. beta. -chain gene complex by use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Charmley, P.; Chao, A.; Gatti, R.A. ); Concannon, P. ); Hood, L. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have studied the genetic segregation of human T-cell receptor {beta}-chain (TCR{beta}) genes on chromosome 7q in 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families by using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). They constructed haplotypes from eight RFLPs by using variable- and constant-region cDNA probes, which detect polymorphisms that span more than 600 kilobases of the TCR{beta} gene complex. Analysis of allele distributions between TCR{beta} genes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium between only 6 of the 28 different pairs of RFLPs. This linkage disequilibrium strongly influences the most efficient order to proceed for typing of these RFLPs in order to achieve maximum genetic informativeness, which in this study revealed a 97.3% level of heterozygosity within the TCR{beta} gene complex. The results should provide new insight into recent reports of disease associations with the TCR{beta} gene complex and should assist in designing future experiments to detect or confirm the existence of disease-susceptibility loci in this region of the human genome.

  7. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S.; Van Eyken, P.; Cabras, T.; Cau, F.; Fanari, M.U.; Locci, A.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1). At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4. PMID:22073372

  8. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray analysis of Human Recombinant Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase, a treatment for Gaucher's Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana F.; Achari, Aniruddha; Manavalan, Partha; Edmunds, Tim; Scott, David L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (N-acylsphingosyl - O - beta-D - glucoside:glucohydrolase) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide. Inadequate levels of this enzyme underly the pathophysiology of Gaucher's disease. Cerezyme(R) (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) is a partially deglycosylated form of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase that is commercially available for the treatment of Gaucher patients. Although acid beta-glucocerebrosidase belongs to a large family of glycosidases, relatively little is known regarding its structural biology. We report the crystallization and the initial diffraction analysis of Cerezyme(R). The crystals are C-centered orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters of a = 285.0 A, b = 110.2 A, and c = 91.7 A. A 99.9 A complete data set has been collected to 2.75 A with an R(sub sym) of 8.8 %.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase, a treatment for Gaucher's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Manavalan, Partha; Edmunds, Tim; Scott, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (N-acylsphingosyl-1-O-beta-D-glucoside:glucohydrolase) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide. Inadequate levels of this enzyme underly the pathophysiology of Gaucher's disease. Cerezyme (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA, USA) is a partially deglycosylated form of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase that is used in the treatment of Gaucher patients. Although acid beta-glucocerebrosidase belongs to a large family of glycosidases, relatively little is known regarding its structural biology. Here, the crystallization and the initial diffraction analysis of Cerezyme are reported. The crystals are C-centered orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters a = 285.0, b = 110.2, c = 91.7 A. A 99.9% complete data set has been collected to 2.75 A with an R(sym) of 8.8%.

  10. INCA, a novel human caspase recruitment domain protein that inhibits interleukin-1beta generation.

    PubMed

    Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Denecker, Geertrui; Kalai, Michael; D'hondt, Kathleen; Meeus, Ann; Declercq, Wim; Saelens, Xavier; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2004-12-10

    Using in silico methods for screening the human genome for new caspase recruitment domain (CARD) proteins, we have identified INCA (Inhibitory CARD) as a protein that shares 81% identity with the prodomain of caspase-1. The INCA gene is located on chromosome 11q22 between the genes of COP/Pseudo-ICE and ICEBERG, two other CARD proteins that arose from caspase-1 gene duplications. We show that INCA mRNA is expressed in many tissues. INCA is specifically upregulated by interferon-gamma in the monocytic cell lines THP-1 and U937. INCA physically interacts with procaspase-1 and blocks the release of mature IL-1beta from LPS-stimulated macrophages. Unlike COP/Pseudo-ICE and procaspase-1, INCA does not interact with RIP2 and does not induce NF-kappaB activation. Our data show that INCA is a novel intracellular regulator of procaspase-1 activation, involved in the regulation of pro-IL-1beta processing and its release during inflammation.

  11. Human Subthalamic Nucleus Theta and Beta Oscillations Entrain Neuronal Firing During Sensorimotor Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Damera, Srikanth; Dong, Jian Wilson; Lungu, Codrin; Brown, Peter; Zaghloul, Kareem A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that prefrontal cortical structures may inhibit impulsive actions during conflict through activation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Consistent with this hypothesis, deep brain stimulation to the STN has been associated with altered prefrontal cortical activity and impaired response inhibition. The interactions between oscillatory activity in the STN and its presumably antikinetic neuronal spiking, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we simultaneously recorded intraoperative local field potential and spiking activity from the human STN as participants performed a sensorimotor action selection task involving conflict. We identified several STN neuronal response types that exhibited different temporal dynamics during the task. Some neurons showed early, cue-related firing rate increases that remained elevated longer during high conflict trials, whereas other neurons showed late, movement-related firing rate increases. Notably, the high conflict trials were associated with an entrainment of individual neurons by theta- and beta-band oscillations, both of which have been observed in cortical structures involved in response inhibition. Our data suggest that frequency-specific activity in the beta and theta bands influence STN firing to inhibit impulsivity during conflict. PMID:26494798

  12. Secondary structure determination of human. beta. -endorphin by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtarge, O.; Jardetzky, O.; Li, C.H.

    1987-09-08

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of human ..beta..-endorphin indicate that the peptide exists in random-coil form in aqueous solution but becomes helical in mixed solvent. Thermal denaturation NMR experiments show that in water there is no transition between 24 and 75/sup 0/C, while a slow noncooperative thermal unfolding is observed in a 60% methanol-40% water mixed solvent in the same temperature range. These findings are consistent with circular dichroism studies by other workers concluding that ..beta..-endorphin is a random coil in water but that it forms 50% ..cap alpha..-helix or more in mixed solvents. The peptide in the mixed water-methanol solvent was further studied by correlated spectroscopy (COSY) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. These allow a complete set of assignments to be made and establish two distinct stretches over which the solvent induces formation of ..cap alpha..-helices: the first occurs between Tyr-1 and Thr-12 and the second between Leu-14 and extending to Lys-28. There is evidence that the latter is capped by a turn occurring between Lys-28 and Glu-31. These helices form at the enkephalin receptor binding site, which is at the amino terminus, and at the morphine receptor binding site, located at the carboxyl terminus. The findings suggest that these two receptors may specifically recognize ..cap alpha..-helices.

  13. Simultaneous determination of beta-blockers in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Hironobu; Lee, Xiao-Pen; Arima, Yoshiko; Hasegawa, Chika; Izawa, Hikaru; Kumazawa, Takeshi; Sato, Keizo

    2008-07-01

    A detailed procedure for the analysis of four beta-blockers, acebutolol, labetalol, metoprolol and propranolol, in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using an MSpak GF column, which enables direct injection of crude plasma samples, is presented. Protein and/or macromolecule matrix compounds were eluted first from the column, while the drugs were retained on the polymer stationary phase of the MSpak GF column. The analytes retained on the column were then eluted into an acetonitrile-rich mobile phase using a gradient separation technique. All drugs showed base peak ions due to [M + H]+ ions by LC-MS with positive ion electrospray ionization, and the product ions were produced from each [M + H]+ ion by LC-MS-MS. Quantification was performed by selected reaction monitoring. The recoveries of the four beta-blockers spiked into plasma were 73.5-89.9%. The regression equations for all compounds showed excellent linearity in the range 10-1000 ng/mL of plasma, with the exception of propranolol (10-800 ng/mL). The limits of detection and quantification for each drug were 1-3 and 10 ng/mL, respectively, of plasma. The intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation for all drugs in plasma were not greater than 10.9%.

  14. beta-Carboline alkaloids in Peganum harmala and inhibition of human monoamine oxidase (MAO).

    PubMed

    Herraiz, T; González, D; Ancín-Azpilicueta, C; Arán, V J; Guillén, H

    2010-03-01

    Peganum harmala L. is a multipurpose medicinal plant increasingly used for psychoactive recreational purposes (Ayahuasca analog). Harmaline, harmine, harmalol, harmol and tetrahydroharmine were identified and quantified as the main beta-carboline alkaloids in P. harmala extracts. Seeds and roots contained the highest levels of alkaloids with low levels in stems and leaves, and absence in flowers. Harmine and harmaline accumulated in dry seeds at 4.3% and 5.6% (w/w), respectively, harmalol at 0.6%, and tetrahydroharmine at 0.1% (w/w). Roots contained harmine and harmol with 2.0% and 1.4% (w/w), respectively. Seed extracts were potent reversible and competitive inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase (MAO-A) with an IC(50) of 27 microg/l whereas root extracts strongly inhibited MAO-A with an IC(50) of 159 microg/l. In contrast, they were poor inhibitors of MAO-B. Inhibition of MAO-A by seed extracts was quantitatively attributed to harmaline and harmine whereas inhibition by root extracts came from harmine with no additional interferences. Stems and leaves extracts were poor inhibitors of MAO. The potent inhibition of MAO-A by seed and root extracts of P. harmala containing beta-carbolines should contribute to the psychopharmacological and toxicological effects of this plant and could be the basis for its purported antidepressant actions.

  15. Dose assessment of bremsstrahlung induced by beta-emitting radioisotopes of uranium-238 series and lead in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, H C

    2014-01-01

    In the natural uranium-238 decay series, pure beta isotopes such as (234)Th, (234)Pa, (214)Pb, (214)Bi, (210)Pb and (210)Bi are released. The few lead isotopes such as (211)Pb, (212)Pb, (213)Pb and (215)Pb are good beta emitters. In certain nuclear reactions of reactor these isotopes are released. These beta isotopes have maximum beta energies, which induce the bremsstrahlung radiation. The bremsstrahlung component of these beta isotopes has been traditionally ignored in dosimetry calculations. The shapes of bremsstrahlung spectra are a basic ingredient in the understanding and quantification of beta-ray dosimetry. The bremsstrahlung spectra produced by these high-energy isotopes such as (234)Th, (234)Pa, (214)Pb, (214)Bi, (210)Pb, (210)Bi, (211)Pb, (212)Pb, (213)Pb and (215)Pb in bone, muscle and teeth are studied, and the computed spectral distributions are presented. The spectral shapes are primarily responsible for variations in the shapes of depth-dose distributions. They are intended to provide a quick and convenient reference for spectral shapes and to give an indication of the wide variation in these shapes. The evaluated beta bremsstrahlung dose as a function distance for the studied nuclides is also presented. The efficiency, intensity and dose rate of bremsstrahlung induced by beta isotopes of natural uranium-238 decay series and beta-emitting lead isotopes in human tissues such as brain, breast, heart, kidney, liver, muscle, pancreas and bone have also been studied in the present investigation. The values of bremsstrahlung dosimetric parameters are low for pancreas, but they are high for bone. For all studied tissues these parameters are high for (234)Pa, but low for (210)Pb.

  16. The complete 685-kilobase DNA sequence of the human {Beta} T cell receptor locus

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, L.; Koop, B.F.; Hood, L.

    1996-06-21

    The human {Beta} T cell receptor (TCR) locus, comprising a complex family of genes, has been sequenced. The locus contains two types of coding elements-TCR elements (65 variable gene segments and two clusters of diversity, joining, and constant segments) and eight trypsinogen genes-that constitute 4.6 percent of the DNA. Genome-wide interspersed repeats and locus-specific repeats span 30 and 47 percent, respectively, of the 685-kilobase sequence. A comparison of the germline variable elements with their approximately 300 complementary DNA counterparts reveals marked differential patterns of variable gene expression, the importance of exonuclease activity in generating TCR diversity, and the predominant tendency for only functional variable elements to be present in complementary DNA libraries. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Production of human beta interferon in insect cells infected with a Baculovirus expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.E.; Summers, M.D.; Fraser, M.J.

    1983-12-01

    Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was used as an expression vector for human beta interferon. By using specially constructed plasmids, the protein-coding sequences for interferon were linked to the AcNPV promoter for the gene encoding for polyhedrin, the major occlusion protein. The interferon gene was inserted at various locations relative to the AcNPV polyhedrin transcriptional and translational signals, and the interferon-polyhedrin hybrid genes were transferred to infectious AcNPV expression vectors. Biologically active interferon was produced, and greater than 95% was secreted from infected insect cells. A maximum of ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ U of interferon activity was produced by 10/sup 6/ infected cells. These results demonstrate that AcNPV should be suitable for use as a eucaryotic expression vector for the production of products from cloned genes.

  18. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  19. Infrequency of urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid by healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Evered, D F; Barley, J F

    1978-03-15

    Urinary beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB) levels were measured by modified ion-exchange chromatography. Daily BAIB levels are reported for a group of apparently healthy individuals, a subject with infective hepatitis and two human genetic variants who were high "excretors" of BAIB. The frequency of high "excretors" of BAIB was found using low-voltage paper electrophoresis. The frequency among 403 male European subjects was 5 (1.2%) and lower than previous estimates in the United Kingdom. The percentage recovery of fed BAIB suggests that Oriental "excretors" may have a different type of genetic lesion from non-Oriental "excretors". The clinical usefulness of urinary BAIB assays and qualitative screening is reviewed.

  20. Identification of beta-adrenergic receptors on cultured human fibroblast IMR-90 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.

    1986-03-05

    Fibroblast cultures derived from normal human tissue undergo a finite number of population doublings when serial subcultivated in vitro. IMR-90 cells derived from human embryonic lung tissue undergo approximately 60 population doublings. Beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR) characteristics and isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity were assessed in IMR-90 cells at various population doublings (PDL). Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-Iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) binding yields a straight line consistent with a single class of antagonist binding sites with 452 +/- 35 sites/cell and a dissociation constant of 18.7 +/- 1.3 pM. There were no changes in BAR density between PDL 32 to PDL 46. Binding was both stereospecific and specific. Competition with epinephrine was 7.4 times more potent than with norepinephrine, suggesting predominate beta/sub 2/-type BAR. Competition with isoproterenol (Hill plots) indicated an apparent K/sub d/ of 1.3 +/- 0.1 x 10/sup -8/ M. Competition curves were resolved into high and low affinity binding sites yielding K/sub d/-high = 3.6 +/- 1.3 nM and k/sub d/-low = 1.6 +/- 0.7 x 10/sup -7/ M with 49.9 +/- 6.6% of the receptors in the high affinity state at PDL 31 to PDL 37. Cultures demonstrate isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a concentration of 1 x 10/sup -6/ M producing half-maximal stimulation and a maximum stimulation of 2 pmol cAMP/mg/min. Forskolin-stimulated was 10 pmol/cAMP/mg/min at PDL 46.

  1. Dynamic elastic behavior of alpha-satellite DNA domains visualized in situ in living human cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have constructed a fluorescent alpha-satellite DNA-binding protein to explore the motile and mechanical properties of human centromeres. A fusion protein consisting of human CENP-B coupled to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of A. victoria specifically targets to centromeres when expressed in human cells. Morphometric analysis revealed that the alpha-satellite DNA domain bound by CENPB-GFP becomes elongated in mitosis in a microtubule-dependent fashion. Time lapse confocal microscopy in live mitotic cells revealed apparent elastic deformations of the central domain of the centromere that occurred during metaphase chromosome oscillations. These observations demonstrate that the interior region of the centromere behaves as an elastic element that could play a role in the mechanoregulatory mechanisms recently identified at centromeres. Fluorescent labeling of centromeres revealed that they disperse throughout the nucleus in a nearly isometric expansion during chromosome decondensation in telophase and early G1. During interphase, centromeres were primarily stationary, although motility of individual or small groups of centromeres was occasionally observed at very slow rates of 7-10 microns/h. PMID:8909532

  2. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema; Zhang, Yongkang; Jain, Sumit; Skidgel, Randal A.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Mazzone, Theodore; Holterman, Mark J.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  3. Exogenous thymosin beta4 prevents apoptosis in human intervertebral annulus cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tapp, H; Deepe, R; Ingram, J A; Yarmola, E G; Bubb, M R; Hanley, E N; Gruber, H E

    2009-12-01

    Loss of cells in the human disc due to programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a major factor in the aging and degenerating human intervertebral disc. Our objective here was to determine if thymosin beta(4) (TB4), a small, multifunctional 5 kDa protein with diverse activities, might block apoptosis in human annulus cells cultured in monolayer or three-dimensional (3D) culture. Apoptosis was induced in vitro using hydrogen peroxide or serum starvation. Annulus cells were processed for identification of apoptotic cells using the TUNEL method. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined by cell counts. Annulus cells also were treated with TB4 for determination of proliferation, and proteoglycan production was assessed using cell titer and 1,2 dimethylmethylamine (DMB) assays and histological staining. A significant reduction in disc cell apoptosis occurred after TB4 treatment. The percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis decreased significantly in TB4 treated cells in both apoptosis induction designs. TB4 exposure did not alter proteoglycan production as assessed by either DMB measurement or histological staining. Our results indicate the need for further studies of the anti-apoptotic effect of TB4 and suggest that TB4 may have therapeutic application in future biological therapies for disc degeneration.

  4. Human factors analysis of workstation design: Earth Radiation Budget Satellite Mission Operations Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, L. J.; Murphy, E. D.; Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    A human factors analysis addressed three related yet distinct issues within the area of workstation design for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) mission operation room (MOR). The first issue, physical layout of the MOR, received the most intensive effort. It involved the positioning of clusters of equipment within the physical dimensions of the ERBS MOR. The second issue for analysis was comprised of several environmental concerns, such as lighting, furniture, and heating and ventilation systems. The third issue was component arrangement, involving the physical arrangement of individual components within clusters of consoles, e.g., a communications panel.

  5. Potent induction of apoptosis by beta-lapachone in human multiple myeloma cell lines and patient cells.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Li, C. J.; Yu, D.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematological malignancy. We have reported that beta-lapachone, a pure compound derived from a plant, can induce cell death in a variety of human carcinoma cells, including ovary, colon, lung, prostate, pancreas, and breast, suggesting a wide spectrum of anticancer activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We first studied antisurvival effects of beta-lapachone in human MM cells by colony formation assay. To determine whether the differential inhibition of colony formation occurs through antiproliferative activity, we performed MTT assays. The cytotoxicity of beta-lapachone on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also measured by MTT assay. To determine whether the cell death induced by beta-lapachone occurs through necrosis or apoptosis, we used the propidium iodide staining procedure to determine the sub-GI fraction, Annexin-V staining for externalization of phosphatidylserine, and fragmentation of cellular genomic DNA subjected to gel electrophoresis. To investigate the mechanism of anti-MM activity, we examined Bcl-2 expression, cytochrome C release, and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage by Western blot assay. RESULTS: We found that beta-lapachone (less than 4 microM) inhibits cell survival and proliferation by triggering cell death with characteristics of apoptosis in ARH-77, HS Sultan, and MM.1S cell lines, in freshly derived patient MM cells (MM.As), MM cell lines resistant to dexamethasone (MM.1R), doxorubicin (DOX.40), mitoxantrone (MR.20), and mephalan (LR5). Importantly, after treatment with beta-lapachone, we observed no apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in either quiescent or proliferative states, freshly isolated from healthy donors. In beta-lapachone treated ARH-77, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria to cytosol, and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase was cleaved, signature events of apoptosis. Finally, the apoptosis induced by beta-lapachone in MM cells was not blocked

  6. Evidence for beta corticomuscular coherence during human standing balance: Effects of stance width, vision, and support surface.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J V; Wu, G; Kelly, K M

    2015-07-09

    The role of the cerebral cortex in maintaining human standing balance remains unclear. Beta corticomuscular coherence (CMC) provides a measure of communication between the sensory-motor cortex and muscle, but past literature has not demonstrated significant beta CMC during human stance. This study evaluated the effects of stance width, vision, and surface compliance on beta CMC during human stance using methods to enhance sensitivity to CMC. Ten healthy, young adults stood for three 60-s trials in each of a wide or narrow stance width while on a firm surface and in narrow stance on a foam surface, each with eyes open or closed. Beta CMC was calculated between contralateral electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings. Electromyography was recorded from bilateral tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius lateralis muscles. CMC magnitude was defined as the average integrated area of coherence spectrum above a significance threshold. Measures of center-of-pressure (COP) sway were derived from force plates under the subjects' feet. Results of CMC from four muscles across six stance conditions (a total of 24 combinations) demonstrated significant average CMC magnitude from every subject in 20 combinations and significant average CMC magnitude in nine of 10 subjects in the remaining four combinations. The CMC magnitude was significantly larger in the wide-stance condition than in the narrow-stance condition with eyes open. No significant differences were detected when comparing eyes-open to eyes-closed conditions or when comparing firm- to foam-surface conditions. Correlations between CMC magnitude and COP sway elicited some significant relationships, but there was no consistent direction or pattern of correlation based on muscle or stance condition. Results demonstrate that significant beta CMC is evident during human standing balance, and that beta CMC is responsive to changes in mechanical, but not visual or surface, conditions.

  7. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  8. Inter-MAR association contributes to transcriptionally active looping events in human beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Di, Li-Jun; Lv, Xiang; Zheng, Wei; Xue, Zheng; Guo, Zhi-Chen; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chi-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are important in chromatin organization and gene regulation. Although it is known that there are a number of MAR elements in the beta-globin gene cluster, it is unclear that how these MAR elements are involved in regulating beta-globin genes expression. Here, we report the identification of a new MAR element at the LCR (locus control region) of human beta-globin gene cluster and the detection of the inter-MAR association within the beta-globin gene cluster. Also, we demonstrate that SATB1, a protein factor that has been implicated in the formation of network like higher order chromatin structures at some gene loci, takes part in beta-globin specific inter-MAR association through binding the specific MARs. Knocking down of SATB1 obviously reduces the binding of SATB1 to the MARs and diminishes the frequency of the inter-MAR association. As a result, the ACH establishment and the alpha-like globin genes and beta-like globin genes expressions are affected either. In summary, our results suggest that SATB1 is a regulatory factor of hemoglobin genes, especially the early differentiation genes at least through affecting the higher order chromatin structure.

  9. Assimilation of Real-Time Satellite And Human Sensor Networks for Modeling Natural Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulov, O.; Halem, M.; Lary, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of underlying technologies needed to address the merging of a web of real time satellite sensor Web (SSW) and Human Sensor Web (HSW) needed to augment the US response to extreme events. As an initial prototyping step and use case scenario, we consider the development of two major system tools that can be transitioned from research to the responding operational agency for mitigating coastal oil spills. These tools consist of the capture of Situation Aware (SA) Social Media (SM) Data, and assimilation of the processed information into forecasting models to provide incident decision managers with interactive virtual spatial temporal animations superimposed with probabilistic data estimates. The system methodologies are equally applicable to the wider class of extreme events such as plume dispersions from volcanoes or massive fires, major floods, hurricane impacts, radioactive isotope dispersions from nuclear accidents, etc. A successful feasibility demonstration of this technology has been shown in the case of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill where Human Sensor Networks have been combined with a geophysical model to perform parameter assessments. Flickr images of beached oil were mined from the spill area, geolocated and timestamped and converted into geophysical data. This data was incorporated into General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME), a Lagrangian forecast model that uses near real-time surface winds, ocean currents, and satellite shape profiles of oil to generate a forecast of plume movement. As a result, improved estimates of diffusive coefficients and rates of oil spill were determined. Current approaches for providing satellite derived oil distributions are collected from a satellite sensor web of operational and research sensors from many countries, and a manual analysis is performed by NESDIS. A real time SA HSW processing system based on geolocated SM data from sources such as Twitter, Flickr, YouTube etc., greatly

  10. Transforming growth factors beta 1 and 2 transcriptionally regulate human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 early gene expression in HPV-immortalized human genital epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, C D; Notario, V; DiPaolo, J A

    1990-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) early proteins E6 and E7 have been implicated in maintenance of the malignant phenotype in cervical cancer. Transforming growth factors beta one and two (TGF betas 1 and 2), polypeptides that regulate cellular growth and differentiation, reversibly inhibited expression of the HPV16 E6 and E7 genes in several immortal genital epithelial cell lines. Loss of E6 and E7 protein expression followed a dramatic time- and dose-dependent decrease in E6 and E7 RNA levels and was accompanied by cessation of cell proliferation. TGF betas 1 and 2 inhibited HPV16 RNA expression at the transcriptional level; inhibition was dependent upon ongoing protein synthesis. TGF betas 1 and 2 also induced a six- to sevenfold increase in TGF beta 1 RNA. Cells became partially resistant to the inhibitory effects of TGF beta 1 on cell growth and HPV early gene expression after prolonged cultivation in vitro or after malignant transformation. Thus, TGF beta 1 may function as an autocrine regulator of HPV gene expression in infected genital epithelial cells. Images PMID:2168964

  11. Beta Blockers Suppress Dextrose-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michael J; Kurban, William; Shah, Harshit; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D

    Beta blockers are known to have favorable effects on endothelial function partly because of their capacity to reduce oxidative stress. To determine whether beta blockers can also prevent dextrose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in addition to their antioxidative effects, human coronary artery endothelial cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells were treated with 27.5 mM dextrose for 24 hours in the presence of carvedilol (a lipophilic beta blockers with alpha blocking activity), propranolol (a lipophilic nonselective beta blockers), and atenolol (a water-soluble selective beta blockers), and ER stress, oxidative, stress and cell death were measured. ER stress was measured using the placental alkaline phosphatase assay and Western blot analysis of glucose regulated protein 78, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), phospho-JNK, eukaryotic initiating factor 2α (eIF2α), and phospho-eIF2α and measurement of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Superoxide (SO) generation was measured using the superoxide-reactive probe 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) chemiluminescence. Cell viability was measured by propidium iodide staining method. The ER stress, SO production, and cell death induced by 27.5 mM dextrose were inhibited by all 3 beta blockers tested. The antioxidative and ER stress reducing effects of beta blockers were also observed in HepG2 cells. The salutary effects of beta blockers on endothelial cells in reducing both ER stress and oxidative stress may contribute to the cardioprotective effects of these agents.

  12. Induction of TNF-alpha production from human peripheral blood monocytes with beta-1,3-glucan oligomer prepared from laminarin with beta-1,3-glucanase from Bacillus clausii NM-1.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Nobumitsu; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Etsuo; Odaz, Tatsuya

    2003-01-01

    We prepared a beta-1,3-glucan oligomer (DP> or = 4) from laminarin (DP: 25-30) derived from Laminaria digitata with beta-1,3-glucanase, and examined its effect on human peripheral blood monocytes. Conditioned medium prepared by incubating monocytes (MC-CM) with the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer showed strong inhibitory activity against the proliferation of human leukemic U937 cells. Since the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer had no direct cytotoxic effect on U937 cells up to 1000 microg/ml, the cytotoxicity of the MC-CM may be due to cytotoxic cytokines produced from monocytes stimulated by the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer. On the other hand, the MC-CM prepared with original laminarin had little effect on the growth of U937 cells. The cytotoxicity of the MC-CM prepared with the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer was significantly reduced by an anti-TNF-alpha antibody, but the anti-TNF-beta antibody had no effect. Our results suggest that the enzymatically depolymerized beta-1,3-glucan oligomer induces TNF-alpha production from human monocytes.

  13. Expression of human {beta}-defensin-2 gene induced by CpG-DNA in human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Su Ho; Kim, Young-Eun; Park, Jeong-A; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Yong-Sun; Lee, Younghee; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2009-11-20

    Defensins have a broad range of antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The expression of human {beta}-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is prevalently observed in epithelial cells and is induced by bacterial infection. Here, we have shown that the expression of the hBD-2 gene and release of hBD-2 protein into the medium is up-regulated in response to CpG-DNA in human B cell line RPMI 8226. The induction of hBD-2 was dependent on CG sequence and phosphorothioate backbone-modification. This was also confirmed in primary human lymphocytes. To shed light on the molecular mechanism involved in hBD-2 induction by CpG-DNA, we examined the contribution of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway in RPMI 8226 cells. Suppression of MyD88 function and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization blocked hBD-2 induction. The NF-{kappa}B pathway inhibitors also abolished hBD-2 induction. These results may contribute to a better understanding on the therapeutic effects of CpG-DNA against infectious diseases.

  14. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS.

  15. beta-NAD is a novel nucleotide released on stimulation of nerve terminals in human urinary bladder detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Breen, Leanne T; Smyth, Lisa M; Yamboliev, Ilia A; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N

    2006-02-01

    Endogenous nucleotides with extracellular functions may be involved in the complex neural control of human urinary bladder (HUB). Using HPLC techniques with fluorescence detection, we observed that in addition to ATP and its metabolites ADP, AMP and adenosine, electrical field stimulation (EFS; 4-16 Hz, 0.1 ms, 15 V, 60 s) of HUB detrusor smooth muscle coreleases novel nucleotide factors, which produce etheno-1N(6)-ADP-ribose (eADPR) on etheno-derivatization at high temperature. A detailed HPLC fraction analysis determined that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD+; 7.0 +/- 0.7 fmol/mg tissue) is the primary nucleotide that contributes to the formation of eADPR. The tissue superfusates collected during EFS also contained the beta-NAD+ metabolite ADPR (0.35 +/- 0.2 fmol/mg tissue) but not cyclic ADPR (cADPR). HUB failed to degrade nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide (NGD+), a specific substrate of ADP ribosyl cyclase, suggesting that the activity of this enzyme in the HUB is negligible. The EFS-evoked release of beta-NAD+ was frequency dependent and is reduced in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 micromol/l), omega-conotoxin GVIA (50 nmol/l), and botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A; 100 nmol/l), but remained unchanged in the presence of guanethidine (3 micromol/l), omega-agatoxin IVA (50 nmol/l), or charbachol (1 micromol/l). Capsaicin (10 micromol/l) increased both the resting and EFS-evoked overflow of beta-NAD+. Exogenous beta-NAD+ (1 micromol/l) reduced both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contractions. In conclusion, we detected nerve-evoked overflow of beta-NAD+ and ADPR in HUB. The beta-NAD(+)/ADPR system may constitute a novel inhibitory extracellular nucleotide mechanism of neural control of the human bladder.

  16. Assignment of the gene for the. beta. subunit of thyroid-stimulating hormone to the short arm of human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dracopoli, N.C.; Rettig, W.J.; Whitfield, G.K.; Darlington, G.J.; Spengler, B.A.; Biedler, J.L.; Old, L.J.; Kourides, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    The chromosomal locations of the genes for the ..beta.. subunit of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and the glycoprotein hormone ..cap alpha.. subunit have been determined by restriction enzyme analysis of DNA extracted from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA and a cloned 0.9-kilobase (kb) fragment of the human TSH ..beta..-subunit gene were used as hybridization probes in the analysis of Southern blots of DNA extracted from rodent-human hybrid clones. Analysis of the segregation of 5- and 10-kb EcoRI fragments hybridizing to CG ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA confirmed the previous assignment of this gene to chromosome 6. Analysis of the patterns of segregation of a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment containing human TSH ..beta..-subunit sequences permitted the assignment of the TSH ..beta..-subunit gene to human chromosome 1. The subregional assignment of TSH ..beta.. subunit to chromosome 1p22 was made possible by the additional analysis of a set of hybrids containing partially overlapping segments of this chromosome. Human TSH ..beta.. subunit is not syntenic with genes encoding the ..beta.. subunits of CG, luteinizing hormone, or follicle-stimulating hormone and is assigned to a conserved linkage group that also contains the structural genes for the ..beta.. subunit of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and the proto-oncogene N-ras (NRAS).

  17. Depletion of endogenous interleukin-10 augments interleukin-1 beta secretion by Mycobacterium bovis BCG-reactive human cells.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Garcia-Martinez, E; Hernandez-Garay, M; Solis-Cardona, M

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we found evidence that the interleukin-10 (IL-10) protein is functionally relevant in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced cytokine synthesis, as neutralization of endogenously synthesized IL-10 in human cells activated with BCG resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the level of IL-1 beta. When exogenous recombinant human IL-10 was added to human mononuclear cells, a significant reduction of BCG-induced IL-1 beta secretion was observed. This inhibitory effect was not attributed to a cytotoxic effect, since trypan blue exclusion studies indicated no loss of cell viability in the presence of IL-10, and it was specific, as it was completely abolished in the presence of anti-IL-10 neutralizing monoclonal antibody while an irrelevant antibody used as a control had no effect. Taken together, these are the first studies that demonstrate that the depletion of endogenous IL-10 via anti-IL-10 antibody results in a very significantly enhanced BCG-induced IL-1 beta secretion and that the addition of exogenous IL-10 to human mononuclear cells stimulated with BCG inhibits IL-1 beta production. Further experimental work is needed to determine if the neutralization of IL-10 activity via anti-IL-10 antibody indeed enhances cytokine synthesis in vivo. However, the present results may be of importance, since the use of anti-IL-10 antibody could presumably contribute to the protective immunity induced by BCG against tuberculosis via an increase in cytokine synthesis that would amplify antimicrobial systems.

  18. Activation of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase gene promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta in human papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimin; Capezzone, Marco; Xu, Xiao; Hershman, Jerome M

    2005-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that the human nicotinamide N-methytransferase (NNMT) gene was highly expressed in many papillary thyroid cancers and cell lines. The expression in other papillary and follicular cancers or cell lines and normal thyroid cells was low or undetectable. To gain an understanding of the molecular mechanism of this cell-specific expression, the NNMT promoter was cloned and studied by luciferase reporter gene assay. The promoter construct was expressed highly in papillary cancer cell lines, including those with higher (e.g. BHP 2-7) and lower (e.g. BHP 14-9) NNMT gene expression, and expressed weakly in follicular thyroid cancer cell lines. Further study with 5'-deletion promoter construct suggested that the NNMT promoter was regulated differently in BHP 2-7 and BHP 14-9 cells. In BHP 2-7 cells, promoter activity was dependent on an upstream sequence. In BHP 14-9 cells, sequence in the basal promoter region contributed notably to the overall promoter activity. RT-PCR or Western blot analysis indicated that hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta (HNF-1beta) was expressed in only papillary cancer cell lines with high NNMT gene expression. HNF-1beta was not expressed or expressed very weakly in other papillary, follicular, and Hurthle cancer cell lines and primary cultures of normal thyroid cells and benign thyroid conditions. A HNF-1 binding site was identified in the NNMT basal promoter region. Mutations in this site decreased NNMT promoter activity in the HNF-1beta-positive BHP 2-7 cells, but not in the HNF-1beta-negative BHP 14-9 cells. HNF-1beta bound to the HNF-1 site specifically as a homodimer as determined by gel retardation assays with HNF-1beta-specific antibody. Cotransfection of a HNF-1beta expression plasmid increased NNMT promoter activity significantly in both HNF-1beta-positive and -negative thyroid cancer cell lines and Hep G2 liver cancer cells. Furthermore, transient expression of HNF-1beta in BHP 14-9 cells increased endogenous NNMT

  19. Evidence that a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin is encoded by a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, M A; Barondes, S H

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated by immunoscreening a human hepatoma cDNA library with an antiserum that bound specifically to a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin with Mr of approximately 14,000. The deduced amino acid sequences of the inserts of these two clones show considerable homology with each other, the sequence of chicken skin beta-galactoside-binding lectin, and eight peptides derived from purified human lung lectin of Mr approximately 14,000. However, the sequence differences between the two hepatoma clones as well as among each clone and the lung peptides suggest that at least three variants of the gene encoding this lectin are expressed in human tissue. Images PMID:3020551

  20. Integrin alpha 3 beta 1 participates in the phagocytosis of extracellular matrix molecules by human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Coopman, P J; Thomas, D M; Gehlsen, K R; Mueller, S C

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms and receptors involved in phagocytosis by nonhematopoietic cells are not well understood. The involvement of the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin in phagocytosis of the extracellular matrix by human breast cancer cells was studied. The possible role of this integrin was suggested since alpha 3 and beta 1 but not alpha 2 subunits are concentrated at membrane sites where local degradation of fluorescently labeled gelatin occurs. Strikingly, anti-alpha 3 integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) stimulate the phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled gelatin films, gelatin beads, and Matrigel films in a quantitative phagocytosis assay. Stimulation of the gelatin uptake by the anti-alpha 3 mAb is dose responsive, saturable, and time dependent. Antibodies against other integrin subunits have a lower stimulatory effect (anti-beta 1) or no significant effect (anti-alpha 2, -alpha 5, -alpha 6, and -alpha v) on gelatin phagocytosis. The synthetic HGD-6 human laminin peptide that binds specifically the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin, but not the scrambled HSGD-6 control peptide, also markedly stimulates gelatin uptake in a dose-responsive way. Furthermore, the stimulatory effects of the HGD-6 peptide and the anti-alpha 3 mAb are additive, suggesting that they might promote phagocytosis in different ways. Other laminin (YIGSR, IKVAV) and fibronectin (GRGDS) peptides have no effect on gelatin phagocytosis. Immunofluorescence shows that the alpha 3 and the beta 1, but not the alpha 2 integrin subunit, concentrate into patches on the cell surface after treatment with their respective mAbs. And, both gelatin and the alpha 3 beta 1 but not the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin are cointernalized and routed to acidic vesicles such as lysosomes. In conclusion, we demonstrate that human breast cancer cells locally degrade and phagocytose the extracellular matrix and show for the first time that the alpha 3 beta 1 integrin participates in this phagocytosis. We hypothesize that the anti-alpha 3

  1. Assignment of a new TGF-{beta} superfamily member, human cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1, to chromosome 20q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Keming; Thomas, J.T.; McBride, O.W.; Luyten, F.P.

    1996-05-15

    This report describes the localization of a new TGF {beta} superfamily member, human cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1, to human chromosome 20q11.2 using southern analysis, RFLP analysis and linkage analysis. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Changes in satellite cells in human skeletal muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crameri, Regina M; Langberg, Henning; Magnusson, Peter; Jensen, Charlotte H; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Olesen, Jens L; Suetta, Charlotte; Teisner, Børge; Kjaer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    No studies to date have reported activation of satellite cells in vivo in human muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise. In this investigation, eight individuals performed a single bout of high intensity exercise with one leg, the contralateral leg being the control. A significant increase in mononuclear cells staining for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) and fetal antigen 1 (FA1) were observed within the exercised human vastus lateralis muscle on days 4 and 8 post exercise. In addition, a significant increase in the concentration of the FA1 protein was determined in intramuscular dialysate samples taken from the vastus lateralis muscle of the exercising leg (day 0: 1.89 ± 0.82 ng ml−1; day 2: 1.68 ± 0.37 ng ml−1; day 4: 3.26 ± 1.29 ng ml−1, P < 0.05 versus basal; day 8: 4.68 ± 2.06 ng ml−1, P < 0.05 versus basal and control). No change was noted in the control leg. Despite this increase in N-CAM- and FA1-positive mononuclear cells, an increased expression of myogenin and the neonatal isoform of the myosin heavy chain (MHCn) was not observed. Interestingly, myofibre lesions resulting from extensive damage to the proteins within the myofibre, particularly desmin or dystrophin, were not observed, and hence did not appear to induce the expression of either N-CAM or FA1. We therefore propose that satellite cells can be induced to re-enter the cell growth cycle after a single bout of unaccustomed high intensity exercise. However, a single bout of exercise is not sufficient for the satellite cell to undergo terminal differentiation. PMID:15121802

  3. Immunological and structural homology between human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoprotein and a region of human interleukin-2 implicated in binding the. beta. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohtz, D.S.; Kohtz, J.D.; Puszkin, S. ); Altman, A. )

    1988-02-01

    The N-terminal segment of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) appears to mediate binding of the {beta} hIL-2 receptor. An affinity-purified antibody prepared against this peptide segment (p81) is shown here to cross-react with a homologous region of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) envelope glycoprotein, raising the interesting possibility that the envelope glycoprotein of HTLV-I can interact with the {beta} hIL-2 receptor.

  4. Activation of human platelets by antibodies to thymocytes and beta 2-microglobulin. I. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of the platelet aggregation induced by HATG and SA beta 2mG.

    PubMed Central

    Csákó, G; Suba, E A; Wistar, R

    1980-01-01

    The platelet effect of antibody preparations known to have immunosuppressive action was investigated by a turbidimetric method in vitro. Both horse anti-human thymocyte globulin (HATG) and sheep anti-human beta 2-microglobulin IgG (SA beta 2mG) caused the platelets to aggregate in all human platelet-rich plasmas (PRP) tested. The aggregation was usually irreversible and characterized by a sigmoid curve. The action is specific for the antibodies in HATG and SA beta 2mG because control preparations (horse normal IgG and IgG fractions of sheep normal, anti-dog IgG and anti-human IgA sera) were ineffective; further, heating (30 min at 56 degrees C) and BaSO4 or Al(OH)3 adsorption of HATG and SA beta 2mG did not alter their aggregating capability. When HATG and SA beta 2mG were added together to PRP, they induced aggregation in a simple additive manner. High antibody doses tended to decrease the extent of aggregation. The effect of platelet count on aggregation varied with both the dose level ('low' or 'high') and type (HATG or SA beta 2mG) of the inducer antibody. Using fixed submaximal doses, four main aggregation patterns could be recognized among 60 PRP: (i) high responses to both HATG and SA beta 2mG; (ii) high to HATG, low to SA beta 2mG; (iii) low to HATG, high to SA beta 2mG; and (iv) low to both. The results provide guidelines for quantitative aggregation studies with platelet antibodies and suggest that HATG and SA beta 2mG act through distinct platelet membrane components, the receptor for the latter being the best characterized protein of the mammalian cell membrane. PMID:6156042

  5. Role of beta 1 and beta 2 integrins in the adhesion of human CD34hi stem cells to bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, J; Hemler, M E; Greenberger, J S; Anklesaria, P

    1992-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell interaction with elements of the underlying stroma is essential for sustained normal hematopoiesis. Here we have determined that adhesion receptors in the integrin family play a role in promoting adhesion of human hematopoietic stem cells to cultured human marrow stromal cells. Enriched CD34hi progenitor cells expressed VLA-4, VLA-5, and at least one or more beta 2 integrins. Homogeneous marrow stromal cell monolayers capable of supporting proliferation of cocultivated CD34hi cells expressed VCAM-1 and fibronectin (ligands for VLA-4 and VLA-5) as well as ICAM-1 (ligand for LFA-1 and Mac-1). Adhesion-blocking experiments indicated that VLA-4/VCAM-1, VLA-5/fibronectin, and beta 2-integrin/ICAM-1 pathways all are important for CD34hi cell attachment to stromal cells. Consistent with this suggestion, IL-1 stimulation of stromal cells caused both increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and increased attachment by CD34hi bone marrow cells. In addition, CD34hi cells utilized VLA-4 to adhere to purified VCAM-1 and employed VLA-5 (and to a lesser extent VLA-4) to adhere to purified fibronectin. Together these results suggest that CD34hi stem cells may utilize multiple integrin-mediated adhesion pathways to localize within specialized microenvironmental niches created by marrow stromal cells. Images PMID:1379610

  6. Human epidermal T cells predominantly belong to the lineage expressing alpha/beta T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The epidermis of clinically normal-appearing human skin harbors a phenotypically heterogeneous population of T lymphocytes (TCs), the majority of which are CD2+/CD3+/CD5+ "memory" cells, but in an unactivated state, and express the TCR-alpha/beta. In contrast to murine skin, only a very minor subpopulation of CD3+ cells in the human epidermis bears the TCR-gamma/delta. Epidermal TCs primarily are distributed along the rete ridges in the basal keratinocyte layer and are often in close apposition to Langerhans cells (LCs). These TCs were propagated from epidermal cell suspensions after stimulation with TC activating agents (Con A, rIL-1, rIL-2), then evaluated for phenotypic features and TCR diversity. Similar to the in situ situation, most were CD4-/CD8+/TCR-alpha/beta+. In addition, two cultures contained TCR- gamma/delta+ cells; one of these determined to be an adherent CD4-/CD8+ population. Epidermal TCs were significantly (p less than 0.0001) more abundant in the sole than in the other body regions examined (i.e., 40 vs. 7 CD3+ cells/linear centimeter of epidermis) and seemed to have a particular affinity for the acrosyringial epithelium of eccrine sweat ducts. Moreover, the sole usually contained a greater number of CD8+ relative to CD4+ TCs, whereas the epidermal CD4/CD8 ratio in the trunk and extremities was quite variable, although the trend also was towards a slightly larger percentage of CD8+ cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the volar epidermis has a unique microenvironment which is responsible for both the higher density of TCs, preferentially CD8+, and lower number of LCs. This study has not only provided evidence for significant regional variability in the human epidermal TC population of normal skin, but also strengthens the concept for skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), whereby memory TCs recirculate back to the epidermis and interact with resident antigen-presenting cells (i.e., LC). PMID:2182763

  7. The FBXW7 {beta}-form is suppressed in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhaodi; Inomata, Kenichi; Ishizawa, Kota; Horii, Akira . E-mail: horii@mail.tains.tohoku.ac.jp

    2007-03-23

    FBXW7 (F-box and WD40 domain protein 7) is an F-box protein with 7 tandem WDs (tryptophan-aspartic acid) that functions as a phosphoepitope-specific substrate recognition component of SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) ubiquitin ligases and catalyzes the ubiquitination of proteins promoting cell proliferation, such as CCNE1, MYC, AURKA, NOTCH1, and JUN, which are frequently activated in a wide range of human cancers. FBXW7 is a candidate tumor suppressor, and mutations have been reported in some human tumors. In this study, we analyzed 84 human tumor cell lines in search for genetic alterations of FBXW7, as well as mRNA and protein expressional changes, and compared them with expression levels of the CCNE1, MYC, and AURKA proteins. We found a novel nonsense mutation in a colon cancer cell line SCC and confirmed the missense mutations in SKOV3, an ovarian cancer cell line, and LoVo, a colon cancer cell line. Moreover, suppressed expression of FBXW7 accompanied by activation of the target proteins were observed in ovarian, colon, endometrial, gastric, and prostate cancers. It is notable that highly suppressed mRNA expression of the FBXW7 {beta}-form was found in all the human glioma cell lines analyzed; enhanced expressions of CCNE1, MYC, and AURKA were observed in these cells. Our present results imply that FBXW7 plays a pivotal role in many tissues by controlling the amount of cell cycle promoter proteins and that dysfunction of this protein is one of the essential steps in carcinogenesis in multiple organs.

  8. Human amyloid-beta synthesis and clearance rates as measured in cerebrospinal fluid in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Randall J; Munsell, Ling Y; Morris, John C; Swarm, Robert; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Holtzman, David M

    2006-07-01

    Certain disease states are characterized by disturbances in production, accumulation or clearance of protein. In Alzheimer disease, accumulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) in the brain and disease-causing mutations in amyloid precursor protein or in enzymes that produce Abeta indicate dysregulation of production or clearance of Abeta. Whether dysregulation of Abeta synthesis or clearance causes the most common form of Alzheimer disease (sporadic, >99% of cases), however, is not known. Here, we describe a method to determine the production and clearance rates of proteins within the human central nervous system (CNS). We report the first measurements of the fractional production and clearance rates of Abeta in vivo in the human CNS to be 7.6% per hour and 8.3% per hour, respectively. This method may be used to search for novel biomarkers of disease, to assess underlying differences in protein metabolism that contribute to disease and to evaluate treatments in terms of their pharmacodynamic effects on proposed disease-causing pathways.

  9. Soluble Amyloid-beta Aggregates from Human Alzheimer’s Disease Brains

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Thomas J.; Wildburger, Norelle C.; Jiang, Hao; Gangolli, Mihika; Cairns, Nigel J.; Bateman, Randall J.; Brody, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates likely contribute substantially to the dementia that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease. However, despite intensive study of in vitro preparations and animal models, little is known about the characteristics of soluble Aβ aggregates in the human Alzheimer’s disease brain. Here we present a new method for extracting soluble Aβ aggregates from human brains, separating them from insoluble aggregates and Aβ monomers using differential ultracentrifugation, and purifying them >6000 fold by dual antibody immunoprecipitation. The method resulted in <40% loss of starting material, no detectible ex vivo aggregation of monomeric Aβ, and no apparent ex vivo alterations in soluble aggregate sizes. By immunoelectron microscopy, soluble Aβ aggregates typically appear as clusters of 10–20 nanometer diameter ovoid structures with 2-3 amino-terminal Aβ antibody binding sites, distinct from previously characterized structures. This approach may facilitate investigation into the characteristics of native soluble Aβ aggregates, and deepen our understanding of Alzheimer’s dementia. PMID:27917876

  10. Linking Regional Satellite Observations with Coupled Human-Ecological Systems in Global Drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, C.; Reynolds, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The African Sahel has attracted consistent attention since a series of droughts in the 1970s and 1980s caused widespread famine and land degradation (desertification). These events spawned international conventions and sustained development efforts to increase food security and reverse poverty for the local populations, and to arrest environmental degradation. Since 1985, several studies using satellite data have described a general “greening” in response to increased rainfall trends. However, some areas show more greening while others less greening than can be explained by precipitation alone (Glob. Env. Change 15- 2005). The debated question is how to explain the residual changes: management, policy, human adaptation, or something else? Placing results in an human-ecological framework could help answer this question. Providing a meaningful assessment will allow national and international agencies to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative approaches to poverty alleviation and environmental restoration in drylands at regional and global scales.

  11. Food intake and body temperature responses of rats to recombinant human interleukin-1 beta and a tripeptide interleukin-1 beta antagonist.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C L; Rogan, G J; Tou, J; Baile, C A; Joy, W D

    1992-12-01

    Food intake and body temperature are two of many factors affected by IL-1 beta, a cytokine which is produced in response to tissue injury and inflammatory processes. In the present experiment, a tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist which blocked IL-1 beta-induced hyperalgesia was tested for the ability to block IL-1 beta-induced effects on food intake and body temperature. Food intake was decreased 4-22 h after intraperitoneal (IP) administration of 1.25, 1.88, or 2.50 micrograms IL-1 beta/rat, and 0-22 h food intake was decreased by 1.88 and 2.50 micrograms IL-1 beta/rat. The effect of 1.25 micrograms IL-1 beta/rat on food intake measured 4 and 22 h after (IP) injection was blocked by coadministration of 5 mg tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist. However, 25 mg tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist/rat plus 1.25 micrograms IL-1 beta/rat decreased 0-22 h food intake more than IL-1 beta alone. Administration (IP) of 1.25 micrograms IL-1 beta/rat increased body temperature 1 degrees C 4 h later, and 5 and 25 mg tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist/rat blocked this increase. Although food intake remained decreased after IL-1 beta administration alone or with 25 mg tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist/rat for 22 h, body temperature returned to normal under these conditions. Thus, a tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist shown to block IL-1 beta-induced hyperalgesia also blocked food intake and body temperature responses to IL-1 beta, although the effective doses of IL-1 beta and the tripeptide IL-1 beta antagonist differ by 4,000-fold when both are administered peripherally.

  12. Human-Specific SNP in Obesity Genes, Adrenergic Receptor Beta2 (ADRB2), Beta3 (ADRB3), and PPAR γ2 (PPARG), during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Akiko; Nakamura, Shin; Mitsunaga, Fusako; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Udono, Toshifumi; Suryobroto, Bambang

    2012-01-01

    Adrenergic-receptor beta2 (ADRB2) and beta3 (ADRB3) are obesity genes that play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. The Glu27 allele in ADRB2 and the Arg64 allele in ADRB3 are associated with abdominal obesity and early onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in many ethnic groups. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) is required for adipocyte differentiation. Pro12Ala mutation decreases PPARG activity and resistance to NIDDM. In humans, energy-expense alleles, Gln27 in ADRB2 and Trp64 in ADRB3, are at higher frequencies than Glu27 and Arg64, respectively, but Ala12 in PPARG is at lower frequency than Pro12. Adaptation of humans for lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of fat accumulation could be considered by examining which alleles in these genes are dominant in non-human primates (NHP). All NHP (P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, H. agilis and macaques) had energy-thrifty alleles, Gly16 and Glu27 in ADRB2, and Arg64 in ADRB3, but did not have energy-expense alleles, Arg16, Gln27 and Trp64 alleles. In PPARG gene, all NHP had large adipocyte accumulating type, the Pro12 allele. Conclusions These results indicate that a tendency to produce much more heat through the energy-expense alleles developed only in humans, who left tropical rainforests for savanna and developed new features in their heat-regulation systems, such as reduction of body hair and increased evaporation of water, and might have helped the protection of entrails from cold at night, especially in glacial periods. PMID:22937051

  13. The soluble form of Alzheimer's amyloid beta protein is complexed to high density lipoprotein 3 and very high density lipoprotein in normal human plasma.

    PubMed

    Koudinov, A; Matsubara, E; Frangione, B; Ghiso, J

    1994-12-15

    The amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's neuritic plaques and cerebral blood vessels are mainly composed of aggregated forms of a 39 to 44 amino acids peptide, named amyloid beta (A beta). A similar although soluble form of A beta (sA beta) has been identified in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and cell culture supernatants, indicating that it is produced under physiologic conditions. We report here that sA beta in normal human plasma is associated with lipoprotein particles, in particular to the HDL3 and VHDL fractions where it is complexed to ApoJ and, to a lesser extent, to ApoAI. This was assessed by immunoprecipitation experiments of purified plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein-depleted plasma and confirmed by means of amino acid sequence analysis. Moreover, biotinylated synthetic peptide A beta 1-40 was traced in normal human plasma in in vitro experiments. As in the case of sA beta, biotinylated A beta 1-40 was specifically recovered in the HDL3 and VHDL fractions. This data together with the previous demonstration that A beta 1-40 is taken up into the brain via a specific mechanism and possibly as an A beta 1-40-ApoJ complex indicate a role for HDL3- and VHDL-containing ApoJ in the transport of the peptide in circulation and suggest their involvement in the delivery of sA beta across the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  15. Modeling of conformational transitions of fibrillogenic peptide, homologous to beta-domain of human alpha-lactalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadochnikov, V. V.; Egorov, V. V.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the peptide corresponding to beta domain of human alpha-lactalbumin (GYDTQAIVENNESTEYG, WT) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, within the model considered, the monomer of this peptide does not tend to form a stable secondary structure; however, simulation of the behavior of several peptide molecules revealed the occurrence of beta structures due to the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Since the aforementioned interactions involve the terminal portions of peptides, the influence of the tetrapeptide corresponding to the N-terminal portion of WT, TDYG (R), on the secondary structure has been analyzed. The model calculations show that the interaction of this peptide with WT monomer facilitates formation of beta-structures. It is suggested that peptide R may affect the quaternary structure of WT.

  16. A novel method for the assessment of cellular composition and beta-cell viability in human islet preparations.

    PubMed

    Ichii, Hirohito; Inverardi, Luca; Pileggi, Antonello; Molano, R Damaris; Cabrera, Over; Caicedo, Alejandro; Messinger, Shari; Kuroda, Yoshikazu; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ricordi, Camillo

    2005-07-01

    Current methodologies to evaluate islet cell viability are largely based on tests that assess the exclusion of DNA-binding dyes. While these tests identify cells that have lost selective membrane permeability, they do not allow us to recognize apoptotic cells, which do not yet stain with DNA-binding dyes. Furthermore, current methods of analysis do not discriminate between cell subsets in the preparation and, in particular, they do not allow for selectively defining beta-cell viability. For these reasons we have developed novel methods for the specific assessment of beta-cell content and viability in human islets based on cellular composition analysis through laser scanning cytometry (LSC) coupled with identification of beta-cell-specific apoptosis at the mitochondrial level. Our novel analytical methods hold promise to prospectively analyze clinical islet transplantation preparations and predict functional performance, as suggested by the observed correlation with in vivo analysis of islet potency in immunodeficient rodents.

  17. Studies on the protein composition of human serum very low density lipoproteins: demonstration of the beta 2-glycoprotein-I.

    PubMed

    Polz, E; Kostner, G M; Holasek, A

    1979-08-01

    Human serum VLDL isolated by polyanion precipitation and ultracentrifugation have been delipidated with ethanal/diethyl ether. By electrophoresis in 10% polyacrylamide gels containing 8M urea, we found a protein which comigrated with apolipoprotein E. This protein was purified by column chromatography and turned out to be identical with beta 2-glycoprotein-I, the serum factor which is necessary for the precipitation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins with sodium decyl sulfate or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Upon analytical isoelectric focusing, beta 2-glycoprotein-I gave four major bands in the pH region 5.7--6.6. All four bands gave an immunochemical reaction of identity with a monospecific antiserum. From its unique amino acid composition we conclude that beta 2-glycoprotein-I is distinct from all apolipoproteins described previously in the literature.

  18. Concentrations of cyclosporin A and FK506 that inhibit IL-2 induction in human T cells do not affect TGF-beta1 biosynthesis, whereas higher doses of cyclosporin A trigger apoptosis and release of preformed TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Kim, Seong-Jin; López-Botet, Miguel; Aramburu, José

    2005-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 suppress T cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin and the calcineurin-dependent transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc), which are central regulators of T cell function. It was reported that CsA up-regulated the transcription of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in lymphocytes and other cells and activated its promoter in A549 lung carcinoma cells, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and it is unclear whether calcineurin plays any role. We have studied the regulation of TGF-beta1 in normal human lymphocytes and cell lines. In Jurkat T cells, the TGF-beta1 promoter was activated by calcineurin and NFATc and inhibited by CsA and FK506. However, the promoter was insensitive to both drugs in A549 cells. In human T cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin, biosynthesis of TGF-beta1, induced by the T cell receptor (TCR) or the TGF-beta receptor, was not substantially affected by CsA and FK506 concentrations (< or = 1 microM) that effectively inhibited interleukin-2 production. However, pretreatment of fresh lymphocytes with CsA or FK506 during primary TCR stimulation reduced their production of TGF-beta1 during secondary TCR activation. Finally, high concentrations of CsA (10 microM), in the range attained in vivo in experiments in rodents, caused apoptosis in human T cells and the release of preformed, bioactive TGF-beta1. These effects are unlikely to owe to calcineurin inhibition, as they were not observed with FK506. Our results indicate that CsA and FK506 are not general inducers of TGF-beta1 biosynthesis but can cause different effects on TGF-beta1 depending on the cell type and concentrations used.

  19. Human liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase gammagamma isozyme: the sole cytosolic 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of iso bile acids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, H U; Oppermann, U C; Svensson, S; Nordling, E; Persson, B; Höög, J O; Jörnvall, H

    2000-04-01

    3beta-Hydroxy (iso) bile acids are formed during enterohepatic circulation from 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids and constitute normal compounds in plasma but are virtually absent in bile. Isoursodeoxycholic acid (isoUDCA) is a major metabolite of UDCA. In a recent study it was found that after administration of isoUDCA, UDCA became the major acid in bile. Thus, epimerization of the 3beta-hydroxy to a 3alpha-hydroxy group, catalyzed by 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) and 3-oxo-reductases must occur. The present study aims to characterize the human liver bile acid 3beta-HSD. Human liver cytosol and recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) betabeta and gammagamma isozymes were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. Activity staining with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) or oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) as cofactors and various iso bile acids as substrates was used to screen for 3beta-HSD activity. Reaction products were identified and quantified by gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Computer-assisted substrate docking of isoUDCA to the active site of a 3-dimensional model of human class I gammagamma ADH was performed. ADH gammagamma isozyme was identified as the iso bile acid 3beta-HSD present in human liver cytosol, with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Values for k(cat)/K(m) were in the rank order isodeoxycholic acid (isoDCA), isochenodeoxycholic acid (isoCDCA), isoUDCA, and isolithocholic acid (isoLCA) (0.10, 0.09, 0.08, and 0. 05 min(-1) x micromol/L(-1), respectively). IsoUDCA fits as substrate to the 3-dimensional model of the active-site of ADH gammagamma. ADH gammagamma isozyme was defined as the only bile acid 3beta-HSD in human liver cytosol. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are candidates for the binding and transport of 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids. We assume that ADH gammagamma isozyme is involved in cytosolic bile acid binding and transport processes as well.

  20. Molecular mimicry between the immunodominant ribosomal protein P0 of Trypanosoma cruzi and a functional epitope on the human beta 1- adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Sera from chagasic patients possess antibodies recognizing the carboxy- terminal part of the ribosomal P0 protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor. Comparison of both peptides showed that they contain a pentapeptide with very high homology (AESEE in P0 and AESDE in the human beta 1- adrenergic receptor). Using a competitive immunoenzyme assay, recognition of the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop (H26R) was inhibited by both P0-14i (AAAESEEEDDDDDF) and P0-beta (AESEE). Concomitantly, recognition of P0-beta was inhibited with the H26R peptide. Recognition of P0 in Western blots was inhibited by P0- 14i, P0-beta, and H26R, but not by a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor or by an unrelated peptide. Autoantibodies affinity purified with the immobilized H26R peptide were shown to exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats. This effect was blocked by both the specific beta 1 blocker bisoprolol and the peptide P0-beta. These results unambiguously prove that T. cruzi is able to induce a functional autoimmune response against the cardiovascular human beta 1-adrenergic receptor through a molecular mimicry mechanism. PMID:7790824

  1. Molecular mimicry between the immunodominant ribosomal protein P0 of Trypanosoma cruzi and a functional epitope on the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, I; Levin, M J; Wallukat, G; Elies, R; Lebesgue, D; Chiale, P; Elizari, M; Rosenbaum, M; Hoebeke, J

    1995-07-01

    Sera from chagasic patients possess antibodies recognizing the carboxy-terminal part of the ribosomal P0 protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor. Comparison of both peptides showed that they contain a pentapeptide with very high homology (AESEE in P0 and AESDE in the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor). Using a competitive immunoenzyme assay, recognition of the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop (H26R) was inhibited by both P0-14i (AAAESEEEDDDDDF) and P0-beta (AESEE). Concomitantly, recognition of P0-beta was inhibited with the H26R peptide. Recognition of P0 in Western blots was inhibited by P0-14i, P0-beta, and H26R, but not by a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor or by an unrelated peptide. Autoantibodies affinity purified with the immobilized H26R peptide were shown to exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats. This effect was blocked by both the specific beta 1 blocker bisoprolol and the peptide P0-beta. These results unambiguously prove that T. cruzi is able to induce a functional autoimmune response against the cardiovascular human beta 1-adrenergic receptor through a molecular mimicry mechanism.

  2. Human artificial chromosome assembly by transposon-based retrofitting of genomic BACs with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays.

    PubMed

    Basu, Joydeep; Willard, Huntington F; Stromberg, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The development of methodologies for the rapid assembly of synthetic alpha-satellite arrays recapitulating the higher-order periodic organization of native human centromeres permits the systematic investigation of the significance of primary sequence and sequence organization in centromere function. Synthetic arrays with defined mutations affecting sequence and/or organization may be evaluated in a de novo human artificial chromosome assay. This unit describes strategies for the assembly of custom built alpha-satellite arrays containing any desired mutation as well as strategies for the construction and manipulation of alpha satellite-based transposons. Transposons permit the rapid and reliable retrofitting of any genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays and other functional components, thereby facilitating conversion into BAC-based human artificial chromosome vectors. These techniques permit identification and optimization of the critical parameters underlying the unique ability of alpha-satellite DNA to facilitate de novo centromere assembly, and they will establish the foundation for the next generation of human artificial chromosome vectors.

  3. Active site mutant transgene confers tolerance to human beta-glucuronidase without affecting the phenotype of MPS VII mice.

    PubMed

    Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Grubb, J H; Zhou, M; Jiang, J; Zhou, X Y; Tomatsu, S; Bi, Y; Snella, E M

    2001-02-27

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII; Sly syndrome) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to an inherited deficiency of beta-glucuronidase. A naturally occurring mouse model for this disease was discovered at The Jackson Laboratory and shown to be due to homozygosity for a 1-bp deletion in exon 10 of the gus gene. The murine model MPS VII (gus(mps/mps)) has been very well characterized and used extensively to evaluate experimental strategies for lysosomal storage diseases, including bone marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy, and gene therapy. To enhance the value of this model for enzyme and gene therapy, we produced a transgenic mouse expressing the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA with an amino acid substitution at the active site nucleophile (E540A) and bred it onto the MPS VII (gus(mps/mps)) background. We demonstrate here that the mutant mice bearing the active site mutant human transgene retain the clinical, morphological, biochemical, and histopathological characteristics of the original MPS VII (gus(mps/mps)) mouse. However, they are now tolerant to immune challenge with human beta-glucuronidase. This "tolerant MPS VII mouse model" should be useful for preclinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of enzyme and/or gene therapy with the human gene products likely to be administered to human patients with MPS VII.

  4. Distribution of precursor amyloid-. beta. -protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid ..beta.. protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid ..beta.. proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid ..beta.. protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein.

  5. Dephosphorylation of human cyclin-dependent kinases by protein phosphatase type 2C alpha and beta 2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Kaldis, P; Solomon, M J

    2000-11-03

    We previously reported that the activating phosphorylation on cyclin-dependent kinases in yeast (Cdc28p) and in humans (Cdk2) is removed by type 2C protein phosphatases. In this study, we characterize this PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract and determine that it is due to PP2C beta 2, a novel PP2C beta isoform, and to PP2C alpha. PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 co-purified with Mg(2+)-dependent Cdk2/Cdk6 phosphatase activity in DEAE-Sepharose, Superdex-200, and Mono Q chromatographies. Moreover, purified recombinant PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 proteins efficiently dephosphorylated monomeric Cdk2/Cdk6 in vitro. The dephosphorylation of Cdk2 and Cdk6 by PP2C isoforms was inhibited by the binding of cyclins. We found that the PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract, partially purified HeLa PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 isoforms, and the recombinant PP2Cs exhibited a comparable substrate preference for a phosphothreonine containing substrate, consistent with the conservation of threonine residues at the site of activating phosphorylation in CDKs.

  6. Crystal structures of human DNA polymerase beta complexed with DNA: implications for catalytic mechanism, processivity, and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, H; Sawaya, M R; Wolfle, W; Wilson, S H; Kraut, J

    1996-10-01

    Mammalian DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) is a small (39 kDa) DNA gap-filling enzyme that comprises an amino-terminal 8-kDa domain and a carboxy-terminal 31-kDa domain. In the work reported here, crystal structures of human pol beta complexed with blunt-ended segments of DNA show that, although the crystals belong to a different space group, the DNA is nevertheless bound in the pol beta binding channel in the same way as the DNA in previously reported structures of rat pol beta complexed with a template-primer and ddCTP [Pelletier, H., Sawaya, M. R., Kumar, A., Wilson, S. H., & Kraut, J. (1994) Science 264, 1891-1903]. The 8-kDa domain is in one of three previously observed positions relative to the 31-kDa domain, suggesting that the 8-kDa domain may assume only a small number of stable conformations. The thumb subdomain is in a more open position in the human pol beta-DNA binary complex than it is in the rat pol beta-DNA-ddCTP ternary complex, and a closing thumb upon nucleotide binding could represent the rate-limiting conformational change that has been observed in pre-steady-state kinetic studies. Intermolecular contacts between the DNA and the 8-kDa domain of a symmetry-related pol beta molecule reveal a plausible binding site on the 8-kDa domain for the downstream oligonucleotide of a gapped-DNA substrate; in addition to a lysine-rich binding pocket that accommodates a 5'-PO4 end group, the 8-kDa domain also contains a newly discovered helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif that binds to DNA in the same way as does a structurally and sequentially homologous HhH motif in the 31-kDa domain. DNA binding by both HhH motifs is facilitated by a metal ion. In that HhH motifs have been identified in other DNA repair enzymes and DNA polymerases, the HhH-DNA interactions observed in pol beta may be applicable to a broad range of DNA binding proteins. The sequence similarity between the HhH motif of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and the HhH motif of the 8-kDa domain of

  7. Beta3 subunits promote expression and nicotine-induced up-regulation of human nicotinic alpha6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in transfected cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tumkosit, Prem; Kuryatov, Alexander; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2006-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) containing alpha6 subunits are typically found at aminergic nerve endings where they play important roles in nicotine addiction and Parkinson's disease. alpha6* AChRs usually contain beta3 subunits. beta3 subunits are presumed to assemble only in the accessory subunit position within AChRs where they do not participate in forming acetylcholine binding sites. Assembly of subunits in the accessory position may be a critical final step in assembly of mature AChRs. Human alpha6 AChRs subtypes were permanently transfected into human tsA201 human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. alpha6beta2beta3 and alpha6beta4beta3 cell lines were found to express much larger amounts of AChRs and were more sensitive to nicotine-induced increase in the amount of AChRs than were alpha6beta2 or alpha6beta4 cell lines. The increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced up-regulation was due not to a beta3-induced increase in affinity for nicotine but probably to a direct effect on assembly of AChR subunits. HEK cells express only a small amount of mature alpha6beta2 AChRs, but many of these subunits are on the cell surface. This contrasts with Xenopus laevis oocytes, which express a large amount of incorrectly assembled alpha6beta2 subunits that bind cholinergic ligands but form large amorphous intracellular aggregates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were made to the alpha6 and beta3 subunits to aid in the characterization of these AChRs. The alpha6 mAbs bind to epitopes C-terminal of the extracellular domain. These data demonstrate that both cell type and the accessory subunit beta3 can play important roles in alpha6* AChR expression, stability, and up-regulation by nicotine.

  8. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  9. Enhanced polymerization of recombinant human deoxyhemoglobin. beta. 6 Glu yields Ile

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin-Chich, V.; Pagnier, J.; Marden, M.; Bohn, B.; Lacaze, N.; Kister, J.; Poyart, C. ); Schaad, O.; Edelstein, S.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Polymerization of the deoxy form of sickle cell hemoglobin involves both hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular contacts. These interactions drive the mutated molecules into long fibrous rods composed of seven pairs of strands. X-ray crystallography of Hb S and electron microscopy image reconstruction of the fibers have revealed the remarkable complementarity between one of the {beta}6 valines of each molecule (the donor site) and an acceptor site at the EF corner of a neighboring tetramer. To estimate the relative importance of this key hydrophobic contact in polymer formation the authors have generated a polymerizing Hb with isoleucine at the {beta}6 position ({beta}E6I) by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutated {beta} chains were produced in Escherichia coli and reassembled into functional tetramers with native {alpha} chains. Compared to native Hb S, the {beta}E6I mutant polymerizes faster and with a shortened delay time in 1.8 M phosphate buffer, indicating an increased stability of the nuclei preceding fiber growth. Computer modeling of the donor-acceptor interaction shows that the presence of an isoleucine side chain at the donor site induced increased contacts with the receptor site and an increased buried surface area, in agreement with the higher hydrophobicity of the isoleucine residue. The agreement between the predicted and experimental differences in solubility suggests that the transfer of the {beta}6 valine or isoleucine side chain from water to a hydrophobic environment is sufficient to explain the observations.

  10. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  11. QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BETA CELL APOPTOSIS AND CELL COMPOSITION OF ISOLATED, UNDISRUPTED HUMAN ISLETS BY LASER SCANNING CYTOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Ivan; Nair, Indu; Avakian-Mansoorian, Alina; Rawson, Jeffrey; Omori, Keiko; Ito, Taihei; Valiente, Luis; Iglesias-Meza, Itzia; Orr, Chris; Shiang, Keh D.; Ferreri, Kevin; Al-Abdullah, Ismail H.; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad

    2010-01-01

    Background Assays for assessing human islet cell quality which provide results prior to transplantation would be very beneficial to improving outcomes for islet transplantation therapy. Parameters such as percent beta cell apoptosis and cell composition are found to vary markedly between different islet preparations, and may serve as markers of islet quality. We have developed fluorescence-based assays using laser scanning cytometry (LSC) for assessing beta cell apoptosis and islet cell composition on serial sections of intact isolated islets. Methods Isolated human islets were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were immunostained for the pancreatic hormones, acinar and ductal cell markers. DNA fragmentation was used to label apoptotic cells. Stained cells were quantified using an iCys laser scanning cytometer. Results Islet preparations from 102 human pancreatic islet isolations were analyzed. For the whole set of islet preparations we found a mean islet cell composition of 54.5±1.2% insulin positive; 33.9±1.2% glucagon; 12.1±0.7% somatostatin and 1.5±0.2% pancreatic polypeptide positive cells. The apoptotic beta cells were 2.85±0.4% with a range of 0.27% to 18.3%. The percentage of apoptotic beta cells correlated well (p<0.0001, n=59) with results obtained in vivo by transplantation of the corresponding islets in diabetic NODscid mice. Conclusions The analysis of whole, non-dissociated islets for cell composition and beta cell apoptosis using LSC is giving reliable and reproducible results and could be done both before islet transplantation, as well as on preserved cell blocks at any future time. Thus, they can be a powerful tool for islet quality assessment. PMID:20697327

  12. The fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway is important for decidualization of endometrial stromal cells in both humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; Chi, Maggie M-Y; Schulte, Maureen B; Moley, Kelle H

    2014-02-01

    Embryo implantation and development requires the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) to undergo decidualization. This differentiation process requires glucose utilization, and blockade of the pentose phosphate pathway inhibits decidualization of ESCs both in vitro and in vivo. Glucose and fatty acids are energy substrates for many cell types, and fatty acid beta-oxidation is critical for embryo implantation. Here, we investigated whether beta-oxidation is required for decidualization of ESCs. As assessed by marker gene expression, decidualization of human primary ESCs was blocked by reducing activity of carnitine calmitoyltransferase I, the rate-limiting enzyme in beta-oxidation, either by short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing or by treatment with the inhibitor etomoxir. Ranolazine (RAN), a partial beta-oxidation inhibitor, blocked early decidualization of a human ESC line. However, decidualization resumed after several days, most likely due to a compensatory up-regulation of GLUT1 expression and an increase in glucose metabolism. Simultaneous inhibition of the beta-oxidation pathway with RAN and the pentose phosphate pathway with glucosamine (GlcN) impaired in vitro decidualization of human ESCs more strongly than inhibition of either pathway alone. These findings were confirmed in murine ESCs in vitro, and exposure to RAN plus GlcN inhibited decidualization in vivo in a deciduoma model. Finally, intrauterine implantation of time-release RAN and GlcN pellets reduced pup number. Importantly, pup number returned to normal after the end of the pellet-active period. This work indicates that both fatty acids and glucose metabolism pathways are important for ESC decidualization, and suggests novel pathways to target for the design of future nonhormonal contraceptives.

  13. Increased production of 4 kDa amyloid beta peptide in serum deprived human primary neuron cultures: possible involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A

    1995-12-01

    The etiology of the amyloid beta peptide in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not known. Amyloid beta peptide (A beta), a proteolytic product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is deposited in the senile plaques and cerebrovascular tissues of individuals with either sporadic or familial AD (FAD). Increased A beta production from mutant APPs in FAD fosters the hypothesis that overexpression of A beta plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of AD. The absence of APP mutations in sporadic AD which displays identical pathological features than FAD such as synapse and neuronal loss, senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, suggests other causes for overexpression and/or deposition of A beta. To investigate the effect of neuronal death on APP metabolism and A beta secretion, human primary neuron cultures were induced to undergo apoptosis by serum deprivation. Serum deprived neurons display shrunken and rounded morphology, contain condensed chromatine and fragmented DNA, which are characteristic of apoptosis. In serum deprived neurons, metabolism of APP through the nonamyloidogenic secretory pathway is decreased to 20% from 40% in control cultures whereas 4kDa A beta is increased three- to fourfold. The results suggest that human neurons undergoing apoptosis generate excess A beta and indicates a possible mechanism for increased A beta in the absence of APP mutations.

  14. Mutations in the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene are associated with human norepinephrine deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chun-Hyung; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Cho, Sonhae; Biaggioni, Italo; Cohen, Bruce M.; Robertson, David; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2002-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), a key neurotransmitter of the central and peripheral nervous systems, is synthesized by dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that catalyzes oxidation of dopamine (DA) to NE. NE deficiency is a congenital disorder of unknown etiology, in which affected patients suffer profound autonomic failure. Biochemical features of the syndrome include undetectable tissue and circulating levels of NE and epinephrine, elevated levels of DA, and undetectable levels of DBH. Here, we report identification of seven novel variants including four potentially pathogenic mutations in the human DBH gene (OMIM 223360) from analysis of two unrelated patients and their families. Both patients are compound heterozygotes for variants affecting expression of DBH protein. Each carries one copy of a T-->C transversion in the splice donor site of DBH intron 1, creating a premature stop codon. In patient 1, there is a missense mutation in DBH exon 2. Patient 2 carries missense mutations in exons 1 and 6 residing in cis. We propose that NE deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from heterogeneous molecular lesions at DBH. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained.

  16. Barrier function, epidermal differentiation, and human beta-defensin 2 expression in tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jens-Michael; Pfeiffer, Stephan; Akaki, Tatsuya; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Kleine, Michael; Neumann, Claudia; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Brasch, Jochen

    2007-07-01

    Tinea corporis is a superficial mycotic infection resulting in substantial epidermal changes. We determined skin barrier function, epidermal differentiation, and human-beta-defensin 2 (hBD-2) protein expression in 10 patients with tinea corporis caused by Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum). We found disturbed skin barrier function as shown by a significant increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and specific ultrastructural changes including disturbed formation of extracellular lipid bilayers, lamellar body extrusion, and deposit of clotted material at the stratum granulosum/stratum corneum interface. Epidermal proliferation in tinea increased several fold and accordingly, proliferation and inflammation-associated keratins K6, K16, and K17 were expressed. Expression of basal keratins K5 and K14 increased, whereas differentiation-associated K10 was reduced. Reduction of the cornified envelope proteins involucrin, loricrin, and the S100 protein filaggrin was also seen. Reduced filaggrin expression correlated with reduced skin hydration; protein breakdown products of filaggrin have been shown to be important for water binding. Surprisingly, we found pronounced epidermal protein expression of hBD-2, which may be related to disturbed epidermal differentiation and inflammation. hBD-2 showed a weak, although significant, antifungal activity against T. rubrum in the turbidimetric assay and the immunohistological staining was somewhat less pronounced in areas directly underneath fungal hyphae in the stratum corneum. Together, we describe profound changes in skin barrier structure and function, epidermal proliferation, and differentiation including pronounced protein expression of hBD-2 in tinea corporis.

  17. MEF up-regulates human beta-defensin 2 expression in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhuo; Kim, Kyoung-Ah; Suico, Mary Ann; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Li, Jian-Dong; Kai, Hirofumi

    2004-03-12

    Human beta-defensin 2 (HBD2), an antimicrobial peptide, is widely expressed in epithelial tissues and displays a potent killing activity in response to the invasiveness of a wide range of microorganisms and the stimulation of various molecules. Myeloid ELF-1-like factor (MEF) has been reported to be involved in innate immunity responses, such as activation of perforin and lysozyme transcription. The role of MEF in the transcription regulation of HBD2, however, is unknown. Here, we show that MEF not only activated HBD2 promoter activity, but also increased the endogenous HBD2 transcription level. Moreover, the activated HBD2 promoter activity was attenuated by the antisense MEF RNA input and the loss of the ETS binding site (EBS: GGAA core sequence) in the HBD2 promoter. The interaction between the EBS and MEF protein was further confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Thus, our data indicate that MEF may play an important role in regulating HBD2 expression in epithelial cells.

  18. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yange; Shi, Zhaopeng; Gao, Ming-Qing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM) milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health. PMID:27438026

  19. Recombinant expression of human nerve growth factor beta in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bo-Sheng; Lou, Ji-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is required for the differentiation and maintenance of sympathetic and sensory neurons. In the present study, the recombinant expression of human nerve growth factor beta (hNGF-β) gene in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) was undertaken. Recombinant vector containing hNGF-β was constructed and transferred into rMSCs, the expressions of the exogenous in rMSCs were determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), ELISA and Western blot, whereas the biological activity of recombinant hNGF-β was confirmed using PC12 cells and cultures of dorsal root ganglion neurons from chicken embryos. The results showed that the hNGF-β gene expressed successfully in the rMSCs, a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 13.2 kDa was detected. The maximal expression level of recombinant hNGF-β in rMSCs reached 126.8012 pg/10(6) cells, the mean concentration was 96.4473 pg/10(6) cells. The recombinant hNGF-β in the rMSCs showed full biological activity when compared to commercial recombinant hNGF-β.

  20. Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase locus and the chromosome 9q34 region in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian. A.; Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.

    1994-09-01

    Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (DBH) is responsible for conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine in catecholamine neurons. Potential inhibitors of this enzyme do exist, but they are generally not effective in vivo in reducing tissue concentrations of catecholamines. The gene for DBH has been localized to 9q34 by linkage analysis and in situ hybridization. Recently there have been reports indicating a suggestive evidence of linkage between DNA markers in 9q34 region and alcoholism. In order to test for this suggestive linkage, we have genotyped a sample of 134 subjects with alcoholism, 30 alcoholic families (n=302) and 92 normal controls. The alcoholic subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained samples of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. The markers used in this study were dinucleotide repeats in the DBH gene, and two highly informative (CA) markers (D9S64, D9S66) flanking the DBH gene. A preliminary affected-sib-pair analysis was carried out under two diagnostic schemes. Regardless of whether `probable` alcoholics are classified as unaffected (t=0.63) or affected (t=1.50), these data do not reveal a significant excess in DBH marker sharing among affected-sib-pairs. However, the comparison of the DBH marker allele frequencies between the unrelated alcoholic panel and the unrelated normal control panel was significant at the p=0.04 level.

  1. Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Lung with High Serum Beta-human Chorionic Gonadotropin Level and Gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Hasbal, Baris; Aydin, Kubra; Bozkurt, Mustafa; Namal, Esat; Oz, Buge; Kaynak, Kamil; Demir, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Although gynecomastia is a well-defined paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, the association with pleomorphic carcinoma has not been reported. A 50-yr-old man presented with bilateral gynecomastia and elevated serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) level. Chest tomography showed a mass in the right middle lobe. Right middle lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed. βhCG levels decreased rapidly after surgery. Histological examination revealed pleomorphic carcinoma with positive immunostaining for βhCG. Serum βhCG levels began to increase gradually on postoperatively 4th month. Computed tomography detected recurrence and chemotherapy was started. After second cycle of chemotherapy, βhCG levels decreased dramatically again and tomography showed regression in mass. Patient died 6 months later due to brain metastasis. βhCG expression may be associated with aggressive clinical course and increased risk of recurrence, also βhCG levels may be used to evaluate therapy response in patients with pleomorphic carcinoma. PMID:21165299

  2. Human melanoma cells derived from lymphatic metastases use integrin alpha v beta 3 to adhere to lymph node vitronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Nip, J; Shibata, H; Loskutoff, D J; Cheresh, D A; Brodt, P

    1992-01-01

    Human melanoma is a highly metastatic cancer and the regional lymph nodes are generally the first site of metastasis. Adhesion to cryostat sections of human lymph nodes was therefore studied using two human melanoma models established from lymph node metastases, namely, MeWo cell lines of diverse metastatic potentials and a highly metastatic cell line of recent origin designated MIM/8. We found a good correlation between the metastatic potentials of the melanoma cells as measured in nude mice and their ability to adhere to cryostat sections of human lymph nodes. When adhesion to immobilized extracellular matrix proteins was measured, a significant increase in adhesion, which correlated with increased metastasis, was seen mainly on vitronectin and to a lesser extent on fibronectin. The adhesion to vitronectin and to the frozen sections were specifically blocked by an RGD-containing peptide, mAb 661 to vitronectin and mAb LM609 to integrin alpha v beta 3. FACS analysis revealed a significant and specific increase in cell surface expression of alpha v beta 3 on the metastatic cells as compared to the parent line. Together these results suggest that the adhesion of melanoma cells to lymph node vitronectin via the alpha v beta 3 receptor plays a role in the process of lymphatic dissemination. Images PMID:1383272

  3. Human T-cell receptor v{beta} gene polymorphism and multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Charmley, P.; Birchfield, R.I.; Concannon, P.

    1995-04-01

    Population-based genetic associations have been reported between RFLPs detected with probes corresponding to the genes encoding the {beta} chain of the T-cell receptor for antigen (RCRB) and a variety of autoimmune disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis (MS), these studies have localized a putative disease-associated gene to a region of {approximately}110 kb in length, located within the TCRB locus. In the current study, all 14 known TCRBV (variable region) genes within the region of localization were mapped and identified. The nucleotide sequences of these genes were determined in a panel of six MS patients and six healthy controls, who were human-leukocyte antigen and TCRB-RFLP haplotype matched. Nine of the 14 TCRBV genes studied showed evidence of polymorphism. PCR-based assays for each of these polymorphic genes were developed, and allele and genotype frequencies were determined in a panel of DNA samples from 48 MS patients and 60 control individuals. No significant differences in allele, genotype, or phenotype frequencies were observed between the MS patients and controls for any of the 14 TCRBV-gene polymorphisms studied. In light of the extensive linkage disequilibrium across the region studied, the saturating numbers of polymorphisms examined, and the direct sequence analysis of all BV genes in the region, these results suggest that it is unlikely that germ-line polymorphism in the TCRBV locus makes a major contribution to MS susceptibility. The TCRBV coding region-specific markers generated in these studies, as well as the approach of testing for associations with specific functionally relevant polymorphic sites within individual BV genes, should be useful in the evaluation of the many reported disease associations involving the human TCRB region. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  5. Characterization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoenzyme expression in benign and malignant human prostate.

    PubMed

    Elo, J P; Akinola, L A; Poutanen, M; Vihko, P; Kyllönen, A P; Lukkarinen, O; Vihko, R

    1996-03-28

    In the present study, expressions of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1, 2, and 3, 5alpha-reductase type 2 and human androgen receptor mRNAs were determined in 12 benign prostatic hyperplasia and 17 prostatic carcinoma specimens. 17HSD type 2 was found to be the principle isoenzyme expressed in the prostate. Significantly higher expressions of 17HSD type 2 and 5alpha-reductase type 2 were detected in benign prostatic hyperplasia compared with the carcinoma specimens. Expression of the androgen receptor in the 2 groups was not significantly different. 17HSD type 3 mRNA was not detected in any of the specimens investigated. Only low constructive expression of the 2.3 kb mRNA of 17HSD type 1 was seen. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that this did not lead to significant enzyme expression, only faint staining for the enzyme protein being detected, mainly in uroepithelial cells. No significant correlation was found between any of the mRNAs analysed, but the data on 5alpha-reductase type 2 mRNA support the presence of an increased proportion of 5alpha-dihydrotesterone in the hyperplastic prostate. In cultured PC-3 prostatic cancer cells and in the transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, 17HSD type 2 was found exclusively to convert 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and testosterone into the less potent 17-keto compounds 5alpha-androstanedione and 4-androstenedione, respectively. We suggest that the 17HSD type 2 isoenzyme plays a part in the metabolic pathway, resulting in the inactivation of testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone locally in the prostate. The enzyme expressed in the prostate could, therefore, protect cells from excessive androgen action.

  6. Assessment of human health impact from exposure to multiple air pollutants in China based on satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Wen; Ciren, Pubu; Zhu, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of human health impact caused by air pollution is crucial for evaluating environmental hazards. In this paper, concentrations of six air pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, O3, and CO) were first derived from satellite observations, and then the overall human health risks in China caused by multiple air pollutants were assessed using an aggregated health risks index. Unlike traditional approach for human health risks assessment, which relied on the in-situ air pollution measurements, the spatial distribution of aggregated human health risks in China were obtained using satellite observations in this research. It was indicated that the remote sensing data have advantages over in-situ data in accessing human health impact caused by air pollution.

  7. Receptor-binding properties of the peptides corresponding to the beta-endorphin-like sequence of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zaitseva, O R; Navolotskaya, E V; Abramov, V M; Volodina EYu; Mitin, Y V

    1996-01-01

    The decapeptide H2N-Ser-Leu-Thr-Cys-Leu-Val-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (termed immunorphin) corresponding to the sequence 364-373 of the CH3 domain of the human immunoglobulin G1 Eu heavy chain and displaying a 43% identity with the antigenic determinant of beta-endorphin was synthesized. Immunorphin was found to compete with 125I-beta-endorphin for high-affinity receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages (K = 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10(-9) M) and with 3H-morphin for receptors on murine thymocytes (Ki = 2.7 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M) and murine macrophages (Ki = 5.9 +/- 0.7 x 10(-9) M). In particular two types of receptors to 125I-beta-endorphin with Kd1 = 6.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M and Kd2 = 3.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-8) M were revealed on macrophages. The second type of receptors interacted with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-Met-enkephalin, 3H-Leu-enkephalin and 3H-morphin; the first displayed reactivity with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-morphin and immunorphin. The first type receptors are not present on murine brain cells nor are inhibited by naloxone. A minimum fragment of immunorphin practically completely retaining its inhibitory activity in the competition tests with 125I-beta-endorphin for common receptors on thymocytes was found to correspond to the tetrapeptide H2N-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (Ki = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(-9) M).

  8. Increased intracellular levels of lysosomal beta-glucuronidase in peripheral blood PMNs from humans with rapidly progressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pippin, D J; Cobb, C M; Feil, P

    1995-01-01

    Release of potent lysosomal enzymes by degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in host gingiva may contribute significantly to tissue destruction and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A pilot study established that peripheral blood PMNs from humans with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) contained significantly increased amounts of intracellular lysosomal beta-glucuronidase as compared to healthy controls. This investigation gained insight into the question: are the increased levels of beta-glucuronidase in persons with RPP an a priori genetically determined PMN characteristic, or a reactive phenomenon induced by the periodontal disease process during granulopoiesis? Twelve healthy controls and twelve otherwise healthy individuals with RPP participated in a repeated measures design to T0 (initial, baseline), T1 (four weeks after disease control therapy), and T2 (two months later). At each visit clinical indices (GI, pocket depths, GCF flow, plaque index) were performed and peripheral blood obtained. PMNs were isolated and suspended as 5 x 10(6) cells in 2.0 ml of HBSS. PMN suspensions were tested for total intracellular beta-glucuronidase, degranulation induced by 1 x 10(-6)M and 5 x 10(-7) M FMLP challenges, and unchallenged for non-specific enzyme release. PMNs from individuals with RPP contained significantly higher absolute amounts of beta-glucuronidase and released greater absolute amounts at FMLP challenge at T0, T1, and T2 compared to controls. No relationship was found between any of the clinical indices and beta-glucuronidase levels and no pattern was discovered relating to the repeated measures over time. We conclude that RPP peripheral blood PMNs contain elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase that are not induced by the periodontal disease process.

  9. Conformational studies on the beta subunits of human hemoglobin and their arginyl-COOH peptides.

    PubMed

    Bucci, C F; Bucci, E

    1975-10-07

    The beta subunits of hemoglobin upon alkylation of the cysteinyl residues with iodoacetamide showed a sedimentation velocity with an S20w, near 1.8 as for monomeric subunits. They reacted with alpha chains to give a tetrameric hemoglobin with a sedimentation constant near 4.4. Their CD spectrum was indistinguishable from that of untreated beta chains below 270 nm, otherwise they showed some deviation that became pronounced in the Soret region, where the optical activity of the alkylated subunits was definitely lower than that of the native subunits. Upon removal of the heme the apo-beta subunits showed a decreased optical activity in the far-uv region of the spectrum indicating a substantial loss of helical content. Their sedimentation behavior was consistent with the presence of large aggregates, which dissociates into monomers upon reconstitution with cyanoheme. The apo-beta subunits could be renatured from 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. They showed a stoichiometric reaction with heme in the molar ratio 1:1. Upon reconstitution with the heme their optical activity became similar to that of the native beta chains in the far-uv region of the spectrum, but remained lower in the near-uv and Soret regions. After acylation of the lysyl residues with citraconic anhydride the apo-beta subunits were digested with trypsin and the arginyl-COOH peptides beta(1-30), beta(31-40), beta(41-104), and beta(105-146) were separated by gel chromatography. With the exception of the peptide beta/105-146), which was insoluble at neutral pH, the sedimentation behavior of the other peptides showed the presence of small polymers. The sedimentation behavior of the peptide beta(31-40) was not tested. The percentage of alpha helix, beta conformation, and of random coil (or unordered structure) of the various proteins and peptides was measured fitting their CD spectra in the far-uv region with the parameter published by Y.H. Chen et al. ((1974), Biochemistry 13, 3350) and by N. Greenfield and G

  10. CCAAT-binding factor regulates expression of the beta1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase gene in the BE2 human neuroblastoma cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Martin, Emil; Thomas, Anthony; Uray, Karen L.; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a cytosolic enzyme producing the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) on activation with nitric oxide (NO). sGC is an obligatory heterodimer composed of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated human beta1 sGC transcriptional regulation in BE2 human neuroblastoma cells. The 5' upstream region of the beta1 sGC gene was isolated and analyzed for promoter activity by using luciferase reporter constructs. The transcriptional start site of the beta1 sGC gene in BE2 cells was identified. The functional significance of consensus transcriptional factor binding sites proximal to the transcriptional start site was investigated by site deletions in the 800-bp promoter fragment. The elimination of CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) and growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) binding cores significantly diminished whereas deletion of the NF1 core elevated the transcription. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and Western analysis of proteins bound to biotinated EMSA probes confirmed the interaction of GFI1, CBF, and NF1 factors with the beta1 sGC promoter. Treatment of BE2 cells with genistein, known to inhibit the CBF binding to DNA, significantly reduced protein levels of beta1 sGC by inhibiting transcription. In summary, our study represents an analysis of the human beta1 sGC promoter regulation in human neuroblastoma BE2 cells and identifies CBF as a critically important factor in beta1 sGC expression.

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) negatively regulates PTTG1/human securin protein stability, and GSK3beta inactivation correlates with securin accumulation in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-08-26

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCF(βTrCP) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers.

  12. Activity of human beta-defensin 3 alone or combined with other antimicrobial agents against oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Batoni, Giovanna; Esin, Semih; Luperini, Filippo; Pardini, Manuela; Bottai, Daria; Florio, Walter; Giuca, Maria Rita; Gabriele, Mario; Campa, Mario

    2003-10-01

    The in vitro activities of human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3) alone or combined with lysozyme, metronidazole, amoxicillin, and chlorhexidine were investigated with the oral bacteria Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. hBD-3 showed bactericidal activity against all of the bacterial species tested. The bactericidal effect was enhanced when the peptide was used in combination with the antimicrobial agents mentioned above.

  13. Priming affects the activity of a specific region of the promoter of the human beta interferon gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dron, M; Lacasa, M; Tovey, M G

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of Daudi or HeLa cells with human interferon (IFN) alpha 8 before induction with either poly(I)-poly(C) or Sendai virus resulted in an 8- to 100-fold increase in IFN production. The extent of priming in Daudi cells paralleled the increase in the intracellular content of IFN-beta mRNA. IFN-alpha mRNA remained undetectable in poly(I)-poly(C)-treated Daudi cells either before or after priming. An IFN-resistant clone of Daudi cells was found to produce 4- to 20-fold more IFN after priming, indicating that priming was unrelated to the phenotype of IFN sensitivity. IFN treatment of either Daudi or HeLa cells transfected with the human IFN-beta promoter (-282 to -37) linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene resulted in an increase in CAT activity after induction with poly(I)-poly(C) or Sendai virus. A synthetic double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to an authentic 30-base-pair (bp) region of the human IFN-beta promoter between positions -91 and -62 was found to confer virus inducibility upon the reporter CAT gene in HeLa cells. IFN treatment of HeLa cells transfected with this 30-bp region of the IFN-beta promoter in either the correct or reversed orientation also increased CAT activity upon subsequent induction. IFN treatment alone had no detectable effect on the activity of either the 30-bp region or the complete human IFN promoter. Images PMID:2153928

  14. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  15. Ibuprofen inhibits activation of nuclear {beta}-catenin in human colon adenomas and induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta}.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Emily J; Madigan, James P; Boardman, Lisa A; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    Nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors target many of the same cancer-associated molecular pathways as COX-2-specific inhibitors. Although these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often associated with gastrointestinal toxicity, there is renewed interest in their use as colorectal cancer (CRC) chemopreventive agents due to the adverse side effects associated with long-term use of selective COX-2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term use (up to 25 years) of NSAIDs (ibuprofen or aspirin) on adenoma pathology and β-catenin-mediated signaling in sporadic human colon adenomas. Although NSAID use did not impact overall adenoma size or degree of dysplasia, it did cause a significant inhibition of nuclear β-catenin localization, which correlated with suppression of cyclin D1 expression. To further elucidate the effect of these agents in regulating β-catenin, we treated SW480 colon cancer cells with a panel of NSAIDs and determined their effects on β-catenin levels and cellular localization. In agreement with our in vivo results, both S-ibuprofen and aspirin were found to decrease total levels of β-catenin while increasing its phosphorylation. In addition, S-ibuprofen induced both degradation of IκBα and nuclear localization of NF-κB. Despite its nuclear localization, however, the activation of the NF-κB target genes, Bcl-2, survivin, and cyclin D1, was suppressed. This reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity may be due to increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β following S-ibuprofen treatment. These data suggest that ibuprofen can effectively target both the Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB pathways, and potentially uncovers a novel mechanism through which NSAIDS may exert their chemopreventive efficacy.

  16. Expression of human. alpha. -globin and mouse/human hybrid. beta. -globin genes in murine hemopoietic stem cells transduced by recombinant retroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.L.; Dwarki, V.J.; Verma, I.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Murine cell lines releasing helper-free recombinant retroviruses containing human {alpha}-globin and mouse/human hybrid {beta}-globin genes were generated. The expression of the hybrid {beta}-globin gene but not the human {alpha}-globin gene was regulated appropriately in infected mouse erythroid leukemia (MEL) cells. Murine bone marrow cells were infected by coculture with virus-producing cells and transplanted into lethally irradiated syngeneic recipients. Greater than 90% of the spleen colonies (12-15 days), which are derived from hemopoietic multipotential stem cells, showed proviral integration. Various levels of expression of the transduced globin genes were detected in all of the provirus-positive spleen colonies. Proviral sequences and transcripts from the transduced globin genes could also be detected in a few long-term reconstituted recipients in an observation period of 10 months after transplantation.

  17. Human placental estradiol 17. beta. -dehydrogenase: evidence for inverted substrate orientation (wrong-way binding) at the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, G.L.; Warren, J.C.; Sweet, F.

    1988-06-14

    Human placental estradiol 17..beta..-dehydrogenase was affinity labeled with 17lambda-estradiol 17-(bromo(2-/sup 14/C)acetate) (10 ..mu..M) or 17..beta..-estradiol 17-(bromo(2-/sup 14/C)acetate) (10 ..mu..M). The steroid bromoacetates competitively inhibit the enzyme (against 17..beta..-estradiol) with K/sub i/ values of 90 ..mu..M (17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate) and 134 ..mu..M(17..beta.. bromoacetate). Inactivation of the enzyme followed pseudo-first-order kinetics with t/sub 1/2/ = 110 min (17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate) and t/sub 1/2/ = 220 min (17..beta.. bromoacetate). Amino acid analysis of the affinity radioalkylated enzyme samples from the two bromoacetates revealed that N/sup ..pi../-(carboxy(/sup 14/C)methyl histidine was the modified amino acid labeled in each case. Digestion with trypsin produced peptides that were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and found to contain N/sup ..pi../-(carboxy(/sup 14/C)methyl)histidine. Both the 17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate and also the 17..beta.. bromoacetate modified the same histidine in the peptide Phe-Tyr-Gln-Tyr-Leu-Ala-His(..pi..CM)-Ser-Lys. Previously, the same histidine had been exclusively labeled by estrone 3-(bromoacetate) and shown not to be directly involve in catalytic hydrogen transfer at the D-ring of estradiol. Therefore, this histidine was presumed to proximate the A-ring of the bound steroid substrate. The present results suggest that the 17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate and 17..beta.. bromoacetate D-ring analogue of estradiol react with the same active site histidine residue as estrone 3-(bromoacetate), the A-ring analogue of estrone. Moreover, as each of the estradiol 17-(bromoacetates) undergoes the reversible binding step at the enzyme active site, its D-ring is in a reversed binding position relative to that of the natural substrate 17..beta..-estradiol as it undergoes catalytic hydrogen transfer at the same active site.

  18. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  19. [123I]beta-CIT SPECT imaging of dopamine transporter availability after mazindol administration in human cocaine addicts.

    PubMed

    Malison, R T; McCance, E; Carpenter, L L; Baldwin, R M; Seibyl, J P; Price, L H; Kosten, T R; Innis, R B

    1998-06-01

    The in vivo potency of mazindol for binding to striatal dopamine transporters (DAT) was assessed by [123I]beta-CIT ([123I]2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropane) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Cocaine-dependent subjects (n = 12) underwent three SPECT scans; one before, between, and after subchronic (1 week) administration of 2 mg/day and 4 mg/day mazindol. For each scan, subjects were injected with [123I]beta-CIT and imaged 24 h later under equilibrium conditions. Results showed a statistically significant main effect of mazindol dose (df = 2, F = 10.30, P < 0.001, repeated measures ANOVA) in reducing the specific to non-displaceable equilibrium partition coefficient, V3'' (a measure proportional to DAT binding potential). Regression analysis of the logit transformed data enabled estimation of the 50% displacement dose of mazindol (ED50 = 30mg/day). These data suggest that low doses of mazindol (i.e., 2-4 mg) occupy a small percentage (i.e., < 25%) of DAT in human cocaine abusers and that much higher, potentially intolerable doses (i.e., > or = 30 mg/day) may be required to antagonize significantly cocaine binding in vivo.

  20. Phase Dependency of the Human Primary Motor Cortex and Cholinergic Inhibition Cancelation During Beta tACS

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Andrea; Pogosyan, Alek; Nowak, Magdalena; Tan, Huiling; Ferreri, Florinda; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The human motor cortex has a tendency to resonant activity at about 20 Hz so stimulation should more readily entrain neuronal populations at this frequency. We investigated whether and how different interneuronal circuits contribute to such resonance by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at motor (20 Hz) and a nonmotor resonance frequency (7 Hz). We tested different TMS interneuronal protocols and triggered TMS pulses at different tACS phases. The effect of cholinergic short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was abolished by 20 Hz tACS, linking cortical beta activity to sensorimotor integration. However, this effect occurred regardless of the tACS phase. In contrast, 20 Hz tACS selectively modulated MEP size according to the phase of tACS during single pulse, GABAAergic short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and glutamatergic intracortical facilitation (ICF). For SICI this phase effect was more marked during 20 Hz stimulation. Phase modulation of SICI also depended on whether or not spontaneous beta activity occurred at ~20 Hz, supporting an interaction effect between tACS and underlying circuit resonances. The present study provides in vivo evidence linking cortical beta activity to sensorimotor integration, and for beta oscillations in motor cortex being promoted by resonance in GABAAergic interneuronal circuits. PMID:27522077

  1. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Seiichiro; Haga, Hisashi; Yasuda, Motoaki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  2. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin beta based recombinant antibodies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Talwar, G P; Vyas, Hemant K; Purswani, Shilpi; Gupta, Jagdish C

    2009-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are unique targets for the control of fertility. Immunological approaches to neutralizing these hormones have additional utility in cancer treatment. Vaccines have been developed against both GnRH and hCG and these have undergone Phase I/II clinical trials documenting their safety, reversibility and efficacy. The heterospecies dimer hCG vaccine prevented pregnancy in women of proven fertility without impairment of ovulation or derangement of menstrual regularity and bleeding profiles. The protective threshold of antibody titers to achieve efficacy was determined in these first-ever trials. Recently, a recombinant vaccine against the beta subunit of hCG linked to the B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin has been made and expressed as a glycosylated conjugate in Pichia pastoris. Experiments indicate its ability to generate antibodies above the protective threshold in all immunized Balb/c mice. Ectopic expression of hCG/hCGbeta is observed in many advanced stage cancers of various origins. A chimeric high affinity and specific recombinant antibody against hCGbeta linked to curcumin kills hCGbeta expressing T lymphoblastic leukemia cells without any deleterious effect. Several synthetic and recombinant vaccines have been developed against GnRH. These reduce serum testosterone to castration levels causing atrophy of the prostate. Three Phase I/II clinical trials conducted in India and Austria have shown that these vaccines elicit non-surgical reduction of testosterone, a fall in prostate specific antigen and clinical improvement of prostate carcinoma patients. A multimer recombinant vaccine against GnRH has high efficacy for sterilization of pigs and other animals.

  4. Studies of the biological properties of human beta-defensin 1.

    PubMed

    Pazgier, Marzena; Prahl, Adam; Hoover, David M; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2007-01-19

    Defensins are small (30-45 amino acid residues) cationic proteins with broad antimicrobial activity against many bacteria and fungi, some enveloped viruses, and other activities such as chemoattraction of a range of different cell types to the sites of inflammation. These proteins represent attractive targets for developing novel antimicrobial agents and modulators of immune responses with therapeutic applicability. In this report, we present the results of functional and structural studies of 26 single-site mutants of human beta-defensin 1 (hBD1). All mutants were assayed for antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (ATCC strain 25922) and for chemotactic activity with CCR6-transfected HEK293 cells. To analyze the structural implications of mutagenesis and to verify the correctness of the disulfide connectivity, we used x-ray crystallography to conduct complete structural studies for 10 mutants in which the topology of disulfides was the same as in the native hBD1. Mutations did not induce significant changes of the tertiary structure, suggesting that the observed alterations of biological properties of the mutants were solely associated with changes in the respective side chains. We found that cationic residues located near the C terminus (Arg(29), Lys(31), Lys(33), and Lys(36)) of hBD1 define most of the anti-E. coli in vitro activity of this protein. In turn, nearly all mutations altering the CCR6-mediated chemotaxis are located at one area of the protein, defined by the N-terminal alpha-helical region (Asp(1)... Ser(8)) and a few topologically adjacent residues (Lys(22), Arg(29), and Lys(33)). These experimental results allow for the first time drafting of the CCR6-epitope for a defensin molecule.

  5. Genistein potentiates the effect of 17-beta estradiol on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Fraidoon; Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Valiani, Ali; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sanaei, Masumeh; Hakemi, Mazdak Ganjalikhani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors. This cancer may be due to a multistep process with an accumulation of epigenetic alterations in tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), leading to hypermethylation of the genes. Hypermethylation of TSGs is associated with silencing and inactivation of them. It is well-known that DNA hypomethylation is the initial epigenetic abnormality recognized in human tumors. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is one of the TSGs which modulates gene transcription and its hypermethylation is because of overactivity of DNA methyltransferases. Fortunately, epigenetic changes especially hypermethylation can be reversed by pharmacological compounds such as genistein (GE) and 17-beta estradiol (E2) which involve in preventing the development of certain cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of GE on ERα and DNMT1 genes expression and also apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of GE and E2 on HCC. Materials and Methods: Cells were treated with various concentrations of GE and E2 and the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. Furthermore, cells were treated with single dose of GE and E2 (25 μM) and flow cytometry assay was performed. The expression level of the genes was determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: GE increased ERα and decreased DNMT1 genes expression, GE and E2 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis significantly. Conclusion: GE can epigenetically increase ERα expression by inhibition of DNMT1 expression which in turn increases apoptotic effect of E2. Furthermore, a combination of GE and E2 can induce apoptosis more significantly. PMID:27656602

  6. The Role of Thymosin Beta 4 on Odontogenic Differentiation in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that overexpression of thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) in transgenic mice promotes abnormal hair growth and tooth development, but the role of Tβ4 in dental pulp regeneration was not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 on odontoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism regulating pulp regeneration in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Our results demonstrate that mRNA and protein expression of Tβ4 is upregulated during odontogenic differentiation in HDPCs. Transfection with Tβ4 siRNA decreases OM-induced odontoblastic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA expression of differentiation markers, and calcium nodule formation. In contrast, Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide promotes these processes by enhancing the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2, BMP4, phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2/3, and expression of transcriptional factors such as Runx2 and Osterix, which were blocked by the BMP inhibitor noggin. The expression of integrin receptors α1, α2, α3, and β1 and downstream signaling molecules including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), p-paxillin, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) were increased by Tβ4 peptide in HDPCs. ILK siRNA blocked Tβ4-induced odontoblastic differentiation and activation of the BMP and MAPK transcription factor pathways in HDPCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that Tβ4 plays a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs and activation of Tβ4 could provide a novel mechanism for regenerative endodontics. PMID:23613983

  7. Protein kinase C-{beta}, fibronectin, {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1}-integrin and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} are required for phorbol diester-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Glesne, D.; Huberman, E.

    2001-12-01

    The human myeloid HL-60 cell line and its cell variant HL-525 were used to study signaling events leading to apoptosis induction by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Unlike parental cells, HL-525 cells are PKC-{beta} deficient and resistant to PMA-induced apoptosis. These cells regain susceptibility to apoptosis induction after transfection with a PKC-{beta} expression vector. By using this vector and specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), it was established that PMA-induced apoptosis also called for an interaction between cell-surface {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1}-integrin and its deposited ligand fibronectin (FN), which is downstream of PKC-{beta} activation. Experiments with mAbs, the PKC-{beta} vector, and exogenous FN revealed that the next step entailed an interaction between secreted tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and its type I receptor. By using a sphingomyelinase inhibitor, it was concluded that the subsequent step involved ceramide production. Moreover, a permeable ceramide was effective in inducing apoptosis in both HL-60 and HL-525 cells, and this induction was caspase-1 and/or -4 dependent because an inhibitor of these caspases abrogated the induced apoptosis. Based on these and related differentiation studies, we conclude that the above signaling events, the early ones in particular, are shared with PMA-induced macrophage differentiation in the HL-60 cells. It is likely that once these cells acquire their macrophage phenotype and perform their tasks, they become superfluous and are eliminated from the body by a self-triggered apoptotic process that involves our proposed signaling scheme.

  8. Evidence for increased beta-adrenoreceptor responsiveness induced by 14 days of simulated microgravity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Polet, J. L.; Engelke, K. A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Lane, L. D.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Eckberg, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    We studied hemodynamic responses to alpha- and beta-receptor agonists in eight healthy men before and after 14 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) to test the hypothesis that increased adrenoreceptor responsiveness is induced by prolonged exposure to simulated microgravity. Steady-state infusions of isoproterenol (Iso) at rates of 0.005, 0.01, and 0.02 microgram.kg-1.min-1 were used to assess beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoreceptor responsiveness. Infusions of phenylephrine (PE) at rates of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 microgram.kg-1.min-1 were used to assess responsiveness of alpha 1-vascular adrenoreceptors. Slopes calculated from linear regressions between Iso and PE doses and changes in beat-to-beat heart rate, blood pressure, and leg vascular resistance (occlusion plethysmography) for each subject were used as an index of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor responsiveness. HDT increased the slopes of heart rate (1,056 +/- 107 to 1,553 +/- 83 beats micrograms-1.kg-1.min-1; P = 0.014) and vasodilation (-469 +/- 111 to -1,446 +/- 309 peripheral resistance units.microgram-1.kg-1.min-1; P = 0.0224) to Iso infusion. There was no alteration in blood pressure or vascular resistance responses to PE infusion after HDT. Our results provide evidence that simulated microgravity causes selective increases in beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoreceptor responsiveness without affecting alpha 1-vascular adrenoreceptor responses.

  9. Stoichiometry and pharmacology of two human alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor types.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Mirko; Bermudez, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    The alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant nAChR subtype in the brain, where it forms the high-affinity binding site for nicotine. The alpha4beta2 nAChR belongs to a gene family of ligand-gated ion channels that also includes muscle nAChRs, GABAA receptors, and glycine receptors and that assembles into pentameric structures. alpha4 and beta2 nAChR subunits expressed heterologously in Xenopus laevis oocytes assemble into a mixture of high- and low-affinity functional receptors, giving rise to biphasic ACh concentration-response curves (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001). High- and low-affinity alpha4beta2 nAChRs differ significantly in their functional and pharmacological properties (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001; Nelson et al., 2003) and result from the assembly of alpha4 and beta2 subunits into two distinct stoichiometric arrangements: (alpha4)2(beta2)3(high-affinity subtype) and (alpha4)3(beta2)2 (low-affinity subtype) (Nelson et al., 2003). In this study we have examined the functional and pharmacological properties of high- and low-affinity alpha4beta2 receptors using two-electrode voltage clamp procedures on Xenopus oocytes transfected with high (1:10) or low (10:1) ratios of alpha4/beta2 cDNAs, which yield high (1:10)- or low (10:1)- affinity receptors with monophasic ACh concentration- response curves. Furthermore, to determine the stoichiometry of high- and low-affinity receptors expressed heterologously by Xenopus oocytes, we have determined the stoichiometry of high- and low-affinity alpha4beta2 receptors by mutating a highly conserved hydrophobic residue in the middle (position 9') of the pore-lining domain, which increases agonist potency in a manner that allows predictions on subunit composition (Cooper et al., 1991; Revah et al., 1991; Labarca et al., 1995; Boorman et al., 2000).

  10. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) causes a persistent increase in steady-state amounts of type I and type III collagen and fibronectin mRNAs in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, J; Rosenbloom, J; Jimenez, S A

    1987-01-01

    It has been previously shown that transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is capable of stimulating fibroblast collagen and fibronectin biosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms involved in TGF beta stimulation of fibroblast biosynthetic activity. Our results indicate that TGF beta causes a marked enhancement of the production of types I and III collagens and fibronectin by cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts. The rate of collagen production by fibroblasts exposed to TGF beta was 2-3-fold greater than that of control cells. These effects were associated with a 2-3-fold increase in the steady-state amounts of types I and III collagen mRNAs and a 5-8-fold increase in the amounts of fibronectin mRNAs as determined by dot-blot hybridization with specific cloned cDNA probes. In addition, the increased production of collagen and fibronectin and the increased amounts of their corresponding mRNAs remained elevated for at least 72 h after removal of TGF beta. These findings suggest that TGF beta may play a major role in the normal regulation of extracellular matrix production in vivo and may contribute to the development of pathological states of fibrosis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3501287

  11. Comparative mapping of a gorilla-derived alpha satellite DNA clone on great ape and human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Miller, D A; Shridhar, V; Rocchi, M; Miller, O J; Ward, D C

    1991-11-01

    We have isolated an alpha satellite DNA clone, pG3.9, from gorilla DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes under high stringency conditions revealed that pG3.9 identifies homologous sequences at the centromeric region of ten gorilla chromosomes, and, with few exceptions, also recognizes the homologous chromosomes in human. A pG3.9-like alphoid DNA is present on a larger number of orangutan chromosomes, but, in contrast, is present on only two chromosomes in the chimpanzee. These results show that the chromosomal subsets of related alpha satellite DNA sequences may undergo different patterns of evolution.

  12. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the human. gamma. -actin gene: Differential evolution, location, and expression of the cytoskeletal BETA- and. gamma. -actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, H.P.; Eddy, R.; Shows, T.; Kedes, L.; Gunning, P.

    1988-04-01

    The accumulation of the cytoskeletal ..beta..-and ..gamma..-actin mRNAs was determined in a variety of mouse tissues and organs. The ..beta..-iosform is always expressed in excess of the ..gamma..-isoform. However, the molar ratio of ..beta..- to ..gamma..-actin mRNA varies from 1.7 in kidney and testis to 12 in sarcomeric muscle to 114 in liver. The authors conclude that, whereas the cytoskeletal ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actins are truly coexpressed, their mRNA levels are subject to differential regulation between different cell types. The human ..gamma..-actin gene has been cloned and sequenced, and its chromosome location has been determined. The gene is located on human chromosome 17, unlike ..beta..-actin which is on chromosome 7. Thus, if these genes are also unlinked in the mouse, the coexpression of the ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin genes in rodent tissues cannot be determined by gene linkage. Comparison of the human ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin genes reveals that noncoding sequences in the 5'-flanking region and in intron III have been conserved since the duplication that gave rise to these two genes. In contrast, there are sequences in intron III and the 3'-untranslated region which are not present in the ..beta..-actin gene but are conserved between the human ..gamma..-actin and the Xenopus borealis type 1 actin genes. Such conserved noncoding sequences may contribute to the coexpression of ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin or to the unique regulation and function of the ..gamma..-actin gene. Finally, the authors demonstrate that the human ..gamma..-actin gene is expressed after introduction into mouse L cells and C2 myoblasts and that, upon fusion of C2 cells to form myotubes, the human ..gamma..-actin gene is appropriately regulated.

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta, transforming growth factor-beta receptor II, and p27Kip1 expression in nontumorous and neoplastic human pituitaries.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Qian, X.; Kulig, E.; Sanno, N.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Kovacs, K.; Young, W. F.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been implicated in the regulation of normal and neoplastic anterior pituitary cell function. TGF-beta regulates the expression of various proteins, including p27Kip1 (p27), a cell cycle inhibitory protein. We examined TGF-beta, TGF-beta type II receptor (TGF-beta-RII), and p27 expression in normal pituitaries, pituitary adenomas, and carcinomas to analyze the possible roles of these proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis. Normal pituitary, pituitary adenomas, and pituitary carcinomas all expressed TGF-beta and TGF-beta-RII immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 isoforms and TGF-beta-RII in normal pituitaries and pituitary adenomas. Pituitary adenomas cells cultured for 7 days in defined media showed a biphasic response to TGF-beta with significant inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at higher concentrations (10(-9) mol/L) and stimulation of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at lower concentrations (10(-13) mol/L) of TGF-beta 1 in gonadotroph adenomas. Immunohistochemical analysis for p27 protein expression showed the highest levels in nontumorous pituitaries with decreased immunoreactivity in adenomas and carcinomas. When nontumorous pituitaries and various adenomas were analyzed for p27 and specific hormone production, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone cells and tumors had the highest percentages of cells expressing p27, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells and tumors had the lowest percentages. Immunoblotting analysis showed that adrenocorticotrophic hormone adenomas also had the lowest levels of p27 protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization analysis did not show significant differences in p27 mRNA expression in the various types of adenomas or in nontumorous pituitaries. In situ hybridization for p27 mRNA showed similar

  14. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  15. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; diIorio, Philip; Brostowin, Dean; Leehy, Linda; Yang, Chaoxing; Urano, Fumihiko; Harlan, David M; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice treated with alogliptin show improved human insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation compared to control mice engrafted with the same donor islets. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets provide a useful model to interrogate potential therapies to improve human islet function and survival in vivo. PMID:24376359

  16. Modulation of DNA polymerase beta-dependent base excision repair in cultured human cells after low dose exposure to arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Peter; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2008-05-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is crucial for development and for the repair of endogenous DNA damage. However, unlike nucleotide excision repair, the regulation of BER is not well understood. Arsenic, a well-established human carcinogen, is known to produce oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired primarily by BER, whilst high doses of arsenic can also inhibit DNA repair. However, the mechanism of repair inhibition by arsenic and the steps inhibited are not well defined. To address this question we have investigated the regulation of DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and AP endonuclease (APE1), in response to low, physiologically relevant doses of arsenic. GM847 lung fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to sodium arsenite, As(III), and mRNA, protein levels and BER activity were assessed. Both Pol {beta} and APE1 mRNA exhibited significant dose-dependant down regulation at doses of As(III) above 1 {mu}M. However, at lower doses Pol {beta} mRNA and protein levels, and consequently, BER activity were significantly increased. In contrast, APE1 protein levels were only marginally increased by low doses of As(III) and there was no correlation between APE1 and overall BER activity. Enzyme supplementation of nuclear extracts confirmed that Pol {beta} was rate limiting. These changes in BER correlated with overall protection against sunlight UV-induced toxicity at low doses of As(III) and produced synergistic toxicity at high doses. The results provide evidence that changes in BER due to low doses of arsenic could contribute to a non-linear, threshold dose response for arsenic carcinogenesis.

  17. Thermodynamic insights into the structural basis governing the donor substrate recognition by human beta1,4-galactosyltransferase 7.

    PubMed

    Daligault, Franck; Rahuel-Clermont, Sophie; Gulberti, Sandrine; Cung, Manh-Thong; Branlant, Guy; Netter, Patrick; Magdalou, Jacques; Lattard, Virginie

    2009-03-15

    Human beta1,4-GalT (galactosyltransferase)7 is involved in the biosynthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker protein region (GlcAbeta1-->3Galbeta1-->3Galbeta1-->4Xylbeta1) (where GlcA is glucuronic acid and Xyl is xylose) of proteoglycans, by catalysing the transfer of Gal (galactose) from the uridine 5'-diphosphogalactose to a Xyl residue. This reaction is rate-limiting in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis. In the present study, we established a large-scale production system of beta1,4-GalT7 fused with the maltose-binding protein to study substrate recognition. Calorimetric binding studies showed that the binding of the donor substrate UDP-Gal largely promoted binding of the acceptor substrate. To identify the structural basis governing substrate recognition, we used a fragment-based approach involving the artificial breakdown of the donor substrate into smaller fragments and characterization of their respective binding to the enzyme by isothermal titration calorimetry. The beta-phosphate, and to a lesser extent the alpha-phosphate, largely contributed to the binding energy. However, the uridine moiety was found to be essential for the optimal positioning of the donor substrate within the binding site. Unexpectedly, the contribution of the Gal moiety in substrate recognition was found to be negligible. Indeed, UDP-Gal, but also various UDP-sugars, could bind to beta1,4-GalT7. Surprisingly, in contrast with other GalTs, soluble beta1,4-GalT7 was able to transfer Glc (glucose), Xyl and, to a lesser extent GlcA and GlcNAc (N-acetyl glucosamine), to acceptor sugars, whereas UDP-Man (mannose) and UDP-GalNAc (N-acetyl galactosamine) were not substrates.

  18. Production, purification, and crystallization of human interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme derived from an Escherichia coli expression system.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, J J; Grasberger, B L; Trakshel, G; Huston, E E; Helaszek, C T; Smallwood, A M; Ator, M A; Banks, T M; Brake, P G; Ciccarelli, R B

    1995-10-01

    Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) is a cysteine protease that catalyzes the conversion of the inactive precursor form of IL-1 beta to an active mature form. The mature form of IL-1 beta is involved in mediating inflammatory responses and in the progression of autoimmune diseases. We recently reported on the production of active human ICE in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system (Wang XM et al., 1994, Gene 145:273-277). Because the levels of expression achieved with this system were limiting for the purpose of performing detailed biochemical and biophysical studies, we examined the production of ICE in Escherichia coli. By using a tac promoter-based expression system and fusion to thioredoxin we were able to recover high levels of active ICE protein. The expressed protein, which was distributed between the soluble and insoluble fractions, was purified to homogeneity from both fractions using a combination of classical and affinity chromatography. Comparisons of ICE derived from both fractions indicated that they were comparable in their specific activities, subunit composition, and sensitivities to specific ICE inhibitors. The combined yields of ICE obtained from the soluble and insoluble fractions was close to 1 mg/L of induced culture. Recombinant human ICE was crystallized in the presence of a specific ICE inhibitor in a form suitable for X-ray crystallographic analysis. This readily available source of ICE will facilitate the further characterization of this novel and important protease.

  19. The Evolutionary Origin of Man Can Be Traced in the Layers of Defunct Ancestral Alpha Satellites Flanking the Active Centromeres of Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shepelev, Valery A.; Alexandrov, Alexander A.; Yurov, Yuri B.; Alexandrov, Ivan A.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha satellite domains that currently function as centromeres of human chromosomes are flanked by layers of older alpha satellite, thought to contain dead centromeres of primate progenitors, which lost their function and the ability to homogenize satellite repeats, upon appearance of a new centromere. Using cladistic analysis of alpha satellite monomers, we elucidated complete layer patterns on chromosomes 8, 17, and X and related them to each other and to primate alpha satellites. We show that discrete and chronologically ordered alpha satellite layers are partially symmetrical around an active centromere and their succession is partially shared in non-homologous chromosomes. The layer structure forms a visual representation of the human evolutionary lineage with layers corresponding to ancestors of living primates and to entirely fossil taxa. Surprisingly, phylogenetic comparisons suggest that alpha satellite arrays went through periods of unusual hypermutability after they became “dead” centromeres. The layer structure supports a model of centromere evolution where new variants of a satellite repeat expanded periodically in the genome by rounds of inter-chromosomal transfer/amplification. Each wave of expansion covered all or many chromosomes and corresponded to a new primate taxon. Complete elucidation of the alpha satellite phylogenetic record would give a unique opportunity to number and locate the positions of major extinct taxa in relation to human ancestors shared with extant primates. If applicable to other satellites in non-primate taxa, analysis of centromeric layers could become an invaluable tool for phylogenetic studies. PMID:19749981

  20. A pseudodeficiency allele (D152N) of the human beta-glucuronidase gene.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Islam, M R; Sly, W; Chabas, A; Wevers, R; de Jong, J; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1995-10-01

    We present evidence that a 480G-->A transition in the coding region of the beta-glucuronidase gene, which results in an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine substitution at amino acid position 152 (D152N), produces a pseudodeficiency allele (GUSBp) that leads to greatly reduced levels of beta-glucuronidase activity without apparent deleterious consequences. The 480G-->A mutation was found initially in the pseudodeficient mother of a child with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPSVII), but it was not on her disease-causing allele, which carried the L176F mutation. The 480G-->A change was also present in an unrelated individual with another MPSVII allele who had unusually low beta-glucuronidase activity, but whose clinical symptoms were probably unrelated to beta-glucuronidase deficiency. This individual also had an R357X mutation, probably on his second allele. We screened 100 unrelated normal individuals for the 480G-->A mutation with a PCR method and detected one carrier. Reduced beta-glucuronidase activity following transfection of COS cells with the D152N cDNA supported the causal relationship between the D152N allele and pseudodeficiency. The mutation reduced the fraction of expressed enzyme that was secreted. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the reduced activity in COS cells was due to accelerated intracellular turnover of the D152N enzyme. They also suggested that a potential glycosylation site created by the mutation is utilized in approximately 50% of the enzyme expressed.

  1. Beta-endorphin, but not substance-P, is increased by acute stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Schedlowski, M; Flüge, T; Richter, S; Tewes, U; Schmidt, R E; Wagner, T O

    1995-01-01

    The role of neuropeptides in the psychoneuroendocrinological stress response is largely unknown. In this study the effect of acute psychological stress on beta-endorphin and substance-P plasma concentrations was investigated and further the effect of different anxiety levels or control attributions on beta-endorphin or substance-P levels were determined. Blood samples were obtained from 47 inexperienced tandem-parachutists 2 h before, immediately after, and 1 h after a parachute jump and plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and substance-P were analysed. Anxiety levels and control attributions were assessed by psychometric scales. Whereas substance-P concentrations seemed to be unaffected by the jump stress, there was a transient but significant increase in beta-endorphin levels immediately after jumping. However, subjects higher in state-anxiety at the point of jumping (exit) displayed higher substance-P values at all three time points compared to the "low-anxiety" jumpers. In addition, stress-induced beta-endorphin secretion was dependent on subjective control attributions.

  2. Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex from human placenta with a photoreactive neuraminidase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.G.; Louie, A.; Potier, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex in human placenta was carried out using the radioactive photoprobe, 9-S-(4-azido-3,5-3H-2-nitrophenyl)-5-acetamido-2,6 anhydro-2,3,5,9- tetradeoxy-9- thio-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-enonic acid. Two intensely labeled bands at 61 and 46 kD were detected with autoradiography. Labeling of the 46 kD protein was blocked with the inclusion of the surfactant Triton X-100 in the photolysis mixture, indicating a nonspecific, hydrophobic interaction. The 61 kD protein was protected from labeling only when the neuraminidase inhibitor 2,3 dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (1 mM) was present during photolysis. These results suggest that the neuraminidase activity resides among the proteins in the 61 kD molecular weight range comigrating with the lysosomal beta-galactosidase, under denaturing conditions.

  3. TGF{beta}-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiaotang

    2008-05-02

    TGF{beta} is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGF{beta} inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGF{beta} upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGF{beta} arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGF{beta}-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGF{beta}-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  4. Nonsense codons in human beta-globin mRNA result in the production of mRNA degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S K; Sigmund, C D; Gross, K W; Maquat, L E

    1992-01-01

    Human beta zero-thalassemic beta-globin genes harboring either a frameshift or a nonsense mutation that results in the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation have been previously introduced into the germ line of mice (S.-K. Lim, J.J. Mullins, C.-M. Chen, K. Gross, and L.E. Maquat, EMBO J. 8:2613-2619, 1989). Each transgene produces properly processed albeit abnormally unstable mRNA as well as several smaller RNAs in erythroid cells. These smaller RNAs are detected only in the cytoplasm and, relative to mRNA, are longer-lived and are missing sequences from either exon I or exons I and II. In this communication, we show by using genetics and S1 nuclease transcript mapping that the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation is mechanistically required for the abnormal RNA metabolism. We also provide evidence that generation of the smaller RNAs is a cytoplasmic process: the 5' ends of intron 1-containing pre-mRNAs were normal, the rates of removal of introns 1 and 2 were normal, and studies inhibiting RNA synthesis with actinomycin D demonstrated a precursor-product relationship between full-length mRNA and the smaller RNAs. In vivo, about 50% of the full-length species that undergo decay are degraded to the smaller RNAs and the rest are degraded to undetectable products. Exposure of erythroid cells that expressed a normal human beta-globin transgene to either cycloheximide or puromycin did not result in the generation of the smaller RNAs. Therefore, a drug-induced reduction in cellular protein synthesis does not reproduce this aspect of cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism. These data suggest that the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation in either exon I or exon II results in the cytoplasmic generation of discrete mRNA degradation products that are missing sequences from exon I or exons I and II. Since these degradation products appear to be the same for all nonsense codons tested, there is no correlation between the position of

  5. The functional importance of a cap site-proximal region of the human prointerleukin 1 beta gene is defined by viral protein trans-activation.

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, G W; Monks, B G; Geist, L J; Monick, M M; Monroy, M A; Stinski, M F; Webb, A C; Dayer, J M; Auron, P E; Fenton, M J

    1992-01-01

    Prointerleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) is a cytokine that mediates a broad range of biological activities. Genomic sequences that regulate IL-1 beta transcription include both inducible regulatory elements located more than 2,700 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (cap site) and proximal elements located near the TATA box of this gene. In this study, we focused on the identification and characterization of trans-acting nuclear regulatory proteins that bind to the cap site-proximal region of the human IL-1 beta gene. We identified a protein, termed NFIL-1 beta A (NF beta A), that binds to a highly conserved 12-bp DNA sequence (-49 to -38) located upstream of the TATA box motif in both the human and murine IL-1 beta genes. The IL-1 alpha gene, which lacks a TATA motif, does not possess an NF beta A-binding sequence within the promoter region, suggesting that NF beta A may selectively regulate IL-1 beta expression. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified several distinct DNA-protein complexes that are expressed in a cell-type-specific manner. In monocytic cell lines, the relative abundance of these complexes varies rapidly following stimulation of the cells with phorbol esters or lipopolysaccharide. UV cross-linking analysis identified two distinct DNA-binding polypeptides that comprise distinct complexes. The functional role of NF beta A was assessed in transient transfection assays. These data indicate that NF beta A is required for both basal and inducible promoter activity in monocytic cells. Furthermore, the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene product requires the presence of NF beta A in order to trans-activate the proximal IL-1 beta promoter in a monocytic cell line. We propose that NF beta A is a factor that mediates either direct or indirect activation by the immediate-early 1 gene product. The proximity of this essential factor to the TATA motif suggests a possible role in transcriptional initiation. Images PMID:1630455

  6. A Novel Di-Leucine Motif at the N-Terminus of Human Organic Solute Transporter Beta Is Essential for Protein Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuhua; Soroka, Carol J.; Sun, An-Qiang; Backos, Donald S.; Mennone, Albert; Suchy, Frederick J.; Boyer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The heteromeric membrane protein Organic Solute Transporter alpha/beta is the major bile acid efflux transporter in the intestine. Physical association of its alpha and beta subunits is essential for their polarized basolateral membrane localization and function in the transport of bile acids and other organic solutes. We identified a highly conserved acidic dileucine motif (-EL20L21EE) at the extracellular amino-tail of organic solute transporter beta from multiple species. To characterize the role of this protein interacting domain in the association of the human beta and alpha subunits and in membrane localization of the transporter, Leu20 and Leu21 on the amino-tail of human organic solute transporter beta were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation study in HEK293 cells demonstrated that substitution of the leucine residues with alanines prevented the interaction of the human beta mutant with the alpha subunit. Membrane biotinylation demonstrated that the LL/AA mutant eliminated membrane expression of both subunits. Computational-based modelling of human organic solute transporter beta suggested that the LL/AA mutation substantially alters both the structure and lipophilicity of the surface, thereby not only affecting the interaction with the alpha subunit but also possibly impacting the capacity of the beta subunit to traffick through the cell and interact with the membrane. In summary, our findings indicate that the dileucine motif in the extracellular N-terminal region of human organic solute transporter beta subunit plays a critical role in the association with the alpha subunit and in its polarized plasma membrane localization. PMID:27351185

  7. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Massumi, Mohammad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Nalla, Amarnadh; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Nagy, Kristina; Neely, Eric; Gull, Rida; Nagy, Andras; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have developed an abbreviated five-stage protocol (25–30 days) to generate human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-like Cells (ES-DBCs). We showed that Geltrex, as an extracellular matrix, could support the generation of ES-DBCs more efficiently than that of the previously described culture systems. The activation of FGF and Retinoic Acid along with the inhibition of BMP, SHH and TGF-beta led to the generation of 75% NKX6.1+/NGN3+ Endocrine Progenitors. The inhibition of Notch and tyrosine kinase receptor AXL, and the treatment with Exendin-4 and T3 in the final stage resulted in 35% mono-hormonal insulin positive cells, 1% insulin and glucagon positive cells and 30% insulin and NKX6.1 co-expressing cells. Functionally, ES-DBCs were responsive to high glucose in static incubation and perifusion studies, and could secrete insulin in response to successive glucose stimulations. Mitochondrial metabolic flux analyses using Seahorse demonstrated that the ES-DBCs could efficiently metabolize glucose and generate intracellular signals to trigger insulin secretion. In conclusion, targeting selected signaling pathways for 25–30 days was sufficient to generate ES-DBCs in vitro. The ability of ES-DBCs to secrete insulin in response to glucose renders them a promising model for the in vitro screening of drugs, small molecules or genes that may have potential to influence beta-cell function. PMID:27755557

  8. Interaction of human TNF and beta2-microglobulin with Tanapox virus-encoded TNF inhibitor, TPV-2L.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Jeng, David; Singh, Rajkumari; Coughlin, Jake; Essani, Karim; McFadden, Grant

    2009-04-10

    Tanapox virus (TPV) encodes and expresses a secreted TNF-binding protein, TPV-2L or gp38, that displays inhibitory properties against TNF from diverse mammalian species, including human, monkey, canine and rabbit. TPV-2L also has sequence similarity with the MHC-class I heavy chain and interacts differently with human TNF as compared to the known cellular TNF receptors or any of the known virus-encoded TNF receptor homologs derived from many poxviruses. In order to determine the TNF binding region in TPV-2L, various TPV-2L C-terminal truncations and internal deletions were created and the muteins were expressed using recombinant baculovirus vectors. C-terminal deletions from TPV-2L resulted in reduced binding affinity for human TNF and specific mutants of TNF that discriminate between TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. However, deletion of C-terminal 42 amino acid residues totally abolished the binding of human TNF and its mutants. Removal of any of the predicted internal domains resulted in a mutant TPV-2L protein incapable of binding to human TNF. Deletion of C-terminal residues also affected the ability of TPV-2L to block TNF-induced cellular cytotoxicity. In addition to TNF, TPV-2L can also form complexes with human beta2-microglobulin to form a novel macromolecular complex. In summary, the TPV-2L protein is a bona fide MHC-1 heavy chain family member that binds and inhibits human TNF in a fashion very distinct from other known poxvirus-encoded TNF inhibitors, and also can form a novel complex with the human MHC-1 light chain, beta2-microglobulin.

  9. Antisense targeting of TGF-{beta}1 augments BMP-induced upregulation of osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1 in human Saos-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhong-Jian . E-mail: zshen2@wisc.edu; Kook Kim, Sang; Youn Jun, Do; Park, Wan; Ho Kim, Young; Malter, James S.; Jo Moon, Byung . E-mail: bjmoon@mail.knu.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    Despite commonalities in signal transduction in osteoblasts from different species, the role of TGF-{beta}1 on bone formation remains elusive. In particular, the role of autocrine TGF-{beta}1 on human osteoblasts is largely unknown. Here we show the effect of TGF-{beta}1 knock-down on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts induced by BMP2. Treatment with antisense TGF-{beta}1 moderately increased the rate of cell proliferation, which was completely reversed by the exogenous addition of TGF-{beta}1. Notably, TGF-{beta}1 blockade significantly enhanced BMP2-induced upregulation of mRNAs encoding osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1, which was suppressed by exogenous TGF-{beta}1. Moreover, TGF-{beta}1 knock-down increased BMP2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 as well as their nuclear import, which paralleled a reduction of inhibitory Smad6. These data suggest autocrine TGF-{beta}1 antagonizes BMP signaling through modulation of inducible Smad6 and the activity of BMP specific Smad1/5.

  10. Autologous human-derived bone marrow cells exposed to a novel TGF-beta1 fusion protein for the treatment of critically sized tibial defect.

    PubMed

    Becerra, José; Guerado, Enrique; Claros, Silvia; Alonso, Mônica; Bertrand, María L; González, Carlos; Andrades, José A

    2006-03-01

    We report the first clinical case of transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived cells in vitro exposed to a novel recombinant human transforming growth factor (rhTGF)-beta1 fusion protein bearing a collagen-binding domain (rhTGF-beta(1)-F2), dexamethasone (DEX) and beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP). When such culture-expanded cells were loaded into porous ceramic scaffolds and transplanted into the bone defect of a 69-year-old man, they differentiated into bone tissue. Marrow cells were obtained from the iliac crest and cultured in collagen gels impregnated with rhTGF-beta1-F2. Cells were selected under serum-restricted conditions in rhTGF-beta(1)-F2-containing medium for 10 days, expanded in 20% serum for 22 days and osteoinduced for 3 additional days in DEX/beta-GP-supplemented medium. We found that the cell number harvested from rhTGF-beta(1)-F2-treated cultures was significantly higher (2.3- to 3-fold) than that from untreated cultures. rhTGF-beta(1)-F2 treatment also significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity (2.2- to 5-fold) and osteocalcin synthesis, while calcium was only detected in rhTGF-beta(1)-F2-treated cells. Eight weeks after transplantation, most of the scaffold pores were filled with bone and marrow tissue. When we tested the same human cells treated in vitro in a rat model using diffusion chambers, there was subsequent development of cartilage and bone following the subcutaneous transplantation of rhTGF-beta(1)-F2-treated cells. This supports the suggestion that such cells were marrow-derived cells, with chondrogenic and osteogenic potential, whereas the untreated cells were not under the same conditions. The ability for differentiation into cartilage and bone tissues, combined with an extensive proliferation capacity, makes such a marrow-derived stem cell population valuable to induce bone regeneration at skeletal defect sites.

  11. Satellite cell activation induced by aerobic muscle adaptation in response to endurance exercise in humans and rodents.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Phablo; Mendes, Sávio Victor Diógenes; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande; Hirabara, Sandro Massao

    2017-02-01

    Although the requirement of satellite cells activation and expansion following injury, mechanical load or growth stimulus provoked by resistance exercise has been well established, their function in response to aerobic exercise adaptation remains unclear. A clear relationship between satellite cell expansion in fiber-type specific myosin heavy chain and aerobic performance has been related, independent of myonuclear accretion or muscle growth. However, the trigger for this activation process is not fully understood yet and it seems to be a multi-faceted and well-orchestrated process. Emerging in vitro studies suggest a role for metabolic pathways and oxygen availability for satellite cell activation, modulating the self-renewal potential and cell fate control. The goal of this review is to describe and discuss the current knowledge about the satellite cell activation and expansion in response to aerobic exercise adaptation in human and rodent models. Additionally, findings about the in vitro metabolic control, which seems be involved in the satellite cell activation and cell fate control, are presented and discussed.

  12. Evidence for Increased Beta-Adrenoreceptor Responsiveness Induced by 14 Days of Simulated Microgravity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Polet, Jill L.; Engelke, Keith A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Lane, Lynda D.

    1996-01-01

    We studied hemodynamic responses to alpha and beta receptor agonists in 8 healthy men ( 38+- 2 yrs) before and after 14 days of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) to test the hypothesis that increased adrenergic responsiveness is induced by prolonged exposure to microgravity. Immediately following a 30-min baseline period, a steady-state infusion of isoproterenol (ISO) was used to assess beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic responsiveness. ISO was infused at three graded constant rates of 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02 ug/kg/min. After heart rate and blood pressure had been allowed to return to baseline levels following ISO infusion graded infusion of phenylephrine (PE) was used to assess responsiveness of alpha I-vascular receptors. PE was infused at three graded constant rates of 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00 ug/kg/min. Each infusion interval for both drugs was 9 min. During the infusions, constant monitoring of beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate was performed and leg blood flow was measured with occlusion plethysmography at each infusion level. The slopes calculated from linear regressions between ISO and PE doses and changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and leg vascular resistance for each subject were used to represent alpha- and beta- adrenoreceptor responsiveness. Fourteen days HDT increased the slopes of heart rate (1056 +- 107 to 1553 +- 83 beats/ug/kg/min; P= 0.014) and vasodilation (-469ft +- 111 to -l446 +- 309 PRU/ug/kg/min; P =0.0224) to ISO infusion. There was no alteration in blood pressure or vascular resistance responses to PE infusion after HDT. Our results provide evidence that microgravity causes selective increases in beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic responsiveness without affecting alpha 1-vascular responses.

  13. Transfer of nonselectable genes into mouse teratocarcinoma cells and transcription of the transferred human. beta. -globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.F.; Mintz, B.

    1982-02-01

    Teratocarcinoma (TCC) stem cells can function as vehicles for the introduction of specific recombinant genes into mice. Because most genes do not code for a selectable marker, the authors investigated the transformation efficiency of vectors with a linked selectable gene. In one series, TCC cells first selected for thymidine kinase deficiency were treated with DNA from the plasmid vector PtkH..beta..1 containing the human genomic ..beta..-globin gene and the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus. A high transformation frequency was obtained after selection in hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium. Hybridization tests revealed that the majority of transformants had intact copies of the human gene among three to six total copies per cell. These were associated with cellular DNA sequences as judged from the presence of additional new restriction fragments and from stability of the sequences in tumors produced by injecting the cells subcutaneously. Total polyadenylate-containing RNA from cell cultures of two out of four transformants examined showed hybridization to the human gene probe: one RNA species resembled mature human ..beta..-globin mRNA transcripts; the others were of larger size. In differentiating tumors, various tissues, including hematopoietic cells of TCC provenance could be found. In a second model set of experiments, wild-type TCC cells were used to test a dominant-selection scheme with pSV-gpt vectors. Numerous transformants were isolated, and their transfected DNA was apparently stably integrated. Thus, any gene of choice can be transferred into TCC stem cells even without mutagenesis of the cells, and selected cell clones can be characterized. Cells of interest may then be introduced into early embryos to produce new mouse strains with predetermined genetic changes.

  14. Lack of immunological analogy between the beta-subunits of cholera toxin and human choriogonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, H F; Kellen, J A

    1986-01-01

    A chemical relatedness has been described between the beta-subunit of cholera toxin and that of the four dimeric glycoprotein hormones (hCG, hLH, hFSH and hTSH). However, antibodies induced by cholera toxin did not crossreact, when tested by labeled hCG binding and immunocytochemistry, with the beta-subunit of hCG. It appears that differences in the tertiary structures, as shown in this study, account for distinct epitopes. Similarities in biological activity between these two compounds, such as induction of adenyl cyclase or a protective effect against some tumors, are not based on immunological mechanisms.

  15. Multifunctional interleukin-1beta promotes metastasis of human lung cancer cells in SCID mice via enhanced expression of adhesion-, invasion- and angiogenesis-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Yano, Seiji; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Kanematsu, Takanori; Miki, Toyokazu; Uehara, Hisanori; Saijo, Yasuo; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Sone, Saburo

    2003-03-01

    We examined whether interleukin-1 (IL-1), a multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, progresses or regresses metastasis of lung cancer. Exogenous IL-1beta enhanced expression of various cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by A549, PC14, RERF-LC-AI, and SBC-3 cells expressing IL-1 receptors. A549 cells transduced with human IL-1beta-gene with the growth-hormone signaling-peptide sequence (A549/IL-1beta) secreted a large amount of IL-1beta protein. Overexpression of IL-1beta resulted in augmentation of expression of the cytokines, ICAM-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). A549/IL-1beta cells intravenously inoculated into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice distributed to the lung more efficiently and developed lung metastasis much more rapidly than did control A549 cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-IL-1beta antibody inhibited formation of lung metastasis by A549/IL-1beta cells. Moreover, A549/IL-1beta cells inoculated in the subcutis grew more rapidly, without necrosis, than did control A549 cells, which produced smaller tumors with central necrosis, suggesting involvement of angiogenesis in addition to enhanced binding in the high metastatic potential of A549/IL-1beta cells. Histological analyses showed that more host-cell infiltration, fewer apoptotic cells, more vascularization, and higher MMP activity were observed in tumors derived from A549/IL-1beta cells, compared with tumors derived from control A549 cells. These findings suggest that IL-1beta facilitates metastasis of lung cancer via promoting multiple events, including adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis.

  16. Cyclic AMP induces transforming growth factor beta 2 gene expression and growth arrest in the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Y J; Kim, S J; Danielpour, D; O'Reilly, M A; Kim, K Y; Myers, C E; Trepel, J B

    1992-01-01

    The standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer is androgen ablation. Despite transitory responses, hormonally treated patients ultimately relapse with androgen-independent disease that is resistant to further hormonal manipulation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines. We report here that elevation of intracellular cAMP markedly inhibits the growth of the hormone-refractory cell line PC-3. To examine the mechanism of cAMP action in PC-3 cells, we tested the effect of the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2-cAMP) on the regulation of the potent negative growth factor transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Bt2-cAMP selectively induced the secretion of TGF-beta 2 and not TGF-beta 1 by PC-3 cells. This TGF-beta 2 was shown to be bioactive by using the CCL-64 mink lung cell assay. TGF-beta 1 was not activated despite being present at 3-fold higher concentrations than TGF-beta 2. Northern analysis showed that Bt2-cAMP induced an increase in the five characteristic TGF-beta 2 transcripts and had no effect on the level of TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 3 transcripts. TGF-beta 2 induction was only weakly enhanced by cycloheximide and was completely inhibited by actinomycin D. These data show that Bt2-cAMP induces the expression of active TGF-beta 2 by PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, suggesting a new approach to the treatment of prostate cancer and a new molecular mechanism of cAMP action. Images PMID:1373503

  17. The neuro-steroid, 3beta androstene 17alpha diol exhibits potent cytotoxic effects on human malignant glioma and lymphoma cells through different programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Graf, M R; Jia, W; Loria, R M

    2007-09-03

    The neuro-steroids 3beta-androstene-17alpha-diol (17alpha-AED), 3beta-androstene-17beta-diol (17beta-AED), 3beta-androstene-7alpha,-17beta-triol (7alpha-AET) and 3beta-androstene-7beta,-17beta-triol (7beta-AET) are metabolites of dehydroepiandrosterone and are produced in neuro-ectodermal tissue. Both epimers of androstenediols (17alpha-AED and 17beta-AED) and androstenetriols (7alpha-AET and 7beta-AET) have markedly different biological functions of their chemical analogue. We investigated the cytotoxic activity of these neuro-steroids on human T98G and U251MG glioblastoma and U937 lymphoma cells. Proliferation studies showed that 17alpha-AED is the most potent inhibitor, with an IC(50) approximately 15 microM. For T98G glioma, 90% inhibition was achieved with 25 muM of 17alpha-AED. Other neuro-steroids tested only marginally suppressed cell proliferation. Reduced cell adherence and viability could be detected after 18 h of 17alpha-AED exposure. Treatment with 17alpha-AED induced a significant level of apoptosis in U937 lymphoma cells, but not in the glioma cells. Cytopathology of 17alpha-AED-treated T98G cells revealed the presence of multiple cytoplasmic vacuoles. Acridine orange staining demonstrated the formation of acidic vesicular organelles in 17alpha-AED-treated T98G and U251MG, which was inhibited by bafilomycin A1. These findings indicate that 17alpha-AED bears the most potent cytotoxic activity of the neuro-steroids tested, and the effectiveness may depend on the number of hydroxyls and their position on the androstene molecule. These cytotoxic effects may utilize a non-apoptotic pathway in malignant glioma cells.

  18. Preventive immunization of aged and juvenile non-human primates to beta-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunization against beta-amyloid (Aβ) is a promising approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, but the optimal timing for the vaccination remains to be determined. Preventive immunization approaches may be more efficacious and associated with fewer side-effects; however, there is only limited information available from primate models about the effects of preclinical vaccination on brain amyloid composition and the neuroinflammatory milieu. Methods Ten non-human primates (NHP) of advanced age (18–26 years) and eight 2-year-old juvenile NHPs were immunized at 0, 2, 6, 10 and 14 weeks with aggregated Aβ42 admixed with monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvant, and monitored for up to 6 months. Anti-Aβ antibody levels and immune activation markers were assessed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples before and at several time-points after immunization. Microglial activity was determined by [11C]PK11195 PET scans acquired before and after immunization, and by post-mortem immunohistochemical and real-time PCR evaluation. Aβ oligomer composition was assessed by immunoblot analysis in the frontal cortex of aged immunized and non-immunized control animals. Results All juvenile animals developed a strong and sustained serum anti-Aβ IgG antibody response, whereas only 80 % of aged animals developed detectable antibodies. The immune response in aged monkeys was more delayed and significantly weaker, and was also more variable between animals. Pre- and post-immunization [11C]PK11195 PET scans showed no evidence of vaccine-related microglial activation. Post-mortem brain tissue analysis indicated a low overall amyloid burden, but revealed a significant shift in oligomer size with an increase in the dimer:pentamer ratio in aged immunized animals compared with non-immunized controls (P < 0.01). No differences were seen in microglial density or expression of classical and alternative microglial activation markers between immunized and control

  19. Long-term expression of beta-glucuronidase by genetically modified human neural progenitor cells grafted into the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Buchet, Delphine; Serguera, Ché; Zennou, Véronique; Charneau, Pierre; Mallet, Jacques

    2002-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) is an inherited disease caused by beta-glucuronidase (beta-glu) deficiency. This deficiency results in the lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in all tissues and affects a wide range of organs, including the central nervous system (CNS). Gene transfer is a promising approach to therapy for MPS VII because it allows extensive delivery of the enzyme to the affected tissues. We studied neurotransplantation of primary human cells to supply beta-glucuronidase to the CNS. Human neural progenitor cells (HNPC) were amplified and cotransduced with two lentiviral vectors, one encoding the green fluorescent protein and the other the human beta-glu. We show that these cells strongly expressed both transgenes in culture. When grafted into the mouse striatum, HNPC differentiated into neurons and astrocytes and expressed the two transgenes for at least 6 months. This study therefore paves the way for the treatment of MPS VII by long-term delivery of the appropriate enzyme.

  20. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  1. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D.

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  3. Cloning and characterization of the human beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) gene promoter: roles of the atypical TATA box and hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha in regulating beta2-GPI promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Chiang, An-Na

    2004-01-01

    Beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein primarily synthesized in the liver. The interindividual variability of beta2-GPI expression in subjects with various metabolic syndromes and disease states suggests that it may have clinical importance. However, the regulation of beta2-GPI gene expression has not been clarified. To gain more insight into the control of beta2-GPI gene expression, we cloned the 4.1-kb 5'-flanking region and characterized the proximal promoter of the beta2- GPI gene in this study. Cis -acting elements required for beta2-GPI promoter activity were identified with transient transfection assays in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 and in non-hepatic HeLa cells. Serial deletion analyses of the beta2-GPI 5'-flanking sequence revealed that the region from -197 to +7 had strong promoter activity in hepatoma cells but not in HeLa cells. Truncation and site-directed mutagenesis of putative cis -elements within this region showing an atypical TATA box and a HNF-1 (hepatic nuclear factor-1) element were both essential for the beta2-GPI promoter activity. Subsequent gel mobility shift assays confirmed the interaction of HNF-1alpha with the HNF-1 site residing downstream of the TATA box. Co-transfection of beta2-GPI promoter-luciferase vector with HNF-1alpha expression vector in Huh7 and HNF-1-deficient HeLa cells demonstrated the transactivation effect of HNF-1alpha on beta2-GPI promoter activity. In addition, overexpression of HNF-1alpha enhanced the endogenous beta2-GPI expression. These results suggest that the atypical TATA box and HNF-1 cis-element are critical for beta2-GPI transcription and HNF-1alpha may play an important role in cell-specific regulation of beta2-GPI gene expression. PMID:14984368

  4. Facilitation of Learning by Social-Emotional Feedback in Humans Is Beta-Noradrenergic-Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihov, Yoan; Mayer, Simon; Musshoff, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Kendrick, Keith M.; Hurlemann, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in dynamic environments critically depends on the ability to learn rapidly and flexibly from the outcomes of prior choices. In social environments, facial expressions of emotion often serve as performance feedback and thereby guide declarative learning. Abundant evidence implicates beta-noradrenergic signaling in the modulatory…

  5. Connexin-43 expression in oral-derived human osteoblasts after transforming growth factor-beta and prostaglandin E2 exposure.

    PubMed

    Adamo, C T; Mailhot, J M; Smith, A K; Borke, J L

    2001-01-01

    Dental implant placement stimulates a response in the supporting tissue; the response involves bone remodeling and release of wound-healing factors, including cytokines. Important factors such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), which promotes matrix synthesis, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a mediator of inflammation, have the potential to alter the communication between bone cells and interfere with implant site healing. Cells responsible for the formation of bone are interconnected to form a multicellular network. Cell-to-cell communication in this network occurs in part via gap junctions. In bone cells, the predominant gap junction protein is connexin-43. TGF-beta is a growth modulator produced by osteoblasts and released from the matrix in response to resorption and may influence the progression of periodontal disease. TGF-beta also promotes the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and adhesion molecules. PGE2 is a mediator of inflammation produced in response to periodontal pathogens. PGE2 levels in the gingival sulcular fluid have been correlated with attachment loss and bone resorption. The relationship between these factors and connexin-43 is unclear. Oral-derived (alveolar) bone was used because the phenotype of bone can differ between species and between different sites in the body. For our studies, explants of human osteoblasts were cultured on eight well plates and characterized by their expression of osteocalcin, osteonectin, alkaline phosphatase, type 1 collagen, and connexin-43. Cells were grown to near confluence on 12 well plates in 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS) Dulbecco modified Eagle medium (DMEM) and then cultured for 24 hours in 0.5% FBS DMEM before exposure to either 1, 5, or 10 ng/mL of TGF-beta in serum-free DMEM for 12 or 24 hours or to 20, 80, or 300 ng/mL of PGE2 in serum-free DMEM for 12 or 24 hours. After incubation, cells were removed from plates by scraping and assayed for connexin-43

  6. Overexpression of orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, Gpr49, in human hepatocellular carcinomas with beta-catenin mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Sakamoto, Michiie; Fujii, Gen; Tsuiji, Hitomi; Kenetaka, Kengo; Asaka, Masahiro; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2003-03-01

    To identify the genes responsible for carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we screened differentially expressed genes in several human HCC cell lines. Among these genes, Gpr49 was up-regulated in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2. Gpr49 is a member of the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily, which includes the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). However, Gpr49 remains to be an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor. By real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, overexpression (>3-fold increase compared with the corresponding noncancerous liver tissue) of Gpr49 mRNA was observed in 18 of 38 (47%) HCCs compared with corresponding noncancerous livers. Clinicopathologically, overexpression of Gpr49 was frequently observed in HCC with mutation in beta-catenin exon 3 (14 of 16 cases, 87.5%). Moreover, introduction of mutant beta-catenin into mouse hepatocytes in culture caused up-regulation of the Gpr49 mouse homologue. Therefore, Gpr49 is likely to be a target gene activated by Wnt-signaling in HCC. In conclusion, although much is still unknown, Gpr49 may be critically involved in the development of HCCs with beta-catenin mutations and has the potential to be a new therapeutic target in the treatment of HCC.

  7. Flavonoids of Herba Epimedii regulate osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells through BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-fang; Li, Guo; Chan, Chu-yan; Meng, Chun-ling; Lin, Marie Chia-mi; Chen, Yang-chao; He, Ming-liang; Leung, Ping-chung; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2010-01-15

    Herba Epimedii is one of the most commonly used Chinese herbs for treating osteoporosis. In the present study, the flavonoids of Herba Epimedii (HEF) have shown to promote the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. They were noted to enhance the mRNA expression of BMP-2, BMP-4, Runx2, beta-catenin and cyclinD1, all of which are BMP or Wnt-signaling pathway related regulators. The osteogenic effect was inhibited by the introduction of noggin and DKK-1, which is classical inhibitor of BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, respectively. These results suggest that HEF exerts promoting effect on osteogenic differentiation, which plausibly functions via the BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. Considering the therapeutic efficiency and economical issues, HEF may be a potential candidate for promoting bone regeneration. On the other hand, osteogenic differentiation of MSCs may also be a promising and attractive tool to apply in bone repair.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human mismatch repair protein MutS[beta

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Quincy; Orans, Jillian; Hast, Michael A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Changela, Anita; Modrich, Paul L.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-03-16

    MutS{beta} is a eukaryotic mismatch repair protein that preferentially targets extrahelical unpaired nucleotides and shares partial functional redundancy with MutS{alpha} (MSH2-MSH6). Although mismatch recognition by MutS{alpha} has been shown to involve a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif, little is known about the lesion-binding mechanism of MutS{beta}. Combined MSH3/MSH6 deficiency triggers a strong predisposition to cancer in mice and defects in msh2 and msh6 account for roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations. These three MutS homologs are also believed to play a role in trinucleotide repeat instability, which is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. The baculovirus overexpression and purification of recombinant human MutS{beta} and three truncation mutants are presented here. Binding assays with heteroduplex DNA were carried out for biochemical characterization. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein bound to a heteroduplex DNA substrate are also reported.

  9. Identification of a mutation in the human raloxifene response element of the transforming growth factor-beta 3 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Han, K. O.; Kang, Y. S.; Hwang, C. S.; Moon, I. G.; Yim, C. H.; Chung, H. Y.; Jang, H. C.; Yoon, H. K.; Han, I. K.; Choi, Y. K.

    2001-01-01

    The human transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) is an important cytokine to maintain bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation. Recently raloxifene response element (RRE), a new enhancer with a polypurine sequence for estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated gene activation, was identified on the TGF-beta 3 gene. Functional analysis of the RRE-mediated pathway has shown that this would be an important pathway for bone preserving effect. We found a novel mutation in the RRE sequence by single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in one of 200 Korean women. Cloning and sequencing revealed a heterozygote in which one allele had an insertion of 20 nucleotides (AGAGAGGGAGAGGGAGA GGG) between nucleotide +71 and +72 and a point mutation at nucleotide +75 (G-A transition), and the other allele had normal sequence. The insertion was a nearly perfect tandem duplication of the wild type DNA sequence. The bone mineral density of the affected woman was not much lower than that of age-matched controls. Transient transfection of the mutant allele showed no significantly different activity compared with that of the wild type allele. These observations suggest that the heterozygote variation of the RRE sequence seems not to be operative in determination of bone mass. PMID:11641521

  10. Eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis in humans require FcgammaRIIa and the integrin beta3 cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cunji; Boylan, Brian; Bougie, Dan; Gill, Joan C; Birenbaum, Jessica; Newman, Debra K; Aster, Richard H; Newman, Peter J

    2009-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia and thrombosis following treatment with the integrin alphaIIbbeta3 antagonist eptifibatide are rare complications caused by patient antibodies specific for ligand-occupied alphaIIbbeta3. Whether such antibodies induce platelet clearance by simple opsonization, by inducing mild platelet activation, or both is poorly understood. To gain insight into the mechanism by which eptifibatide-dependent antibodies initiate platelet clearance, we incubated normal human platelets with patient serum containing an alphaIIbbeta3-specific, eptifibatide-dependent antibody. We observed that in the presence of eptifibatide, patient IgG induced platelet secretion and aggregation as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of the integrin beta3 cytoplasmic domain, the platelet FcgammaRIIa Fc receptor, the protein-tyrosine kinase Syk, and phospholipase Cgamma2. Each activation event was inhibited by preincubation of the platelets with Fab fragments of the FcgammaRIIa-specific mAb IV.3 or with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2. Patient serum plus eptifibatide did not, however, activate platelets from a patient with a variant form of Glanzmann thrombasthenia that expressed normal levels of FcgammaRIIa and the alphaIIbbeta3 complex but lacked most of the beta3 cytoplasmic domain. Taken together, these data suggest a novel mechanism whereby eptifibatide-dependent antibodies engage the integrin beta3 subunit such that FcgammaRIIa and its downstream signaling components become activated, resulting in thrombocytopenia and a predisposition to thrombosis.

  11. Normal and mutant human beta-globin pre-mRNAs are faithfully and efficiently spliced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krainer, A R; Maniatis, T; Ruskin, B; Green, M R

    1984-04-01

    Human beta-globin mRNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) synthesized in vitro from a bacteriophage SP6 promoter/beta-globin gene fusion are accurately and efficiently spliced when added to a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Under optimal conditions, the first intervening sequence (IVS 1) is removed by splicing in up to 90% of the input pre-mRNA. Splicing requires ATP and in its absence the pre-mRNA is neither spliced nor cleaved at splice junctions. Splicing does not require that the pre-mRNA contain a correct 5' or 3' end, a 3' poly A tail, or a 5'-terminal cap structure. However, capping of the pre-mRNA significantly affects the specificity of in vitro processing. In the absence of a cap approximately 30%-40% of the pre-mRNA is accurately spliced, and a number of aberrantly cleaved RNAs are also detected. In contrast, capped pre-mRNAs are spliced more efficiently and produce fewer aberrant RNA species. The specificity of splice-site selection in vitro was tested by analyzing pre-mRNAs that contain beta-thalassemia splicing mutations in IVS 1. Remarkably, these mutations cause the same abnormal splicing events in vitro and in vivo. The ability to synthesize mutant pre-mRNAs and study their splicing in a faithful in vitro system provides a powerful approach to determine the mechanisms of RNA splice-site selection.

  12. Amygdalin (Laetrile) and prunasin beta-glucosidases: distribution in germ-free rat and in human tumor tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Newmark, J; Brady, R O; Grimley, P M; Gal, A E; Waller, S G; Thistlethwaite, J R

    1981-01-01

    Amygdalin, the gentiobioside derivative of mandelonitrile commonly referred to as Laetrile, is presently under intensive investigation as a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Because of this interest, we investigated the activity of beta-glucosidases that cleave glucose from amygdalin and from prunasin (mandelonitrile monoglucoside) in tissues from germ-free rats and in normal and neoplastic human tissues. Rat and human small intestinal mucosa contain high levels of activity of glucosidases that act on both of these cyanogenic glucosides. Release of glucose from these compounds was not detected in any of the human neoplastic tissues examined in the present study. These observations are consistent with reports of cyanide toxicity through the oral use of amygdalin or prunasin and pose serious questions concerning the alleged tumoricidal effect of amygdalin. PMID:6796962

  13. beta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    beta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( beta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 85 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  14. Separation of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and immunoglobulin G by a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongmo; Chae, Junseok

    2009-04-01

    This report describes a miniaturized size exclusion chromatography column that effectively preseparates raw samples for medical point-of-care testing (POCT) devices. The minicolumn is constructed of polydimethylsiloxane fabricated on a glass slide. The minicolumn separates 300 ng/ml of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) from an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-rich solution (100 μg/ml) in 7.7 min, with 2.23 resolution and 0.018 mm plate height. The complete analyte discrimination shows potential for the sample preparation stage of POCT devices for cancer screening, prognosis, and monitoring.

  15. Gender-dependent expression of alpha and beta estrogen receptors in human nontumor and tumor lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Fasco, Michael J; Hurteau, Gregory J; Spivack, Simon D

    2002-02-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) expression in human lung has been understudied, particularly in light of its potential biological importance in the female lung cancer epidemic. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to probe mRNA expression of wild-type ERalpha and ERbeta and their splice variants in human bronchogenic tumor and adjacent nontumor specimens. In tumor tissue from 13 women and 13 men, ERalpha was expressed in 85% of women versus 15% in men [P=0.001]. ERbeta was expressed equally in tumors from women versus men [92% vs. 69%, P=ns]. Both ERalpha and beta forms were expressed simultaneously in the lung tumors of 77% of women versus 15% of men [P=0.005]. Among adjacent nontumor lung specimens, 31% of the women expressed ERalpha mRNA versus 0% of men [P=0.101], and 39% of women expressed ERbeta mRNA versus 31% of men [P=ns]; only one woman and no men expressed both ERalpha and beta in nontumor tissue. Females expressed ERalpha [P=0.017], ERbeta [P=0.013], and ERalpha+beta [P=0.002] more frequently in tumor versus nontumor tissue, whereas in males expression of ERalpha, beta and both alpha+beta was not clearly different for tumor versus nontumor tissue. In specimens expressing ERalpha mRNA, the transcript lacking exon 7 (delta7) was the major splice variant with varying contributions from the transcripts delta4, delta3+4, delta5 and others unidentified. Alternative splicing of ERbeta mRNA was observed, but not to as great an extent as for ERalpha mRNA. ERalpha promoter usage in tumors varied among individuals. When the ER receptors were co-expressed in tumors, ERalpha was quantitatively more abundant in the majority of cases than ERbeta. Within this small group of 26 patients, no correlation was found between age, smoking history, plasma nicotine, cotinine, estradiol concentrations or histopathologic type with tumor or nontumor estrogen receptor status of any type. However, several positive correlations imply that: (1) ERalpha expression occurs

  16. Regulation of cyclic AMP formation in cultures of human foetal astrocytes by beta 2-adrenergic and adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Woods, M D; Freshney, R I; Ball, S G; Vaughan, P F

    1989-09-01

    Two cell cultures, NEP2 and NEM2, isolated from human foetal brain have been maintained through several passages and found to express some properties of astrocytes. Both cell cultures contain adenylate cyclase stimulated by catecholamines with a potency order of isoprenaline greater than adrenaline greater than salbutamol much greater than noradrenaline, which is consistent with the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors. This study reports that the beta 2-adrenergic-selective antagonist ICI 118,551 is approximately 1,000 times more potent at inhibiting isoprenaline stimulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation in both NEP2 and NEM2 than the beta 1-adrenergic-selective antagonist practolol. This observation confirms the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these cell cultures. The formation of cAMP in NEP2 is also stimulated by 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) more potently than by either adenosine or N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (L-PIA), which suggests that this foetal astrocyte expresses adenosine A2 receptors. Furthermore, L-PIA and NECA inhibit isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation, a result suggesting the presence of adenosine A1 receptors on NEP2. The presence of A1 receptors is confirmed by the observation that the A1-selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine reverses the inhibition of isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation by L-PIA and NECA. Additional evidence that NEP2 expresses adenosine receptors linked to the adenylate cyclase-inhibitory GTP-binding protein is provided by the finding that pretreatment of these cells with pertussis toxin reverses the adenosine inhibition of cAMP formation stimulated by either isoprenaline or forskolin.

  17. Case-control study of genus-beta human papillomaviruses in plucked eyebrow hairs and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Gheit, Tarik; Pfister, Herbert; Giuliano, Anna R; Messina, Jane L; Fenske, Neil A; Cherpelis, Basil S; Sondak, Vernon K; Roetzheim, Richard G; Silling, Steffi; Pawlita, Michael; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been reported in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We conducted a clinic-based case-control study to investigate the association between genus-beta HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs (EBH) and SCC. EBH from 168 SCC cases and 290 controls were genotyped for genus-beta HPV DNA. SCC tumors from a subset of cases (n = 142) were also genotyped. Viral load was determined in a subset of specimens positive for a single HPV type. Associations with SCC were estimated by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age and sex using logistic regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. EBH DNA prevalence was greater in cases (87%) than controls (73%) (p < 0.05), and the association with SCC increased with the number of HPV types present, (≥ 4 types vs. HPV-negative: OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.07-3.80; p(trend) = 0.02). Type-specific associations were observed between SCC and DNA in EBH for HPV23 (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.10-3.30) and HPV38 (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.04-3.24). Additionally, when compared with the controls, the DNA prevalence in EBH was significantly higher among cases for 11 of the 25 genus-beta types tested, when accounting for DNA for the same HPV type in the tumor (ORs = 3.44-76.50). Compared to controls, the mean viral DNA load in EBH among the selected cases was greater for HPV5, HPV8 and HPV24, but lower for HPV38. SCC cases were more likely than controls to have HPV DNA+ EBH for single and multiple HPV types, providing additional support for the potential role of genus-beta HPV infections in SCC development.

  18. Induction of cytochrome P450IA1 gene expression in rat epidermis and human keratinocytes by. beta. -napthoflavone and benzanthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, I.U.; Mukhtar, H.; Bickers, D.R.; Haqqi, T.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Cytochrome P450IA1 (P450IA1) plays a major role in the bioactivation of procarcinogens in various tissues including skin. However, factors controlling the expression of P450IA1 gene message in mammalian skin are unknown. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers was employed to study the expression of P450IA1 mRNA transcripts in rat epidermis and human keratinocytes (HK) treated with {beta}-napthoflavone ({beta}NF) and benzanthracene (BA). Total RNA was extracted from the epidermis of control and inducer-treated 4-day-old and adult Sprague Dawley rats, and from control and inducer-treated HL. cDNAs were synthesized using random primers and reverse transcriptase. PCR products were analyzed on agarose gel and quantitated by densitometry. Inducer treatment of rats and HK resulted in several-fold increases in aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity. The level of P450IA1 gene message increased 2-5-fold in treated animals as compared to controls; higher basal level and inducibility in adult than in 4-day-old rats. This induction occurred as early as 4 h after {beta}NF application, reached a maximum at 16 h and returned to basal levels by 36 h. Exposure to {beta}NF and BA resulted in 2-3-fold increase in gene message in HK. Northern blot analysis complemented PCR data. These results indicate that in mammalian skin P450IA1 gene expression is increased by the inducers of epidermal AHH activity.

  19. A tale of two glucose transporters: how GLUT2 re-emerged as a contender for glucose transport into the human beta cell.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, M; Gloyn, A L

    2012-09-01

    Finding novel causes for monogenic forms of diabetes is important as, alongside the clinical implications of such a discovery, it can identify critical proteins and pathways required for normal beta cell function in humans. It is increasingly apparent that there are significant differences between rodent and human islets. One example that has generated interest is the relative importance of the glucose transporter GLUT2 in rodent and human beta cells. The central role of GLUT2 in rodent beta cells is well established, but a number of studies have suggested that other glucose transporters, namely GLUT1 and GLUT3, may play an important role in facilitating glucose transport into human beta cells. In this issue of Diabetologia Sansbury et al (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2595-0 ) report homozygous loss of function mutations in SLC2A2, which encodes GLUT2, as a rare cause of neonatal diabetes. Evidence for a beta cell defect in these subjects comes from very low birthweights, lack of endogenous insulin secretion and a requirement for insulin therapy. Neonatal diabetes is not a consistent feature of SLC2A2 mutations. It is only found in a small percentage of cases (~4%) and the diabetes largely resolves before 18 months of age. This discovery is significant as it suggests that GLUT2 plays an important role in human beta cells, but the interplay and relative roles of other transporters differ from those in rodents. This finding should encourage efforts to delineate the precise role of GLUT2 in the human beta cell at different developmental time points and is a further reminder of critical differences between human and rodent islets.

  20. Active macrophage-associated TGF-beta co-localizes with type I procollagen gene expression in atherosclerotic human pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, L.; Milder, J.; Gold, L.; Botney, M.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in adult atherosclerotic pulmonary arteries is characterized by discrete areas of neointimal smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix gene expression in close proximity to non-foamy macrophages, suggesting regulation by local macrophage-associated factors. The purpose of these studies was to begin addressing the role of putative macrophage-associated factors such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), by determining the spatial relationship between TGF-beta and neointimal matrix gene expression in human atherosclerotic pulmonary arteries. For example, the participation of TGF-beta in vascular remodeling could be inferred by its colocalization with non-foamy macrophages in areas of active matrix synthesis. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated focal neointimal procollagen gene expression in close association with non-foamy but not foamy macrophages. Immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific anti-TGF-beta antibodies demonstrated all three isoforms of TGF-beta associated with non-foamy macrophages, but foamy macrophages were not immunoreactive. Neointimal and medial smooth muscle cells stained lightly. In contrast, intense TGF-beta immunoreactivity was also associated with medial smooth muscle cells in normal nonremodeling vessels. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for latent TGF-beta was similar to immunohistochemistry for mature TGF-beta in both remodeling and nonremodeling vessels. Finally, using an antibody specific for active TGF-beta 1, immunoreactivity was only seen in non-foamy neointimal macrophages but not in foamy macrophages or medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive or normal vessels. These observations suggest non-foamy macrophages may participate in modulating matrix gene expression in atherosclerotic remodeling via a TGF-beta-dependent mechanism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7747808

  1. Oxidative metabolism of the bioactive and naturally occurring beta-carboline alkaloids, norharman and harman, by human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Guillén, Hugo; Arán, Vicente J

    2008-11-01

    Norharman and harman are naturally occurring beta-carboline alkaloids exhibiting a wide range of biological, psychopharmacological, and toxicological actions. They occur in foods and tobacco smoke and also appear endogenously in humans. In this research, metabolic and kinetic studies with cytochrome P450 enzymes and human liver microsomes showed that beta-carbolines were efficiently oxidized to several ring-hydroxylated and N-oxidation products that were subsequently identified and quantified. 6-Hydroxy- beta-carboline (6-hydroxynorharman and 6-hydroxyharman) was a major metabolite efficiently produced (high kcat and low Km) by P450 1A2 and 1A1 and to a minor extent by P450 2D6, 2C19 and 2E1. 3-Hydroxy-beta-carboline (3-hydroxynorharman and 3-hydroxyharman), another major metabolite, was specifically produced by P450 1A2 and 1A1, whereas beta-carboline-N(2)-oxide (harman-2-oxide and norharman-2-oxide) was produced by P450 2E1. The same pattern of metabolism was confirmed for human liver microsomes. Oxidative metabolism for harman was slightly higher than norharman, but norharman showed lower Km values. The oxidation of beta-carbolines is a detoxication route performed mainly by P450 1A2 and 1A1, with the participation of P450 2D6, 2C19, and 2E1, as additional contributors. Then, individual variations in the levels and activity of these P450s may influence biotransformation of beta-carboline alkaloids and their ultimate biological effects. beta-Carbolines were previously reported as comutagens and/or inhibitors of mutagens activated by P450 1A enzymes such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic hydrocarbons. Results in this work show that beta-carbolines are good ligands and substrates for P450 1A2/1A1, contributing to the explanation of some of their toxicological effects.

  2. Overexpression of transforming growth factor-. beta. in transgenic mice carrying the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I tax gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongjin; Winokur, T.S.; Lee, Hyde; Danielpour, D.; Kim, Kyung Young; Geiser, A.G.; Sporn, M.B.; Roberts, A.B. ); Chen, Liansheng; Jay, G. )

    1991-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) has been associated with an adult form of T-cell leukemia as well as tropical spastic paraparesis, a neurodegenerative disease. Adult T-cell leukemia patients express high levels of the type 1 isoform of transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}1), which is mediated by the effects of the HTLV-I Tax transactivator protein on the TGF-{beta}1 promoter. To understand further the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 expression by Tax, the authors examined its expression in transgenic mice carrying the HTLV-I tax gene. They show that tumors from these mice and other tissues, such as submaxillary glands and skeletal muscle, which express high levels of tax mRNA selectively express high levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, TGF-{beta}1 significantly stimulated the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into one of three cells lines derived from neurofibromas of tax-transgenic mice, which suggest that the excessive production of TGF-{beta}1 may play a role in tumorigenesis and that these mice may serve as a useful model for studying the biological effects of TGF-{beta} in vivo.

  3. Synthesis and secretion of transforming growth factor-beta1 by human desmoid fibroblast cell line and its modulation by toremifene.

    PubMed

    Locci, P; Bellocchio, S; Lilli, C; Marinucci, L; Cagini, L; Baroni, T; Giustozzi, G; Balducci, C; Becchetti, E

    2001-11-01

    The present study provides evidence that the in vitro cultured fibroblast cell line from desmoid tumors differs from normal fibrobasts in its extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecule composition and is modulated by treatment with toremifene, an antiestrogen that reduces tumor mass by an unknown mechanism. The results showed increased transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) production, TGF-beta1 mRNA expression, and TGF-beta1 receptor number in desmoid fibroblasts compared with normal cells. As desmoid fibroblasts did not produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) but were sensitive to it, which enhanced glycosaminoglycans (GAG) accumulation, we assessed the TGF-beta1 effects on TNF-alpha production by human monocytes. Our results showed TGF-beta1 significantly increased TNF-alpha secretion by monocytes. Toremifene mediated its effects in desmoid fibroblasts via an estrogen receptor-independent pathway. It inhibited GAG accumulation and the secretion of both latent and active forms of TGF-beta1 and had an inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production by monocytes. Our results suggest that in reducing TGF-beta1 production by desmoid fibroblasts and TNF-alpha production by monocytes, toremifene may restore the balance between the two growth factors.

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta modulates plasminogen activator activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 expression in human keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Elder, J T; Persichitte, K A; Mink, P; Clark, R A

    1990-11-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional mediator with effects on cellular growth, differentiation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Because TGF-beta stimulates fibronectin expression in cultured human keratinocytes, we wished to determine whether it might also affect ECM degradation through the plasminogen activator (PA)-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) system. Immunofluorescence of human keratinocytes using a monospecific antiserum to type 1 PAI (PAI-1) showed enhanced cellular and ECM staining when they were cultured in the presence of TGF-beta. The antiserum also identified an Mr 50,000 protein in conditioned media that was markedly enhanced by TGF-beta. A corresponding stimulation of PAI-1 mRNA was demonstrated by quantitative RNA blot analysis. Total plasminogen activating activity of conditioned medium was markedly decreased by TGF-beta. Zymography showed this to be at least partially due to decreased secreted urokinase activity. TGF-beta may play an important role in stabilizing the provisional matrix synthesized by keratinocytes in healing wounds.

  5. beta. -endorphin-like and. alpha. -MSH-like immunoreactivities in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, T.; Rainero, I.; De Gennaro, T.; Oggero, R.; Mostert, M.; Dattola, P.; Pinessi, L. )

    1990-01-01

    We measured with radioimmunoassay the {beta}-endorphin-like and {alpha}-MSH-like immunoreactivities in milk and plasma of 8 lactating women. Mean {beta}-endorphin concentrations ({plus minus} SD) were 16.6 {plus minus} 6.7 fmol/ml in milk and 9.9 {plus minus} 4.1 fmol/ml in plasma. {alpha}-MSH concentrations were 39.4 {plus minus} 15.5 pg/ml in milk and 18.2 {plus minus} 8.4 pg/ml in plasma. The concentrations of both peptides in milk were significantly higher than in plasma. No significant correlation between milk and plasma concentrations of these peptides was found.

  6. Novel Confocal Microscopic and Flow Cytometric Based Assays to Visualize and Detect the (Beta)2-Adrenergic Receptor in Human Lymphocyte and Mononuclear Cell Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salicru, A. N.; Crucian, B. E.; Nelman, M. A.; Sams, C. F.; Actor, J. K.; Marshall, G. D.

    2006-01-01

    The data show that immunophenotyping of leukocyte populations with (beta)2AR is possible with the commercially available Ab, although the FC assay is limited to the IST as a result of the Ab binding site to the intracellular C-terminus of the 2AR. The FC assay has applications for measuring alterations in total (beta)2AR in human leukocyte populations as changes in fluorescence. In addition, CM confirms that both surface and intracellular compartments stain positively for the (beta)2AR and can be used for qualitative assays that screen for changes in receptor compartmentalization and localization.

  7. Satellite cell activity is differentially affected by contraction mode in human muscle following a work-matched bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hyldahl, Robert D.; Olson, Ty; Welling, Tyson; Groscost, Logan; Parcell, Allen C.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal repair and adaptation of skeletal muscle is facilitated by resident stem cells (satellite cells). To understand how different exercise modes influence satellite cell dynamics, we measured satellite cell activity in conjunction with markers of muscle damage and inflammation in human skeletal muscle following a single work- and intensity-matched bout of eccentric (ECC) or concentric contractions (CON). Participants completed a single bout of ECC (n = 7) or CON (n = 7) of the knee extensors. A muscle biopsy was obtained before and 24 h after exercise. Functional measures and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine the extent of muscle damage and indices of satellite cell activity. Cytokine concentrations were measured using a multiplexed magnetic bead assay. Isokinetic peak torque decreased following ECC (p < 0.05) but not CON. Greater histological staining of the damage marker Xin was observed in muscle samples of ECC vs. CON. Tenasin C immunoreactivity increased 15 fold (p < 0.01) following ECC and was unchanged following CON. The inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) increased pre- to post-ECC (4.26 ± 1.4 vs. 10.49 ± 5.8 pg/ml, and 3.06 ± 0.7 vs. 6.25 ± 4.6 pg/ml, respectively; p < 0.05). There was no change in any cytokine post-CON. Satellite cell content increased 27% pre- to post-ECC (0.10 ± 0.031 vs. 0.127 ± 0.041, respectively; p < 0.05). There was no change in satellite cell number in CON (0.099 ± 0.027 vs. 0.102 ± 0.029, respectively). There was no fiber type-specific satellite cell response following either exercise mode. ECC but not CON resulted in an increase in MyoD positive nuclei per myofiber pre- to post-exercise (p < 0.05), but there was no change in MyoD DNA binding activity in either condition. In conclusion, ECC but not CON results in functional and histological evidence of muscle damage that is accompanied by increased satellite cell activity 24 h

  8. Towards an automated monitoring of human settlements in South Africa using high resolution SPOT satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, T.; Mudau, N.; Mangara, P.; Pesaresi, M.

    2015-04-01

    Urban areas in sub-Saharan Africa are growing at an unprecedented pace. Much of this growth is taking place in informal settlements. In South Africa more than 10% of the population live in urban informal settlements. South Africa has established a National Informal Settlement Development Programme (NUSP) to respond to these challenges. This programme is designed to support the National Department of Human Settlement (NDHS) in its implementation of the Upgrading Informal Settlements Programme (UISP) with the objective of eventually upgrading all informal settlements in the country. Currently, the NDHS does not have access to an updated national dataset captured at the same scale using source data that can be used to understand the status of informal settlements in the country. This pilot study is developing a fully automated workflow for the wall-to-wall processing of SPOT-5 satellite imagery of South Africa. The workflow includes an automatic image information extraction based on multiscale textural and morphological image features extraction. The advanced image feature compression and optimization together with innovative learning and classification techniques allow a processing of the SPOT-5 images using the Landsat-based National Land Cover (NLC) of South Africa from the year 2000 as low-resolution thematic reference layers as. The workflow was tested on 42 SPOT scenes based on a stratified sampling. The derived building information was validated against a visually interpreted building point data set and produced an accuracy of 97 per cent. Given this positive result, is planned to process the most recent wall-to-wall coverage as well as the archived imagery available since 2007 in the near future.

  9. Antimicrobial actions of the human epididymis 2 (HE2) protein isoforms, HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2

    PubMed Central

    Yenugu, Suresh; Hamil, Katherine G; French, Frank S; Hall, Susan H

    2004-01-01

    Background The HE2 gene encodes a group of isoforms with similarities to the antimicrobial beta-defensins. We demonstrated earlier that the antimicrobial activity of HE2 proteins and peptides is salt resistant and structure dependent and involves permeabilization of bacterial membranes. In this study, we further characterize the antimicrobial properties of HE2 peptides in terms of the structural changes induced in E. coli and the inhibition of macromolecular synthesis. Methods E. coli treated with 50 micro g/ml of HE2alpha, HE2beta1 or HE2beta2 peptides for 30 and 60 min were visualized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the impact of these peptides on bacterial internal and external structure. The effects of HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 on E. coli macromolecular synthesis was assayed by incubating the bacteria with 2, 10 and 25 micro g/ml of the individual peptides for 0–60 min and measuring the incorporation of the radioactive precursors [methyl-3H]thymidine, [5-3H]uridine and L-[4,5-3H(N)]leucine into DNA, RNA and protein. Statistical analyses using Student's t-test were performed using Sigma Plot software. Values shown are Mean ± S.D. Results E. coli treated with HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 peptides as visualized by transmission electron microscopy showed extensive damage characterized by membrane blebbing, thickening of the membrane, highly granulated cytoplasm and appearance of vacuoles in contrast to the smooth and continuous membrane structure of the untreated bacteria. Similarly, bacteria observed by scanning electron microscopy after treating with HE2alpha, HE2beta1 or HE2beta2 peptides exhibited membrane blebbing and wrinkling, leakage of cellular contents, especially at the dividing septa, and external accumulation of fibrous materials. In addition, HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 peptides inhibited E. coli DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Conclusions The morphological changes observed in E. coli treated with

  10. Distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors in failing human myocardium. Implications for mechanisms of down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphree, S.S.; Saffitz, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The density of beta-adrenergic receptors is reduced in crude membranes prepared from failing human myocardium. We used quantitative autoradiography of radioligand binding sites in intact tissue slices to determine whether the total tissue content of receptors is reduced and to characterize the transmural distribution of receptors in cardiac myocytes and the coronary vasculature in hearts obtained from nine cardiac transplant patients with severe congestive failure. Binding of (125Iodo)cyanopindolol to transmural slices of human myocardium was rapid, saturable, stereoselective, and displaceable by agonists and antagonists with an appropriate rank order of potency. Binding isotherms in four normal and nine failing ventricles showed a significant reduction in the total tissue content of beta-receptors in failing myocardium (38.3 +/- 2.0 fmol/mg protein) compared with normal tissue (52.4 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein, p = 0.038). In the normal ventricles, the greatest receptor density was observed autoradiographically in myocytic regions of the subendocardium. Receptor density of the coronary arterioles was approximately 70% of that in adjacent myocytic regions. The density of binding sites in both myocytic regions and arterioles was diminished in all regions of the failing ventricles, but down-regulation was due primarily to a selective reduction of beta-receptors of subendocardial myocytes (63 +/- 5% of subepicardial receptor density vs. 115 +/- 6% in controls, p less than 0.0001). These observations indicate that down-regulation occurs nonuniformly in the transmural distribution and thus is likely not related simply to elevated circulating catecholamine levels.

  11. Cloning and characterization of the major promoter of the human protein kinase C beta gene. Regulation by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Obeid, L M; Blobe, G C; Karolak, L A; Hannun, Y A

    1992-10-15

    The expression of the beta isoenzyme for protein kinase C is regulated developmentally and in response to inducers of cell differentiation (such as phorbol esters and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3). The 5' segment of the gene for protein kinase C beta was cloned from a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL3 bacteriophage. This segment of the gene (greater than 54 kilobases in length) encompassed the coding sequence for the amino-terminal regulatory domain of the enzyme, the 5'-untranslated region, and the 5'-flanking region. Initiation of transcription was identified by S1 nuclease analysis and confirmed by RNase protection analysis at 197 base pairs 5' of the initiator ATG. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region revealed it to be extremely G+C-rich (> 80%) with many features of a CpG island. Comparison of sequence with known cis-regulatory motifs disclosed a number of potential regulatory elements including an octamer binding motif at -76, Sp1-binding sites at -94 and -63, E boxes at -110, -26, and +18, an AP-1 site at -442, and an AP-2 site at -330. To demonstrate promoter activity, a 630-base pair fragment extending from -587 to +43 was subcloned in front of a promoterless luciferase gene. This fragment was able to drive the expression of luciferase in transient transfections of human hematopoietic cells. Deletion analysis demonstrated that a fragment -111 to +43 was necessary and sufficient for promoter activity; this fragment did not contain TATA or CAAT motifs. The promoter was stimulated 8-20-fold by phorbol esters accounting for the previously observed transcriptional activation of protein kinase C beta. This phorbol ester responsiveness was conferred by the basal promoter (-111 to +43) and was independent of the AP-1 site. These results define a novel mechanism of protein kinase C autoregulation at a transcriptional level.

  12. A high performance sensorimotor beta rhythm-based brain computer interface associated with human natural motor behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ou; Lin, Peter; Vorbach, Sherry; Floeter, Mary Kay; Hattori, Noriaki; Hallett, Mark

    2008-03-01

    To explore the reliability of a high performance brain-computer interface (BCI) using non-invasive EEG signals associated with human natural motor behavior does not require extensive training. We propose a new BCI method, where users perform either sustaining or stopping a motor task with time locking to a predefined time window. Nine healthy volunteers, one stroke survivor with right-sided hemiparesis and one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) participated in this study. Subjects did not receive BCI training before participating in this study. We investigated tasks of both physical movement and motor imagery. The surface Laplacian derivation was used for enhancing EEG spatial resolution. A model-free threshold setting method was used for the classification of motor intentions. The performance of the proposed BCI was validated by an online sequential binary-cursor-control game for two-dimensional cursor movement. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization were observed when subjects sustained or stopped either motor execution or motor imagery. Feature analysis showed that EEG beta band activity over sensorimotor area provided the largest discrimination. With simple model-free classification of beta band EEG activity from a single electrode (with surface Laplacian derivation), the online classifications of the EEG activity with motor execution/motor imagery were: >90%/~80% for six healthy volunteers, >80%/~80% for the stroke patient and ~90%/~80% for the ALS patient. The EEG activities of the other three healthy volunteers were not classifiable. The sensorimotor beta rhythm of EEG associated with human natural motor behavior can be used for a reliable and high performance BCI for both healthy subjects and patients with neurological disorders. Significance: The proposed new non-invasive BCI method highlights a practical BCI for clinical applications, where the user does not require extensive training.

  13. Characterization of Beta-lactamases in Faecal Enterobacteriaceae Recovered from Healthy Humans in Spain: Focusing on AmpC Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Porres-Osante, Nerea; Sáenz, Yolanda; Somalo, Sergio; Torres, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal tract is a huge reservoir of Enterobacteriaceae, some of which are opportunist pathogens. Several genera of these bacteria harbour intrinsic antibiotic resistance genes, such as ampC genes in species of Citrobacter, Enterobacter or Escherichia genera. In this work, beta-lactamases and other resistance mechanisms have been characterized in Enterobacteriaceae isolates recovered from healthy human faecal samples, focusing on the ampC beta-lactamase genes. Fifty human faecal samples were obtained, and 70 Enterobacteriaceae bacteria were isolated: 44 Escherichia coli, 4 Citrobacter braakii, 9 Citrobacter freundii, 8 Enterobacter cloacae, 1 Proteus mirabilis, 1 Proteus vulgaris, 1 Klebsiella oxytoca, 1 Serratia sp. and 1 Cronobacter sp. A high percentage of resistance to ampicillin was detected (57%), observing the AmpC phenotype in 22 isolates (31%) and the ESBL phenotype in 3 isolates. AmpC molecular characterization showed high diversity into bla CMY and bla ACT genes from Citrobacter and Enterobacter species, respectively, and the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis demonstrated low clonality among them. The prevalence of people colonized by strains carrying plasmid-mediated ampC genes obtained in this study was 2%. The unique plasmid-mediated bla AmpC identified in this study was the bla CMY-2 gene, detected in an E. coli isolate ascribed to the sequence type ST405 which belonged to phylogenetic group D. The hybridization and conjugation experiments demonstrated that the ISEcp1-bla CMY-2-blc structure was carried by a ~78-kb self-transferable IncK plasmid. This study shows a high polymorphism among beta-lactamase genes in Enterobacteriaceae from healthy people microbiota. Extensive AmpC-carrier studies would provide important information and could allow the anticipation of future global health problems.

  14. The Human-Technological Interface: An Analysis of a Satellite Communication Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Valerie A. C.; Murphy, Peter J.

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of distance education methods that involve direct interaction between the student and communications satellite technology is discussed, drawing on experiences in British Columbia adult distance education programs using interactive instructional television and other modern technologies. (MSE)

  15. The human papillomavirus18 E7 protein inhibits CENP-C binding to α-satellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma, Yuji; Yoshimoto, Masafumi; Eguchi, Ayami; Tokuda, Aoi; Takahashi, Shoko

    2015-07-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection leads to aneuploidy, a numerical chromosomal aberration that is caused by dysregulation of chromosomal segregation. We previously found that the E7 proteins of high-risk HPVs, but not of low-risk HPVs, could bind to centromere protein-C (CENP-C). In this study, we first found that CENP-C could bind centromere α-satellite DNAs using ChIP analysis and HA-tagged CENP-C/nuc transfected 293T cells. We then investigated if HA-CENP-C/nuc binding to α-satellite DNAs was affected by the E7 proteins of high- or low-risk HPVs. We found that transfection of the FLAG tagged HPV18 E7 inhibited the binding of HA-CENP-C/nuc to α-satellite DNAs. This finding was confirmed in HeLa S3 cells transfected with siRNA targeted to HPV18 E7 expression. We therefore speculate that altered function of kinetochores as a result of inhibition of CENP-C and α-satellite DNAs binding may be associated with the chromosomal abnormalities observed in HPV18-positive cancers.

  16. Human Skeletal Muscle-derived CD133(+) Cells Form Functional Satellite Cells After Intramuscular Transplantation in Immunodeficient Host Mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jinhong; Chun, Soyon; Asfahani, Rowan; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of muscular dystrophies. In addition to muscle fiber formation, reconstitution of functional stem cell pool by donor cells is vital for long-term treatment. We show here that some CD133(+) cells within human muscle are located underneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers, in the position of the muscle satellite cell. Cultured hCD133(+) cells are heterogeneous and multipotent, capable of forming myotubes and reserve satellite cells in vitro. They contribute to extensive muscle regeneration and satellite cell formation following intramuscular transplantation into irradiated and cryodamaged tibialis anterior muscles of immunodeficient Rag2-/γ chain-/C5-mice. Some donor-derived satellite cells expressed the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, indicating that they were activated. In addition, when transplanted host muscles were reinjured, there was significantly more newly-regenerated muscle fibers of donor origin in treated than in control, nonreinjured muscles, indicating that hCD133(+) cells had given rise to functional muscle stem cells, which were able to activate in response to injury and contribute to a further round of muscle regeneration. Our findings provide new evidence for the location and characterization of hCD133(+) cells, and highlight that these cells are highly suitable for future clinical application.

  17. Human skeletal muscle-derived CD133(+) cells form functional satellite cells after intramuscular transplantation in immunodeficient host mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jinhong; Chun, Soyon; Asfahani, Rowan; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of muscular dystrophies. In addition to muscle fiber formation, reconstitution of functional stem cell pool by donor cells is vital for long-term treatment. We show here that some CD133(+) cells within human muscle are located underneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers, in the position of the muscle satellite cell. Cultured hCD133(+) cells are heterogeneous and multipotent, capable of forming myotubes and reserve satellite cells in vitro. They contribute to extensive muscle regeneration and satellite cell formation following intramuscular transplantation into irradiated and cryodamaged tibialis anterior muscles of immunodeficient Rag2-/γ chain-/C5-mice. Some donor-derived satellite cells expressed the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, indicating that they were activated. In addition, when transplanted host muscles were reinjured, there was significantly more newly-regenerated muscle fibers of donor origin in treated than in control, nonreinjured muscles, indicating that hCD133(+) cells had given rise to functional muscle stem cells, which were able to activate in response to injury and contribute to a further round of muscle regeneration. Our findings provide new evidence for the location and characterization of hCD133(+) cells, and highlight that these cells are highly suitable for future clinical application.

  18. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms form high affinity complexes with human and porcine beta-microseminoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Karin; Kjellberg, Margareta; Fernlund, Per

    2009-08-01

    BETA-microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10 kDa protein in human seminal plasma, binds human cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) with high affinity. CRISP-3 is a member of the family of CRISPs, which are widespread among animals. In this work we show that human as well as porcine MSP binds catrin, latisemin, pseudecin, and triflin, which are CRISPs present in the venoms of the snakes Crotalus atrox, Laticauda semifasciata, Pseudechis porphyriacus, and Trimeresurus flavoviridis, respectively. The CRISPs were purified from the venoms by affinity chromatography on a human MSP column and their identities were settled by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their interactions with human and porcine MSPs were studied with size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The binding affinities at 25 degrees C were between 10(-10)M and 10(-7)M for most of the interactions, with higher affinities for the interactions with porcine MSP compared to human MSP and with Elapidae CRISPs compared to Viperidae CRISPs. The high affinities of the bindings in spite of the differences in amino acid sequence between the MSPs as well as between the CRISPs indicate that the binding is tolerant to amino acid sequence variation and raise the question how universal this cross-species reaction between MSPs and CRISPs is.

  19. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  20. apl-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans gene encoding a protein related to the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, I; Li, C

    1993-01-01

    The major component of senile plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer disease patients is the beta-amyloid peptide, which is derived from a larger amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recently, a number of APP and APP-related proteins have been identified in different organisms and constitute the family of APP proteins. We have isolated several cDNAs encoding an APP-related protein in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and have designated the corresponding gene as apl-1. The apl-1 transcripts undergo two forms of posttranscriptional modification: trans-splicing and alternative polyadenylylation. In vitro translation of an apl-1 cDNA results in a protein of approximately the expected size. Similar to the Drosophila, human, and mouse APP-related proteins, APL-1 does not appear to contain the beta-amyloid peptide. Because APP-related proteins seem to be conserved through evolution, the apl-1 gene from C. elegans should be important for determining the normal function of human APP. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265668

  1. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  2. Beta-scorpion toxin 2 from Centruroides noxius blocks voltage-gated K+ channels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, R; Bene, L; Damjanovich, S; Muñoz-Garay, C; Calderon-Aranda, E S; Possani, L D

    1995-08-15

    Using the patch-clamp technique, we determined that beta-scorpion toxin 2 from Centruroides noxius Hoffmann decreased whole-cell n-type K+ currents in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with a half blocking concentration of approx. 5 microM. Toxin-2-accelerated inactivation, however, did not influence the kinetics of activation of the K+ conductance. The percentage increase in K+ channel inactivation rate and the degree of drug-induced block was independent of membrane potential. K+ channel block by Toxin 2 was instantaneous, not removable by washing with drug free extracellular solution. However, 10 mg/ml BSA in the bath lifted the toxin-induced block almost instantaneously and completely. Flow cytometric membrane potential measurements with the oxonol dye showed that Toxin 2 depolarizes human lymphocytes in concert with its K+ channel blocking effect.

  3. [Effect of pH on circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy of secondary structure of beta-casein from Chinese human milk].

    PubMed

    Ren, Hao-wei; Zhang, Wan-shu; Li, Xiang-yi; Liu, Ning

    2015-02-01

    To obtain a structural basis for the beta-casein in Chinese human milk, structural transitions of the beta-casein in response to variation of pH were investigated using Raman and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Both methods indicated that the secondary structures of beta-casein in the solution were induced by the pH. Secondary structural analysis of beta-casein by CD spectroscopy yielded 0.5%-2% alpha-helical, 16%-18% beta-sheet, 30%-34% beta-turn and 49%-51% random coil contents. Another result was that as pH increases, these structures change. Several distinct transitions were observed by circular dichroism in alpha-helix at pH 8 and pH 10. Raman spectrum also showed random coil as the major secondary structure in native beta-casein, for the characteristic band of the beta-casein amide I was at 1662 cm(-1): Calculations from I850/I830 suggested that the tyrosine residues of beta-casein tended to "exposure". CD and Raman spectra both showed that at neutral and alkaline pH the beta-casein existed predominantly in random coil conformation, and the proportion of alpha-helix was higher at pH 8 than under other pH conditions. Over the range of pH studied, the sheet and turn areas remained relatively constant, and in the condition of pH 8, the content of alpha-helical was higher than in the other pH conditions.

  4. Activating point mutations in the common beta subunit of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors suggest the involvement of beta subunit dimerization and cell type-specific molecules in signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B J; D'Andrea, R; Gonda, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have combined retroviral expression cloning with random mutagenesis to identify two activating point mutations in the common signal-transducing subunit (h beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 by virtue of their ability to confer factor independence on the haemopoietic cell line, FDC-P1. One mutation (V449E) is located within the transmembrane domain and, by analogy with a similar mutation in the neu oncogene, may act by inducing dimerization of h beta c. The other mutation (I374N) lies in the extracellular, membrane-proximal portion of h beta c. Neither of these mutants, nor a previously described mutant of h beta c (FI delta, which has a small duplication in the extracellular region), was capable of inducing factor independence in CTLL-2 cells, while only V449E could induce factor independence in BAF-B03 cells. These results imply that the extracellular and transmembrane mutations act by different mechanisms. Furthermore, they imply that the mutants, and hence also wild-type h beta c, interact with cell type-specific signalling molecules. Models are presented which illustrate how these mutations may act and predict some of the characteristics of the putative receptor-associated signalling molecules. Images PMID:7556069

  5. Exercise intensity-dependent contribution of beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilatation in hypoxic humans.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Brad W; Pike, Tasha L; Martin, Elizabeth A; Curry, Timothy B; Ceridon, Maile L; Joyner, Michael J

    2008-02-15

    We previously reported that hypoxia-mediated reductions in alpha-adrenoceptor sensitivity do not explain the augmented vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise, suggesting an enhanced vasodilator signal. We hypothesized that beta-adrenoceptor activation contributes to augmented hypoxic exercise vasodilatation. Fourteen subjects (age: 29 +/- 2 years) breathed hypoxic gas to titrate arterial O(2) saturation (pulse oximetry) to 80%, while remaining normocapnic via a rebreath system. Brachial artery and antecubital vein catheters were placed in the exercising arm. Under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, baseline and incremental forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) was performed during control (saline), alpha-adrenoceptor inhibition (phentolamine), and combined alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor inhibition (phentolomine/propranolol). Forearm blood flow (FBF), heart rate, blood pressure, minute ventilation, and end-tidal CO(2) were determined. Hypoxia increased heart rate (P < 0.05) and minute ventilation (P < 0.05) at rest and exercise under all drug infusions, whereas mean arterial pressure was unchanged. Arterial adrenaline (P < 0.05) and venous noradrenaline (P < 0.05) were higher with hypoxia during all drug infusions. The change (Delta) in FBF during 10% hypoxic exercise was greater with phentolamine (Delta306 +/- 43 ml min(-1)) vs. saline (Delta169 +/- 30 ml min(-1)) or combined phentolamine/propranolol (Delta213 +/- 25 ml min(-1); P < 0.05 for both). During 20% hypoxic exercise, DeltaFBF was greater with phentalomine (Delta466 +/- 57 ml min(-1); P < 0.05) vs. saline (Delta346 +/- 40 ml min(-1)) but was similar to combined phentolamine/propranolol (Delta450 +/- 43 ml min(-1)). Thus, in the absence of overlying vasoconstriction, the contribution of beta-adrenergic mechanisms to the augmented hypoxic vasodilatation is dependent on exercise intensity.

  6. Deamidation alters the structure and decreases the stability of human lens betaA3-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takumi; Oxford, Julie T; Brandon, Theodore R; Lampi, Kirsten J

    2007-07-31

    According to the World Health Organization, cataracts account for half of the blindness in the world, with the majority occurring in developing countries. A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye due to light scattering of precipitated lens proteins or aberrant cellular debris. The major proteins in the lens are crystallins, and they are extensively deamidated during aging and cataracts. Deamidation has been detected at the domain and monomer interfaces of several crystallins during aging. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two potential deamidation sites at the predicted interface of the betaA3-crystallin dimer on its structure and stability. The glutamine residues at the reported in vivo deamidation sites of Q180 in the C-terminal domain and at the homologous site Q85 in the N-terminal domain were substituted with glutamic acid residues by site-directed mutagenesis. Far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that there were subtle differences in the secondary structure and more notable differences in the tertiary structure of the mutant proteins compared to that of the wild type betaA3-crystallin. The Q85E/Q180E mutant also was more susceptible to enzymatic digestion, suggesting increased solvent accessibility. These structural changes in the deamidated mutants led to decreased stability during unfolding in urea and increased precipitation during heat denaturation. When simulating deamidation at both residues, there was a further decrease in stability and loss of cooperativity. However, multiangle-light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering experiments showed that dimer formation was not disrupted, nor did higher-order oligomers form. These results suggest that introducing charges at the predicted domain interface in the betaA3 homodimer may contribute to the insolubilization of lens crystallins or favor other, more stable, crystallin subunit interactions.

  7. Mechanism of inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by beta-lactams. 2. Stability, reactivation kinetics, and products of beta-lactam-derived E-I complexes.

    PubMed

    Green, B G; Chabin, R; Mills, S; Underwood, D J; Shah, S K; Kuo, D; Gale, P; Maycock, A L; Liesch, J; Burgey, C S

    1995-11-07

    The monocyclic beta-lactams reported by Knight et al. [Knight, W. B., et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 8160; Chabin, R., et al. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 8970] as inhibitors of human leucocyte elastase (HLE) produce stable HLE-inhibitor complexes that slowly reactivate with half-lives ranging from less than 1 to 15 h at 37 degrees C. The complexes produced between PPE and two C-3 dimethyl-substituted beta-lactams are less stable than those produced between HLE and analogous C-3 diethyl-substituted lactams. The stability of the HLE-I complexes is governed primarily by the structure of the substituted urea portion of the inhibitors and not by the identity or presence of a leaving group at C-4 of the lactam ring. In some cases substitutions on the urea portion of the inhibitors yielded complexes that displayed biphasic reactivation kinetics. This suggests the presence of at least two different complexes. The stereochemistry of the leaving group at C-4 has a small effect on the stability of the final complex (1.3-2-fold); therefore, the identity of the final complex is dependent upon the initial stereochemistry at that position. The stability of the complexes was relatively insensitive to hydroxylamine, which suggests that the acyl-enzymes are protected from nucleophilic "rescue". The rate of reactivation of the complex derived from L-680,833,[S-R*,S*)]-4-[(1-(((1-(4- methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-oxo-4-azetidinyl)ben zeneacetic acid, was pH independent, while the L-684,481, (R)-(1-(((1-(4-methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-azeti din one generated complex displayed a pH-dependent reactivation rate. In the latter case, the increase in reactivation rate with pH displayed a pKa of 7.2. This is consistent with the requirement for base catalysis by the active site histidine to regenerate enzymatic activity. Reactivation of the L-680,833-derived complex produced different products as a function of pH, suggesting two different pH-dependent routes

  8. Conductivity of normal and pathological human erythrocytes (homozygous beta-thalassemia) at radiowave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Ballario, C; Bonincontro, A; Cametti, C; Rosi, A; Sportelli, L

    1984-01-01

    The conductivity of normal and homozygous beta-thalassemic erythrocyte suspensions has been measured over the frequency range from 5 KHz to 100 MHz in the temperature interval from 5 to 45 degrees C. The electrical parameters of the membrane, i.e., the capacitance CM and the conductance GM per unit surface have been calculated from an expression given by Hanai for the conductivity of a suspension of ellipsoidal particles covered with a shell. Some interesting differences between the normal and pathological state are evidentiated.

  9. Ccdc13 is a novel human centriolar satellite protein required for ciliogenesis and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Staples, Christopher J; Myers, Katie N; Beveridge, Ryan D D; Patil, Abhijit A; Howard, Anna E; Barone, Giancarlo; Lee, Alvin J X; Swanton, Charles; Howell, Michael; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-07-01

    Here, we identify coiled-coil domain-containing protein 13 (Ccdc13) in a genome-wide RNA interference screen for regulators of genome stability. We establish that Ccdc13 is a newly identified centriolar satellite protein that interacts with PCM1, Cep290 and pericentrin and prevents the accumulation of DNA damage during mitotic transit. Depletion of Ccdc13 results in the loss of microtubule organisation in a manner similar to PCM1 and Cep290 depletion, although Ccdc13 is not required for satellite integrity. We show that microtubule regrowth is enhanced in Ccdc13-depleted cells, but slowed in cells that overexpress Ccdc13. Furthermore, in serum-starved cells, Ccdc13 localises to the basal body, is required for primary cilia formation and promotes the localisation of the ciliopathy protein BBS4 to both centriolar satellites and cilia. These data highlight the emerging link between DNA damage response factors, centriolar and peri-centriolar satellites and cilia-associated proteins and implicate Ccdc13 as a centriolar satellite protein that functions to promote both genome stability and cilia formation.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  11. 17beta-estradiol promotes the synthesis and the secretion of annexin I in the CCRF-CEM human cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Caldas, M; Duarte, C B; Carvalho, A R; Lopes, M C

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: Annexin I (ANXA1), a 37kDa member of the annexin family of Ca2+-binding and phospholipid-binding proteins, is particularly abundant in various populations of peripheral blood leukocytes. Since this protein modulates the anti-inflammatory actions of the steroid hormones, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the female sex steroid hormone, 17beta-estradiol (E2beta), on the synthesis and secretion of ANXA1 in the human CCRF-CEM acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line. METHODS: Complementary reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assays were performed to study the effect of E2beta on the expression of mRNA and protein ANXA1, respectively. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Treatment of CCRF-CEM cells with E2beta, for 30 min, stimulated the synthesis of ANXA1 mRNA molecules, and increased the cellular level of ANXA1 protein. Moreover, when the cells were incubated with E2beta under the same experimental conditions, a significant increase in the amount of ANXA1 secreted from the cells was also detected. ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the intracellular estrogen receptor, had no effect on the E2beta-stimulated expression and externalisation of ANXA1. Taken together, these results indicate that E2beta induces de novo synthesis of ANXA1 and stimulates its secretion in the CCRF-CEM cell line, apparently through a mechanism independent of the intracellular estrogen receptor. PMID:11759108

  12. Expression of human beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit gene (the gene defect of Tay-Sachs disease) in mouse brains upon engraftment of transduced progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lacorazza, H D; Flax, J D; Snyder, E Y; Jendoubi, M

    1996-04-01

    In humans, beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit deficiency prevents the formation of a functional beta-hexosaminidase A heterodimer resulting in the severe neurodegenerative disorder, Tay-Sachs disease. To explore the feasibility of using ex vivo gene transfer in this lysosomal storage disease, we produced ecotropic retroviruses encoding the human beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit cDNA and transduced multipotent neural cell lines. Transduced progenitors stably expressed and secreted high levels of biologically active beta-hexosaminidase A in vitro and cross-corrected the metabolic defect in a human Tay-Sachs fibroblasts cell line in vitro. These genetically engineered CNS progenitors were transplanted into the brains of both normal fetal and newborn mice. Engrafted brains, analyzed at various ages after transplant, produced substantial amounts of human beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit transcript and protein, which was enzymatically active throughout the brain at a level reported to be therapeutic in Tay-Sachs disease. These results have implications for treating neurologic diseases characterized by inherited single gene mutations.

  13. Modulation of the immunologic response to acute stress in humans by beta-blockade or benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Benschop, R J; Jacobs, R; Sommer, B; Schürmeyer, T H; Raab, J R; Schmidt, R E; Schedlowski, M

    1996-03-01

    Acute stress evokes immediate responses in the cardiovascular endocrine, and immune systems. In particular, the number and activity of natural killer (NK) lymphocytes increase after stress. Here, we investigate the possibility to pharmacologically interfere with these stress-induced immunologic changes. Twenty-five healthy males were subjected to an acute stressor, a first-time tandem parachute jump. Subjects were randomly assigned to a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (propranolol), a benzodiazepine (alprazolam), or placebo group. To analyze the role of the spleen in lymphocyte redistribution, splenectomized subjects performed a parachute jump. Propranolol, but no alprazolam, inhibited the heart rate increase during jumping. Increases in epinephrine and cortisol in the propranolol group were comparable to placebo, but were attenuated by alprazolam. The number and activity of NK cells significantly increased in the placebo group but not in the propranolol group immediately after stress. Alprazolam treatment did not alter the increase in NK cell numbers but did inhibit the increase in NK activity. In splenectomized subjects, NK cell numbers, but not NK activity, increased as in placebo subjects. We conclude that stress-induced changes in the immune system are controlled by beta-adrenergic mechanisms and only partly depend on the spleen; central interference with alprazolam differentially affects stress-induced changes in the NK cell compartment.

  14. Structure of the iSH2 domain of Human phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 beta Subunit Reveals Conformational Plasticity in the Interhelical Turn Region

    SciTech Connect

    C Schauder; L Ma; R Krug; G Montelione; R Guan

    2011-12-31

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) proteins actively trigger signaling pathways leading to cell growth, proliferation and survival. These proteins have multiple isoforms and consist of a catalytic p110 subunit and a regulatory p85 subunit. The iSH2 domain of the p85 {beta} isoform has been implicated in the binding of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses. Here, the crystal structure of human p85 {beta} iSH2 determined to 3.3 {angstrom} resolution is reported. The structure reveals that this domain mainly consists of a coiled-coil motif. Comparison with the published structure of the bovine p85 {beta} iSH2 domain bound to the influenza A virus nonstructural protein 1 indicates that little or no structural change occurs upon complex formation. By comparing this human p85 {beta} iSH2 structure with the bovine p85 {beta} iSH2 domain, which shares 99% sequence identity, and by comparing the multiple conformations observed within the asymmetric unit of the bovine iSH2 structure, it was found that this coiled-coil domain exhibits a certain degree of conformational variability or 'plasticity' in the interhelical turn region. It is speculated that this plasticity of p85 {beta} iSH2 may play a role in regulating its functional and molecular-recognition properties.

  15. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2005-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar+ laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm-1, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm2. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  16. Activation of the human. beta. sub 2 -interferon/hepatocyte-stimulating factor/interleukin 6 promoter by cytokines, viruses, and second messenger agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.; Tatter, S.B.; May, L.T.; Sehgal, P.B. )

    1988-09-01

    The hallmark of {beta}{sub 2}-interferon (IFN-{beta}{sub 2})/hepatocyte-stimulating factor/interleukin 6 gene expression is its inducibility in different types of human cells (fibroblasts, monocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells) by different stimuli, which include cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 (IL-1) and platelet-derived growth factor, different viruses, and bacterial products such as endotoxin. The activation by cytokines, viruses, and second messenger agonists of the IFN-{beta}{sub 2} promoter linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was studied after transfection into HeLa cells. A chimeric gene containing IFN-{beta}{sub 2} DNA from -1180 to +13 linked to the CAT gene was inducible {approx}10-fold by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), followed, in decreasing order, by pseudorabies and Sendai viruses; serum; the cytokines tumor necrosis factor, IL-1, and epidermal growth factor; the cAMP agonists BrcAMP and forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine; poly(I){center dot}poly(C); 1,2-diacylglycerol and the calcium ionophore A23187. The region between -225 and -113 in IFN-{beta}{sub 2}, which contains DNA motifs similar to the regulatory elements in the human c-fos gene, appears to contain the major cis-acting regulatory elements responsible for the activation of the IFN-{beta}{sub 2} promoter by several different cytokines, viruses, and second messenger agonists.

  17. Human Pregnancy Specific Beta-1-Glycoprotein 1 (PSG1) Has a Potential Role in Placental Vascular Morphogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Cam T.; Wu, Julie A.; Irmak, Ster; Lisboa, Felipe A.; Dizon, Anne M.; Warren, James W.; Ergun, Suleyman; Dveksler, Gabriela S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that human pregnancy specific beta-1-glycoproteins (PSGs) play immunomodulatory roles during pregnancy; however, other possible functions of PSGs have yet to be explored. We have observed that PSGs induce transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), which among its other diverse functions inhibits T-cell function and has proangiogenic properties. The present study investigates a potential role for PSG1, the most abundant PSG in maternal serum, as a possible inducer of proangiogenic growth factors known to play an important role in establishment of the vasculature at the maternal-fetal interface. To this end, we measured TGFB1, vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) A and C, and placental growth factor (PGF) protein levels in several cell types after PSG1 treatment. In addition, tube formation and wound healing assays were performed to investigate a possible direct interaction between PSG1 and endothelial cells. PSG1 induced up-regulation of both TGFB1 and VEGFA in human monocytes, macrophages, and two human extravillous trophoblast cell lines. We did not observe induction of VEGFC or PGF by PSG1 in any of the cells tested. PSG1 treatment resulted in endothelial tube formation in the presence and absence of VEGFA. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to map the essential regions within the N-domain of PSG1 required for functional activity. We found that the aspartic acid at position 95, previously believed to be required for binding of PSGs to cells, is not required for PSG1 activity but that the amino acids implicated in the formation of a salt bridge within the N-domain are essential for PSG1 function. PMID:20335639

  18. Modeling risk of ignition as a function of landscape and human presence using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loboda, T. V.; Hight-Harf, C.; French, N. H.

    2012-12-01

    Wildland fire is an integral component of many ecosystems worldwide. However, relatively little is known about the patterns of fire ignitions as a function of landscape and how they influence regional fire occurrence. Conventional methods of identifying the patterns of ignition are limited especially in areas where field-based data are not available. Satellite observations of fire activity from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) now provide a 12-year record of fire activity globally. In this study we show how Fire Spread Reconstruction approach is applied to the MODIS active fire detections to analyze the spatial patterns and drivers of fire ignition in three different ecoregions: 1) boreal forests the Russian Far East (RFE), 2) Mediterranean ecosystems of Southern California, and 3) North American tundra. The resultant spatio-temporal patterns are used to develop a Risk of Ignition (ROI) coefficient within the Fire Occurrence modeling framework. Our results show pronounced differences in the spatial patterns of the ROI between the three regions. Only in tundra's remote and unpopulated regions temporal patterns of ROI coincide with the known patterns of fire occurrence and spread. In Southern California and the RFE ROI is more closely linked to spatial and temporal patterns of human activity on the landscape and thus does not correlate well with seasons when large burns occur. Fig. 1 shows the spatial and temporal distribution of ROI in the Russian Far East. The success rate of this method is limited by the amount of observations and fire occurrence within the ecosystems of interest: ROI is established with higher accuracy in the RFE for a single month of April when more than 4000 individual fire events were observed between 2001 and 2010. In tundra and in the winter months within the RFE, where relative amount of fire occurrence is low, the results are less robust. However, the accuracy of the ROI modeling will grow as the MODIS era

  19. DNA methylation profiles in the human genes for tumor necrosis factors. alpha. and. beta. in subpopulations of leukocytes and in leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, S.; Radbruch, A.; Tesch, H.; Renz, D.; Doerfler, W. )

    1991-07-01

    The genomic sequencing technique has been applied to assess the state of methylation in the DNA from human leukocyte subpopulations from healthy individuals and in the DNA from several individuals with myeloid or lymphatic leukemias or non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Leukocyte populations were purified by the high-gradient magnetic cell sorting technique. In the human tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) gene segment between nucleotides 300 and 1150, the specific methylation profile in the DNA from human granulocytes and monocytes is maintained in three cases of myeloid leukemia. In the TNF-{beta} gene, DNA methylation is decreased in several examples of acute or chronic myeloid leukemias in comparison to normal human granulocytes or monocytes, whose DNA is almost completely methylated between nucleotides 700 and 900. In human T and B lymphocytes, the main producers of TNF-{beta}, in three instances of chronic lymphatic leukemias and two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, all 5{prime}-CG-3{prime} sequences are unmethylated in this region. The DNA from the human HeLa cell line is highly methylated at all 5{prime}-CG-3{prime} sequences in the TNF-{alpha} and -{beta} genes. The TNF-{alpha} gene is transcribed in the cells of one case of acute myeloid leukemia in which the analyzed region of the TNF-{alpha} gene is completely unmethylated. The TNF-{beta} gene is not transcribed in any of the malignant cells tested.

  20. NOVEL AMYLOID-BETA SPECIFIC scFv and VH ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS FROM HUMAN AND MOUSE PHAGE DISPLAY ANTIBODY LIBRARIES

    PubMed Central

    Medecigo, M.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Govezensky, T.; Munguia, M. E.; Becerril, B.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Vaca, L.; Cribbs, D. H.; Gevorkian, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single domain (VH) formats. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Aβ1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependently manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Aβ, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Aβ species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. PMID:20451261

  1. Engagement of beta2 integrins recruits 14-3-3 proteins to c-Cbl in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Melander, Fredrik; Andersson, Tommy; Dib, Karim

    2004-05-14

    We found that engagement of beta2 integrins on human neutrophils triggered both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of c-Cbl. Pretreatment of the neutrophils with the broad range protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X blocked the serine but not the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl. Moreover, the Src kinase inhibitor PP1 prevented the beta2 integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl but not the simultaneous serine phosphorylation. These results indicate that Src family kinases and PKC can separately modulate the properties of c-Cbl. Indeed, tyrosine kinase-dependent phosphorylation of c-Cbl regulated the ubiquitin ligase activity of that protein, whereas PKC-dependent phosphorylation of c-Cbl had no such effect. Instead, c-Cbl that underwent PKC-induced serine phosphorylation associated with the scaffolding and anti-apoptotic 14-3-3 proteins. Consequently, c-Cbl can independently target proteins for degradation or intracellular localization and may initiate an anti-apoptotic signal in neutrophils.

  2. Expression of two human beta-adrenergic receptors in Escherichia coli: functional interaction with two forms of the stimulatory G protein.

    PubMed Central

    Freissmuth, M; Selzer, E; Marullo, S; Schütz, W; Strosberg, A D

    1991-01-01

    When expressed in Escherichia coli, the human beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors retain their ligand binding specificity. Their functional integrity was investigated by analyzing receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory (G) protein coupling by using two splice variants of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein Gs synthesized in E. coli (rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L) and the beta gamma subunits of G protein purified from bovine brain. In competition binding experiments with (-)-[125I]iodocyanopindolol and (-)-isoproterenol, rGs alpha-S.beta gamma and rGs alpha-L.beta gamma reconstituted guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding with comparable affinities, whereas rGs alpha PT, a mutant of rGs alpha-L with an altered carboxyl terminus, and a recombinant subtype of the alpha subunit of the inhibitory G protein, rGi alpha-1, were approximately 20- and approximately 200-fold less potent, respectively. A comparison of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptor expressed in E. coli with the beta 2-receptor in S49 murine lymphoma cyc- cell membranes revealed a similar affinity of rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L for the recombinant and native receptors. After stable incorporation of rGs alpha-S.beta gamma into E. coli membranes, receptor-G protein coupling was also verified by determining the isoproterenol-mediated acceleration of the rate for guanine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate binding. These results show that (i) receptor-G protein coupling can be reconstituted in E. coli using recombinant components and that (ii) such an approach may be more generally used to evaluate coupling preferences between defined molecular species of receptors and G-protein subunits. PMID:1656450

  3. Interleukin 1 regulates synthesis of amyloid beta-protein precursor mRNA in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goldgaber, D; Harris, H W; Hla, T; Maciag, T; Donnelly, R J; Jacobsen, J S; Vitek, M P; Gajdusek, D C

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the modulation of amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The level of the APP mRNA transcripts increased as HUVEC reached confluency. In confluent culture the half-life of the APP mRNA was 4 hr. Treatment of the cells with human-recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or heparin-binding growth factor 1 enhanced the expression of APP gene in these cells, but calcium ionophore A23187 and dexamethasone did not. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(isoquinolinsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) inhibited IL-1-mediated increase of the level of APP transcripts. To map IL-1-responsive elements of the APP promoter, truncated portions of the APP promoter were fused to the human growth hormone reporter gene. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into mouse neuroblastoma cells, and the cell medium was assayed for the human growth hormone. A 180-base-pair region of the APP promoter located between position -485 and -305 upstream from the transcription start site was necessary for IL-1-mediated induction of the reporter gene. This region contains the upstream transcription factor AP-1 binding site. These results suggest that IL-1 upregulates APP gene expression in HUVEC through a pathway mediated by protein kinase C, utilizing the upstream AP-1 binding site of the APP promoter. Images PMID:2508093

  4. Genotyping of Giardia duodenalis from humans and dogs from Mexico using a beta-giardin nested polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Lalle, Marco; Jimenez-Cardosa, Enedina; Cacciò, Simone M; Pozio, Edoardo

    2005-02-01

    Cysts of Giardia duodenalis were collected in Mexico from symptomatic children (n = 9) and from pet dogs (n = 5), and they were directly characterized by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the beta-giardin gene. Eight isolates of human origin established as in vitro cultures and 2 reference strains, representing assemblages A and B of G. duodenalis, were also analyzed. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that all isolates belonged to assemblage A. Sequence analyses indicated that the large majority of isolates were of the A1 genotype; interestingly, 2 human isolates displayed the A3 genotype, which has been previously identified in human isolates from Italy. The presence of cysts of the A1 and A3 genotypes in isolates from pet dogs is consistent with their role as reservoirs for human infection, although further studies are needed to confirm the occurrence of zoonotic transmission. Remarkably, cysts of assemblage B have not been found in any of the Mexican isolates studied to date.

  5. Beta cell dynamics: beta cell replenishment, beta cell compensation and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, arises mostly from beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance and remains a highly complex metabolic disease due to various stages in its pathogenesis. Glucose homeostasis is primarily regulated by insulin secretion from the beta cells in response to prevailing glycemia. Beta cell populations are dynamic as they respond to fluctuating insulin demand. Beta cell replenishment and death primarily regulate beta cell populations. Beta cells, pancreatic cells, and extra-pancreatic cells represent the three tiers for replenishing beta cells. In rodents, beta cell self-replenishment appears to be the dominant source for new beta cells supported by pancreatic cells (non-beta islet cells, acinar cells, and duct cells) and extra-pancreatic cells (liver, neural, and stem/progenitor cells). In humans, beta cell neogenesis from non-beta cells appears to be the dominant source of beta cell replenishment as limited beta cell self-replenishment occurs particularly in adulthood. Metabolic states of increased insulin demand trigger increased insulin synthesis and secretion from beta cells. Beta cells, therefore, adapt to support their physiology. Maintaining physiological beta cell populations is a strategy for targeting metabolic states of persistently increased insulin demand as in diabetes.

  6. Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Household Survey Data to Assess Human Health and Nutrition Response to Environmental Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Grace, Kathryn; Shively, Gerald; Johnson, Kiersten B.; Carroll, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Climate change and degradation of ecosystem services functioning may threaten the ability of current agricultural systems to keep up with demand for adequate and inexpensive food and for clean water, waste disposal and other broader ecosystem services. Human health is likely to be affected by changes occurring across multiple geographic and time scales. Impacts range from increasing transmissibility and the range of vector-borne diseases, such as malaria and yellow fever, to undermining nutrition through deleterious impacts on food production and concomitant increases in food prices. This paper uses case studies to describe methods that make use of satellite remote sensing and Demographic and Health Survey data to better understand individual-level human health and nutrition outcomes. By bringing these diverse datasets together, the connection between environmental change and human health outcomes can be described through new research and analysis.

  7. Definition of the minimal requirements within the human beta-globin gene and the dominant control region for high level expression.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, P; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F

    1990-01-01

    The human beta-globin dominant control region (DCR) was previously identified as a region from the 5' end of the human beta-globin locus which directs high level, site of integration-independent, copy number-dependent expression on a linked human beta-globin gene in transgenic mice and stably transfected mouse erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells. We have now analysed the elements comprising the DCR by systematic deletion mutagenesis in stable MEL transfectants. We have identified two independent elements within the DNase I hypersensitive sites 2 and 3, containing fragments which direct strong transcriptional inducibility of a beta-globin gene. Whilst the remaining two hypersensitive sites do not direct significant transcriptional induction, our data suggest that all four sites may be necessary for the fully regulated expression conferred by the DCR. We have also tested a number of beta-globin minigene constructs under the control of the DCR to assess if any of the local sequences from the gene may be removed without loss of expression. We find that the 3' enhancer may be removed without affecting expression, but there is an absolute requirement for the presence of the second intron, not related to the enhancer present in that intron. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2295312

  8. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  9. Galectin-1 as a fusion partner for the production of soluble and folded human {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase-T7 in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Pasek, Marta; Boeggeman, Elizabeth; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K.

    2010-04-09

    The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli often leads to inactive aggregated proteins known as the inclusion bodies. To date, the best available tool has been the use of fusion tags, including the carbohydrate-binding protein; e.g., the maltose-binding protein (MBP) that enhances the solubility of recombinant proteins. However, none of these fusion tags work universally with every partner protein. We hypothesized that galectins, which are also carbohydrate-binding proteins, may help as fusion partners in folding the mammalian proteins in E. coli. Here we show for the first time that a small soluble lectin, human galectin-1, one member of a large galectin family, can function as a fusion partner to produce soluble folded recombinant human glycosyltransferase, {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7), in E. coli. The enzyme {beta}4Gal-T7 transfers galactose to xylose during the synthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker sequence attached to a Ser residue of proteoglycans. Without a fusion partner, {beta}4Gal-T7 is expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. We have designed a new vector construct, pLgals1, from pET-23a that includes the sequence for human galectin-1, followed by the Tev protease cleavage site, a 6x His-coding sequence, and a multi-cloning site where a cloned gene is inserted. After lactose affinity column purification of galectin-1-{beta}4Gal-T7 fusion protein, the unique protease cleavage site allows the protein {beta}4Gal-T7 to be cleaved from galectin-1 that binds and elutes from UDP-agarose column. The eluted protein is enzymatically active, and shows CD spectra comparable to the folded {beta}4Gal-T1. The engineered galectin-1 vector could prove to be a valuable tool for expressing other proteins in E. coli.

  10. Mutations in cystathionine beta-synthase or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene increase N-homocysteinylated protein levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Hieronim; Boers, Godfried H J; Strauss, Kevin A

    2008-12-01

    Severely elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels observed in genetic disorders of Hcy metabolism are associated with pathologies in multiple organs and lead to premature death due to vascular complications. In addition to elevating plasma Hcy, mutations in cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene lead to markedly elevated levels of circulating Hcy-thiolactone. The thiooester chemistry of Hcy-thiolactone underlies its ability to form isopeptide bonds with protein lysine residues (N-Hcy-protein), which may impair or alter the protein's function. However, it was not known whether genetic deficiencies in Hcy metabolism affect N-Hcy-protein levels in humans. Here we show that plasma N-Hcy-protein levels are significantly elevated in CBS- and MTHFR-deficient patients. We also show that CBS-deficient patients have significantly elevated plasma levels of prothrombotic N-Hcy-fibrinogen. These results provide a possible explanation for increased atherothrombosis observed in CBS-deficient patients.

  11. Structural characteristics of the beta-sheet-like human and rat islet amyloid polypeptides as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaobo; Ma, Xiaojing; Liu, Lei; Niu, Lin; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate in this work that scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) provides a useful approach to obtaining structural information about human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) and rat islet amyloid polypeptide (rIAPP) assembly on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) with sub-molecular resolution. The observed hIAPP and rIAPP lamellae consisted of parallel stripes. The STM images of hIAPPs show multiple molecular folding structures, with an average of 11 amino acid residues for the core regions. In addition, the STM images also reveal the assembly characteristics of rIAPP lamellae and may indicate a secondary structural conformation from random coil to beta-sheet-like on the graphite surface.

  12. Novel dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes as potent modulators of human P-glycoprotein dependent multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Torres-Romero, David; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2009-12-21

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) overexpression is one factor contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and represents one drawback in the treatment of cancer. In an attempt to find more specific and less toxic anticancer MDR-reversal agents, we report herein the isolation, structure elucidation and biological activity of nine new (, and ) and seven known (, and ) dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes from the leaves of Celastrus vulcanicola. Their stereostructures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques, CD studies and biogenetic means. All the compounds were assayed on human MDR1-transfected NIH-3T3 cells, in order to determine their ability to reverse the MDR phenotype due to Pgp overexpression. Six compounds from these series (, , , , and ) showed an effectiveness that was similar to (or higher than) the classical Pgp reversal agent verapamil for the reversal of resistance to daunomycin and vinblastine. The structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  13. Exploring Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production Using Earth Observation Satellites and Statistical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, M.; Bounoua, L.

    2004-12-01

    A unique combination of satellite and socio-economic data were used to explore the relationship between human consumption and the carbon cycle. Biophysical models were applied to consumption data to estimate the annual amount of Earth's terrestrial net primary production humans require for food, fiber and fuel using the same modeling architecture as satellite-supported NPP measurements. The amount of Earth's NPP required to support human activities is a powerful measure of the aggregate human impacts on the biosphere and indicator of societal vulnerability to climate change. Equations were developed estimating the amount of landscape-level NPP required to generate all the products consumed by 230 countries including; vegetal foods, meat, milk, eggs, wood, fuel-wood, paper and fiber. The amount of NPP required was calculated on a per capita basis and projected onto a global map of population to create a spatially explicit map of NPP-carbon demand in units of elemental carbon. NPP demand was compared to a map of Earth's average annual net primary production or supply created using 17 years (1982-1998) of AVHRR vegetation index to produce a geographically accurate balance sheet of terrestrial NPP-carbon supply and demand. Globally, humans consume 20 percent of Earth's total net primary production on land. Regionally the NPP-carbon balance percentage varies from 6 to over 70 percent and locally from near 0 to over 30,000 percent in major urban areas. The uneven distribution of NPP-carbon supply and demand, indicate the degree to which various human populations rely on NPP imports, are vulnerable to climate change and suggest policy options for slowing future growth in NPP demand.

  14. Physical map of the centromeric region of human chromosome 7: relationship between two distinct alpha satellite arrays.

    PubMed Central

    Wevrick, R; Willard, H F

    1991-01-01

    A long-range physical map of the centromeric region of human chromosome 7 has been constructed in order to define the region containing sequences with potential involvement in centromere function. The map is centered around alpha satellite DNA, a family of tandemly repeated DNA forming arrays of hundreds to thousands of kilobasepairs at the primary constriction of every human chromosome. Two distinct alpha satellite arrays (the loci D7Z1 and D7Z2) have previously been localized to chromosome 7. Detailed one- and two- locus maps of the chromosome 7 centromere have been constructed. Our data indicate that D7Z1 and D7Z2 arrays are not interspersed with each other but are both present on a common Mlu I restriction fragment estimated to be 3500 kb and 5500 kb on two different chromosome 7's investigated. These long-range maps, combined with previous measurements of the D7Z1 and D7Z2 array lengths, are used to construct a consensus map of the centromere of chromosome 7. The analysis used to construct the map provides, by extension, a framework for analysis of the structure of DNA in the centromeric regions of other human and mammalian chromosomes. Images PMID:2041770

  15. Beta-adrenergic effect of antibodies from chagasic patients and normal human lymphocytes on isolated rat atria

    PubMed Central

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Fink, Susana; Diez, C.; Cossio, Patricio; De E. De Bracco, María M.

    1982-01-01

    It was previously shown that fresh sera from chagasic patients that contained antibodies reacting with the plasma membrane of striated muscle and endothelial cells (EVI(+) serum) could act in co-operation with complement as a partial beta-agonist increasing the frequency of contraction of isolated rat atria. This activity was absent in EVI(-) chagasic serum or normal human serum and was lost upon heat-inactivation of EVI(+) serum. Also, IgG purified from EVI(+) serum was virtually devoid of activity. In this report we demonstrate that normal human lymphocytes can collaborate with EVI(+) IgG or heat-inactivated EVI(+) sera and induce both positive ino- and chronotropic effects on isolated rat atria. Depletion of phagocytic mononuclear cells from the effector cell population did not alter its activity, whereas blockade of the receptors for the Fc fragment of IgG with heat-aggregated IgG abrogated the effect. After fractionation of the T and non-T cell populations by sedimentation of E rosette forming cells the activity was present in the non-T cell fraction. The mechanism triggered involved a beta-adrenergic reaction that could be blocked by 10-7 M (-)-propanolol and not by inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis (10-6 M indomethacin and 1·8 × 10-4 M acetyl salicylic acid) or an anti-histamine drug (10-6 M pyrilamine). Since positive EVI reactivity and myocardial lympho-mononuclear cell infiltrates are frequent in patients with chronic Chagas' cardiomyo-pathy, the possibility that they could interact influencing the rhythm and contractile activity of the heart should be taken into account. PMID:6819907

  16. Beta-Carotene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-carotene is a pigment that occurs naturally in many photosynthetic plants and organisms and one of the most abundant carotenoids found in human blood. The richest dietary sources of beta-carotene are yellow, orange, and leafy green fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, spinach, sweet potatoes...

  17. Computer-graphics interpretations of residue exchanges between the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of human-liver alcohol dehydrogenase class I isozymes.

    PubMed

    Eklund, H; Horjales, E; Vallee, B L; Jörnvall, H

    1987-09-01

    Three-dimensional models of human alcohol dehydrogenase subunits have been constructed, based on the homologous horse enzyme, with computer graphics. All types of class I subunits (alpha, beta, and gamma) and the major allelic variants (beta 1/beta 2 and gamma 1/gamma 2) have been studied. Residue differences between the E-type subunit of the horse enzyme and any of the subunits of the human isozymes occur at 64 positions, about half of which are isozyme-specific. About two thirds of the substitutions are at the surface and all differences can be accommodated in highly conserved three-dimensional structures. The model of the gamma isozyme is most similar to the crystallographically analyzed horse liver E-type alcohol dehydrogenase, and has all the functional residues identical to those of the E subunit except for one which is slightly smaller: Val-141 in the substrate pocket. The residues involved in coenzyme binding are generally conserved between the horse enzyme and the alpha, beta, and gamma types of the human enzyme. In contrast, single exchanges of these residues are the ones involved in the major allelic differences (beta 1 versus beta 2 and gamma 1 versus gamma 2), which affects the overall rate of alcohol oxidation since NADH dissociation is the rate-determining step. Residue 47 is His in beta 2 and Arg in the beta 1, gamma 1, and gamma 2 subunits, and in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Both His and Arg can make a hydrogen bond to a phosphate oxygen atom of NAD; hence the lower turnover rate of beta 1 apparently derives from a charge effect. The substitution to Gly in the alpha subunit results in one less hydrogen bond in NAD binding, and consequently in rapid dissociation. This may explain why the overall rate is an order of magnitude faster than that of beta 1. The important difference between gamma 1 and gamma 2 is an exchange at position 271 from Arg to Gln which can give a hydrogen bond from Gln in gamma 2 to the adenine of NAD. The tighter binding

  18. Malassezia furfur induces the expression of beta-defensin-2 in human keratinocytes in a protein kinase C-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Giovanna; Paoletti, Iole; Buommino, Elisabetta; Orlando, Manuela; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Baroni, Adone

    2004-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides of the beta-defensin family are expressed in all human epithelial tissues tested to date and have recently been the subject of vigorous investigation. Their localization and characteristics support the hypothesis that these peptides play a role in mucosal and skin defense. The lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur is a saprophyte found in normal human cutaneous flora. Malassezia furfur is not only a saprophyte, but is also associated with several diseases such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis and some forms of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and confluent and reticulate papillomatosis. Little is known about the mechanism by which M. furfur overcomes the natural barrier of the skin. To further define the role of the beta-defensins in the innate human skin immune response, we analyzed the mRNA expression of two human beta-defensins HBD-1 and HBD-2 in human keratinocytes treated with M. furfur. In addition, we looked into how M. furfur of TGF-beta1 and IL-10, cytokines that interfere with the development of protective cell immunity, regulate their expression. Finally, we examined the signal transduction mechanisms involved during M. furfur uptake. Cultured human keratinocytes were treated with M. furfur. The mRNA and protein expression were analyzed, respectively, by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Our data demonstrate that M. furfur does not modify HBD-1 expression, whereas it up-regulates, via protein kinase C (PKC), the expression of HBD-2, TGFbeta-1 and IL-10 48 h after treatment. Our results suggest that beta-defensins are integral components of innate host defenses. They play an essential part in the resistance of the human skin surfaces against M. furfur uptake and other microbial invasion.

  19. Beta-palmitate - a natural component of human milk in supplemental milk formulas.

    PubMed

    Havlicekova, Zuzana; Jesenak, Milos; Banovcin, Peter; Kuchta, Milan

    2016-03-17

    The composition and function of human milk is unique and gives a basis for the development of modern artificial milk formulas that can provide an appropriate substitute for non-breastfed infants. Although human milk is not fully substitutable, modern milk formulas are attempting to mimic human milk and partially substitute its complex biological positive effects on infants. Besides the immunomodulatory factors from human milk, research has been focused on the composition and structure of human milk fat with a high content of β-palmitic acid (sn-2 palmitic acid, β-palmitate). According to the available studies, increasing the content of β-palmitate added to milk formulas promotes several beneficial physiological functions. β-palmitate positively influences fatty acid metabolism, increases calcium absorption, improves bone matrix quality and the stool consistency, and has a positive effect on the development of the intestinal microbiome.

  20. Creatine supplementation augments the increase in satellite cell and myonuclei number in human skeletal muscle induced by strength training.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steen; Aagaard, Per; Kadi, Fawzi; Tufekovic, Goran; Verney, Julien; Olesen, Jens L; Suetta, Charlotte; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The present study investigated the influence of creatine and protein supplementation on satellite cell frequency and number of myonuclei in human skeletal muscle during 16 weeks of heavy-resistance training. In a double-blinded design 32 healthy, male subjects (19-26 years) were assigned to strength training (STR) while receiving a timed intake of creatine (STR-CRE) (n=9), protein (STR-PRO) (n=8) or placebo (STR-CON) (n=8), or serving as a non-training control group (CON) (n=7). Supplementation was given daily (STR-CRE: 6-24 g creatine monohydrate, STR-PRO: 20 g protein, STR-CON: placebo). Furthermore, timed protein/placebo intake were administered at all training sessions. Muscle biopsies were obtained at week 0, 4, 8 (week 8 not CON) and 16 of resistance training (3 days per week). Satellite cells were identified by immunohistochemistry. Muscle mean fibre (MFA) area was determined after histochemical analysis. All training regimes were found to increase the proportion of satellite cells, but significantly greater enhancements were observed with creatine supplementation at week 4 (compared to STR-CON) and at week 8 (compared to STR-PRO and STR-CON) (P<0.01-0.05). At week 16, satellite cell number was no longer elevated in STR-CRE, while it remained elevated in STR-PRO and STR-CON. Furthermore, creatine supplementation resulted in an increased number of myonuclei per fibre and increases of 14-17% in MFA at week 4, 8 and 16 (P<0.01). In contrast, STR-PRO showed increase in MFA only in the later (16 week, +8%) and STR-CON only in the early (week 4, +14%) phases of training, respectively (P<0.05). In STR-CRE a positive relationship was found between the percentage increases in MFA and myonuclei from baseline to week 16, respectively (r=0.67, P<0.05). No changes were observed in the control group (CON). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that creatine supplementation in combination with strength training amplifies the training

  1. Creatine supplementation augments the increase in satellite cell and myonuclei number in human skeletal muscle induced by strength training

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Steen; Aagaard, Per; Kadi, Fawzi; Tufekovic, Goran; Verney, Julien; Olesen, Jens L; Suetta, Charlotte; Kjær, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of creatine and protein supplementation on satellite cell frequency and number of myonuclei in human skeletal muscle during 16 weeks of heavy-resistance training. In a double-blinded design 32 healthy, male subjects (19–26 years) were assigned to strength training (STR) while receiving a timed intake of creatine (STR-CRE) (n = 9), protein (STR-PRO) (n = 8) or placebo (STR-CON) (n = 8), or serving as a non-training control group (CON) (n = 7). Supplementation was given daily (STR-CRE: 6–24 g creatine monohydrate, STR-PRO: 20 g protein, STR-CON: placebo). Furthermore, timed protein/placebo intake were administered at all training sessions. Muscle biopsies were obtained at week 0, 4, 8 (week 8 not CON) and 16 of resistance training (3 days per week). Satellite cells were identified by immunohistochemistry. Muscle mean fibre (MFA) area was determined after histochemical analysis. All training regimes were found to increase the proportion of satellite cells, but significantly greater enhancements were observed with creatine supplementation at week 4 (compared to STR-CON) and at week 8 (compared to STR-PRO and STR-CON) (P < 0.01–0.05). At week 16, satellite cell number was no longer elevated in STR-CRE, while it remained elevated in STR-PRO and STR-CON. Furthermore, creatine supplementation resulted in an increased number of myonuclei per fibre and increases of 14–17% in MFA at week 4, 8 and 16 (P < 0.01). In contrast, STR-PRO showed increase in MFA only in the later (16 week, +8%) and STR-CON only in the early (week 4, +14%) phases of training, respectively (P < 0.05). In STR-CRE a positive relationship was found between the percentage increases in MFA and myonuclei from baseline to week 16, respectively (r = 0.67, P < 0.05). No changes were observed in the control group (CON). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that creatine supplementation in combination with strength training amplifies

  2. Efficient and persistent expression of beta-glucuronidase gene in CD34+ cells from human umbilical cord blood by retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Iizuka, S; Sly, W S; Machiki, K; Eto, Y

    1998-10-01

    We succeeded in efficiently transferring the beta-glucuronidase gene in a retroviral vector to human hematopoietic progenitor cells using a centrifugation enhancement protocol. The transduction efficiency in CFU-GM was highly variable (23-100%) with an average of 66.8%. In the case of BFU-E, efficiency was 83% and 76% in 2 separate experiments. In LTCIC (long-term culture-initiating cell), transduction efficiency were 20% and 50% in 2 experiments. The enzymatic activity of beta-glucuronidase in transduced cells were increased above the control level up to 5 wk. Considering that correction of the enzyme deficiency in a small number of hematopoietic cells can be therapeutic for the Sly disease mouse, our data provide encouragement that human trials of gene therapy based on transferring beta-glucuronidase gene to hematopoietic cells may be efficacious.

  3. Affilin-novel binding molecules based on human gamma-B-crystallin, an all beta-sheet protein.

    PubMed

    Ebersbach, Hilmar; Fiedler, Erik; Scheuermann, Tanja; Fiedler, Markus; Stubbs, Milton T; Reimann, Carola; Proetzel, Gabriele; Rudolph, Rainer; Fiedler, Ulrike

    2007-09-07

    The concept of novel binding proteins as an alternative to antibodies has undergone rapid development and is now ready for practical use in a wide range of applications. Alternative binding proteins, based on suitable scaffolds with desirable properties, are selected from combinatorial libraries in vitro. Here, we describe an approach using a beta-sheet of human gamma-B-crystallin to generate a universal binding site through randomization of eight solvent-exposed amino acid residues selected according to structural and sequence analyses. Specific variants, so-called Affilin, have been isolated from a phage display library against a variety of targets that differ considerably in size and structure. The isolated Affilin variants can be produced in Escherichia coli as soluble proteins and have a high level of thermodynamic stability. The crystal structures of the human wild-type gamma-B-crystallin and a selected Affilin variant have been determined to 1.7 A and 2.0 A resolution, respectively. Comparison of the two molecules indicates that the human gamma-B-crystallin tolerates amino acid exchanges with no major structural change. We conclude that the intrinsically stable and easily expressed gamma-B-crystallin provides a suitable framework for the generation of novel binding molecules.

  4. Short hairpin RNA screen indicates that Klotho beta/FGF19 protein overcomes stasis in human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyong; Eskiocak, Ugur; Stadler, Guido; Lou, Zhenjun; Kuro-o, Makoto; Shay, Jerry W; Wright, Woodring E

    2011-12-16

    Normal human colonic epithelial cells (HCECs) are not immortalized by telomerase alone but also require CDK4. Some human cell types growth-arrest due to stress- or aberrant signaling-induced senescence (stasis). Stasis represents the consequences of growth conditions culture that are inadequate to maintain long-term proliferation. Overexpressed CDK4 titers out p16 and allows cells to ignore the growth arrest signals produced by stasis. To identify factors contributing to the inadequate culture environment, we used a 62,000-member shRNA library to knock down factors cooperating with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in the immortalization of HCECs. Knockdown of Klotho gamma (KLG; also known as KLPH and LCTL) allowed hTERT to immortalize HCECs. KLG is one isoform of the Klotho family of factors that coordinate interaction between different FGF ligands and the FGF receptor. We also found that knockdown of KLG induced another member of the Klotho family, Klotho beta (KLB). Induction of KLB was maintained and could activate ERK1/2 in immortalized cells. Supplementation of the culture medium with the KLB ligand FGF19 had a similar effect on hTERT-expressing HCECs as knockdown of KLG regarding both immortalization and down-regulation of the tumor suppressor Klotho alpha. Together, these data suggest that KLB is an important regulator in the immortalization of HCECs by facilitating FGF19 growth factor signaling.

  5. Structural studies on the [Bu(t)-Cys18](19-37)-fragment of human beta-calcitonin-gene-related peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, J K; Bose, C; Beeley, N R; Tendler, S J

    1991-01-01

    High-field n.m.r. studies were undertaken upon a peptide fragment of the C-terminal region of human beta-calcitonin-gene-related peptide (beta-hCGRP). Studies on the antigenic [Bu(t)-Cys18]beta-hCGRP-(19-37)-fragment revealed that several elements of secondary structure were present when the peptide was dissolved in [2H6]dimethyl sulphoxide. In particular an unspecified turn in the region of Ser19-Gly20 and a type I beta-turn in the region of Asn31-Val32-Gly33 were identified. Through-space connections between the terminal Phe37 amide group and the beta-protons of Thr50 suggest that the peptide may be folded into a loop-type conformation. These structural elements appear to overlap with the epitopes of a number of monoclonal antibodies and provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of the terminal Phe37 amide residue in the immune recognition of beta-hCGRP. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1741742

  6. Induction of multiple programmed cell death pathways by IFN-beta in human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Koty, P P; Mayotte, J; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-25

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and keratinocyte transglutaminase (kTG), as well as the cross-linked envelopes (CLE) that they form, have been associated with squamous differentiation and programmed cell death in epithelial cells. When interferon-beta (IFN-beta) was used to stimulate differentiation and programmed cell death in the human lung cancer cell lines NCI-H596 and NCI-H226, the cells underwent a decrease in cellular density. In NCI-H596 IFN-beta caused an increase in kTG activity and DNA fragmentation in the lower density cells, which were significantly slower growing than control cells. However, in the higher density cells, which were only slightly slower growing than control cells, IFN-beta caused an increase in tTG activity and CLE competence. Dual-parameter flow cytometry demonstrated that IFN-beta-induced squamous differentiation preceded programmed cell death. Treatment of NCI-H596 cells with monodansylcadaverine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, prevented the increase in CLE competence, but did not inhibit DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that IFN-beta can induce NCI-H596 cells to enter multiple cell death pathways and that these pathways are not only differentiation related, but may also be growth driven.

  7. Cross-talk between Smad and p38 MAPK signalling in transforming growth factor {beta} signal transduction in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dziembowska, Magdalena; Danilkiewicz, Malgorzata; Wesolowska, Aleksandra; Zupanska, Agata; Chouaib, Salem; Kaminska, Bozena . E-mail: bozenakk@nencki.gov.pl

    2007-03-23

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-{beta}) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Malignant tumour cells often do not respond to TGF-{beta} by growth inhibition, but retain responsiveness to cytokine in regulating extracellular matrix deposition, cell adhesion, and migration. We demonstrated that TGF-{beta}1 does not affect viability or proliferation of human glioblastoma T98G, but increases transcriptional responses exemplified by induction of MMP-9 expression. TGF-{beta} receptors were functional in T98G glioblastoma cells leading to SMAD3/SMAD4 nuclear translocation and activation of SMAD-dependent promoter. In parallel, a selective activation of p38 MAPK, and phosphorylation of its substrates: ATF2 and c-Jun proteins were followed by a transient activation of AP-1 transcription factor. Surprisingly, an inhibition of p38 MAPK with a specific inhibitor, SB202190, abolished TGF-inducible activation of Smad-dependent promoter and decreased Smad2 phosphorylation. It suggests an unexpected interaction between Smad and p38 MAPK pathways in TGF-{beta}1-induced signalling.

  8. Effect of interleukin-1beta and dehydroepiandrosterone on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in fibroblast-like synovial cells of the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Kiga, N; Shinohara, Y; Tojyo, I; Fujita, S

    2015-02-23

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are more prevalent in women than in men. It has recently been proposed that sex hormones such as estrogen, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are involved with the pathogenesis of TMDs. Although studies have investigated the relationship between estrogen and testosterone and the restoration of TMDs, the relationship between DHEA and TMDs is unknown. The synovial tissue of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is made up of connective tissue with an extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen and proteoglycan. One proteoglycan family, comprised of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs), was found to be involved in collagen fibril formation and interaction. In recent years, the participation of SLRPs such as lumican and fibromodulin in the internal derangement of TMJ has been suggested. Although these SLRPs may contribute to the restoration of the synovium, their effect is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DHEA, a sex hormone, on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in human temporomandibular specimens and in cultured human TMJ fibroblast-like synovial cells in the presence or absence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In the in vivo study, both normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human temporomandibular synovial tissues were immunohistochemically examined. In the in vitro study, five fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) cell lines were established from human TMJ synovial tissue of patients with osteoarthritis. The subcultured cells were then incubated for 3, 6, 12 or 24 h with/without IL-1beta (1 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of DHEA (10 μM). The gene expression of lumican and fibromodulin was examined using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and their protein expression was examined using immunofluorescent staining. We demonstrated that the expression of lumican significantly

  9. Autoimmunity and beta cell regeneration in mouse and human type 1 diabetes: the peace is not enough.

    PubMed

    Ablamunits, Vitaly; Sherry, Nicole A; Kushner, Jake A; Herold, Kevan C

    2007-04-01

    Accumulating data from animal models of type 1 diabetes and some findings from clinical studies suggest that autoimmune destruction of islet beta cells is associated with enhanced beta cell regeneration. Successful immune therapies, aimed at preservation of islet cell mass, result in a remarkable reduction of beta cell regeneration. Treated or not, as long as the task of treatment is limited by "making peace" with autoimmunity, the process of beta cell loss continues. Additional therapeutic modalities capable of stimulating beta cell regeneration in the absence of active autoimmune destruction are urgently needed.

  10. Dimethandrolone (7alpha,11beta-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone) and 11beta-methyl-19-nortestosterone are not converted to aromatic A-ring products in the presence of recombinant human aromatase.

    PubMed

    Attardi, Barbara J; Pham, Trung C; Radler, Lisa C; Burgenson, Janet; Hild, Sheri A; Reel, Jerry R

    2008-06-01

    Dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU: 7alpha,11beta-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone 17beta-undecanoate) is a potent orally active androgen in development for hormonal therapy in men. Cleavage of the 17beta-ester bond by esterases in vivo leads to liberation of the biologically active androgen, dimethandrolone (DMA), a 19-norandrogen. For hormone replacement in men, administration of C19 androgens such as testosterone (T) may lead to elevations in circulating levels of estrogens due to aromatization. As several reports have suggested that certain 19-norandrogens may serve as substrates for the aromatase enzyme and are converted to the corresponding aromatic A-ring products, it was important to investigate whether DMA, the related compound, 11beta-methyl-19-nortestosterone (11beta-MNT), also being tested for hormonal therapy in men, and other 19-norandrogens can be converted to aromatic A-ring products by human aromatase. The hypothetical aromatic A-ring product corresponding to each substrate was obtained by chemical synthesis. These estrogens bound with high affinity to purified recombinant human estrogen receptors (ER) alpha and beta in competitive binding assays (IC50's: 5-12 x 10(-9) M) and stimulated transcription of 3XERE-luciferase in T47Dco human breast cancer cells with a potency equal to or greater than that of estradiol (E2) (EC50's: 10(-12) to 10(-11) M). C19 androgens (T, 17alpha-methyltestosterone (17alpha-MT), androstenedione (AD), and 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (16alpha-OHAD)), 19-norandrogens (DMA, 11beta-MNT, 19-nortestosterone (19-NT), and 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT)) or the structurally similar 19-norprogestin, norethindrone (NET) were incubated at 50 microM with recombinant human aromatase for 10-180 min at 37 degrees C. The reactions were terminated by extraction with acetonitrile and centrifugation, and substrate and potential product were separated by HPLC. Retention times were monitored by UV absorption, and UV peaks were quantified

  11. High glucose concentration induces the overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta through the activation of a platelet-derived growth factor loop in human mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, S.; Gesualdo, L.; Ranieri, E.; Grandaliano, G.; Schena, F. P.

    1996-01-01

    High glucose concentration has been shown to induce the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 mRNA and protein in different cell types, including murine mesangial cells, thus possibly accounting for the expansion of mesangial extracellular matrix observed in diabetic glomerulopathy. In the present study, we evaluated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain and PDGF-beta receptor gene expression in human mesangial cells (HMCs) exposed to different concentrations of glucose and then sought a possible relationship between a PDGF loop and the modulation of TGF-beta 1 expression. HMC [3H]thymidine incorporation was upregulated by 30 mmol/L glucose (HG) up to 24 hours, whereas it was significantly inhibited at later time points. Neutralizing antibodies to PDGF BB abolished the biphasic response to HG, whereas anti-TGF-beta antibodies reversed only the late inhibitory effect of hyperglycemic medium. HG induced an early and persistent increase of PDGF B-chain gene expression, as evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, whereas PDGF-beta receptor mRNA increased by twofold after 6 hours, thereafter declining at levels 70% lower than in controls after 24 hours. 125I-Labeled PDGF BB binding studies in HMCs exposed to HG for 24 hours confirmed the decrease of PDGF-beta receptor expression. TGF-beta 1-specific transcripts showed 43 and 78% increases after 24 and 48 hours of incubation in HG, respectively, which was markedly diminished by anti-PDGF BB neutralizing antibodies or suramin. We conclude that HG induces an early activation of a PDGF loop that, in turn, causes an increase of TGF-beta 1 gene expression, thus modulating both HMC proliferation and mesangial matrix production. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8952542

  12. Stress effects on declarative memory retrieval are blocked by a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist in humans.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Römer, Sonja; Richter, Steffen; Dockendorf, Svenja; Bilak, Boris; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2009-04-01

    Previous evidence indicates that stress hormone effects on memory consolidation depend on concurrent emotional arousal-induced noradrenergic activity. Here, we asked whether this is also true for stress effects on memory retrieval and hypothesized that administration of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol would block the effects of stress on declarative and procedural retrieval performance. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 44 healthy young men learned a list of emotional and neutral words (declarative memory task) and completed a serial reaction time task (procedural memory task). On the following day, participants received either a placebo or 40 mg propranolol orally. One hour later, they were exposed to stress (socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT)) or a control condition 30 min prior to retention testing. Stress selectively enhanced the retrieval of emotionally arousing words. Pretreatment with propranolol had no effect on memory alone but blocked the stress-induced memory enhancement for emotional words, confirming the importance of noradrenergic activity in stress effects on memory retrieval. Memory for neutral words and the procedural task was neither affected by stress nor by propranolol. The present findings suggest that stress (hormone) effects on emotional memory retrieval require concurrent noradrenergic activation. Procedural memory retrieval and the retrieval of neutral verbal material appear to be less susceptible to stress.

  13. ATS-6 - A satellite for human needs. [Health, Education, Telecommunications Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, A. A.; Johnston, W. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    On May 30, 1974, NASA launched the ATS-6 experimental communications satellite into a geosynchronous orbit at a station centered over the United States. The 1400 kg satellite was designed to be body-stabilized with a 3-axis control system capable of precision offset pointing. It deployed a 9.1 meter (30 foot) parabolic reflector antenna with a transponder that covered a frequency range from VHF through C-band. The high RF gains obtained with the antenna were to be used for many dramatic communications experiments, one of which was the Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET), a demonstration of direct broadcast of color television to low cost terminals in remote regions of the United States. More than 120 terminals with 3-meter antennas were deployed in Alaska, Washington, the Rocky Mountains, and Appalachia to provide educational and health services to selected community centers. After 11 months of nearly continuous service, the performance of both the satellite and the experiment have exceeded all expectations.

  14. Splicing and 3' end formation in the definition of nonsense-mediated decay-competent human beta-globin mRNPs.

    PubMed

    Neu-Yilik, G; Gehring, N H; Thermann, R; Frede, U; Hentze, M W; Kulozik, A E

    2001-02-01

    Premature translation termination codons are common causes of genetic disorders. mRNAs with such mutations are degraded by a surveillance mechanism termed nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), which represents a phylogenetically widely conserved post-transcriptional mechanism for the quality control of gene expression. How NMD-competent mRNPs are formed and specified remains a central question. Here, we have used human beta-globin mRNA as a model system to address the role of splicing and polyadenylation for human NMD. We show that (i) splicing is an indispensable component of the human beta-globin NMD pathway, which cannot be compensated for by exonic beta-globin 'failsafe' sequences; (ii) the spatial requirements of human beta-globin NMD, as signified by the maximal distance of the nonsense mutation to the final exon-exon junction, are less constrained than in yeast; and (iii) non-polyadenylated mRNAs with a histone 3' end are NMD competent. Thus, the formation of NMD-competent mRNP particles critically depends on splicing but does not require the presence of a poly(A) tail.

  15. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  16. Analysis of the T-cell receptor beta-chain variable-region (V beta) repertoire in monozygotic twins discordant for human immunodeficiency virus: evidence for perturbations of specific V beta segments in CD4+ T cells of the virus-positive twins.

    PubMed Central

    Rebai, N; Pantaleo, G; Demarest, J F; Ciurli, C; Soudeyns, H; Adelsberger, J W; Vaccarezza, M; Walker, R E; Sekaly, R P; Fauci, A S

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed the T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta repertoire in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals at different stages of disease. To circumvent the effect of HLA and other loci on the expressed TCR repertoire, we compared the TCR repertoire in nine pairs of monozygotic twins who were discordant for HIV infection. A semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and flow cytometry enabled us to show distinct differences in the V beta repertoire in the HIV-positive twin compared with the HIV-negative twin. By combining PCR and cytofluorometry, these differences were restricted to a specific set of TCR V beta segments, with members of the V beta 13 family perturbed in six out of seven cases and those of the V beta 21 family perturbed in four out of seven cases studied. Most of the other V beta families remained unchanged. Our results provide direct evidence for a skewed TCR repertoire in HIV infection. Images PMID:7906416

  17. A 16-amino acid peptide from human alpha2-macroglobulin binds transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor-BB.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, D. J.; Roadcap, D. W.; Dhakephalkar, A.; Gonias, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) is a major carrier of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in vitro and in vivo. By screening glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with overlapping sequences, we localized the TGFbeta-binding site to aa 700-738 of the mature human alpha2M subunit. In separate experiments, we screened overlapping synthetic peptides corresponding to aa 696-777 of alpha2M and identified a single 16-mer (718-733) that binds TGF-beta1. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) bound to the same peptide, even though TGF-beta and PDGF-BB share almost no sequence identity. The sequence of the growth factor-binding peptide, WDLVVVNSAGVAEVGV, included a high proportion of hydrophobic amino acids. The analogous peptide from murinoglobulin, a human alpha2M homologue that does not bind growth factors, contained only three nonconservative amino acid substitutions; however, the MUG peptide failed to bind TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB. These results demonstrate that a distinct and highly-restricted site in alpha2M, positioned near the C-terminal flank of the bait region, mediates growth factor binding. At least part of the growth factor-binding site is encoded by exon 18 of the alpha2M gene, which is notable for a 5' splice site polymorphism that has been implicated in Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:11106172

  18. Phenotypes of Myopathy-Related Beta-Tropomyosin Mutants in Human and Mouse Tissue Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Rahl, Karin; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Tajsharghi, Homa

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TMEGFP mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TMEGFP mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TMEGFP and E122K-β-TMEGFP mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TMEGFP mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TMEGFP in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein. PMID:24039757

  19. Human beta-defensins 2 and -3 cointernalize with human immunodeficiency virus via heparan sulfate proteoglycans and reduce infectivity of intracellular virions in tonsil epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Rossana; Morris, Michael; Rosbe, Kristina; Feng, Zhimin; Weinberg, Aaron; Tugizov, Sharof

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that expression of the anti-HIV innate proteins human beta-defensin 2 (hBD2) and hBD3 in adult oral epithelial cells reduces HIV transepithelial transmission by inactivation of virus. However, fetal/infant oral epithelia lack beta-defensin expression, leading to transmission of HIV. The mechanisms of hBD2- and hBD3-mediated HIV inactivation in adult oral epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here we found that heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the apical surfaces of epithelial cells facilitate simultaneous binding of hBDs and HIV gp120 to the cell surface. HSPG-facilitated binding of hBDs and HIV gp120 to the cell surface did not affect viral attachment. HBD2 or -3 cointernalized with virions in endosomes, formed oligomers, and reduced infectivity of HIV. The anti-HIV effect of combining hBD2 and hBD3 was substantially higher than that of the individual peptides. These findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms of anti-HIV resistance in adult oral epithelium. PMID:26539799

  20. Naringenin and 17beta-estradiol coadministration prevents hormone-induced human cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Bulzomi, Pamela; Bolli, Alessandro; Galluzzo, Paola; Leone, Stefano; Acconcia, Filippo; Marino, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Flavonoids have been described as health-promoting, disease-preventing dietary components. In vivo and in vitro experiments also support a protective effect of flavonoids to reduce the incidence of certain hormone-responsive cancers. In particular, our previous results indicate that the flavanone naringenin (Nar), decoupling estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) action mechanisms, drives cancer cells to apoptosis. Because these studies were conducted in the absence of the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol (E2), the physiological relevance of these findings is not clear. We investigate whether the antiproliferative Nar effect persists in the presence of physiological E2 concentration (i.e. 10 nM), using both ERalpha-transfected (HeLa cells) and ERalpha-containing (HepG2 cells) cancer cell lines. Ligand saturation experiments indicate that Nar decreases the binding of E2 to ERalpha without impairing the estrogen response element (ERE)-driven reporter plasmid activity. In contrast, Nar stimulation prevents E2-induced extracellular regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and AKT activation and still induces the activation of p38, the proapoptotic member of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) family. As a consequence, Nar stimulation impedes the E2-induced transcription of cyclin D1 promoter and reverts the E2-induced cell proliferation, driving cancer cell to apoptosis. Thus, these results suggest that coexposure to this low-affinity, low-potency ligand for ERalpha specifically antagonizes the E2-induced ERalpha-dependent rapid signals by reducing the effect of the endogenous hormone in promoting cellular proliferation. As a whole, these data indicate that Nar is an excellent candidate as a chemopreventive agent in E2-dependent cancers.

  1. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  2. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  3. NF-E2 disrupts chromatin structure at human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive site 2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J A; Emerson, B M

    1996-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is responsible for forming an active chromatin structure extending over the 100-kb locus, allowing expression of the beta-globin gene family. The LCR consists of four erythroid-cell-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS1 to -4). DNase I hypersensitive sites are thought to represent nucleosome-free regions of DNA which are bound by trans-acting factors. Of the four hypersensitive sites only HS2 acts as a transcriptional enhancer. In this study, we examine the binding of an erythroid protein to its site within HS2 in chromatin in vitro. NF-E2 is a transcriptional activator consisting of two subunits, the hematopoietic cell-specific p45 and the ubiquitous DNA-binding subunit, p18. NF-E2 binds two tandem AP1-like sites in HS2 which form the core of its enhancer activity. In this study, we show that when bound to in vitro-reconstituted chromatin, NF-E2 forms a DNase I hypersensitive site at HS2 similar to the site observed in vivo. Moreover, NF-E2 binding in vitro results in a disruption of nucleosome structure which can be detected 200 bp away. Although NF-E2 can disrupt nucleosomes when added to preformed chromatin, the disruption is more pronounced when NF-E2 is added to DNA prior to chromatin assembly. Interestingly, the hematopoietic cell-specific subunit, p45, is necessary for binding to chromatin but not to naked DNA. Interaction of NF-E2 with its site in chromatin-reconstituted HS2 allows a second erythroid factor, GATA-1, to bind its nearby sites. Lastly, nucleosome disruption by NF-E2 is an ATP-dependent process, suggesting the involvement of energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors. PMID:8816476

  4. Ionizing radiation predisposes nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells to undergo transforming growth factor beta induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Andarawewa, Kumari L; Erickson, Anna C; Chou, William S; Costes, Sylvain V; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-09-15

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGFbeta activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGFbeta-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Nonmalignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1, and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture or treated with a low concentration of TGFbeta (0.4 ng/mL) or double treated. All double-treated (IR + TGFbeta) HMEC underwent a morphologic shift from cuboidal to spindle shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by a decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin, and vimentin. Furthermore, double treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion, and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel. Neither radiation nor TGFbeta alone elicited EMT, although IR increased chronic TGFbeta signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double-treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes nonmalignant HMEC to undergo TGFbeta-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation was transiently induced by irradiation and persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGFbeta, and treatment with U0126, a MAP/Erk kinase (MEK) inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data show that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  5. Effects of bioactive compounds from carrots (Daucus carota L.), polyacetylenes, beta-carotene and lutein on human lymphoid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zaini, Rana G; Brandt, Kirsten; Clench, Malcolm R; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2012-07-01

    New therapies for leukaemia are urgently needed. Carrots have been suggested as a potential treatment for leukaemia in traditional medicine and have previously been studied in other contexts as potential sources of anticancer agents. Indicating that carrots may contain bioactive compounds, which may show potential in leukaemia therapies. This study investigated the effects of five fractions from carrot juice extract (CJE) on human lymphoid leukaemia cell lines, together with five purified bioactive compounds found in Daucus carota L, including: three polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) and two carotenoids (beta-carotene and lutein). Their effects on induction of apoptosis using Annexin V/PI and Caspase 3 activity assays analysed via flow cytometry and inhibition of cellular proliferation using Cell Titer Glo assay and cell cycle analysis were investigated. Treatment of all three lymphoid leukaemia cell lines with the fraction from carrot extracts which contained polyacetylenes and carotenoids was significantly more cytotoxic than the 4 other fractions. Treatments with purified polyacetylenes also induced apoptosis in a dose and time responsive manner. Moreover, falcarinol and falcarindiol-3-acetate isolated from Daucus carota L were more cytotoxic than falcarindiol. In contrast, the carotenoids showed no significant effect on either apoptosis or cell proliferation in any of the cells investigated. This suggests that polyacetylenes rather than beta-carotene or lutein are the bioactive components found in Daucus carota L and could be useful in the development of new leukemic therapies. Here, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of polyacetylenes have been shown to be exerted via induction of apoptosis and arrest of cell cycle.

  6. Transgene produces massive overexpression of human beta -glucuronidase in mice, lysosomal storage of enzyme, and strain-dependent tumors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Carole; Galvin, Nancy; Levy, Beth; Grubb, Jeffery; Jiang, Jinxing; Zhou, Xiao Yan; Sly, William S

    2003-03-04

    beta-Glucuronidase (GUSB) is a lysosomal enzyme important in the normal step-wise degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Deficiency of GUSB causes the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII, Sly disease). Affected patients have widespread progressive accumulation of beta-glucuronide-containing glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes. Enzyme replacement, bone marrow transplantation, and gene therapy can correct lysosomal storage in the MPS VII mouse model. Gene therapy in MPS VII patients and animals may result in massive overexpression of GUSB in individual tissues, and the toxicity of such overexpression is incompletely investigated. To gain insight into the effect of massive overexpression of GUSB, we established 19 transgenic mouse lines, two of which expressed very high levels of human GUSB in many tissues. The founder overexpressing mice had from >100- to several thousand-fold increases in tissue and serum GUSB. The enzyme expression in most tissues decreased in subsequent generations in one line, and expression in liver and marrow fell in subsequent generations of the other. Both lines had morphologically similar widespread lysosomal storage of GUSB and secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes, a finding characteristic of lysosomal storage disease. One line developed tumors, and one did not. These transgenic models show that massive overexpression of a lysosomal enzyme can be associated with dramatic morphological alterations, which, at least in one of the two lines, had little clinical consequence. For the other transgenic line, the high frequency of tumor development in F(2) FVB progeny suggests that the vector used to generate the transgenic lines has an integration site-dependent potential to be oncogenic, at least in this strain background.

  7. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Yan; Nguyen, Hong T.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Cao, Subing; Li, Cui; Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E.; Shan, Bin

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  8. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  9. Lack of correlation between growth inhibition by TGF-beta and the percentage of cells expressing type II TGF-beta receptor in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    López-González, José Sullivan; Aguilar-Cázares, Dolores; Prado-García, Heriberto; Nieto-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Mandoki, Juan José; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Rivera, Rosa María; Chavarría-Garcés, Jorge

    2002-11-01

    To determine the mechanisms involved in the evasion from TGF-beta growth regulation in the small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines and the non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, we studied: (a) production of TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2; (b) percentage of cells expressing TGF-beta RII; (c) responsiveness of the tumour cell lines to exogenous TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2; and (d) presence of mRNA transcripts of the three TGF-beta isoforms and of the TGF-beta RII. Our results indicate that the SCLC cell lines do not synthesize the isoforms TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2 nor the TGF-beta RII, thus avoiding inhibitory autocrine and paracrine TGF-beta actions. However, NSCLC cell lines express not only TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta RII mRNA transcripts, but also synthesize both isoforms and the TGF-beta RII. Although approximately 50% of the cells from the studied cell lines expressed the TGF-beta RII, different cell lines varied greatly in the sensitivity to the inhibitory action of TGF-beta. This could result from alterations in: (i) the structure of TGF-beta RII; (ii) the phosphorylation motif of TGF-beta RI; (iii) the molecules involved in the intracellular signalling pathway of TGF-beta; and (iv) cell cycle regulation.

  10. Conversion of Human Steroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) into 3[beta]-Hyd