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Sample records for human beta-defensin locus

  1. Haplotyping and copy number estimation of the highly polymorphic human beta-defensin locus on 8p23 by 454 amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Taudien, Stefan; Groth, Marco; Huse, Klaus; Petzold, Andreas; Szafranski, Karol; Hampe, Jochen; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Platzer, Matthias

    2010-04-19

    The beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB) at chromosome 8p23.1 is one of the most copy number (CN) variable regions of the human genome. Whereas individual DEFB CNs have been suggested as independent genetic risk factors for several diseases (e.g. psoriasis and Crohn's disease), the role of multisite sequence variations (MSV) is less well understood and to date has only been reported for prostate cancer. Simultaneous assessment of MSVs and CNs can be achieved by PCR, cloning and Sanger sequencing, however, these methods are labour and cost intensive as well as prone to methodological bias introduced by bacterial cloning. Here, we demonstrate that amplicon sequencing of pooled individual PCR products by the 454 technology allows in-depth determination of MSV haplotypes and estimation of DEFB CNs in parallel. Six PCR products spread over approximately 87 kb of DEFB and harbouring 24 known MSVs were amplified from 11 DNA samples, pooled and sequenced on a Roche 454 GS FLX sequencer. From approximately 142,000 reads, approximately 120,000 haplotype calls (HC) were inferred that identified 22 haplotypes ranging from 2 to 7 per amplicon. In addition to the 24 known MSVs, two additional sequence variations were detected. Minimal CNs were estimated from the ratio of HCs and compared to absolute CNs determined by alternative methods. Concordance in CNs was found for 7 samples, the CNs differed by one in 2 samples and the estimated minimal CN was half of the absolute in one sample. For 7 samples and 2 amplicons, the 454 haplotyping results were compared to those by cloning/Sanger sequencing. Intrinsic problems related to chimera formation during PCR and differences between haplotyping by 454 and cloning/Sanger sequencing are discussed. Deep amplicon sequencing using the 454 technology yield thousands of HCs per amplicon for an affordable price and may represent an effective method for parallel haplotyping and CN estimation in small to medium-sized cohorts. The obtained

  2. Directional and balancing selection in human beta-defensins

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background In primates, infection is an important force driving gene evolution, and this is reflected in the importance of infectious disease in human morbidity today. The beta-defensins are key components of the innate immune system, with antimicrobial and cell signalling roles, but also reproductive functions. Here we examine evolution of beta-defensins in catarrhine primates and variation within different human populations. Results We show that five beta-defensin genes that do not show copy number variation in humans show evidence of positive selection in catarrhine primates, and identify specific codons that have been under selective pressure. Direct haplotyping of DEFB127 in humans suggests long-term balancing selection: there are two highly diverged haplotype clades carrying different variants of a codon that, in primates, is positively selected. For DEFB132, we show that extensive diversity, including a four-state amino acid polymorphism (valine, isoleucine, alanine and threonine at position 93), is present in hunter-gatherer populations, both African and non-African, but not found in samples from agricultural populations. Conclusion Some, but not all, beta-defensin genes show positive selection in catarrhine primates. There is suggestive evidence of different selective pressures on these genes in humans, but the nature of the selective pressure remains unclear and is likely to differ between populations. PMID:18416833

  3. Directional and balancing selection in human beta-defensins.

    PubMed

    Hollox, Edward J; Armour, John A L

    2008-04-16

    In primates, infection is an important force driving gene evolution, and this is reflected in the importance of infectious disease in human morbidity today. The beta-defensins are key components of the innate immune system, with antimicrobial and cell signalling roles, but also reproductive functions. Here we examine evolution of beta-defensins in catarrhine primates and variation within different human populations. We show that five beta-defensin genes that do not show copy number variation in humans show evidence of positive selection in catarrhine primates, and identify specific codons that have been under selective pressure. Direct haplotyping of DEFB127 in humans suggests long-term balancing selection: there are two highly diverged haplotype clades carrying different variants of a codon that, in primates, is positively selected. For DEFB132, we show that extensive diversity, including a four-state amino acid polymorphism (valine, isoleucine, alanine and threonine at position 93), is present in hunter-gatherer populations, both African and non-African, but not found in samples from agricultural populations. Some, but not all, beta-defensin genes show positive selection in catarrhine primates. There is suggestive evidence of different selective pressures on these genes in humans, but the nature of the selective pressure remains unclear and is likely to differ between populations.

  4. Increased expression of human beta-defensin 3 in mollusca contagiosum.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hoffert, U; Schwarz, T; Schröder, J M; Gläser, R

    2010-03-01

    The human beta defensins (hBDs)-2 and -3 are inducible antimicrobial peptides present in human skin. Besides an important role in fighting bacteria, they also have an antiviral function. Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a cutaneous viral disease caused by the MC virus. Lesions show a tendency towards spontaneous regression, which might be caused by antiviral proteins such as defensins. We report a marked increase in hBD-3 immunoreactivity in MC lesions in contrast to hBD-2, which was only marginally increased. We suggest a role for the hBD-3 peptide in MC pathogenesis.

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of beta-defensin-2 expression in human lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, T; Zhuravel, E; Bolgova, L; Zaitsev, S; Efanova, O; Soldatkina, M; Pogrebnoy, P

    2010-12-01

    The present research was directed on analysis of the expression patterns of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) in human lung tumors. Specimens of surgically resected human lung tumors (n = 31) of different histological type (1 case of small cell lung cancer, and 30 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (1 case of clear cell carcinoma, 9 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 20 cases of adenocarcinoma (AC)) were analyzed for expression of hBD-2 with the use of immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis has revealed that all lung tumor samples independently on their histological type express hBD-2 peptide, however at different levels (from < 5% to 100% cells). According to our observations, low-differentiated AC differs from moderately differentiated AC by significantly lower hBD-2 expression levels (p < 0.05). No correlation between hBD-2 expression patterns and PCNA or Bcl-2 expression has been found. Human beta-defensin-2 expression levels may depend on differentiation grade of lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Resistance to human beta-defensins is common among oral treponemes.

    PubMed

    Brissette, C A; Simonson, L G; Lukehart, S A

    2004-12-01

    Oral treponemes are implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. We have previously shown that Treponema denticola ATCC type strains and strain GM-1 are resistant to killing by human beta-defensins (hbetaD)-1 and -2. We hypothesize that resistance to beta-defensins is a common feature of oral treponemes, which allows colonization and persistence in the oral cavity. In this study, we tested additional isolates of T. denticola, as well as six other species of treponemes, for resistance to hbetaD-1, -2 and -3. We also examined the four ATCC strains of T. denticola and strain GM-1 for resistance to hbetaD-3. Resistance was determined by motility and Alamar Blue assays for metabolic activity. All T. denticola strains tested were resistant to hbetaD-1, -2 and -3, with the exception of strain Ambigua, which was sensitive to hbetaD-2 and -3. All other treponemes except Treponema vincentii were resistant to hbetaD-1. Treponema pectinovorum was sensitive to hbetaD-2, while T. vincentii, T. pectinovorum and Treponema maltophilum were sensitive to hbetaD-3. Escherichia coli was used as a control organism and was killed by all three defensins. Resistance to the constitutively expressed hbetaD-1 may assist treponemes in initial colonization of epithelial surfaces, while resistance to the inducible hbetaD-2 and -3 would allow some treponemes to survive in active periodontal lesions.

  7. Biologic activities of recombinant human-beta-defensin-4 toward cultured human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, O L; Zhuravel, E V; Skachkova, O V; Khranovska, N N; Filonenko, V V; Pogrebnoy, P V; Soldatkina, M A

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was in vitro analysis of biological activity of recombinant human beta-defensin-4 (rec-hBD-4). hBD-4 cDNA was cloned into pGEX-2T vector, and recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) cells. To purify soluble fusion GST-hBD-4 protein, affinity chromatography was applied. Rec-hBD-4 was cleaved from the fusion protein with thrombin, and purified by reverse phase chromatography on Sep-Pack C18. Effects of rec-hBD-4 on proliferation, viability, cell cycle distribution, substrate-independent growth, and mobility of cultured human cancer cells of A431, A549, and TPC-1 lines were analyzed by direct cell counting technique, MTT assay, flow cytofluorometry, colony forming assay in semi-soft medium, and wound healing assay. Rec-hBD-4 was expressed in bacterial cells as GST-hBD-4 fusion protein, and purified by routine 3-step procedure (affine chromatography on glutathione-agarose, cleavage of fusion protein by thrombin, and reverse phase chromatography). Analysis of in vitro activity of rec-hBD-4 toward three human cancer cell lines has demonstrated that the defensin is capable to affect cell behaviour in concentration-dependent manner. In 1-100 nM concentrations rec-hBD-4 significantly stimulates cancer cell proliferation and viability, and promotes cell cycle progression through G2/M checkpoint, greatly enhances colony-forming activity and mobility of the cells. Treatment of the cells with 500 nM of rec-hBD-4 resulted in opposite effects: significant suppression of cell proliferation and viability, blockage of cell cycle in G1/S checkpoint, significant inhibition of cell migration and colony forming activity. Recombinant human beta-defensin-4 is biologically active peptide capable to cause oppositely directed effects toward biologic features of cancer cells in vitro dependent on its concentration.

  8. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  9. Genetic variants of the copy number polymorphic beta-defensin locus are associated with sporadic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huse, Klaus; Taudien, Stefan; Groth, Marco; Rosenstiel, Philip; Szafranski, Karol; Hiller, Michael; Hampe, Jochen; Junker, Kerstin; Schubert, Jorg; Schreiber, Stefan; Birkenmeier, Gerd; Krawczak, Michael; Platzer, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents the cancer with the highest worldwide prevalence in men. Chromosome 8p23 has shown suggestive genetic linkage to early-onset familial prostate cancer and is frequently deleted in cancer cells of the urogenital tract. Within this locus some beta-defensin genes (among them DEFB4, DEFB103, DEFB104) are localized, which are arranged in a gene cluster shown to exhibit an extensive copy number variation in the population. This structural variation considerably hampers genetic studies. In a new approach considering both sequence as well as copy number variations we aimed to compare the defensin locus at 8p23 in prostate cancer patients and controls. We apply PCR/cloning-based haplotyping and high-throughput copy number determination methods which allow assessment of both individual haplotypes and gene copy numbers not accessible to conventional SNP-based genotyping. We demonstrate association of four common DEFB104 haplotypes with the risk of prostate cancer in two independent patient cohorts. Moreover, we show that high copy numbers (>9) of the defensin gene cluster are significantly underrepresented in both patient samples. Our findings imply a role of the antibacterial defensins in prostate cancerogenesis qualifying distinct gene variants and copy numbers as potential tumor markers. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Probiotic E. coli treatment mediates antimicrobial human beta-defensin synthesis and fecal excretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Möndel, M; Schroeder, B O; Zimmermann, K; Huber, H; Nuding, S; Beisner, J; Fellermann, K; Stange, E F; Wehkamp, J

    2009-03-01

    Inducible epithelial human beta-defensins (hBD) play an important role in intestinal barrier function. In vitro studies showed that clinically effective probiotics induce antimicrobial hBD-2. Here, we aimed to assess the in vivo effect in healthy volunteers and also addressed how defensins affect probiotic survival. Symbioflor 2 containing one strain of several viable genotypes of Escherichia coli was administered to 23 healthy individuals. After 3 weeks, fecal hBD-2 peptide was increased in 78% (mean 3.7-fold; P<0.0001). Interestingly, the fecal hBD-2 peptide was still elevated 9 weeks after treatment (P=0.008). In vitro studies revealed that this effect was mediated by only one out of three tested E. coli genotypes and comparable to probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 (10- to 15-fold). Functional assays showed that all tested bacteria were similarly killed by defensins allowing to speculate about a suicidal character of this effect. Defensin induction seems to be a common and important mechanism of probiotic treatment.

  11. Involvement of human beta-defensin-2 in proliferation of transformed cells of human cervix.

    PubMed

    Markeeva, N; Lysovskiy, I; Zhuravel, E; Soldatkina, M; Lyzogubov, V; Usenko, V; Potapov, V; Pogrebnoy, P

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) on viability and proliferation of cultured human epithelial cells and the patterns of hBD-2 expression in normal tissues and early-stage human cervical neoplasia in the relation to proliferative state of these cells. The influence of recombinant hBD-2 on viability and proliferation of cultured cells of A431 and M-HeLa lines in vitro was performed by MTT-test, 3H-thymidine incorporation and cell counting techniques. Immunohistochemical analysis of expression of hBD-2 and PCNA in tissue samples (10 normal cases (control), 30 carcinomas of the cervix uteri: 15 - squamous cell carcinoma in situ (Stage 0), and 15 squamous cell carcinoma (Stage Ia)) was performed with the use of anti-hBD-2 and anti-PCNA-mAbs, respectively. We have revealed that hBD-2 significantly stimulated proliferation of A431 and M-HeLa cells in a concentration-dependent manner in the range of 0.1-2 microg/ml, whilst at higher concentrations (> 3-5 microg/ml) it negatively influenced cell viability. The results of immunohistochemical study have shown that malignant transformation of human cervical epithelium is accompanied by the increase of expression of hBD-2 and PCNA. However, the correlative analysis of the expression of the mentioned markers has revealed no relation between them. The effect of hBD-2 on viability and proliferation of cultured epithelial cells possesses a concentration-dependent character. Expression of hBD-2 is increased in early-stage cervical carcinoma.

  12. Activity of human beta-defensin 3 alone or combined with other antimicrobial agents against oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Batoni, Giovanna; Esin, Semih; Luperini, Filippo; Pardini, Manuela; Bottai, Daria; Florio, Walter; Giuca, Maria Rita; Gabriele, Mario; Campa, Mario

    2003-10-01

    The in vitro activities of human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3) alone or combined with lysozyme, metronidazole, amoxicillin, and chlorhexidine were investigated with the oral bacteria Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. hBD-3 showed bactericidal activity against all of the bacterial species tested. The bactericidal effect was enhanced when the peptide was used in combination with the antimicrobial agents mentioned above.

  13. MEF up-regulates human beta-defensin 2 expression in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhuo; Kim, Kyoung-Ah; Suico, Mary Ann; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Li, Jian-Dong; Kai, Hirofumi

    2004-03-12

    Human beta-defensin 2 (HBD2), an antimicrobial peptide, is widely expressed in epithelial tissues and displays a potent killing activity in response to the invasiveness of a wide range of microorganisms and the stimulation of various molecules. Myeloid ELF-1-like factor (MEF) has been reported to be involved in innate immunity responses, such as activation of perforin and lysozyme transcription. The role of MEF in the transcription regulation of HBD2, however, is unknown. Here, we show that MEF not only activated HBD2 promoter activity, but also increased the endogenous HBD2 transcription level. Moreover, the activated HBD2 promoter activity was attenuated by the antisense MEF RNA input and the loss of the ETS binding site (EBS: GGAA core sequence) in the HBD2 promoter. The interaction between the EBS and MEF protein was further confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Thus, our data indicate that MEF may play an important role in regulating HBD2 expression in epithelial cells.

  14. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yange; Shi, Zhaopeng; Gao, Ming-Qing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM) milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health. PMID:27438026

  15. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Yange; Shi, Zhaopeng; Gao, Ming-Qing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM) milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health.

  16. Barrier function, epidermal differentiation, and human beta-defensin 2 expression in tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jens-Michael; Pfeiffer, Stephan; Akaki, Tatsuya; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Kleine, Michael; Neumann, Claudia; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Brasch, Jochen

    2007-07-01

    Tinea corporis is a superficial mycotic infection resulting in substantial epidermal changes. We determined skin barrier function, epidermal differentiation, and human-beta-defensin 2 (hBD-2) protein expression in 10 patients with tinea corporis caused by Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum). We found disturbed skin barrier function as shown by a significant increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and specific ultrastructural changes including disturbed formation of extracellular lipid bilayers, lamellar body extrusion, and deposit of clotted material at the stratum granulosum/stratum corneum interface. Epidermal proliferation in tinea increased several fold and accordingly, proliferation and inflammation-associated keratins K6, K16, and K17 were expressed. Expression of basal keratins K5 and K14 increased, whereas differentiation-associated K10 was reduced. Reduction of the cornified envelope proteins involucrin, loricrin, and the S100 protein filaggrin was also seen. Reduced filaggrin expression correlated with reduced skin hydration; protein breakdown products of filaggrin have been shown to be important for water binding. Surprisingly, we found pronounced epidermal protein expression of hBD-2, which may be related to disturbed epidermal differentiation and inflammation. hBD-2 showed a weak, although significant, antifungal activity against T. rubrum in the turbidimetric assay and the immunohistological staining was somewhat less pronounced in areas directly underneath fungal hyphae in the stratum corneum. Together, we describe profound changes in skin barrier structure and function, epidermal proliferation, and differentiation including pronounced protein expression of hBD-2 in tinea corporis.

  17. Involvement of human beta-defensin-2 in intracellular signaling: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lytvyn, D; Zhuravel, E; Markeeva, N; Soldatkina, M; Dudchenko, T; Pogrebnoy, P

    2006-09-01

    To analyze involvement of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) in intracellular signaling in vitro. A431cells were cultured in the presence of 1 microg/ml of recombinant hBD-2 and/or 10 ng/ml EGF. For evaluation of expression of mRNAs for p70S6 kinase, isoforms alpha and beta, RT-PCR analysis was applied. Expression and activity of p70S6K, phosphorylation of PDK1, ERK, JNK, p38 kinases and EGF receptor (EGFR) was evaluated using Western blot analysis. 30 min incubation of A431 cells with 1 mug/ml of hBD-2 didn't influence autophosphorylation level of EGFR, but resulted in activation of p70S6K, 12 h treatment - in prominently increased level of mRNA for alpha and beta-isoforms of p70S6 kinase, whilst 24 h treatment - in elevation of p70S6K synthesis on protein level. Up-stream kinase phosphorylating p70S6K, PDK1, is also phosporylated upon influence of exogenous hBD-2 in vitro. Our data point on the involvement of PDK1-p70S6K pathway in mediation of action of hBD-2 in A431 cells.

  18. Studies of the biological properties of human beta-defensin 1.

    PubMed

    Pazgier, Marzena; Prahl, Adam; Hoover, David M; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2007-01-19

    Defensins are small (30-45 amino acid residues) cationic proteins with broad antimicrobial activity against many bacteria and fungi, some enveloped viruses, and other activities such as chemoattraction of a range of different cell types to the sites of inflammation. These proteins represent attractive targets for developing novel antimicrobial agents and modulators of immune responses with therapeutic applicability. In this report, we present the results of functional and structural studies of 26 single-site mutants of human beta-defensin 1 (hBD1). All mutants were assayed for antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (ATCC strain 25922) and for chemotactic activity with CCR6-transfected HEK293 cells. To analyze the structural implications of mutagenesis and to verify the correctness of the disulfide connectivity, we used x-ray crystallography to conduct complete structural studies for 10 mutants in which the topology of disulfides was the same as in the native hBD1. Mutations did not induce significant changes of the tertiary structure, suggesting that the observed alterations of biological properties of the mutants were solely associated with changes in the respective side chains. We found that cationic residues located near the C terminus (Arg(29), Lys(31), Lys(33), and Lys(36)) of hBD1 define most of the anti-E. coli in vitro activity of this protein. In turn, nearly all mutations altering the CCR6-mediated chemotaxis are located at one area of the protein, defined by the N-terminal alpha-helical region (Asp(1)... Ser(8)) and a few topologically adjacent residues (Lys(22), Arg(29), and Lys(33)). These experimental results allow for the first time drafting of the CCR6-epitope for a defensin molecule.

  19. Human beta-defensin-2 controls cell cycle in malignant epithelial cells: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhuravel, E; Shestakova, T; Efanova, O; Yusefovich, Yu; Lytvin, D; Soldatkina, M; Pogrebnoy, P

    2011-09-01

    In the present research we analyze the mechanism of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) influence on cultured malignant epithelial cell growth. The analysis of a concentration-dependent effect of recombinant hBD-2 (rec-hBD-2) on cell growth patterns and cell cycle distribution has been performed in vitro with 2 cell lines (human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells) using MTT test, flow cytometry and direct cell counting. To study intracellular localization of hBD-2 immunocytofluorescent and immunocytochemical analyses were applied, and effect of hBD-2 on signal cascades involved in cell cycle regulation has been studied by Western blotting. According to our data, rec-hBD-2 exerts a concentration-dependent effect on the viability of cultured A549 and A431 cells. It causes proproliferative effect at concentrations below 1 nM, significant suppression of cell proliferation at concentration range from 10 nM to 1 μM (p<0.05), and cell death at higher concentrations. Using flow cytometry we have demonstrated that hBD-2 dependent growth suppression is realized via cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase (p<0.05). Also, we have registered significant activation of pRB and decreased expression of Cyclin D1 in cells treated with the defensin compared to untreated control cells, while the expression of p53 remains unaffected. The study of intracellular localization of hBD-2 in these cells has revealed that exogeneously added defensin molecules enter the cells, are distributed throughout the cytoplasm and could be detected in cell nuclei. The model study using A549 cells treated with 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) has shown similar cell growth suppression effect of native endogenously produced hBD-2. The results of our study suggest that in malignant epithelial cells hBD-2 may control cell growth via arrest of G1/S transition and activation of pRB.

  20. Expression of human {beta}-defensin-2 gene induced by CpG-DNA in human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Su Ho; Kim, Young-Eun; Park, Jeong-A; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Yong-Sun; Lee, Younghee; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2009-11-20

    Defensins have a broad range of antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The expression of human {beta}-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is prevalently observed in epithelial cells and is induced by bacterial infection. Here, we have shown that the expression of the hBD-2 gene and release of hBD-2 protein into the medium is up-regulated in response to CpG-DNA in human B cell line RPMI 8226. The induction of hBD-2 was dependent on CG sequence and phosphorothioate backbone-modification. This was also confirmed in primary human lymphocytes. To shed light on the molecular mechanism involved in hBD-2 induction by CpG-DNA, we examined the contribution of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway in RPMI 8226 cells. Suppression of MyD88 function and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization blocked hBD-2 induction. The NF-{kappa}B pathway inhibitors also abolished hBD-2 induction. These results may contribute to a better understanding on the therapeutic effects of CpG-DNA against infectious diseases.

  1. Sebum free fatty acids enhance the innate immune defense of human sebocytes by upregulating beta-defensin-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C; Zhang, Liangfang; Zouboulis, Christos C; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2010-04-01

    Various sebum free fatty acids (FFAs) have shown antibacterial activity against a broad range of gram-positive bacteria, resulting in the suggestion that they are accountable, at least partially, for the direct antimicrobial activity of the skin surface. In this study, we examined the effects of sebum FFAs on the antimicrobial peptide (AMP)-mediated innate immune defense of human sebocytes. Incubation of lauric acid, palmitic acid, or oleic acid (OA) with human sebocytes dramatically enhanced their expression of human beta-defensin (hBD)-2, one of the predominant AMPs found in the skin, whereas remarkable increases in hBD-1, hBD-3, and human cathelicidin LL-37 were not observed. Secreted hBD-2 was detectable by western blotting in the supernatant of sebocyte culture incubated with each FFA, but not with a vehicle control. The supernatant of FFA-incubated sebocyte culture showed antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, whereas the enhanced antimicrobial activity of human sebocytes was neutralized by anti-hBD-2 IgG. In addition, the FFA-induced hBD-2 expression was suppressed by blocking the cluster of differentiation (CD)36 fatty acid translocase on the surface of sebocytes with anti-human CD36 IgG or blocking the NF-kappaB signaling pathway with BMS-345541, a highly selective inhibitor of inhibitory kappaB kinase. These data suggest that sebum FFAs upregulate the expression of hBD-2 in human sebocytes, which may enhance the disinfecting activity of the human sebaceous gland. The FFA-induced upregulation of hBD-2 is facilitated by CD36-mediated FFA uptake and NF-kappaB-mediated transactivation. The upregulation of mouse beta-defensin 4, a mouse ortholog for hBD-2, was also observed in the hair follicle sebaceous glands of mouse ear skin after an epicutaneous application of OA, the most hBD-2-inducible FFA tested. This report highlights the potential of using FFAs as a multifunctional antimicrobial therapy agent for acne vulgaris treatment; FFAs may

  2. Malassezia furfur induces the expression of beta-defensin-2 in human keratinocytes in a protein kinase C-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Giovanna; Paoletti, Iole; Buommino, Elisabetta; Orlando, Manuela; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Baroni, Adone

    2004-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides of the beta-defensin family are expressed in all human epithelial tissues tested to date and have recently been the subject of vigorous investigation. Their localization and characteristics support the hypothesis that these peptides play a role in mucosal and skin defense. The lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur is a saprophyte found in normal human cutaneous flora. Malassezia furfur is not only a saprophyte, but is also associated with several diseases such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis and some forms of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and confluent and reticulate papillomatosis. Little is known about the mechanism by which M. furfur overcomes the natural barrier of the skin. To further define the role of the beta-defensins in the innate human skin immune response, we analyzed the mRNA expression of two human beta-defensins HBD-1 and HBD-2 in human keratinocytes treated with M. furfur. In addition, we looked into how M. furfur of TGF-beta1 and IL-10, cytokines that interfere with the development of protective cell immunity, regulate their expression. Finally, we examined the signal transduction mechanisms involved during M. furfur uptake. Cultured human keratinocytes were treated with M. furfur. The mRNA and protein expression were analyzed, respectively, by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Our data demonstrate that M. furfur does not modify HBD-1 expression, whereas it up-regulates, via protein kinase C (PKC), the expression of HBD-2, TGFbeta-1 and IL-10 48 h after treatment. Our results suggest that beta-defensins are integral components of innate host defenses. They play an essential part in the resistance of the human skin surfaces against M. furfur uptake and other microbial invasion.

  3. Involvement of human beta-defensin-2 in regulation of malignant potential of cultured human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, O; Zhuravel, E; Skachkova, O; Khranovska, N; Pushkarev, V; Pogrebnoy, P; Soldatkina, M

    2014-03-01

    Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial cationic peptide capable to control human carcinoma cell growth via cell cycle regulation. The present study was aimed on determination of hBD-2 influence on the growth patterns and malignant potential of cultured human melanoma cells. The study was performed on cultured human melanoma cells of mel Z and mel Is lines treated with recombinant hBD-2 (rec-hBD-2); cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and anchorage-independent growth were analyzed using MTT test, direct cell counting, flow cytometry, and colony forming assay respectively. Expression and/or phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in cell cycle control were evaluated by Western blotting. The treatment of mel Z and mel Is cells with rec-hBD-2 in a concentration range of 100-1000 nM resulted in a concentration-dependent suppression of cell proliferation, viability, and colony forming activity. It has been shown that rec-hBD-2 exerts its growth suppression effects via significant downregulation of B-Raf expression, activation of pRB and upregulation of p21(WAF1) expression, downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E resulting in cell cycle arrest at G1/S checkpoint. According to obtained results, hBD-2 exerts its growth suppression effect toward human melanoma cells via downregulation of B-Raf, cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, upregulation of p21(WAF1) expression and activation of pRB.

  4. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Devi, R Shobana; Mary, R Regina; Prabhavathi, D; Vidya, R; Mechenro, John; Mahendri, N V; Pugazhendhi, Srinivasan; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2011-12-23

    Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (10⁹ in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  5. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. Findings 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (109 in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Conclusions Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections. PMID:22196482

  6. Human beta-defensin 3 contributes to the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer via activation of NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chongbing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Weijia; Chang, Ying; Shao, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Human beta-defensin 3 (hBD3), an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) expressed in epithelium in response to various stimulations including human papillomavirus infection, has recently been found to be overexpressed in head and neck cancers and exhibit tumorigenic activities. However, the role of hBD3 in cervical cancer remains to be investigated. In this study, we showed by immunohistochemistry that hBD3 expression was elevated in cervical cancer samples of different stages versus the normal tissue, and was positively correlated with the progression of the disease. Overexpression of hBD3 in cervical cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation by accelerating G1/S progression and enhanced cell migration and invasion in vitro. These oncogenic effects of hBD3 were associated with activation of NF-κB signaling. Using a mouse xenograft model, we further demonstrated that hBD3 overexpression promoted the growth of cervical cancer cells in vivo. Our results suggested that hBD3 is involved in the carcinogenesis and development of cervical cancer, and may serve as a biomarker or therapeutic target of this disease. PMID:27713149

  7. Safety assessment of genetically modified milk containing human beta-defensin-3 on rats by a 90-day feeding study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Gao, Ming-Qing; Liang, Dong; Yin, Songna; Yao, Kezhen; Zhang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, transgenic technology has been widely applied in many fields. There is concern about the safety of genetically modified (GM) products with the increased prevalence of GM products. In order to prevent mastitis in dairy cows, our group produced transgenic cattle expressing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3) in their mammary glands, which confers resistance to the bacteria that cause mastitis. The milk derived from these transgenic cattle thus contained HBD3. The objective of the present study was to analyze the nutritional composition of HBD3 milk and conduct a 90-day feeding study on rats. Rats were divided into 5 groups which consumed either an AIN93G diet (growth purified diet for rodents recommended by the American Institute of Nutrition) with the addition of 10% or 30% HBD3 milk, an AIN93G diet with the addition of 10% or 30% conventional milk, or an AIN93G diet alone. The results showed that there was no difference in the nutritional composition of HBD3 and conventional milk. Furthermore, body weight, food consumption, blood biochemistry, relative organ weight, and histopathology were normal in those rats that consumed diets containing HBD3. No adverse effects were observed between groups that could be attributed to varying diets or gender.

  8. Narrowing down the distal border of the copy number variable beta-defensin gene cluster on human 8p23.

    PubMed

    Taudien, Stefan; Huse, Klaus; Groth, Marco; Platzer, Matthias

    2014-02-19

    Copy number variation (CNV) in the range from 2 to 12 per diploid genome is an outstanding feature of the beta-defensin gene (DEFB) cluster on human chromosome 8p23.1 numerously demonstrated by different methods. So far, CNV was proven for a 115 kb region between DEFB4 and 21 kb proximal of DEFB107 but the borders for the entire CNV repeat unit are still unknown. Our study aimed to narrow down the distal border of the DEFB cluster. We established tests for length polymorphisms based on amplification and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) analysis of seven insertion/deletion (indel) containing regions spread over the entire cluster. The tests were carried out with 25 genomic DNAs with different previously determined cluster copy numbers. CNV was demonstrated for six indels between ~1 kb distal of DEFB108P and 10 kb proximal of DEFB107. In contrast, the most distal indel is not affected by CNV. Our analysis fixes the minimal length of proven CNV to 157 kb including DEFB108P but excluding DEFB109P. The distal border between CNV and non-CNV part of the DEF cluster is located in the 59 kb interval chr8:7,171,082-7,230,128.

  9. In vitro activity of human beta-defensin 2 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of tear fluid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling C; Redfern, Rachel L; Narayanan, Srihari; Reins, Rose Y; McDermott, Alison M

    2007-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes vision-threatening keratitis and is difficult to treat due to emerging resistance. Human beta-defensin 2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide expressed by ocular surface epithelia with broad-spectrum activity against various pathogens, including P. aeruginosa. The activity of hBD-2 against P. aeruginosa in the presence of human tears or NaCl was studied. In some experiments, tears were heat-inactivated, filtered, and separated into cationic/anionic fractions or mucin MUC5AC was removed by immunoprecipitation before use. Immunoprecipitation was performed to study the interaction between hBD-2 and MUC5AC. hBD-2 activity was reduced by 40 to 90% in the presence of 17.5 to 70% (vol/vol) tears. NaCl reduced hBD-2 activity, but at most it could account for only 36% of the inhibitory effect of tears. Heat inactivation and filtration attenuated the ability of tears to inhibit hBD-2 activity by 65 and 68%, respectively. Anionic tear fractions significantly reduced (86%) the activity of hBD-2, whereas only a 22% reduction was observed with the cationic fractions. In the absence of MUC5AC, the activity of hBD-2 was restored by 64%. Immunoprecipitation studies suggested that the loss of hBD-2 activity in tears is due to a direct binding interaction with MUC5AC. Our data showed that the antimicrobial activity of hBD-2 is sensitive to the presence of human tears and that this is partly due to the salt content and also the presence of MUC5AC. These data cast doubt on the effectiveness of hBD-2 as an antimicrobial peptide, and additional studies are required to conclusively elucidate its role in innate immunity at the ocular surface in vivo.

  10. Down regulation and nuclear localization of human beta-defensin-1 in pleomorphic adenomas of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Pantelis, Annette; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Haas, Susanne; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Pantelis, Dimitrios; Jepsen, Søren; Bootz, Friedrich; Winter, Jochen

    2009-06-01

    Although antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear to have diverse functional activities in innate immunity, a few reports suggest a potential role of human beta-defensin (hBD)-1 in tumor suppression. The aim of the present study was to compare the expression patterns of hBD-1, -2 and -3 in various features of human salivary gland tissues, such as healthy parenchyma, chronic sialadenitis and intraglandular pleomorphic adenomas, with their adjacent normal tissues. Twenty human salivary gland specimens (five healthy, five chronic sialadenitis, five pleomorphic adenomas and five adenoma adjacent normal tissues (AANTs)) were investigated for mRNA expression levels of hBD-1, -2 and -3 by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Additionally, immunohistochemistry for the hBD-1, -2 and -3 peptides was performed for analysis of localization. Considerably increased, 80-fold higher hBD-1 and increased hBD-3 mRNA expression levels compared to healthy salivary gland tissues were detected in chronic sialadenitis. In pleomorphic adenomas hBD-2 expression levels were lower, but hBD-1 expression levels were significant decreased (p=0.03) compared to healthy parenchyma. Interestingly, the AANTs showed a 48-fold higher expression of hBD-1 and increased hBD-3 expression compared to the healthy salivary gland. Immunohistochemistry of the tumors showed nuclear hBD-1 localization. For the first time, it was shown that hBD-1 gene expression is significantly decreased in pleomorphic adenomas, while simultaneously the protein is localized in the nucleus. Increased expression levels in glandular inflammation have been described previously albeit not in AANTs. These data support the hypothesis that hBD-1 might be a potential tumor suppressor also in benign salivary gland tumors in addition to other genetic alterations.

  11. Expression of human beta-defensins-1, 2 and 4 mRNA in human lung tumor tissue: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, T; Zhuravel, E; Bolgova, L; Alekseenko, O; Soldatkina, M; Pogrebnoy, P

    2008-06-01

    To analyze the patterns of human beta-defensin-1, 2, 4 (hBDs) expression in human lung tumors. Tissue samples of surgically resected human lung tumors (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n=10; adenocarcinoma (AC), n=10) paired with conditionally normal tissue samples were analyzed for expression of hBD-1, 2, 4 mRNA by semiquantitative RT-PCR. In a number of studied lung cancer tissue samples, overexpression of defensin mRNA was registered: hBD-1 mRNA (50% of SCC and 60% AC), hBD-2 mRNA (60% of SCC and 50% of AC) or hBD-4 (40% of SCC and 20% AC). No correlation was detected between the levels of hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-4 mRNA and histological type, differentiation grade of the tumor, and the stage of the disease, as well as the content of hBD-2 peptide in blood serum of lung cancer patients. Human beta-defensins-1 and -2 are often up-regulated in human lung tumors.

  12. Signal transduction and nuclear responses in Staphylococcus aureus-induced expression of human beta-defensin 3 in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Barbara E; Kenoyer, Aimee

    2006-12-01

    The human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3) is an inducible epithelial peptide antibiotic that has potent antistaphylococcal activity. Infection of skin epithelial cells with viable Staphylococcus aureus, a common skin pathogen, induces increased gene expression of hBD-3 and other antimicrobial peptides. The aim of this study was to identify signaling pathways and nuclear responses that contribute to the gene expression of hBD-3 in primary human keratinocytes upon contact with S. aureus. Increased hBD-3 peptide was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in keratinocytes exposed to S. aureus and to lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Both are ligands for the cell surface Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and thus the contribution of TLR2 signaling in hBD-3 expression was examined. Functional inhibition of TLR2 prior to S. aureus stimulation significantly decreased hBD-3 mRNA levels by 37%, attesting to the involvement of this surface receptor in the initial recognition and downstream signaling for hBD-3 expression. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor prior to either S. aureus or LTA stimulation was associated with reduced hBD-3 mRNA transcripts and peptide. We also propose a role for the MAPK-regulated transcriptional activating protein 1 in S. aureus-induced hBD-3 gene expression. Combined, these studies indicate a role for TLR2 signaling and MAPK activation in the upregulation of hBD-3 and demonstrate the innate immune capacity of skin keratinocytes under conditions of S. aureus challenge to enhance the local expression of this antistaphylococcal peptide antibiotic.

  13. Defective killing of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis is associated with reduced mobilization of human beta-defensin-3.

    PubMed

    Kisich, Kevin O; Carspecken, Charles W; Fiéve, Stephanie; Boguniewicz, Mark; Leung, Donald Y M

    2008-07-01

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD) have frequent colonization and infection with Staphylococcus aureus. Rapid elimination of S. aureus depends on constitutive synthesis and mobilization of human beta-defensin-3 (HBD-3). To determine whether keratinocytes in AD, compared with normal, skin are less able to kill S. aureus rapidly, and to assess the potential role that abnormally low mobilization of HBD-3 onto S. aureus has in this process. Skin samples from 10 normal individuals and 10 patients with AD were compared for synthesis and mobilization of HBD-3 onto surface-associated S. aureus. Furthermore, keratinocytes from 10 individuals were studied for the effects of T(H)2 cytokines on the ability of the cells to synthesize and mobilize HBD-3, and to kill S. aureus. Keratinocytes in skin biopsies from subjects with AD were defective in killing S. aureus relative to normal individuals (P < .001). The constitutive levels of HBD-3 in the epidermal keratinocytes were similar between normal individuals and those with AD. However, the cells of patients with AD were unable to mobilize HBD-3 efficiently to kill S. aureus. Physiologic Ca(++) was essential for development of normal HBD-3 levels by cultured human keratinocytes. Mobilization of HBD-3 and the ability to kill S. aureus were significantly (P < .05) inhibited by IL-4 and IL-13. Antagonism of IL-4/10/13 with antibodies significantly (P < .01) improved mobilization of HBD-3 onto the surface of S. aureus by skin from patients with AD. Patients with AD have problems with S. aureus skin infection. This is a result of increased levels of T(H)2 cytokines, which inhibit keratinocyte mobilization of HBD-3.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing human beta-defensin-2 are more resistant to fungal attack: functional homology between plant and human defensins.

    PubMed

    Aerts, An M; Thevissen, Karin; Bresseleers, Sara M; Sels, Jan; Wouters, Piet; Cammue, Bruno P A; François, Isabelle E J A

    2007-08-01

    Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is a small antimicrobial peptide with potent activity against different Gram-negative bacteria and fungal/yeast species. Since human beta-defensins and plant defensins share structural homology, we set out to analyse whether there also exists a functional homology between these defensins of different eukaryotic kingdoms. To this end, we constructed a plant transformation vector harbouring the hBD-2 coding sequence, which we transformed to Arabidopsis thaliana plants, giving rise to A. thaliana plants indeed expressing hBD-2. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that this heterologously produced hBD-2 possesses antifungal activity in vitro. Finally, we could show that hBD-2 expressing A. thaliana plants are more resistant against the broad-spectrum fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea as compared to untransformed A. thaliana plants, and that this resistance is correlated with the level of active hBD-2 produced in these transgenic plants. Hence, we demonstrated a functional homology, next to the already known structural homology, between defensins originating from different eukaryotic kingdoms. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this is specifically demonstrated for plant and mammalian defensins.

  15. Structure-activity relation of human beta-defensin 3: influence of disulfide bonds and cysteine substitution on antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Enno; Schulz-Maronde, Sandra; Scheid, Svenja; Meyer, Bernd; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Adermann, Knut

    2005-07-19

    Human beta-defensins form a group of cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides which have been found in epithelial tissue and, more recently, in the male genital tract. They play a role in the defense against microbial pathogens in innate immunity and display additional chemotactic functions in the adaptive immune system. An important characteristic of antimicrobial peptides is that they also exhibit toxic potential on eukaryotic cells. Very little is known about the structure dependence of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects. We investigated human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3), a potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial effector peptide, regarding the influence of structural parameters on the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity. We have established a structure-activity relation of the hBD-3 using synthetic derivatives differing in length, charge, disulfide connectivity, and overall hydrophobicity. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides was compared to the cyctotoxic effects on monocytic THP-1 cells and the hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes. We found that it is not important for antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity whether and how cysteine residues are arranged to form disulfide bonds. Substitution of half-cystinyl residues by tryptophan resulted in increased activities, while other substitutions did not change activity. Correlation of activities with the structural changes demonstrates that the activity on eukaryotic cells appears to depend strongly on the overall hydrophobicity. In contrast, the antimicrobial potency of hBD-3 peptides is determined by the distribution of positively charged amino acid residues and hydrophobic side chains. The results facilitate the understanding of beta-defensin interaction with different cell types and guide the design of antimicrobially active peptides.

  16. Comparative simulation studies of native and single-site mutant human beta-defensin-1 peptides.

    PubMed

    Toubar, Rabab A; Zhmurov, Artem; Barsegov, Valeri; Marx, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins play important roles in a broad range of biological functions, such as microbial defense and immunity. Yet, little is known about their molecular properties, i.e. secondary structure stability, structural variability, important side chain interactions, surface charge distribution, and resistance to thermal fluctuations, and how these properties are related to their functions. To assess these factors, we studied the native human β-defensin-1 monomer and dimer as well as several single-site mutants using molecular dynamics simulations. The results showed that disulfide bonds are important determinants in maintaining the defensins' structural integrity, as no structural transitions were observed at 300 K and only minor structural unfolding was detected upon heating to 500 K. The α-helix was less thermally stable than the core β-sheet structure held together by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The monomer α-helix stability was directly correlated, whereas the end-to-end distance was inversely correlated to the experimentally measured β-defensin-1 chemotactic activity, in the order: mutant 2 (Gln24Glu) > mutant 3 (Lys31Ala) = wild type > mutant 1 (Asn4Ala). The structural stability of the β-defensin-1 dimer species exhibited an inverse correlation to their chemotactic activity. In dimers formed by mutants 2 and 3, we observed sliding of one monomer upon the surface of the other in the absence of unbinding. This dynamic sliding feature may enhance the molecular oligomerization of β-defensin-1 peptides contributing to their antibacterial activity. It could also help these peptides orient correctly in the CC chemokine receptor 6 binding site, thereby initiating their chemotactic activity. In agreement with this notion, the remarkable sliding behavior was observed only for the mutants with the highest chemotactic activity.

  17. Expression of Beta-Defensin 131 Promotes an Innate Immune Response in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Kyeoung-Hwa; Kim, Hae Jong; Lee, Jaehyouk; Myung, Soon Chul

    2015-01-01

    Previously, using the Illumina HumanHT-12 microarray we found that β-defensin 131 (DEFB131), an antimicrobial peptide, is upregulated in the human prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1 upon stimulation with lipoteichoic acid (LTA; a gram-positive bacterial component), than that in the untreated RWPE-1 cells. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of DEFB131 in RWPE-1 cells during bacterial infection. We examined the intracellular signaling pathways and nuclear responses in RWPE-1 cells that contribute to DEFB131 gene induction upon stimulation with LTA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to determine whether NF-κB directly binds to the DEFB131 promoter after LTA stimulation in RWPE-1 cells. We found that DEFB131 expression was induced by LTA stimulation through TLR2 and p38MAPK/NF-κB activation, which was evident in the phosphorylation of both p38MAPK and IκBα. We also found that SB203580 and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of p38MAPK and NF-κB, respectively, suppressed LTA-induced DEFB131 expression. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that NF-κB directly binds to the DEFB131 promoter, suggesting that NF-κB is a direct regulator, and is necessary for LTA-induced DEFB131 expression in RWPE-1 cells. Interestingly, with DEFB131 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells, the accumulation of mRNA and protein secretion of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12α) and chemokines (CCL20, CCL22, and CXCL8) were significantly enhanced. In addition, DEFB131-transfected RWPE-1 cells markedly induced chemotactic activity in THP-1 monocytes. We concluded that DEFB131 induces cytokine and chemokine upregulation through the TLR2/NF-κB signaling pathway in RWPE-1 cells during bacterial infection and promotes an innate immune response.

  18. Expression of Beta-Defensin 131 Promotes an Innate Immune Response in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Jong; Lee, Jaehyouk; Myung, Soon Chul

    2015-01-01

    Previously, using the Illumina HumanHT-12 microarray we found that β-defensin 131 (DEFB131), an antimicrobial peptide, is upregulated in the human prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1 upon stimulation with lipoteichoic acid (LTA; a gram-positive bacterial component), than that in the untreated RWPE-1 cells. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of DEFB131 in RWPE-1 cells during bacterial infection. We examined the intracellular signaling pathways and nuclear responses in RWPE-1 cells that contribute to DEFB131 gene induction upon stimulation with LTA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to determine whether NF-κB directly binds to the DEFB131 promoter after LTA stimulation in RWPE-1 cells. We found that DEFB131 expression was induced by LTA stimulation through TLR2 and p38MAPK/NF-κB activation, which was evident in the phosphorylation of both p38MAPK and IκBα. We also found that SB203580 and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of p38MAPK and NF-κB, respectively, suppressed LTA-induced DEFB131 expression. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that NF-κB directly binds to the DEFB131 promoter, suggesting that NF-κB is a direct regulator, and is necessary for LTA-induced DEFB131 expression in RWPE-1 cells. Interestingly, with DEFB131 overexpression in RWPE-1 cells, the accumulation of mRNA and protein secretion of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12α) and chemokines (CCL20, CCL22, and CXCL8) were significantly enhanced. In addition, DEFB131-transfected RWPE-1 cells markedly induced chemotactic activity in THP-1 monocytes. We concluded that DEFB131 induces cytokine and chemokine upregulation through the TLR2/NF-κB signaling pathway in RWPE-1 cells during bacterial infection and promotes an innate immune response. PMID:26649771

  19. Regulated expression of human beta-defensin-2 leads to altered phenotype and growth patterns of cultured human embryonal kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuravel, E; Lytvyn, D; Soldatkina, M; Zeleniy, S; Shestakova, T; Pogrebnoy, P

    2006-12-01

    To create cell line with regulated expression of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) and evaluate the influence of expressed peptide on its phenotypic and growth patterns. Using cloning techniques, on the base of human embryonic kidney cells of HEK293T line, stable T-rex HEK-hBD2-m cell subline expressing mature biologically active hBD-2 molecule upon the presence of tetracycline in culture medium was generated. The morphological patterns, growth characteristics and colony forming activity of these cells were studied using routine techniques. T-rex HEK-HBD2-m cell subline was shown to express both mRNA and hBD-2m protein upon the presence of 1 mug/ml tetracycline in culture medium as it was demonstrated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemical approach. Upon prolonged expression of hBD-2, the cells acquired special features: they lost ability to grow in monolayer in vitro and to form colonies in soft agar, characteristic to parental HEK293T cells, but possess higher growth rate and longer survival in FBS-free medium than wild type cells. Expression of hBD-2 in T-rex HEK-HBD2-m cell subline results in specific biological consequences that favor cell survival.

  20. Tissue-specific human beta-defensins (HBD)1, HBD2, and HBD3 secretion from human extra-placental membranes stimulated with Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During an ascending infection along the reproductive tract, the extra-placental membranes must act as a selective and competent barrier against pathogens. Human beta defensins (HBD)1, HBD2, and HBD3 are key elements of innate immunity that are secreted to neutralize/control the progression of infection. Methods Full-thickness membranes were mounted on a Transwell device, constituted by two independent chambers, 1 × 10(6) CFU/ml of Escherichia coli were added to either the amnion (AMN) or the choriodecidual (CHD) face or to both. Secretion profiles of HBD1, HBD2, and HBD3 to the culture medium were quantified by ELISA. Results In comparison with basal conditions, the secretion profile of HBD1 remained without significant changes; HBD2 level in CHD and AMN increased 1.9- and 1.4-times, respectively, after stimulation with bacteria. HBD3 secretion level increased significantly (7.8 +/- 1.9 pg/micrograms) in the CHD but only if the stimulus was applied on the AMN side. Conclusions Selective stimulation of extra-placental membranes with E. coli, results in a tissue specific secretion of HBD1, HBD2, and HBD3 mainly in the CHD, which is the first infected region during an ascending infection. PMID:21122132

  1. Mycobacterium bovis-mediated induction of human beta-defensin-2 in epithelial cells is controlled by intracellular calcium and p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Alba, Laura; Trejo, Artemisa

    2007-05-01

    Induction of human beta defensin-2 (HBD-2) by mycobacteria has been reported. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which mycobacteria up-regulates HBD-2 gene expression in epithelial cells remains poorly understood. In this work, we provide evidence that the induction of HBD-2 mRNA in response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by pretreatment with a cell-permeable BAPTA-AM, which chelates intracellular calcium. Our data also demonstrate that HBD-2 mRNA induction by M. bovis in A549 lung epithelial cells requires activation of calmodulin. Interestingly, HBD-2 mRNA expression in response to M. bovis BCG was attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK]), but not by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK): PD98059. Furthermore, we found that a second p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190) significantly blocked M. bovis BCG-mediated HBD-2 induction in A549 lung epithelial cells. Together, these data suggest that M. bovis BCG induces HBD-2 mRNA expression in A549 lung epithelial cells at least in part mediated through intracellular calcium flux as well as activation of signaling protein of p38MAPK, but not ERK.

  2. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Human Beta-Defensins Modulate the Release of Antimicrobial Chemokine CCL20/Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Santosh K.; Gupta, Sanhita; Jiang, Bin; Weinberg, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system regulate immune responses through the production of antimicrobial peptides, chemokines, and cytokines, including human beta-defensins (hBDs) and CCL20. In this study, we examined the kinetics of primary human oral epithelial cell (HOEC) production of CCL20 and hBDs in response to Fusobacterium nucleatum, a commensal bacterium of the oral cavity, which we previously showed promotes HOEC induction of hBDs. HOECs secrete maximal levels of CCL20 at 6 h, following stimulation by F. nucleatum cell wall (FnCW). The kinetics of CCL20 release is distinct from that of hBD-2 and -3, which peaks after 24 h and 48 h of FnCW stimulation, respectively. FnCW-induced release of CCL20 by HOECs requires both transcriptional and translational activation. Release of CCL20 by HOECs is inhibited by brefeldin A, suggesting that it is secreted through a vesicle transport pathway. Other epithelium-derived agents that FnCW induces, such as hBD-2, hBD-3, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), are also able to release CCL20. By focusing on mitogen-activated protein kinases, we show that both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38, but not JNK, are required for hBD-, TNF-α-, and IL-1β-induced secretion of CCL20 by HOECs. The ability of FnCW and its induced hBDs to produce proinflammatory cytokines and CCL20 suggests the broad role of F. nucleatum and human antimicrobial peptides in primary immune responses elicited by oral epithelium. PMID:21911466

  3. Human beta-defensin 1, 2 and 3 production by amniotic epithelial cells with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV oncogenic potential and the mode of delivery.

    PubMed

    Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Alkhalayla, Habib; Pyzlak, Michal; Watroba, Mateusz; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Wejman, Jaroslaw

    2016-08-01

    Human beta-defensins (HBD) produced by human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) co-create an innate antiviral immune response in the materno-placento-fetal unit. Oncogenic potential of HPV may reflect its ability to avoid immune recognition. In this study we assessed the risk of HAEC infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) in relation to the type of labor and the impact of the oncogenic potential of HPV on HBD production in HAEC. A comparative analysis [HPV(+) vs. HPV(-)HAEC] of the production of HBD were performed. HAEC were isolated from placentas of 116 HPV(+) and 36 HPV(-) parturients (groups I and II, respectively) using trypsin-based method. The cases of premature rupture of membranes (PROM), natural labors (NL) and cesarean sections (CS) were analysed in respective subgroups. High-risk (HR-HPV) and low-risk (LR-HPV) genotypes of HPV in cervical smears and HAEC were identified using the Roche Linear Array(®) HPV Genotyping Test. HBD-1,-2,-3 concentrations in the HAEC culture supernatant were assessed using ELISA. The highest percentage (42.1%) of HPV transmission to HAEC occurred in PROM, an intermediate value was observed after NL (38.5%), and the lowest (25.6%) after CS. The mean concentrations of HBD-2 and HBD-3 in group I were up to 3.1- and 2.8-fold higher (p < 0.05), respectively. The mean concentration of HBD-2 was higher (p < 0.05) in LR-HPV infection compared with HR-HPV. The course of labor and the mode of delivery influence the risk of HPV transmission to the HAEC. HPV infection upregulates HBD-2 and HBD-3 production in HAEC. Smaller increases in HBD-2 level after HR-HPV infection as compared to LR-HPV may affect cancerogenesis. Therapeutic potential of HBD-2 for HR-HPV infection should be assessed in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Toll-like receptor 2 and NALP2 mediate induction of human beta-defensins by fusobacterium nucleatum in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Suk; Shin, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Sook; Oh, Ju-Eun; Min, Byung-Moo; Choi, Youngnim

    2009-03-01

    We previously reported that infection by Fusobacterium nucleatum strongly induced the expression of both human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2) and HBD-3 by gingival epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and regulatory mechanisms involved in the induction of HBD-2 and -3 expression by F. nucleatum in gingival epithelial cells. Immortalized human gingival epithelial HOK-16B cells were infected with live or heat-killed F. nucleatum, and the expression of HBDs and interleukin-8 (IL-8) was examined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Live, but not heat-killed, F. nucleatum invaded HOK-16B cells, as seen by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Live F. nucleatum induced both HBD-2 and -3 efficiently, whereas heat-killed bacteria induced only HBD-3 at a reduced level. Knockdown of NACHT-LRR- and pyrin domain-containing protein 2 (NALP2), the most abundant intracellular PRR in HOK-16B cells, by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly reduced the induction of HBD-3 but not HBD-2 and IL-8. In addition, knockdown of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by RNAi reduced the upregulation of HBD-2 and -3 but not IL-8. Heat-killed F. nucleatum was hindered in its ability to activate TLR2 and JNK signaling pathways. Theses data show that TLR2 and NALP2 mediate the induction of HBDs by F. nucleatum in gingival epithelial cells, but thresholds for the two HBD genes are different.

  5. Psoriasis is associated with increased beta-defensin genomic copy number

    PubMed Central

    Hollox, Edward J.; Huffmeier, Ulrike; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Palla, Raquel; Lascorz, Jesús; Rodijk-Olthuis, Diana; van de Kerkhof, Peter C.M.; Traupe, Heiko; de Jongh, Gys; den Heijer, Martin; Reis, André; Armour, John A.L.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic component. We have analysed the genomic copy number polymorphism of the beta-defensin region on human chromosome 8 in 179 Dutch psoriasis patients and 272 controls, and in 319 German psoriasis patients and 305 controls. Comparisons in both cohorts show a significant association between higher genomic copy number for beta-defensin genes and the risk of psoriasis. PMID:18059266

  6. De Novo sphingolipid synthesis is essential for Salmonella-induced autophagy and human beta-defensin 2 expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important for innate immune response to eliminate infected pathogens and involved in autophagy. On the other hand, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) served as an intracellular pattern recognition receptor to enhance host defense by inducing autophagy and the production of antimicrobial peptides, such as human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2). However, the role of sphingolipids in Salmonella-induced autophagy and hBD-2 response in intestinal epithelial cells has not been previously elucidated. Salmonella typhimurium wild-type strain SL1344 was used to infect SW480, an intestinal epithelial cell. hBD-2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expressions were assessed in SW480 cells using RT-PCR, and intracellular signaling pathways and autophagy protein expression were analyzed by Western blot in SW480 cells in the presence or absence of inhibitors or transfected with siRNA. We demonstrated that inhibition of de novo sphingolipid synthesis repressed the membrane recruitment of NOD2 and autophagy-related protein 16-like 1 (Atg16L1), suppressed Salmonella-induced autophagic protein LC3-II expression, and reduced NOD2-mediated hBD-2 response in Salmonella-infected SW480 cells. Contrasting to the utilization of membrane cholesterol on maintenance of Salmonella-containing vacuoles and anti-inflammation by Salmonella, sphingolipids act on epithelial defense against the invasive pathogen. Our results offer mechanistic insights on the role of de novo sphingolipid synthesis in the innate immunity of intestinal epithelial cells to Salmonella infection. The pharmaceuticals enhancing or diet enriched with sphingolipids may induce the dual anti-bacterial mechanisms. The role of de novo sphingolipid synthesis on inflammatory bowel disease is deserved to be further investigated.

  7. Human beta-defensin-1 suppresses tumor migration and invasion and is an independent predictor for survival of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Qi; Wang, Ruinan; Sun, Chongkui; Jin, Xin; Liu, Dongjuan; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Lili; Ji, Ning; Li, Jing; Zhou, Yu; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xinhua; Jiang, Lu; Liao, Ga; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Human beta-defensin-1 (hBD-1) has recently been considered as a candidate tumor suppressor in renal and prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hBD-1 in the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and its potential as diagnostic/prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for OSCC. HBD-1 expression in tissues at different stages of oral carcinogenesis, as well as OSCC cell lines was examined. HBD-1 was overexpressed in HSC-3, UM1, SCC-9 and SCC-25 cells and subjected to cell growth, apoptosis, migration and invasion assays. Tissue microarray constructed with tissues from 175 patients was used to examine clinicopathological significance of hBD-1 expression in OSCC. HBD-1 expression decreased from oral precancerous lesions to OSCC and was lower in OSCC with lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis. In vitro, the expression of hBD-1 was related to the invasive potential of OSCC cell lines. Induction of exogenous expression of hBD-1 inhibited migration and invasion of OSCC cells, probably by regulation of RhoA, RhoC and MMP-2; but had no significant effect on proliferation or apoptosis. In a cohort of patients with primary OSCC, cases with no expression of hBD-1 had more chance to be involved in lymph node metastasis. Eventually, the positive expression of hBD-1 was associated with longer survival of patients with OSCC, and multivariate analysis and ROC curve analysis confirmed hBD-1 positivity to be an independent prognostic factor of OSCC, especially OSCC at early stage. Overall, these data indicated that hBD-1 suppressed tumor migration and invasion of OSCC and was likely to be a prognostic biomarker and a potential target for treatment of OSCC.

  8. Calcium triggers beta-defensin (hBD-2 and hBD-3) and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-3 alpha (MIP-3alpha/CCL20) expression in monolayers of activated human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Pernet, I; Reymermier, C; Guezennec, A; Branka, J-E; Guesnet, J; Perrier, E; Dezutter-Dambuyant, C; Schmitt, D; Viac, J

    2003-12-01

    The inducible epidermal beta-defensins and the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-3alpha (MIP-3alpha/CCL20) are important mediators involved in innate and adaptive immunity and in the recruitment of immune cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether calcium could trigger the induction of beta-defensins (hBD-2 and hBD-3) mRNA and the release of MIP-3alpha by normal human keratinocyte monolayers. Epidermal cells derived from foreskin were cultured in defined medium supplemented with different calcium levels (0.09, 0.8 and 1.7 mM) and were stimulated or not with the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha 1-500 ng/ml) or interferon-gamma (INF-gamma 1-100 ng/ml). A high calcium concentration (1.7 mM) alone applied in culture medium for 4 days was sufficient to induce hBD-2 and hBD-3 mRNA expression. Whatever interindividual variability in the expression of hBD-2 and hBD-3 mRNA and MIP-3alpha secretion, the addition of TNF-alpha for a short duration (26h), initiated a dose-dependent and coordinated up-regulation of hBD-2 and hBD-3 mRNA and MIP-3alpha release in keratinocyte cultures. Unlike hBD-2 and hBD-3 mRNA was preferentially stimulated by IFN-gamma rather than TNF-alpha. In our experimental conditions, L-isoleucine, described to stimulate beta-defensin in bovine epithelial cells, did not exert any effect either on hBD-2 and hBD-3 transcripts or MIP-3alpha protein. Taken together, these results confirm the major role of the maturation/differentiation process of normal human keratinocytes in the induction of inducible beta-defensins and MIP-3alpha chemokine, which contribute in vivo to the immunosurveillance of the skin barrier function.

  9. Expression of human beta-defensins-1-4 in thyroid cancer cells and new insight on biologic activity of hBD-2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhuravel, O V; Gerashchenko, O L; Khetsuriani, M R; Soldatkina, M A; Pogrebnoy, P V

    2014-09-01

    The study was aimed on analysis of human beta-defensin-1-4 (hBDs) mRNA expression in cultured thyroid cancer cells and evaluation of effects of recombinant hBD-2 (rec-hBD-2) on growth patterns, migration properties and expression of E-cadherin and vimentin in these cells. The study was performed on cultured follicular thyroid cancer WRO cells, papillary thyroid cancer TPC1 cells, and anaplastic thyroid cancer KTC-2 cells. For analysis of hBD-1-4 mRNA expression in thyroid cancer cells, semiquantitative RT-PCR was used. Effects of rec-hBD-2 on cell proliferation, viability, and migration were analyzed using direct cell counting, MTT test, and scratch assay respectively. Expression of vimentin and E-cadherin was evaluated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). By the data of RT-PCR, all three studied thyroid cancer cell lines express hBD-1 and -4 mRNA, but not hBD-2 mRNA, while hBD-3 expression was detected in WRO and KTC-2 cells. The treatment of TPC-1, WRO, and KTC-2 cells with 100-1000 nM rec-hBD-2 resulted in significant concentration-dependent suppression of cell proliferation, viability, and migratory property. By the data of qPCR, significant up-regulation of vimentin expression was registered in KTC-2 and WRO cells treated with 500 nM rec-hBD-2. Significant down-regulation of E-cadherin expression (p < 0.05) was detected only in KTC-2 cells treated with the defensin. Also, it has been shown that TPC-1 cells treated with 500 nM rec-hBD-2 acquired more elongated morphology. The data demonstrate that hBD-2 in concentrations higher than 100 nM exerts significant concentration-dependent suppression of thyroid cancer cell growth and migration, and affects vimentin and E-cadherin expression dependent on histologic type of thyroid cancer cells.

  10. Expression and New Exon Mutations of the Human Beta Defensins and Their Association on Colon Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Al Amri, Abdullah; Azzi, Arezki; Al Shahrani, Omair; Arafah, Maha; Kohailan, Muhammad; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; alharbi, Othman; Almadi, Majid A.; Azzam, Nahla Ali; Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Alanazi, Mohammad S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer involves genetic predisposition and a variety of environmental exposures. Genome-wide linkage analyses provide evidence for the significant linkage of many diseases to susceptibility loci on chromosome 8p23, the location of the human defensin gene cluster. Human β-defensins (hBDs) are important molecules of innate immunity. This study was designed to analyze the expression and genetic variations in hBDs (hBD-1, hBD-2, hBD-3 and hBD-4) and their putative association with colon cancer. hBD gene expression and relative protein expression were evaluated by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively, from 40 normal patients and 40 age-matched patients with colon cancer in Saudi Arabia. In addition, hBD polymorphisms were genotyped by exon sequencing and by promoter methylation. hBD-1, hBD-2, hBD-3 and hBD-4 basal messenger RNA expression was significantly lower in tumor tissues compared with normal tissues. Several insertion mutations were detected in different exons of the analyzed hBDs. However, no methylation in any hBDs promoters was detected because of the limited number of CpG islands in these regions. We demonstrated for the first time a link between hBD expression and colon cancer. This suggests that there is a significant link between innate immunity deregulation through disruption of cationic peptides (hBDs) and the potential development of colon cancer. PMID:26038828

  11. Expression and new exon mutations of the human Beta defensins and their association on colon cancer development.

    PubMed

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Al Amri, Abdullah; Azzi, Arezki; Al Shahrani, Omair; Arafah, Maha; Kohailan, Muhammad; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M; Alharbi, Othman; Almadi, Majid A; Azzam, Nahla Ali; Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Alanazi, Mohammad S

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer involves genetic predisposition and a variety of environmental exposures. Genome-wide linkage analyses provide evidence for the significant linkage of many diseases to susceptibility loci on chromosome 8p23, the location of the human defensin gene cluster. Human β-defensins (hBDs) are important molecules of innate immunity. This study was designed to analyze the expression and genetic variations in hBDs (hBD-1, hBD-2, hBD-3 and hBD-4) and their putative association with colon cancer. hBD gene expression and relative protein expression were evaluated by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively, from 40 normal patients and 40 age-matched patients with colon cancer in Saudi Arabia. In addition, hBD polymorphisms were genotyped by exon sequencing and by promoter methylation. hBD-1, hBD-2, hBD-3 and hBD-4 basal messenger RNA expression was significantly lower in tumor tissues compared with normal tissues. Several insertion mutations were detected in different exons of the analyzed hBDs. However, no methylation in any hBDs promoters was detected because of the limited number of CpG islands in these regions. We demonstrated for the first time a link between hBD expression and colon cancer. This suggests that there is a significant link between innate immunity deregulation through disruption of cationic peptides (hBDs) and the potential development of colon cancer.

  12. High-resolution mapping of the 8p23.1 beta-defensin cluster reveals strictly concordant copy number variation of all genes.

    PubMed

    Groth, Marco; Szafranski, Karol; Taudien, Stefan; Huse, Klaus; Mueller, Oliver; Rosenstiel, Philip; Nygren, Anders O H; Schreiber, Stefan; Birkenmeier, Gerd; Platzer, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    One unexpected feature of the human genome is the high structural variability across individuals. Frequently, large regions of the genome show structural polymorphisms and many vary in their abundance. However, accurate methods for the characterization and typing of such copy number variations (CNV) are needed. The defensin cluster at the human region 8p23.1 is one of the best studied CNV regions due to its potential clinical relevance for innate immunity, inflammation, and cancer. The region can be divided into two subclusters, which harbor predominantly either alpha- or beta-defensin genes. Previous studies assessing individual copy numbers gave different results regarding whether the complete beta-defensin cluster varies or only particular genes therein. We applied multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to measure defensin locus copy numbers in 42 samples. The data show strict copy number concordance of all 10 loci typed within the beta-defensin cluster in each individual, while seven loci within the alpha-defensin cluster are consistently found as single copies per chromosome. The exception is DEFA3, which is located within the alpha-defensin cluster and was found to also differ in copy number interindividually. Absolute copy numbers ranged from two to nine for the beta-defensin cluster and zero to four for DEFA3. The CNV-typed individuals, including HapMap samples, are publicly available and may serve as a universal reference for absolute copy number determination. On this basis, MLPA represents a reliable technique for medium- to high-throughput typing of 8p23.1 defensin CNV in association studies for diverse clinical phenotypes.

  13. Expression of beta-defensin-1 in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) airways.

    PubMed

    Duits, L A; Langermans, J A; Paltansing, S; van der Straaten, T; Vervenne, R A; Frost, P A; Hiemstra, P S; Thomas, A W; Nibbering, P H

    2000-10-01

    In human airways, beta-defensins function in the elimination of various pathogens. They have been identified in a wide range of species. Here we report the identification and expression of chimpanzee beta-defensin-1 (cBD1), which is a homolog of human beta-defensin-1, in chimpanzee airways and skin. The cBD1 cDNA sequence differs by only one synonymous nucleotide substitution compared to the human cDNA sequence. In situ hybridization revealed that in lung tissue beside alveolar macrophages also airway epithelial cells, endothelial cells and type II pneumocytes express cBD1 mRNA. In skin, cBD1 mRNA was expressed in keratinocytes and endothelial cells. Together, these results show similarity in structure and expression pattern and perhaps in function.

  14. Immune response in human chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma - focusing on human interleukin-17A, interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta and human beta-defensin-2.

    PubMed

    Leeyaphan, Charussri; Hau, Carren; Takeoka, Shintaro; Tada, Yayoi; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Sasajima, Yuko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-07-12

    Knowledge regarding host immune response to chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma is limited, particularly concerning cytokines and antimicrobial peptides production. This was a retrospective study of 12 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients diagnosed with chromoblastomycosis or eumycetoma from histological findings and tissue culture. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from tissues were done to evaluate human interleukin-17A (IL-17A), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and human beta-defensin-2 (HBD-2) expressions. Human beta-actin primer was used for confirming DNA detection, and DNA extracted from psoriasis lesional skin samples was used as positive controls. The twelve paraffin-embedded sections used in this study consisted of five chromoblastomycosis and seven eumycetoma tissues. All PCR reactions showed beta-actin band at 51 bp in all clinical specimens, confirming adequate DNA levels in each reaction. As positive control, the psoriasis skin samples revealed bands for IL-17A at 174 bp, IFN-γ at 273 bp, TNF-α at 360 bp, IL-1β at 276 bp and HBD-2 at 255 bp. For the chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma tissues, PCR analyses showed IL-17A band at 174 bp in two eumycetoma tissues and HBD-2 band at 255 bp in a chromoblastomycosis tissue. This study demonstrated IL-17A expression in human eumycetoma and HBD-2 expression in human chromoblastomycosis for the first time. However, their role in immune response remains to be elucidated. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Expression of natural antimicrobial peptide beta-defensin-2 and Langerhans cell accumulation in epidermis from human non-healing leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Galkowska, Hanna; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Wojewodzka, Urszula

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds like venous calf and diabetic foot ulcers are frequently contaminated and colonized by bacteria and it remains unclear whether there is sufficient expression of defensins and recruitment of epidermal Langerhans cells in the margin of ulcer compared to normal skin. The aim of this study was to examine immunohistochemically the expression of beta-defensin-2 (hBD2), GM-CSF, VEGF growth factors and accumulation of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LC) in epidermis from chronic skin ulcers and to compare it to normal skin from the corresponding areas. Studies were carried out in 10 patients with diabetic foot, 10 patients with varicous ulcers of the calf and 10 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery (normal skin for control). Biopsy specimens were immunostained using specific primary antibodies, LSAB+ kit based on biotin-avidin-peroxidase complex technique and DAB chromogen. Results were expressed as a mean staining intensity. Statistical analysis of staining showed significantly higher staining of hBD2 in both normal and ulcerated epidermis from foot sole skin compared to calf skin (normal and ulcerated, p < 0.05). Chronic ulcers showed the same expression of hBD2 as normal skin. There was significantly lower accumulation of CD1a+ LC in normal epidermis from foot sole skin compared to normal calf skin (p<0.05). Accumulation of CD1a+ LC and GM-CSF upregulation at the border area of diabetic foot ulcer and reduction of LC concentration at the margin of venous calf ulcer compared to normal skin were observed. It seems that normal calf and sole epidermis is, unlike in the mechanisms of innate immunity, influenced by the different keratinocyte turnover and bacterial flora colonizing these regions. Insufficient upregulation of hBD2 in both diabetic foot and venous calf ulcers may suggest the pathological role of this protein in the chronicity of ulcers.

  16. Conformational preferences of linear beta-defensins are revealed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Martin; Seo, Emily S; Clarke, David J; McCullough, Bryan J; Taylor, Karen; Macmillan, Derek; Dorin, Julia R; Campopiano, Dominic J; Barran, Perdita E

    2010-02-18

    In recent times there has been an enormous rise in resistance to synthetic antibiotics as well as an increase in the virulence of bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". This problem has catalyzed a search for novel molecules to fight bacteria, which in turn relies on a better understanding of the molecular basis of the immune response. Beta-defensins are a class of small, cationic, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides expressed by humans and other animals to act against incoming pathogens. As well as their antimicrobial properties, beta-defensins also act as chemokines, recruiting cells to the sites of infection. Here the relationship between the tertiary structures of beta-defensin analogs and their chemotactic activities has been investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and biochemical assays. A panel of derivatives of the murine beta-defensin Defb14 has been formed and the ability of these peptides to chemoattract the receptor CCR6 has been assessed in vitro. The derivatives can be divided into two groups, those with chemotactic activity equal to that of the unmodified parent peptide, and those whose chemotactic activity has been lost upon modification. Analysis by ion mobility-mass spectrometry reveals the conformational preferences of these peptides upon ionization from different solvents. Under denaturing conditions, the chemotactic peptides adopt more compact conformations in the gas-phase at higher charge states than those which are inactive. While the conditions of these experiments are not akin to the environment around the receptor in vivo, this technique provides an in vacuo method for distinguishing between the different chemotactic activities of beta-defensin derivatives.

  17. Effect of selectively introducing arginine and D-amino acids on the antimicrobial activity and salt sensitivity in analogs of human beta-defensins.

    PubMed

    Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human β-defensins HBD-1 and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs.

  18. Ubiquitously expressed Human Beta Defensin 1 (hBD1) forms bacteria-entrapping nets in a redox dependent mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Raschig, Judith; Mailänder-Sánchez, Daniela; Berscheid, Anne; Berger, Jürgen; Malek, Nisar P.; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of endogenous host defense antimicrobial peptides it has been discussed how these evolutionary conserved molecules avoid to induce resistance and to remain effective. Human ß-defensin 1 (hBD1) is an ubiquitously expressed endogenous antimicrobial peptide that exhibits qualitatively distinct activities between its oxidized and reduced forms. Here, we explore these antimicrobial mechanisms. Surprisingly, using electron microscopy we detected a so far unknown net-like structure surrounding bacteria, which were treated with the reduced but not the oxidized form of hBD1. A transmigration assay demonstrated that hBD1-derived nets capture bacteria and inhibit bacterial transmigration independent of bacterial killing. The presence of nets could completely prevent migration of hBD1 resistant pathogens and are stable in the presence of human duodenal secretion with a high amount of proteases. In contrast to HD6, cysteins are necessary for net formation. This redox-dependent function serves as an additional mechanism of action for hBD1 and differs from net formation by other defensins such as Paneth cell-derived human α-defensin 6 (HD6). While hBD1red and hBD1ox have distinct antimicrobial profiles and functions, only the reduced form provides additional host protection by entrapping bacteria in extracellular net structures preventing bacterial invasion. Better understanding of the modes of action of endogenous host peptides will help to find new antimicrobial strategies. PMID:28323883

  19. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hielpos, M Soledad; Ferrero, Mariana C; Fernández, Andrea G; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site.

  20. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Andrea G.; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site. PMID:26448160

  1. In Vitro Studies on the Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin 9 (HBD9): Signalling Pathways and Pathogen-Related Response (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Harminder S.; Otri, Ahmad Muneer; Hopkinson, Andrew; Mohammed, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Human β-defensins (HBDs) are an important part of the innate immune host defense at the ocular surface. Unlike other defensins, expression of HBD9 at the ocular surface is reduced during microbial infection, but activation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in corneal epithelial cells has been shown to up-regulate HBD9. Our purpose was to test the hypothesis that TLR2 has a key role in the signalling pathway(s) involved in the overexpression or underexpression of HBD9, and accordingly, different pathogens would induce a different expression pattern of HBD9. Methods: The in vitro RNAi silencing method and response to dexamethasone were used to determine key molecules involved in signalling pathways of HBD9 in immortalized human corneal epithelial cells. The techniques included cell culture with exposure to specific transcription factor inhibitors and bacteria, RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistology. Results: This study demonstrates that TLR2 induces HBD9 mRNA and protein expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Transforming growth factor-β–activated kinase 1 (TAK1) plays a central role in HBD9 induction by TLR2, and transcription factors c-JUN and activating transcription factor 2 are also involved. Dexamethasone reduces TLR2-mediated up-regulation of HBD9 mRNA and protein levels in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP1)-dependent and c-JUN-independent manner. HBD9 expression differs with gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Conclusions: TLR2-mediated MKPs and nuclear factor-κB signalling pathways are involved in HBD9 expression. TAK-1 is a key molecule. These molecules can be potentially targeted to modulate HBD9 expression. Differential expression of HBD9 with different bacteria could be related to differences in pathogen-associated molecular patterns of these organisms. PMID:25646028

  2. Modulation of host antimicrobial peptide (beta-defensins 1 and 2) expression during gastritis.

    PubMed

    Bajaj-Elliott, M; Fedeli, P; Smith, G V; Domizio, P; Maher, L; Ali, R S; Quinn, A G; Farthing, M J G

    2002-09-01

    beta-Defensins are a newly identified family of antimicrobial peptides that are expressed by epithelia on mucosal surfaces where their production is augmented by infection or inflammation. Helicobacter pylori colonises the gastric epithelium causing persistent gastric inflammation leading to antral and corpus gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease. To evaluate the role of beta-defensins in the innate immune response of the gastric epithelium to infection and inflammation, we have assessed mRNA expression and regulation of human beta-defensins 1 and 2 (hBD1, hBD2) by H pylori and proinflammatory stimuli. We have also compared gene and peptide expression of these bactericidal agents in H pylori induced gastritis with that in normal gastric mucosa. Modulation of expression of hBD1 and hBD2 by various stimuli was studied in three (AGS, MKN7, MKN45) gastric epithelial cell lines by quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Defensin mRNA expression was measured by semiquantitative RT-PCR in gastritis tissue and compared with controls. Peptide localisation was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Cytotoxic H pylori and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) markedly upregulated expression of hBD2 in a dose and time dependent manner in both AGS and MKN7 cell lines. A modest increase in hBD1 expression was also noted during infection. Interestingly, induction of hBD1 gene expression by IL-1 beta was only observed in MKN7 cells. The magnitude of this response was delayed and reduced compared with hBD2 expression. In gastric biopsies, hBD2 was undetectable in normal gastric antrum but a marked increase was observed in H pylori positive gastritis compared with control tissue (p<0.001). Constitutive expression of hBD1 was observed in normal gastric mucosa and there was a significant increase in gastritis (p<0.05). Immunohistochemistry revealed a parallel increase in hBD1 and hBD2 peptide expression in gastritis tissue with positive staining confined

  3. Characterization of beta-defensin prepropeptide mRNA from chicken and turkey bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Brockus, C W; Jackwood, M W; Harmon, B G

    1998-08-01

    Four avian beta-defension prepropeptide cDNA sequences [gallinacins: Gal 1 (synonym CHP 1, chicken heterophil peptide 1), and Gal 2; turkey heterophil peptides: THP 1 and THP 2] were amplified from chicken or turkey bone marrow mRNA samples, respectively. Partial chicken beta-defensin cDNA sequences were obtained using degenerate primers based on chicken peptide sequences (Gal 1/CHP 1 and Gal 2). The complete cDNA sequences of the chicken beta-defensins were then determined by designing specific intrapeptidal primers, from the newly acquired sequence, and pairing one primer with a specific poly A primer tail sequence (3' end) and the other primer with an adapter primer in a 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) reaction. The two, turkey beta-defensins were amplified from turkey marrow using primers designed from chicken beta-defensin preproregions. The complete amino acid sequences for the prepropeptides were deduced for all four avian beta-defensins. Previously, only partial mature peptide sequences for the turkey beta-defensins and complete mature peptide sequences for the chicken beta-defensins were known. All sequences obtained translated accurately to complete and partial amino acid sequences reported for beta-defensins purified from chicken and turkey heterophil granules except for one additional amino acid for Gal 1/CHP 1. The four deduced beta-defensin proregions lack the long, negatively charged propiece reported in classical defensin proregions. These regions are thought to stabilize and inactivate the positively charged mature peptide and target the propeptide to the storage granule. Instead, these beta-defensin proregions are shorter and similar to storage granule-free beta-defensins proregions reported for bovine tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) and lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP). These are the first prepropeptide beta-defensins from leukocyte granules to be completely characterized.

  4. Evaluation of beta defensin 2 production by chicken heterophils using direct MALDI mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beta defensins (BD) are cysteine rich, cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMP) produced mainly by epithelial and myeloid cells such as neutrophils. In birds, the equivalent of neutrophils, heterophils produce avian beta defensins (AvBD) of which AvBD2 is the major isoform. Heterophils recognize patho...

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epididymitis disrupts epididymal beta-defensin expression and inhibits sperm motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Li, Yidong; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yuchuan; Diao, Hua; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yonglian; Lu, Jian

    2010-12-01

    Although more than 40 beta-defensins have been identified in rat epididymis, little is known about their regulation or their relation to male infertility caused by inflammation. Using a rat model of epididymitis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we examined expression of SPAG11E (also known as Bin1b), a caput epididymis-specific beta-defensin in rat. Unlike the expression of other beta-defensins in various epithelial cells with upregulated expression after LPS stimulation, expression of SPAG11E was significantly decreased by LPS at the mRNA and protein levels. LPS treatment also significantly decreased both sperm binding to SPAG11E and sperm motility, and supplementation of the spermatozoa with recombinant SPAG11E in vitro remarkably increased both SPAG11E binding and motility of sperm. To clarify whether decreased expression is a common pattern of epididymal beta-defensins after LPS stimulation, we examined the expression of another 12 epididymal beta-defensins expressed in the caput epididymis. For nine of these beta-defensins, expression was decreased, but for the other three, expression remained unaffected. These findings demonstrate that LPS-induced epididymitis can decrease the expression of epididymal beta-defensins and that disruption of SPAG11E expression is involved in the impairment of sperm motility.

  6. Green tea extract and its major constituent, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, induce epithelial beta-defensin secretion and prevent beta-defensin degradation by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Lombardo Bedran, T B; Feghali, K; Zhao, L; Palomari Spolidorio, D M; Grenier, D

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, such as beta-defensins, secreted by gingival epithelial cells, are thought to play a major role in preventing periodontal diseases. In the present study, we investigated the ability of green tea polyphenols to induce human beta-defensin (hBD) secretion in gingival epithelial cells and to protect hBDs from proteolytic degradation by Porphyromonas gingivalis. Gingival epithelial cells were treated with various amounts (25-200 μg/mL) of green tea extract or epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The secretion of hBD1 and hBD2 was measured using ELISAs, and gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. The treatments were also carried out in the presence of specific kinase inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in hBD secretion. The ability of green tea extract and EGCG to prevent hBD degradation by proteases of P. gingivalis present in a bacterial culture supernatant was evaluated by ELISA. The secretion of hBD1 and hBD2 was up-regulated, in a dose-dependent manner, following the stimulation of gingival epithelial cells with a green tea extract or EGCG. Expression of the hBD gene in gingival epithelial cells treated with green tea polyphenols was also increased. EGCG-induced secretion of hBD1 and hBD2 appeared to involve extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Lastly, green tea extract and EGCG prevented the degradation of recombinant hBD1 and hBD2 by a culture supernatant of P. gingivalis. Green tea extract and EGCG, through their ability to induce hBD secretion by epithelial cells and to protect hBDs from proteolytic degradation by P. gingivalis, have the potential to strengthen the epithelial antimicrobial barrier. Future clinical studies will indicate whether these polyphenols represent a valuable therapeutic agent for treating/preventing periodontal diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Granulocytes of reptilian sauropsids contain beta-defensin-like peptides: a comparative ultrastructural survey.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2013-08-01

    The ability of lizards to withstand infections after wounding or amputation of the tail or limbs has suggested the presence of antimicrobial peptides in their tissues. Previous studies on the lizard Anolis carolinensis have identified several beta-defensin-like peptides that may potentially be involved in protection from infections. The present ultrastructural immunocytochemical study has analyzed tissues in different reptilian species in order to localize the cellular source of one of the more expressed beta-defensins previously sequenced in lizard indicated as AcBD15. Beta-defensin-like immunoreactivity is present in some of the larger, nonspecific granules of granulocytes in two lizard species, a snake, the tuatara, and a turtle. The ultrastructural study indicates that only heterophilic and basophilic granulocytes contain this defensin while other cell types from the epidermis, mesenchyme, and dermis, muscles, nerves, cartilage or bone are immunonegative. The study further indicates that not all granules in reptilian granulocytes contain the beta-defensin peptide, suggesting the presence of granules with different content as previously indicated for mammalian neutrophilic leucocytes. No immunolabeling was instead observed in granulocytes of the alligator and chick using this antibody. The present immunocytochemical observations suggest a broad cross-reactivity and conservation of beta-defensin-like sequence or steric motif across lepidosaurians and likely in turtles while archosaurian granulocytes may contain different beta-defensin-like or other peptides. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Bioinformatic and molecular characterization of beta-defensins-like peptides isolated from the green lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Dalla Valle, Luisa; Benato, Francesca; Maistro, Silvia; Quinzani, Stefano; Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The high resistance of lizards to infections indicates that anti-microbial peptides may be involved. Through the analysis of the green lizard (Anolis carolinensis) genome and the expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries 32 beta-defensin-like-peptides have been identified. The level of expression of some of these genes in different tissues has been determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Gene expression and structure analysis suggest the presence of alternative splicing mechanisms, with a number of exons ranging from two to four, similar to that for beta-defensins genes in mammals. Lizard beta-defensin-like peptides present the characteristic cysteine-motif identified in mammalian and avian beta-defensins. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some lizard beta-defensins-like peptides are related to crotamine and crotamin-like peptides of snakes and lizards suggesting that beta-defensins and venomous peptides have a common ancestor gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement methods and accuracy in copy number variation: failure to replicate associations of beta-defensin copy number with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldhous, Marian C.; Abu Bakar, Suhaili; Prescott, Natalie J.; Palla, Raquel; Soo, Kimberley; Mansfield, John C.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Satsangi, Jack; Armour, John A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The copy number variation in beta-defensin genes on human chromosome 8 has been proposed to underlie susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, but presents considerable challenges for accurate typing on the scale required for adequately powered case–control studies. In this work, we have used accurate methods of copy number typing based on the paralogue ratio test (PRT) to assess beta-defensin copy number in more than 1500 UK DNA samples including more than 1000 cases of Crohn's disease. A subset of 625 samples was typed using both PRT-based methods and standard real-time PCR methods, from which direct comparisons highlight potentially serious shortcomings of a real-time PCR assay for typing this variant. Comparing our PRT-based results with two previous studies based only on real-time PCR, we find no evidence to support the reported association of Crohn's disease with either low or high beta-defensin copy number; furthermore, it is noteworthy that there are disagreements between different studies on the observed frequency distribution of copy number states among European controls. We suggest safeguards to be adopted in assessing and reporting the accuracy of copy number measurement, with particular emphasis on integer clustering of results, to avoid reporting of spurious associations in future case–control studies. PMID:20858604

  10. Cationic amino acid transporters and beta-defensins in dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kristin; Garreis, Fabian; Dunse, Matthias; Paulsen, Friedrich P

    2010-01-01

    Several diseases concomitant with L-arginine deficiency (diabetes, chronic kidney failure, psoriasis) are significantly associated with dry eye syndrome. One important factor that has so far been neglected is the y(+) transporter. In humans, y(+) accounts for nearly 80% of arginine transport, exclusively carrying the cationic amino acids L-arginine, L-lysine and L-ornithine. y(+) is represented by CAT(cationic amino acid transporter) proteins. L-arginine is a precursor of the moisturizer urea, which has been used in the treatment of dry skin diseases. Although urea has also been shown to be part of the tear film, little attention has been paid to it in this role. Moreover, L-arginine and L-lysine are major components contributing to synthesis of the antimicrobially active beta-defensins induced under dry eye conditions. The first results have demonstrated that transport of L-arginine and L-lysine into epithelial cells is limited by the y(+) transporter at the ocular surface.

  11. Identification of a Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Porcine Beta-Defensin-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Pruthviraj, D R; Usha, A P; Venkatachalapathy, R T

    2016-03-01

    Porcine beta-defensin-1 (PBD-1) gene plays an important role in the innate immunity of pigs. The peptide encoded by this gene is an antimicrobial peptide that has direct activity against a wide range of microbes. This peptide is involved in the co-creation of an antimicrobial barrier in the oral cavity of pigs. The objective of the present study was to detect polymorphisms, if any, in exon-1 and exon-2 regions of PBD-1 gene in Large White Yorkshire (LWY) and native Ankamali pigs of Kerala, India. Blood samples were collected from 100 pigs and genomic DNA was isolated using phenol chloroform method. The quantity of DNA was assessed in a spectrophotometer and quality by gel electrophoresis. Exon-1 and exon-2 regions of PBD-1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the products were subjected to single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Subsequent silver staining of the polyacrylamide gels revealed three unique SSCP banding patterns in each of the two exons. The presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products. A novel SNP was found in the 5'-UTR region of exon-1 and a SNP was detected in the mature peptide coding region of exon-2. In exon-1, the pooled population frequencies of GG, GT, and TT genotypes were 0.67, 0.30, and 0.03, respectively. GG genotype was predominant in both the breeds whereas TT genotype was not detected in LWY breed. Similarly, in exon-2, the pooled population frequencies of AA, AG, and GG genotypes were 0.50, 0.27, and 0.23, respectively. AA genotype was predominant in LWY pigs whereas GG genotype was predominant in native pigs. These results suggest that there exists a considerable genetic variation at PBD-1 locus and further association studies may help in development of a PCR based genotyping test to select pigs with better immunity.

  12. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of beta-defensins, multi-functional peptides of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Enno; Adermann, Knut; Schulz, Axel

    2006-04-01

    beta-defensins are a large family of multiple disulfide-bonded peptides occurring in mammals and birds. They play an important role in the innate immune system, directly killing microbial organisms. Recent research has demonstrated that beta-defensins are important for other biological functions beyond antimicrobial effects, including inhibition of viral infection, interaction with Toll-like receptors, chemotactic effects, and sperm function. The corresponding broad spectrum of activities makes this peptide class an important subject and tool in immunologic research. In this review, we summarize the current status of the routes to obtain synthetic beta-defensins, their major structural properties and structure-activity relationship.

  13. Toll-like Receptor Signaling Activation by Entamoeba histolytica Induces Beta Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells: Its Possible Role as an Element of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Téllez-López, Victor M.; Domínguez-Robles, M. del Carmen; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; Meza, Isaura

    2013-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2) mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. Conclusions/Significance Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed. PMID:23469306

  14. Modulation of human beta-defensin-1 (hBD-1) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC), monocytes, and epithelial cells by influenza virus, Herpes simplex virus, and Sendai virus and its possible role in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Lisa K; Dai, Jihong; Yin, Zhiwei; Megjugorac, Nicholas; Uhlhorn, Victoria; Yim, Sunghan; Schwartz, Kyell D; Abrahams, Joshua M; Diamond, Gill; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia

    2011-08-01

    hBD comprise a family of antimicrobial peptides that plays a role in bridging the innate and adaptive immune responses to infection. The expression of hBD-2 increases upon stimulation of numerous cell types with LPS and proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, hBD-1 remains constitutively expressed in most cells in spite of cytokine or LPS stimulation; however, its presence in human PDC suggests it plays a role in viral host defense. To examine this, we characterized the expression of hBD-1 in innate immune cells in response to viral challenge. PDC and monocytes increased production of hBD-1 peptide and mRNA as early as 2 h following infection of purified cells and PBMCs with PR8, HSV-1, and Sendai virus. However, treatment of primary NHBE cells with influenza resulted in a 50% decrease in hBD-1 mRNA levels, as measured by qRT-PCR at 3 h following infection. A similar inhibition occurred with HSV-1 challenge of human gingival epithelial cells. Studies with HSV-1 showed that replication occurred in epithelial cells but not in PDC. Together, these results suggest that hBD-1 may play a role in preventing viral replication in immune cells. To test this, we infected C57BL/6 WT mice and mBD-1((-/-)) mice with mouse-adapted HK18 (300 PFU/mouse). mBD-1((-/-)) mice lost weight earlier and died sooner than WT mice (P=0.0276), suggesting that BD-1 plays a role in early innate immune responses against influenza in vivo. However, lung virus titers were equal between the two mouse strains. Histopathology showed a greater inflammatory influx in the lungs of mBD-1((-/-)) mice at Day 3 postinfection compared with WT C57BL/6 mice. The results suggest that BD-1 protects mice from influenza pathogenesis with a mechanism other than inhibition of viral replication.

  15. Beta-defensin 1 plays a role in acute mucosal defense to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Tomalka, Jeffrey; Azodi, Elaheh; Narra, Hema P.; Patel, Krupen; O’Neill, Samantha; Cardwell, Cisley; Hall, Brian A.; Wilson, James M.; Hise, Amy G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that colonizes the mucosal tract of humans. Pathogenic infection occurs in the presence of conditions causing perturbations to the commensal microbiota or host immunity. Early innate immune responses by the epithelium, including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cytokines, are critical for protection against overgrowth. Reduced salivary AMP levels are associated with oral Candida infection and certain AMPs, including human beta-defensins 1 - 3, have direct fungicidal activity. Here we demonstrate that murine β-Defensin 1 (mBD1) is important for control of early mucosal Candida infection and plays a critical role in the induction of innate inflammatory mediators. Mice deficient in mBD1 exhibit elevated oral and systemic fungal burdens as compared to wild-type mice. Neutrophil infiltration to the sites of mucosal Candida invasion, an important step in limiting fungal infection, is significantly reduced in mBD1 deficient mice. These mice also exhibit defects in the expression of other antimicrobial peptides, including mBD2 and mBD4, which may have direct anti-Candida activity. We also show that mBD1 deficiency impacts the production of important anti-fungal inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, IL-6, KC, and IL-17. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a role for the mBD1 peptide in early control of Candida infection in a murine model of mucosal candidiasis, as well as on the modulation of host immunity through augmentation of leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory gene induction. PMID:25595775

  16. Potential roles of placental human beta-defensin-3 and apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3G in prevention of intrauterine transmission of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoxia; Tian, Ting; Wang, Peng; Yang, Xiaofu; Wang, Zhengping; Dong, Minyue

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 5% of newborns were infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV) via intrauterine transmission and this is the main reason for high prevalence of HBV in endemic regions. However, the mechanisms by which intrauterine transmission is avoided in most cases remain elusive and placental natural anti-microbial factors may play a role in the prevention of HBV intrauterine transmission. The expression levels of human β-defensin-3 (HBD-3), apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3G (A3G) and mannose binding lectin (MBL) were determined in the placenta of 30 HBV-seronegative pregnant women (controls), 7 HBV-seropositive pregnant women with infants infected via intrauterine transmission (infected group) and 30 HBV-seropositive pregnant women with non-infected infants (non-infected group). The expression of HBD-3, A3G, and MBL of placental trophoblast cell line Swan71 was determined after exposed to HBV. There were significant differences in placental HBD-3 and A3G levels among three groups, but the expression of MBL did not significantly differ. The expressions of HBD-3 and A3G were higher in non-infected group than controls and infected group, but not significantly different between infected group and controls. The exposure to HBV increased significantly the expression of HBD-3, A3G, and MBL by Swan 71. It may be concluded HBV up-regulates HBD-3 and A3G expression in vivo and in vitro in placental trophoblast and lack of this up-regulation is possibly associated with intrauterine transmission of HBV.

  17. Copy number variation of the beta defensin gene cluster on chromosome 8p influences the bacterial microbiota within the nasopharynx of otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eric A; Kananurak, Anchasa; Bevins, Charles L; Hollox, Edward J; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2014-01-01

    As there is increasing evidence that aberrant defensin expression is related to susceptibility for infectious disease and inflammatory disorders, we sought to determine if copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster located on chromosome 8p23.1 (DEFB107, 106, 105, 104, 103, DEFB4 and SPAG11), that shows copy number variation as a block, was associated with susceptibility to otitis media (OM). The gene DEFB103 within this complex encodes human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), an antimicrobial peptide (AP) expressed by epithelial cells that line the mammalian airway, important for defense of mucosal surfaces and previously shown to have bactericidal activity in vitro against multiple human pathogens, including the three that predominate in OM. To this end, we conducted a retrospective case-control study of 113 OM prone children and 267 controls aged five to sixty months. We identified the copy number of the above defined beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB-CN) in each study subject by paralogue ratio assays. The mean DEFB-CN was indistinguishable between subjects classified as OM prone based on a recent history of multiple episodes of OM and control subjects who had no history of OM (4.4 ± 0.96 versus 4.4 ± 1.08, respectively: Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.20). Despite a lack of direct association, we observed a statistically significant correlation between DEFB-CN and nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Collectively, our findings suggested that susceptibility to OM might be mediated by genetic variation among individuals, wherein a DEFB-CN less than 4 exerts a marked influence on the microbiota of the nasopharynx, specifically with regard to colonization by the three predominant bacterial pathogens of OM.

  18. A potential relationship among beta-defensins haplotype, SOX7 duplication and cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Long, Fei; Wang, Xike; Fang, Shaohai; Xu, Yuejuan; Sun, Kun; Chen, Sun; Xu, Rang

    2013-01-01

    To determine the pathogenesis of a patient born with congenital heart defects, who had appeared normal in prenatal screening. In routine prenatal screening, G-banding was performed to analyse the karyotypes of the family and fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to investigate the 22q11.2 deletion in the fetus. After birth, the child was found to be suffering from heart defects by transthoracic echocardiography. In the following study, sequencing was used to search for potential mutations in pivotal genes. SNP-array was employed for fine mapping of the aberrant region and quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the results. Furthermore, other patients with a similar phenotype were screened for the same genetic variations. To compare with a control, these variations were also assessed in the general population. The child and his mother each had a region that was deleted in the beta-defensin repeats, which are usually duplicated in the general population. Besides, the child carried a SOX7-gene duplication. While this duplication was not detected in his mother, it was found in two other patients with cardiac defects who also had the similar deletion in the beta-defensin repeats. The congenital heart defects of the child were probably caused by a SOX7-gene duplication, which may be a consequence of the partial haplotype of beta-defensin regions at 8p23.1. To our knowledge, this is the first congenital heart defect case found to have the haplotype of beta-defensin and the duplication of SOX7.

  19. A Potential Relationship among Beta-Defensins Haplotype, SOX7 Duplication and Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shaohai; Xu, Yuejuan; Sun, Kun; Chen, Sun; Xu, Rang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the pathogenesis of a patient born with congenital heart defects, who had appeared normal in prenatal screening. Methods In routine prenatal screening, G-banding was performed to analyse the karyotypes of the family and fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to investigate the 22q11.2 deletion in the fetus. After birth, the child was found to be suffering from heart defects by transthoracic echocardiography. In the following study, sequencing was used to search for potential mutations in pivotal genes. SNP-array was employed for fine mapping of the aberrant region and quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the results. Furthermore, other patients with a similar phenotype were screened for the same genetic variations. To compare with a control, these variations were also assessed in the general population. Results The child and his mother each had a region that was deleted in the beta-defensin repeats, which are usually duplicated in the general population. Besides, the child carried a SOX7-gene duplication. While this duplication was not detected in his mother, it was found in two other patients with cardiac defects who also had the similar deletion in the beta-defensin repeats. Conclusion The congenital heart defects of the child were probably caused by a SOX7-gene duplication, which may be a consequence of the partial haplotype of beta-defensin regions at 8p23.1. To our knowledge, this is the first congenital heart defect case found to have the haplotype of beta-defensin and the duplication of SOX7. PMID:24009689

  20. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Protim; Mily, Akhirunnesa; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Jalal, Shah; Bergman, Peter; Raqib, Rubhana; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. PMID:27025750

  1. Inducibility of the endogenous antibiotic peptide beta-defensin 2 is impaired in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Book, Malte; Chen, QiXing; Lehmann, Lutz E; Klaschik, Sven; Weber, Stefan; Schewe, Jens-Christian; Luepertz, Markus; Hoeft, Andreas; Stuber, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The potent endogenous antimicrobial peptide human beta-defensin 2 (hBD2) is a crucial mediator of innate immunity. In addition to direct antimicrobial properties, different effects on immune cells have been described. In contrast to the well-documented epithelial beta-defensin actions in local infections, little is known about the leukocyte-released hBD2 in systemic infectious disorders. This study investigated the basic expression levels and the ex vivo inducibility of hBD2 mRNA in peripheral whole blood cells from patients with severe sepsis in comparison to non-septic critically ill patients and healthy individuals. This investigation was a prospective case-control study performed at a surgical intensive care unit at a university hospital. A total of 34 individuals were tested: 16 patients with severe sepsis, 9 critically ill but non-septic patients, and 9 healthy individuals. Serial blood samples were drawn from septic patients, and singular samples were obtained from critically ill non-septic patients and healthy controls. hBD2 mRNA levels in peripheral white blood cells were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction in native peripheral blood cells and following ex vivo endotoxin stimulation. Defensin plasma levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Endotoxin-inducible hBD2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in patients with severe sepsis compared to healthy controls and non-septic critically ill patients (0.02 versus 0.95 versus 0.52, p < 0.05, arbitrary units). hBD2 plasma levels in septic patients were significantly higher compared to healthy controls and critically ill non-septic patients (541 versus 339 versus 295 pg/ml, p < 0.05). In contrast to healthy individuals and critically ill non-septic patients, ex vivo inducibility of hBD2 in peripheral blood cells from septic patients is reduced. Impaired hBD2 inducibility may contribute to the complex immunological dysfunction in patients with severe sepsis.

  2. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  3. Chronic tonsillitis is not associated with beta defensin 1 gene polymorphisms in Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Fatih; Babakurban, Seda Turkoglu; Erbek, Selim S; Sahin, Feride I; Terzi, Yunus Kasım

    2015-04-01

    Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed on mucosal surfaces. They function as part of the innate immune system. Palatine tonsils play important roles in innate immune system. However, our knowledge on the pathophysiology of chronic tonsils is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between beta defensin 1 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms and chronic tonsillitis. Prospective, non-randomized, controlled clinical study. Tertiary referral center. Eighty six patients with chronic tonsillitis and eighty controls without history of chronic tonsillitis were enrolled in this study. Genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses after polymerase chain reaction. Genotype and allele frequencies of the -20G/A (rs11362), -44C/G (rs1800972) and -52G/A (rs1799946) single nucleotide polymorphisms were not statistically different between patients and control groups (p>0.05). In this study, we found that DEFB1 gene -20G/A, -44C/G and -52G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms were not associated with chronic tonsillitis. Studies, which analyse other polymorphism of the beta defensin 1 gene in large case series, should be conducted to understand the role of DEFB1 gene on chronic tonsillitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A new Beta defensin from sika deer: molecular cloning and sequence characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinfeng; Jing, Lan; Li, Tao; Cao, Guifang; Liu, Shuying

    2011-04-01

    The beta-defensins are small, well-characterized peptides with broad antimicrobial activities. Here we report the identification of a novel β-defensin, sika deer β-defensin-1 (siBD-1), from sika deer tissues with a pair of PCR primers according to the conserved cDNA sequences of known ruminant β-defensins. Total RNA was extracted from the tongue epithelia of a sika deer and the 418 bp cDNA encoding siBD-1 was amplified by the reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), 5'- and 3'-RACE. The cDNA contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 192 bases which encoded a 64 amino acid prepro-peptide. The prepro-peptide contained six invariantly spaced cysteine residues, which is the β defensin consensus sequence. The putative mature peptide of the siBD-1 contained nine positively charged residues (5 arginine-R, 3 lysine-K, and 1 histidine-H). The sequence homology shows that siBD-1 has 73.0-90.6% amino-acid identity and 74.6-90.6% cDNA identity with other ruminant beta-defensins, sharing the greatest identity with buffalo enteric β-defensin in both amino acid and nucleotide sequences.

  5. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry suggests that periderm granules in embryonic chick epidermis contain beta-defensins.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    The capability to express an innate antimicrobial action through the production of beta-defensins in the skin of chick embryos has been studied by immunocytochemistry. The immunolabeling of periderm granules present in the initial embryonic epidermis of the chick is obtained with a lizard anti-defensin antibody (Ac-BD-15) that recognizes a homologous peptide in the chick beta-defensin 9. Similar granules, termed honeycomb granules, are also stored in some basophilic granulocytes of adult and hatchling chicks, but did not show immunoreactivity to the antibody. It is unclear whether this morphology indicates different organelles, content or lack of available antigens due to organelle packaging. The remarkable ultrastructural similarity between periderm granules and the honeycomb granules present in basophil granulocytes further indicates that embryonic keratinocytes can synthesize antimicrobial peptides together with corneous proteins. These peptides may participate in the formation of an epidermal microbial barrier during ontogenesis or protect the embryo in case of damage to the amniotic-periderm barrier. These transient organelles, apart from the early keratinization of the epidermis that forms the initial barrier before hatching may also contribute to the formation of an efficient anti-microbial barrier against the penetration of microbes during embryonic life until hatching when the adaptive immunity system is still immature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of yoga exercise on salivary beta-defensin 2.

    PubMed

    Eda, Nobuhiko; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Satomi; Tanabe, Yoko; Lee, Eunjae; Akama, Takao

    2013-10-01

    Yoga stretching can be done comfortably and easily by beginners and older adults to compensate for lack of exercise or poor health maintenance. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of yoga stretching on mucosal immune functions, primarily human β-defensin 2 (HBD-2) in saliva. Fifteen healthy adults (age, 60.4 ± 8.0 years) participated in the study. Participants rested for 90 min on the first day and performed yoga for 90 min on the second day. Measurements were carried out before and after rest or yoga. Saliva samples were collected by chewing a sterile cotton at a frequency of 60 cycles per min. Salivary HBD-2 concentration was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBD-2 concentration after yoga stretching (165.4 ± 127.1 pg/mL) was significantly higher than that before yoga stretching (84.1 ± 63.4 pg/mL; p < 0.01). HBD-2 expression rate after yoga stretching (232.8 ± 192.9 pg/min) was significantly higher than that before yoga stretching (110.7 ± 96.8 pg/min; p < 0.01). HBD-2 concentration (p < 0.05) and HBD-2 expression rate (p < 0.01) at post on the second day (yoga) was significantly higher than that on the first day (rest). POMS score of anger-hostility was lower after yoga than before. Yoga stretching for 90 min can increase salivary HBD-2 expression in older adults. Therefore, yoga stretching might be useful for older adults and athletes to maintain their health.

  7. The DUB/USP17 deubiquitinating enzymes: A gene family within a tandemly repeated sequence, is also embedded within the copy number variable Beta-defensin cluster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The DUB/USP17 subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes were originally identified as immediate early genes induced in response to cytokine stimulation in mice (DUB-1, DUB-1A, DUB-2, DUB-2A). Subsequently we have identified a number of human family members and shown that one of these (DUB-3) is also cytokine inducible. We originally showed that constitutive expression of DUB-3 can block cell proliferation and more recently we have demonstrated that this is due to its regulation of the ubiquitination and activity of the 'CAAX' box protease RCE1. Results Here we demonstrate that the human DUB/USP17 family members are found on both chromosome 4p16.1, within a block of tandem repeats, and on chromosome 8p23.1, embedded within the copy number variable beta-defensin cluster. In addition, we show that the multiple genes observed in humans and other distantly related mammals have arisen due to the independent expansion of an ancestral sequence within each species. However, it is also apparent when sequences from humans and the more closely related chimpanzee are compared, that duplication events have taken place prior to these species separating. Conclusions The observation that the DUB/USP17 genes, which can influence cell growth and survival, have evolved from an unstable ancestral sequence which has undergone multiple and varied duplications in the species examined marks this as a unique family. In addition, their presence within the beta-defensin repeat raises the question whether they may contribute to the influence of this repeat on immune related conditions. PMID:20403174

  8. [Cloning and antimicrobial activity of pigeon avian beta-defensin 5].

    PubMed

    Xin, Shengnan; Zhang, Kexing; Zhang, Mingyue; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Shengwang; Ma, Deying

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the study was to clone avian beta-defensin (AvBD) 5 gene from pigeon bone marrow tissues and liver tissues, to express the recombinant AvBD5 protein in E. coli, and to determine its antimicrobial activity. The mRNA of duck AvBD5 was cloned from pigeon bone marrow tissues and liver tissues by RT-PCR. In addition, phylogenetic relationships between amino acid sequence of the pigeon AvBD5, AvBDs from other avian species, and some mammalian beta-defensin-5 were analyzed. The cDNA of pigeon AvBD5 was sub-cloned into pGEX-6p-1 vector to construct recombinant plasmid pGEX-pigeon AvBD5. The recombinant protein was expressed into E. coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity and physical-chemical stability of the recombinant fusion protein were measured in vitro. The complete nucleotide sequence of both cDNAs contained 201 bp nucleotides, encoding a polypeptide of 66 amino acids. Both beta-defensins have six conserved cysteines. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed. Both pigeon AvBDs shared the highest amino acid homology (87.9% and 78.8%) with duck AvBD5. So it was named as pigeon AvBD5alpha (bone marrow) and AvBD5beta (liver). Both recombinant plasmids were transformed into E. coli BL21 and the bacteria were induced with Isopropyl beta-D-1-Thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). After purification, antibacterial activity of the purified was investigated. In addition, effect of ionic strength on the antibacterial activity, and hemolytic recombinant protein activity of the purified recombinant protein were investigated. A 32 kDa protein was highly expressed. Both purified recombinant pigeon AvBD5alpha and AvBD5beta exhibited extensive antimicrobial activities against 12 bacteria, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative. In high salt ions concentrations, antibacterial activity of both recombinant proteins was decreased. In addition, the hemolysis activity of recombinant protein was extremely low.

  9. Inhibition of beta-defensin gene expression in airway epithelial cells by low doses of residual oil fly ash is mediated by vanadium.

    PubMed

    Klein-Patel, Marcia E; Diamond, Gill; Boniotto, Michele; Saad, Sherif; Ryan, Lisa K

    2006-07-01

    Poor ambient air quality is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, including respiratory infections. However, its effects on various host-defense mechanisms are poorly understood. This study utilized an in vitro model to study the effect of particulate matter (PM(2.5)) on one antimicrobial mechanism of host defense in the airway, beta-defensin-2 and its bovine homologue, tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) induction in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL-1beta. Our model utilized cultured primary bovine tracheal epithelial (BTE) cells and the human alveolar type II epithelial cell line, A549, treated with 0-20 microg/cm(2) residual oil fly ash (ROFA) for 6 h. The cells were then washed and stimulated for 18 h with 100 ng/ml LPS or for 6 h with 100 ng/ml IL-1beta. ROFA inhibited the LPS-induced increase in TAP mRNA and protein without inducing significant cytotoxicity. As little as 2.5 microg/cm(2) of ROFA inhibited LPS-induced TAP gene expression by 30%. The inhibitory activity was associated with the soluble fraction and not the washed particle. The activity in the leachate was attributed to vanadium, but not nickel or iron. SiO(2) and TiO(2) were utilized as controls and did not inhibit LPS induction of TAP gene expression in BTE. ROFA also inhibited the increase of IL-1beta-induced human beta-defensin-2, a homologue of TAP, in A549 cells. The results show that ROFA, V(2)O(5), and VOSO(4) inhibit the ability of airway epithelial cells to respond to inflammatory stimuli at low, physiologically relevant doses and suggest that exposure to these agents could result in an impairment of defense against airborne pathogens.

  10. Beta-defensin-2 genomic copy number variation and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, S W; Hoder-Przyrembel, C; Cubillos, S; Krieg, N; Lehmann, K; Piehler, S; Sigusch, B W; Norgauer, J

    2013-11-01

    Chronic periodontitis (ChP) is a multifactorial disease influenced by microbial and host genetic variability; however, the role of beta-defensin-2 genomic (DEFB4) copy number (CN) variation (V) in ChP remains unknown. The association of the occurrence and severity of ChP and DEFB4 CNV was analyzed. Our study included 227 unrelated Caucasians, that is, 136 ChP patients (combined ChP) and 91 control individuals. The combined ChP group was subdivided into the severe ChP and slight-to-moderate ChP subgroups. To determine DEFB4 CNV, we isolated genomic DNA samples and analyzed them by relative quantitation using the comparative CT method. The serum beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) level was determined via ELISA. The distribution pattern and mean DEFB4 CN did not differ significantly in combined ChP cases vs. the controls; however, the mean DEFB4 CN in the severe ChP group differed significantly from those for the control and slight-to-moderate ChP groups. Low DEFB4 CN increased the risk of severe ChP by about 3-fold. DEFB4 CN was inversely associated with average attachment loss. Mean serum hBD-2 levels were highest in the controls, followed by the slight-to-moderate ChP group and the severe ChP group. The results suggested an association between decreased DEFB4 CN and serum hBD-2 levels and periodontitis severity.

  11. Immunocytochemical detection of beta-defensins and cathelicidins in the secretory granules of the tongue in the lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Previous molecular studies indicated that antimicrobial peptides in lizard are expressed in the skin and tongue among other epithelial organs. The present ultrastructural immunogold study aimed to detect the specific location of three broadly expressed antimicrobial peptides in the tongue of the lizard Anolis carolinensis. The immunocytochemical study indicated that beta-defensin-15, the likely main defensin of granulocytes and skin, is poorly expressed in some dense and medium-dense granules of glandular cells of the papillated tongue. Conversely beta-defensin-27 appears highly expressed in numerous pale and cribriform dense granules of glandular cells and is also secreted on the tongue surface. The immunostaining for cathelicidin-1 indicated a variable but however positive immunolabeling in numerous granules in the tongue glands, suggesting that this antimicrobial peptide previously found on the epidermal surface is also present in the tongue secretions and participates to the formation of the anti-microbial oral barrier. The study suggests that among the numerous beta-defensins and cathelicidins identified in the genome of this lizard is present a specific distribution of different peptide subtypes in various body regions, including the tongue, and that these peptides contribute to the formation of local antimicrobial barriers.

  12. Biomolecular identification of beta-defensin-like peptides from the skin of the soft-shelled turtle Apalone spinifera.

    PubMed

    Benato, F; Dalla Valle, L; Skobo, T; Alibardi, L

    2013-06-01

    Numerous bacteria are frequently observed in the superficial corneocytes forming the corneous layer of the soft-shelled turtle Apalona spinifera. The resistance to bacterial penetration through the living epidermis in this turtle suggests the presence of an antimicrobial barrier, possibly derived from the presence of anti-microbial peptides in the epidermis. Four beta-defensin-like peptides, named As-BD-1 to 4, have been characterized from skin tissues using molecular and bioinformatics methods. The precursor peptides contain the beta-defensin motif with the typical cysteine localization pattern. The analysis of the expression for the four different beta-defensin-like proteins show that these molecules are expressed in the skin (epidermis and dermis) of the carapace, neck, digit, and tail but are apparently not expressed in the liver or intestine under normal conditions. These data suggest that in the skin of the soft-shelled turtle there are potential effective anti-microbial peptides against epidermal bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Overexpression of Porcine Beta-Defensin 2 Enhances Resistance to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Infection in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Tan, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Wan-Quan; Zou, Geng; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Deng, Si-Min; Yu, Lei; Hu, Xue-Ying; Li, Lu; Zhou, Rui

    2015-07-01

    To reduce the need for antibiotics in animal production, alternative approaches are needed to control infection. We hypothesized that overexpression of native defensin genes will provide food animals with enhanced resistance to bacterial infections. In this study, recombinant porcine beta-defensin 2 (PBD-2) was overexpressed in stably transfected PK-15 porcine kidney cells. PBD-2 antibacterial activities against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important respiratory pathogen causing porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, were evaluated on agar plates. Transgenic pigs constitutively overexpressing PBD-2 were produced by a somatic cell cloning method, and their resistance to bacterial infection was evaluated by direct or cohabitation infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. Recombinant PBD-2 peptide that was overexpressed in the PK-15 cells showed antibacterial activity against A. pleuropneumoniae. PBD-2 was overexpressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, and jejunum of the transgenic pigs, which showed significantly lower bacterial loads in the lungs and reduced lung lesions after direct or cohabitation infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. The results demonstrate that transgenic overexpression of PBD-2 in pigs confers enhanced resistance against A. pleuropneumoniae infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Overexpression of Porcine Beta-Defensin 2 Enhances Resistance to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Infection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Tan, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Wan-Quan; Zou, Geng; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Deng, Si-Min; Yu, Lei; Hu, Xue-Ying; Li, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the need for antibiotics in animal production, alternative approaches are needed to control infection. We hypothesized that overexpression of native defensin genes will provide food animals with enhanced resistance to bacterial infections. In this study, recombinant porcine beta-defensin 2 (PBD-2) was overexpressed in stably transfected PK-15 porcine kidney cells. PBD-2 antibacterial activities against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important respiratory pathogen causing porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, were evaluated on agar plates. Transgenic pigs constitutively overexpressing PBD-2 were produced by a somatic cell cloning method, and their resistance to bacterial infection was evaluated by direct or cohabitation infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. Recombinant PBD-2 peptide that was overexpressed in the PK-15 cells showed antibacterial activity against A. pleuropneumoniae. PBD-2 was overexpressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, and jejunum of the transgenic pigs, which showed significantly lower bacterial loads in the lungs and reduced lung lesions after direct or cohabitation infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. The results demonstrate that transgenic overexpression of PBD-2 in pigs confers enhanced resistance against A. pleuropneumoniae infection. PMID:25916992

  15. Identification and characterization of a novel antibacterial peptide, avian beta-defensin 2 from ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deying; Wang, Ruiqin; Liao, Wenyan; Han, Zongxi; Liu, Shengwang

    2009-10-01

    In this study, a novel avian beta-defensin (AvBD) was isolated from duck pancreas. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene contained an 195 bp open reading frame encoding 64 amino acids. Homology, characterization and comparison of the gene with AvBD from other avian species confirmed that it was duck AvBD2. The mRNA expression of the gene was analyzed in 17 tissues from 21-day-old ducks. AvBD2 was highly expressed in the trachea, crop, heart, bone marrow, and pancreas; moderately expressed in the muscular stomach, small intestine, kidney, spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius; and weakly expressed in skin. We produced and purified recombinant AvBD2 by expressing the gene in Escherichia coli. As expected, the recombinant peptide exhibited strong bactericidal properties against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pasteurella multocida, and weak bactericidal properties against E. coli and Salmonella choleraesuis. In addition, the recombinant protein retained antimicrobial activity against S. aureus under different temperatures (range, -20 degrees C to 100 degrees C) and pH values (range, 3 to 12).

  16. Two novel duck antibacterial peptides, avian beta-defensins 9 and 10, with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deying; Liao, Wenyan; Wang, Ruiqin; Han, Zongxi; Liu, Shengwang

    2009-11-01

    Two novel avian beta-defensins (AvBDs) isolated from duck liver were characterized and their homologies with other AvBDs were analyzed. They were shown to be duck AvBD9 and AvBD10. The mRNA expression of the two genes was analyzed in 17 different tissues from 1-28-dayold ducks. AvBD9 was differentially expressed in the tissues, with especially high levels of expression in liver, kidney, crop, and trachea, whereas AvBD10 was only expressed in the liver and kidney of ducks at all the ages investigated. We produced and purified GST-tagged recombinant AvBD9 and AvBD10 by expressing the two genes in Escherichia coli. Both recombinant proteins exhibited antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains. The results revealed that both recombinant proteins retained their antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus under a range of different temperatures (-70 degrees C -100 degrees C) and pH values (pH 3-12).

  17. Two Cheers for Crohn's Disease and Periodontitis: Beta-Defensin-2 as an Actionable Target to Intervene on Two Clinically Distinct Diseases.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Mutlu; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gursoy, Mervi; Könönen, Eija; Rautava, Jaana; Gursoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in multi-omics approaches encompassing genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics offer hitherto unprecedented insights on common complex human diseases. A unique angle pertinent for both diagnostic and therapeutic sciences involves rethinking clinically distinct diseases with a view to their shared molecular targets, interactomes, and pathophysiologies. Reflecting at a scale of disease-to-disease associations might help clinicians, public health practitioners, drug and biotechnology developers, and associated knowledge industries in the current era. This review article examines the hypothesis that "Intersecting Molecular Pathways Permit Interventions on Multiple Clinical Endpoints", thus uniquely bringing together Crohn's disease and periodontitis. Furthermore, we propose a novel connector molecular target between these two ostensibly distinct diseases at a clinical level, human beta defensin (hBD)-2, and suggest pathways by which hBD-2 can conceivably connect Crohn's disease and periodontitis by virtue of regulating the innate-immune response. We conclude by emphasizing different approaches where hBD-2 can be employed as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool to improve the quality of life of susceptible individuals and minimize the economic costs of these two major global public health problems. The strategy presented here also presents potentials for targeting of multiple diseases through a unique "nodal molecular target" that "speaks to" multiple clinical endpoints.

  18. A novel beta-defensin structure: a potential strategy of big defensin for overcoming resistance by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Takahide; Fujitani, Naoki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Nitta, Katsutoshi; Kawano, Keiichi

    2008-10-07

    Big defensin is a 79-residue peptide derived from hemocytes of the Japanese horseshoe crab. It has antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of big defensin can be divided into an N-terminal hydrophobic half and a C-terminal cationic half. Interestingly, the trypsin cleaves big defensin into two fragments, the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments, which are responsible for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, respectively. To explore the antimicrobial mechanism of big defensin, we determined the solution structure of mature big defensin and performed a titration experiment with DPC micelles. Big defensin has a novel defensin structure; the C-terminal domain adopts a beta-defensin structure, and the N-terminal domain forms a unique globular conformation. It is noteworthy that the hydrophobic N-terminal domain undergoes a conformational change in micelle solution, while the C-terminal domain remains unchanged. Here, we propose that the N-terminal domain achieves its antimicrobial activity in a novel fashion and explain that big defensin has developed a strategy different from those of other beta-defensins to suppress the growth of Gram-positive bacteria.

  19. Cauda Epididymis-Specific Beta-Defensin 126 Promotes Sperm Motility but Not Fertilizing Ability in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuertes, Beatriz; Narciandi, Fernando; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Kelly, Alan K; Fair, Sean; Meade, Kieran G; Lonergan, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Bovine beta-defensin 126 (BBD126) exhibits preferential expression for the cauda epididymis of males, where it is absorbed onto the tail and postacrosomal region of the sperm. The aim of this study was to examine the role of BBD126 in bull sperm function. Fresh and frozen-thawed semen were incubated in the presence of different capacitating agents as well as with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. These treatments, which have been successful in releasing beta-defensin 126 from macaque sperm, proved to be ineffective in bull sperm. This finding suggests that the protein behaves in a different manner in the bovine. The lack of success in removing BBD126 led us to use corpus epididymis sperm, a model in which the protein is not present, to study its functional role. Corpus sperm were incubated with cauda epididymal fluid (CEF) in the absence or presence of BBD126 antibody or with recombinant BBD126 (rBBD126). Confocal microscopy revealed that rBBD126 binds to corpus sperm with the same pattern observed for BBD126 in cauda sperm, whereas an aberrant binding pattern is observed when sperm are subject to CEF incubation. Addition of CEF increased motility as well as the number of corpus sperm migrating through cervical mucus from estrus cows. However, it decreased the ability of sperm to fertilize in vitro matured oocytes. The presence of the antibody failed to abrogate these effects. Furthermore, when rBBD126 was added in the absence of other factors and proteins from the CEF, an increase in motility was also observed and no negative effects in fertility were seen. These results suggest that BBD126 plays a key role in the acquisition of sperm motility in the epididymis. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Vaccine with beta-defensin 2-transduced leukemic cells activates innate and adaptive immunity to elicit potent antileukemia responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Tong; Xu, Bin; An, Li-Li; Dong, Cheng-Ya; Lin, Yong-Min; Shi, Yang; Wu, Ke-Fu

    2006-01-15

    Murine beta-defensin 2 (MBD2) is a small antimicrobial peptide of the innate immune system. Recent study showed that MBD2 could not only recruit immature dendritic cells but also activate them by Toll-like receptor 4 and thus may provide a critical link between the innate immune system and the adaptive immune response. In this report, we examined the antileukemia activity of MBD2 in a murine model of acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) L1210. L1210 cells were engineered to secrete biologically functional MBD2. MBD2-modified L1210 (L1210-MBD2) showed significantly reduced leukemogenecity, resulting in a 80% rate of complete leukemia rejection. Inoculation of mice with L1210-MBD2 induced enhanced CTL and natural killer (NK) activity and augmented interleukin-12 and IFN-gamma production. All the recovered mice from the inoculation showed a protective immunity to the following challenge with parental L1210 cells and generate leukemia-specific memory CTL. Vaccines with irradiated L1210-MBD2 cells could cure 50% leukemia-bearing mice. Depletion of CD8+ T cells but not CD4+ T cells completely abrogated the antileukemia activity of MBD2. Interestingly, NK cells were also required for the MBD2-mediated antileukemia response, although ALL generally display a high degree of resistance to NK-mediated lysis. Our results suggest that MBD2 can activate both innate and adaptive immunity to generate potent antileukemia response, and MBD2 immunotherapy warrants further evaluation as a potential treatment for ALL.

  1. The beta-defensin gallinacin-6 is expressed in the chicken digestive tract and has antimicrobial activity against food-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Albert; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Kalkhove, Stefanie I C; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L M; Romijn, Roland A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2007-03-01

    Food-borne pathogens are responsible for most cases of food poisoning in developed countries and are often associated with poultry products, including chicken. Little is known about the role of beta-defensins in the chicken digestive tract and their efficacy. In this study, the expression of chicken beta-defensin gallinacin-6 (Gal-6) and its antimicrobial activity against food-borne pathogens were investigated. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed high expression of Gal-6 mRNA in the esophagus and crop, moderate expression in the glandular stomach, and low expression throughout the intestinal tract. Putative transcription factor binding sites for nuclear factor kappa beta, activator protein 1, and nuclear factor interleukin-6 were found in the Gal-6 gene upstream region, which suggests a possible inducible nature of the Gal-6 gene. In colony-counting assays, strong bactericidal and fungicidal activity was observed, including bactericidal activity against food-borne pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Clostridium perfringens, and Escherichia coli. Treatment with 16 mug/ml synthetic Gal-6 resulted in a 3 log unit reduction in Clostridium perfringens survival within 60 min, indicating fast killing kinetics. Transmission electron microscopy examination of synthetic-Gal-6-treated Clostridium perfringens cells showed dose-dependent changes in morphology after 30 min, including intracellular granulation, cytoplasm retraction, irregular septum formation in dividing cells, and cell lysis. The high expression in the proximal digestive tract and broad antimicrobial activity suggest that chicken beta-defensin gallinacin-6 plays an important role in chicken innate host defense.

  2. Recombinant PBD-1 (porcine beta-defensin 1) expressed in the milk by transplanting transgenic mES-like-derived cells into mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Jun; Gao, Qi-Shuang; Qian, Yun-Guo; Zhang, Yu-Dan; Tao, Bi-Fei; Xiang, Min; Peng, Jian; Jiang, Si-Wen; Hause, Ben

    2010-10-01

    ES (embryonic stem)-derived cells have been investigated in many animal models of severe injury and degenerative disease. However, few studies have examined the ability of ES-derived cells to improve functional outcome following partially damaged breast and also the modification of mammary tissue to produce costly proteins. This study investigates the feasibility of implanting mES-dK (mouse ES-derived keratinocytes-like) cells stably transfected with a mammary gland special expression vector for the PBD-1 (porcine beta-defensin 1) in developing mammary glands. Our aim was to assess the ability of cell grafting to improve functional outcome following partial damage of the breast, also on the breast modification mammary tissue in mice for the production of PBD-1 protein secreted in the milk. Our results showed that the ratios of the surviving cells labelled with the myoepithelial or luminal cell markers, EMA (epithelial membrane antigen) and CALLA, were 41.7 +/- 15.2% and 28.4 +/- 9.6%, respectively, which revealed that transplanted mES-dK cells survived, integrated in vivo and differentiated into myoepithelial or luminal cells. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that 37.5% (3 out of 8) female transplanted mice had PBD-1 expression in their milk and reached 0.4998, 0.5229 and 0.5195 microg/ml, respectively.

  3. Expression patterns of murine beta-defensin-2 mRNA in Lewis lung carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhuravel, E; Shestakova, T; Glushko, N; Soldatkina, M; Pogrebnoy, P

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the anti-tumor activity of murine beta-defensin-2 (mBD-2) expression in vitro and in vivo. Based on pcDNA3 vector, constructs containing mBD-2 cDNA coding mature defensin molecule (pcDNA3-mBD2), and Igk-mBD-2 insertion, coding secretory sequence plus mature defensin molecule (pcDNA3-Igk-mBD-2) were generated. Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) cells were transfected in vitro with these plasmids and with blank pcDNA3 vector, and the proliferative rate and clonogenic ability of obtained cell lines cultivated in vitro were analyzed using (3)H-incorporation technique and colony formation in semi-soft medium, respectively. Expression of mBD-2 mRNA was studied by semiquantative RT-PCR analysis. Also, transfected cells were transplanted to C57B mice, and the patterns of tumor growth in vivo were analyzed by routine techniques. We have found out that in the 3LL cells transfected with pcDNA3-mBD-2 and pcDNA3-Igk-mBD-2, the expression of mBD-2 mRNA is significantly down regulated compared to wild-type cells and 3LL cells transfected with blank vector. The cells with suppressed mBD-2 expression differed from parental cells and cells transfected with blank vector by higher proliferation rate (p < 0.001) and higher clonogenic ability. The 3LL-mBD-2 and 3LL-Igk-mBD-2 cells that are transplanted to C57B mice gave rise to more aggressive tumors that possessed significantly higher growth rate (p < 0.01) than those that arise from wild-type 3LL cells. The obtained results indicate the relation between mBD-2 expession in 3LL cells and their proliferation rate and malignant phenotype, and also allow to hypothesize the possibility of regulation of mBD-2 mRNA expression in these cells by a feedback mechanism.

  4. Pupil diameter covaries with BOLD activity in human locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Peter R; O'Connell, Redmond G; O'Sullivan, Michael; Robertson, Ian H; Balsters, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) neuromodulatory system has been implicated in a broad array of cognitive processes, yet scope for investigating this system's function in humans is currently limited by an absence of reliable non-invasive measures of LC activity. Although pupil diameter has been employed as a proxy measure of LC activity in numerous studies, empirical evidence for a relationship between the two is lacking. In the present study, we sought to rigorously probe the relationship between pupil diameter and BOLD activity localized to the human LC. Simultaneous pupillometry and fMRI revealed a relationship between continuous pupil diameter and BOLD activity in a dorsal pontine cluster overlapping with the LC, as localized via neuromelanin-sensitive structural imaging and an LC atlas. This relationship was present both at rest and during performance of a two-stimulus oddball task, with and without spatial smoothing of the fMRI data, and survived retrospective image correction for physiological noise. Furthermore, the spatial extent of this pupil/LC relationship guided a volume-of-interest analysis in which we provide the first demonstration in humans of a fundamental characteristic of animal LC activity: phasic modulation by oddball stimulus relevance. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential for utilizing pupil diameter to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the LC-NA system in human cognition.

  5. Somatic cell genotoxicity at the glycophorin A locus in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Grant, S.G.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1990-12-28

    We have developed an assay for detecting variant erythrocytes that occur as a result of in vivo allele loss at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus on chromosome 4 in humans. This gene codes for an erythroid- specific cell surface glycoprotein, and with our assay we are able to detect rare variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of one of the two GPA alleles. Two distinctly different variant cell types are detected with this assay. One variant cell type (called N{O}) is hemizygous. Our assay also detects homozygous variant erythrocytes that have lost expression of the GPA(M) allele and express the GPA(N) allele at twice the heterozygous level. The results of this assay are an enumeration of the frequency of N{O} and NN variant cell types for each individual analyzed. These variant cell frequencies provide a measure of the amount of somatic cell genotoxicity that has occurred at the GPA locus. Such genotoxicity could be the result of (1) reactions of toxic chemicals to which the individual has been exposed, or (2) high energy radiation effects on erythroid precursor cells, or (3) errors in DNA replication or repair in these cells of the bone marrow. Thus, the GPA-based variant cell frequency can serve as a biodosimeter that indicates the amount of genotoxic exposure each individual has received. Because two very different kinds of variant cells are enumerated, different kinds of genotoxicity should be distinguishable. Results of the GPA somatic genotoxicity assay may also provide valuable information for cancer-risk estimation on each individual. 16 refs.

  6. High polymorphism at the human melanocortin 1 receptor locus.

    PubMed Central

    Rana, B K; Hewett-Emmett, D; Jin, L; Chang, B H; Sambuughin, N; Lin, M; Watkins, S; Bamshad, M; Jorde, L B; Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T; Li, W H

    1999-01-01

    Variation in human skin/hair pigmentation is due to varied amounts of eumelanin (brown/black melanins) and phaeomelanin (red/yellow melanins) produced by the melanocytes. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a regulator of eu- and phaeomelanin production in the melanocytes, and MC1R mutations causing coat color changes are known in many mammals. We have sequenced the MC1R gene in 121 individuals sampled from world populations with an emphasis on Asian populations. We found variation at five nonsynonymous sites (resulting in the variants Arg67Gln, Asp84Glu, Val92Met, Arg151Cys, and Arg163Gln), but at only one synonymous site (A942G). Interestingly, the human consensus protein sequence is observed in all 25 African individuals studied, but at lower frequencies in the other populations examined, especially in East and Southeast Asians. The Arg163Gln variant is absent in the Africans studied, almost absent in Europeans, and at a low frequency (7%) in Indians, but is at an exceptionally high frequency (70%) in East and Southeast Asians. The MC1R gene in common and pygmy chimpanzees, gorilla, orangutan, and baboon was sequenced to study the evolution of MC1R. The ancestral human MC1R sequence is identical to the human consensus protein sequence, while MC1R varies considerably among higher primates. A comparison of the rates of substitution in genes in the melanocortin receptor family indicates that MC1R has evolved the fastest. In addition, the nucleotide diversity at the MC1R locus is shown to be several times higher than the average nucleotide diversity in human populations, possibly due to diversifying selection. PMID:10101176

  7. Evolutionary conservation of CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4 locus from zebrafish to human.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2003-07-01

    The CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4-FGF3-FLJ10261-FADD-PPFIA1-EMS1 locus on human chromosome 11q13 is frequently amplified in esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and bladder tumors. FGF19, FGF4 and FGF3 genes are implicated in embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. We proposed in 2002 the hypothesis that mouse Fgf15 might be the ortholog of human FGF19 based on comparative genomics. Here, we identified zebrafish fgf19 and oraov1 genes by using bioinformatics to demonstrate the hypothesis. Zebrafish fgf19 gene, consisting of three exons, was located around nucleotide position 121802-124963 of zebrafish genome draft sequence AL929586.12 in the reverse orientation. Zebrafish fgf19 (209 aa) was more homologous to chicken fgf19 and human FGF19 than to rodent Fgf15. Zebrafish oraov1 gene, consisting of five exons, was located around nucleotide position 112172-115838 of AL929586.12 in the reverse orientation. Zebrafish oraov1 protein (141 aa) was more homologous to human ORAOV1 than to rodent Oraov1. The CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4 locus was well conserved between human and zebrafish genomes in the order of genes, in the direction of genes, and in the exon-intron structure. Rat Ccnd1-Oraov1-Fgf15-Fgf4 locus was synthenic to mouse Ccnd1-Oraov1 (also known as 2210010N10Rik)-Fgf15-Fgf4 locus. Fgf15, homologous to human FGF19 and zebrafish fgf19, was located on the synthenic locus of human FGF19 and zebrafish fgf19 within rodent genomes. Based on the evolutionary conservation of the CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4 locus from zebrafish to human, it was concluded that Fgf15 gene is the rodent ortholog of human FGF19 gene.

  8. Administration of Poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and Avian Beta Defensin as Adjuvants in Inactivated Inclusion Body Hepatitis Virus and its Hexon Protein-Based Experimental Vaccine Formulations in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Dar, Arshud; Tipu, Masroor; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andy; Gerdts, Volker; Tikoo, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is one of the major infectious diseases adversely affecting the poultry industry of the United States and Canada. Currently, no effective and safe vaccine is available for the control of IBH virus (IBHV) infection in chickens. However, based on the excellent safety and immunogenic profiles of experimental veterinary vaccines developed with the use of new generation adjuvants, we hypothesized that characterization of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV or its capsid protein hexon as antigens, along with poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and avian beta defensin 2 (ABD2) as vaccine adjuvants, will be helpful in development of an effective and safe vaccine formulation for IBH. Our data demonstrated that experimental administration of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV and a mixture of PCEP with or without ABD2 as an adjuvant induced significantly higher antibody responses compared with other vaccine formulations, while hexon protein-based vaccine formulations showed relatively lower levels of antibody responses. Thus, a vaccine formulation containing inactivated IBHV with PCEP or a mixture of PCEP and ABD2 (with a reduced dosage of PCEP) as an adjuvant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate. However, in order to overcome the risks associated with whole virus inactivated vaccines, characterization of additional viral capsid proteins, including fiber protein and penton of IBHV along with hexon protein in combination with more new generation adjuvants, will be helpful in further improvements of vaccines against IBHV infection.

  9. Oral administration of synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 improves growth performance and cecal microbial flora and down-regulates the expression of intestinal toll-like receptor-4 and inflammatory cytokines in weaned piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiru; Xu, Ling; Shi, Baoshi; Deng, Huang; Lai, Xin; Liu, Jingyan; Sun, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 (pBD-2) was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth-promoters in pig production. Thirty 21-day weaned piglets were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and orally dosed with either sterile water (CON), pBD-2 (BD) or neomycin sulphate (NS) twice daily for 21 days. pBD-2 and NS led to higher growth performance, jejunum villus height and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-I compared with the CON group (P < 0.05). Hemolytic E. coli scores from rectal swabs, and copy numbers of E. coli, Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus in the cecal digesta of the BD- or NS-treated piglets were lower than those in the CON group (P < 0.05). Messenger RNA levels of toll-like receptor 4, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-8 in the jejunum mucosa of the BD and NS groups were lower than those in the CON group (P < 0.05). Copy numbers of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in the cecal digesta of the BD group were higher than those of the CON and NS groups (P < 0.05). Therefore, pBD-2 has antimicrobial activity in piglets, and it can improve growth performance, reduce inflammatory cytokine expression and affect intestinal morphological indices in the same way as probiotics. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Mapping of human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments outside the major IGH locus

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, R.F.; Cox, D.W. |

    1994-09-01

    Physical mapping of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster (IGH) on chromosome 14 has previously shown that the locus includes at least 63 variable region (VH) gene segments. Fifteen VH gene segments are located on six NotI DNA restriction fragments that are not within the mapped region of IGH. We have used human/rodent somatic cell hybrid lines to map these genes segments, as it was previously not proven that they are located in the chromosome 14 IGH locus. Four gene segments map to human chromosome 16 and two to chromosome 15. Apparently, four of the six NotI fragments, representing 11 VH gene segments, are not located within the chromosome 14 IGH locus. In addition, we have demonstrated that a YAC containing a functional human telomere, and mapping to 14qter, is located at the telomeric end of the IGH gene cluster physical map and contains at least four VH gene segments. This YAC is collinear with the existing physical map of genomic DNA. We conclude that our original physical map of IGH represents almost the entire locus on chromosome 14 and that the 11 gene segments newly mapped are not part of the functional IGH locus. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [Optimizing conditions for the expression of human beta defensin 3 and des-pGlu1-Brazzein in Escherichia coli and analysis of their activity].

    PubMed

    Li, Chunli; Xu, Xueli; Zheng, Zhenyu; Zhao, Weidong

    2008-03-01

    The inductive conditions for the flask-shaking of E.coli BL21-pET-hBD3-Bra had been optimized, at the same time, the expressed protein had been purified and analyzed. The effect of three factors which were IPTG concentration, induction time and temperature on growth of strain and on the yield of hBD3-Bra was analyzed in detail. The result indicated that the concentration of IPTG had little effect on the growth and the expression of target protein between 0.2-1 mmol/L, Biomass would be improved as time passed, but the target protein didn't increase obviously as the same time, temperature was the most important factor, the expressed level of hBD3-Bra, as high as about 35% of total cell protein, could be gained when strain was induced by IPTG under 30 degrees C. Further analysis showed the best temperature for growth was 30 degrees C-32 degrees C and for expression protein was 30 degrees C.The purified hBD3-Bra has a weak antimicrobial activity, but is 200 times sweeter than that of sucrose. After digested by thrombin and purified by affinity column, the natural des-pGlul-Brazzein also has 600-time sweetness of sucrose, and the recombinant hBD3 has a high antimicrobial activity again E. coli and S. aureus.

  12. Search for a schizophrenia susceptibility locus of human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.

    1994-06-15

    We used 10 highly informative DNA polymorphic markers and genetic linkage analysis to examine whether a gene locus predisposing to schizophrenia is located on chromosome 22, in 105 families with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The LOD score method, including analysis for heterogeneity, provided no conclusive evidence of linkage under a dominant, recessive, or penetrance free model of inheritance. Affected sib-pair analysis was inconclusive. Affected Pedigree Member (APM) analysis gave only suggestive evidence for linkage. Multipoint APM analysis, using 4 adjacent loci including D22S281 and IL2RB, a region of interest from the APM analysis, gave non-significant results for the three different weighting functions. 18 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  13. Content and organization of the human Ig VH locus: definition of three new VH families and linkage to the Ig CH locus.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J E; Mellis, S J; Pollock, R; Smith, C L; Suh, H; Heinke, B; Kowal, C; Surti, U; Chess, L; Cantor, C R

    1988-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the content and organization of the human immunoglobulin VH locus. Human VH genes representing five distinct families were isolated, including novel members belonging to two out of three of the known VH gene families (VH1 and VH3) as well as members of three new families (VH4, VH5, and VH6). We report the nucleotide sequence of 21 novel human VH genes, many of which belong to the three new VH gene families. In addition, we provide a preliminary analysis of the organization of these gene segments over the full extent of the locus. We find that the five multi-segment families (VH1-5) have members interspersed over nearly the full 1500-2000 kb of the VH locus, and estimate that the entire heavy chain locus covers 2500 kb or less. Finally, we provide the first report of the physical linkage of the variable and constant loci of a human Ig gene family by demonstrating that the most proximal known human VH segments lie within 100 kb of the constant region locus. Images PMID:3396540

  14. Regional mapping of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene and the phenylketonuria locus in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Lidsky, A.S.; Law, M.L.; Morse, H.G.; Kao, F.T.; Rabin, M.; Ruddle, F.H.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1985-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. To define the regional map position of the disease locus and the PAH gene on human chromosome 12, DNA was isolated from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids with various deletions of human chromosome 12 and was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using the human cDNA PAH clone as a hybridization probe. From these results, together with detailed biochemical and cytogenetic characterization of the hybrid cells, the region on chromosome 12 containing the human PAH gene has been defined as 12q14.3..-->..qter. The PAH map position on chromosome 12 was further localized by in situ hybridization of /sup 125/I-labeled human PAH cDNA to chromosomes prepared from a human lymphoblastoid cell line. Results of these experiments demonstrated that the region on chromosome 12 containing the PAH gene and the PKU locus in man is 12q22..-->..12q24.1. These results not only provide a regionalized map position for a major human disease locus but also can serve as a reference point for linkage analysis with other DNA markers on human chromosome 12.

  15. Human obesity associated with an intronic SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 ...

  16. Updated listing of haplotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-12-01

    Analysis of mutant PAH chromosomes has identified approximately 60 different single-base substitutions and deletions within the PAH locus. Nearly all of these molecular lesions are in strong linkage disequilibrium with specific RFLP haplotypes in different ethnic populations. Thus, haplotype analysis is not only useful for diagnostic purposes but is proving to be a valuable tool in population genetic studies of the origin and spread of phenylketonuria alleles in human populations. PCR-based methods have been developed to detect six of the eight polymorphic restriction sites used for determination of RFLP haplotypes at the PAH locus. A table of the proposed expanded haplotypes is given.

  17. The complete 685-kilobase DNA sequence of the human {Beta} T cell receptor locus

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, L.; Koop, B.F.; Hood, L.

    1996-06-21

    The human {Beta} T cell receptor (TCR) locus, comprising a complex family of genes, has been sequenced. The locus contains two types of coding elements-TCR elements (65 variable gene segments and two clusters of diversity, joining, and constant segments) and eight trypsinogen genes-that constitute 4.6 percent of the DNA. Genome-wide interspersed repeats and locus-specific repeats span 30 and 47 percent, respectively, of the 685-kilobase sequence. A comparison of the germline variable elements with their approximately 300 complementary DNA counterparts reveals marked differential patterns of variable gene expression, the importance of exonuclease activity in generating TCR diversity, and the predominant tendency for only functional variable elements to be present in complementary DNA libraries. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Human pituitary adenomas show no loss of heterozygosity at the retinoblastoma gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Leon, S.P.; Beggs, A.H.; Busque, L.; Gilliland, D.G.; Black, P.M.

    1994-04-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (RB1) is inactivated in hereditary and sporadic forms of retinoblastoma as well as in a number of other sporadic tumors. The majority of human pituitary tumors have been shown to be monoclonal neoplasms, suggesting that 1 or more somatic mutations are involved in the clonal expansion of a single progenitor cell. Recently, a high percentage of transgenic mice containing a disrupted RB1 allele have been shown to develop pituitary tumors. To investigate whether RB1 inactivation contributes to the development of human pituitary adenomas, the authors searched for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) within the RB1 gene locus in a variety of human pituitary adenomas. They screened 34 adenomas for LOH using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based microsatellite polymorphic marker at the RB1 gene locus. In addition, a variable number of tandem repeat markers from within the RB1 gene was also used to search for LOH in 14 tumors. They found no LOH or microsatellite instability at the RB1 locus in any of the informative cases (30 of 34). Additionally, they showed that 4 representative adenomas from female patients are monoclonal in origin using a PCR-based clonality analysis assay. They conclude that the RB1 gene shows no LOH in a variety of human pituitary adenomas and that PCR-based microsatellite markers can serve as a useful tool for LOH analysis in human pituitary tumors. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Structure and expression of the human haptoglobin locus.

    PubMed Central

    Bensi, G; Raugei, G; Klefenz, H; Cortese, R

    1985-01-01

    Human genomic clones of the haptoglobin Hp1F and the "haptoglobin related' gene (Hpr) have been isolated. The two genes are adjacent, spanning a region of approximately 21 kb. A comparison of their coding sequences shows that Hpr differs from Hp1F at 28 codons. Northern blot and primer elongation analyses with human liver RNA show that the haptoglobin gene Hp1F appears to be transcribed some 1000-fold less in fetal than in adult liver. In adult liver the amount of Hpr mRNA is at the lower limit of detection, therefore the extent of its expression is at most less than 1000-fold that of the Hp1F gene. No Hpr mRNA can be detected in fetal liver. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:4018023

  20. Structure and expression of the human haptoglobin locus.

    PubMed

    Bensi, G; Raugei, G; Klefenz, H; Cortese, R

    1985-01-01

    Human genomic clones of the haptoglobin Hp1F and the "haptoglobin related' gene (Hpr) have been isolated. The two genes are adjacent, spanning a region of approximately 21 kb. A comparison of their coding sequences shows that Hpr differs from Hp1F at 28 codons. Northern blot and primer elongation analyses with human liver RNA show that the haptoglobin gene Hp1F appears to be transcribed some 1000-fold less in fetal than in adult liver. In adult liver the amount of Hpr mRNA is at the lower limit of detection, therefore the extent of its expression is at most less than 1000-fold that of the Hp1F gene. No Hpr mRNA can be detected in fetal liver.

  1. Tissue specific CTCF occupancy and boundary function at the human growth hormone locus.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2014-04-01

    The robust and tissue-specific activation of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene cluster in the pituitary and placenta constitutes an informative model for analysis of gene regulation. The five-gene hGH cluster is regulated by two partially overlapping sets of DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSs) that constitute the pituitary (HSI, II, III and V) and placental (HSIII, IV, and V) locus control regions (LCRs). The single placenta-specific LCR component, HSIV, is located at -30 kb to the cluster. Here we generate a series of hGH/BAC transgenes specifically modified to identify structural features of the hGH locus required for its appropriate placental expression. We find that placental specificity is dependent on the overall multigene configuration of the cluster whereas the distance between the cluster and its LCR impacts the level of placental expression. We further observe that a major function of the placental hGH LCR is to insulate the transgene locus from site-of-integration effects. This insulation activity is linked to placenta-specific occupancy of the chromatin architectural protein, CTCF, at HSIV. These data reveal a remarkable combination of structural configurations and regulatory determinants that must work in concert to insure robust and tightly controlled expression from a complex multigene locus.

  2. Lipooligosaccharide locus classes and putative virulence genes among chicken and human Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    PubMed

    Ellström, Patrik; Hansson, Ingrid; Nilsson, Anna; Rautelin, Hilpi; Olsson Engvall, Eva

    2016-11-21

    Campylobacter cause morbidity and considerable economic loss due to hospitalization and post infectious sequelae such as reactive arthritis, Guillain Barré- and Miller Fischer syndromes. Such sequelae have been linked to C. jejuni harboring sialic acid structures in their lipooligosaccharide (LOS) layer of the cell wall. Poultry is an important source of human Campylobacter infections but little is known about the prevalence of sialylated C. jejuni isolates and the extent of transmission of such isolates to humans. Genotypes of C. jejuni isolates from enteritis patients were compared with those of broiler chicken with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), to study the patterns of LOS biosynthesis genes and other virulence associated genes and to what extent these occur among Campylobacter genotypes found both in humans and chickens. Chicken and human isolates generally had similar distributions of the putative virulence genes and LOS locus classes studied. However, there were significant differences regarding LOS locus class of PFGE types that were overlapping between chicken and human isolates and those that were distinct to each source. The study highlights the prevalence of virulence associated genes among Campylobacter isolates from humans and chickens and suggests possible patterns of transmission between the two species.

  3. Antibacterial effect of mesenchymal stem cells against Escherichia coli is mediated by secretion of beta- defensin- 2 via toll- like receptor 4 signalling.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong Kyung; Chang, Yun Sil; Sung, Se In; Yoo, Hye Soo; Ahn, So Yoon; Park, Won Soon

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that intratracheal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood- derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuates Escherichia (E) coli- induced acute lung injury primarily by down- modulating inflammation and enhancing bacterial clearance iQn mice. This study was performed to elucidate the mechanism underlying the antibacterial effects of MSCs. The growth of E. coli in vitro was significantly inhibited only by MSCs or their conditioned medium with bacterial preconditioning, but not by fibroblasts or their conditioned medium. Microarray analysis identified significant up- regulation of toll- like receptors (TLR)- 2 and TLR- 4, and β- defensin 2 (BD2) in MSCs compared with fibroblasts after E. coli exposure. The increased BD2 level and the in vitro antibacterial effects of MSCs were abolished by specific antagonist or by siRNA- mediated knockdown of TLR- 4, but not TLR- 2, and restored by BD2 supplementation. The in vivo down- modulation of the inflammatory response and enhanced bacterial clearance, increased BD2 secretion and the resultant protection against E. coli- induced pneumonia observed only with MSCs, but not fibroblasts, transplantation in mice, were abolished by knockdown of TLR- 4 with siRNA transfection. Our data indicate that BD2 secreted by the MSCs via the TLR- 4 signalling pathway is one of the critical paracrine factors mediating their microbicidal effects against E. coli, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, TLR- 4 from the transplanted MSCs plays a seminal role in attenuating in vivo E. coli- induced pneumonia and the ensuing acute lung injury through both its anti- inflammatory and antibacterial effects. © 2015 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  5. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. )

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  7. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Uptake of inorganic mercury by human locus ceruleus and corticomotor neurons: implications for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental toxins are suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an attempt to determine which pathways these toxins can use to enter motor neurons we compared the distribution of mercury in the CNS of a human and of mice that had been exposed to inorganic mercury. Results In the human who had been exposed to metallic mercury, mercury was seen predominantly in the locus ceruleus and corticomotor neurons, as well as in scattered glial cells. In mice that had been exposed to mercury vapor or mercuric chloride, mercury was present in lower motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain stem. Conclusions In humans, inorganic mercury can be taken up predominantly by corticomotor neurons, possibly when the locus ceruleus is upregulated by stress. This toxin uptake into corticomotor neurons is in accord with the hypothesis that ALS originates in these upper motor neurons. In mice, inorganic mercury is taken up predominantly by lower motor neurons. The routes toxins use to enter motor neurons depends on the nature of the toxin, the duration of exposure, and possibly the amount of stress (for upper motor neuron uptake) and exercise (for lower motor neuron uptake) at the time of toxin exposure. PMID:24252585

  9. Highly informative typing of the human TNF locus using six adjacent polymorphic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Udalova, I.A.; Nedospasov, S.A.; Turetskaya, R.L. ); Webb, G.C.; Chaplin, D.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor locus (TNF locus) is located within the major histocompatibility complex between the class III genes and HLA-B. The authors recently characterized and studied two closely linked highly informative dinucleotide repeats (AC/GT)[sub n] (designated TNFa) and (TC/GA)[sub k], (designated TNFb) in the upstream region of the human TNF-[beta] (lymphotoxin) gene. They also characterized two linked (TC/GA) and (TC/GA)-like repeats located downstream of the TNF-[alpha] gene, designated TNFe and TNFd, respectively. Here, they combine these four markers together with a biallelic TC/GA repeat in the first intron of the TNF-[beta] gene (TNFc) and a biallelic NcoI RFLP (TNFn) to type 105 cell lines from the American Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Workshop and the Center for Human Polymorphism Studies reference panels of HLA typing cell lines. These 6 polymorphic markers define 35 distinct TNF haplotypes and together with the reference panel can be used for disease association and population genetics studies. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A Dual Reporter Mouse Model of the Human β-Globin Locus: Applications and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Petros; Gutiérrez, Laura; van der Linden, Reinier; Kong-A-San, John; Maas, Alex; Drabek, Dubravka; Patrinos, George P.; Philipsen, Sjaak; Grosveld, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The human β-globin locus contains the β-like globin genes (i.e. fetal γ-globin and adult β-globin), which heterotetramerize with α-globin subunits to form fetal or adult hemoglobin. Thalassemia is one of the commonest inherited disorders in the world, which results in quantitative defects of the globins, based on a number of genome variations found in the globin gene clusters. Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) also caused by similar types of genomic alterations can compensate for the loss of adult hemoglobin. Understanding the regulation of the human γ-globin gene expression is a challenge for the treatment of thalassemia. A mouse model that facilitates high-throughput assays would simplify such studies. We have generated a transgenic dual reporter mouse model by tagging the γ- and β-globin genes with GFP and DsRed fluorescent proteins respectively in the endogenous human β-globin locus. Erythroid cell lines derived from this mouse model were tested for their capacity to reactivate the γ-globin gene. Here, we discuss the applications and limitations of this fluorescent reporter model to study the genetic basis of red blood cell disorders and the potential use of such model systems in high-throughput screens for hemoglobinopathies therapeutics. PMID:23272095

  11. Impaired glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice expressing the human transient neonatal diabetes mellitus locus, TNDM

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Shield, Julian P.H.; Dean, Wendy; Leclerc, Isabelle; Knauf, Claude; Burcelin, Rémy; Rutter, Guy A.; Kelsey, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM) is a rare inherited diabetic syndrome apparent in the first weeks of life and again during early adulthood. The relative contributions of reduced islet β cell number and impaired β cell function to the observed hypoinsulinemia are unclear. The inheritance pattern of this imprinted disorder implicates overexpression of one or both genes within the TNDM locus: ZAC, which encodes a proapoptotic zinc finger protein, and HYMAI, which encodes an untranslated mRNA. To investigate the consequences for pancreatic function, we have developed a high-copy transgenic mouse line, TNDM29, carrying the human TNDM locus. TNDM29 neonates display hyperglycemia, and older adults, impaired glucose tolerance. Neonatal hyperglycemia occurs only on paternal transmission, analogous to paternal dependence of TNDM in humans. Embryonic pancreata of TNDM29 mice showed reductions in expression of endocrine differentiation factors and numbers of insulin-staining structures. By contrast, β cell mass was normal or elevated at all postnatal stages, whereas pancreatic insulin content in neonates and peak serum insulin levels after glucose infusion in adults were reduced. Expression of human ZAC and HYMAI in these transgenic mice thus recapitulates key features of TNDM and implicates impaired development of the endocrine pancreas and β cell function in disease pathogenesis. PMID:15286800

  12. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  13. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-09-17

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer.

  14. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, E; Brandys, M K; van Lith, H A; Kas, M J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region for voluntary exercise levels. First, a panel of mouse chromosome substitution strains was used to map a genomic region on mouse chromosome 2 that contributes to voluntary wheel running levels - a behavioral readout considered a model of voluntary exercise in humans. Subsequently, we tested the syntenic region (HSA20: 51,212,545-55,212,986) in a human sample (Saint Thomas Twin Register; n=3038) and found a significant association between voluntary exercise levels (categorized into excessive and non-excessive exercise) and an intergenic SNP rs459465 (adjusted P-value of 0.001). Taking under consideration the methodological challenges embedded in this translational approach in the research of complex phenotypes, we wanted to further test the validity of this finding. Therefore, we repeated the analysis in an independent human population (ALSPAC data set; n=2557). We found a significant association of excessive exercise with two SNPs in the same genomic region (rs6022999, adjusted P-value of P=0.011 and rs6092090, adjusted P-value of 0.012). We explored the locus for possible candidate genes by means of literature search and bioinformatics analysis of gene function and of trans-regulatory elements. We propose three potential human candidate genes for voluntary physical exercise levels (MC3R, CYP24A1, and GRM8). To conclude, the identified genetic variance in the human locus 20q13.2 may affect voluntary exercise levels.

  15. A Study of Human Leukocyte D Locus Related Antigens in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Nadir R.; Sampson, Laura; Noel, Elke P.; Barnard, John M.; Mandeville, Robert; Larsen, Bodil; Marshall, William H.; Carter, Nicholas D.

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them. PMID:105012

  16. Detection of the signature of natural selection in humans: evidence from the Duffy blood group locus.

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, M T; Di Rienzo, A

    2000-01-01

    The Duffy blood group locus, which encodes a chemokine receptor, is characterized by three alleles-FY*A, FY*B, and FY*O. The frequency of the FY*O allele, which corresponds to the absence of Fy antigen on red blood cells, is at or near fixation in most sub-Saharan African populations but is very rare outside Africa. The FST value for the FY*O allele is the highest observed for any allele in humans, providing strong evidence for the action of natural selection at this locus. Homozygosity for the FY*O allele confers complete resistance to vivax malaria, suggesting that this allele has been the target of selection by Plasmodium vivax or some other infectious agent. To characterize the signature of directional selection at this locus, we surveyed DNA sequence variation, both in a 1.9-kb region centered on the FY*O mutation site and in a 1-kb region 5-6 kb away from it, in 17 Italians and in a total of 24 individuals from five sub-Saharan African populations. The level of variation across both regions is two- to threefold lower in the Africans than in the Italians. As a result, the pooled African sample shows a significant departure from the neutral expectation for the number of segregating sites, whereas the Italian sample does not. The FY*O allele occurs on two major haplotypes in three of the five African populations. This finding could be due to recombination, recurrent mutation, population structure, and/or mutation accumulation and drift. Although we are unable to distinguish among these alternative hypotheses, it is likely that the two major haplotypes originated prior to selection on the FY*O mutation. PMID:10762551

  17. Locus for a human hereditary cataract is closely linked to the. gamma. -crystallin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Lubsen, N.H.; Renwick, J.H.; Tsui, L.C.; Breitman, M.L.; Schoenmakers, J.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Within the human ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster polymorphic Taq I sites are present. These give rise to three sets of allelic fragments from the ..gamma..-crystallin genes. Together these restriction fragment length polymorphisms define eight possible haplotypes, three of which (Q, R, and S) were found in the Dutch and English population. A fourth haplotype (P) was detected within a family in which a hereditary Coppock-like cataract of the embryonic lens nucleus occurs in heterozygotes. Haplotype P was found only in family members who suffered from cataract, and all family members who suffered from cataract had haplotype P. The absolute correlation between the presence of haplotype P and cataract within this family shows that the ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster and the locus for the Coppock-like cataract are closely linked. This linkage provides genetic evidence that the primary cause of a cataract in humans could possibly be a lesion in a crystallin gene.

  18. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  19. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome1-3. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A, and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. The copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the genome’s largest influence on obesity4, though genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole genome sequence analysis3,5, droplet digital PCR6, and genome mapping7, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that AMY1 copy number in individuals’ genomes is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates to nearby SNPs, which do not associate with BMI. We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in two other cohorts totaling ~3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI4, yet found no association. PMID:26098870

  20. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. Copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the largest genomic influence on obesity, although genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole-genome sequence analysis, droplet digital PCR and genome mapping, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that the AMY1 copy number in an individual's genome is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates with nearby SNPs, which do not associate with body mass index (BMI). We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in 2 other cohorts totaling ∼3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI, yet found no association.

  1. Genetic diversity and evolution of the human leptin locus tetranucleotide repeat.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Susan; Martinson, Jeremy; Shriver, Mark D; Deka, Ranjan; McGarvey, Stephen T; Barrantes, Ramiro; Ferrell, Robert E

    2002-05-01

    To better understand the evolutionary history of the gene region containing the multifunctional adipose tissue hormone leptin, we genotyped 1,957 individuals from 12 world populations for a highly variable tetranucleotide repeat polymorphism located 476 bp 3' of exon 3 of the leptin gene. Common alleles shared among populations, alleles specific to geographically defined populations, and the homologous alleles in the common and pygmy chimpanzee, the gorilla and the orangutan, were sequenced to define the allelic variation at the nucleotide level. These data reveal a common set of alleles shared among world populations, presumed to have arisen from a great ape ancestral allele prior to the divergence of the major geographical subdivisions of the human population, a subset of alleles specific to populations of African ancestry and a second set of alleles that arose by tandem duplication of the core repeat unit following the separation of African and non-African populations. These findings emphasize the complex evolutionary history of this locus and raise cautions about the pooling of alleles at this locus in association studies.

  2. Association of bone mineral density with polymorphism of the human calcium-sensing receptor locus.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, K; Orimo, H; Hosoi, T; Miyao, M; Ota, N; Nakajima, T; Yoshida, H; Watanabe, S; Suzuki, T; Emi, M

    2000-03-01

    A strong correlation between bone mass and genetic factors has been shown in twins and family studies. Some of the genes involved would regulate bone metabolism, bone formation, and resorption, all processes that determine bone mass. One candidate genes, calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) in the parathyroid gland, regulates calcium homeostasis by sensing decreases in extracellular calcium level and effecting an increase in secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium (Ca) reabsorption in the kidney. We have investigated a possible association between the CA-repeat polymorphism at the human CASR gene locus and the bone mineral density (BMD) of radial bone in 472 postmenopausal Japanese women. Genotypes were classified into nine groups according to the number of CA repeats present, from 20 to 12. BMD was expressed as the adjusted BMD, which was the body mass index (BMI), and age-adjusted average BMD. The 247 women who had an A3 allele (228 bp, containing 18 repeats of CA) had significantly lower adjusted BMD (mean +/- SD: 0.303 +/- 0.059 versus 0.316 +/- 0.063 g/cm(2); P = 0.0308) than the participants (n = 201) who did not carry an allele of that size. This result suggests that genetic variation at the CASR gene locus is associated with some determinants for BMD in postmenopausal women.

  3. Molecular population genetics of human CYP3A locus: signatures of positive selection and implications for evolutionary environmental medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoping; Wang, Haijian; Zhou, Gangqiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Dong, Xiaojia; Zhi, Lianteng; Jin, Li; He, Fuchu

    2009-10-01

    The human CYP3A gene cluster codes for cytochrome P450 (CYP) subfamily enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of various exogenous and endogenous chemicals and is an obvious candidate for evolutionary and environmental genomic study. Functional variants in the CYP3A locus may have undergone a selective sweep in response to various environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to profile the allelic structure across the human CYP3A locus and investigate natural selection on that locus. From the CYP3A locus spanning 231 kb, we resequenced 54 genomic DNA fragments (a total of 43,675 bases) spanning four genes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, and CYP3A43) and two pseudogenes (CYP3AP1 and CYP3AP2), and randomly selected intergenic regions at the CYP3A locus in Africans (24 individuals), Caucasians (24 individuals), and Chinese (29 individuals). We comprehensively investigated the nucleotide diversity and haplotype structure and examined the possible role of natural selection in shaping the sequence variation throughout the gene cluster. Neutrality tests with Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F*, and Fay and Wu's H indicated possible roles of positive selection on the entire CYP3A locus in non-Africans. Sliding-window analyses of nucleotide diversity and frequency spectrum, as well as haplotype diversity and phylogenetically inferred haplotype structure, revealed that CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 had recently undergone or were undergoing a selective sweep in all three populations, whereas CYP3A43 and CYP3A5 were undergoing a selective sweep in non-Africans and Caucasians, respectively. The refined allelic architecture and selection spectrum for the human CYP3A locus highlight that evolutionary dynamics of molecular adaptation may underlie the phenotypic variation of the xenobiotic disposition system and varied predisposition to complex disorders in which xenobiotics play a role.

  4. Reproduction and immunity-driven natural selection in the human WFDC locus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Zélia; Seixas, Susana; Andrés, Aida M; Kretzschmar, Warren W; Mullikin, James C; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Cruz, Pedro; Swanson, Willie J; Clark, Andrew G; Green, Eric D; Hurle, Belen

    2013-04-01

    The whey acidic protein (WAP) four-disulfide core domain (WFDC) locus located on human chromosome 20q13 spans 19 genes with WAP and/or Kunitz domains. These genes participate in antimicrobial, immune, and tissue homoeostasis activities. Neighboring SEMG genes encode seminal proteins Semenogelin 1 and 2 (SEMG1 and SEMG2). WFDC and SEMG genes have a strikingly high rate of amino acid replacement (dN/dS), indicative of responses to adaptive pressures during vertebrate evolution. To better understand the selection pressures acting on WFDC genes in human populations, we resequenced 18 genes and 54 noncoding segments in 71 European (CEU), African (YRI), and Asian (CHB + JPT) individuals. Overall, we identified 484 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including 65 coding variants (of which 49 are nonsynonymous differences). Using classic neutrality tests, we confirmed the signature of short-term balancing selection on WFDC8 in Europeans and a signature of positive selection spanning genes PI3, SEMG1, SEMG2, and SLPI. Associated with the latter signal, we identified an unusually homogeneous-derived 100-kb haplotype with a frequency of 88% in Asian populations. A putative candidate variant targeted by selection is Thr56Ser in SEMG1, which may alter the proteolytic profile of SEMG1 and antimicrobial activities of semen. All the well-characterized genes residing in the WDFC locus encode proteins that appear to have a role in immunity and/or fertility, two processes that are often associated with adaptive evolution. This study provides further evidence that the WFDC and SEMG loci have been under strong adaptive pressure within the short timescale of modern humans.

  5. A new transcript in the TCRB locus unveils the human ortholog of the mouse pre-Dß1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Lethé, Bernard; Snauwaert, Sylvia; Bricard, Orian; Schröder, David; Gomard, Tiphanie; Hames, Gérald; Muller, Catherine; Lurquin, Christophe; Gauthy, Emilie; Essaghir, Ahmed; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Coulie, Pierre G

    2017-09-01

    While most transcripts arising from the human T Cell Receptor locus reflect fully rearranged genes, several germline transcripts have been identified. We describe a new germline transcript arising from the human TCRB locus. cDNA sequencing, promoter, and gene expression analyses were used to characterize the new transcript. The new germline transcript encoded by the human TCRB locus consists of a new exon of 103 bp, which we named TRBX1 (X1), spliced with the first exon of gene segments Cß1 or Cß2. X1 is located upstream of gene segment Dß1 and is therefore deleted from a V-DJ rearranged TCRB locus. The X1-Cß transcripts do not appear to code for a protein. We define their transcription start and minimal promoter. These transcripts are found in populations of mature T lymphocytes from blood or tissues and in T cell clones with a monoallelic TCRB rearrangement. In immature thymocytes, they are already detectable in CD1a(-) CD34(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) cells, therefore before completion of the TCRB rearrangements. The X1 promoter appears to be the ortholog of the mouse pre-Dß1 promoter (PDß1). Like PDß1, its activation is regulated by Eß in T cells and might facilitate the TCRB rearrangement process by contributing to the accessibility of the Dß1 locus. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The lta4h Locus Modulates Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infection in Zebrafish and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, David M.; Vary, Jay C.; Ray, John P.; Walsh, Gregory S.; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Bang, Nguyen D.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Khadge, Saraswoti; King, Mary-Claire; Hawn, Thomas R.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces varied early outcomes, ranging from resistance to infection to progressive disease. Here we report results from a forward genetic screen in zebrafish larvae that identify multiple mutant classes with distinct patterns of innate susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum. A hypersusceptible mutant maps to the lta4h locus encoding leukotriene A4 hydrolase, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent chemoattractant and proinflammatory eicosanoid. lta4h mutations confer hypersusceptibility independent of LTB4 reduction, by redirecting eicosanoid substrates to anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The resultant anti-inflammatory state permits increased mycobacterial proliferation by limiting production of tumor necrosis factor. In humans, we find that protection from both tuberculosis and multibacillary leprosy is associated with heterozygosity for LTA4H polymorphisms that have previously been correlated with differential LTB4 production. Our results suggest conserved roles for balanced eicosanoid production in vertebrate resistance to mycobacterial infection. PMID:20211140

  7. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.P.; Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF, also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by absent central rays and other distal limb malformations. Physical mapping of SHSF-associated chromosomal rearrangements has provided compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene locus (designated SHFD1) on chromosome 7 within q21.3-q22.1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21.3q22.1 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen - D7S492 - COL1A2 - D7S527 - D7S479 - D7S491 - SHFD1 - D7S554 - ASNS - D7S518 -qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at several of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance of this disorder. Strong evidence against linkage of SHSF to the SHFD1 critical region was obtained, and the gene responsible for the SHSF phenotype in this pedigree was excluded from a 10 cM interval spanning the entire SHFD1 critical region. Evidence of exclusion to the SHFD1 critical region was also observed in five additional families. Thus, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF, implying that mutations in at least two separate autosomal genes can result in this distinctive human developmental disorder.

  8. Mutational spectrum of ICR-191 at the hprt locus in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Taft, S A; Liber, H L; Skopek, T R

    1994-01-01

    Human TK6 lymphoblasts were treated with the acridine derivative ICR-191, and mutants at the hprt locus were isolated. Mutant hprt cDNA was reverse-transcribed from mRNA, amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. Additions of single G:C base pairs (+1 frameshift mutations) in repetitive G:C sequences were found in 82% (32/39) of the mutants. Sixteen of the +1 frameshifts analyzed were located in a single sequence of six consecutive guanine bases in exon 3. The remaining +1 frameshifts occurred at six different GGG sequences (14 mutants) and a single GGGG sequence (2 mutants) in other hprt exons. The repetitive guanine sequences that underwent frameshift mutagenesis were located in both the transcribed and nontranscribed strands of hprt. No single base deletions (-1 frameshift mutations) were observed. Base substitutions were observed in 13% (5/39) of the clones analyzed and occurred at both G:C and A:T bases. Loss of exon 4 from the cDNA was also observed in 5% (2/39) of the mutants. Hprt mutants containing seven consecutive guanines (produced from a +1 frameshift in a GGGGGG sequence) were treated with ICR-191 and wild-type revertants selected in CHAT medium. Revertants were recovered at a frequency of approximately 10(-7) and contained the wild-type sequence (GGGGGG) in all clones analyzed. The observed frequency of ICR-191-induced-1 frameshift reversion in the GGGGGGG sequence was approximately 500-fold lower than the estimated frequency of +1 frameshifts observed in the wild-type GGGGGG sequence following the same ICR-191 treatment. These results suggest that ICR-191 produces predominantly +1 frameshift mutations at the hprt locus in human cells.

  9. A human melanoma metastasis-suppressor locus maps to 6q16.3-q23.

    PubMed

    Miele, M E; Jewett, M D; Goldberg, S F; Hyatt, D L; Morelli, C; Gualandi, F; Rimessi, P; Hicks, D J; Weissman, B E; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Welch, D R

    2000-05-15

    Loss, deletion or rearrangement along large portions of the long arm (q-arm) of chromosome 6 occurs in >80% of late-stage human melanomas, suggesting that genes controlling malignant characteristics are encoded there. Metastasis, but not tumorigenicity, was completely suppressed in the human melanoma cell line C8161 into which an additional intact chromosome 6 had been introduced by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our objective was to refine the location of a putative metastasis suppressor gene. To do this, we transferred an intact (neo6) and a deletion variant [neo6qdel; neo6(del)(q16.3-q23)] of neomycin-tagged human chromosome 6 into metastatic C8161 subclone 9 (C8161.9) by MMCT. Single cell hybrid clones were selected in G-418 and isolated. Following verification that the hybrids retained the expected regions of chromosome 6 using a panel of polymorphic sequence-tagged sites, the hybrids were tested for tumorigenicity and metastasis in athymic mice. As reported previously, intact, normal chromosome 6 suppressed metastasis whether tumor cells were injected i.v. or into an orthotopic (i.e., intradermal) site. In contrast, metastasis was not suppressed in the neo6qdel hybrids. Tumorigenicity was unaffected in hybrids prepared with either chromosome 6 donor. These data strongly suggest that a human melanoma metastasis suppressor locus maps between 6q16.3-q23 ( approximately 40 cM).

  10. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1]. PMID:26937449

  11. RUNX1-dependent RAG1 deposition instigates human TCR-δ locus rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Agata; Le Noir, Sandrine; Trinquand, Amélie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Franchini, Don-Marc; Villarese, Patrick; Gon, Stéphanie; Bond, Jonathan; Simonin, Mathieu; Vanhille, Laurent; Reimann, Christian; Verhoeyen, Els; Larghero, Jerome; Six, Emmanuelle; Spicuglia, Salvatore; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Langerak, Anton; Nadel, Bertrand; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    V(D)J recombination of TCR loci is regulated by chromatin accessibility to RAG1/2 proteins, rendering RAG1/2 targeting a potentially important regulator of lymphoid differentiation. We show that within the human TCR-α/δ locus, Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangements occur at a very immature thymic, CD34+/CD1a−/CD7+dim stage, before Dδ2(Dδ3)-Jδ1 rearrangements. These strictly ordered rearrangements are regulated by mechanisms acting beyond chromatin accessibility. Importantly, direct Dδ2-Jδ1 rearrangements are prohibited by a B12/23 restriction and ordered human TCR-δ gene assembly requires RUNX1 protein, which binds to the Dδ2-23RSS, interacts with RAG1, and enhances RAG1 deposition at this site. This RUNX1-mediated V(D)J recombinase targeting imposes the use of two Dδ gene segments in human TCR-δ chains. Absence of this RUNX1 binding site in the homologous mouse Dδ1-23RSS provides a molecular explanation for the lack of ordered TCR-δ gene assembly in mice and may underlie differences in early lymphoid differentiation between these species. PMID:25135298

  12. A survey of locus-specific database curation. Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Richard G H; Phillips, Kate; Horaitis, Ourania

    2007-04-01

    It is widely accepted that curation of variation in genes is best performed by experts in those genes and their variation. However, obtaining funding for such variation is difficult even though up-to-date lists of variations in genes are essential for optimum delivery of genetic healthcare and for medical research. This study was undertaken to gather information on gene-specific databases (locus-specific databases) in an effort to understand their functioning, funding and needs. A questionnaire was sent to 125 curators and we received 47 responses. Individuals performed curation of up to 69 genes. The time curators spent curating was extremely variable. This ranged from 0 h per week up to 5 curators spending over 4 h per week. The funding required ranged from US$600 to US$45,000 per year. Most databases were stimulated by the Human Genome Organization-Mutation Database Initiative and used their guidelines. Many databases reported unpublished mutations, with all but one respondent reporting errors in the literature. Of the 13 who reported hit rates, 9 reported over 52,000 hits per year. On the basis of this, five recommendations were made to improve the curation of variation information, particularly that of mutations causing single-gene disorder: 1. A curator for each gene, who is an expert in it, should be identified or nominated. 2. Curation at a minimum of 2 h per week at US$2000 per gene per year should be encouraged. 3. Guidelines and custom software use should be encouraged to facilitate easy setup and curation. 4. Hits per week on the website should be recorded to allow the importance of the site to be illustrated for grant-giving purposes. 5. Published protocols should be followed in the establishment of locus-specific databases.

  13. A large section of the gene locus encoding human immunoglobulin variable regions of the kappa type is duplicated.

    PubMed

    Pech, M; Smola, H; Pohlenz, H D; Straubinger, B; Gerl, R; Zachau, H G

    1985-06-05

    The structure of a new segment of the gene locus encoding the variable regions of human immunoglobulins of the Kappa type (VK) has been elucidated. This segment (cluster B) encompasses six VK sequences, which belong to three different subgroups and which are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. Part of cluster B was found to be very similar to another region of the VK gene locus, which was cloned previously (cluster A). Sequence differences between the homologous region of clusters A and B range from 0.2% to 3.7% depending on the position of the VK sequences. The divergence is in the same range for genes and pseudogenes. Hybridization experiments with DNAs from different individuals clearly demonstrate that the two segments are located at different positions within the VK locus and do not represent allelic variants. The sequence homology between clusters A and B is higher than the homology of both clusters to an allelic variant, which is represented by a DNA segment that had been isolated from another individual. These results, together with a report in the literature of two other homologous regions in the VK locus, make it very likely that a major part of even the whole locus is duplicated. In this case, VK gene numbers would be higher than previously estimated on the basis of hybridization studies. An inverse orientation of VK gene clusters would explain published data on rearrangement products in B-cells if an inversion-deletion mechanism is assumed.

  14. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; McKee, Lauren S.; Tauzin, Alexandra S.; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Creagh, A. Louise; Haynes, Charles A.; Kelly, Amelia G.; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J.; Martens, Eric C.; Brumer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed “dietary fibre,” from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables.1 Due to a paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome,2 our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut.3,4 The xyloglucans (XyGs), in particular, are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides5,6 whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition was heretofore unknown.1,7,8 Here, we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers xyloglucan catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of xyloglucan catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.9–12 PMID:24463512

  15. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E; Hemsworth, Glyn R; McKee, Lauren S; Tauzin, Alexandra S; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kelly, Amelia G; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J; Martens, Eric C; Brumer, Harry

    2014-02-27

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed 'dietary fibre', from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables. Owing to the paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome, our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on the saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut. The xyloglucans (XyGs) are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition have been unclear. Here we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers XyG catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous XyG utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of XyG catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.

  16. Human Obesity Associated with an Intronic SNP in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Locus.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zongyang; Hyde, Thomas M; Lipska, Barbara K; Martinowich, Keri; Wei, Peter; Ong, Chiew-Jen; Hunter, Lindsay A; Palaguachi, Gladys I; Morgun, Eva; Teng, Rujia; Lai, Chen; Condarco, Tania A; Demidowich, Andrew P; Krause, Amanda J; Marshall, Leslie J; Haack, Karin; Voruganti, V Saroja; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Nalls, Michael A; Zonderman, Alan B; Singleton, Andrew B; Evans, Michele K; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Tsao, Jack W; Kleinman, Joel E; Yanovski, Jack A; Han, Joan C

    2015-11-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 BDNF SNPs. We observed that the minor C allele of rs12291063 is associated with lower human ventromedial hypothalamic BDNF expression (p < 0.001) and greater adiposity in both adult and pediatric cohorts (p values < 0.05). We further demonstrated that the major T allele for rs12291063 possesses a binding capacity for the transcriptional regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0B, knockdown of which disrupts transactivation by the T allele. Binding and transactivation functions are both disrupted by substituting C for T. These findings provide a rationale for BDNF augmentation as a targeted treatment for obesity in individuals who have the rs12291063 CC genotype. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA methylation-histone modification relationships across the desmin locus in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Lindahl Allen, Marianne; Koch, Christoph M; Clelland, Gayle K; Dunham, Ian; Antoniou, Michael

    2009-05-27

    We present here an extensive epigenetic analysis of a 500 kb region, which encompasses the human desmin gene (DES) and its 5' locus control region (LCR), the only muscle-specific transcriptional regulatory element of this type described to date. These data complement and extend Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) studies on region ENr133. We analysed histone modifications and underlying DNA methylation patterns in physiologically relevant DES expressing (myoblast/myotube) and non-expressing (peripheral blood mononuclear) primary human cells. We found that in expressing myoblast/myotube but not peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures, histone H4 acetylation displays a broadly distributed enrichment across a gene rich 200 kb region whereas H3 acetylation localizes at the transcriptional start site (TSS) of genes. We show that the DES LCR and TSS of DES are enriched with hyperacetylated domains of acetylated histone H3, with H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methylation (H3K4me2 and me3) exhibiting a different distribution pattern across this locus. The CpG island that extends into the first intron of DES is methylation-free regardless of the gene's expression status and in non-expressing PBMCs is marked with histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27me3). Overall, our results constitute the first study correlating patterns of histone modifications and underlying DNA methylation of a muscle-specific LCR and its associated downstream gene region whilst additionally placing this within a much broader genomic context. Our results clearly show that there are distinct patterns of histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation at the DES LCR, promoter and intragenic region. In addition, the presence of H3K27me3 at the DES methylation-free CpG only in non-expressing PBMCs may serve to silence this gene in non-muscle tissues. Generally, our work demonstrates the importance of using multiple, physiologically relevant tissue types that represent different expressing

  18. MicroRNAs at the human 14q32 locus have prognostic significance in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deregulation of microRNA (miRNA) transcript levels has been observed in many types of tumors including osteosarcoma. Molecular pathways regulated by differentially expressed miRNAs may contribute to the heterogeneous tumor behaviors observed in naturally occurring cancers. Thus, tumor-associated miRNA expression may provide informative biomarkers for disease outcome and metastatic potential in osteosarcoma patients. We showed previously that clusters of miRNAs at the 14q32 locus are downregulated in human osteosarcoma. Methods Human and canine osteosarcoma patient’s samples with clinical follow-up data were used in this study. We used bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to identify miRNA based prognostic biomarkers in osteosarcoma. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Whitney Mann U tests were conducted for validating the statistical significance. Results Here we show that an inverse correlation exists between aggressive tumor behavior (increased metastatic potential and accelerated time to death) and the residual expression of 14q32 miRNAs (using miR-382 as a representative of 14q32 miRNAs) in a series of clinically annotated samples from human osteosarcoma patients. We also show a comparable decrease in expression of orthologous 14q32 miRNAs in canine osteosarcoma samples, with conservation of the inverse correlation between aggressive behavior and expression of orthologous miRNA miR-134 and miR-544. Conclusions We conclude that downregulation of 14q32 miRNA expression is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that contributes to the biological behavior of osteosarcoma, and that quantification of representative transcripts from this family, such as miR-382, miR-134, and miR-544, provide prognostic and predictive markers that can assist in the management of patients with this disease. PMID:23311495

  19. Gene discovery at the human T-cell receptor alpha/delta locus.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Marsha R; Wu, Gillian E

    2007-02-01

    The human T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha/delta variable loci are interspersed on the chromosome 14q11 and consist of 57 intergenic spaces ranging from 4 to 100 kb in length. To elucidate the evolutionary history of this locus, we searched the intergenic spaces of all TCR alpha/delta variable (TRAV/DV) genes for pseudogenes and potential protein-coding genes. We applied direct open reading frame (ORF) searches, an exon-finding algorithm and comparative genomics. Two TRAV/DV pseudogenes were discovered bearing 80 and 65% sequence similarity to TRAV14DV4 and TRAV9-1/9-2 genes, respectively. A gene bearing 85% sequence identity to B lymphocyte activation-related protein, BC-1514, upstream of TRAV26-2 was also discovered. This ORF (BC-1514tcra) is a member of a gene family whose evolutionary history and function are not known. In total, 36 analogs of this gene exist in the human, the chimpanzee, the Rhesus monkey, the frog and the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analyses show convergent evolution of these genes. Assays for the expression of BC-1514tcra revealed transcripts in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and small intestine. These assays also showed the expression of another analog to BC-1514, found on chromosome 5 in the bone marrow and thymus RNA. The existence of at least 17 analogs at various locations in the human genome and in nonsyntenic chromosomes of the chimpanzee suggest that BC-1514tcra, along with its analogs may be transposable elements with evolved function(s). The identification of conserved putative serine phosphorylation sites provide evidence of their possible role(s) in signal transduction events involved in B cell development and differentiation.

  20. Second locus involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, L; Croteau, G; Thibeault, D; Poulin, F; Pilote, L; Lamarre, D

    1996-01-01

    Protease inhibitors are potent antiviral agents against human immunodeficiency virus type 1. As with reverse transcriptase inhibitors, however, resistance to protease inhibitors can develop and is attributed to the appearance of mutations in the protease gene. With the substrate analog protease inhibitors BILA 1906 BS and BILA 2185 BS, 350- to 1,500-fold-resistant variants have been selected in vitro and were found not only to contain mutations in the protease gene but also to contain mutations in Gag precursor p1/p6 and/or NC (p7)/p1 cleavage sites. Mutations in cleavage sites give rise to better peptide substrates for the protease in vitro and to improved processing of p15 precursors in drug-resistant clones. Importantly, removal of cleavage site mutations in resistant clones leads to a decrease or even an absence of viral growth, confirming their role in viral fitness. Therefore, these second-locus mutations indicate that cleavage of p15 is a rate-limiting step in polyprotein processing in highly resistant viruses. The functional constraint of p15 processing also suggests that additional selective pressure could further compromise viral fitness and maintain the benefits of antiviral therapies. PMID:8648711

  1. The human VK locus. Characterization of a duplicated region encoding 28 different immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Huber, E; Lorenz, W; Osterholzer, E; Pargent, W; Pech, M; Pohlenz, H D; Zimmer, F J; Zachau, H G

    1988-01-05

    Two large regions of the human multigene family coding for the variable parts of the immunoglobulin light chains of the K type (VK) have been characterized on cosmid clones. The two germline regions, called Aa and Ab, span together 250,000 base-pairs and comprise 28 different VK gene segments, nine of which have been sequenced. There is a preponderance of VKII genes but genes belonging to subgroups I and III, and genes that cannot be easily assigned to one of the known subgroups, are interspersed within the VKII gene clusters. A number of pseudogenes have been identified. Within the Aa and Ab regions, all gene segments are organized in the same transcriptional orientation. The regions Aa and Ab, whose restriction maps are highly homologous, were shown not to be allelic structures; they must have arisen by a duplication event. Taken together with previous results, one can conclude that the major part of the VK locus exists in duplicated form. One individual has been found who has only one copy of some of the duplicated regions. By chromosomal walking, the A regions could be linked to the O regions, an analysis of which has been reported. The A regions contribute about one-third of the VK genes so far identified.

  2. An Endothelial Cell-Specific Requirement for the UL133-UL138 Locus of Human Cytomegalovirus for Efficient Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bughio, Farah; Elliott, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects a variety of cell types in humans, resulting in a varied pathogenesis in the immunocompromised host. Endothelial cells (ECs) are considered an important target of HCMV infection that may contribute to viral pathogenesis. Although the viral determinants important for entry into ECs are well defined, the molecular determinants regulating postentry tropism in ECs are not known. We previously identified the UL133-UL138 locus encoded within the clinical strain-specific ULb′ region of the HCMV genome as important for the latent infection in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Interestingly, this locus, while dispensable for replication in fibroblasts, was required for efficient replication in ECs infected with the TB40E or fusion-inducing factor X (FIX) HCMV strains. ECs infected with a virus lacking the entire locus (UL133-UL138NULL virus) complete the immediate-early and early phases of infection but are defective for infectious progeny virus production. ECs infected with UL133-UL138NULL virus exhibited striking differences in the organization of intracellular membranes and in the assembly of mature virions relative to ECs infected with wild-type (WT) virus. In UL133-UL138NULL virus-infected ECs, Golgi stacks were disrupted, and the viral assembly compartment characteristic of HCMV infection failed to form. Further, progeny virions in UL133-UL138NULL virus-infected ECs inefficiently acquired the virion tegument and secondary envelope. These defects were specific to infection in ECs and not observed in fibroblasts infected with UL133-UL138NULL virus, suggesting an EC-specific requirement for the UL133-UL138 locus for late stages of replication. To our knowledge, the UL133-UL138 locus represents the first cell-type-dependent, postentry tropism determinant required for viral maturation. PMID:23283945

  3. A gene for the mouse pink-eyed dilution locus and for human type II oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Bultman, S J; Horsthemke, B; Lee, S T; Strunk, K M; Spritz, R A; Avidano, K M; Jong, M T; Nicholls, R D

    1993-01-07

    The mouse pink-eyed dilution (p) locus on chromosome 7 is associated with defects of skin, eye and coat pigmentation. Mutations at p cause a reduction of eumelanin (black-brown) pigment and altered morphology of black pigment granules (eumelanosomes), but have little effect on pheomelanin (yellow-red) pigment. We show here that the human complementary DNA DN10, linked to the p locus in mice, identifies the human homologue (P) of the mouse p gene, and appears to encode an integral membrane transporter protein. The expression pattern of this gene in various p mutant mice correlates with the pigmentation phenotype; moreover, an abnormally sized messenger RNA is detected in one mutant, p(un), which reverts to the normal size in p(un) revertants. The human P gene corresponds to the D15S12 locus within the chromosome segment 15q11-q13, which is typically deleted in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome (see ref. 5 for review). These disorders are phenotypically distinct, depending on the parent of origin of the deleted chromosome, but both syndromes are often associated with hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eyes (see ref. 8 for review), and deletion of the P gene may be responsible for this hypopigmentation. In addition, we report a mutation in both copies of the human P gene in one case of tyrosinase-positive (type II) oculocutaneous albinism, recently linked to 15q11-q13 (ref. 9).

  4. Signatures of natural selection at the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) locus in human populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuanshi; Weidle, Kerstin; Schröck, Kristin; Tönjes, Anke; Schleinitz, Dorit; Breitfeld, Jana; Stumvoll, Michael; Böttcher, Yvonne; Schöneberg, Torsten; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the first intron of FTO have been robustly replicated for associations with obesity. In the Sorbs, a Slavic population resident in Germany, the strongest effect on body mass index (BMI) was found for a variant in the third intron of FTO (rs17818902). Since this may indicate population specific effects of FTO variants, we initiated studies testing FTO for signatures of selection in vertebrate species and human populations. First, we analyzed the coding region of 35 vertebrate FTO orthologs with Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML, ω = dN/dS) to screen for signatures of selection among species. Second, we investigated human population (Europeans/CEU, Yoruba/YRI, Chinese/CHB, Japanese/JPT, Sorbs) SNP data for footprints of selection using DnaSP version 4.5 and the Haplotter/PhaseII. Finally, using ConSite we compared transcription factor (TF) binding sites at sequences harbouring FTO SNPs in intron three. PAML analyses revealed strong conservation in coding region of FTO (ω<1). Sliding-window results from population genetic analyses provided highly significant (p<0.001) signatures for balancing selection specifically in the third intron (e.g. Tajima's D in Sorbs = 2.77). We observed several alterations in TF binding sites, e.g. TCF3 binding site introduced by the rs17818902 minor allele. Population genetic analysis revealed signatures of balancing selection at the FTO locus with a prominent signal in intron three, a genomic region with strong association with BMI in the Sorbs. Our data support the hypothesis that genes associated with obesity may have been under evolutionary selective pressure.

  5. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E.; Pope, Emily A.; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  6. Antimicrobial Decapeptide KSL-W Attenuates Candida albicans Virulence by Modulating Its Effects on Toll-Like Receptor, Human Beta-Defensin, and Cytokine Expression by Engineered human Oral Mucosa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-02

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and... reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including...have generated greater interest toward developing new antifungal drugs using various synthetic and naturally occurring antimicrobial molecules

  7. ASAR15, A cis-Acting Locus that Controls Chromosome-Wide Replication Timing and Stability of Human Chromosome 15

    PubMed Central

    Donley, Nathan; Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a “cloud” on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and “inactivation/stability centers”, all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome. PMID:25569254

  8. Identification of the UBP1 Locus as a Critical Blood Pressure Determinant Using a Combination of Mouse and Human Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu; Combe, Roy; Paananen, Jussi; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Smith, Ulf; Hanefeld, Markolf; Williams, Robert W.; Auwerx, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 27 recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897 G/A, located within the UBP1 locus, with systolic and diastolic BP (rs17030583: 1.3±0.4 mmHg p<0.001, 0.8±0.3 mmHg p = 0.006, respectively and rs2291897: 1.5±0.4 mmHg p<0.001, 0.8±0.3 mmHg p = 0.003, respectively) in three separate studies. Our study, which underscores the marked complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest that UBP1 and its functional partners are components of a network controlling blood pressure. PMID:19662162

  9. Development of a polymorphic short tandem repeat locus multiplex system for efficient human identification.

    PubMed

    Rodovalho, R G; Rodrigues, E L; Santos, G S; Cavalcanti, L M; Lima, P R; Rodovalho, A G; Vital, R G; Gigonzac, M A D; da Cruz, A D

    2017-04-05

    This study aimed to develop a short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex system, made up of 22 highly informative STR loci, for application in forensic genetics. The system comprised 21 polymorphic autosomal loci (D3S1358, TH01, D21S11, D18S51, Penta E, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSF1PO, Penta D, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX, FGA, D2S441, D17S1301, D19S433, D18S853, D20S482, and D14S1434) and the amelogenin gene locus. Strategies were developed to overcome the challenges involved in creating a multiplex system. Based on the literature and available databases, the STR loci were selected with the aim to obtain discriminatory markers, and followed specific criteria for this purpose. Primers were projected using the Primer3 software, and AutoDimer was used to evaluate possible interactions between them. The 22 selected STR loci were validated individually and jointly, both to assess their sensitivity and to test the efficiency of the multiplex system. Statistical analyses were based on the genetic data of 450 unrelated individuals living in the State of Goiás, thus allowing the establishment of the parameters necessary to use this system. A total of 239 alleles were detected for the 22 loci in the set, allowing for a probability of identity of 4.23 x 10(-25) to be obtained. The combined power of discrimination was 0.999999999999999999999999 and the combined power of exclusion was 0.99999. Upon complete validation of the entire system, this multiplex assay was considered to be a powerful tool for application in human identification by DNA analysis.

  10. In vivo visualization of the locus coeruleus in humans: quantifying the test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Tona, Klodiana-Daphne; Keuken, Max C; de Rover, Mischa; Lakke, Egbert; Forstmann, Birte U; Nieuwenhuis, Sander; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2017-06-24

    The locus coeruleus (LC) is a brainstem nucleus involved in important cognitive functions. Recent developments in neuroimaging methods and scanning protocols have made it possible to visualize the human LC in vivo by utilizing a T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) scan. Despite its frequent use and its application as a biomarker for tracking the progress of monoaminergic-related neurodegenerative diseases, no study to date has investigated the reproducibility and inter-observer variability of LC identification using this TSE scan sequence. In this paper, we aim to quantify the test-retest reliability of LC imaging by assessing stability of the TSE contrast of the LC across two independent scan sessions and by quantifying the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the TSE scan. Additionally, we created a probabilistic LC atlas which can facilitate the spatial localization of the LC in standardized (MNI) space. Seventeen healthy volunteers participated in two scanning sessions with a mean intersession interval of 2.8 months. We found that for intra-rater reliability the mean Dice coefficient ranged between 0.65 and 0.74, and inter-rater reliability ranged between 0.54 and 0.64, showing moderate reproducibility. The mean LC contrast was 13.9% (SD 3.8) and showed scan-rescan stability (ROI approach: ICC = 0.63; maximum intensity approach: ICC = 0.53). We conclude that localization and segmentation of the LC in vivo are a challenging but reliable enterprise although clinical or longitudinal studies should be carried out carefully.

  11. Mechanisms of anaphylaxis in human low-affinity IgG receptor locus knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Caitlin M; Jönsson, Friederike; Mancardi, David A; Tu, Naxin; Beutier, Héloïse; Van Rooijen, Nico; Macdonald, Lynn E; Murphy, Andrew J; Bruhns, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Anaphylaxis can proceed through distinct IgE- or IgG-dependent pathways, which have been investigated in various mouse models. We developed a novel mouse strain in which the human low-affinity IgG receptor locus, comprising both activating (hFcγRIIA, hFcγRIIIA, and hFcγRIIIB) and inhibitory (hFcγRIIB) hFcγR genes, has been inserted into the equivalent murine locus, corresponding to a locus swap. We sought to determine the capabilities of hFcγRs to induce systemic anaphylaxis and identify the cell types and mediators involved. hFcγR expression on mouse and human cells was compared to validate the model. Passive systemic anaphylaxis was induced by injection of heat-aggregated human intravenous immunoglobulin and active systemic anaphylaxis after immunization and challenge. Anaphylaxis severity was evaluated based on hypothermia and mortality. The contribution of receptors, mediators, or cell types was assessed based on receptor blockade or depletion. The human-to-mouse low-affinity FcγR locus swap engendered hFcγRIIA/IIB/IIIA/IIIB expression in mice comparable with that seen in human subjects. Knock-in mice were susceptible to passive and active anaphylaxis, accompanied by downregulation of both activating and inhibitory hFcγR expression on specific myeloid cells. The contribution of hFcγRIIA was predominant. Depletion of neutrophils protected against hypothermia and mortality. Basophils contributed to a lesser extent. Anaphylaxis was inhibited by platelet-activating factor receptor or histamine receptor 1 blockade. Low-affinity FcγR locus-switched mice represent an unprecedented model of cognate hFcγR expression. Importantly, IgG-related anaphylaxis proceeds within a native context of activating and inhibitory hFcγRs, indicating that, despite robust hFcγRIIB expression, activating signals can dominate to initiate a severe anaphylactic reaction. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Mechanism and consequences of the duplication of the human C4/P450c21/gene X locus

    SciTech Connect

    Gitelman, S.E.; Bristow, J.; Miller, W.L. )

    1992-05-01

    The adjacent C4 and P450c21 genes encode the fourth component of serum complement and steroid 21-hydroxylase respectively, and are tandemly duplicated in the human, murine, and bovine genomes. We recently cloned a cDNA for another duplicated gene, operationally termed X, which overlaps the 3' end of human P450c21 and has the opposite transcriptional orientation. Thus, the organization of the locus is 5'-C4A-21A-XA-C4B-21B-XB-3'. To determine how this locus was duplicated, we sequenced the DNA at the duplication boundaries and the 7 kb between P450c21A and C4B comprising the XA locus. The sequences located the duplication boundaries precisely and indicate that the duplication occurred by nonhomologous recombination. The boundaries are substantially different from those of the corresponding duplication in the mouse genome, suggesting that similar gene duplications may have occurred independently in ancestors of rodents and primates after mammalian speciation. Compared with XB, the XA gene is truncated at its 5' end and bears a 121-bp intragenic deletion causing a frameshift and premature translational stop signal. Nevertheless, XA is transcribed into a stable 2.6-kb polyadenylated RNA that is expressed uniquely in the adrenal gland. 61 refs., 8 figs.

  13. The GNAS complex locus and human diseases associated with loss-of-function mutations or epimutations within this imprinted gene

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Serap; Bastepe, Murat

    2013-01-01

    GNAS is a complex imprinted locus leading to several different gene products that show exclusive monoallelic expression. GNAS also encodes the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα), a ubiquitously expressed signaling protein that is essential for the actions of many hormones and other endogenous molecules. Gsα is expressed biallelically in most tissues but its expression is silenced from the paternal allele in a small number of tissues. The tissue-specific paternal silencing of Gsα results in different parent-of-origin specific phenotypes in patients who carry inactivating GNAS mutations. In this paper, we review the GNAS complex locus and discuss how disruption of Gsα expression and the expression of other GNAS products shape the phenotypes of human disorders caused by mutations in this gene. PMID:24107509

  14. Identification of the genomic locus for the human Rieske Fe-S Protein gene on Chromosome 19q12

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, L.A.

    1994-05-06

    We have identified the chromosomal location of the human Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein (UQCRFS1) gene. Mapping by hybridization to a panel of monochromosomal hybrid cell lines indicated that the gene was either on chromosome 19 or 22. By screening a human chromosome 19 specific genomic cosmid library with an oligonucleotide probe made from the published Rieske cDNA sequence, we identified a corresponding cosmid. Portions of this cosmid were sequenced directly. The exon, exon:intron junction, and flanking sequences verified that this cosmid contains the genomic locus. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to localize this cosmid to chromosome band 19q12.

  15. Development of Transgenic Mice Containing an Introduced Stop Codon on the Human Methylmalonyl-CoA Mutase Locus

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Nicole E.; Dashnow, Harriet; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Peters, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The mutation R403stop was found in an individual with mut0 methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) which resulted from a single base change of C→T in exon 6 of the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene (producing a TGA stop codon). In order to accurately model the human MMA disorder we introduced this mutation onto the human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase locus of a bacterial artificial chromosome. A mouse model was developed using this construct. The transgene was found to be intact in the mouse model, with 7 copies integrated at a single site in chromosome 3. The phenotype of the hemizygous mouse was unchanged until crossed against a methylmalonyl-CoA mutase knockout mouse. Pups with no endogenous mouse methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and one copy of the transgene became ill and died within 24 hours. This severe phenotype could be partially rescued by the addition of a transgene carrying two copies of the normal human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase locus. The “humanized” mice were smaller than control litter mates and had high levels of methylmalonic acid in their blood and tissues. This new transgenic MMA stop codon model mimics (at both the phenotypic and genotypic levels) the key features of the human MMA disorder. It will allow the trialing of pharmacological and, cell and gene therapies for the treatment of MMA and other human metabolic disorders caused by stop codon mutations. PMID:23024777

  16. Sequence diversity, natural selection and linkage disequilibrium in the human T cell receptor alpha/delta locus.

    PubMed

    Mackelprang, Rachel; Livingston, Robert J; Eberle, Michael A; Carlson, Christopher S; Yi, Qian; Akey, Joshua M; Nickerson, Deborah A

    2006-04-01

    T cell receptors (TR), through their interaction with the major histocompatibility complex, play a central role in immune responsiveness and potentially immune-related disorders. We resequenced all 57 variable (V) genes in the human T cell receptor alpha and delta (TRA/TRD) locus in 40 individuals of Northern European, Mexican, African-American and Chinese descent. Two hundred and eighty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. The distribution of SNPs between V genes was heterogeneous, with an average of five SNPs per gene and a range of zero to 15. We describe the patterns of linkage disequilibrium for these newly discovered SNPs and compare these patterns with other emerging large-scale datasets (e.g. Perlegen and HapMap projects) to place our findings into a framework for future analysis of genotype-phenotype associations across this locus. Furthermore, we explore signatures of natural selection across V genes. We find evidence of strong directional selection at this locus as evidenced by unusually high values of Fst.

  17. Biosynthesis and intracellular movement of the melanosomal membrane glycoprotein gp75, the human b (brown) locus product

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayasaradhi, S.; Doskoch, P.M.; Houghton, A.N. Cornell Univ., New York, NY )

    1991-10-01

    A 75-kDa melanosomal glycoprotein (gp75) is the product of a gene that maps to the b (brown) locus, a genetic locus that determines coat color in the mouse. The b locus is conserved (88% identity) between mouse and human. The mouse monoclonal antibody TA99 was used to study the biosynthesis and processing of gp75. gp75 was synthesized as a 55-kDa polypeptide, glycosylated by addition and processing of five or more Asn-linked carbohydrate chains through the cis and trans Golgi, and transported to melanosomes as a mature 75-kDa form. Synthesis and processing of gp75 was rapid (T{sub 1/2} < 30 min), and early steps in processing were required for efficient export of gp75 was quite stable in the melanosome. Studies with inhibitors of steps in oligosaccharide processing showed that alternative forms of gp75 were generated during trimming reactions by mannosidase IA/IB and that further maturation resulted in the two mature forms of gp75. The authors purpose that the kinetics of biosynthesis and processing reflect events in the biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes.

  18. Integrative genomics identifies 7p11.2 as a novel locus for fever and clinical stress response in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jane F.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Qu, Liming; Xue, Chenyi; Liu, Yichuan; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L.; Rushefski, Melanie; Paschos, Georgios K.; Tang, Soonyew; Schadt, Eric E.; Li, Mingyao; Christie, Jason D.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2015-01-01

    Fever predicts clinical outcomes in sepsis, trauma and during cardiovascular stress, yet the genetic determinants are poorly understood. We used an integrative genomics approach to identify novel genomic determinants of the febrile response to experimental endotoxemia. We highlight multiple integrated lines of evidence establishing the clinical relevance of this novel fever locus. Through genome-wide association study (GWAS) of evoked endotoxemia (lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 1 ng/kg IV) in healthy subjects of European ancestry we discovered a locus on chr7p11.2 significantly associated with the peak febrile response to LPS (top single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7805622, P = 2.4 × 10−12), as well as with temperature fluctuation over time. We replicated this association in a smaller independent LPS study (rs7805622, P = 0.03). In clinical translation, this locus was also associated with temperature and mortality in critically ill patients with trauma or severe sepsis. The top GWAS SNPs are not located within protein-coding genes, but have significant cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) associations with expression of a cluster of genes ∼400 kb upstream, several of which (SUMF2, CCT6A, GBAS) are regulated by LPS in vivo in blood cells. LPS- and cold-treatment of adipose stromal cells in vitro suggest genotype-specific modulation of eQTL candidate genes (PSPH). Several eQTL genes were up-regulated in brown and white adipose following cold exposure in mice, highlighting a potential role in thermogenesis. Thus, through genomic interrogation of experimental endotoxemia, we identified and replicated a novel fever locus on chr7p11.2 that modulates clinical responses in trauma and sepsis, and highlight integrated in vivo and in vitro evidence for possible novel cis candidate genes conserved across human and mouse. PMID:25416278

  19. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  20. Genetic variation at the delta-sarcoglycan (SGCD) locus elevates heritable sympathetic nerve activity in human twin pairs.

    PubMed

    Hightower, C Makena; Zhang, Kuixing; Miramontes-González, José P; Rao, Fangwen; Wei, Zhiyun; Schork, Andrew J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Biswas, Nilima; Mahata, Manjula; Elkelis, Nina; Taupenot, Laurent; Stridsberg, Mats; Ziegler, Michael G; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2013-12-01

    The Syrian Cardiomyopathic Hamster (BIO-14.6/53.58 strains) model of cardiac failure, resulting from naturally occurring deletion at the SGCD (delta-sarcoglycan) locus, displays widespread disturbances in catecholamine metabolism. Rare Mendelian myopathy disorders of human SGCD occur, although common naturally occurring SGCD genetic variation has not been evaluated for effects on human norepinephrine (NE) secretion. This study investigated the effect of SGCD genetic variation on control of NE secretion in healthy twin pairs. Genetic associations profiled SNPs across the SGCD locus. Trait heritability (h(2)) and genetic covariance (pleiotropy; shared h(2)) were evaluated. Sympathochromaffin exocytosis in vivo was probed in plasma by both catecholamines and Chromogranin B (CHGB). Plasma NE is substantially heritable (p = 3.19E-16, at 65.2 ± 5.0% of trait variance), sharing significant (p < 0.05) genetic determination with circulating and urinary catecholamines, CHGB, eGFR, and several cardio-metabolic traits. Participants with higher pNE showed significant (p < 0.05) differences in several traits, including increased BP and hypertension risk factors. Peak SGCD variant rs1835919 predicted elevated systemic vascular compliance, without changes in specifically myocardial traits. We used a chimeric-regulated secretory pathway photoprotein (CHGA-EAP) to evaluate the effect of SGCD on the exocytotic pathway in transfected PC12 cells; in transfected cells, expression of SGCD augmented CHGA trafficking into the exocytotic regulated secretory pathway. Thus, our investigation determined human NE secretion to be a highly heritable trait, influenced by common genetic variation within the SGCD locus. Circulating NE aggregates with BP and hypertension risk factors. In addition, coordinate NE and CHGB elevation by rs1835919 implicates exocytosis as the mechanism of release.

  1. Genetic variation at the delta-sarcoglycan (SGCD) locus elevates heritable sympathetic nerve activity in human twin pairs

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, C. Makena; Zhang, Kuixing; Miramontes-González, José Pablo; Rao, Fangwen; Wei, Zhiyun; Schork, Andrew J.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Biswas, Nilima; Mahata, Manjula; Elkelis, Nina; Taupenot, Laurent; Stridsberg, Mats; Ziegler, Michael G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    The Syrian Cardiomyopathic Hamster (BIO-14.6/53.58 strains) model of cardiac failure, resulting from naturally occurring deletion at the SGCD (delta-sarcoglycan) locus, displays widespread disturbances in catecholamine metabolism. Rare Mendelian myopathy disorders of human SGCD occur, though common naturally occurring SGCD genetic variation has not been evaluated for effects on human norepinephrine (NE) secretion. This study investigated the effect of SGCD genetic variation on control of NE secretion in healthy twin pairs. Genetic associations profiled SNPs across the SGCD locus. Trait heritability (h2) and genetic covariance (pleiotropy; shared h2) were evaluated. Sympathochromaffin exocytosis in vivo was probed in plasma by both catecholamines and CHGB. Plasma NE is substantially heritable (P=3.19E-16, at 65.2±5.0% of trait variance), sharing significant (P<0.05) genetic determination with circulating and urinary catecholamines, CHGB, eGFR and several cardio-metabolic traits. Participants with higher pNE showed significant (P<0.05) differences in several traits, including increased BP and hypertension risk factors. Peak SGCD variant rs1835919 predicted elevated systemic vascular compliance, without changes in specifically myocardial traits. We used a chimeric regulated secretory pathway photoprotein (CHGA-EAP) to evaluate the effect of SGCD on the exocytotic pathway in transfected PC12 cells; in transfected cells, expression of SGCD augmented CHGA trafficking into the exocytotic regulated secretory pathway. Thus our investigation determined human NE secretion to be a highly heritable trait, influenced by common genetic variation within the SGCD locus. Circulating NE aggregates with BP and hypertension risk factors. Additionally, coordinate NE and CHGB elevation by rs1835919 implicates exocytosis as the mechanism of release. PMID:23786442

  2. Causes and Consequences of Multi-Locus Imprinting Disturbances in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Riccio, Andrea; Eggermann, Thomas; Maher, Eamonn R; Lapunzina, Pablo; Mackay, Deborah; Monk, David

    2016-07-01

    Eight syndromes are associated with the loss of methylation at specific imprinted loci. There has been increasing evidence that these methylation defects in patients are not isolated events occurring at a given disease-associated locus but that some of these patients may have multi-locus imprinting disturbances (MLID) affecting additional imprinted regions. With the recent advances in technology, methylation profiling has revealed that imprinted loci represent only a small fraction of the methylation differences observed between the gametes. To figure out how imprinting anomalies occur at multiple imprinted domains, we have to understand the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modifications in the process of selective imprint protection during pre-implantation reprogramming, which, if disrupted, leads to these complex imprinting disorders (IDs).

  3. Human Fc. gamma. RIII: Cloning, expression, and identification of the chromosomal locus of two Fc receptors for IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Peltz, G.A.; Moore, K.W. ); Grundy, H.O.; Lebo, R.V.; Barsh, G.S. ); Yssel, H. )

    1989-02-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human receptor for the Fc portion of IgG Fc{gamma}RIII or CD16, was isolated from a human leukocyte library by a transient expression-immunoselection procedure. This cDNA (pGP5) encodes a 46-kDa phosphatidylinositol-linked cell surface protein with CD16 determinants and affinity for human IgG. The deduced protein sequence is most homologous to the murine receptor Fc{gamma}RII{alpha}, with slightly less homology to the human receptors Fc{gamma}RII and Fc{epsilon}RI. The cDNA hybridizes to a 2.2 kilobase mRNA in human leukocytes and a cloned human natural killer cell line. Fc{gamma}RIII is mapped to chromosome 1 by spot-blot analysis of sorted human chromosomes. Hybridization of Fc{gamma}RII and Fc{gamma}RIII probes to restriction digests of human genomic DNA separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrates physical linkage of the two genes within a maximum distance of 200 kilobases. The results identify a locus for at least two Fc{gamma}R genes on human chromosome 1.

  4. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  5. Antibacterial properties of the sperm-binding proteins and peptides of human epididymis 2 (HE2) family; salt sensitivity, structural dependence and their interaction with outer and cytoplasmic membranes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yenugu, Suresh; Hamil, Katherine G; Birse, Charles E; Ruben, Steven M; French, Frank S; Hall, Susan H

    2003-01-01

    During passage through the epididymis, sperm interact with secreted epididymal proteins that promote maturation, including the acquisition of motility and fertilization competence. Viewed previously as distinct from sperm maturation, host defence capabilities are now recognized functions of the human epididymis 2 (HE2) family of sperm-binding proteins. We analysed the potent dose and time-dependent bactericidal activity of recombinant HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 and found that the full-length proteins (10 microg/ml or approximately 1 microM) caused more than a 50% decrease in Escherichia coli colony forming units within 15 min. By contrast, human beta-defensin-1, at a similar concentration, required more than 90 min to exhibit similar antibacterial activity. The epididymis-specific lipocalin, LCN6, failed to kill bacteria. Higher concentrations (25-100 microg/ml) of HE2 proteins and a longer duration of treatment resulted in near total inhibition of bacterial growth. The C-terminal peptides of HE2alpha, HEbeta1 and HEbeta2 proteins exhibited antibacterial activity similar to their full-length counterparts, indicating that the antibacterial activity of HE2 proteins resides in these C-terminal regions. Antibacterial activities of HE2 proteins and peptides were slightly inhibited by NaCl concentrations of up to 150 mM, while human beta-defensin-1 activity was nearly eliminated. Reduction and alkylation of disulphide bonds in HE2 proteins and their C-terminal peptides abolished their antibacterial activity. Consistent with the ability to kill bacteria, full-length HE2 proteins and C-terminal peptides caused rapid dose-dependent permeabilization of outer and cytoplasmic E. coli membranes. A much longer exposure time was required for human beta-defensin-1-mediated permeabilization of membranes, suggesting a possible difference in mode of action compared with the HE2 antibacterial peptides. PMID:12628001

  6. Rat Mcs5a is a compound quantitative trait locus with orthologous human loci that associate with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, David J.; Hesselson, Stephanie E.; Aperavich, Beth A.; Zan, Yunhong; Haag, Jill D.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Hampton, John M.; Mau, Bob; Chen, Kai-Shun; Baynes, Caroline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Doug F.; Ponder, Bruce A.; Gould, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is a polygenic trait. To identify breast cancer modifier alleles that have a high population frequency and low penetrance we used a comparative genomics approach. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were initially identified by linkage analysis in a rat mammary carcinogenesis model followed by verification in congenic rats carrying the specific QTL allele under study. The Mcs5a locus was identified by fine-mapping Mcs5 in a congenic model. Here we characterize the Mcs5a locus, which when homozygous for the Wky allele, reduces mammary cancer risk by 50%. The Mcs5a locus is a compound QTL with at least two noncoding interacting elements: Mcs5a1 and Mcs5a2. The resistance phenotype is only observed in rats carrying at least one copy of the Wky allele of each element on the same chromosome. Mcs5a1 is located within the ubiquitin ligase Fbxo10, whereas Mcs5a2 includes the 5′ portion of Frmpd1. Resistant congenic rats show a down-regulation of Fbxo10 in the thymus and an up-regulation of Frmpd1 in the spleen. The association of the Mcs5a1 and Mcs5a2 human orthologs with breast cancer was tested in two population-based breast cancer case-control studies (≈12,000 women). The minor alleles of rs6476643 (MCS5A1) and rs2182317 (MCS5A2) were independently associated with breast cancer risk. The minor allele of rs6476643 increases risk, whereas the rs2182317 minor allele decreases risk. Both alleles have a high population frequency and a low penetrance toward breast cancer risk. PMID:17404222

  7. High Throughput Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) of Staphylococcus aureus from Human, Animal and Food Sources

    PubMed Central

    Sobral, Daniel; Schwarz, Stefan; Bergonier, Dominique; Brisabois, Anne; Feßler, Andrea T.; Gilbert, Florence B.; Kadlec, Kristina; Lebeau, Benoit; Loisy-Hamon, Fabienne; Treilles, Michaël; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs) and –a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398) previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51), representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin. PMID:22567085

  8. LET and ion-species dependence for mutation induction and mutation spectrum on hprt locus in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Suzuki, Masao; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2004-11-01

    We have been studying LET and ion species dependence of RBE in mutation frequency and mutation spectrum of deletion pattern of exons in hprt locus. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with heavy-ion beams, such as carbon- (290 MeV/u and 135 MeV/u), neon- (230 MeV/u and 400 MeV/u), silicon- (490 MeV/u) and iron- (500 MeV/u) ion beams, generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at national Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Mutation induction in hprt locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine resistant colonies and deletion spectrum of exons was analyzed by multiplex PCR. The LET-RBE curves of mutation induction for carbon- and neon-ion beams showed a peak around 75 keV/micrometers and 155 keV/micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, there observed no clear peak for silicon-ion beams. The deletion spectrum of exons was different in induced mutants among different ion species. These results suggested that quantitative and qualitative difference in mutation occurred when using different ion species even if similar LET values.

  9. A two-locus DNA sequence database for typing plant and human pathogens within the Fusarium oxysporum species complex.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Gueidan, Cécile; Sink, Stacy; Johnston, Peter R; Crous, Pedro W; Glenn, Anthony; Riley, Ron; Zitomer, Nicholas C; Colyer, Patrick; Waalwijk, Cees; Lee, Theo van der; Moretti, Antonio; Kang, Seogchan; Kim, Hye-Seon; Geiser, David M; Juba, Jean H; Baayen, Robert P; Cromey, Matthew G; Bithell, Sean; Sutton, Deanna A; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Ploetz, Randy; Corby Kistler, H; Elliott, Monica; Davis, Mike; Sarver, Brice A J

    2009-12-01

    We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC). Of the 850 isolates typed, 101 EF-1alpha, 203 IGS rDNA, and 256 two-locus sequence types (STs) were differentiated. Analysis of the combined dataset suggests that two-thirds of the STs might be associated with a single host plant. This analysis also revealed that the 26 STs associated with human mycoses were genetically diverse, including several which appear to be nosocomial in origin. A congruence analysis, comparing partial EF-1alpha and IGS rDNA bootstrap consensus, identified a significant number of conflicting relationships dispersed throughout the bipartitions, suggesting that some of the IGS rDNA sequences may be non-orthologous. We also evaluated enniatin, fumonisin and moniliformin mycotoxin production in vitro within a phylogenetic framework.

  10. Sequence variation at the human FOXO3 locus: A study of premature ovarian failure and primary amenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Teresa D.; John, George B.; Bradshaw, Karen; Welt, Corrine; Reijo-Pera, Renee; Vogt, Peter H.; Touraine, Philippe; Bione, Silvia; Toniolo, Daniela; Nelson, Lawrence M.; Zinn, Andrew R.; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The forkhead transcription factor Foxo3 is a master regulator and potent suppressor of primordial follicle activation. Loss of Foxo3 function in the mouse leads to premature ovarian failure due to global follicle activation. Here we show that the mouse Foxo3 locus is haploinsufficient, and that Foxo3−/+ females undergo early reproductive senescence consistent with an increased rate of primordial follicle utilization. Then, to determine if heterozygous or homozygous polymorphisms or mutations of the human orthologue FOXO3 contribute to premature ovarian failure (POF) or idiopathic primary amenorrhea (PA), we sequenced the exons and flanking splice sequences of the gene in a large number of women with idiopathic POF (N=273) or PA (N=29). A total of 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, revealing a substantial amount of genetic variation at this locus. Allelic frequencies in control samples excluded several of these variants as causal. For the remaining variants, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to assess their functional impact. These rare sequence variants were not associated with significant decreases in FOXO3 activity. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings suggest that, despite the potential for FOXO3 haploinsufficiency to cause ovarian failure, FOXO3 mutations or common SNPs are not a common cause of either POF or PA. PMID:17959613

  11. Global distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.M.; Kidd, J.R.; Livak, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    The dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is a candidate gene for schizophrenia because the dopaminergic system has been implicated in this neuropsychiatric disorder. Several research groups have reported an association between allelic variants at DRD4 and schizophrenia, while others have been unable to replicate that finding. Knowledge of the appropriate gene frequencies in the underlying populations may resolve these inconsistencies. We have determined the frequencies of 8 different alleles of the 48 bp imperfect tandem repeat of exon 3 at the DRD4 locus in samples from 33 populations around the world. The frequencies vary considerably in the different populations with the most common allele ranging from 16% to 95%. Frequencies and Fst values will be presented for the 3 most common alleles (4-, 7-, and 2- repeat) by continental groupings, but the individual populations vary significantly around the averages. The populations averaged 4.3 alleles (range 2 to 7).

  12. Distal Regions of the Human IFNG Locus Direct Cell Type-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Patrick L.; Chang, Shaojing; Henderson, Melodie; Soutto, Mohammed; Davis, Georgia M.; McLoed, Allyson G.; Townsend, Michael J.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Aune, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes, such as IFNG, which are expressed in multiple cell lineages of the immune system, may employ a common set of regulatory elements to direct transcription in multiple cell types or individual regulatory elements to direct expression in individual cell lineages. By employing a bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic system, we demonstrate that IFNG employs unique regulatory elements to achieve lineage-specific transcriptional control. Specifically, a one 1-kb element 30 kb upstream of IFNG activates transcription in T cells and NKT cells but not in NK cells. This distal regulatory element is a Runx3 binding site in Th1 cells and is needed for RNA polymerase II recruitment to IFNG, but it is not absolutely required for histone acetylation of the IFNG locus. These results support a model whereby IFNG utilizes cis-regulatory elements with cell type-restricted function. PMID:20574006

  13. Two polymorphic TaqI sites at the human NGFR locus (17q12 yields 17q22)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.C.; Fain, P.R.; Barker, D.F. ); Chao, M.V. )

    1989-01-25

    The cosmid clone C3 contains human NGFR sequences cloned in the JB8 vector. TaqI (TCGA) identifies two site dimorphisms. Constant bands are observed at 6.5 kb, 3.2 kb, 2.3 kb, 2.0 kb, 1.15 kb and 0.85 kb. Combined heterozygosity is 55%. The NGFR locus has been assigned to 17q12->17q22 with somatic cell hybrid analysis and in situ hybridization. The TaqI site polymorphisms show tight linkage to HOX2 and other 17q markers and loose linkage to NFl. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium has been observed for either system. Proper Mendelian segregation has been observed in 45 offspring of parents segregating system A and 31 offspring of parents segregating B alleles.

  14. A Cis-acting locus determines the polymorphic parental imprinting of the human IGF2R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Polychronakos, C.

    1994-09-01

    The murine gene encoding the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF2R) is parentally imprinted in the mouse with exclusive maternal expression, but most humans express both gene copies. We have reported preferential expression of the maternal copy in approximately 17% of normal human pre-term placenta samples and in 50% of the kidneys of Wilms` tumor patients. Thus, IGF2R imprinting appears to be a polymorphic trait that may predispose to cancer. We explored the possibility that imprinting is associated with sequence variations of the imprinted domain itself (cis-acting locus). We studied 9 subjects with imprinted IGF2R expression that were informative for parental origin. These subjects were heterozygous for a transcribed CA repeat at the 3{prime}UTR of the gene, used for the study of the parental origin of mRNA transcripts. The two most common alleles, A162 and A164 (names refer to size in bp), were analyzed. In all cases the preferentially transcribed allele was maternal (p=0.002). In all 8 cases in which A164 was present, it was of paternal origin and was repressed (p=0.008), while A162 was maternal and preferentially expressed in 8/9 cases. Parental origin of A162 and A164 was random in individuals with biallelic expression. PCR amplification of genomic DNA after digestion with the methylation-sensitive enzyme HpaII revealed biallelic methylation at the 3{prime}UTR in both imprinting and non-imprinting individuals, making it unlikely that the imprint-controlling element (ICE) is located there. Polymorphic IGF2R imprinting depends on a cis-acting locus, at linkage disequilibrium with, but probably distinct from, our 3{prime}UTR marker. Biallelic expression in many subjects with a paternal A164 suggests that the frequency of the imprintable ICE is much lower than that of A164. Alternatively, the cis-locus is necessary but not sufficient and input in trans is additionally required for paternal-germline specific IGF2R repression.

  15. The effects of human relations training on reported teacher stress, pupil control ideology and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hall, E; Hall, C; Abaci, R

    1997-12-01

    This study presents the reported outcomes of a two-year, part-time Masters' programme in human relations using an experiential learning methodology based mainly on humanistic psychological theory. The following hypotheses were examined. That as a result of the two-year programme: the experience of reported stress would be reduced; reported attitudes to student classroom control would shift from custodial to humanistic; there would be an increase in reports from participants of a sense of control over their lives; changes of behaviour in work, social settings and at home related to these three variables would be reported. Involved in the study were 42 experienced teachers. These included 32 women and 10 men, with an average age of 35, who worked in a wide range of educational institutions. Their learning style preferences were also considered as independent variables. A control group of 42 was established with similar demographic characteristics. Prior to the course, the experimental group and the control group were given the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Pupil Control Ideology Form. In the early stages of the course, the experimental group completed the Kolb Learning Style Inventory and an informal measure of locus of control which was repeated at the end of the first year of the course. A sample of 32 from the experimental group were given semi-structured interviews relating to changes in their professional and personal lives. The results indicated that, following the training, there was a reduction in reported stress, indications of a more humanistic orientation towards pupil control and an increase in a sense of an internal locus of control. The quantitative data were confirmed by qualitative data generated from semi-structured interviews, which involved substantial reports of applications of the training in their professional and personal lives. These results provide support for including experiential human relations training as part of both the in

  16. Antibody expression from the core region of the human IgH locus reconstructed in transgenic mice using bacteriophage P1 clones

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.D.; Cook, G.P.; Davies, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    Mice carrying transgenic human immunoglobulin gene miniloci can be used for the production of human monoclonal antibodies. The human variable region (V) gene segments in these miniloci undergo productive rearrangement in mouse lymphoid tissue to yield a population of B lymphocytes expressing a repertoire of antibodies. Many of the miniloci studied to date have included only a small number of germline gene segments in an artificially compact configuration. Here we describe the use of the bacteriophage P1 cloning system to create mice carrying the core region of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus. Three P1 clones carrying overlapping regions of the human IgH locus (spanning the five J{sub H}-proximal V{sub H} segments, the entire D{sub H} and J{sub H} clusters, and the C{mu} and C{delta} constant regions) were injected into mouse eggs and appear to have reconstituted the core region of the locus (>180 kb) following homologous recombination with each other. While this translocus yielded a titer of serum immunoglobulin similar to that obtained with a smaller plasmid-basid minilocus, the P1-based locus gave rise to substantially greater diversification by somatic hypermutation. Such diversification is important for obtaining high-affinity antibodies. The results show the usefulness of the P1 system in facilitating the manipulation and recreation of large transgenes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Practical guidelines addressing ethical issues pertaining to the curation of human locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs)

    PubMed Central

    Povey, Sue; Al Aqeel, Aida I; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dalgleish, Raymond; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Greenblatt, Marc S; Barash, Carol Isaacson; Parker, Michael; Patrinos, George P; Savige, Judith; Sobrido, Maria-Jesus; Winship, Ingrid; Cotton, Richard GH

    2010-01-01

    More than 1,000 Web-based locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs) are listed on the Website of the Human Genetic Variation Society (HGVS). These individual efforts, which often relate phenotype to genotype, are a valuable source of information for clinicians, patients, and their families, as well as for basic research. The initiators of the Human Variome Project recently recognized that having access to some of the immense resources of unpublished information already present in diagnostic laboratories would provide critical data to help manage genetic disorders. However, there are significant ethical issues involved in sharing these data worldwide. An international working group presents second-generation guidelines addressing ethical issues relating to the curation of human LSDBs that provide information via a Web-based interface. It is intended that these should help current and future curators and may also inform the future decisions of ethics committees and legislators. These guidelines have been reviewed by the Ethics Committee of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). Hum Mutat 31:–6, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20683926

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-11-29

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome. PMID:27898094

  1. The human protein kinase C gamma gene (PRKCG) as a susceptibility locus for behavioral disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Clegg, Hilary V; Corley, Robin P; Crowley, Thomas J; Hewitt, John K; Hopfer, Christian J; Krauter, Kenneth; Lessem, Jeffrey; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Stallings, Michael C; Wehner, Jeanne M; Young, Susan E; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2007-06-01

    This study explores the association between a highly heritable behavioral disinhibition phenotype and the protein kinase C gamma (PRKCG) gene in an ethnically diverse youth sample from Colorado, USA. The rationale for this study was based on the impulsive behavior and increased ethanol consumption observed in the protein kinase C gamma (PKC-gamma)-deficient mouse model. Two composite behavioral disinhibition phenotypes and their component behavioral scores [conduct disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), substance experimentation (SUB) and novelty-seeking] were examined for association with five independent PRKCG single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Association analysis for the five individual SNPs revealed modest genetic association of Exon 14 (rs2242244) and Upstream (rs307941) markers with the behavioral disinhibition composite variables in the combined, Hispanic and African-American samples. Additionally, haplotype-based association analysis for two SNPs located in Intron 3 (rs402691) and Exon 6 (rs3745406) indicated a significant overall association of the PRKCG locus with the ADHD-hyperactive subscale scores in the combined and Caucasian samples, supporting the relation between impulsive behaviors and the PRKCG gene. A significant haplotype association was also observed with SUB scores but only in the Hispanic ethnic group, highlighting the marker variability for each ethnic group. In conclusion, our results support the role of the PKC-gamma enzyme in behavioral impulsivity previously observed in mice. This study provides the first exploration of the PRKCG gene and its association with behavioral disinhibition and warrants further study in other larger population samples.

  2. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tay, Bee Yong; Ahmad, Norazah; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Thong, Kwai Lin; Koh, Xiu Pei; Mohd Noor, Azura

    2015-06-02

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. It can cause acute febrile illness in human and is a major health problem. Studies in human brucellosis in Malaysia is limited and so far no genotyping studies has been done on Brucella isolates. The aim of the study was to determine the genetic diversity among Brucella species isolated from human brucellosis, obtained over a 6-year period (2009-2014). In this study, the genotypic characteristics of 43 human Brucella melitensis isolates were analysed using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) which consisted of eight minisatellite loci (panel 1) and eight microsatellite loci; panels 2A (3 microsatellite loci) and panel 2B (5 microsatellite loci). Two human Brucella suis isolates were also investigated using the MLVA assay. Using panel 1 (MLVA8), two genotypes namely genotype 43 and 44 were obtained from the 43 B. melitensis isolates. Using the combination of panels 1 and 2A loci (MLVA11), two genotypes were obtained while using the complete panels 1, 2A and 2B, nine genotypes were obtained. The polymorphisms in using the complete panels (MLVA16) were observed in three loci from panel 2B, which showed a diversity index higher than 0.17. All B. melitensis isolates were closely related to the East Mediterranean group. For B. suis isolates, only genotype 6 and genotype 33 were obtained using panel 1 and MLVA11 respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a low genetic diversity among B. melitensis and B. suis isolates from human patients. Based on the MLVA16 assay, B. melitensis belonging to the East Mediterranean group is responsible for the vast majority of Brucella infections in our Malaysian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first genotyping study of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

  3. Identification of the locus for human polymorphic cataract on chromosome 2 near gamma-crystallin gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Rogaev, E.I.; Rogaeva, E.A.; Keryanov, S.

    1994-09-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in human population. While positive linkage data have been obtained for some forms of inherited cataract, no evidence for mutations in any genes have been reported for human inherited cataract existing as an isolated abnormality. Previously, we have described the autosomal dominant polymorphic congenital cataract (PCC) which is characterized by partial opacity located between the fetal nucleus of the lens and the equator. The number, color and form of opacity is varied. We described pedigrees with 73 affected individuals, and used this in a linkage analysis with a set of polymorphic DNA markers randomly placed across the genome as well as with markers selected from some of the candidate genes or from nearby chromosomal regions. We have found evidence for segregation of a cataract locus with DNA markers from 2q36. The causative genetic defect has been mapped to a 20 cM interval which includes a cluster of gamma-crystallin genes. The gamma-crystallin proteins are abundant soluble low molecular weight proteins in the lens. We have used the trinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers from intron 2 of gamma-crystallin B gene and found the segregation of this marker with the disease with no evidence for recombination in the pedigree containing 62 affected individuals. These data suggest that the non-nuclear forms of human cataract may be caused by defects in gamma-crystallin genes.

  4. Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis in Genotyping Yersinia enterocolitica Strains from Human and Porcine Origins

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen-Ninios, R.; Ortiz Martínez, P.; Siitonen, A.; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M.; Korkeala, H.

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic and epidemiologically linked Yersinia enterocolitica strains (n = 379) isolated from fecal samples from human patients, tonsil or fecal samples from pigs collected at slaughterhouses, and pork samples collected at meat stores were genotyped using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) with six loci, i.e., V2A, V4, V5, V6, V7, and V9. In total, 312 different MLVA types were found. Similar types were detected (i) in fecal samples collected from human patients over 2 to 3 consecutive years, (ii) in samples from humans and pigs, and (iii) in samples from pigs that originated from the same farms. Among porcine strains, we found farm-specific MLVA profiles. Variations in the numbers of tandem repeats from one to four for variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci V2A, V5, V6, and V7 were observed within a farm. MLVA was applicable for serotypes O:3, O:5,27, and O:9 and appeared to be a highly discriminating tool for distinguishing sporadic and outbreak-related strains. With long-term use, interpretation of the results became more challenging due to variations in more-discriminating loci, as was observed for strains originating from pig farms. Additionally, we encountered unexpectedly short V2A VNTR fragments and sequenced them. According to the sequencing results, updated guidelines for interpreting V2A VNTR results were prepared. PMID:23637293

  5. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis in genotyping Yersinia enterocolitica strains from human and porcine origins.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S; Laukkanen-Ninios, R; Ortiz Martínez, P; Siitonen, A; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M; Korkeala, H

    2013-07-01

    Sporadic and epidemiologically linked Yersinia enterocolitica strains (n = 379) isolated from fecal samples from human patients, tonsil or fecal samples from pigs collected at slaughterhouses, and pork samples collected at meat stores were genotyped using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) with six loci, i.e., V2A, V4, V5, V6, V7, and V9. In total, 312 different MLVA types were found. Similar types were detected (i) in fecal samples collected from human patients over 2 to 3 consecutive years, (ii) in samples from humans and pigs, and (iii) in samples from pigs that originated from the same farms. Among porcine strains, we found farm-specific MLVA profiles. Variations in the numbers of tandem repeats from one to four for variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci V2A, V5, V6, and V7 were observed within a farm. MLVA was applicable for serotypes O:3, O:5,27, and O:9 and appeared to be a highly discriminating tool for distinguishing sporadic and outbreak-related strains. With long-term use, interpretation of the results became more challenging due to variations in more-discriminating loci, as was observed for strains originating from pig farms. Additionally, we encountered unexpectedly short V2A VNTR fragments and sequenced them. According to the sequencing results, updated guidelines for interpreting V2A VNTR results were prepared.

  6. Human cardiac troponin T: Identification of fetal isoforms and assignment of the TNNT2 locus to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, P.J.; Farza, H.; Yacoub, M.H.; Barton, P.J.R. ); MacGeoch, C.; Spurr, N.K. ); Wade, R. ); Gahlmann, R. )

    1994-05-15

    The troponin complex is located on the thin filament of striated muscle and is composed of three component polypeptides: Troponin T, troponin I, and troponin C. Three troponin T genes have been described on the basis of molecular cloning in humans and other vertebrates. These are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and encode the troponin T isoforms expressed in cardiac muscle, slow skeletal muscle, and fast skeletal muscle, respectively. Each of these genes is subject to alternative splicing, resulting in the production of multiple tissue-specific isoforms. The authors have cloned cDNAs encoding human cardiac troponin T from adult heart and have used these to demonstrate that multiple cardiac troponin T mRNAs are present in the human fetal heart, resulting from alternative splicing in the 5[prime] coding region of the gene. Hybridization of the cloned cDNAs to genomic DNA identifies a single-copy gene, and using somatic cell hybrid analysis, the authors have mapped the corresponding gene locus (designated TNNT2) to the long arm of chromosome 1 (1cen-qter). 52 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Sequential genetic change at the TP53 and chemokine receptor CXCR4 locus during transformation of human ovarian surface epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Kyra M; Kulbe, Hagen; Kwong, Joseph; Chakravarty, Probir; Temple, Jill; Chaplin, Tracy; Flak, Magdalena B; McNeish, Iain A; Deen, Suha; Brenton, James D; Young, Bryan D; Balkwill, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Early genetic events in the development of high-grade serous ovarian cancer, HGSOC, may define the molecular basis of the profound structural and numerical instability of chromosomes in this disease. To discover candidate genetic changes we sequentially passaged cells from a karyotypically normal hTERT immortalised human ovarian surface epithelial line (IOSE25) resulting in the spontaneous formation of colonies in soft agar. Cell lines (TOSE 1 and 4) established from these colonies had an abnormal karyotype and altered morphology but were not tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. TOSE cells showed loss of heterozygosity at TP53, increased nuclear p53 immunoreactivity and altered expression profile of p53 target genes. The parental IOSE25 cells contained a missense, heterozygous R175H mutation in TP53 whereas TOSE cells had loss of heterozygosity at the TP53 locus with a new R273H mutation at the previous wild-type TP53 allele. Cytogenetic and array CGH analysis of TOSE cells also revealed a focal genomic amplification of CXCR4, a chemokine receptor commonly expressed by HGSOC cells. TOSE cells had increased functional CXCR4 protein and its abrogation reduced epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, expression, as well as colony size and number. The CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, was epigenetically silenced in TOSE cells and its forced expression increased TOSE colony size. TOSE cells had other cytogenetic changes typical of those seen in HGSOC ovarian cancer cell lines and biopsies. In addition, enrichment of CXCR4 pathway in expression profiles from HGSOC correlated with enrichment of a mutated TP53 gene expression signature and of EGFR pathway genes. Our data suggest that mutations in TP53 and amplification of the CXCR4 gene locus may be early events in the development of HGSOC, and associated with chromosomal instability. PMID:22266861

  8. Sequential genetic change at the TP53 and chemokine receptor CXCR4 locus during transformation of human ovarian surface epithelium.

    PubMed

    Archibald, K M; Kulbe, H; Kwong, J; Chakravarty, P; Temple, J; Chaplin, T; Flak, M B; McNeish, I A; Deen, S; Brenton, J D; Young, B D; Balkwill, F

    2012-11-29

    Early genetic events in the development of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) may define the molecular basis of the profound structural and numerical instability of chromosomes in this disease. To discover candidate genetic changes we sequentially passaged cells from a karyotypically normal hTERT immortalised human ovarian surface epithelial line (IOSE25) resulting in the spontaneous formation of colonies in soft agar. Cell lines transformed ovarian surface epithelium 1 and 4 (TOSE 1 and 4) established from these colonies had an abnormal karyotype and altered morphology, but were not tumourigenic in immunodeficient mice. TOSE cells showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at TP53, increased nuclear p53 immunoreactivity and altered expression profile of p53 target genes. The parental IOSE25 cells contained a missense, heterozygous R175H mutation in TP53, whereas TOSE cells had LOH at the TP53 locus with a new R273H mutation at the previous wild-type TP53 allele. Cytogenetic and array CGH analysis of TOSE cells also revealed a focal genomic amplification of CXCR4, a chemokine receptor commonly expressed by HGSOC cells. TOSE cells had increased functional CXCR4 protein and its abrogation reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, as well as colony size and number. The CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, was epigenetically silenced in TOSE cells and its forced expression increased TOSE colony size. TOSE cells had other cytogenetic changes typical of those seen in HGSOC ovarian cancer cell lines and biopsies. In addition, enrichment of CXCR4 pathway in expression profiles from HGSOC correlated with enrichment of a mutated TP53 gene expression signature and of EGFR pathway genes. Our data suggest that mutations in TP53 and amplification of the CXCR4 gene locus may be early events in the development of HGSOC, and associated with chromosomal instability.

  9. NF-E2 disrupts chromatin structure at human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive site 2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J A; Emerson, B M

    1996-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is responsible for forming an active chromatin structure extending over the 100-kb locus, allowing expression of the beta-globin gene family. The LCR consists of four erythroid-cell-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS1 to -4). DNase I hypersensitive sites are thought to represent nucleosome-free regions of DNA which are bound by trans-acting factors. Of the four hypersensitive sites only HS2 acts as a transcriptional enhancer. In this study, we examine the binding of an erythroid protein to its site within HS2 in chromatin in vitro. NF-E2 is a transcriptional activator consisting of two subunits, the hematopoietic cell-specific p45 and the ubiquitous DNA-binding subunit, p18. NF-E2 binds two tandem AP1-like sites in HS2 which form the core of its enhancer activity. In this study, we show that when bound to in vitro-reconstituted chromatin, NF-E2 forms a DNase I hypersensitive site at HS2 similar to the site observed in vivo. Moreover, NF-E2 binding in vitro results in a disruption of nucleosome structure which can be detected 200 bp away. Although NF-E2 can disrupt nucleosomes when added to preformed chromatin, the disruption is more pronounced when NF-E2 is added to DNA prior to chromatin assembly. Interestingly, the hematopoietic cell-specific subunit, p45, is necessary for binding to chromatin but not to naked DNA. Interaction of NF-E2 with its site in chromatin-reconstituted HS2 allows a second erythroid factor, GATA-1, to bind its nearby sites. Lastly, nucleosome disruption by NF-E2 is an ATP-dependent process, suggesting the involvement of energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors. PMID:8816476

  10. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, R; Boehm, T; Yssel, H; Spits, H; Rabbitts, T H

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one rearrangement within J delta-C delta and one or more J alpha rearrangements, and finally, cells with rearrangements within J alpha and consequential deletion of the delta locus. Further analysis by cloning of rearrangements within the J alpha locus show that, in addition to V alpha-J alpha joins, J alpha-J alpha aberrant recombinations occur and rearrangement data indicate that such events are frequent. A model is presented to account for such recombinations. Images PMID:2971534

  11. A variable number of tandem repeats locus within the human complement C2 gene is associated with a retroposon derived from a human endogenous retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have previously described multiallelic restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the C2 gene, suggesting the presence of a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) locus. We report here the cloning and sequencing of the polymorphic fragments from the two most common alleles of the gene, a and b. The results confirm the presence of a VNTR locus consisting of a nucleotide sequence, 41 bp in average length, repeated tandemly 23 and 17 times in alleles a and b, respectively. The difference in the number of repeats between the two alleles is due to the deletion/insertion of two noncontiguous segments, 143 and 118 bp long, of allele a, and of a 40-bp segment of allele b. The VNTR region is associated with a SINE (short interspersed sequence)- type retroposon, SINE-R.C2, located within the third intron of the C2 gene. SINE-R.C2 is a member of a previously described large retroposon family of the human genome, apparently derived from the human endogenous retrovirus, (HERV) K10, which is homologous to the mouse mammary tumor virus. PMID:1350302

  12. The IGF2 Locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) mediates intracellular signalling in human keratinocytes in response to Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Adone; Orlando, Manuela; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Farro, Pietro; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Buommino, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are crucial players in the innate immune response to microbial invaders. The lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur has been implicated in the triggering of scalp lesions in psoriasis. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of TLRs in the defence against M. furfur infection. The expression of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) gene, which is involved in the signalling pathway of many TLRs, was also analysed. In addition, a possible correlation of antimicrobial peptides of the beta-defensin family to TLRs was tested. Human keratinocytes infected with M. furfur and a variety of M. furfur-positive psoriatic skin biopsies were analysed by RT-PCR, for TLRs, MyD88, human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2), HBD-3 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. When keratinocytes were infected with M. furfur, an up-regulation for TLR2, MyD88, HBD-2, HBD-3 and IL-8 mRNA was demonstrated, compared to the untreated cells. The same results were obtained when psoriatic skin biopsies were analysed. The M. furfur-induced increase in HBD-2 and IL-8 gene expression is inhibited by anti-TLR2 neutralising antibodies, suggesting that TLR2 is involved in the M. furfur-induced expression of these molecules. These findings suggest the importance of TLRs in skin protection against fungi and the importance of keratinocytes as a component of innate immunity.

  14. The 4q subtelomere harboring the FSHD locus is specifically anchored with peripheral heterochromatin unlike most human telomeres.

    PubMed

    Tam, Rose; Smith, Kelly P; Lawrence, Jeanne B

    2004-10-25

    This paper investigates the nuclear localization of human telomeres and, specifically, the 4q35 subtelomere mutated in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FSHD is a common muscular dystrophy that has been linked to contraction of D4Z4 tandem repeats, widely postulated to affect distant gene expression. Most human telomeres, such as 17q and 17p, avoid the nuclear periphery to reside within the internal, euchromatic compartment. In contrast, 4q35 localizes at the peripheral heterochromatin with 4p more internal, generating a reproducible chromosome orientation that we relate to gene expression profiles. Studies of hybrid and translocation cell lines indicate this localization is inherent to the distal tip of 4q. Investigation of heterozygous FSHD myoblasts demonstrated no significant displacement of the mutant allele from the nuclear periphery. However, consistent association of the pathogenic D4Z4 locus with the heterochromatic compartment supports a potential role in regulating the heterochromatic state and makes a telomere positioning effect more likely. Furthermore, D4Z4 repeats on other chromosomes also frequently organize with the heterochromatic compartment at the nuclear or nucleolar periphery, demonstrating a commonality among chromosomes harboring this subtelomere repeat family.

  15. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Ge, Hengtao; Hu, Linyong; Li, Qian; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG). Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA) genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:27258157

  16. Multi-Locus Sequence Analysis Reveals Profound Genetic Diversity among Isolates of the Human Pathogen Bartonella bacilliformis

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Gemma L.; Palmira Ventosilla; Birtles, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella bacilliformis is the aetiological agent of human bartonellosis, a potentially life threatening infection of significant public health concern in the Andean region of South America. Human bartonellosis has long been recognised in the region but a recent upsurge in the number of cases of the disease and an apparent expansion of its geographical distribution have re-emphasized its contemporary medical importance. Here, we describe the development of a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for B. bacilliformis and its application to an archive of 43 isolates collected from patients across Peru. MLST identified eight sequence types among these isolates and the delineation of these was generally congruent with those of the previously described typing scheme. Phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequence data derived from MLST loci revealed that seven of the eight sequence types were closely related to one another; however, one sequence type, ST8, exhibited profound evolutionary divergence from the others. The extent of this divergence was akin to that observed between other members of the Bartonella genus, suggesting that ST8 strains may be better considered as members of a novel Bartonella genospecies. PMID:21811647

  17. A genome-wide scan for human obesity genes reveals a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Hager, J; Dina, C; Francke, S; Dubois, S; Houari, M; Vatin, V; Vaillant, E; Lorentz, N; Basdevant, A; Clement, K; Guy-Grand, B; Froguel, P

    1998-11-01

    Obesity, a common multifactorial disorder, is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD). According to the definition of the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 6-10% of the population in Westernized countries are considered obese. Epidemiological studies have shown that 30-70% of the variation in body weight may be attributable to genetic factors. To date, two genome-wide scans using different obesity-related quantitative traits have provided candidate regions for obesity. We have undertaken a genome-wide scan in affected sibpairs to identify chromosomal regions linked to obesity in a collection of French families. Model-free multipoint linkage analyses revealed evidence for linkage to a region on chromosome 10p (MLS=4.85). Two further loci on chromosomes 5cen-q and 2p showed suggestive evidence for linkage of serum leptin levels in a genome-wide context. The peak on chromosome 2 coincided with the region containing the gene (POMC) encoding pro-opiomelanocortin, a locus previously linked to leptin levels and fat mass in a Mexican-American population and shown to be mutated in obese humans. Our results suggest that there is a major gene on chromosome 10p implicated in the development of human obesity, and the existence of two further loci influencing leptin levels.

  18. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  19. The human HNRPD locus maps to 4q21 and encodes a highly conserved protein.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, L A; Li, M J; DePace, A; Bray-Ward, P; Maizels, N

    1998-05-01

    The hnRNP D protein interacts with nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Like many other proteins that interact with RNA, it contains RBD (or "RRM") domains and arg-gly-gly (RGG) motifs. We have examined the organization and localization of the human and murine genes that encode the hnRNP D protein. Comparison of the predicted sequences of the hnRNP D proteins in human and mouse shows that they are 96.9% identical (98.9% similar). This very high level of conservation suggests a critical function for hnRNP D. Sequence analysis of the human HNRPD gene shows that the protein is encoded by eight exons and that two additional exons specify sequences in the 3' UTR. Use of two of the coding exons is determined by alternative splicing of the HNRPD mRNA. The human HNRPD gene maps to 4q21. The mouse Hnrpd gene maps to the F region of chromosome 3, which is syntenic with the human 4q21 region.

  20. The blp Locus of Streptococcus pneumoniae Plays a Limited Role in the Selection of Strains That Can Cocolonize the Human Nasopharynx

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Carina; Dawid, Suzanne; Pinto, Francisco R.; Hinds, Jason; Simões, Alexandra S.; Gould, Katherine A.; Mendes, Luís A.; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nasopharyngeal colonization is important for Streptococcus pneumoniae evolution, providing the opportunity for horizontal gene transfer when multiple strains co-occur. Although colonization with more than one strain of pneumococcus is common, the factors that influence the ability of strains to coexist are not known. A highly variable blp (bacteriocin-like peptide) locus has been identified in all sequenced strains of S. pneumoniae. This locus controls the regulation and secretion of bacteriocins, small peptides that target other bacteria. In this study, we analyzed a series of cocolonizing isolates to evaluate the impact of the blp locus on human colonization to determine whether competitive phenotypes of bacteriocin secretion restrict cocolonization. We identified a collection of 135 nasopharyngeal samples cocolonized with two or more strains, totaling 285 isolates. The blp locus of all strains was characterized genetically with regard to pheromone type, bacteriocin/immunity content, and potential for locus functionality. Inhibitory phenotypes of bacteriocin secretion and locus activity were assessed through overlay assays. Isolates from single colonizations (n = 298) were characterized for comparison. Cocolonizing strains had a high diversity of blp cassettes; approximately one-third displayed an inhibitory phenotype in vitro. Despite in vitro evidence of competition, pneumococci cocolonized the subjects independently of blp pheromone type (P = 0.577), bacteriocin/immunity content, blp locus activity (P = 0.798), and inhibitory phenotype (P = 0.716). In addition, no significant differences were observed when single and cocolonizing strains were compared. Despite clear evidence of blp-mediated competition in experimental models, the results of our study suggest that the blp locus plays a limited role in restricting pneumococcal cocolonization in humans. IMPORTANCE Nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is important for

  1. Functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in isogenic settings using zinc finger nuclease-driven transgenesis into a safe harbor locus in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    DeKelver, Russell C.; Choi, Vivian M.; Moehle, Erica A.; Paschon, David E.; Hockemeyer, Dirk; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sancak, Yasemin; Cui, Xiaoxia; Steine, Eveline J.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Tam, Phillip; Bartsevich, Victor V.; Meng, Xiangdong; Rupniewski, Igor; Gopalan, Sunita M.; Sun, Helena C.; Pitz, Kathleen J.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Zhang, Lei; Davis, Gregory D.; Rebar, Edward J.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Yamamoto, Keith R.; Sabatini, David M.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.

    2010-01-01

    Isogenic settings are routine in model organisms, yet remain elusive for genetic experiments on human cells. We describe the use of designed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for efficient transgenesis without drug selection into the PPP1R12C gene, a “safe harbor” locus known as AAVS1. ZFNs enable targeted transgenesis at a frequency of up to 15% following transient transfection of both transformed and primary human cells, including fibroblasts and hES cells. When added to this locus, transgenes such as expression cassettes for shRNAs, small-molecule-responsive cDNA expression cassettes, and reporter constructs, exhibit consistent expression and sustained function over 50 cell generations. By avoiding random integration and drug selection, this method allows bona fide isogenic settings for high-throughput functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in essentially any transformed human cell type and in primary cells. PMID:20508142

  2. Functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in isogenic settings using zinc finger nuclease-driven transgenesis into a safe harbor locus in the human genome.

    PubMed

    DeKelver, Russell C; Choi, Vivian M; Moehle, Erica A; Paschon, David E; Hockemeyer, Dirk; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sancak, Yasemin; Cui, Xiaoxia; Steine, Eveline J; Miller, Jeffrey C; Tam, Phillip; Bartsevich, Victor V; Meng, Xiangdong; Rupniewski, Igor; Gopalan, Sunita M; Sun, Helena C; Pitz, Kathleen J; Rock, Jeremy M; Zhang, Lei; Davis, Gregory D; Rebar, Edward J; Cheeseman, Iain M; Yamamoto, Keith R; Sabatini, David M; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D

    2010-08-01

    Isogenic settings are routine in model organisms, yet remain elusive for genetic experiments on human cells. We describe the use of designed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for efficient transgenesis without drug selection into the PPP1R12C gene, a "safe harbor" locus known as AAVS1. ZFNs enable targeted transgenesis at a frequency of up to 15% following transient transfection of both transformed and primary human cells, including fibroblasts and hES cells. When added to this locus, transgenes such as expression cassettes for shRNAs, small-molecule-responsive cDNA expression cassettes, and reporter constructs, exhibit consistent expression and sustained function over 50 cell generations. By avoiding random integration and drug selection, this method allows bona fide isogenic settings for high-throughput functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in essentially any transformed human cell type and in primary cells.

  3. The F7 gene and clotting factor VII levels: dissection of a human quantitative trait locus.

    PubMed

    Soria, Jose Manuel; Almasy, Laura; Souto, Juan Carlos; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Blangero, John

    2005-10-01

    Localization of human quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is now routine. However, identifying their functional DNA variants is still a formidable challenge. We present a complete dissection of a human QTL using novel statistical techniques to infer the most likely functional polymorphisms of a QTL that influence plasma levels of clotting factor VII (FVII), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Resequencing of 15 kb in and around the F7 gene identified 49 polymorphisms, which were then genotyped in 398 people. Using a Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) method, we identified four to seven functional variants that completely account for this QTL. These variants include both rare coding variants and more common, potentially regulatory polymorphisms in intronic and promoter regions.

  4. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  5. Analysis and comparison of the mouse and human immunoglobulin heavy chain JH-Cmu-Cdelta locus.

    PubMed

    Koop, B F; Richards, J E; Durfee, T D; Bansberg, J; Wells, J; Gilliam, A C; Chen, H L; Clausell, A; Tucker, P W; Blattner, F R

    1996-02-01

    We report here 23,686 bases of contiguous DNA sequences from the mouse germline immunoglobulin heavy chain (H) constant (C) mu delta region. The sequence spans the joining (JH) regions, the mu constant region (C mu), the delta constant region (C delta) coding regions, a domain relic, the mu switch region (S mu), seven blocks of simple sequence repeats, a large unique sequence inverted repeat, a large unique sequence forward repeat, and all of the intervening material. A comparison of this 23.7-kb region with the corresponding human C mu/C delta region reveals clear homology in the coding and introns of C mu but not in the 5' flanking J gene segments nor in the intergenic and C delta regions. This mixed pattern of similarity between the human and the mouse sequences contrasts with high levels of similarity found in the T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region and alpha and beta myosin genes and the very low levels found in the gamma-crystallin, XRCC1, and beta-globin gene clusters. The human and mouse comparison further suggests the incorporation of novel sequences into expressed genes of IgD.

  6. Molecular phylogeography of a human autosomal skin color locus under natural selection.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Victor A; Berg, Arthur; Peckins, Steven; Wentzel, Steven M; Ang, Khai Chung; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Cheng, Keith C

    2013-11-06

    Divergent natural selection caused by differences in solar exposure has resulted in distinctive variations in skin color between human populations. The derived light skin color allele of the SLC24A5 gene, A111T, predominates in populations of Western Eurasian ancestry. To gain insight into when and where this mutation arose, we defined common haplotypes in the genomic region around SLC24A5 across diverse human populations and deduced phylogenetic relationships between them. Virtually all chromosomes carrying the A111T allele share a single 78-kb haplotype that we call C11, indicating that all instances of this mutation in human populations share a common origin. The C11 haplotype was most likely created by a crossover between two haplotypes, followed by the A111T mutation. The two parental precursor haplotypes are found from East Asia to the Americas but are nearly absent in Africa. The distributions of C11 and its parental haplotypes make it most likely that these two last steps occurred between the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent, with the A111T mutation occurring after the split between the ancestors of Europeans and East Asians.

  7. Structural dissection of a complex Bacteroides ovatus gene locus conferring xyloglucan metabolism in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Stepper, Judith; Sobala, Łukasz F.; Coyle, Travis; Larsbrink, Johan; Spadiut, Oliver; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Brumer, Harry; Davies, Gideon J.

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract harbours myriad bacterial species, collectively termed the microbiota, that strongly influence human health. Symbiotic members of our microbiota play a pivotal role in the digestion of complex carbohydrates that are otherwise recalcitrant to assimilation. Indeed, the intrinsic human polysaccharide-degrading enzyme repertoire is limited to various starch-based substrates; more complex polysaccharides demand microbial degradation. Select Bacteroidetes are responsible for the degradation of the ubiquitous vegetable xyloglucans (XyGs), through the concerted action of cohorts of enzymes and glycan-binding proteins encoded by specific xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs). Extending recent (meta)genomic, transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, significant questions remain regarding the structural biology of the molecular machinery required for XyG saccharification. Here, we reveal the three-dimensional structures of an α-xylosidase, a β-glucosidase, and two α-l-arabinofuranosidases from the Bacteroides ovatus XyGUL. Aided by bespoke ligand synthesis, our analyses highlight key adaptations in these enzymes that confer individual specificity for xyloglucan side chains and dictate concerted, stepwise disassembly of xyloglucan oligosaccharides. In harness with our recent structural characterization of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanse and cell-surface glycan-binding proteins, the present analysis provides a near-complete structural view of xyloglucan recognition and catalysis by XyGUL proteins. PMID:27466444

  8. Humanized H19/Igf2 locus reveals diverged imprinting mechanism between mouse and human and reflects Silver–Russell syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Stella K.; Freschi, Andrea; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Thorvaldsen, Joanne L.; Luense, Lacey J.; Weller, Angela H.; Berger, Shelley L.; Cerrato, Flavia; Riccio, Andrea; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals, such that they are expressed in a monoallelic, parent-of-origin–specific manner. These genes are regulated by imprinting control regions (ICRs), cis-regulatory elements that exhibit allele-specific differential DNA methylation. Although genomic imprinting is conserved in mammals, ICRs are genetically divergent across species. This raises the fundamental question of whether the ICR plays a species-specific role in regulating imprinting at a given locus. We addressed this question at the H19/insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) imprinted locus, the misregulation of which is associated with the human imprinting disorders Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS). We generated a knock-in mouse in which the endogenous H19/Igf2 ICR (mIC1) is replaced by the orthologous human ICR (hIC1) sequence, designated H19hIC1. We show that hIC1 can functionally replace mIC1 on the maternal allele. In contrast, paternally transmitted hIC1 leads to growth restriction, abnormal hIC1 methylation, and loss of H19 and Igf2 imprinted expression. Imprint establishment at hIC1 is impaired in the male germ line, which is associated with an abnormal composition of histone posttranslational modifications compared with mIC1. Overall, this study reveals evolutionarily divergent paternal imprinting at IC1 between mice and humans. The conserved maternal imprinting mechanism and function at IC1 demonstrates the possibility of modeling maternal transmission of hIC1 mutations associated with BWS in mice. In addition, we propose that further analyses in the paternal knock-in H19+/hIC1 mice will elucidate the molecular mechanisms that may underlie SRS. PMID:27621468

  9. A radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11q22-q23 containing the ataxia-telangiectasia disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, C.W. III; Cox, D.R.; Kapp, L.; Murnane, J. ); Cornelis, F.; Julier, C.; Lathrop, M.; James, M.R. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a high-resolution radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11q22-q23 containing the ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) disease gene loci. The order and intermarker distances of 32 chromosome 11q22-q23 markers were determined by a multipoint maximum likelihood method analysis of the cosegregation of markers in 100 radiation hybrids. The radiation hybrid map of polymorphic loci was consistent with genetic linkage maps of common markers. Several genes, including [alpha]B-crystallin, adrenal ferrodoxin, CBL2, collagenase, dopamine receptor type 2, neural cell adhesion molecule, progesterone receptor, and stromelysins 1 and 2, were placed in relation to previously ordered, genetically mapped polymorphic loci. Five new markers ([alpha]B-crystallin, adrenal ferrodoxin, CJ52.114, CJ52.3, and D11S535) were ordered within the current published flanking markers for the AT group A and group C disease loci. A candidate AT group D gene (ATDC) identified by Kapp et al. was mapped telomeric to THY1, outside the flanking markers identified by multipoint linkage analysis for the major AT locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. A sequence homologous to kappa-deleting element is located 5 prime to the human J sub K locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, M.A.; Morris, C.M.; Fitzgerald, P.H. )

    1989-01-25

    The human kappa deleting element (Kde) mediates loss of CK and JK genes in B cells. A probe for Kde detects two genomic sequences on Southern blots. The Kde is located 24kb 3{prime} to CK, but the position of the homologous sequence is unknown. The authors in situ hybridized m141-2 to metaphase cells of JC11, a B-cell line bearing a t(2;14)(p11;q32) in which the chromosome 2 breakpoint is within JK or the VK-JK intron. Three peaks of labelled sites were obtained. Southern analysis of BamH1 digested DNA showed that Kde (14kb) and the homologous sequence (3kb) were both intact. Kde accounts for hybridization to 14q+ and the 2p- signal presumably derives from the related sequence. This locates the sequence homologous to Kde upstream from JK, possibly within the VK cluster, and may reflect transposition or some other duplicative event as proposed for the evolution of other regions of the kappa locus.

  11. Dosage-sensitive X-linked locus influences the development of amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, and fear recognition in humans.

    PubMed

    Good, Catriona D; Lawrence, Kate; Thomas, N Simon; Price, Cathy J; Ashburner, John; Friston, Karl J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Oreland, Lars; Skuse, David H

    2003-11-01

    The amygdala, which plays a critical role in emotional learning and social cognition, is structurally and functionally sexually dimorphic in humans. We used magnetic neuroimaging and molecular genetic analyses with healthy subjects and patients possessing X-chromosome anomalies to find dosage-sensitive genes that might influence amygdala development. If such X-linked genes lacked a homologue on the Y-chromosome they would be expressed in one copy in normal 46,XY males and two copies in normal 46,XX females. We showed by means of magnetic neuroimaging that 46,XY males possess significantly increased amygdala volumes relative to normal 46,XX females. However, females with Turner syndrome (45,X) have even larger amygdalae than 46,XY males. This finding implies that haploinsufficiency for one or more X-linked genes influences amygdala development irrespective of a direct or indirect (endocrinological) mechanism involving the Y-chromosome. 45,X females also have increased grey matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, close to a region implicated in emotional learning. They are as poor as patients with bilateral amygdalectomies in the recognition of fear from facial expressions. We attempted to localize the gene(s) responsible for these deficits in X-monosomy by means of a deletion mapping strategy. We studied female patients possessing structural X-anomalies of the short arm. A genetic locus (no greater than 4.96 Mb in size) at Xp11.3 appears to play a key role in amygdala and orbitofrontal structural and (by implication) functional development. Females with partial X-chromosome deletions, in whom this critical locus is deleted, have normal intelligence. Their fear recognition is as poor as that of 45,X females and their amygdalae are correspondingly enlarged. This 4.96 Mb region contains, among others, the genes for monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and B (MAOB), which are involved in the oxidative deamination of several neurotransmitters, including dopamine and

  12. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Vendelbosch, Sanne; de Boer, Martin; Gouw, Remko A T W; Ho, Cynthia K Y; Geissler, Judy; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Moorhouse, Michael J; Lardy, Neubury M; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV) has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (auto)immunity and infectious disease.

  13. Rat Genome Database: a unique resource for rat, human, and mouse quantitative trait locus data.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Rajni; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Smith, Jennifer R; Wang, Shur-Jen; Lowry, Timothy F; Petri, Victoria; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Liu, Weisong; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-09-16

    The rat has been widely used as a disease model in a laboratory setting, resulting in an abundance of genetic and phenotype data from a wide variety of studies. These data can be found at the Rat Genome Database (RGD, http://rgd.mcw.edu/), which provides a platform for researchers interested in linking genomic variations to phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) form one of the earliest and core datasets, allowing researchers to identify loci harboring genes associated with disease. These QTLs are not only important for those using the rat to identify genes and regions associated with disease, but also for cross-organism analyses of syntenic regions on the mouse and the human genomes to identify potential regions for study in these organisms. Currently, RGD has data on >1,900 rat QTLs that include details about the methods and animals used to determine the respective QTL along with the genomic positions and markers that define the region. RGD also curates human QTLs (>1,900) and houses>4,000 mouse QTLs (imported from Mouse Genome Informatics). Multiple ontologies are used to standardize traits, phenotypes, diseases, and experimental methods to facilitate queries, analyses, and cross-organism comparisons. QTLs are visualized in tools such as GBrowse and GViewer, with additional tools for analysis of gene sets within QTL regions. The QTL data at RGD provide valuable information for the study of mapped phenotypes and identification of candidate genes for disease associations.

  14. ''Normal'' tissues from humans exposed to radium contain an alteration in the c-mos locus

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Schlenker, R.A.; Hardwick, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of a number of human proto-oncogenes from persons with internal systemic exposure to radium were analyzed by restriction enzyme digestion and southern blotting of their DNA. Two extra c-mos Eco R1 restriction-fragment-length bands of 5.0 kb and 5.5 kb were found in tissue DNA from six of seven individuals. The extra c-mos bands were detected in DNA from many, but not all, of the tissues of the individuals exposed to radium. Our results suggest that the c-mos restriction-fragment-length alterations (RFLA) found in individuals exposed to radium were induced rather than inherited, are epigenetic in origin, and most likely result from changes in the methylation of bases surrounding the single exon of the c-mos proto-oncogene. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Assignment of the human GABA transporter gene (GABATHG) locus to chromosome 3p24-p25

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Guo, Li-He

    1995-09-01

    An essential regulatory process of synaptic transmission is the inactivation of released neurotransmitters by the transmitter-specific uptake mechanism, {gamma}-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory transmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system; its activity is terminated by a high-affinity Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} -dependent specific GABA transporter (GAT), which carries the neurotransmitter to the presynaptic neuron and/or glial elements surrounding the synaptic cleft. Deficiency of the transporter may cause epilepsy and some other nervous diseases. The human GAT gene (GABATHG), approximately 25 kb in length, has been cloned and sequenced by our colleagues (7). Here the results of the in situ hybridization mapping with the gene are presented. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Regulatory effects of genomic translocations at the human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) gene locus.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Jonathan C; Wang, Xinwen; Shi, Jian; Barrie, Elizabeth S; Wang, Danxin; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    CES1 encodes carboxylesterase-1, an important drug-metabolizing enzyme with high expression in the liver. Previous studies have reported a genomic translocation of the 5' region from the poorly expressed pseudogene CES1P1, to CES1, yielding the structural variant CES1VAR. The aim of this study was to characterize this translocation and its effect on CES1 expression in the human liver. Experiments were conducted in human liver tissues and cell culture (HepG2). The promoter and exon 1 of CES1 were sequenced by Sanger and Ion Torrent sequencing to identify gene translocations. The effects of CES1 5'UTRs on mRNA and protein expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, allelic ratio mRNA analysis by primer extension (SNaPshot), quantitative targeted proteomics, and luciferase reporter gene assays. Sequencing of CES1 identified two translocations: first, CES1VAR (17% minor allele frequency) comprising the 5'UTR, exon 1, and part of intron 1. A second shorter translocation, CES1SVAR, was observed excluding exon 1 and intron 1 regions (<0.01% minor allele frequency). CES1VAR is associated with 2.6-fold decreased CES1 mRNA and ∼1.35-fold lower allelic mRNA. Luciferase reporter constructs showed that CES1VAR decreases luciferase activity 1.5-fold, whereas CES1SVAR slightly increases activity. CES1VAR was not associated with CES1 protein expression or metabolism of the CES1 substrates enalapril, clopidogrel, or methylphenidate in the liver. The frequent translocation variant CES1VAR reduces mRNA expression of CES1 in the liver by ∼30%, but protein expression and metabolizing activity in the liver were not detectably altered - possibly because of variable CES1 expression masking small allelic effects. Whether drug therapies are affected by CES1VAR will require further in-vivo studies.

  17. Contribution of a helix 5 locus to selectivity of hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic ligands for the human 5-hydroxytryptamine2A and 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptors: direct and indirect effects on ligand affinity mediated by the same locus.

    PubMed

    Almaula, N; Ebersole, B J; Ballesteros, J A; Weinstein, H; Sealfon, S C

    1996-07-01

    An important determinant of the neurobehavioral responses induced by a drug is its relative receptor selectivity. The molecular basis of ligand selectivity of hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic compounds of varying structural classes for the human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A and 5-HT2C receptors was investigated with the use of reciprocal site-directed mutagenesis. Because these two closely related receptor subtypes differ in the amino acid present at position 5.46 (residues 242 and 222 in the sequences, respectively), the effects of corresponding substitutions in the 5-HT2A[S5.46(242)-->A] and 5-HT2C[A5.46(222)-->S] receptors were studied in tandem. By studying both receptors, the direct and indirect effects of mutations on affinity and selectivity can be distinguished. The ergolines studied, mesulergine (selective for the 5-HT2C receptor) and d-lysergic acid diethylamide (selective for the 5-HT2A receptor), reversed their relative affinity with mutations in each receptor, supporting a direct role of this locus in the selectivity of these ligands. However, interchange mutations in either receptor led to decreased or unchanged affinity for (+/-)-1-)(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane and ketanserin, which have higher affinity for the 5-HT2A receptor, consistent with little contribution of this locus to the selectivity of these ligands. The indoleamines studied were affected differently by mutations in each receptor, suggesting that they bind differently to the two receptor subtypes. Mutation of this locus in the 5-HT2A receptor decreased the affinity of all indoleamines, whereas the interchange mutation of the 5-HT2C receptor did not affect indoleamine affinity. These results are consistent with a direct interaction between this side chain and indoleamines for the 5-HT2A receptor but not for the 5-HT2C receptor. Furthermore, this analysis shows that the higher affinity of 5-HT and tryptamine for the 5-HT2C receptor than for the 5-HT2A receptors is not

  18. Mapping of human microtubule-associated protein 1B in proximity to the spinal muscular atrophy locus at 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, L.L. Children's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Boyce, F.M.; Kunkel, L.M. ); Kleyn, P.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.C. New York State Psychiatric Inst., New York, NY ); Menninger, J.; Ward, D.C. )

    1991-09-01

    A polyclonal antiserum directed against the C-terminal domain of dystrophin was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding an antigenically cross-reactive protein, microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP-1B). Physical mapping of the human MAP-1B locus places its chromosomal location at 5q13, in proximity to the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. SMA is a degenerative disorder primarily affecting motor neurons. Genetic linkage analysis of SMA families using a human dinucleotide repeat polymorphism just 3{prime} of the MAP-1B gene has shown tight linkage to SMA mutations. These mapping data together with the postulated role of MAP-1B in neuronal morphogenesis and its localization in anterior horn motor neurons suggest a possible association with SMA.

  19. Chromatin configuration of the human CD2 gene locus during T-cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Wotton, D.; Flanagan, B.F.; Owen, M.J. )

    1989-06-01

    T investigate the molecular basis for the tissue-specific expression of the human CD2 gene, its chromatin configuration was assessed by determining DNase I hypersensitivity and the degree of methylation during T-cell lineage commitment and development. Tissue-specific DNase I-hypersensitive sites were found within the 5{prime} promoter region and a region 3{prime} of the gene essential for gene expression. DNase I hypersensitivity of the 5{prime} region correlated strictly with transcriptional activity, whereas hypersensitivity of the 3{prime} region correlated with T-cell progenitor activity or lineage commitment but not necessarily with transcription. Hha I and Hpa II sites around the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions were undermethylated in CD2-expressing T cells but were more extensively methylated in other cell types. These results define likely regulatory elements both upstream and downstream of the CD2 gene that control its tissue-specific expression. Further, they show that the 3{prime} regulatory region adopts an open chromatin configuration prior to lineage commitment and during early stages of T-cell development before the CD2 gene is transcribed.

  20. Trans locus inhibitors limit concomitant polysaccharide synthesis in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Weinacht, Katja G; Comstock, Laurie E

    2010-06-29

    Bacteroides is an abundant genus of bacteria of the human intestinal microbiota. Bacteroides species synthesize a large number of capsular polysaccharides (PS), a biological property not shared with closely related oral species, suggesting importance for intestinal survival. Bacteroides fragilis, for example, synthesizes eight capsular polysaccharides per strain, each of which phase varies via inversion of the promoters located upstream of seven of the eight polysaccharide biosynthesis operons. In a single cell, many of these polysaccharide loci promoters can be simultaneously oriented on for transcription of the downstream biosynthesis operons. Here, we demonstrate that despite the promoter orientations, concomitant transcription of multiple polysaccharide loci within a cell is inhibited. The proteins encoded by the second gene of each of these eight loci, collectively designated the UpxZ proteins, inhibit the synthesis of heterologous polysaccharides. These unique proteins interfere with the ability of UpxY proteins encoded by other polysaccharide loci to function in transcriptional antitermination of their respective operon. The eight UpxZs have different inhibitory spectra, thus establishing a hierarchical regulatory network for polysaccharide synthesis. Limitation of concurrent polysaccharide synthesis strongly suggests that these bacteria evolved this property as an evasion-type mechanism to avoid killing by polysaccharide-targeting factors in the ecosystem.

  1. Chromatin configuration of the human CD2 gene locus during T-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Wotton, D; Flanagan, B F; Owen, M J

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis for the tissue-specific expression of the human CD2 gene, its chromatin configuration was assessed by determining DNase I hypersensitivity and the degree of methylation during T-cell lineage commitment and development. Tissue-specific DNase I-hypersensitive sites were found within the 5' promoter region and a region 3' of the gene essential for gene expression. DNase I hypersensitivity of the 5' region correlated strictly with transcriptional activity, whereas hypersensitivity of the 3' region correlated with T-cell progenitor activity or lineage commitment but not necessarily with transcription. Hha I and Hpa II sites around the 5' and 3' regions were undermethylated in CD2-expressing T cells but were more extensively methylated in other cell types. These results define likely regulatory elements both upstream and downstream of the CD2 gene that control its tissue-specific expression. Further, they show that the 3' regulatory region adopts an open chromatin configuration prior to lineage commitment and during early stages of T-cell development before the CD2 gene is transcribed. Images PMID:2567000

  2. Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase locus and the chromosome 9q34 region in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian. A.; Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.

    1994-09-01

    Human dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (DBH) is responsible for conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine in catecholamine neurons. Potential inhibitors of this enzyme do exist, but they are generally not effective in vivo in reducing tissue concentrations of catecholamines. The gene for DBH has been localized to 9q34 by linkage analysis and in situ hybridization. Recently there have been reports indicating a suggestive evidence of linkage between DNA markers in 9q34 region and alcoholism. In order to test for this suggestive linkage, we have genotyped a sample of 134 subjects with alcoholism, 30 alcoholic families (n=302) and 92 normal controls. The alcoholic subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained samples of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. The markers used in this study were dinucleotide repeats in the DBH gene, and two highly informative (CA) markers (D9S64, D9S66) flanking the DBH gene. A preliminary affected-sib-pair analysis was carried out under two diagnostic schemes. Regardless of whether `probable` alcoholics are classified as unaffected (t=0.63) or affected (t=1.50), these data do not reveal a significant excess in DBH marker sharing among affected-sib-pairs. However, the comparison of the DBH marker allele frequencies between the unrelated alcoholic panel and the unrelated normal control panel was significant at the p=0.04 level.

  3. Production of Human Albumin in Pigs Through CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Knockin of Human cDNA into Swine Albumin Locus in the Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Junyi; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Song, Lei; Wang, Lulu; Ding, Chen; Qin, Jun; Liu, Liping; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Jianqiao; Huang, Xingxu; Wei, Hong; Zhang, Pumin

    2015-11-12

    Precise genome modification in large domesticated animals is desirable under many circumstances. In the past it is only possible through lengthy and burdensome cloning procedures. Here we attempted to achieve that goal through the use of the newest genome-modifying tool CRISPR/Cas9. We set out to knockin human albumin cDNA into pig Alb locus for the production of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA). HSA is a widely used human blood product and is in high demand. We show that homologous recombination can occur highly efficiently in swine zygotes. All 16 piglets born from the manipulated zygotes carry the expected knockin allele and we demonstrated the presence of human albumin in the blood of these piglets. Furthermore, the knockin allele was successfully transmitted through germline. This success in precision genomic engineering is expected to spur exploration of pigs and other large domesticated animals to be used as bioreactors for the production of biomedical products or creation of livestock strains with more desirable traits.

  4. Localization of a novel natural killer triggering receptor locus to human chromosome 3p23-p21 and mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.A.; Jenkins, N.A.; Copeland, N.G.; Simek, S.; Lerman, M.I.; Zbar, B.; Glenn, G.; Ortaldo, J.R.; Anderson, S.K.

    1993-05-01

    A novel gene (NKTR) that is involved in the recognition of tumor cells by large granular lymphocytes (LGLs) has been assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 3 in the region 3p23-p21 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Interspecific backcross analysis revealed that the murine homologue maps to the distal end of mouse chromosome 9 and is closely linked to the locus coding for cholecystokinin (Cck). This region of mouse 9 shares a region of homology with human 3p. Thus, the placement of NKTR in these regions confirms and extends the relationship between these human and mouse chromosomes. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Mapping of a locus correcting lack of phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cell Ade-D mutants to human chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Barton, J W; Hart, I M; Patterson, D

    1991-02-01

    The human phosphoribosylaminoimidazole (AIR) carboxylase locus has been until this report one of the genes encoding purine biosynthetic enzymes that had not been assigned to an individual human chromosome. Characterization of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant Ade-D showed that the cell line was unable to produce IMP and accumulated AIR. CHO Ade-D cells were fused with normal human lymphocytes utilizing inactivated Sendai virus and the resulting hybrid cell lines were selected for purine prototrophy. Cytogenetic analysis showed a 100% concordance value for chromosome 4. Two of the isolated subclones contained only the long arm of chromosome 4 translocated onto a CHO chromosome, providing evidence for a regional assignment of the Ade-D gene to the long arm of chromosome 4. Two of the subclones containing chromosome 4 were subjected to the BrdU visible light segregation. All of the isolated purine auxotrophic cell lines showed a loss of the q arm of chromosome 4. The localization of the Ade-D locus to the long arm of chromosome 4 may reveal further clustering of the mammalian purine genes since the Ade-A locus has previously been regionally assigned to 4pter-q21.

  6. Reconstitution of human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive sites in the absence of chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Leach, K M; Nightingale, K; Igarashi, K; Levings, P P; Engel, J D; Becker, P B; Bungert, J

    2001-04-01

    The human beta-globin genes are regulated by the locus control region (LCR), an element composed of multiple DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS sites) located 5' to the genes. Various functional studies indicate that the LCR confers high-level, position-independent, and copy number-dependent expression to linked globin genes in transgenic mice. However, the structural basis for LCR function is unknown. Here we show that LCR HS sites can be reconstituted in an erythroid cell-specific manner on chromatin-assembled LCR templates in vitro. Surprisingly, HS2 and HS3 are also formed with erythroid proteins in the absence of chromatin assembly, indicating that sensitivity to nucleases is not simply a consequence of nucleosome reorganization. The generation of LCR HS sites in the absence of chromatin assembly leads to the formation of S1- and KMnO(4)-sensitive regions in HS2 and HS3. These sites are also sensitive to S1 nuclease in erythroid cells in vivo, suggesting a distorted DNA structure in the LCR core enhancer elements. Finally, we show that RNA polymerase II initiates transcription in the HS2 and HS3 core enhancer regions in vitro. Transcription in both HS2 and HS3 proceeds in a unidirectional manner. Taken together, the data suggest that erythroid proteins interact with the core enhancer elements, distort the DNA structure, and recruit polymerase II transcription complexes. These results further our understanding of the structural basis for LCR function and provide an explanation for why the LCR core regions are so extremely sensitive to nucleases in erythroid cells.

  7. Rescue of retinal morphology and function in a humanized mouse at the mouse retinol-binding protein locus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shen, Jingling; Wakana, Shigeharu; Araki, Kimi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Lei, Lei; Li, Zhenghua

    2017-01-30

    Retinol-binding protein RBP4 is the specific carrier for retinol in the blood. We previously produced a Rbp4-deficient (Rbp4(-/-)) mouse that showed electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities, accompanied by histological and electron-microscopic changes such as fewer synapses in the inner plexiform layer in the central retina. To address whether human RBP4 gene expression can rescue the phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice, we produced a humanized (Rbp4(hRBP4orf/ hRBP4orf)) mouse with a human RBP4 open reading frame in the mouse Rbp4 locus using a Cre-mutant lox recombination system. In Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice, the tissue-specific expression pattern of hRBP4orf was roughly the same as that of mouse Rbp4. ERG and morphological abnormalities observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice were rescued in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice as early as 7 weeks of age. The temporal expression pattern of hRBP4orf in the liver of Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice was similar to that of mouse Rbp4 in Rbp4(+/+)mice. In contrast, hRBP4orf expression levels in eyes were significantly lower at 6 and 12 weeks of age compared with mouse Rbp4 but were restored to the control levels at 24 weeks. The serum hRBP4 levels in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice were approximately 30% of those in Rbp4(+/+) at all ages examined. In accordance with this finding, the plasma retinol levels remained low in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Retinol accumulation in the liver occurred in control and Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice but was higher in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice at 30 weeks of age. Mouse transthyretin expression was not altered in Rbp4(-/-) or Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Taken together, 30% of the serum RBP4 level was sufficient to correct the abnormal phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 30 January 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2016.156.

  8. Human debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (P450IID1): cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence and assignment of the CYP2D locus to chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, F J; Vilbois, F; Hardwick, J P; McBride, O W; Nebert, D W; Gelboin, H V; Meyer, U A

    1988-02-01

    The enzyme P450db1 (db1) is responsible for the common human defect in drug oxidation known as the "debrisoquine/sparteine polymorphism." Polyclonal antibody against the rat db1 protein was used to screen a human liver lambda gt11 library for the db1 cDNA clone. A cDNA containing the full protein coding sequence was isolated; the deduced NH2-terminal sequence of this cDNA was identical to that derived from direct sequencing of the purified human db1 protein. Comparison of the human db1 with rat db1 revealed 71 and 73% similarities of nucleotides and amino acids, respectively. By use of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids the db1 gene was localized to human chromosome 22 (CYP2D locus).

  9. Dynamics of alpha-globin locus chromatin structure and gene expression during erythroid differentiation of human CD34(+) cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Milind C; Karmakar, Subhradip; Newburger, Peter E; Krause, Diane S; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study has been to establish serum-free culture conditions for ex vivo expansion and differentiation of human CD34(+) cells into erythroid lineage and to study the chromatin structure, gene expression, and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha-globin locus in the developing erythron. A basal Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium cell culture medium with 1% bovine serum albumin as a serum replacement and a combination of cytokines and growth factors was used for expansion and differentiation of the CD34(+) cells. Expression patterns of the alpha- and beta-like genes at various stages of erythropoiesis was studied by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, profile of key erythroid transcription factors was investigated by Western blotting, and the chromatin structure and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha-globin locus was investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Human CD34(+) cells in the serum-free medium undergo near synchronous erythroid differentiation to yield large amount of cells at different differentiation stages. We observe distinct patterns of the histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the alpha-globin locus during erythroid differentiation of CD34(+) cells. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (NF-E2) was present at upstream activator sites even before addition of erythropoietin (EPO), while bound GATA-1 was only detectable after EPO treatment. After 7 days of EPO treatment, H3K4Me2 modification uniformly increases throughout the alpha-globin locus. Acetylation at H3K9 and binding of Pol II, NF-E2, and GATA-1 were restricted to certain hypersensitive sites of the enhancer and theta gene, and were conspicuously low at the alpha-like globin promoters. Rearrangement of the insulator binding factor CTCF took place at and around the alpha-globin locus as CD34(+) cells differentiated into erythroid pathway. Our results

  10. Dynamics of α-globin locus chromatin structure and gene expression during erythroid differentiation of human CD34+ cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Milind C; Karmakar, Subhradip; Krause, Diane; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study has been to establish serum free culture conditions for the ex vivo expansion and differentiation of human CD34+ cells into erythroid lineage and to study the chromatin structure, gene expression and transcription factor recruitment at the α–globin locus in the developing erythron. Methods A basal IMDM cell culture medium with 1% bovine serum albumin as a serum replacement and a combination of cytokines and growth factors was used for the expansion and differentiation of the CD34+ cells. Expression patterns of the alpha and beta like genes at various stages of erythropoiesis was studied by Reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR analysis, profile of key erythroid transcription factors was investigated by western blotting, and the chromatin structure and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha globin locus was investigated by ChIP-qPCR analysis. Results Human CD34+ cells in the serum free medium undergo near synchronous erythroid differentiation to yield large amount of cells at different differentiation stages. We observe distinct patterns of the histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the α-globin locus during erythroid differentiation of CD34+ cells. NF-E2 was present at upstream activator sites even before addition of erythropoietin (Epo), while bound GATA-1 was only detectable after Epo treatment. After seven days of erythropoietin treatment, H3K4Me2 modification uniformly increases throughout the α–globin locus. Acetylation at H3K9 and binding of Pol II, NF-E2 and GATA-1 were restricted to certain HS sites of the enhancer and theta gene, and were conspicuously low at the α-like globin promoters. Rearrangement of the insulator binding factor CTCF took place at and around the α-globin locus as CD34+ cells differentiated into erythroid pathway. Conclusion Our results indicate that remodeling of the upstream elements may be the primary event in activation of α–globin gene expression. Activation of

  11. Genes encoding human caveolin-1 and -2 are co-localized to the D7S522 locus (7q31.1), a known fragile site (FRA7G) that is frequently deleted in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Engelman, J A; Zhang, X L; Lisanti, M P

    1998-10-09

    The (CA)n microsatellite repeat marker D7S522 is located on human chromosome 7q31.1 and is frequently deleted in a variety of human cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, prostate cancers, renal cell carcinomas, ovarian adenocarcinomas, colon carcinomas, and breast cancers. In addition, D7S522 spans FRA7G, a known common fragile site on human chromosome 7. Based on these studies, it has been proposed that an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor gene (or genes) is contained within or located in close proximity to this locus. However, the identity of the candidate tumor suppressor gene at the D7S522 locus remains unknown. Here, we show that the human genes encoding caveolins 1 and 2 are contained within the same human genomic BAC clones and co-localize to the q31.1-q31.2 region of human chromosome 7, as seen by FISH analysis. In addition, we determined the intron-exon boundaries of the human caveolin-1 and -2 genes. The human caveolin-1 gene contains three exons, while the human caveolin-2 gene contains two exons. Interestingly, the boundary of the last exon of the human caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 genes are analogous, suggesting that they arose through gene duplication at this locus. (CA)n microsatellite repeat marker analysis of these caveolin genomic clones indicates they contain the marker D7S522 (located at 7q31.1), but not other microsatellite repeat markers tested. The close proximity of caveolins 1 and 2 to the D7S522 locus was independently confirmed by using a panel of MIT/Whitehead human STS markers that are known to map in the neighborhood of the D7S522 locus. As it has been previously shown that caveolin 1 possesses transformation suppressor activity (Koleske, A.J., Baltimore, D. and M.P. Lisanti (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 1381-1385; Engelman, J.A. et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 16374-16381), we propose that the caveolin-1 gene may represent the candidate tumor suppressor gene at the D7S522 locus on human chromosome

  12. The application of the human beta-globin gene locus control region and murine erythroleukemia cell system to the expression and pharmacological characterization of human endothelin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Whiting, E; Bath, C; Tang, E; Brennand, J

    1995-06-01

    The cDNAs encoding both A and B subtypes of the human endothelin receptor have been inserted into mammalian cell expression vectors that utilize the human globin gene, locus control region. These constructs have been introduced into murine erythroleukemia cells and inducible high level expression of the receptors has been achieved (approximately 1.5-pM/mg membrane protein and approximately 13,500 binding sites/cell for both receptor subtypes). Cell lines expressing these receptors were obtained on a rapid time scale (3-4 weeks), facilitated by the need for the analysis of only small numbers of cell clones/receptor (approximately 6). Competitive binding assays with endothelin-1 gave IC50s of 130 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-A receptor and 160 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-B receptor. Similar studies with the different isoforms of endothelin, sarafatoxin-S6b and -S6c, BQ123 and BQ3020, all gave the expected selectivity profiles. The IC50s for all compounds were in close agreement with those reported for native receptors. Thus, this expression system, which has several advantages over other described expression systems, is capable of rapidly providing large quantities of receptor for detailed pharmacological analyses or drug screening. In addition, the expressed receptors display the expected pharmacological profiles in the absence of any complicating, competing interactions from other subtypes or binding sites.

  13. cDNA cloning and characterization of a human sperm antigen (SPAG6) with homology to the product of the Chlamydomonas PF16 locus.

    PubMed

    Neilson, L I; Schneider, P A; Van Deerlin, P G; Kiriakidou, M; Driscoll, D A; Pellegrini, M C; Millinder, S; Yamamoto, K K; French, C K; Strauss, J F

    1999-09-15

    Serum from an infertile male with high-titer anti-sperm antibodies was used to identify a novel human sperm antigen by screening of a testis expression library. The clone, initially designated Repro-SA-1 (HUGO-approved symbol SPAG6), was found to encode a sequence highly enriched in testis. The deduced amino acid sequence of the full-length cDNA revealed striking homology to the product of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PF16 locus, which encodes a protein localized to the central pair of the flagellar axoneme. The human gene encodes 1.8- and 2.8-kb mRNAs highly expressed in testis but not in prostate, ovary, spleen, thymus, small intestine, colon, peripheral blood leukocytes, heart, brain, placenta, liver, muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The gene was mapped to chromosome 10p11.2-p12. Antibodies raised against SPAG6 sequences localized the protein to the tails of permeabilized human sperm. Both the Chlamydomonas protein and SPAG6 contain eight contiguous armadillo repeats, which place them in a family of proteins known to mediate protein-protein interactions. The cloning of the human homologue of the Chlamydomonas PF16 locus provides a new avenue to explore the role of the axoneme central pair in human sperm function. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. A Two-locus DNA Sequence Database for Typing Plant and Human Pathogens Within the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex ...

  15. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P; Saunders, Gary I; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J C; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Jukema, J Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J M; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline

    2014-08-15

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼ 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥ 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥ 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Loss of heterozygosity at the SS receptor type 5 locus in human GH- and TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Filopanti, M; Ballarè, E; Lania, A G; Bondioni, S; Verga, U; Locatelli, M; Zavanone, L M; Losa, M; Gelmini, S; Peri, A; Orlando, C; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2004-11-01

    SS receptor types 2 and 5 (sst2 and sst5) are involved in the control of secretion and proliferation of normal and tumoral somatotrophs and thyrotrophs. The mechanisms leading to reduced responsiveness to SS analogues in patients with pituitary tumors are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to verify the possible loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the sst5 gene locus in somatotroph and thyrotroph adenomas by screening leukocyte and tumor DNA for two single nucleotide polymorphisms, i.e. C1004T leading to P335L change and T-461C in the 5'-upstream region. Among the 13 informative samples, 1 GH- and 1 TSH-secreting adenoma showed LOH at sst5 gene locus with the retention of Leu335 variant. By analyzing other polymorphic markers spanning from telomere to 16p13.3-13.2 boundaries, DNA deletion of at least 1 megabase was found in both tumors. LOH in thyrotroph adenoma was associated with unusual tumor aggressiveness that required a second surgery and resistance to SS analogs, while no obvious phenotype was identified in the case of the somatotroph adenoma. In conclusions, LOH at the sst5 gene locus is a rare phenomenon, occurring in about 10% of pituitary tumors, that seems to be associated with an aggressive phenotype, at least in thyrotroph adenomas. Further studies are required to confirm this association and to identify the genes, in addition to sst5, lost in these tumors.

  17. Nonredundant and locus-specific gene repression functions of PRC1 paralog family members in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, Vincent; Rozenveld-Geugien, Marjan; Bonardi, Francesco; Malanga, Donatella; van Gosliga, Djoke; Heijink, Anne Margriet; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Morrone, Giovanni; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2013-03-28

    The Polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 is a key factor in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic stem cell self-renewal and functions in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). In humans, each of the 5 subunits of PRC1 has paralog family members of which many reside in PRC1 complexes, likely in a mutually exclusive manner, pointing toward a previously unanticipated complexity of Polycomb-mediated silencing. We used an RNA interference screening approach to test the functionality of these paralogs in human hematopoiesis. Our data demonstrate a lack of redundancy between various paralog family members, suggestive of functional diversification between PcG proteins. By using an in vivo biotinylation tagging approach followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify PcG interaction partners, we confirmed the existence of multiple specific PRC1 complexes. We find that CBX2 is a nonredundant CBX paralog vital for HSC and progenitor function that directly regulates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, independently of BMI1 that dominantly controls expression of the INK4A/ARF locus. Taken together, our data show that different PRC1 paralog family members have nonredundant and locus-specific gene regulatory activities that are essential for human hematopoiesis.

  18. Generation of mastitis resistance in cows by targeting human lysozyme gene to β-casein locus using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Tian, Yuchen; Yu, Yuan; Gao, Mingqing; Hu, Guangdong; Su, Feng; Pan, Shaohui; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-04-07

    Mastitis costs the dairy industry billions of dollars annually and is the most consequential disease of dairy cattle. Transgenic cows secreting an antimicrobial peptide demonstrated resistance to mastitis. The combination of somatic cell gene targeting and nuclear transfer provides a powerful method to produce transgenic animals. Recent studies found that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) stimulated the integration of exogenous DNA stretches into a pre-determined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Here, we used ZFNs to target human lysozyme (hLYZ) gene to bovine β-casein locus, resulting in hLYZ knock-in of approximately 1% of ZFN-treated bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFFs). Gene-targeted fibroblast cell clones were screened by junction PCR amplification and Southern blot analysis. Gene-targeted BFFs were used in somatic cell nuclear transfer. In vitro assays demonstrated that the milk secreted by transgenic cows had the ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. We report the production of cloned cows carrying human lysozyme gene knock-in β-casein locus using ZFNs. Our findings open a unique avenue for the creation of transgenic cows from genetic engineering by providing a viable tool for enhancing resistance to disease and improving the health and welfare of livestock.

  19. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced null mutation at the mouse Car-2 locus: an animal model for human carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S E; Erickson, R P; Barnett, L B; Venta, P J; Tashian, R E

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic screening of (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J)F1 progeny of male mice treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea revealed a mouse that lacked the paternal carbonic anhydrase II (CA II). Breeding tests showed that this trait was heritable and due to a null mutation at the Car-2 locus on chromosome 3. Like humans with the same inherited enzyme defect, animals homozygous for the new null allele are runted and have renal tubular acidosis. However, the prominent osteopetrosis found in humans with CA II deficiency could not be detected even in very old homozygous null mice. A molecular analysis of the deficient mice shows that the mutant gene is not deleted and is transcribed. The CA II protein, which is normally expressed in most tissues, could not be detected by immunodiffusion analysis in any tissues of the CA II-deficient mice, suggesting a nonsense or a missense mutation at the Car-2 locus. Images PMID:3126501

  20. A T-cell specific transcriptional enhancer element 3 prime of C sub. alpha. in the human T-cell receptor. alpha. locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Icheng; Yang, Lihsuan; Morle, G.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1989-09-01

    A transcriptional enhancer element has been identified 4.5 kilobases 3{prime} of C{sub {alpha}} (constant region {alpha} chain) in the human T-cell receptor (TCR) {alpha}-chain locus. This enhancer is active on both a TCR V{sub {alpha}} (variable region {alpha} chain) promoter and the minimal simian virus 40 promoter in TCR {alpha}/{beta} Jurkat and EL4 cells but is inactive on a V{sub {alpha}} promoter TCR {gamma}/{delta} PEER and Molt-13 cells, clone 13 B cells, and HeLa fibroblasts. The enhancer has been localized to a 116-base-pair BstXI/Dra I restriction enzyme fragment, which lacks immunoglobulin octamer and {kappa}B enhancer motifs but does contain a consensus cAMP-response element (CRE). DNase I footprint analyses demonstrated that the minimal enhancer contains two binding sites for Jurkat nuclear proteins. One of these sites corresponds to the CRE, while the other does not correspond to a known transcriptional enhancer motif. These data support a model in which TCR {alpha} gene transcription is regulated by a unique set of cis-acting sequences and trans-acting factors, which are differentially active in cells of the TCR {alpha}/{beta} lineage. In addition, the TCR {alpha} enhancer may play a role in activating oncogene expression in T-lymphoblastoid tumors that have previously been shown to display chromosomal translocations into the human TCR {alpha} locus.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  2. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Human pedigree-based quantitative-trait-locus mapping: localization of two genes influencing HDL-cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Almasy, L; Hixson, J E; Rainwater, D L; Cole, S; Williams, J T; Mahaney, M C; VandeBerg, J L; Stern, M P; MacCluer, J W; Blangero, J

    1999-01-01

    Common disorders with genetic susceptibilities involve the action of multiple genes interacting with each other and with environmental factors, making it difficult to localize the specific genetic loci responsible. An important route to the disentangling of this complex inheritance is through the study of normal physiological variation in quantitative risk factors that may underlie liability to disease. We present an analysis of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), which is inversely correlated with risk of heart disease. A variety of HDL subphenotypes were analyzed, including HDL particle-size classes and the concentrations and proportions of esterified and unesterified HDL-C. Results of a complete genomic screen in large, randomly ascertained pedigrees implicated two loci, one on chromosome 8 and the other on chromosome 15, that influence a component of HDL-C-namely, unesterified HDL2a-C. Multivariate analyses of multiple HDL phenotypes and simultaneous multilocus analysis of the quantitative-trait loci identified permit further characterization of the genetic effects on HDL-C. These analyses suggest that the action of the chromosome 8 locus is specific to unesterified cholesterol levels, whereas the chromosome 15 locus appears to influence both HDL-C concentration and distribution of cholesterol among HDL particle sizes. PMID:10330356

  4. A human-specific AS3MT isoform and BORCS7 are molecular risk factors in the 10q24.32 schizophrenia-associated locus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jaffe, Andrew E; Straub, Richard E; Tao, Ran; Shin, Joo Heon; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Qiang; Li, Chao; Jia, Yankai; Ohi, Kazutaka; Maher, Brady J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Cross, Alan; Chenoweth, Joshua G; Hoeppner, Daniel J; Wei, Huijun; Hyde, Thomas M; McKay, Ronald; Kleinman, Joel E; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2016-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reported many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with psychiatric disorders, but knowledge is lacking regarding molecular mechanisms. Here we show that risk alleles spanning multiple genes across the 10q24.32 schizophrenia-related locus are associated in the human brain selectively with an increase in the expression of both BLOC-1 related complex subunit 7 (BORCS7) and a previously uncharacterized, human-specific arsenite methyltransferase (AS3MT) isoform (AS3MT(d2d3)), which lacks arsenite methyltransferase activity and is more abundant in individuals with schizophrenia than in controls. Conditional-expression analysis suggests that BORCS7 and AS3MT(d2d3) signals are largely independent. GWAS risk SNPs across this region are linked with a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the first exon of AS3MT that is associated with the expression of AS3MT(d2d3) in samples from both Caucasians and African Americans. The VNTR genotype predicts promoter activity in luciferase assays, as well as DNA methylation within the AS3MT gene. Both AS3MT(d2d3) and BORCS7 are expressed in adult human neurons and astrocytes, and they are upregulated during human stem cell differentiation toward neuronal fates. Our results provide a molecular explanation for the prominent 10q24.32 locus association, including a novel and evolutionarily recent protein that is involved in early brain development and confers risk for psychiatric illness.

  5. Characterization of the DNF15S2locus on human chromosome 3: Identification of a gene coding for four kringle domains with homology to hepatocytes growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Su; Stuart, L.A.; Degen, S.J.F. )

    1991-10-08

    A human genomic DNA library was screened by using conditions of reduced stringency with a bovine cDNA probe coding for the kringle domains in prothrombin in order to isolate the human prothrombin gene. Twelve positives were identified, three of which coded for prothrombin. Phage L5 was characterized in more detail because of its strong hybridization to the cDNA probe and its unique restriction map compare to the gene coding for human prothrombin. The gene in L5 was sequenced and found to code for a kringle-containing protein. A human liver cDNA library was screened by using a genomic probe from the gene in L5. cDNAs were isolated that contained sequence identical with regions in the gene in L5. Comparison of the cDNA with the gene indicated that the gene in L5 was composed of 18 exons separated by 17 intervening sequences and is 4,690 bp in length. The putative protein encoded by the gene in L5 contains four kringle domains followed by a serine protease-like domain. The authors propose that the putative L5 protein be tentatively called HGF-like protein until a function is identified. The DNA sequence of the gene and cDNA and its translated amino acid sequence were compared against GenBank and NBRF databases. The DNF15S2 locus has been proposed to code for one or more tumor suppressor genes since this locus is deleted in DNA from small cell lung carcinoma, other lung cancers, renal cell carcinoma, and von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

  6. Assignment of the gene encoding the 5-HT{sub 1E} serotonin receptor (S31) (locus HTR1E) to human chromosome 6q14-q15

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, F.O.; Tasken, K.; Solberg, R.

    1994-08-01

    The human gene for the 5-HT{sub 1E} serotonin receptor was recently cloned, but no chromosomal assignment has yet been given to this gene (locus HTR1E). In this work, we demonstrate by two independent polymerase chain reactions on a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrid genomic DNA that the 5-HT{sub 1E} serotonin receptor gene is localized on human chromosome 6. Furthermore, by means of in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, using the cloned 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor gene (phage clone {lambda}-S31) as a probe, we demonstrate that this gene is localized to the q14-q15 region on chromosome 6. Screening of genomic DNA from 15 unrelated Caucasian individuals, using as a probe the open reading frame of the cloned 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor gene, did not reveal any restriction fragment length polymorphisms with the enzymes BamHI, BanII, BglII, EcoRI, HincII, HindIII, HinfI, MspI, PstI, and PvuII. Since the 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor is found mainly in the cerebral cortex and abnormal function of the serotonergic system has been implicated in a variety of neurologic and psychiatric diseases, the precise chromosomal assignment of the 5-HT{sub 1E} receptor gene is the crucial first step toward the evaluation of this locus as a candidate for mutations in such syndromes. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A mWAP-hLF hybrid gene locus gave extremely high level expression of human lactoferrin in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gengshou; Chen, Hongxing; Wu, Xiaojie; Zhou, Yanrong; Liu, Zhuguo; Zheng, Tao; Huang, Peitang

    2009-08-01

    The production of pharmaceuticals by current mammary gland bioreactor techniques is limited by the low expression level of foreign proteins. We describe here a novel method that solves this problem. A successive three-step gap-repair strategy was developed to replace the genomic coding sequence in mouse whey acidic protein (mWAP) gene locus with that of human lactoferrin (hLF) precisely from the start code to the end code. A 50-kb mWAP-hLF hybrid gene locus was constructed, and corresponding transgenic mice were generated. An extremely high-level expression of rhLF in the milk was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot. The expression level ranged from 16.7 to 29.8 g/l among five transgenic lines, as indicated by the ELISA assay. Importantly, the expressed rhLF maintained the same antibacterial activity as the native hLF. Our strategy can very likely also be used for the efficient expression of other valuable pharmaceutical proteins.

  8. Non-methylated CpG-rich islands at the human alpha-globin locus: implications for evolution of the alpha-globin pseudogene.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, A P; Taggart, M H; Nicholls, R D; Higgs, D R

    1987-01-01

    We have analysed CpG frequency and CpG methylation across part of the human alpha-globin locus. Clusters of CpG at the alpha 1 and alpha 2 genes resemble the 'HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) islands' that are characteristic of mammalian 'housekeeping' genes: CpG frequency is not suppressed; testable CpGs are not methylated in DNA from erythroid or nonerythroid tissues, although flanking CpGs are methylated; CpG clusters are approximately 1.5 kb long and extend both upstream and downstream of the alpha-globin transcription start site. These features are not found at genes of the beta-globin locus. The alpha-globin pseudogene (psi alpha 1) is highly homologous to the alpha 2 and alpha 1 genes, but it lacks an HTF island. Sequence comparison shows that a high proportion of CpGs in the alpha 2 gene are substituted by TpG or CpA in the pseudogene. This strongly suggests that an ancestral HTF island at the pseudogene became methylated in the germline, and was lost due to the mutability of 5-methylcytosine. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:3595568

  9. The inducible tissue-specific expression of the human IL-3/GM-CSF locus is controlled by a complex array of developmentally regulated enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Euan W.; Mirabella, Fabio; Bowers, Sarion R.; James, Sally R.; Bonavita, Aude-Marine; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Strogantsev, Ruslan; Hawwari, Abbas; Bert, Andrew G.; de Arce, Andrea Gonzalez; West, Adam G.; Bonifer, Constanze; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2012-01-01

    The closely linked human IL-3 and GM-CSF genes are tightly regulated and are expressed in activated T cells and mast cells. Here we used transgenic mice to study the developmental regulation of this locus and to identify DNA elements required for its correct activity in vivo. Because these two genes are separated by a CTCF-dependent insulator, and the GM-CSF gene is regulated primarily by its own upstream enhancer, the main aim was to identify regions of the locus required for correct IL-3 gene expression. We initially found that the previously identified proximal upstream IL-3 enhancers were insufficient to account for the in vivo activity of the IL-3 gene. However, an extended analysis of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) spanning the entire upstream IL-3 intergenic region revealed the existence of a complex cluster of both constitutive and inducible DHSs spanning the −34 to −40 kb region. The tissue specificity of these DHSs mirrored the activity of the IL-3 gene, and included a highly inducible CyclosporinA-sensitive enhancer at −37 kb which increased IL-3 promoter activity 40 fold. Significantly, inclusion of this region enabled correct in vivo regulation of IL-3 gene expression in T cells, mast cells and myeloid progenitor cells. PMID:23024272

  10. Rapid and Efficient Generation of Recombinant Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Recombinase-mediated Cassette Exchange in the AAVS1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Chen, Yemiao; Sambathkumar, Rangarajan; Helsen, Nicky; Vanhove, Jolien; Berckmans, Pieter; Cai, Qing; Vanuytsel, Kim; Raitano, Susanna; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Even with the revolution of gene-targeting technologies led by CRISPR-Cas9, genetic modification of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is still time consuming. Comparative studies that use recombinant lines with transgenes integrated into safe harbor loci could benefit from approaches that use site-specific targeted recombinases, like Cre or FLPe, which are more rapid and less prone to off-target effects. Such methods have been described, although they do not significantly outperform gene targeting in most aspects. Using Zinc-finger nucleases, we previously created a master cell line in the AAVS1 locus of hPSCs that contains a GFP-Hygromycin-tk expressing cassette, flanked by heterotypic FRT sequences. Here, we describe the procedures to perform FLPe recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) using this line. The master cell line is transfected with a RMCE donor vector, which contains a promoterless Puromycin resistance, and with FLPe recombinase. Application of both a positive (Puromycin) and negative (FIAU) selection program leads to the selection of RMCE without random integrations. RMCE generates fully characterized pluripotent polyclonal transgenic lines in 15 d with 100% efficiency. Despite the recently described limitations of the AAVS1 locus, the ease of the system paves the way for hPSC transgenesis in isogenic settings, is necessary for comparative studies, and enables semi-high-throughput genetic screens for gain/loss of function analysis that would otherwise be highly time consuming. PMID:27911376

  11. Physiological functions of the imprinted Gnas locus and its protein variants Galpha(s) and XLalpha(s) in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Plagge, Antonius; Kelsey, Gavin; Germain-Lee, Emily L

    2008-02-01

    The stimulatory alpha-subunit of trimeric G-proteins Galpha(s), which upon ligand binding to seven-transmembrane receptors activates adenylyl cyclases to produce the second messenger cAMP, constitutes one of the archetypal signal transduction molecules that have been studied in much detail. Over the past few years, however, genetic as well as biochemical approaches have led to a range of novel insights into the Galpha(s) encoding guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha-stimulating (Gnas) locus, its alternative protein products and its regulation by genomic imprinting, which leads to monoallelic, parental origin-dependent expression of the various transcripts. Here, we summarise the major characteristics of this complex gene locus and describe the physiological roles of Galpha(s) and its 'extra large' variant XLalpha(s) at post-natal and adult stages as defined by genetic mutations. Opposite and potentially antagonistic functions of the two proteins in the regulation of energy homeostasis and metabolism have been identified in Gnas- and Gnasxl (XLalpha(s))-deficient mice, which are characterised by obesity and leanness respectively. A comparison of findings in mice with symptoms of the corresponding human genetic disease 'Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy'/'pseudohypoparathyroidism' indicates highly conserved functions as well as unresolved phenotypic differences.

  12. Molecular analysis of a series of alleles in humans with reduced activity at the triosephosphate isomerase locus.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M.; Zingg, B. C.; Mohrenweiser, H. W.

    1996-01-01

    Individuals with 50% of expected triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) enzyme activity have been previously identified in families during the screening of approximately 2,000 newborn children for quantitative variation in activity of 12 erythrocyte enzymes. The frequency of the trait was 9/1,713 individuals in the Caucasian population and 7/168 individuals among the African-American population studied. Genetic transmission of the trait was confirmed in all families. The frequency of the presumptive deficiency allele(s) at the TPI locus was greater than expected, given the reported incidence of clinical TPI deficiency. We report the molecular characterization of the variant alleles from seven African-American and three Caucasian individuals in this group of unrelated individuals. Three amino acid substitutions--a Gly-->Ala substitution at residue 72, a Val-->Met at residue 154, and a previously described Glu-->Asp substitution at residue 104--were identified in the Caucasian individuals. The substitutions occur at residues that are not directly involved in the active site but are highly conserved through evolutionary time, suggesting important roles for these residues in maintenance of subunit structure and conformation. The variant allele in the seven African-American individuals had nucleotide changes at positions -8 and -5 (5' of) from the transcription-initiation site. In three of these individuals, an additional T-->G substitution was detected in a TATA box-like sequence located 24 nucleotides 5' of the transcription-initiation site and on the same chromosome as the -5/-8 substitutions. Thus, molecular alterations at the TPI locus were detected in 10 unrelated individuals in whom segregation of a phenotype of reduced TPI activity previously had been identified. Images Figure 3 PMID:8571957

  13. Molecular analysis of a series of alleles in humans with reduced activity at the triosephosphate isomerase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, M.; Zingg, B.C.; Mohrenweiser, H.W.

    1996-02-01

    Individuals with 50% of expected triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) enzyme activity have been previously identified in families during the screening of {approximately}2,000 newborn children for quantitative variation in activity of 12 erythrocyte enzymes. The frequency of the trait was 9/1,713 individuals in the Caucasian population and 7/168 individuals among the African-American population studied. Genetic transmission of the trait was confirmed in all families. The frequency of the presumptive deficiency allele(s) at the TPI locus was greater than expected, given the reported incidence of clinical TPI deficiency. We report the molecular characterization of the variant alleles from seven African-American and three Caucasian individuals in this group of unrelated individuals. Three amino acid substitutions - a Gly {yields} Ala substitution at residue 72, a Val {yields} Met at residue 154, and a previously described Glu {yields} Asp substitution at residue 104 - were identified in the Caucasian individuals. The substitutions occur at residues that are not directly involved in the active site but are highly conserved through evolutionary time, suggesting important roles for these residues in maintenance of subunit structure and conformation. The variant allele in the seven African-American individuals had nucleotide changes at positions -8 and -5 (5{prime} of) from the transcription-initiation site. In three of these individuals, an additional T {yields} G substitution was detected in a TATA box-like sequence located 24 nucleotides 5{prime} of the transcription-initiation site and on the same chromosome as the -5/-8 substitutions. Thus, molecular alterations at the TPI locus were detected in 10 unrelated individuals in whom segregation of a phenotype of reduced TPI activity previously had been identified. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Genomic organization of the human osteopontin gene: Exclusion of the locus from a causative role in the pathogenesis of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, A.H.; Edwards, S.J.; Murray, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is the principal phosphorylated glycoprotein of bone that is also expressed in a limited number of other tissues including dentine. In the current investigation the authors report the genomic organization of the SPP1 gene, which comprises seven exons, six of which contain coding sequence. The splice sites for exon donor and acceptor positions are in close agreement with previously published consensus sequences. Comparison of the human gene with its murine and bovine counterparts revealed a highly homologous organization. A highly informative short tandem repeat polymorphism isolated at the SPP1 locus showed no recombination with the autosomal dominant disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. Nevertheless, sequencing of each exon in individuals affected by this disorder failed to reveal any disease-specific mutations. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Correlation between Genotypic Diversity, Lipooligosaccharide Gene Locus Class Variation, and Caco-2 Cell Invasion Potential of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates from Chicken Meat and Humans: Contribution to Virulotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ihab; Louwen, Rogier; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Houf, Kurt; Vandenberg, Olivier; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.; Miller, William G.; van Belkum, Alex; De Zutter, Lieven

    2009-01-01

    Significant interest in studying the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of Campylobacter jejuni has stemmed from its potential role in postinfection paralytic disorders. In this study we present the results of PCR screening of five LOS locus classes (A, B, C, D, and E) for a collection of 116 C. jejuni isolates from chicken meat (n = 76) and sporadic human cases of diarrhea (n = 40). We correlated LOS classes with clonal complexes (CC) assigned by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Finally, we evaluated the invasion potential of a panel of 52 of these C. jejuni isolates for Caco-2 cells. PCR screening showed that 87.1% (101/116) of isolates could be assigned to LOS class A, B, C, D, or E. Concordance between LOS classes and certain MLST CC was revealed. The majority (85.7% [24/28]) of C. jejuni isolates grouped in CC-21 were shown to express LOS locus class C. The invasion potential of C. jejuni isolates possessing sialylated LOS (n = 29; classes A, B, and C) for Caco-2 cells was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than that of C. jejuni isolates with nonsialylated LOS (n = 23; classes D and E). There was no significant difference in invasiveness between chicken meat and human isolates. However, C. jejuni isolates assigned to CC-206 (correlated with LOS class B) or CC-21 (correlated with LOS class C) showed statistically significantly higher levels of invasion than isolates from other CC. Correlation between LOS classes and CC was further confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The present study reveals a correlation between genotypic diversity and LOS locus classes of C. jejuni. We showed that simple PCR screening for C. jejuni LOS classes could reliably predict certain MLST CC and add to the interpretation of molecular-typing results. Our study corroborates that sialylation of LOS is advantageous for C. jejuni fitness and virulence in different hosts. The modulation of cell surface carbohydrate structure could enhance the ability of C. jejuni to adapt to or survive

  16. MAPK3 at the Autism-Linked Human 16p11.2 Locus Influences Precise Synaptic Target Selection at Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Mee; Park, Hae Ryoun; Lee, Ji Hye

    2017-02-01

    Proper synaptic function in neural circuits requires precise pairings between correct pre- and post-synaptic partners. Errors in this process may underlie development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Development of ASD can be influenced by genetic factors, including copy number variations (CNVs). In this study, we focused on a CNV occurring at the 16p11.2 locus in the human genome and investigated potential defects in synaptic connectivity caused by reduced activities of genes located in this region at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions, a well-established model synapse with stereotypic synaptic structures. A mutation of rolled, a Drosophila homolog of human mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) at the 16p11.2 locus, caused ectopic innervation of axonal branches and their abnormal defasciculation. The specificity of these phenotypes was confirmed by expression of wild-type rolled in the mutant background. Albeit to a lesser extent, we also observed ectopic innervation patterns in mutants defective in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93, all of which were expected to interact with Rolled MAPK3. A further genetic analysis in double heterozygous combinations revealed a synergistic interaction between rolled and Gp93. In addition, results from RT-qPCR analyses indicated consistently reduced rolled mRNA levels in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest a central role of MAPK3 in regulating the precise targeting of presynaptic axons to proper postsynaptic targets, a critical step that may be altered significantly in ASD.

  17. MAPK3 at the Autism-Linked Human 16p11.2 Locus Influences Precise Synaptic Target Selection at Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Mee; Park, Hae Ryoun; Lee, Ji Hye

    2017-01-01

    Proper synaptic function in neural circuits requires precise pairings between correct pre- and post-synaptic partners. Errors in this process may underlie development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Development of ASD can be influenced by genetic factors, including copy number variations (CNVs). In this study, we focused on a CNV occurring at the 16p11.2 locus in the human genome and investigated potential defects in synaptic connectivity caused by reduced activities of genes located in this region at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions, a well-established model synapse with stereotypic synaptic structures. A mutation of rolled, a Drosophila homolog of human mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) at the 16p11.2 locus, caused ectopic innervation of axonal branches and their abnormal defasciculation. The specificity of these phenotypes was confirmed by expression of wild-type rolled in the mutant background. Albeit to a lesser extent, we also observed ectopic innervation patterns in mutants defective in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93, all of which were expected to interact with Rolled MAPK3. A further genetic analysis in double heterozygous combinations revealed a synergistic interaction between rolled and Gp93. In addition, results from RT-qPCR analyses indicated consistently reduced rolled mRNA levels in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest a central role of MAPK3 in regulating the precise targeting of presynaptic axons to proper postsynaptic targets, a critical step that may be altered significantly in ASD. PMID:28196412

  18. Stimulation of the follicular bulge LGR5+ and LGR6+ stem cells with the gut-derived human alpha defensin 5 results in decreased bacterial presence, enhanced wound healing, and hair growth from tissues devoid of adnexal structures.

    PubMed

    Lough, Denver; Dai, Hui; Yang, Mei; Reichensperger, Joel; Cox, Lisa; Harrison, Carrie; Neumeister, Michael W

    2013-11-01

    Discovery of leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors 5 and 6 (LGR5 and LGR6) as markers of adult epithelial stem cells of the skin and intestine permits researchers to draw on the intrinsic cellular fundamentals of wound healing and proliferation dynamics of epithelial surfaces. In this study, the authors use the intestine-derived human alpha defensin 5 to stimulate epithelial proliferation, bacterial reduction, and hair production in burn wound beds to provide the field with initial insight on augmenting wound healing in tissues devoid of adnexal stem cells. Murine third-degree burn wound beds were treated with (1) intestine-derived human alpha defensin 5, (2) skin-derived human beta defensin 1, and (3) sulfadiazine to determine their roles in wound healing, bacterial reduction, and hair growth. The human alpha defensin 5 peptide significantly enhanced wound healing and reduced basal bacterial load compared with human beta defensin 1 and sulfadiazine. Human alpha defensin 5 was the only therapy to induce LGR stem cell migration into the wound bed. In addition, gene heat mapping showed significant mRNA up-regulation of key wound healing and Wnt pathway transcripts such as Wnt1 and Wisp1. Ex vivo studies showed enhanced cell migration in human alpha defensin 5-treated wounds compared with controls. Application of human alpha defensin 5 increases LGR stem cell migration into wound beds, leading to enhanced healing, bacterial reduction, and hair production through the augmentation of key Wnt and wound healing transcripts. These findings can be used to derive gut protein-based therapeutics in wound healing.

  19. Targeted Gene Addition to a Safe Harbor locus in human CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells for Correction of X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Reik, Andreas; Liu, Pei-Qi; Li, Linhong; Wu, Xiaolin; Su, Ling; Raley, Castle; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Song, Alexander H.; Chan, Andy; Pearl, Jocelynn R.; Paschon, David E.; Lee, Janet; Newcombe, Hannah; Koontz, Sherry; Sweeney, Colin; Shivak, David A.; Zarember, Kol A.; Peshwa, Madhusudan V.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Malech, Harry L.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy with genetically modified human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) may be safer using targeted integration (TI) of transgenes into a genomic ‘safe harbor’ site than random viral integration. We demonstrate that temporally optimized delivery of zinc finger nuclease mRNA via electroporation and adeno associated virus (AAV) 6 delivery of donor constructs in human HSCs approaches clinically relevant levels of TI into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. Up to 58% Venus-positive HSCs with 6–16% human cell marking were observed following engraftment into mice. In HSCs from patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), caused by mutations in the gp91phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase, TI of a gp91phox transgene into AAVS1 in resulted in ~15% gp91phox expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity in ex vivo–derived neutrophils. In mice transplanted with corrected HSCs, 4–11% of human cells in the bone marrow expressed gp91phox. This method for TI into AAVS1 may be broadly applicable to correction of other monogenic diseases. PMID:26950749

  20. Methionine synthase: high-resolution mapping of the human gene and evaluation as a candidate locus for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Brody, L C; Baker, P J; Chines, P S; Musick, A; Molloy, A M; Swanson, D A; Kirke, P N; Ghosh, S; Scott, J M; Mills, J L

    1999-08-01

    Periconceptual folate supplementation has been found to prevent the occurrence of many neural tube defects (NTDs). Consequently, genetic variation in folate metabolism genes is expected to contribute to the risk for neural tube defects. Methionine synthase catalyzes the vitamin B(12)-dependent conversion of homocysteine and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to methionine and tetrahydrofolate. The observation that homocysteine and vitamin B(12) levels are independent predictors of NTD risk suggested that methionine synthase could be a candidate gene for NTDs. To assess the role of the MS gene in NTDs, we performed high-resolution physical mapping of the MS locus, isolated highly polymorphic markers linked to the MS gene, and tested for an association between specific MS alleles and NTDs. We mapped the MS gene to a position between 909 and 913 cR(10000) on chromosome 1 by radiation hybrid mapping. Polymorphic markers D1S1567 and D1S1568 map to locations no more than 900 and 194 kb from the MS gene, respectively. The segregation of these polymorphic markers was measured in 85 Irish NTD families. No allele of either marker showed a significant association with NTDs using the transmission disequilibrium test. A lack of association was also observed for the D1919G missense mutation within the gene. Our results suggest that inherited variation in the MS gene does not contribute to NTD risk in this population.

  1. Synthetic human beta-globin 5'HS2 constructs function as locus control regions only in multicopy transgene concatamers.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J; Talbot, D; Dillon, N; Grosveld, F

    1993-01-01

    Transgenes linked to the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) are transcribed in a copy-dependent manner that is independent of the integration site. It has previously been shown that the LCR 5'HS2 region does not require its NF-E2 dimer binding site for LCR activity. In this paper we analyse synthetic 5'HS2 core constructs containing point mutations in the other factor binding sites 3' of the NF-E2 dimer site. The results show that 5'HS2 core is a partially active LCR that functions in a concatamer of at least two copies but not when present as a single copy in transgenic mice and that no single binding site within 5'HS2 is required for position-independent expression. In addition, the H-BP factor is identical to upstream stimulatory factor (USF) and full enhancement levels by 5'HS2 core in MEL cells require a combination of all the factor binding sites. We suggest that 5'HS2 cores in a concatamer interact with each other to establish an area of open chromatin and that this process may be the basis of LCR function. Images PMID:8428573

  2. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  3. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  4. Assignment of the locus for Waardenburg syndrome type I to human chromosome 2q37 and possible homology to the Splotch mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Foy, C; Newton, V; Wellesley, D; Harris, R; Read, A P

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated close linkage between the locus for the autosomal dominant Waardenburg syndrome type I and the placental alkaline phosphatase locus on chromosome 2q37. In five families the peak lod score was 4.76 at a recombination fraction of .023. In the mouse the Splotch locus maps to near the homologous position. Splotch mice have white spotting and hearing defects, suggesting that Splotch may be the murine homologue of Waardenburg syndrome type I. PMID:2339698

  5. A boundary of long-range G+C% mosaic domains in the human MHC locus: Pseudoautosomal boundary-like sequence exists near the boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Sugaya, Kimihiko; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    1995-01-01

    The human genome is composed of long-range G+C% (GC%) mosaic structures related to chromosome bands. We found the human MHC locus to be an example of megabase-level GC% mosaic structures and predicted a possible boundary of the megabase-level domains within an undercharacterized 450-kb region harboring the junction of MHC classes II and III. Chromosome walking of the 450-kb region and base-compositional analysis precisely located the boundary of the mosaic domains, disclosing a sharp GC% transition. Near the transition point there was a 20-kb dense Alu cluster, a 30-kb dense LINE-1 cluster, and a sequence highly homologous with the pseudoautosomal boundary of the short arms of human sex chromosomes (PAB1X and PAB1Y); PAB1X and PAB1Y are the interface between sex-specific and pseudoautosomal regions. Many PAB1XY-like sequences (PABLs) were detected by hybridization against genomic DNA, and the new sequences defined the complete form of PABLs to be about 650 nt. 49 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Efficient Modification of the CCR5 Locus in Primary Human T Cells With megaTAL Nuclease Establishes HIV-1 Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Paul, Biswajit; Sather, Blythe D; Younan, Patrick M; Sommer, Karen; Kowalski, John P; Hale, Malika; Stoddard, Barry; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rawlings, David J

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring 32-base pair deletion of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 has demonstrated protection against HIV infection of human CD4+ T cells. Recent genetic engineering approaches using engineered nucleases to disrupt the gene and mimic this mutation show promise for HIV therapy. We developed a megaTAL nuclease targeting the third extracellular loop of CCR5 that we delivered to primary human T cells by mRNA transfection. The CCR5 megaTAL nuclease established resistance to HIV in cell lines and disrupted the expression of CCR5 on primary human CD4+ T cells with a high efficiency, achieving up to 80% modification of the locus in primary cells as measured by molecular analysis. Gene-modified cells engrafted at levels equivalent to unmodified cells when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, genetically modified CD4+ cells were preferentially expanded during HIV-1 infection in vivo in an immunodeficient mouse model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting CCR5 in primary T cells using an engineered megaTAL nuclease, and the potential to use gene-modified cells to reconstitute a patient's immune system and provide protection from HIV infection. PMID:27741222

  7. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lei; Carr, Aprell L.; Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary; Li, Lei

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  8. General implications for CpG hot spot mutations: methylation patterns of the human iduronate-2-sulfatase gene locus.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Orii, Koji O; Bi, Y; Gutierrez, Monica A; Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kondo, Naomi; Orii, Tadao; Noguchi, Akihiko; Sly, William S

    2004-06-01

    The methylation pattern at CpG sites of a housekeeping gene correlates with the likelihood of mutation. Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type II, an X-linked disorder, results from the deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). In these patients, over 35% of independent point mutations at the IDS gene locus were found at CpG sites as transitional events. To gain insight into the relationship between methylation status and CpG hot spot mutations, we investigated patterns of cytosine methylation in the entire IDS gene, except for introns 4-8. Bisulfite genomic sequencing was performed on the normal leukocyte DNA. Our data show that: 1) cytosine methylation at the CpG sites was extensive, except for those present from the promoter region to a portion of intron 3; 2) a sharp boundary of methylated-nonmethylated regions was observed at the 5'-flanking region, whereas a gradual change in methylation was observed in the 2.0-kb segment in the 3'-flanking region; 3) the boundary of the 5'-flanking region contained multiple Sp1 sites and the TATA box; 4) the CpG sites in exons 1 and 2 were hypomethylated and were associated only with rare transitional mutations, while the CpG sites in exon 3 were also hypomethylated, yet were associated with a high rate of transitional mutations; 5) there was no striking sex difference in the methylation patterns in active alleles; and, 6) the methylation in both strands was symmetrical, except at the boundary of methylated-unmethylated regions.

  9. Two Functional Copies of the DGCR6 Gene Are Present on Human Chromosome 22q11 Due to a Duplication of an Ancestral Locus

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Lisa; Stankiewicz, Pavel; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Pandita, Raj K.; Shaffer, Lisa; Lupski, James; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2001-01-01

    The DGCR6 (DiGeorge critical region) gene encodes a putative protein with sequence similarity to gonadal (gdl), a Drosophila melanogaster gene of unknown function. We mapped the DGCR6 gene to chromosome 22q11 within a low copy repeat, termed sc11.1a, and identified a second copy of the gene, DGCR6L, within the duplicate locus, termed sc11.1b. Both sc11.1 repeats are deleted in most persons with velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), and they map immediately adjacent and internal to the low copy repeats, termed LCR22, that mediate the deletions associated with VCFS/DGS. We sequenced genomic clones from both loci and determined that the putative initiator methionine is located further upstream than originally described, but in a position similar to the mouse and chicken orthologs. DGCR6L encodes a highly homologous, functional copy of DGCR6, with some base changes rendering amino acid differences. Expression studies of the two genes indicate that both genes are widely expressed in fetal and adult tissues. Evolutionary studies using FISH mapping in several different species of ape combined with sequence analysis of DGCR6 in a number of different primate species indicate that the duplication is at least 12 million years old and may date back to before the divergence of Catarrhines from Platyrrhines, 35 mya. These data suggest that there has been selective evolutionary pressure toward the functional maintenance of both paralogs. Interestingly, a full-length HERV-K provirus integrated into the sc11.1a locus after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. PMID:11157784

  10. Two functional copies of the DGCR6 gene are present on human chromosome 22q11 due to a duplication of an ancestral locus.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, L; Stankiewicz, P; Spiteri, E; Pandita, R K; Shaffer, L; Lupski, J R; Morrow, B E; Lupski, J

    2001-02-01

    The DGCR6 (DiGeorge critical region) gene encodes a putative protein with sequence similarity to gonadal (gdl), a Drosophila melanogaster gene of unknown function. We mapped the DGCR6 gene to chromosome 22q11 within a low copy repeat, termed sc11.1a, and identified a second copy of the gene, DGCR6L, within the duplicate locus, termed sc11.1b. Both sc11.1 repeats are deleted in most persons with velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), and they map immediately adjacent and internal to the low copy repeats, termed LCR22, that mediate the deletions associated with VCFS/DGS. We sequenced genomic clones from both loci and determined that the putative initiator methionine is located further upstream than originally described, but in a position similar to the mouse and chicken orthologs. DGCR6L encodes a highly homologous, functional copy of DGCR6, with some base changes rendering amino acid differences. Expression studies of the two genes indicate that both genes are widely expressed in fetal and adult tissues. Evolutionary studies using FISH mapping in several different species of ape combined with sequence analysis of DGCR6 in a number of different primate species indicate that the duplication is at least 12 million years old and may date back to before the divergence of Catarrhines from Platyrrhines, 35 mya. These data suggest that there has been selective evolutionary pressure toward the functional maintenance of both paralogs. Interestingly, a full-length HERV-K provirus integrated into the sc11.1a locus after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans.

  11. An Intronic Locus Control Region Plays an Essential Role in the Establishment of an Autonomous Hepatic Chromatin Domain for the Human Vitamin D-Binding Protein Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Hiroki, Tomoko; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Cooke, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    The human vitamin D-binding protein (hDBP) gene exists in a cluster of four liver-expressed genes. A minimal hDBP transgene, containing a defined set of liver-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSs), is robustly expressed in mouse liver in a copy-number-dependent manner. Here we evaluate these HSs for function. Deletion of HSI, located 5′ to the promoter (kb −2.1) had no significant effect on hDBP expression. In contrast, deletion of HSIV and HSV from intron 1 repressed hDBP expression and eliminated copy number dependency without a loss of liver specificity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed peaks of histone H3 and H4 acetylation coincident with HSIV in the intact hDBP locus. This region contains a conserved array of binding sites for the liver-enriched transcription factor C/EBP. In vitro studies revealed selective binding of C/EBPα to HSIV. In vivo occupancy of C/EBPα at HSIV was demonstrated in hepatic chromatin, and depletion of C/EBPα in a hepatic cell line decreased hDBP expression. A nonredundant role for C/EBPα was confirmed in vivo by demonstrating a reduction of hDBP expression in C/EBPα-null mice. Parallel studies revealed in vivo occupancy of the liver-enriched factor HNF1α at HSIII (at kb 0.13) within the hDBP promoter. These data demonstrate a critical role for elements within intron 1 in the establishment of an autonomous and productive hDBP chromatin locus and suggest that this function is dependent upon C/EBPα. Cooperative interactions between these intronic complexes and liver-restricted complexes within the target promoter are likely to underlie the consistency and liver specificity of the hDBP activation. PMID:17785430

  12. Multidimensional human capital formation in a developing country: Health, cognition and locus of control in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Villa, Kira M

    2017-07-08

    Economic success depends on multiple human capital stocks whose production is interrelated and occurs over many life stages. Yet, much empirical work fails to account for human capital's multidimensional nature and limits its focus to specific childhood stages. Using longitudinal data from the Philippines, I estimate a model of multidimensional human capital formation from birth through adulthood where health, cognitive, and noncognitive dimensions are jointly produced. I examine during which developmental stages parental investment is most influential and address the endogeneity of investment using a policy function where investment depends on child characteristics, exogenous conditions at birth and local prices. Findings imply that not only will early human capital disparities persist into adulthood without early remediation but also that cognitive gains yielded from early remediation will be lost without complementary investment in adolescence. Findings further suggest that interventions will be undervalued if their multidimensional effects are not accounted for. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Haq, A.K.; Pomerantz, S.H.; Halaban, R.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a lambdagt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were form related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase.

  14. A melanocyte-specific gene, Pmel 17, maps near the silver coat color locus on mouse chromosome 10 and is in a syntenic region on human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Chintamaneni, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kim, K.K. ); Kozak, C.A. ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N. ); Barton, D.; Francke, U. )

    1991-10-15

    Melanocytes preferentially express an mRNA species, Pmel 17, whose protein product cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies and whose expression correlates with the melanin content. The authors have now analyzed the deduced protein structure and mapped its chromosomal location in mouse and human. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the Pmel 17 cDNA showed that the protein is composed of 645 amino acids with a molecular weight of 68,600. The Pmel 17 protein contains a putative leader sequence and a potential membrane anchor segment, which indicates that this may be a membrane-associated protein in melanocytes. The deduced protein contains five potential N-glycosylation sites and relatively high levels of serine and threonine. Three repeats of a 26-amino acid motif appear in the middle of the molecule. The human Pmel 17 gene, designated D12S53E, maps to chromosome 12, region 12pter-q21; and the mouse homologue, designated D12S53Eh, maps to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10, a region also known to carry the coat color locus si (silver).

  15. Identification and characterization of a new human gene (APOC4) in the apolipoprotein E, C-I, and C-II gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, C.M.; Walker, D.; Taylor, J.M.; Segrest, J.P.

    1995-07-20

    We have identified and characterized a previously unreported human gene that is found within the apolipoprotein (apo) E/C-I/C-II gene locus. On the basis of its location and its properties, this new gene has been designated APOC4. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genomic DNA and liver cDNA clones revealed a 3.3-kb gene consisting of three exons and two introns. Its 3{prime} terminus lies 555 bp upstream of APOC2, giving both genes the same transcriptional orientation. The promoter of the APOC4 gene lacks a typical TATA box, consistent with an apparent heterogeneity in transcription start sites. RNase protection analysis indicated relatively low apoC-IV mRNA levels in human liver, compared to apoC-II mRNA levels. The predicted apoC-IV protein sequence, comprising 127 amino acid residues, contains a putative 25-residue signal peptide and two potential amphipathic {alpha}-helical domains. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate a limited homology between apoC-IV and either apoC-I or apoC-II. Since its hepatic expression and predicted protein structure are characteristic of the other genes in this cluster, we propose that the APOC4 gene is a member of the apolipoprotein gene family. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  16. In vivo Cigarette Smoke Exposure Decreases CCL20, SLPI, and BD-1 Secretion by Human Primary Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jukosky, James; Gosselin, Benoit J.; Foley, Leah; Dechen, Tenzin; Fiering, Steven; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A.

    2016-01-01

    Smokers and individuals exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke have a higher risk of developing chronic sinus and bronchial infections. This suggests that cigarette smoke (CS) has adverse effects on immune defenses against pathogens. Epithelial cells are important in airway innate immunity and are the first line of defense against infection. Airway epithelial cells not only form a physical barrier but also respond to the presence of microbes by secreting antimicrobials, cytokines, and chemokines. These molecules can lyse infectious microorganisms and/or provide signals critical to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. We examined the effects of CS on antimicrobial secretions of primary human nasal epithelial cells (PHNECs). Compared to non-CS-exposed individuals, PHNEC from in vivo CS-exposed individuals secreted less chemokine ligand (C-C motif) 20 (CCL20), Beta-defensin 1 (BD-1), and SLPI apically, less BD-1 and SLPI basolaterally, and more CCL20 basolaterally. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure in vitro decreased the apical secretion of CCL20 and beta-defensin 1 by PHNEC from non-CS-exposed individuals. Exposing PHNEC from non-CS exposed to CSE also significantly decreased the levels of many mRNA transcripts that are involved in immune signaling. Our results show that in vivo or in vitro exposure to CS alters the secretion of key antimicrobial peptides from PHNEC, but that in vivo CS exposure is a much more important modifier of antimicrobial peptide secretion. Based on the gene expression data, it appears that CSE disrupts multiple immune signaling pathways in PHNEC. Our results provide mechanistic insight into how CS exposure alters the innate immune response and increases an individual’s susceptibility to pathogen infection. PMID:26793127

  17. Population genetic analysis of the DARC locus (Duffy) reveals adaptation from standing variation associated with malaria resistance in humans

    PubMed Central

    Taravella, Angela M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Sikora, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The human DARC (Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines) gene encodes a membrane-bound chemokine receptor crucial for the infection of red blood cells by Plasmodium vivax, a major causative agent of malaria. Of the three major allelic classes segregating in human populations, the FY*O allele has been shown to protect against P. vivax infection and is at near fixation in sub-Saharan Africa, while FY*B and FY*A are common in Europe and Asia, respectively. Due to the combination of strong geographic differentiation and association with malaria resistance, DARC is considered a canonical example of positive selection in humans. Despite this, details of the timing and mode of selection at DARC remain poorly understood. Here, we use sequencing data from over 1,000 individuals in twenty-one human populations, as well as ancient human genomes, to perform a fine-scale investigation of the evolutionary history of DARC. We estimate the time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of the most common FY*O haplotype to be 42 kya (95% CI: 34–49 kya). We infer the FY*O null mutation swept to fixation in Africa from standing variation with very low initial frequency (0.1%) and a selection coefficient of 0.043 (95% CI:0.011–0.18), which is among the strongest estimated in the human genome. We estimate the TMRCA of the FY*A mutation in non-Africans to be 57 kya (95% CI: 48–65 kya) and infer that, prior to the sweep of FY*O, all three alleles were segregating in Africa, as highly diverged populations from Asia and ≠Khomani San hunter-gatherers share the same FY*A haplotypes. We test multiple models of admixture that may account for this observation and reject recent Asian or European admixture as the cause. PMID:28282382

  18. Nuclear cap binding protein maps close to the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) locus in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, B.P.; Obermayr, F.; Frischauf, A.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the localization of the nuclear cap binding protein (NCBP) to human chromosome 9 and mouse chromosome 4 using somatic cell hybridization analysis. NCBP plays an important role in the splicing and transport of messenger-RNA. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  20. Generation and characterization of a human iPSC cell line expressing inducible Cas9 in the "safe harbor" AAVS1 locus.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Julio; Bueno, Clara; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Roca-Ho, Heleia; Fraga, Mario F; Fernandez, Agustín F; Nakanishi, Mahito; Torres-Ruiz, Raúl; Rodríguez-Perales, Sandra; Menéndez, Pablo

    2017-05-01

    We report the generation-characterization of a fetal liver (FL) B-cell progenitor (BCP)-derived human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) line CRISPR/Cas9-edited to carry/express a single copy of doxycycline-inducible Cas9 gene in the "safe locus" AAVS1 (iCas9-FL-BCP-hiPSC). Gene-edited iPSCs remained pluripotent after CRISPR/Cas9 genome-edition. Correct genomic integration of a unique copy of Cas9 was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot. Cas9 was robustly and specifically expressed on doxycycline exposure. T7-endonuclease assay demonstrated that iCas9 induces robust gene-edition when gRNAs against hematopoietic transcription factors were tested. This iCas9-FL-BCP-hiPSC will facilitate gene-editing approaches for studies on developmental biology, drug screening and disease modeling. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Insights into the molecular mechanism for type 2 diabetes susceptibility at the KCNQ1 locus from temporal changes in imprinting status in human islets.

    PubMed

    Travers, Mary E; Mackay, Deborah J G; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Berry, Andrew; Johnson, Paul R; Hanley, Neil; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L

    2013-03-01

    The molecular basis of type 2 diabetes predisposition at most established susceptibility loci remains poorly understood. KCNQ1 maps within the 11p15.5 imprinted domain, a region with an established role in congenital growth phenotypes. Variants intronic to KCNQ1 influence diabetes susceptibility when maternally inherited. By use of quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing of human adult islet and fetal pancreas samples, we investigated the imprinting status of regional transcripts and aimed to determine whether type 2 diabetes risk alleles influence regional DNA methylation and gene expression. The results demonstrate that gene expression patterns differ by developmental stage. CDKN1C showed monoallelic expression in both adult and fetal tissue, whereas PHLDA2, SLC22A18, and SLC22A18AS were biallelically expressed in both tissues. Temporal changes in imprinting were observed for KCNQ1 and KCNQ1OT1, with monoallelic expression in fetal tissues and biallelic expression in adult samples. Genotype at the type 2 diabetes risk variant rs2237895 influenced methylation levels of regulatory sequence in fetal pancreas but without demonstrable effects on gene expression. We demonstrate that CDKN1C, KCNQ1, and KCNQ1OT1 are most likely to mediate diabetes susceptibility at the KCNQ1 locus and identify temporal differences in imprinting status and methylation effects, suggesting that diabetes risk effects may be mediated in early development.

  2. NF-E2 and GATA binding motifs are required for the formation of DNase I hypersensitive site 4 of the human beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Stamatoyannopoulos, J A; Goodwin, A; Joyce, T; Lowrey, C H

    1995-01-01

    The beta-like globin genes require the upstream locus control region (LCR) for proper expression. The active elements of the LCR coincide with strong erythroid-specific DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HSs). We have used 5' HS4 as a model to study the formation of these HSs. Previously, we identified a 101 bp element that is required for the formation of this HS. This element binds six proteins in vitro. We now report a mutational analysis of the HS4 HS-forming element (HSFE). This analysis indicates that binding sites for the hematopoietic transcription factors NF-E2 and GATA-1 are required for the formation of the characteristic chromatin structure of the HS following stable transfection into murine erythroleukemia cells. Similarly arranged NF-E2 and GATA binding sites are present in the other HSs of the human LCR, as well as in the homologous mouse and goat sequences and the chicken beta-globin enhancer. A combination of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assays indicates that the characteristic erythroid-specific hypersensitivity of HS4 to DNase I is the result of tissue-specific alterations in both nucleosome positioning and tertiary DNA structure. Images PMID:7828582

  3. Molecular mapping of a recombination hotspot located in the second intron of the human TAP2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, M.; Carrington, M.; Erlich, H.

    1995-06-01

    Recombination across the HLA class II region is not randomly distributed, as indicated by both strong linkage disequilibrium within the 100 kb encompassing the DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 loci and complete equilibrium between TAP1 and TAP2, the closest variant sites of which are <15 kb. In an attempt to explain these observations, 39 novel polymorphic markers in a region encompassing the TAP, LMP, and DOB genes were used to delineate the site of crossover in 11 class II recombinant chromosomes. SSCP demonstrated that two recombination events occurred within an 850-bp interval in the second intron of TAP2, which separates the variant sites of TAP1 and TAP2. These data indicate the presence of a recombination hotspot, the first to be identified from the analysis of familial transmission in the human major histocompatibility complex. The region of crossover was cloned and sequenced from one of the recombinants, further defining the crossover site to a 138-bp segment nested within the 850-bp region. This represents the most precisely defined region of recombination in the human genome. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. An historical perspective on "The world-wide distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus".

    PubMed

    Kidd, Kenneth K; Pakstis, Andrew J; Yun, Libing

    2014-04-01

    Human population genetics is a completely different science today compared to two decades ago, at least at the empiric level. Our paper [Chang (Hum Genet 98:91-101, 1996a)] demonstrated that three different alleles were common when one considered many populations although other low frequency alleles occurred. Because previous work had been largely done on European subjects, our findings involved 36 distinct populations and showed that East Asian populations had nearly lost the 7-repeat allele, and that Native American populations had the highest frequencies of that allele globally, was a significant early empiric demonstration of the potential magnitude of population variation at important genes. There are thousands of loci tested on many of the same populations and the gene frequency pattern seen for the DRD4 7-repeat allele is seen at other loci, arguing that this pattern commonly reflects the pattern of divergence of populations and accumulated random genetic drift.

  5. Identification of three microsatellites at the human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) locus, a gene potentially involved in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Borot, N.; Dolbois, L.; Coppin, H.

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding MOG is located on the short arm of chromosome 6, less than 120 kb telomeric to HLA-F. We have cloned the MOG gene from a cosmid library. Using tandemly repeated dinucleotides, we probed the genomic region containing the human MOG gene in order to identify and localize polymorphic markers: three microsatellites were characterized in that region. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based technique, we studied length variability for these three markers among 173 healthy individuals and 167 multiple sclerosis patients. Heterozygosity varied from 50% to 60% according to the marker. Pairwise studies showed significant linkage disequilibrium between some alleles. Multiple sclerosis patients and controls were not shown to have statistically significant differences in the MOG region. Further studies on the coding regions are in progress in order to exclude any involvement of the MOG gene in multiple sclerosis.

  6. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis. Methods Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs. Results In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology. Conclusion We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a

  7. A Human Embryonic Kidney 293T Cell Line Mutated at the Golgi α-Mannosidase II Locus*

    PubMed Central

    Crispin, Max; Chang, Veronica T.; Harvey, David J.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Lord, J. Michael; Spooner, Robert A.; Davis, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of Golgi α-mannosidase II activity can result in type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and induce lupus-like autoimmunity in mice. Here, we isolated a mutant human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line called Lec36, which displays sensitivity to ricin that lies between the parental HEK 293T cells, in which the secreted and membrane-expressed proteins are dominated by complex-type glycosylation, and 293S Lec1 cells, which produce only oligomannose-type N-linked glycans. Stem cell marker 19A was transiently expressed in the HEK 293T Lec36 cells and in parental HEK 293T cells with and without the potent Golgi α-mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine. Negative ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectra of the 19A N-linked glycans from HEK 293T Lec36 and swainsonine-treated HEK 293T cells were qualitatively indistinguishable and, as shown by collision-induced dissociation spectra, were dominated by hybrid-type glycosylation. Nucleotide sequencing revealed mutations in each allele of MAN2A1, the gene encoding Golgi α-mannosidase II: a point mutation that mapped to the active site was found in one allele, and an in-frame deletion of 12 nucleotides was found in the other allele. Expression of the wild type but not the mutant MAN2A1 alleles in Lec36 cells restored processing of the 19A reporter glycoprotein to complex-type glycosylation. The Lec36 cell line will be useful for expressing therapeutic glycoproteins with hybrid-type glycans and as a sensitive host for detecting mutations in human MAN2A1 causing type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. PMID:19465480

  8. A transcription map of the regions surrounding the CSF1R locus on human chromosome 5q31: Candidate genes for diastrophic dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Clines, G.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of unknown pathogenesis that is characterized by abnormal skeletal and cartilage growth. Phenotypic characteristics of the disorder include short stature, scoliosis, and deformation of the first metacarpal. The diastrophic dysplasia gene has been localized to chromosome 5q31-33, within {approximately}60 kb of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor gene (CSF1R). We have used direct cDNA selection to build a transcription map across {approximately}250 kb surrounding and including the CSF1R locus. cDNA pools from human placenta, activated T cells, cerebellum, Hela cells, fetal brain, chondrocytes, chondrosarcomas and osteosarcomas were multiplexed in these selections. After two rounds of selection, an analysis revealed that {approximately}70% of the selected cDNAs were contained within the contig. DNA sequencing and cosmid mapping data from a collection of 310 clones revealed the presence of three new genes in this region that show no appreciable homologies on sequence database searches, as well as cDNA clones from the CSF1R and the PDGFRB loci (another of the known genes in the region). An additional cDNA was found with 100% homology to the gene encoding human ribosomal protein L7 (RPL7). This cDNA comprised {approximately}25% of all selected clones. However, further analysis of the genomic contig revealed the presence of an RPL7 processed pseudogene in very close proximity to the CSF1R and PDGFRB genes. The selection of processed pseudogenes is one previously anticipated artifact of selection metholodolgies, but has not been previously observed. Mutational analysis of the three new genes is underway in diastrophic dysplasia families, as is derivation of full length cDNA clones and the expansion of this detailed transcription map into a larger genomic contig.

  9. Pretreatment with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor virus replication and inflammation in a perinatal lamb model of RSV infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is increasingly recognized as a perinatal regulator of lung maturation and surfactant protein expression. Innate immune components including surfactant proteins A and D, and beta defensins have putative antimicrobial activity against pulmonary pathogens inc...

  10. Diversity of the human LILRB3/A6 locus encoding a myeloid inhibitory and activating receptor pair.

    PubMed

    Bashirova, Arman A; Apps, Richard; Vince, Nicolas; Mochalova, Yelizaveta; Yu, Xu G; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR)B3 and LILRA6 represent a pair of inhibitory/activating receptors with identical extracellular domains and unknown ligands. LILRB3 can mediate inhibitory signaling via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs in its cytoplasmic tail whereas LILRA6 can signal through association with an activating adaptor molecule, FcRγ, which bears a cytoplasmic tail with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif. The receptors are encoded by two highly polymorphic neighboring genes within the leukocyte receptor complex on human chromosome 19. Here, we report that the two genes display similar levels of single nucleotide polymorphisms with the majority of polymorphic sites being identical. In addition, the LILRA6 gene exhibits copy number variation (CNV) whereas LILRB3 does not. A screen of healthy Caucasians indicated that 32 % of the subjects possessed more than two copies of LILRA6, whereas 4 % have only one copy of the gene per diploid genome. Analysis of mRNA expression in the major fractions of PBMCs showed that LILRA6 is primarily expressed in monocytes, similarly to LILRB3, and its expression level correlates with copy number of the gene. We suggest that the LILRA6 CNV may influence the level of the activating receptor on the cell surface, potentially affecting signaling upon LILRB3/A6 ligation.

  11. Comment on "Modafinil shifts human locus coeruleus to low-tonic, high-phasic activity during functional MRI" and "Homeostatic sleep pressure and responses to sustained attention in the suprachiasmatic area".

    PubMed

    Astafiev, Serguei V; Snyder, Abraham Z; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2010-04-16

    Minzenberg et al. (Reports, 12 December 2008, p. 1700) and Schmidt et al. (Reports, 24 April 2009, p. 516) reported blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in the human locus coeruleus (LC). Here, we show that these LC responses do not correspond to the anatomical location of the LC and present cautionary data concerning the quality of BOLD signals measured from the LC using standard functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition parameters.

  12. Molecular analysis and comparison of radiation-induced large deletions of the HPRT locus in primary human skin fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Y.; Park, M. S.; Okinaka, R. T.; Chen, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic alterations in gamma-ray- and alpha-particle-induced HPRT mutants were examined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. A total of 39-63% of gamma-ray-induced and 31-57% of alpha-particle-induced mutants had partial or total deletions of the HPRT gene. The proportion of these deletion events was dependent on radiation dose, and at the resolution limits employed there were no significant differences between the spectra induced by equitoxic doses of alpha particles (0.2-0.4 Gy) and gamma rays (3 Gy). The molecular nature of the deletions was analyzed by the use of sequence tagged site (STS) primers and PCR amplification as a "probe" for specific regions of the human X chromosome within the Xq26 region. These STSs were closely linked and spanned regions approximately 1.7 Mbp from the telomeric side and 1.7 Mbp from the centromeric side of the HPRT gene. These markers include: DXS53, 299R, DXS79, yH3L, 3/19, PR1, PR25, H2, yH3R, 1/44, 1/67, 1/1, DXS86, D8C6, DXS10 and DXS144. STS analyses indicated that the maximum size of total deletions in radiation-induced HPRT mutants can be greater than 2.7 Mbp and deletion size appears to be dependent on radiation dose. There were no apparent differences in the sizes of the deletions induced by alpha particles or gamma rays. On the other hand, deletions containing portions of the HPRT gene were observed to be 800 kbp or less, and the pattern of the partial deletion induced by alpha particles appeared to be different from that induced by gamma rays.

  13. Molecular analysis and comparison of radiation-induced large deletions of the HPRT locus in primary human skin fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Y.; Park, M. S.; Okinaka, R. T.; Chen, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic alterations in gamma-ray- and alpha-particle-induced HPRT mutants were examined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. A total of 39-63% of gamma-ray-induced and 31-57% of alpha-particle-induced mutants had partial or total deletions of the HPRT gene. The proportion of these deletion events was dependent on radiation dose, and at the resolution limits employed there were no significant differences between the spectra induced by equitoxic doses of alpha particles (0.2-0.4 Gy) and gamma rays (3 Gy). The molecular nature of the deletions was analyzed by the use of sequence tagged site (STS) primers and PCR amplification as a "probe" for specific regions of the human X chromosome within the Xq26 region. These STSs were closely linked and spanned regions approximately 1.7 Mbp from the telomeric side and 1.7 Mbp from the centromeric side of the HPRT gene. These markers include: DXS53, 299R, DXS79, yH3L, 3/19, PR1, PR25, H2, yH3R, 1/44, 1/67, 1/1, DXS86, D8C6, DXS10 and DXS144. STS analyses indicated that the maximum size of total deletions in radiation-induced HPRT mutants can be greater than 2.7 Mbp and deletion size appears to be dependent on radiation dose. There were no apparent differences in the sizes of the deletions induced by alpha particles or gamma rays. On the other hand, deletions containing portions of the HPRT gene were observed to be 800 kbp or less, and the pattern of the partial deletion induced by alpha particles appeared to be different from that induced by gamma rays.

  14. Complex signatures of locus-specific selective pressures and gene conversion on Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin genes.

    PubMed

    Sedman, Laura; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Kelgo, Piret; Laan, Maris

    2008-10-01

    Reduced birth weight and slow neonatal growth are risks correlated with the development of common diseases in adulthood. The Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin (hGH/CSH) gene cluster (48 kb) at 17q22-24, consisting of one pituitary-expressed postnatal (GH1) and four placental genes (GH2, CSH1, CSH2, and CSHL1) may contribute to common variation in intrauterine and infant growth, and also to the regulation of feto-maternal and adult glucose metabolism. In contrast to GH1, there are limited genetic data on the hGH/CSH genes expressed in utero. We report the first survey of sequence variation encompassing all five hGH/CSH genes. Resequencing identified 113 SNPs/indels (ss86217675-ss86217787 in dbSNP) including 66 novel variants, and revealed remarkable differences in diversity patterns among the homologous duplicated genes as well as between the study populations of European (Estonians), Asian (Han Chinese), and African (Mandenkalu) ancestries. A dominant feature of the hGH/CSH region is hyperactive gene conversion, with the rate exceeding tens to hundreds of times the rate of reciprocal crossing-over and resulting in near absence of linkage disequilibrium. The initiation of gene conversion seems to be uniformly distributed because the data do not predict any recombination hotspots. Signatures of different selective constraints acting on each gene indicate functional specification of the hGH/CSH genes. Most strikingly, the GH2 coding for placental growth hormone shows strong intercontinental diversification (F(ST)=0.41-0.91; p<10(-6)) indicative of balancing selection, whereas the flanking CSH1 exhibits low population differentiation (F(ST)=0.03-0.09), low diversity (non-Africans, pi=8-9 x 10(-5); Africans, pi=8.2 x 10(-4)), and one dominant haplotype worldwide, consistent with purifying selection. The results imply that the success of an association study targeted to duplicated genes may be enhanced by prior resequencing of the study population in order

  15. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  16. Ethylene oxide: induction of specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of heterokaryon 12 of Neurospora crassa and implications for genetic risk assessment of human exposure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Brockman, H E

    1995-04-01

    mutagenic specificity of other chemical mutagens and carcinogens in the ad-3 forward-mutation assay in Neurospora. The utilization of the Neurospora specific-locus data on ETO and those from experiments in the mouse and Drosophila, by others, is discussed for genetic risk assessment of germ-cell effects resulting from human exposure to ETO in the workplace.

  17. Specific-locus mutation rates in the mouse following inhalation of ethylene oxide, and application of the results to estimation of human genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Cumming, R B; Hunsicker, P R

    1984-12-01

    Male (101 X C3H)F1 mice were exposed in an inhalation chamber to ethylene oxide (EtO) in air at a concentration of (generally) 255 ppm. After accumulating total exposures of 101 000 or 150 000 ppm.h in 16-23 weeks, the males were mated to T-stock females for a standard specific-locus mutation-rate study in which 71387 offspring were observed. The spermatogonial stem-cell mutation rate at each exposure level, as well as the combined result, does not differ significantly from the historical control frequency. At the lower and higher exposure levels, the results rule out (at the 5% significance level) an induced frequency that is, respectively, 0.97 and 6.33 times the spontaneous rate; the combined results rule out a multiple of 1.64. The relationship between mouse spermatogonial stem-cell mutation rates and EtO-induced testis ethylations was compared with the relationship between Drosophila post-stem-cell mutation rates and sperm ethylations (Lee, 1980). The comparison does not rule out equal mutability per ethylation; but it cannot prove parallelism. An assessment of the mouse-Drosophila relationship will require a more efficient alkylator than EtO and the use of comparable germ-cell stages. More meaningful conclusions may be drawn by utilizing the data for direct estimation of human risk by expressing the induced mutation frequency that is ruled out (at the 5% significance level) as a multiple of control rate and extrapolating to human exposure levels. The probable absence of major stem-cell killing (and thus, possibly, cell selection) by EtO indicates that such extrapolation probably does not produce an underestimate. For a human exposure concentration of 0.1 ppm on working days during the reproductive lifespan, the mouse experimental results rule out (at the 5% significance level) an induced spermatogonial stem-cell gene mutation rate greater than 8% of the spontaneous rate; for 1.0 ppm, they rule out an induced rate roughly equal to the spontaneous rate. The

  18. Improving resolution of public health surveillance for human Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection: 3 years of prospective multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prospective typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) can assist in identifying clusters of STM cases that might otherwise have gone unrecognised, as well as sources of sporadic and outbreak cases. This paper describes the dynamics of human STM infection in a prospective study of STM MLVA typing for public health surveillance. Methods During a three-year period between August 2007 and September 2010 all confirmed STM isolates were fingerprinted using MLVA as part of the New South Wales (NSW) state public health surveillance program. Results A total of 4,920 STM isolates were typed and a subset of 4,377 human isolates was included in the analysis. The STM spectrum was dominated by a small number of phage types, including DT170 (44.6% of all isolates), DT135 (13.9%), DT9 (10.8%), DT44 (4.5%) and DT126 (4.5%). There was a difference in the discriminatory power of MLVA types within endemic phage types: Simpson's index of diversity ranged from 0.109 and 0.113 for DTs 9 and 135 to 0.172 and 0.269 for DTs 170 and 44, respectively. 66 distinct STM clusters were observed ranging in size from 5 to 180 cases and in duration from 4 weeks to 25 weeks. 43 clusters had novel MLVA types and 23 represented recurrences of previously recorded MLVA types. The diversity of the STM population remained relatively constant over time. The gradual increase in the number of STM cases during the study was not related to significant changes in the number of clusters or their size. 667 different MLVA types or patterns were observed. Conclusions Prospective MLVA typing of STM allows the detection of community outbreaks and demonstrates the sustained level of STM diversity that accompanies the increasing incidence of human STM infections. The monitoring of novel and persistent MLVA types offers a new benchmark for STM surveillance. A part of this study was presented at the MEEGID × (Molecular Epidemiology

  19. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Noradrenergic Locus Coeruleus: Its Roles in the Regulation of Arousal and Autonomic Function Part II: Physiological and Pharmacological Manipulations and Pathological Alterations of Locus Coeruleus Activity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, E. R; Szabadi, E

    2008-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC), the major noradrenergic nucleus of the brain, gives rise to fibres innervating most structures of the neuraxis. Recent advances in neuroscience have helped to unravel the neuronal circuitry controlling a number of physiological functions in which the LC plays a central role. Two such functions are the regulation of arousal and autonomic activity, which are inseparably linked largely via the involvement of the LC. Alterations in LC activity due to physiological or pharmacological manipulations or pathological processes can lead to distinct patterns of change in arousal and autonomic function. Physiological manipulations considered here include the presentation of noxious or anxiety-provoking stimuli and extremes in ambient temperature. The modification of LC-controlled functions by drug administration is discussed in detail, including drugs which directly modify the activity of LC neurones (e.g., via autoreceptors, storage, reuptake) or have an indirect effect through modulating excitatory or inhibitory inputs. The early vulnerability of the LC to the ageing process and to neurodegenerative disease (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases) is of considerable clinical significance. In general, physiological manipulations and the administration of stimulant drugs, α2-adrenoceptor antagonists and noradrenaline uptake inhibitors increase LC activity and thus cause heightened arousal and activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast, the administration of sedative drugs, including α2-adrenoceptor agonists, and pathological changes in LC function in neurodegenerative disorders and ageing reduce LC activity and result in sedation and activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. PMID:19506724

  20. Distribution and factors associated with Salmonella enterica genotypes in a diverse population of humans and animals in Qatar using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST).

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu C; Scaria, Joy; Ibraham, Mariamma; Doiphode, Sanjay; Chang, Yung-Fu; Sultan, Ali; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most commonly reported causes of bacterial foodborne illness around the world. Understanding the sources of this pathogen and the associated factors that exacerbate its risk to humans will help in developing risk mitigation strategies. The genetic relatedness among Salmonella isolates recovered from human gastroenteritis cases and food animals in Qatar were investigated in the hope of shedding light on these sources, their possible transmission routes, and any associated factors. A repeat cross-sectional study was conducted in which the samples and associated data were collected from both populations (gastroenteritis cases and animals). Salmonella isolates were initially analyzed using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to investigate the genetic diversity and clonality. The relatedness among the isolates was assessed using the minimum spanning tree (MST). Twenty-seven different sequence types (STs) were identified in this study; among them, seven were novel, including ST1695, ST1696, ST1697, ST1698, ST1699, ST1702, and ST1703. The pattern of overall ST distribution was diverse; in particular, it was revealed that ST11 and ST19 were the most common sequence types, presenting 29.5% and 11.5% within the whole population. In addition, 20 eBurst Groups (eBGs) were identified in our data, which indicates that ST11 and ST19 belonged to eBG4 and eBG1, respectively. In addition, the potential association between the putative risk factors and eBGs were evaluated. There was no significant clustering of these eBGs by season; however, a significant association was identified in terms of nationality in that Qataris were six times more likely to present with eBG1 compared to non-Qataris. In the MST analysis, four major clusters were presented, namely, ST11, ST19, ST16, and ST31. The linkages between the clusters alluded to a possible transmission route. The results of the study have provided insight into the ST distributions of S. enterica and

  1. Genetic mapping in human and mouse of the locus encoding TRBP, a protein that binds the TAR region of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, C.A.; Gatignol, A.; Graham, K.

    1995-01-01

    Productive infection with HIV-1, the virus responsible for AIDS, requires the involvement of host cell factors for completion of the replicative cycle, but the identification of these factors and elucidation of their specific functions has been difficult. A human cDNA, TRBP, was recently cloned and characterized as a positive regulator of gene expression that binds to the TAR region of the HIV-1 genome. Here we demonstrate that this factor is encoded by a gene, TARBP2, that maps to human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15, and we also identify and map one human pseudogene (TARBP2P) and two mouse TRBP-related sequences. The map location of the expressed gene identifies it as a candidate for the previously identified factor encoded on human chromosome 12 that has been shown to be important for expression of HIV-1 genes. Western blotting indicates that despite high sequence conservation in human and mouse, the TARBP2 protein differs in apparent size in primate and rodent cells. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. An extremely polymorphic locus on the short arm of the human X chromosome with homology to the long arm of the Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, R G; Nelson, C A; Brown, V A; Page, D C; Donis-Keller, H

    1989-01-01

    A genomic DNA clone named CRI-S232 reveals an array of highly polymorphic restriction fragments on the X chromosome as well as a set of non-polymorphic fragments on the Y chromosome. Every individual has multiple bands, highly variable in length, in every restriction enzyme digest tested. One set of bands is found in all males, and co-segregates with the Y chromosome in families. These sequences have been regionally localized by deletion mapping to the long arm of the Y chromosome. Segregation analysis in families shows that all of the remaining fragments co-segregate as a single locus on the X chromosome, each haplotype consisting of three or more polymorphic fragments. This locus (designated DXS278) is linked to several markers on Xp, the closest being dic56 (DXS143) at a distance of 2 cM. Although it is outside the pseudoautosomal region, the S232 X chromosome locus shows linkage to pseudoautosomal markers in female meiosis. In determining the X chromosome S232 haplotypes of 138 offspring among 19 families, we observed three non-parental haplotypes. Two were recombinant haplotypes, consistent with a cross-over among the S232-hybridizing fragments in maternal meiosis. The third was a mutant haplotype arising on a paternal X chromosome. The locus identified by CRI-S232 may therefore be a recombination and mutation hotspot. Images PMID:2911472

  3. Correlation between genotypic diversity, lipooligosaccharide gene locus class variation and Caco-2 invasion potential of Campylobacter jejuni from human and chicken meat origin: a contribution to virulotyping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Significant interest in studying the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of Campylobacter jejuni stemmed from its potential role in post-infection paralytic disorders. In this study we present PCR screening of five LOS locus classes (A, B, C, D, and E), for a collection of 117 C. jejuni strains from chicken m...

  4. Determination of Hyaluronan Molecular Mass Distribution in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; De La Motte, Carol A.; Cowman, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection, via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size-specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from twenty unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employingion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size, and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive Enzyme Linked Sorbent Assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M ≤ 20 kDa, M ≈20-60 kDa, and M ≈ 60-110 kDa comprised an average of 1.5%, 1.4% and 2% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M≥110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from thirteen samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of ∼440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low M HA components. PMID:25579786

  5. Characterization of a human X-linked gene from the DXS732E locus in the candidate region for the anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) gene (Xq13.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Gault, J.; Zonana, J.; Zeltinger, J.

    1994-09-01

    A conserved mouse genomic clone was used to identify a homologous human genomic clone (the DXS732E locus), which was subsequently employed to isolate cDNAs from a human fetal brain library. Nine unique overlapping cDNAs were isolated, and sequences analysis of 3.9 kb identified a putative 1 kb ORF. GRAIL analysis of the sequence supported the hypothesis that the putative ORF was coding sequence, and Prosite analysis of the putative ORF identified potential glycosylation and phosphorylation sites. The 5{prime} end of the gene maps within a CpG island, and comparison of cDNA sequences indicate the gene is alternatively spliced at its 3{prime} end. Northern analysis and RT-PCR indicate that two different sized messages appear to be expressed with the gene expressed in human fetal kidney, intestine, brain, and muscle. The gene is expressed in 77 day human skin, a time when hair follicle formation occurs. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) results in the abnormal morphogenesis of hair, teeth and eccrine sweat glands. A positional cloning strategy towards cloning the EDA gene had been used, and deletion and X-autosome translocation patients have been useful in further delimiting the EDA region. The present gene at the DXS732E locus is partially deleted in one EDA patient who does not have other apparent abnormalities. No rearrangements of the gene have been detected in two female X-autosome translocation EDA patients, nor in four additional male patients with submicroscopic molecular deletions.

  6. Recurrent mutation, gene conversion, or recombination at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase locus: evidence in French-Canadians and a catalog of mutations.

    PubMed Central

    John, S W; Rozen, R; Scriver, C R; Laframboise, R; Laberge, C

    1990-01-01

    The codon 408 mutation (CGG----TGG, Arg----Trp) in exon 12 of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene occurs on haplotype 1 in French-Canadians; elsewhere this mutation (R408W) occurs on haplotype 2. A CpG dinucleotide is involved. The finding is compatible with a recurrent mutation, gene conversion, or a single recombination between haplotypes 2 and 1. A tabulation of 20 known mutations at the PAH locus reveals three instances of putative recurrent mutation. PMID:1971147

  7. Map refinement of locus RP13 to human chromosome 17p13.3 in a second family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kojis, T.L.; Heinzmann, C.; Ngo, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic basis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in a large eight-generation family (UCLA-RP09) of British descent, we assessed linkage between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and numerous genetic loci, including eight adRP candidate genes, five anonymous adRP-linked DNA loci, and 20 phenotypic markers. Linkage to the UCLA-RP09 disease gene was excluded for all eight candidate genes analyzed, including rhodopsin (RP4) and peripherin/RDS (RP7), for the four adRP loci RP1, RP9, RP10 and RP11, as well as for 17 phenotypic markers. The anonymous DNA marker locus D17S938, linked to adRP locus RP13 on chromosome 17p13.1, yielded a suggestive but not statistically significant positive lod score. Linkage was confirmed between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and markers distal to D17S938 in the chromosomal region 17p13.3. A reanalysis of the original RP13 data from a South African adRP family of British descent, in conjunction with our UCLA-RP09 data, suggests that only one adRP locus exists on 17p but that it maps to a more telomeric position, at band 17p13.3, than previously reported. Confirmation of the involvement of RP13 in two presumably unrelated adRP families, both of British descent, suggests that this locus is a distinct adRP gene in a proportion of British, and possibly other, adRP families. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Targeting of the human F8 at the multicopy rDNA locus in Hemophilia A patient-derived iPSCs using TALENickases.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jialun; Wu, Yong; Li, Zhuo; Hu, Zhiqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xionghao; Zhou, Miaojin; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yanchi; Feng, Mai; Liang, Desheng

    2016-03-25

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a monogenic disease due to lack of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII). This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding but there is no cure for HA until very recently. In this study, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with severe HA and used transcription activator-like effector nickases (TALENickases) to target the factor VIII gene (F8) at the multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus in HA-iPSCs, aiming to rescue the shortage of FVIII protein. The results revealed that more than one copy of the exogenous F8 could be integrated into the rDNA locus. Importantly, we detected exogenous F8 mRNA and FVIII protein in targeted HA-iPSCs. After they were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), the exogenous FVIII protein was still detectable. Thus, it is showed that the multicopy rDNA locus could be utilized as an effective target site in patient-derived iPSCs for gene therapy. This strategy provides a novel iPSCs-based therapeutic option for HA and other monogenic diseases.

  9. Susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus maps to a locus (IDDM11) on human chromosome 14q24.3-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Field, L.L.; Tobias, R.; Thomson, G.

    1996-04-01

    To locate genes predisposing to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), an autoimmune disorder resulting from destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic cells, we are testing linkage of IDDM susceptibility to polymorphic markers across the genome using families with two or more IDDM children. A new susceptibility locus (IDDM11) has been localized to chromosome 14q24.3-q31 by detection of significant linkage to microsatellite D14S67, using both maximum likelihood methods D14S67, using both maximum likelihood methods (LOD{sub max} = 4.0 at {theta} = 0.20) and affected sib pair (ASP) methods (P = 1 x 10{sup -5}). This represents the strongest reported evidence for linkage to any IDDM locus outside the HLA region. The subset of families in which affected children did not show increased sharing of HLA genes (HLA sharing {le}50%) provided most of the support for D14S67 linkage (LOD{sub max}4.6 at {theta} = 0.12;ASP P < 5 x 10{sup -6}). There was significant linkage heterogeneity between the HLA-defined subsets of families (P = 0.009), suggesting that IDDM11 may be an important susceptibility locus in families lacking strong HLA region predisposition. 52 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  11. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  12. Independence of Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-09

    F O-AO.. 17 ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN HUMAN ATTENTION RES -ETC F/A 5/10 INDEPENDENCE OF FOVEAL RETINAL LOCUS AND VISUAL DETECTION PARAD -ETC...variably mapped, and frame time of 100 or 200 msec for the consistent or variably mapped conditions, respectively. The main effects of experimental paradigm...Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm Walter Schneider and Arthur D. Fisk Report 8001 Human Attention Research Laboratory University of

  13. Intra-and inter-population genetic diversity at the HLA-DQA1 locus and their implications for parentage analysis and human identification

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, F. |; Cerda-Flores, R. |; Zhong, Y.

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DQA1 locus, studied by PCR-based sequence specific oligonucleotide probes, is highly polymorphic in all populations thus far studied. From the literature we compiled genotype and allele frequency data at this locus for 87 populations to examine the pattern of intra- and inter- population genetic diversity. In general, allele frequency variations in populations are consistent with their ethno-history, although small isolated populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders) exhibit somewhat disparate variations of allele frequencies. A nested gene diversity analysis of 41 populations, classified into 5 ethnic groups (African, n = 3; Caucasian, n = 18; American Native, n = 3; Asian, n = 8; Pacific Islanders, n = 9) showed that the total gene diversity (80.4%) is largely (95%) due to intra-population variation. Only 3% of the gene diversity is due to inter-population within ethnic group variation, with the remaining 2% due to between ethnic group variation. In terms of average heterozygosity, probability of paternity exlusion, and probability of individual identification, the inter-ethnic group variation is larger than that between poulation samples within the ethnic groups. No significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations of genotype frequencies was observed in any population. With an average heterozygosity of 77% around the world, this locus provides a 57% chance of exclusion of a falsely accused person from paternity, and is able to exclude 91% of individuals for identification purposes. In terms of allele fequencies, the geometric positions of the admixed populations (e.g. African-Americans and American-Hispanics) are consistent with their admixture estimates in their gene pool.

  14. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Construction of an ∼700-kb Transcript Map Around the Familial Mediterranean Fever Locus on Human Chromosome 16p13.3

    PubMed Central

    Centola, Michael; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sood, Raman; Deng, Zuoming; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Blake, Trevor; Ricke, Darrell O.; Chen, Xiang; Wood, Geryl; Zaks, Nurit; Richards, Neil; Krizman, David; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Apostolou, Sinoula; Liu, Jingmei; Shafran, Neta; Vedula, Anil; Hamon, Melanie; Cercek, Andrea; Kahan, Tanaz; Gumucio, Deborah; Callen, David F.; Richards, Robert I.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Doggett, Norman A.; Collins, Francis S.; Liu, P. Paul; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Kastner, Daniel L.

    1998-01-01

    We used a combination of cDNA selection, exon amplification, and computational prediction from genomic sequence to isolate transcribed sequences from genomic DNA surrounding the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) locus. Eighty-seven kb of genomic DNA around D16S3370, a marker showing a high degree of linkage disequilibrium with FMF, was sequenced to completion, and the sequence annotated. A transcript map reflecting the minimal number of genes encoded within the ∼700 kb of genomic DNA surrounding the FMF locus was assembled. This map consists of 27 genes with discreet messages detectable on Northerns, in addition to three olfactory-receptor genes, a cluster of 18 tRNA genes, and two putative transcriptional units that have typical intron–exon splice junctions yet do not detect messages on Northerns. Four of the transcripts are identical to genes described previously, seven have been independently identified by the French FMF Consortium, and the others are novel. Six related zinc-finger genes, a cluster of tRNAs, and three olfactory receptors account for the majority of transcribed sequences isolated from a 315-kb FMF central region (between D16S468/D16S3070 and cosmid 377A12). Interspersed among them are several genes that may be important in inflammation. This transcript map not only has permitted the identification of the FMF gene (MEFV), but also has provided us an opportunity to probe the structural and functional features of this region of chromosome 16. PMID:9847080

  16. Cloning of a human ortholog (RPH3AL) of (RNO)Rph3al from a candidate 17p13.3 medulloblastoma tumor suppressor locus.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Tachibana, I; Allen, C; Chiappa, S A; Lee, H K; McIver, B; Jenkins, R B; Raffel, C

    1999-07-01

    Allelic loss of 17p13.3 is observed in approximately 40% of medulloblastomas, suggesting the presence of a tumor suppressor gene in this region. Deletion mapping has defined a region of common loss flanking the telomeric marker D17S34, and a recent report delineated a 9-kb homozygous deletion within the D17S34 locus in one such tumor. Using cDNA selection, we have identified a transcript spanning this deletion, designated (HSA)RPH3AL (rabphillin-3A-like), based on its 77% overall amino acid identity with a recently cloned rat gene, (RNO)Rph3al (originally termed Noc2), a gene putatively involved in regulated endocrine exocytosis through its interactions with the cytoskeleton. We determined the exon-intron boundaries of RPH3AL and screened the coding region for mutations by direct sequencing in DNA extracted from 33 tumor samples with allelic loss of 17p13, including 10 medulloblastoma, 14 follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), and 9 ovarian cancer specimens. No mutations were identified. Thus, despite its location in a homozygously deleted 17p13.3 locus, it is unlikely that RPH3AL is a gene involved in the oncogenesis of medulloblastoma, FTC, or ovarian cancer.

  17. The Effect of Calcipotriol on the Expression of Human β Defensin-2 and LL-37 in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Joon; Rho, Yong Kwan; Lee, Hye In; Jeong, Mi Sook; Li, Kapsok; Seo, Seong Jun; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vitamin D has been reported to regulate innate immunity by controlling the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Objective. We investigated the effect of calcipotriol on the expression of AMPs in human cultured keratinocytes. Methods. Keratinocytes were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TNF-α, Calcipotriol and irradiated with UVB, cultured, and harvested. To assess the expression of human beta defensin-2 and LL-37 in the control group, not exposed to any stimulants, the experimental group was treated with LPS, TNF-α, or UVB, and another group was treated again with calcipotriol; reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Results. In the experimental group treated with LPS, UVB irradiation, and TNF-α, the expression of β-defensin and LL-37 was increased more than in the control group and then decreased in the experimental group treated with calcipotriol. Conclusions. Calcipotriol suppressed HBD-2 and LL-37, which were stimulated by UVB, LPS, and TNF-α. PMID:20182640

  18. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Steele, Natasha Z R; Carr, Jessie S; Bonham, Luke W; Geier, Ethan G; Damotte, Vincent; Miller, Zachary A; Desikan, Rahul S; Boehme, Kevin L; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Hollenbach, Jill A; Huang, Yadong; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4. Separate

  19. Localization of the CYP2D gene locus to human chromosome 22q13. 1 by polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gouch, A.C.; Howell, S.M.; Bryant, S.P.; Spurr, N.K. ); Smith, C.A.D.; Wolf, C.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Using a combination of somatic cell hybrids, in situ hybridization, and linkage mapping, we have been able to localize the cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene to chromosome 22 in the region q13.1. Linkage analysis, using locus-specific primers, showed a maximum sex-average lod score of 8.12 ([theta] = 0.00) between the marker pH130 (D22S64) and CYPsD6, of 6.92 ([theta] - 0.00) between the marker KI839 (D22S95) and CYP2D6, and 4.80 ([theta] = 0.036) between the platelet-derived growth factor [beta] subunit gene (PDGFB) and CYP2D6. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Identification and structural characterization of avian beta-defensin 2 peptides from pheasant and quail

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pheasant and quail orthologues of avian ß-defensin 2 (AVBD2) were identified in methanol extracts of heterophil and bone marrow using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). We used comparative pattern profiling before and after reduction/alkyla...

  1. Expression of avian beta-defensins in the intestine of Eimeria-challenged chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian coccidiosis is caused by the intracellular protozoa Eimeria. The site of invasion and lesions in the intestine is species-specific; for example, E. acervulina mainly affects the duodenum, E. maxima the jejunum, and E. tenella the ceca. Lesions in the intestinal mucosa reduce feed efficiency a...

  2. Identification and Characterization of Pheasant and Quail Avian Beta Defensin 2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peptides play significant roles in physiology as hormones, neurotransmitters, growth, antimicrobial, and signal transducing factors. Identification of their tissue specific occurrence and abundance may lead to a better understanding of their physiological significance. Previously, we identified matu...

  3. Identification, Expression and Activity Analyses of Five Novel Duck Beta-Defensins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyue; Xin, Shengnan; Liu, Xiaoli; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Shengwang

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, five novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs) were identified and characterized in tissues from Peking ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). The nucleotide sequences of these cDNAs comprised 198 bp, 182 bp, 201 bp, 204 bp, and 168 bp, and encoded 65, 60, 66, 67, and 55 amino acids, respectively. Homology, characterization and comparison of these genes with AvBD from other avian species confirmed that they were Apl_AvBD1, 3, 5, 6, and 16. Recombinant AvBDs were produced and purified by expressing these genes in Escherichia coli. In addition, peptides were synthesized according to the respective AvBD sequences. Investigation of the antibacterial activity of the Apl_AvBDs showed that all of them exhibited antibacterial activity against all 12 bacteria investigated (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In addition, the antibacterial activity of all of the AvBDs against M. tetragenus and P. multocida decreased significantly in the presence of 150 mM NaCl (P<0.01). None of the AvBDs showed hemolytic activity. Consistent with their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, the five novel Apl_AvBDs inhibited replication of duck hepatitis virus (DHV) in vitro significantly (P<0.05). The mRNA expression of all five Apl_AvBD in most tissues, including immune organs and the liver, was upregulated in response to DHV infection at different time points. These findings provide evidence that these defensins activate the immune response to combat microbial infection. PMID:23112840

  4. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth.

  5. Human endopeptidase (THOP1) is localized on chromosome 19 within the linkage region for the late-onset Alzheimer disease AD2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Meckelein, B.; Abraham, C.R.; De Silva, H.A.R.

    1996-01-15

    A cDNA encoding the rat endopeptidase 24.15 was used to determine the chromosomal localization of the respective human gene. Hybridization to DNA from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids assigned the human gene to chromosome 19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes localized the human endopeptidase 24.15 to 19q13.3. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. cDNA cloning and gene structure of a novel water channel expressed exclusively in human kidney: evidence for a gene cluster of aquaporins at chromosome locus 12q13.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Yang, B; Kuo, W L; Verkman, A S

    1996-08-01

    A 1.8-kb cDNA clone (designed hKID, gene symbol AQP2L) with homology to the aquaporins was isolated from a human kidney cDNA library. The longest open reading frame of 846 bp encoded a 282-amino-acid hydrophobic protein that contained the conserved NPA motifs of MIP family members. Cell-free translation produced a nonglycosylated protein migrating at 29 kDa. Amino acid alignment showed the greatest homology of hKID to human MIP (48% identity) and AQP-2 (52%), with lesser homology to human MIWC (AQP-4, 34%), CHIP28 (AQP-1, 38%), and GLIP (AQP-3, 22%). Northern blot analysis revealed a 2.2-kb transcript expressed only in human kidney. PCR/Southern blot analysis of human kidney cDNA using primers flanking the hKID coding sequence revealed expression of a full-length mRNA and short transcripts with partial exon 1 and partial exon 4 deletions. Expression of hKID cRNA in Xenopus oocytes did not increase glycerol or urea permeability, but increased osmotic water permeability from (2.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(-4) to (7.4 +/- 0.7) x 10(-4) cm/s (10 degrees C) in a mercurial-sensitive manner. Sequence comparison of hKID cDNA with a cloned 21-kb genomic DNA indicated three introns (lengths 0.7, 0.25, and 0.4 kb) separating four exons with boundaries at amino acids 121, 174, and 201. The hKID promoter was identified and contained TATA, SP1, E-box, and AP1 and AP2 elements; primer extension revealed hKID transcription initiation 654 bp upstream from the translational initiation site. Genomic Southern blot indicated a single-copy hKID gene. PCR analysis of a human/rodent somatic hybrid panel localized the hKID gene to chromosome 12. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization mapped the hKID (AQP2L) gene to chromosome locus 12q13, the same location as the AQP. 2 and MIP genes. The high sequence homology, similar genomic structure, and identical chromosomal loci of hKID, MIP, and AQP-2 suggest a MIP family gene cluster at chromosome locus 12q13. Further work is needed to establish the

  7. The location of a disease-associated polymorphism and genomic structure of the human 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus (SSA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsugu, H.; Horowitz, R.; Gibson, N.

    1994-12-01

    Sera from approximately 30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contain high titers of autoantibodies that bind to the 52-kDa Ro/SSA protein. We previously detected polymorphisms in the 52-kDa Ro/SSA gene (SSA1) with restriction enzymes, one of which is strongly associated with the presence of SLE (P < 0.0005) in African Americans. A higher disease frequency and more severe forms of the disease are commonly noted among these female patients. To determine the location and nature of this polymorphism, we obtained two clones that span 8.5 kb of the 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus including its upstream regulatory region. Six exons were identified, and their nucleotide sequences plus adjacent noncoding regions were determined. No differences were found between these exons and the coding region of one of the reported cDNAs. The disease-associated polymorphic site suggested by a restriction enzyme map and confirmed by DNA amplification and nucleotide sequencing was present upstream of exon 1. This polymorphism may be a genetic marker for a disease-related variation in the coding region for the protein or in the upstream regulatory region of this gene. Although this RFLP is present in Japanese, it is not associated with lupus in this race. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Long-range restriction map of human chromosome 22q11-22q12 between the lambda immunoglobulin locus and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint

    SciTech Connect

    McDermid, H.E. ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA )

    1993-11-01

    A long-range restriction map of the region between the immunoglobulin lambda locus and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint has been constructed using the rare-cutting enzymes NotI, NruI, AscI, and BsiWI. The map spans approximately 11,000 kb and represents about one-fifth of the long arm of chromosome 22. Thirty-nine markers, including seven NotI junction clones as well as numerous genes and anonymous sequences, were mapped to the region with a somatic cell hybrid panel. These probes were then used to produce the map. The seven NotI junction clones each identified a possible CpG island. The breakpoints of the RAJ5 hybrid and the Ewing sarcoma t(11;22) were also localized in the resulting map. This physical map will be useful in studying chromosomal rearrangements in the region, as well as providing the details to examine the fidelity of the YAC and cosmid contigs currently under construction. Comparisons of this physical map to genetic and radiation hybrid maps are discussed. 52 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. High-resolution mapping of the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Becker, H. W.; Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S.; Davies, K. P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N. S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. We have extended our previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009–.075. Multipoint analyses gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosities of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that cosegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXS732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. PMID:1357963

  10. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Browne, D.; Becker, H.W. ); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. ); Davies, K.P.; Clarke, A. )

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  12. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-10-11

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  13. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation. PMID:27727248

  14. Alterations in RD(INK4/ARF) -mediated en bloc regulation of the INK4-ARF locus in human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Poi, Ming J; Knobloch, Thomas J; Sears, Marta T; Warner, Blake M; Uhrig, Lana K; Weghorst, Christopher M; Li, Junan

    2015-07-01

    The presence of RD(INK4/ARF) (RD) enhancer in the INK4-ARF locus provides a novel mechanism to simultaneously increase the transcription of p15(INK4b) (p15), p14ARF (p14), and p16(INK4a) (p16). While such upregulation can be repressed through interactions between RD and oncoproteins CDC6 and BMI1, little is known about the involvement of RD in cancer. In this study we investigated RD deletions in 30 squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and the patient-matched High At-Risk Mucosa specimens (HARM, "phenotypically normal" tissues neighboring SCCHN foci but beyond the surgical resection margin). RD was deleted (homozygously/heterozygously) in SCCHN and HARM at the incidence of 36.7% (11/30) and 13.3% (4/30), respectively. In comparison, no RD deletion was detected in 26 oral buccal brush biopsy specimens from healthy donors. Both p16 and p14 were lowly expressed in SCCHN and HARM, and their mRNA expression levels were positively associated with each other (P < 0.01). Moreover, BMI1 was highly expressed in both SCCHN and HARM, and BMI1 overexpression was associated with p16 downregulation in SCCHN (P < 0.05). These results indicate that RD deletion and BMI1 overexpression frequently occur in the early stage of oral carcinogenesis and BMI1 overexpression may downregulate the transcription of p16 and p14 through interfering with RD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genome annotation of a 1.5 Mb region of human chromosome 6q23 encompassing a quantitative trait locus for fetal hemoglobin expression in adults

    PubMed Central

    Close, James; Game, Laurence; Clark, Barnaby; Bergounioux, Jean; Gerovassili, Ageliki; Thein, Swee Lay

    2004-01-01

    Background Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) is a common multifactorial trait characterized by a modest increase of fetal hemoglobin levels in adults. We previously localized a Quantitative Trait Locus for HPFH in an extensive Asian-Indian kindred to chromosome 6q23. As part of the strategy of positional cloning and a means towards identification of the specific genetic alteration in this family, a thorough annotation of the candidate interval based on a strategy of in silico / wet biology approach with comparative genomics was conducted. Results The ~1.5 Mb candidate region was shown to contain five protein-coding genes. We discovered a very large uncharacterized gene containing WD40 and SH3 domains (AHI1), and extended the annotation of four previously characterized genes (MYB, ALDH8A1, HBS1L and PDE7B). We also identified several genes that do not appear to be protein coding, and generated 17 kb of novel transcript sequence data from re-sequencing 97 EST clones. Conclusion Detailed and thorough annotation of this 1.5 Mb interval in 6q confirms a high level of aberrant transcripts in testicular tissue. The candidate interval was shown to exhibit an extraordinary level of alternate splicing – 19 transcripts were identified for the 5 protein coding genes, but it appears that a significant portion (14/19) of these alternate transcripts did not have an open reading frame, hence their functional role is questionable. These transcripts may result from aberrant rather than regulated splicing. PMID:15169551

  16. Bifurcations of the conjugate locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The conjugate locus of a point p in a surface S will have a certain number of cusps. As the point p is moved in the surface the conjugate locus may spontaneously gain or lose cusps. In this paper we explain this 'bifurcation' in terms of the vanishing of higher derivatives of the exponential map; we derive simple equations for these higher derivatives in terms of scalar invariants; we classify the bifurcations of cusps in terms of the local structure of the conjugate locus; and we describe an intuitive picture of the bifurcation as the intersection between certain contours in the tangent plane.

  17. Characterization of human CD8+TCR- facilitating cells in vitro and in vivo in a NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y.; Elliott, M. J.; Yolcu, E. S.; Miller, T. O.; Ratajczak, J.; Bozulic, L. D.; Wen, Y.; Xu, H.; Ratajczak, M. Z.; Ildstad, S. T.

    2017-01-01

    CD8+/TCR- facilitating cells (FC) in mouse BM significantly enhance engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). Human FC phenotype and mechanism of action remain to be defined. We report for the first time the phenotypic characterization of human FC and correlation of phenotype with function. Approximately half of human FC are CD56neg; the remainder CD56bright. The CD56neg FC subpopulation significantly promotes homing of HSPC to BM in NSG mouse recipients and enhances hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. The CD56neg FC subpopulation promotes rapid reconstitution of donor HSPC without GVHD. However, recipients of CD56bright FC plus HSPC exhibit low donor chimerism early after transplantation but the level of chimerism significantly increases with time. Recipients of HSPC plus CD56neg or CD56bright FC showed durable donor chimerism at significantly higher levels in BM. The majority of both FC subpopulations express CXCR4. Co-culture of CD56bright FC with HSPC up-regulates cathelicidin and beta defensin-2, factors that prime responsiveness of HSPC to SDF-1. Both FC subpopulations significantly up-regulated mRNA expression of the HSPC growth factors and Flt3-Ligand. These results indicate that human FC exert a direct effect on HSPC to enhance engraftment. Human FC offer a potential regulatory cell-based therapy for enhancement of engraftment and prevention of GVHD. PMID:26550777

  18. Effects of AV119, a natural sugar from avocado, on Malassezia furfur invasiveness and on the expression of HBD-2 and cytokines in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Giovanna; Buommino, Elisabetta; Baroni, Adone; Auricchio, Lucia; De Filippis, Anna; Cozza, Valentina; Msika, Philippe; Piccardi, Nathalie; Tufano, Maria Antonietta

    2007-11-01

    AV119 is a patented blend of two sugars from avocado that can induce human beta-defensin-2 production by normal human keratinocytes. In this study, we analysed the effect of AV119 on growth and invasiveness of Malassezia furfur, a dimorphic, lipid-dependent yeast that is part of the normal human cutaneous commensal flora. The ability to modulate the expression of the proinflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines in normal human keratinocytes was also investigated. Microbiological assay demonstrated that this sugar induced the aggregation of yeast cells and inhibited the invasiveness of M. furfur, without affecting its growth. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that AV119 was able to modulate the HBD-2 response in treated keratinocytes, reaching a maximum after 48-h treatment, and to induce the recovery of a satisfactory proinflammatory response in human keratinocytes. As AV119 can induce aggregation of yeast cells, thus inhibiting their penetration into the keratinocytes, the sugar could be used in the preparation of cosmetics or pharmacological drugs to inhibit colonization of the skin by pathogenic strains of M. furfur.

  19. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-01-01

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708766

  20. Rat Mcs1b is concordant to the genome wide association identified breast cancer risk locus at human 5q11.2 and Mier3 is a candidate cancer susceptibility gene

    PubMed Central

    denDekker, Aaron D.; Xu, Xin; Vaughn, M. Derek; Puckett, Aaron H.; Gardner, Louis L.; Lambring, Courtney J.; Deschenes, Lucas; Samuelson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Low-penetrance alleles associated with breast cancer risk have been identified in population-based studies. Most risk loci contain either no or multiple potential candidate genes. Rat mammary carcinoma susceptibility 1b (Mcs1b) is a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on RN02 that confers decreased susceptibility when Copenhagen (COP) resistant alleles are introgressed into a Wistar Furth (WF) susceptible genome. Five WF.COP congenic lines containing COP RN02 segments were compared. One line developed an average of 3.4 ± 2.0 and 5.5 ± 3.6 mammary carcinomas per rat ± SD when females were Mcs1b resistant homozygous and Mcs1b heterozygous, respectively. These phenotypes were significantly different from susceptible genotype littermates (7.8 ± 3.1 mean mammary carcinomas per rat ± SD, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0413, respectively). All other congenic lines tested were susceptible. Thus, Mcs1b was narrowed to 1.8 Mb of RN02 between genetic markers ENSRNOSNP2740854 and g2UL2-27. Mammary-gland-graft carcinoma-susceptibility assays were used to determine that donor (P = 0.0019), but not recipient Mcs1b genotype (P = 0.9381), was associated with ectopic mammary carcinoma outcome. Rat Mcs1b contains sequence orthologous to human 5q11.2, a breast cancer susceptibility locus identified in multiple genome-wide association studies. Human/rat MAP3K1/Map3k1 and MIER3/Mier3 are within these orthologous segments. We identified Mier3 as a candidate Mcs1b gene based on 4.5-fold higher mammary gland levels of Mier3 transcripts in susceptible compared to Mcs1b resistant females. These data suggest that the human 5q11.2 breast cancer risk allele marked by rs889312 is mammary-gland autonomous, and MIER3 is a candidate breast cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:22993404

  1. Human lung cancer antigens recognized by autologous antibodies: definition of a novel cDNA derived from the tumor suppressor gene locus on chromosome 3p21.3.

    PubMed

    Güre, A O; Altorki, N K; Stockert, E; Scanlan, M J; Old, L J; Chen, Y T

    1998-03-01

    Serological analysis of a recombinant lung cancer cDNA expression library with the autologous patient serum led to the isolation of 20 clones representing 12 different genes: 4 of these were known genes, and the other 8 were previously unknown genes. Of the four known genes, aldolase A (NY-LU-1), previously shown to be overexpressed in lung cancer, was most frequently isolated. The other three genes were annexin XI, human HIV Rev-interacting protein Rip-1, and the human homologue of the ATP-binding arsA component of the bacterial arsenite transporter, all of which are known to be widely expressed in human tissues. Among the eight unknown genes, of most interest was NY-LU-12. Cloning of full-length NY-LU-12 showed that this cDNA was derived from the same gene as g16, a partially sequenced gene that mapped to the lung cancer tumor suppressor gene locus on chromosome 3p21. The reported g16 sequence, however, was significantly shorter (2433 versus 3591 bp). As a result of alternate splicing and subsequent frameshift, the reported g16 protein is 603 amino acids shorter than the NY-LU-12 product (1123 residues) at its COOH terminus and would therefore lack the epitopes recognized by the autologous serum. Analysis of the putative NY-LU-12 protein sequence predicted that it is a nuclear zinc finger protein with two RNA-binding domains, and Southern analysis showed that this gene is partially deleted in the lung cancer line NCI-H740 but not in nine other lung cancer lines. Screening of normal and cancer patient sera showed anti-NY-LU-12 seroreactivity in 2 of 21 allogeneic lung cancer patients but not in 24 patients with other tumors or in 16 sera from healthy donors. Comparison of NY-LU-12 cDNA from Lu15 tumor and normal lung tissue by DNA sequencing and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis showed no evidence of mutation. Considering the high frequency of 3p21 alterations in lung cancer and the fact that the tumor suppressor gene or genes in this locus have

  2. Sequence and detailed organization of the human caveolin-1 and -2 genes located near the D7S522 locus (7q31.1). Methylation of a CpG island in the 5' promoter region of the caveolin-1 gene in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Engelman, J A; Zhang, X L; Lisanti, M P

    1999-04-09

    The CA microsatellite repeat marker, D7S522, is located at the center of a approximately 1000 kb smallest common deleted region that is lost in many forms of human cancer. It has been proposed that a putative tumor suppressor gene lies in close proximity to D7S522, within this smallest common deleted region. However, the genes located in proximity to D7S522 have remained elusive. Recently, we identified five independent BAC clones (approximately 100-200 kb) containing D7S522 and the human genes encoding caveolins 1 and 2. Here, we present the detailed organization of the caveolin locus and its relationship to D7S522, as deduced using a shot-gun sequencing approach. We derived two adjacent contigs for a total coverage of approximately 250 kb. Analysis of these contigs reveals that D7S522 is located approximately 67 kb upstream of the caveolin-2 gene and that the caveolin-2 gene is located approximately 19 kb upstream of the caveolin-1 gene, providing for the first time a detailed genetic map of this region. Further sequence analysis reveals many interesting features of the caveolin genes; these include the intron-exon boundaries and several previously unrecognized CA repeats that lie within or in close proximity to the caveolin genes. The first and second exons of both caveolin genes are embedded within CpG islands. These results suggest that regulation of caveolin gene expression may be controlled, in part, by methylation of these CpG regions. In support of this notion, we show here that the CGs in the 5' promoter region of the caveolin-1 gene are functionally methylated in two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and T-47D) that fail to express the caveolin-1 protein. In contrast, the same CGs in cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMECs) are non-methylated and these cells express high levels of the caveolin-1 protein. Comparison of the human locus with the same locus in the pufferfish Fugu rubripes reveals that the overall organization of the

  3. Molecular cloning of a novel human gene encoding a 63-kDa protein and its sublocalization within the 11q13 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Perelman, B.; Dafni, N.; Naiman, T.

    1997-05-01

    A human cDNA previously isolated by virtue of its ability to complement partially the ultraviolet sensitivity of a xeroderma pigmentosum cell line was further characterized. The transcription unit is expressed as a single 4.0-kb mRNA that encodes a novel 63-kDa cytoplasmic protein, possibly initiating from an internal AUG codon. The gene encoding this protein, named UVRAG, has been extremely well conserved during evolution, implying an important role for this gene product in cell metabolism. The transcribed mRNA is constitutively expressed in a wide variety of human tissues. The protein encoded by this gene is predicted to contain a coiled-coil structure and is likely to be metabolically unstable based on the occurrence of a strong PEST domain. UVRAG was assigned to human chromosome 11 by Southern hybridization to a somatic cell hybrid panel. Fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with PCR analysis of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing segments of human chromosome 11 has localized this gene to a subregion of 11q13 in between the D11S916 and the D11S906 loci. Importantly, this region has been shown to be amplified in a variety of human malignancies, including breast cancer. 28 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) from human breast milk activates PAR-2 receptors, of the intestinal epithelial cells HT-29, regulating cytokines and defensins.

    PubMed

    Barrera, G J; Tortolero, G Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factors are effector molecules in gastrointestinal tract physiology. Each one improves healing of the gastrointestinal tract. Trefoil factors may be grouped into three classes: the gastric peptides (TFF1), spasmolytic peptide (TFF2) and intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3). Significant amounts of TFF3 are present in human breast milk. Previously, we have reported that trefoil factor 3 isolated from human breast milk produces down regulation of cytokines and promotes human beta defensins expression in intestinal epithelial cells. This study aimed to determine the molecular mechanism involved. Here we showed that the presence of TFF3 strongly correlated with protease activated receptors 2 (PAR-2) activation in human intestinal cells. Intracellular calcium ((Ca2+)i)mobilization was induced by the treatment with: 1) TFF3, 2) synthetic PAR-2 agonist peptide. The co-treatment with a synthetic PAR-2 antagonist peptide and TFF3 eliminates the latter's effect. Additionally, we demonstrated the existence of interactions among TFF3 and PAR-2 receptors through far Western blot and co-precipitation. Finally, down regulation of PAR-2 by siRNA resulted in a decrease of TFF3 induced intracellular (Ca2+)i mobilization, cytokine regulation and defensins expression. These findings suggest that TFF3 activates intestinal cells through PAR-2 (Fig. 4, Ref. 19).

  5. The human granzyme A (HFSP, CTLA3) gene maps to 5q11-q12 and defines a new locus of the serine protease superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, T.M.; Lichter, P. ); Wekerle, H.; Zimmer, M.; Jenne, D.E. )

    1993-11-01

    Human granzyme A (HFSP, Hanukah factor serine protease; CTLA3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated serine esterase-3), a homodimeric, trypsin-like serine protease of 60 kDa found in granules of cytolytic T cells and natural killer cells, is implicated in lymphocyte-mediated target cell lysis. It contributes to DNA fragmentation in perforin (PRF1)-lysed target cells through an unknown mechanism. The authors have isolated a cosmid clone for the functional gene of human granzyme A and established its complete exon-intron map of 10 kb. Using an 11-kb subfragment of the cloned genomic DNA as a probe, they have identified the chromosomal position of human granzyme A on 5q11-q12. Thus, the human granzyme A gene falls into a region of homology between human chromosome 5 and mouse chromosome 13, band D, where the mouse granzyme A gene has been located previously. The granzyme A gene is not linked to known members of the large superfamily of serine proteases. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Effect of temperature on the shift of Pseudomonas fluorescens from an environmental microorganism to a potential human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, G; Buommino, E; Fusco, A; Paoletti, I; Auricchio, L; Tufano, M A

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium generally considered of scarce clinical significance. However, in the last few years, the isolation of P. fluorescens as the causative agent of nosocomial infections has rapidly increased. P. fluorescens is a psychrophile microorganism which grows at an optimal temperature of 25-30 degrees Celcius. In spite of this constraint, it has recently been reported that the human physiological temperature does not appear to be a barrier for this microorganism. In this study we examined the ability of P. fluorescens, grown at 28 degrees C or at 37 degrees C, to adhere to cultured human A549 pulmonary cells and to form biofilm. The ability of P. fluorescens to induce expression of proinflammatory cytokines, beta-defensin 2 and the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was also investigated. Our results clearly indicate that inflammatory mediators are induced when the microorganism is grown at a lower temperature, while biofilm is formed only at 37 degrees C. The results presented are consistent with previous reports indicating P. fluorescens as an opportunistic pathogen and underscore the urgent need for further studies to better characterize the virulence of this microorganism.

  7. Association of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus with Genital Tract Mucosal Immune Factors In HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Niall; Huber, Ashley; Lo, Yungtai; Castle, Philip E.; Kemal, Kimdar; Burk, Robert D.; Strickler, Howard D.; Einstein, Mark H.; Young, Mary; Anastos, Kathryn; Herold, Betsy C.

    2015-01-01

    Problem High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is prevalent in HIV-infected women and may be associated with mucosal changes that promote HIV replication. Method of Study Innate immune molecules, antimicrobial activity, HIV RNA, and HPV DNA genotypes were measured in a cross-sectional study of 128 HIV-infected women categorized into HPV-16 (n=8), other HR-HPV (n=41), and non-HR-HPV controls (n=79). Results Compared to controls, HR-HPV groups had higher plasma viral loads (p=0.004), lower CD4 cells (p=0.02), more genital tract HIV RNA (p=0.03), greater number of different HPV types (p<0.001), higher cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) IL-1α (p=0.03) and human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) (p=0.049), and less anti-HIVBal activity (p=0.03). HPV-16 remained significantly associated with higher HBD2 (p=0.03), higher IL-1α (p=0.009), and lower anti-HIVBaL activity (p=0.03) compared to controls after adjusting for plasma viral load and CD4 T cell count. Conclusion HR-HPV is associated with mucosal changes in HIV-infected women that could adversely impact genital tract health. PMID:26685115

  8. cDNA sequence and gene locus of the human retinal phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C{beta}4 (PLCB4)

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.; Ghalayini, A.J.; Anderson, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Defects in the Drosophila norpA (no receptor potential A) gene encoding a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) block invertebrate phototransduction and lead to retinal degeneration. The mammalian homolog, PLCB4, is expressed in rat brain, bovine cerebellum, and the bovine retina in several splice variants. To determine a possible role of PLCB4 gene defects in human disease, we isolated several overlapping cDNA clones from a human retina library. The composite cDNA sequence predicts a human PLC{beta}4 polypeptide of 1022 amino acid residues (MW 117,000). This PLC{beta}4 variant lacks a 165-amino-acid N-terminal domain characteristic for the rat brain isoforms, but has a distinct putative exon 1 unique for human and bovine retina isoforms. A PLC{beta}4 monospecific antibody detected a major (130 kDa) and a minor (160 kDa) isoform in retina homogenates. Somatic cell hybrids and deletion panels were used to localize the PCLB4 gene to the short arm of chromosome 20. The gene was further sublocalized to 20p12 by florescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Altered CSMD1 Expression Alters Cocaine-Conditioned Place Preference: Mutual Support for a Complex Locus from Human and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Singhal, Sulabh; Johnson, Kennedy; Kessler, Brice; Troncoso, Juan; Uhl, George R

    2015-01-01

    The CUB and sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) gene harbors signals provided by clusters of nearby SNPs with 10-2 > p > 10-8 associations in genome wide association (GWAS) studies of addiction-related phenotypes. A CSMD1 intron 3 SNP displays p < 10-8 association with schizophrenia and more modest associations with individual differences in performance on tests of cognitive abilities. CSDM1 encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development, connections and plasticity of brain circuits in which it is expressed. We tested association between CSMD1 genotypes and expression of its mRNA in postmortem human brains (n = 181). Expression of CSMD1 mRNA in human postmortem cerebral cortical samples differs 15-25%, in individuals with different alleles of simple sequence length and SNP polymorphisms located in the gene's third/fifth introns, providing nominal though not Bonferroni-corrected significance. These data support mice with altered CSMD1 expression as models for common human CSMD1 allelic variation. We tested baseline and/or cocaine-evoked addiction, emotion, motor and memory-related behaviors in +/- and -/- csmd1 knockout mice on mixed and on C57-backcrossed genetic backgrounds. Initial csmd1 knockout mice on mixed genetic backgrounds displayed a variety of coat colors and sizable individual differences in responses during behavioral testing. Backcrossed mice displayed uniform black coat colors. Cocaine conditioned place preference testing revealed significant influences of genotype (p = 0.02). Homozygote knockouts displayed poorer performance on aspects of the Morris water maze task. They displayed increased locomotion in some, though not all, environments. The combined data thus support roles for common level-of-expression CSMD1 variation in a drug reward phenotype relevant to addiction and in cognitive differences that might be relevant to schizophrenia. Mouse model results can complement data from human association findings of modest magnitude that

  10. Recurrent deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3 in human renal cell carcinoma: shift of the c-raf 1 locus.

    PubMed

    Teyssier, J R; Henry, I; Dozier, C; Ferre, D; Adnet, J J; Pluot, M

    1986-12-01

    A cytogenetic study performed on 6 human renal cell carcinomas after short-term culture on extracellular matrix with serum-free medium showed aneuploidy without structural changes in 2 tumors and a rearrangement of the short arm of chromosome 3 in 4 tumors, including deletions and a translocation involving the 3p14 and 3p21 bands. Chromosomal in situ hybridization with a c-raf 1 probe demonstrated that in 2 renal cancers with del3(p14 or 21) the cellular oncogene had shifted from 3p25 to 3p14 as a result of an interstitial deletion.

  11. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Phenotype-genotype variability in the human CYP3A locus as assessed by the probe drug quinine and analyses of variant CYP3A4 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina . E-mail: cristina.rodriguez-antona@cnio.es; Sayi, Jane G.; Gustafsson, Lars L.; Bertilsson, Leif; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2005-12-09

    The human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) enzymes, which metabolize 50% of currently used therapeutic drugs, exhibit great interindividual differences in activity that have a major impact on drug treatment outcome, but hitherto no genetic background importantly contributing to this variation has been identified. In this study we show that CYP3A4 mRNA and hnRNA contents with a few exceptions vary in parallel in human liver, suggesting that mechanisms affecting CYP3A4 transcription, such as promoter polymorphisms, are relevant for interindividual differences in CYP3A4 expression. Tanzanian (n = 143) healthy volunteers were phenotyped using quinine as a CYP3A probe and the results were used for association studies with CYP3A4 genotypes. Carriers of CYP3A4*1B had a significantly lower activity than those with CYP3A4*1 whereas no differences were seen for five other SNPs investigated. Nuclear proteins from the B16A2 hepatoma cells were found to bind with less affinity to the CYP3A4*1B element around -392 bp as compared to CYP3A4*1. The data indicate the existence of a genetic CYP3A4 polymorphism with functional importance for interindividual differences in enzyme expression.

  13. Human laminin B1 chain. A multidomain protein with gene (LAMB1) locus in the q22 region of chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Pikkarainen, T; Eddy, R; Fukushima, Y; Byers, M; Shows, T; Pihlajaniemi, T; Saraste, M; Tryggvason, K

    1987-08-05

    We report the isolation and characterization of six overlapping cDNA clones that provide the first and complete amino acid sequence of the human laminin B1 chain. The cDNA clones cover 5613 nucleotides with 5358 nucleotides in an open reading frame encoding 1786 amino acids, including a 21-residue signal peptide-like sequence. Sequence analysis demonstrated the presence of two types of internal homology repeats that were found in clusters within the polypeptide chain. The type A repeats contain about 50 amino acids of which 8 are cysteine. These repeats are present in two clusters toward the NH2-terminal end of the chain and are separated from each other by about 220 amino acids. The two clusters contain five and eight consecutive repeats each. There are two copies of consecutive type B repeats of about 40 amino acids close to the COOH-terminal end. Computer analysis of the amino acid sequence of the B1 chain revealed the presence of structurally distinct domains that contain cysteine-rich repeats, globular regions, and helical structures. Using somatic cell hybrid methodology and in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes it was established that the human laminin B1 gene (LAMB1) is located in the q22 region of chromosome 7.

  14. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  15. The Effect of Locus of Control on Message Acceptance and Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Catherine A.; Singh, Surendra

    Locus of control is a personality trait that influences human behavior in many situations. Internal-external control reactions to a persuasive message and the recall of the message were examined in two studies. In the first study, 35 undergraduate students' locus of control was measured using Duttweiler's Internal Control Measure. On the basis of…

  16. Propionibacterium acnes and lipopolysaccharide induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in human sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, István; Pivarcsi, Andor; Kis, Kornélia; Koreck, Andrea; Bodai, László; McDowell, Andrew; Seltmann, Holger; Patrick, Sheila; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kemény, Lajos

    2006-07-01

    Acne is a common skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. In addition to genetic, hormonal and environmental factors, abnormal colonization by Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated in the occurrence of acne via the induction of inflammatory mediators. To gain more insight into the role that sebocytes play in the innate immune response of the skin, particularly in acne, we compared the antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression at mRNA and protein levels, as well as the viability and differentiation of SZ95 sebocytes in response to co-culture with representative isolates of P. acnes type IA and type IB as well as Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that, in vitro, P. acnes type IA and IB isolates and LPS induced human beta-defensin-2 and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression, and influenced sebocyte viability and differentiation. Our results provide evidence that sebocytes are capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and antimicrobial peptides, which may have a role in acne pathogenesis. Furthermore, since P. acnes types IA and IB differentially affect both the differentiation and viability of sebocytes, our data demonstrate that different strains of P. acnes vary in their capacity to stimulate an inflammatory response within the pilosebaceous follicle.

  17. Alu-primed polymerase chain reaction for regional assignment of 110 yeast artificial chromosome clones from the human X chromosome: Identification of clones associated with a disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.; Ballabio, A.; Victoria, M.F.; Pieretti, M.; Bies, R.D.; Gibbs, R.A.; Maley, J.A.; Chinault, A.C.; Webster, T.D.; Caskey, C.T. )

    1991-07-15

    Over 400 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated from the human X chromosome, and 110 of these were assigned to regions defined by chromosome translocation and deletion breakpoints. Polymerase chain reaction using Alu primers was applied to YAC clones in order to generate probes, to identify overlapping clones, and to derive fingerprints and sequence data directly from total yeast DNA. Several clones were identified in regions of medical interest. One set of three overlapping clones was found to cross a chromsomal translocation implicated in Lowe syndrome. The regional assignment of groups of YAC clones provides initiation points for further attempts to develop large cloned contiguous sequences, as well as material for investigation of regions involved in genetic diseases.

  18. Construction of a transcription map of a 300 kb region around the human G6PD locus by direct cDNA selection.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, Z; Korn, B; Konecki, D S; Siebenhaar, R; Coy, J F; Kioschis, P; Poustka, A

    1993-11-01

    A transcription map covering a 300 kb region around the G6PD gene in the human Xq28 region was constructed by the direct cDNA selection method and the analysis of the resulting region-specific enriched cDNA sublibrary. Seven new genes and two loci of endogenous retrovirus HERV-K were identified. The distribution of the genes across the region is strongly non-uniform and follows the non-uniform distribution of GpG islands in the area. While one of the novel genes was found to be highly homologous to bovine smg p25A GDP-dissociation inhibitor, the remaining genes did not detect any homology to known genes. The analysis of region-specific cDNA sublibraries represents a simple, rapid and efficient tool for the generation of a regional transcription map.

  19. Use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) to investigate genetic diversity of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from human, food, and veterinary sources.

    PubMed

    Mateva, Gergana; Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte; Asseva, Galina; Daskalov, Hristo; Petrov, Petar; Kantardjiev, Todor; Alexandar, Irina; Löfström, Charlotta

    2017-08-23

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most common zoonotic pathogen in Bulgaria. To allow efficient outbreak investigations and surveillance in the food chain, accurate and discriminatory methods for typing are needed. This study evaluated the use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and compared results with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinations for 100 S. Typhimurium strains isolated in Bulgaria during 2008-2012 (50 veterinary/food and 50 human isolates). Results showed that isolates were divided into 80 and 34 groups using MLVA and AMR, respectively. Simpson's index of diversity was determined to 0.994 ± 0.003 and 0.945 ± 0.012. The most frequently encountered MLVA profiles were 3-11-9-NA-211 (n = 5); 3-12-9-NA-211 (n = 3); 3-12-11-21-311 (n = 3); 3-17-10-NA-311 (n = 3); 2-20-9-7-212 (n = 3); and 2-23-NA-NA-111 (n = 3). No clustering of isolates related to susceptibility/resistance to antimicrobials, source of isolation, or year of isolation was observed. Some MLVA types were found in both human and veterinary/food isolates, indicating a possible route of transmission. A majority (83%) of the isolates were found to be resistant against at least one antimicrobial and 44% against ≥4 antimicrobials. Further studies are needed to verify MLVA usefulness over a longer period of time and with more isolates, including outbreak strains. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Epidemiological and Phylogenetic Analysis of Spanish Human Brucella melitensis Strains by Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing, Hypervariable Octameric Oligonucleotide Fingerprinting, and rpoB Typing▿

    PubMed Central

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Navarro, Ana; Villalón, Pilar; Carrasco, Gema; Saéz-Nieto, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    The severe morbidity of human brucellosis is one of the main reasons for using molecular typing in the epidemiological surveillance of this worldwide zoonosis. Multiple-locus variable-number repeat analysis (MLVA-16), hypervariable octameric oligonucleotide fingerprinting (HOOF-print), and the differences in the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (codons 1249 and 1309) of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase β subunit (rpoB) were used to type a human Brucella melitensis population (108 strains) collected from throughout Spain over 13 years. Eighty-six MLVA types (discriminatory index, 0.99) were detected, with a wide-ranging genetic similarity coefficient (37.2 to 93.7%). The population clustered into the following groups: American, with genotypes 47 (1 strain), 48 (13 strains), 53 (12 strains), 55 (2 strains), 80 (1 strain), and a new genotype (2 strains), Western Mediterranean, with genotype 51 (9 strains), and Eastern Mediterranean, with genotypes 42 (60 strains), 43 (4 strains), and 63 (4 strains). Two profession-related and two foodborne acquisitions were confirmed. Distributed throughout Spain, Eastern Mediterranean genotype 42 was the most common (55%). The low MLVA-16 allelic polymorphism (genetic similarity range, 75 to 94%) of the genotype 42 strains suggests that they recently evolved from a common ancestor. rpoB typing grouped the strains as rpoB type 1 (1249-ATG/1309-CTG; 28.7%), rpoB type 2 (1249-ATG/1309-CTA; 62.9%), and rpoB type 3 (1249-ATA/1309-CTG; 8.3%). According to the MLVA-16 results, the population clustered by rpoB type. Given the correlation between B. melitensis MLVA groups and rpoB types (American and rpoB type 1, Eastern Mediterranean and rpoB type 2, and Western Mediterranean and rpoB type 3), the rpoB type could be used as an initial marker for the epidemiological surveillance of brucellosis. PMID:20554816

  1. Binding and activation of human and mouse complement by Cryptosporidium parvum (Apicomplexa) and susceptibility of C1q- and MBL-deficient mice to infection.

    PubMed

    Petry, Franz; Jakobi, Vera; Wagner, Swen; Tessema, Tesfaye Sisay; Thiel, Steffen; Loos, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite (Apicomplexa) that causes gastrointestinal disease in animals and humans. Whereas immunocompetent hosts can limit the infection within 1 or 2 weeks, immunocompromised individuals develop a chronic, life-threatening disease. The importance of the adaptive cellular immune response, with CD4+ T-lymphocytes being the major players, has been clearly demonstrated. Several non-adaptive immune mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to the host defence, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) from NK cells, certain chemokines, beta-defensins and pro-inflammatory cytokines, but the influence of the complement systems has been less well studied. We analysed the in vitro binding and activation of the human and mouse complement systems and tested the susceptibility to infection in complement-deficient mouse strains. We found that C. parvum can activate both the classical and lectin pathways, leading to the deposition of C3b on the parasite. Using real-time PCR, parasite development could be demonstrated in adult mice lacking mannan-binding lectin (MBL-A/C-/-) but not in mice lacking complement factor C1q (C1qA-/-) or in wild type C57BL/6 mice. The contribution of the complement system and the lectin pathway in particular to the host defence against cryptosporidiosis may become apparent in situations of immunodeficiency such as HIV infections or in early childhood.

  2. Locus of Responsibility as an Aid to Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattran, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    Human resource development specialists have employed analytical devices to assist them in identifying the trainees' personal, occupational, and professional characteristics. A new instrument called the Locus of Responsibility Inventory assumes that leadership is an unconscious choice that the individuals make as a result of their perception of how…

  3. Locus of Control and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, C. A.; Strongman, K. T.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed delinquent and nondelinquent male adolescents (N=43) on locus of control and intellectual achievement responsibilty. Results supported a multidimensional model. There was no difference in expectancy of control for negative academic events between delinquents and nondelinquents. Birth order and delinquency were the most important…

  4. Locus of Control and Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Adrian; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Predicted that an external locus of control would characterize undersocialization. Tested this hypothesis on a random sample of secondary school children (N=97). Scores from the Child Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Scale were found to predict undersocialization in the expected direction. Suggested several possible interpretations of this…

  5. Humanizing the Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR) Expression Profile in Mouse Platelets by Knocking PAR1 into the Par3 Locus Reveals PAR1 Expression Is Not Tolerated in Mouse Platelets

    PubMed Central

    French, Shauna L.; Paramitha, Antonia C.; Moon, Mitchell J.; Dickins, Ross A.; Hamilton, Justin R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-platelet drugs are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy for heart attack and stroke prevention, yet improvements are continually sought. Thrombin is the most potent activator of platelets and targeting platelet thrombin receptors (protease-activated receptors; PARs) is an emerging anti-thrombotic approach. Humans express two PARs on their platelets–PAR1 and PAR4. The first PAR1 antagonist was recently approved for clinical use and PAR4 antagonists are in early clinical development. However, pre-clinical studies examining platelet PAR function are challenging because the platelets of non-primates do not accurately reflect the PAR expression profile of human platelets. Mice, for example, express Par3 and Par4. To address this limitation, we aimed to develop a genetically modified mouse that would express the same repertoire of platelet PARs as humans. Here, human PAR1 preceded by a lox-stop-lox was knocked into the mouse Par3 locus, and then expressed in a platelet-specific manner (hPAR1-KI mice). Despite correct targeting and the predicted loss of Par3 expression and function in platelets from hPAR1-KI mice, no PAR1 expression or function was detected. Specifically, PAR1 was not detected on the platelet surface nor internally by flow cytometry nor in whole cell lysates by Western blot, while a PAR1-activating peptide failed to induce platelet activation assessed by either aggregation or surface P-selectin expression. Platelets from hPAR1-KI mice did display significantly diminished responsiveness to thrombin stimulation in both assays, consistent with a Par3-/- phenotype. In contrast to the observations in hPAR1-KI mouse platelets, the PAR1 construct used here was successfully expressed in HEK293T cells. Together, these data suggest ectopic PAR1 expression is not tolerated in mouse platelets and indicate a different approach is required to develop a small animal model for the purpose of any future preclinical testing of PAR antagonists as anti-platelet drugs. PMID

  6. Locus of Control and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, M. Michael

    1980-01-01

    The role of locus of control in interpersonal attraction was examined by administering 1) the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale and 2) a sociometric test of friendship to 200 eighth graders. (CM)

  7. Characterization of the spv locus in Salmonella enterica serovar Arizona.

    PubMed

    Libby, Stephen J; Lesnick, Marc; Hasegawa, Patricia; Kurth, Michael; Belcher, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua; Guiney, Donald G

    2002-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Arizona (S. enterica subspecies IIIa) is a common Salmonella isolate from reptiles and can cause serious systemic disease in humans. The spv virulence locus, found on large plasmids in Salmonella subspecies I serovars associated with severe infections, was confirmed to be located on the chromosome of serovar Arizona. Sequence analysis revealed that the serovar Arizona spv locus contains homologues of spvRABC but lacks the spvD gene and contains a frameshift in spvA, resulting in a different C terminus. The SpvR protein functions as a transcriptional activator for the spvA promoter, and SpvB and SpvC are highly conserved. The analysis supports the proposal that the chromosomal spv sequence more closely corresponds to the ancestral locus acquired during evolution of S. enterica, with plasmid acquisition of spv genes in the subspecies I strains involving addition of spvD and polymorphisms in spvA.

  8. Organization of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Luo, Liqun

    2015-11-02

    The release of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the mammalian brain is important for modulating attention, arousal, and cognition during many behaviors. Furthermore, disruption of norepinephrine-mediated signaling is strongly associated with several psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders in humans, emphasizing the clinical importance of this system. Most of the norepinephrine released in the brain is supplied by a very small, bilateral nucleus in the brainstem called the locus coeruleus. The goal of this minireview is to emphasize the complexity of the locus coeruleus beyond its primary definition as a norepinephrine-producing nucleus. Several recent studies utilizing innovative technologies highlight how the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system can now be targeted with increased accuracy and resolution, in order to better understand its role in modulating diverse behaviors.

  9. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  10. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Natasha Z. R.; Geier, Ethan G.; Damotte, Vincent; Boehme, Kevin L.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Kramer, Joel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Huang, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Methods and findings Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case–control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999–2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984–2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005–2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10−4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08–1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk

  11. Which Sry locus is the hypertensive Y chromosome locus?

    PubMed

    Turner, Monte E; Farkas, Joel; Dunmire, Jeff; Ely, Daniel; Milsted, Amy

    2009-02-01

    The Y chromosome of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) contains a genetic component that raises blood pressure compared with the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) Y chromosome. This research tests the Sry gene complex as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome. The Sry loci were sequenced in 1 strain with a hypertensive Y chromosome (SHR/Akr) and 2 strains with a normotensive Y chromosome (SHR/Crl and WKY/Akr). Both SHR strains have 7 Sry loci, whereas the WKY strain has 6. The 6 loci in common between SHR and WKY strains were identical in the sequence compared (coding region, 392-bp 5' prime flanking, 1200-bp 3' flanking). Both SHR strains have a locus (Sry3) not found in WKY rats, but this locus is different between SHR/Akr and SHR/Crl rats. Six mutations have accumulated in Sry3 between the SHR strains, whereas the other 6 Sry loci are identical. This pattern of an SHR-specific locus and mutation in this locus in SHR/Crl coinciding with the loss of Y chromosome hypertension is an expected pattern if Sry3 is the Y chromosome-hypertensive component. The SHR/y strain showed a significant increase in total Sry expression in the kidney between 4 and 15 weeks of age. There are significant differences in Sry expression between adrenal glands and the kidney (15 to 30 times higher in kidneys) but no significant differences between strains. These results, along with previous studies demonstrating an interaction of Sry with the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter and increased blood pressure with exogenous Sry expression, suggest the Sry loci as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome.

  12. On the relevance of locus equations for production and perception of stop consonants.

    PubMed

    Brancazio, L; Fowler, C A

    1998-01-01

    We examined the possible relevance of locus equations to human production and perception of stop consonants. The orderly output constraint (OOC) of Sussman, Fruchter, and Cable (1995) claims that humans have evolved to produce speech such that F2 at consonant release and F2 at vowel midpoint are linearly related for consonants so that developing perceptual systems can form representations in an F2ons-by-F2vowel space. The theory claims that this relationship described by locus equations can distinguish consonants, and that the linearity of locus equations is captured in neural representations and is thus perceptually relevant. We investigated these claims by testing how closely locus equations reflect the production and perception of stop consonants. In Experiment 1, we induced speakers to change their locus equation slope and intercept parameters systematically, but found that consonants remained distinctive in slope-by-intercept space. In Experiment 2, we presented stop-consonant syllables with their bursts removed to listeners, and compared their classification error matrices with the predictions of a model using locus equation prototypes and with those of an exemplar-based model that uses F2ons and F2vowel, but not locus equations. Both models failed to account for a large proportion of the variance in listeners' responses; the locus equation model was no better in its predictions than the exemplar model. These findings are discussed in the context of the OOC.

  13. Locus ceruleus neurons in people with autism contain no histochemically-detectable mercury.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to environmental mercury has been proposed to play a part in autism. Mercury is selectively taken up by the human locus ceruleus, a region of the brain that has been implicated in autism. We therefore looked for the presence of mercury in the locus ceruleus of people who had autism, using the histochemical technique of autometallography which can detect nanogram amounts of mercury in tissues. In addition, we sought evidence of damage to locus ceruleus neurons in autism by immunostaining for hyperphosphorylated tau. No mercury was found in any neurons of the locus ceruleus of 6 individuals with autism (5 male, 1 female, age range 16-48 years). Mercury was present in locus ceruleus neurons in 7 of 11 (64%) age-matched control individuals who did not have autism, which is significantly more than in individuals with autism. No increase in numbers of locus ceruleus neurons containing hyperphosphorylated tau was detected in people with autism. In conclusion, most people with autism have not been exposed early in life to quantities of mercury large enough to be found later in adult locus ceruleus neurons. Human locus ceruleus neurons are sensitive indicators of mercury exposure, and mercury appears to remain in these neurons indefinitely, so these findings do not support the hypothesis that mercury neurotoxicity plays a role in autism.

  14. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-01-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant–vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change. PMID:24535890

  15. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  16. Immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Paolillo, Rossella; Romano Carratelli, Caterina; Sorrentino, Sabato; Mazzola, Nello; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2009-10-01

    Probiotics, defined as live microbial food supplements which improve the health of the host, have obtained increasing medical importance. In the intestine they may prevent the overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria, increase the resistance of the gut to invasion by pathogens and ameliorate disease processes by inducting the secretion of soluble factors such as cytokines and antimicrobial beta-peptides. One important class of human antimicrobial peptides is the family of defensins. Human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2) is a major inducible peptide which plays an important role in host defense and represents a link between innate and adaptive immune responses. This linkage is in part mediated through the recognition of conserved bacterial products or bacteria by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal epithelial cells. We found that Caco-2 cells exposed to L. plantarum bacteria significantly induced HBD-2 mRNA expression and HBD-2 secretion in a dose- (16+/-1.4 pg/ml and 31.5+/-2.3 pg/ml at MOI 10 and 50, respectively) and time-dependent manner, but not HBD-3, compared to controls; in addition, when LPS was added to cells for 48 h, the interleukin (IL)-23 secretion (850+/-5.4 pg/ml) and IL-23 mRNA expression increased; while it was reduced when LPS was cocultured with L. plantarum (330+/-4.2 pg/ml). The L. plantarum-induced increase in HBD-2 expression is inhibited by anti-TLR-2 neutralizing antibodies, in the same way the pre-treatment with the anti-TLR-2 antibody inhibited the production of IL-23 induced by LPS in Caco-2 cells. The results of our study help to achieve a better understanding of how the intestinal epithelium participates in the innate immune response to commensal bacteria and pathogens in the gut.

  17. Haemophilus ducreyi SapA contributes to cathelicidin resistance and virulence in humans.

    PubMed

    Mount, Kristy L B; Townsend, Carisa A; Rinker, Sherri D; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth W; Janowicz, Diane M; Spinola, Stanley M; Katz, Barry P; Bauer, Margaret E

    2010-03-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is an extracellular pathogen of human epithelial surfaces that resists human antimicrobial peptides (APs). The organism's genome contains homologs of genes sensitive to antimicrobial peptides (sap operon) in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. In this study, we characterized the sap-containing loci of H. ducreyi 35000HP and demonstrated that sapA is expressed in broth cultures and H. ducreyi-infected tissue; sapA is also conserved among both class I and class II H. ducreyi strains. We constructed a nonpolar sapA mutant of H. ducreyi 35000HP, designated 35000HPsapA, and compared the percent survival of wild-type 35000HP and 35000HPsapA exposed to several human APs, including alpha-defensins, beta-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Unlike an H. influenzae sapA mutant, strain 35000HPsapA was not more susceptible to defensins than strain 35000HP was. However, we observed a significant decrease in the survival of strain 35000HPsapA after exposure to LL-37, which was complemented by introducing sapA in trans. Thus, the Sap transporter plays a role in resistance of H. ducreyi to LL-37. We next compared mutant strain 35000HPsapA with strain 35000HP for their ability to cause disease in human volunteers. Although both strains caused papules to form at similar rates, the pustule formation rate at sites inoculated with 35000HPsapA was significantly lower than that of sites inoculated with 35000HP (33.3% versus 66.7%; P = 0.007). Together, these data establish that SapA acts as a virulence factor and as one mechanism for H. ducreyi to resist killing by antimicrobial peptides. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that an antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanism contributes to bacterial virulence in humans.

  18. Sequence variation within the fragile X locus.

    PubMed

    Mathews, D J; Kashuk, C; Brightwell, G; Eichler, E E; Chakravarti, A

    2001-08-01

    The human genome provides a reference sequence, which is a template for resequencing studies that aim to discover and interpret the record of common ancestry that exists in extant genomes. To understand the nature and pattern of variation and linkage disequilibrium comprising this history, we present a study of approximately 31 kb spanning an approximately 70 kb region of FMR1, sequenced in a sample of 20 humans (worldwide sample) and four great apes (chimp, bonobo, and gorilla). Twenty-five polymorphic sites and two insertion/deletions, distributed in 11 unique haplotypes, were identified among humans. Africans are the only geographic group that do not share any haplotypes with other groups. Parsimony analysis reveals two main clades and suggests that the four major human geographic groups are distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree and within each major clade. An African sample appears to be most closely related to the common ancestor shared with the three other geographic groups. Nucleotide diversity, pi, for this sample is 2.63 +/- 6.28 x 10(-4). The mutation rate, mu is 6.48 x 10(-10) per base pair per year, giving an ancestral population size of approximately 6200 and a time to the most recent common ancestor of approximately 320,000 +/- 72,000 per base pair per year. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the FMR1 locus, evaluated by conventional LD analysis and by the length of segment shared between any two chromosomes, is extensive across the region.

  19. Mechanisms Underlying the Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus Mcs5a

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Mcs5a2) down regulates the expression of the Fbxo10 gene in the T cells and that this reduced expression is associated with reduced mammary tumor...in primary T cells is conserved between rat and human. We demonstrate that the function of the non-coding Mcs5a locus likely is repressive gene ...regulation. We present a model that begins to explain how the Fbxo10 gene could be regulated in T cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS mammary carcinogenesis

  20. Linkage analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and microsatellite loci spanning 61 cM of human chromosome 6p in 19 nuclear pedigrees provides no evidence for a susceptibility locus in this region

    SciTech Connect

    Elmslie, F.V.; Williamson, M.P.; Rees, M.

    1996-09-01

    Linkage analysis in separately ascertained families of probands with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has previously provided evidence both for and against the existence of a locus (designated {open_quotes}EJM1{close_quotes}), on chromosome 6p, predisposing to a trait defined as either clinical JME, its associated electroencephalographic abnormality, or idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Linkage analysis was performed in 19 families in which a proband and at least one first- or two second-degree relatives have clinical JME. Family members were typed for seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 6p: D6S260, D6S276, D6S291, D6S271, D6S465, D6S257, and D6S254. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out under the assumptions of autosomal dominant inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance and autosomal recessive inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage to the clinical trait of JME was obtained for any locus. The region formally excluded (LOD score <-2) by using multipoint analysis varies depending on the assumptions made concerning inheritance parameters and the proportion of linked families, {alpha} - that is, the degree of locus heterogeneity. Further analysis either classifying all unaffected individuals as unknown or excluding a subset of four families in which pyknoleptic absence seizures were present in one or more individuals did not alter these conclusions. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Organization of the cpe Locus in CPE-Positive Clostridium perfringens Type C and D Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sayeed, Sameera; McClane, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (encoded by the cpe gene) contributes to several important human, and possibly veterinary, enteric diseases. The current study investigated whether cpe locus organization in type C or D isolates resembles one of the three (one chromosomal and two plasmid-borne) cpe loci commonly found amongst type A isolates. Multiplex PCR assays capable of detecting sequences in those type A cpe loci failed to amplify products from cpe-positive type C and D isolates, indicating these isolates possess different cpe locus arrangements. Therefore, restriction fragments containing the cpe gene were cloned and sequenced from two type C isolates and one type D isolate. The obtained cpe locus sequences were then used to construct an overlapping PCR assay to assess cpe locus diversity amongst other cpe-positive type C and D isolates. All seven surveyed cpe-positive type C isolates had a plasmid-borne cpe locus partially resembling the cpe locus of type A isolates carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. In contrast, all eight type D isolates shared the same plasmid-borne cpe locus, which differed substantially from the cpe locus present in other C. perfringens by containing two copies of an ORF with 67% identity to a transposase gene (COG4644) found in Tn1546, but not previously associated with the cpe gene. These results identify greater diversity amongst cpe locus organization than previously appreciated, providing new insights into cpe locus evolution. Finally, evidence for cpe gene mobilization was found for both type C and D isolates, which could explain their cpe plasmid diversity. PMID:20532170

  2. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation studies and in vitro site directed mutagenesis of avian beta-defensin Apl_AvBD2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Defensins comprise a group of antimicrobial peptides, widely recognized as important elements of the innate immune system in both animals and plants. Cationicity, rather than the secondary structure, is believed to be the major factor defining the antimicrobial activity of defensins. To test this hypothesis and to improve the activity of the newly identified avian β-defensin Apl_AvBD2 by enhancing the cationicity, we performed in silico site directed mutagenesis, keeping the predicted secondary structure intact. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies were done to predict the activity. Mutant proteins were made by in vitro site directed mutagenesis and recombinant protein expression, and tested for antimicrobial activity to confirm the results obtained in MD simulation analysis. Results MD simulation revealed subtle, but critical, structural variations between the wild type Apl_AvBD2 and the more cationic in silico mutants, which were not detected in the initial structural prediction by homology modelling. The C-terminal cationic 'claw' region, important in antimicrobial activity, which was intact in the wild type, showed changes in shape and orientation in all the mutant peptides. Mutant peptides also showed increased solvent accessible surface area and more number of hydrogen bonds with the surrounding water molecules. In functional studies, the Escherichia coli expressed, purified recombinant mutant proteins showed total loss of antimicrobial activity compared to the wild type protein. Conclusion The study revealed that cationicity alone is not the determining factor in the microbicidal activity of antimicrobial peptides. Factors affecting the molecular dynamics such as hydrophobicity, electrostatic interactions and the potential for oligomerization may also play fundamental roles. It points to the usefulness of MD simulation studies in successful engineering of antimicrobial peptides for improved activity and other desirable functions. PMID:20122244

  4. Host Avian Beta-Defensin and Toll-Like Receptor Responses of Pigeons following Infection with Pigeon Paramyxovirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Xu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting; Gao, Mengying; Wang, Qiuling; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality in pigeons caused by pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Host defense peptides (HDPs) are key components of the innate immune system. In this study, three novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs 2, 7, and 10) were characterized in pigeons and shown to possess direct antiviral activity against PPMV-1 in vitro. In addition, we evaluated the mRNA expression of these AvBDs and other immune-related genes in tissues of 2-month-old infected pigeons at 3 and 7 days postinfection. We observed that the expression of AvBD2 in the cecal tonsil, lungs, and proventriculus, as well as the expression of AvBD10 in the spleen, lungs, proventriculus, and kidneys, was upregulated in infected pigeons. Similarly, the expression of both Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 was increased in the spleen, trachea, and proventriculus, while TLR15 expression was increased only in the lungs of infected pigeons. In addition, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was upregulated in the spleen, the bursa of Fabricius, the trachea, and the proventriculus of infected pigeons. Furthermore, we observed a high correlation between the expression of AvBD2 and the expression of either TLR7 or TLR15, as well as between AvBD10 expression and either TLR3 or TLR7 expression in respective tissues. The results suggest that PPMV-1 infection can induce innate host responses characterized by the activation of TLRs, particularly TLR3 and TLR7, AvBDs (2 and 10), and iNOS in pigeons. PMID:26162868

  5. Identification of three novel avian beta-defensins from goose and their significance in the pathogenesis of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deying; Zhang, Mingyue; Zhang, Kexin; Liu, Xiaoli; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Shengwang

    2013-12-01

    Here, we report the characterization of three avian β-defensins (AvBDs) from the goose, named anser_AvBD1, AvBD3, and AvBD6, respectively. All of anser_AvBDs exhibited broad antibacterial activity. In addition, the antibacterial activity of all of the AvBDs against Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis decreased significantly in the presence of 100mM NaCl (P<0.01). None of the AvBDs showed hemolytic activity. In order to assess the significance of these anser_AvBDs in the infection of Salmonella enteritidis, mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and anser_AvBDs in tissues of both control and infected geese was evaluated. We observed a significant up-regulation of TLR4, anser_AvBD1, 3, and 6 in some immune tissues evaluated, in response to S. enteritidis infection. These data demonstrated that TLR4 may serve a possible role in eliciting host immune responses to pathogens, and β-defensins may play a pivotal role in the host defense mechanisms of the goose.

  6. Host Avian Beta-Defensin and Toll-Like Receptor Responses of Pigeons following Infection with Pigeon Paramyxovirus Type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Xu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting; Gao, Mengying; Wang, Qiuling; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Ma, Deying; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-09-01

    The high morbidity and mortality in pigeons caused by pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Host defense peptides (HDPs) are key components of the innate immune system. In this study, three novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs 2, 7, and 10) were characterized in pigeons and shown to possess direct antiviral activity against PPMV-1 in vitro. In addition, we evaluated the mRNA expression of these AvBDs and other immune-related genes in tissues of 2-month-old infected pigeons at 3 and 7 days postinfection. We observed that the expression of AvBD2 in the cecal tonsil, lungs, and proventriculus, as well as the expression of AvBD10 in the spleen, lungs, proventriculus, and kidneys, was upregulated in infected pigeons. Similarly, the expression of both Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 was increased in the spleen, trachea, and proventriculus, while TLR15 expression was increased only in the lungs of infected pigeons. In addition, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was upregulated in the spleen, the bursa of Fabricius, the trachea, and the proventriculus of infected pigeons. Furthermore, we observed a high correlation between the expression of AvBD2 and the expression of either TLR7 or TLR15, as well as between AvBD10 expression and either TLR3 or TLR7 expression in respective tissues. The results suggest that PPMV-1 infection can induce innate host responses characterized by the activation of TLRs, particularly TLR3 and TLR7, AvBDs (2 and 10), and iNOS in pigeons.

  7. Endotoxin responsiveness of human airway epithelia is limited by low expression of MD-2.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong Peng; Kline, Joel N; Penisten, Andrea; Apicella, Michael A; Gioannini, Theresa L; Weiss, Jerrold; McCray, Paul B

    2004-08-01

    The expression of inducible antimicrobial peptides, such as human beta-defensin-2 (HBD-2) by epithelia, comprises a component of innate pulmonary defenses. We hypothesized that HBD-2 induction in airway epithelia is linked to pattern recognition receptors such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We found that primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia express the mRNA for TLR-4, but little or no MD-2 mRNA, and display little HBD-2 expression in response to treatment with purified endotoxin +/- LPS binding protein (LBP) and soluble CD14. Expression of endogenous MD-2 by transduction of airway epithelial cells with an adenoviral vector encoding MD-2 or extracellular addition of recombinant MD-2 both increased the responses of airway epithelia to endotoxin + LBP and sCD14 by >100-fold, as measured by NF-kappaB-luciferase activity and HBD-2 mRNA expression. MD-2 mRNA could be induced in airway epithelia by exposure of these cells to specific bacterial or host products (e.g., killed Haemophilus influenzae, the P6 outer membrane protein from H. influenzae, or TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma). These findings suggest that MD-2, either coexpressed with TLR-4 or secreted when produced in excess of TLR-4 from neighboring cells, is required for airway epithelia to respond sensitively to endotoxin. The regulation of MD-2 expression in airway epithelia and pulmonary macrophages may serve as a means to modify endotoxin responsiveness in the airway.

  8. The locus of microRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  9. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  10. Membrane disruptive antimicrobial activities of human β-defensin-3 analogs.

    PubMed

    Sudheendra, U S; Dhople, Vishnu; Datta, Aritreyee; Kar, Rajiv K; Shelburne, Charles E; Bhunia, Anirban; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-02-16

    Human beta defensin-3 (HβD-3) is a host-defense protein exhibiting antibacterial activity towards both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. There is considerable interest in the function of this protein due to its increased salt tolerance and activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, analogs of HβD-3 devoid of N and C terminal regions are investigated to determine the influence of specific structural motif on antimicrobial activity and selectivity between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Circular dichroism, fluorescence and solid-state NMR experiments have been used to investigate the conformation and mode of action of HβD3 analogs with various model membranes to mimic bacterial inner and outer membranes and also mammalian membranes. Our studies specifically focused on determining four major characteristics: (i) interaction of HβD3 analogs with phospholipid vesicles composed of zwitterionic PC or anionic PE:PG vesicles and LPS; (ii) conformation of HβD3-peptide analogs in the presence of PC or PE:PG vesicles; (iii) ability of HβD3 analogs to permeate phospholipid vesicles composed of PC or PE:PG; and (iv) activities on bacteria cells and erythrocytes. Our results infer that the linear peptide L25P and its cyclic form C25P are more active than L21P and C21P analogs. However, they are less active than the parent peptide, thus pointing towards the importance of the N terminal domain in its biological activity. The variation in the activities of L21P/C21P and L25P/C25P also suggest the importance of the positively charged residues at the C terminus in providing selectivity particularly to Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Internal locus of control and vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Selander, John; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno; Asell, Malin; Selander, Ulrika; Millet, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, internal locus of control (ILC) has been pointed out as a key factor for return to work after vocational rehabilitation. The aim of the current study was to gain a deeper understanding of the concept of ILC in a Swedish vocational rehabilitation context. The study was based on data from 347 long-term sick-listed clients collected at the onset of vocational rehabilitation. A first bi-variate analysis showed that ILC was positively associated with physical functioning and general health, and negatively associated with bodily pain. The analysis also showed that women, more than men, reported high internal locus of control. After a second multivariate analysis, only bodily pain remained associated. It is concluded that there exist a strong and negative association between bodily pain and internal locus of control. Clients with severe pain often also suffer from low internal locus of control. This should be kept in mind when providing vocational rehabilitation.

  12. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Corleis, Björn; Lisanti, Antonella C; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E; Rosenberg, Eric S; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection.

  13. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Antonella C.; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection. PMID:28253319

  14. Characterization of frequently deleted 6q locus in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Srikantan, Vasantha; Ma, Lanfeng; Li, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Makarem, Mazen; Strovel, Jeffrey W; Horrigan, Stephen G; Augustus, Meena; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Moul, Judd W; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Zou, Zhiqiang; Srivastava, Shiv

    2006-11-01

    The long arm of chromosome 6 is frequently deleted in diverse human neoplasms. Our previous study showed a minimum deletion region between markers D6S1056 and D6S300 on chromosome 6q in primary prostate cancer (CaP). In this study, we further refined a 200-kb minimal region of deletion (6qTSG1) centered around D6S1013 marker. The 6qTSG1 transcripts contained complex multiple splicing variants with low or absent expression in CaP cells. None of the transcripts identified contained open reading frames that code for a protein in the NCBI database. The expression of 6qTSG transcripts revealed interesting hormonal regulation relevant to CaP biology. Expression of 6q TSG transcript was induced in LNCaP cells that were cultured in charcoal-stripped serum medium suggesting an upregulation of 6qTSG transcript by androgen ablation and cell growth inhibition/apoptosis. Induction of 6qTSG1 expression in response to androgen ablation was abrogated in androgen-independent derivatives of LNCaP cells. In summary, we have defined a candidate CaP suppressor locus on chromosome 6q16.1, and deletions of this locus are frequently associated with prostate tumorigenesis. In the light of emerging role of noncoding RNAs in cancer biology including CaP, future investigations of 6qTSG11 locus is warranted.

  15. The SCL gene is formed from a transcriptionally complex locus.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Begley, C G; Bertness, V; Nussmeier, M; Ezquerra, A; Coligan, J; Kirsch, I R

    1990-01-01

    We describe the structural organization of the human SCL gene, a helix-loop-helix family member which we believe plays a fundamental role in hematopoietic differentiation. The SCL locus is composed of eight exons distributed over 16 kb. SCL shows a pattern of expression quite restricted to early hematopoietic tissues, although in malignant states expression of the gene may be somewhat extended into later developmental stages. A detailed analysis of the transcript(s) arising from the SCL locus revealed that (i) the 5' noncoding portion of the SCL transcript, which resides within a CpG island, has a complex pattern of alternative exon utilization as well as two distinct transcription initiation sites; (ii) the 5' portions of the SCL transcript contain features that suggest a possible regulatory role for these segments; (iii) the pattern of utilization of the 5' exons is cell lineage dependent; and (iv) all of the currently studied chromosomal aberrations that affect the SCL locus either structurally or functionally eliminate the normal 5' transcription initiation sites. These data suggest that the SCL gene, and specifically its 5' region, may be a target for regulatory interactions during early hematopoietic development. Images PMID:2247063

  16. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0445 TITLE: Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mia M. MacCollin, M.D...NUMBER Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0445 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...can be found on next page. 15. SUBJECT TERMS schwannomatosis, tumor suppressor gene, NF2, molecular genetics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  17. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  18. Ancient roots for polymorphism at the HLA-DQ. alpha. locus in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Gyllensten, U.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The genes encoding the human histocompatibility antigens (HLA) exhibit a remarkable degree of polymorphism as revealed by immunologic and molecular analyses. This extensive sequence polymorphism either may have been generated during the lifetime of the human species or could have arisen before speciation and been maintained in the contemporary human population by selection or, possibly, by genetic drift. These two hypotheses were examined using the polymerase chain reaction method to amplify polymorphic sequences from the DQ{alpha} locus, as well as the DX{alpha} locus, an homologous but nonexpressed locus, in a series of primates that diverged at known times. In general, the amino acid sequence of a specific human DQ{alpha} allelic type is more closely related to its chimpanzee or gorilla counterpart than to other human DQ{alpha} alleles. Phylogenetic analysis of the silent nucleotide position changes shows that the similarity of allelic types between species is due to common ancestry rather than convergent evolution. Thus, most of the polymorphism at the DQ{alpha} locus in the human species was already present at least 5 million years ago in the ancestral species that gave rise to the chimpanzee, gorilla, and human lineages. However, one of the DQ{alpha} alleles may have arisen after speciation by recombination between two ancestral alleles.

  19. Development of Highly Sensitive and Specific mRNA Multiplex System (XCYR1) for Forensic Human Body Fluids and Tissues Identification

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Xie, Jianhui; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan; Chen, Liankang; Gu, Lihua; Hu, Wei; Bi, Gang; Ge, Jianye; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Ziqin

    2014-01-01

    The identification of human body fluids or tissues through mRNA-based profiling is very useful for forensic investigations. Previous studies have shown mRNA biomarkers are effective to identify the origin of biological samples. In this study, we selected 16 tissue specific biomarkers to evaluate their specificities and sensitivities for human body fluids and tissues identification, including porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), hemoglobin beta (HBB) and Glycophorin A (GLY) for circulatory blood, protamine 2 (PRM2) and transglutaminase 4 (TGM4) for semen, mucin 4 (MUC4) and human beta defensin 1(HBD1) for vaginal secretion, matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 11 (MMP7 and MMP11) for menstrual blood, keratin 4(KRT4) for oral mucosa, loricrin (LOR) and cystatin 6 (CST6) for skin, histatin 3(HTN3) for saliva, statherin (STATH) for nasal secretion, dermcidin (DCD) for sweat and uromodulin (UMOD) for urine. The above mentioned ten common forensic body fluids or tissues were used in the evaluation. Based on the evaluation, a reverse transcription (RT) PCR multiplex assay, XCYR1, which includes 12 biomarkers (i.e., HBB, GLY, HTN3, PRM2, KRT4, MMP11, MUC4, DCD, UMOD, MMP7, TGM4, and STATH) and 2 housekeeping genes [i.e., glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and 18SrRNA], was developed. This assay was further validated with real casework samples and mock samples (with both single source and mixture) and it was approved that XCYR1 is effective to identify common body fluids or tissues (i.e., circulatory blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretion, menstrual blood, oral mucosa, nasal secretion, sweat and urine) in forensic casework samples. PMID:24991806

  20. Development of highly sensitive and specific mRNA multiplex system (XCYR1) for forensic human body fluids and tissues identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Xie, Jianhui; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan; Chen, Liankang; Gu, Lihua; Hu, Wei; Bi, Gang; Ge, Jianye; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Ziqin

    2014-01-01

    The identification of human body fluids or tissues through mRNA-based profiling is very useful for forensic investigations. Previous studies have shown mRNA biomarkers are effective to identify the origin of biological samples. In this study, we selected 16 tissue specific biomarkers to evaluate their specificities and sensitivities for human body fluids and tissues identification, including porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), hemoglobin beta (HBB) and Glycophorin A (GLY) for circulatory blood, protamine 2 (PRM2) and transglutaminase 4 (TGM4) for semen, mucin 4 (MUC4) and human beta defensin 1(HBD1) for vaginal secretion, matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 11 (MMP7 and MMP11) for menstrual blood, keratin 4(KRT4) for oral mucosa, loricrin (LOR) and cystatin 6 (CST6) for skin, histatin 3(HTN3) for saliva, statherin (STATH) for nasal secretion, dermcidin (DCD) for sweat and uromodulin (UMOD) for urine. The above mentioned ten common forensic body fluids or tissues were used in the evaluation. Based on the evaluation, a reverse transcription (RT) PCR multiplex assay, XCYR1, which includes 12 biomarkers (i.e., HBB, GLY, HTN3, PRM2, KRT4, MMP11, MUC4, DCD, UMOD, MMP7, TGM4, and STATH) and 2 housekeeping genes [i.e., glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and 18SrRNA], was developed. This assay was further validated with real casework samples and mock samples (with both single source and mixture) and it was approved that XCYR1 is effective to identify common body fluids or tissues (i.e., circulatory blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretion, menstrual blood, oral mucosa, nasal secretion, sweat and urine) in forensic casework samples.

  1. Functional analysis of the TRIB1 associated locus linked to plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Douvris, Adrianna; Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Naing, Thet; Martinuk, Amy; Nikpay, Majid; Williams, Andrew; Buick, Julie; Yauk, Carole; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-06-03

    The TRIB1 locus has been linked to hepatic triglyceride metabolism in mice and to plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease in humans. The lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by genome-wide association studies, are located ≈30 kb downstream from TRIB1, suggesting complex regulatory effects on genes or pathways relevant to hepatic triglyceride metabolism. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional relationship between common SNPs at the TRIB1 locus and plasma lipid traits. Characterization of the risk locus reveals that it encompasses a gene, TRIB1-associated locus (TRIBAL), composed of a well-conserved promoter region and an alternatively spliced transcript. Bioinformatic analysis and resequencing identified a single SNP, rs2001844, within the promoter region that associates with increased plasma triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk. Further, correction for triglycerides as a covariate indicated that the genome-wide association studies association is largely dependent on triglycerides. In addition, we show that rs2001844 is an expression trait locus (eQTL) for TRIB1 expression in blood and alters TRIBAL promoter activity in a reporter assay model. The TRIBAL transcript has features typical of long noncoding RNAs, including poor sequence conservation. Modulation of TRIBAL expression had limited impact on either TRIB1 or lipid regulatory genes mRNA levels in human hepatocyte models. In contrast, TRIB1 knockdown markedly increased TRIBAL expression in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. These studies demonstrate an interplay between a novel locus, TRIBAL, and TRIB1. TRIBAL is located in the genome-wide association studies identified risk locus, responds to altered expression of TRIB1, harbors a risk SNP that is an eQTL for TRIB1 expression, and associates with plasma triglyceride concentrations. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the

  2. The Ink4/Arf locus is a barrier for iPS reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Collado, Manuel; Villasante, Aranzazu; Strati, Katerina; Ortega, Sagrario; Cañamero, Marta; Blasco, Maria A.; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells by Oct4, Klf4 and Sox2 (3F) remain poorly understood 1. The Ink4/Arf tumour suppressor locus encodes three potent inhibitors of proliferation, namely p16Ink4a, p15Ink4b and Arf, which are basally expressed in differentiated cells and upregulated by aberrant mitogenic signals 2-4. We show here that the locus is completely silenced in iPS cells, as well as in embryonic stem (ES) cells, acquiring the epigenetic marks of a bivalent chromatin domain, and retaining the ability to be reactivated upon differentiation. Cell culture conditions during reprogramming enhance the expression of the Ink4/Arf locus, further highlighting the importance of silencing the locus to allow proliferation and reprogramming. Indeed, the 3F together repress the Ink4/Arf locus soon after their expression and concomitant with the appearance of the first molecular markers of stemness. This downregulation also occurs in cells carrying the oncoprotein large-T, which functionally inactivates the pathways regulated by the Ink4/Arf locus, thus implying that the silencing of the locus is intrinsic to reprogramming and not the result of a selective process. Genetic inhibition of the Ink4/Arf locus has a profound positive impact on the efficiency of iPS generation, increasing both the kinetics of reprogramming and the number of emerging iPS colonies. In murine cells, Arf, rather than Ink4a, is the main barrier to reprogramming through activation of p53 and p21; whereas, in human fibroblasts, INK4a is more important than ARF. Finally, organismal aging upregulates the Ink4/Arf locus 2,5 and, accordingly, reprogramming is less efficient in cells from old organisms, but this defect can be rescued by inhibiting the locus with an shRNA. All together, we conclude that the silencing of Ink4/Arf locus is rate limiting for reprogramming, and its transient inhibition may significantly improve the

  3. The Ink4/Arf locus is a barrier for iPS cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Collado, Manuel; Villasante, Aranzazu; Strati, Katerina; Ortega, Sagrario; Cañamero, Marta; Blasco, Maria A; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-08-27

    The mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by the three transcription factors Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1), Klf4 and Sox2 remain poorly understood. The Ink4/Arf locus comprises the Cdkn2a-Cdkn2b genes encoding three potent tumour suppressors, namely p16(Ink4a), p19(Arf) and p15(Ink4b), which are basally expressed in differentiated cells and upregulated by aberrant mitogenic signals. Here we show that the locus is completely silenced in iPS cells, as well as in embryonic stem (ES) cells, acquiring the epigenetic marks of a bivalent chromatin domain, and retaining the ability to be reactivated after differentiation. Cell culture conditions during reprogramming enhance the expression of the Ink4/Arf locus, further highlighting the importance of silencing the locus to allow proliferation and reprogramming. Indeed, the three factors together repress the Ink4/Arf locus soon after their expression and concomitant with the appearance of the first molecular markers of 'stemness'. This downregulation also occurs in cells carrying the oncoprotein large-T, which functionally inactivates the pathways regulated by the Ink4/Arf locus, thus indicating that the silencing of the locus is intrinsic to reprogramming and not the result of a selective process. Genetic inhibition of the Ink4/Arf locus has a profound positive effect on the efficiency of iPS cell generation, increasing both the kinetics of reprogramming and the number of emerging iPS cell colonies. In murine cells, Arf, rather than Ink4a, is the main barrier to reprogramming by activation of p53 (encoded by Trp53) and p21 (encoded by Cdkn1a); whereas, in human fibroblasts, INK4a is more important than ARF. Furthermore, organismal ageing upregulates the Ink4/Arf locus and, accordingly, reprogramming is less efficient in cells from old organisms, but this defect can be rescued by inhibiting the locus with a short hairpin RNA. All together, we conclude that

  4. A 4. 5-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig from human chromosome 13q14. 3 ordering 9 polymorphic microsatellites (22 sequence-tagged sites) tightly linked to the Wilson disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.; Tomfohrde, J.; Barnes, R. ); Stewart, E.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. ); Le Paslier, D. ); Weissenbach, J. ); Farrer, L. ); Bowcock, A. Eugene McDermott Center of Human Growth and Development, Dallas, TX )

    1993-11-15

    The authors have previously performed a genetic analysis of multiply affected families to map a locus responsible for Wilson disease (WND) to a 0.3-centimorgan (cM) region within chromosome 13q14.3, between D12S31 and D13S59. Here they describe the construction of a contig of [approx]4.5 Mb, which spans this region and extends from D13S25 to D13S59. This contig consists of 28 genomic yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones. Five critical crossover events have been defined in this interval in two unaffected (Centre d'Etudes du Polymorphisme Humain) and three WND families. The combination of sequence tagged site content mapping of YACs with both polymorphic and nonpolymorphic markers and recombination breakpoint mapping resulted in the following order of polymorphic markers: centromere-RB1-D13S25-AFM205vh2-D13S31-D13S227-D13S228-AFM238vc3-D13S133-AFM084xc5-D13S137-D13S169, D13S155-D13S59-telomere. The recombination/physical distance ratio varies from [approx] 3000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S25 to 6000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S59. Three WND families exhibiting recombination between the disease locus and D13S31 or D13S59 were genotyped for additional markers in this region and further refined the location of the WND gene to between D13S155 and D13S133. Nine of the markers in this region of <1 cM are polymorphic microsatellites (seven have observed heterozygosities of 70% or above) that will be extremely useful in prenatal and preclinical diagnosis of this disease. This physical map is an essential step in the isolation of the WND gene and is a framework for the identification of candidate genes.

  5. Comparative mapping of the Grpr locus on the X chromosomes of man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, G.Ll.; Boyd, Y. )

    1993-07-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor has been previously cloned from both humans and mice. The authors have mapped the mouse gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (Grpr) locus using a polymorphic CA[sub n] repeat located in the 5[prime] untranslated region of the gene and a Mus spretus/Mus musculus interspecific backcross. The Grpr locus mapped between the Pdha-1 and Amg loci on the mouse X chromosome. Studies in man indicate that GRPR maps to the Xp21.2-p22.3 region of the human X chromosome and not to the Xp11-q11 interval as previously reported. The assignment of the GRPR locus to the distal Xp region is supported by the comparative map position in the mouse. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Molecular characterization of the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Michaud, E J; Woychik, R P

    1992-12-24

    The agouti (a) locus acts within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to regulate coat color pigmentation in the mouse. We have characterized a gene encoding a novel 131 amino acid protein that we propose is the one gene associated with the agouti locus. This gene is normally expressed in a manner consistent with a locus function, and, more importantly, its structure and expression are affected by a number of representative alleles in the agouti dominance hierarchy. In addition, we found that the pleiotropic effects associated with the lethal yellow (Ay) mutation, which include pronounced obesity, diabetes, and the development of neoplasms, are accompanied by deregulated overexpression of the agouti gene in numerous tissues of the adult animal.

  7. An autosomal locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and mono-allelic expression.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Eric P; Donley, Nathan; Stauffer, Daniel; Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew J

    2011-06-15

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times, following a temporal replication program. Homologous alleles typically replicate synchronously; however, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes and genes on the female X chromosome replicate asynchronously. We have used a chromosome engineering strategy to identify a human autosomal locus that controls this replication timing program in cis. We show that Cre/loxP-mediated rearrangements at a discrete locus at 6q16.1 result in delayed replication of the entire chromosome. This locus displays asynchronous replication timing that is coordinated with other mono-allelically expressed genes on chromosome 6. Characterization of this locus revealed mono-allelic expression of a large intergenic non-coding RNA, which we have named asynchronous replication and autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, ASAR6. Finally, disruption of this locus results in the activation of the previously silent alleles of linked mono-allelically expressed genes. We previously found that chromosome rearrangements involving eight different autosomes display delayed replication timing, and that cells containing chromosomes with delayed replication timing have a 30-80-fold increase in the rate at which new gross chromosomal rearrangements occurred. Taken together, these observations indicate that human autosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control chromosome-wide replication timing, mono-allelic expression and the stability of entire chromosomes.

  8. An autosomal locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and mono-allelic expression

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Eric P.; Donley, Nathan; Stauffer, Daniel; Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times, following a temporal replication program. Homologous alleles typically replicate synchronously; however, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes and genes on the female X chromosome replicate asynchronously. We have used a chromosome engineering strategy to identify a human autosomal locus that controls this replication timing program in cis. We show that Cre/loxP-mediated rearrangements at a discrete locus at 6q16.1 result in delayed replication of the entire chromosome. This locus displays asynchronous replication timing that is coordinated with other mono-allelically expressed genes on chromosome 6. Characterization of this locus revealed mono-allelic expression of a large intergenic non-coding RNA, which we have named asynchronous replication and autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, ASAR6. Finally, disruption of this locus results in the activation of the previously silent alleles of linked mono-allelically expressed genes. We previously found that chromosome rearrangements involving eight different autosomes display delayed replication timing, and that cells containing chromosomes with delayed replication timing have a 30–80-fold increase in the rate at which new gross chromosomal rearrangements occurred. Taken together, these observations indicate that human autosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control chromosome-wide replication timing, mono-allelic expression and the stability of entire chromosomes. PMID:21459774

  9. Oscillating Evolution of a Mammalian Locus with Overlapping Reading Frames: An XLαs/ALEX Relay

    PubMed Central

    Nekrutenko, Anton; Wadhawan, Samir; Goetting-Minesky, Paula; Makova, Kateryna D

    2005-01-01

    XLαs and ALEX are structurally unrelated mammalian proteins translated from alternative overlapping reading frames of a single transcript. Not only are they encoded by the same locus, but a specific XLαs/ALEX interaction is essential for G-protein signaling in neuroendocrine cells. A disruption of this interaction leads to abnormal human phenotypes, including mental retardation and growth deficiency. The region of overlap between the two reading frames evolves at a remarkable speed: the divergence between human and mouse ALEX polypeptides makes them virtually unalignable. To trace the evolution of this puzzling locus, we sequenced it in apes, Old World monkeys, and a New World monkey. We show that the overlap between the two reading frames and the physical interaction between the two proteins force the locus to evolve in an unprecedented way. Namely, to maintain two overlapping protein-coding regions the locus is forced to have high GC content, which significantly elevates its intrinsic evolutionary rate. However, the two encoded proteins cannot afford to change too quickly relative to each other as this may impair their interaction and lead to severe physiological consequences. As a result XLαs and ALEX evolve in an oscillating fashion constantly balancing the rates of amino acid replacements. This is the first example of a rapidly evolving locus encoding interacting proteins via overlapping reading frames, with a possible link to the origin of species-specific neurological differences. PMID:16110341

  10. RefSeq and LocusLink: NCBI gene-centered resources.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, K D; Maglott, D R

    2001-01-01

    Thousands of genes have been painstakingly identified and characterized a few genes at a time. Many thousands more are being predicted by large scale cDNA and genomic sequencing projects, with levels of evidence ranging from supporting mRNA sequence and comparative genomics to computing ab initio models. This, coupled with the burgeoning scientific literature, makes it critical to have a comprehensive directory for genes and reference sequences for key genomes. The NCBI provides two resources, LocusLink and RefSeq, to meet these needs. LocusLink organizes information around genes to generate a central hub for accessing gene-specific information for fruit fly, human, mouse, rat and zebrafish. RefSeq provides reference sequence standards for genomes, transcripts and proteins; human, mouse and rat mRNA RefSeqs, and their corresponding proteins, are discussed here. Together, RefSeq and LocusLink provide a non-redundant view of genes and other loci to support research on genes and gene families, variation, gene expression and genome annotation. Additional information about LocusLink and RefSeq is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/.

  11. Organization of the murine Cd22 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Che-Leung; Torres, R.M.; Sundeberg, H.A.; Clark, E.A ); Parkhouse, R.M.E. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Murine CD22 (mCD22) is a B cell-associated adhesion protein with seven extracellular Ig-like domains that has 62% amino acid identify to its human homologue. Southern analysis on genomic DNA isolated from tissues and cell lines from several mouse strains using mCD22 cDNA demonstrated that the Cd22 locus encoding mCD22 is a single copy gene of [le]30 kb. Digestion of genomic DNA preparations with four restriction endonucleases revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H strains vs DBA/2j, NZB, and NZC strains, suggesting the presence of two or more Cd22 alleles. Using a mCD22 cDNA clone derived from the BALB/c strain, the authors isolated genomic clones from a DBA/2 genomic library that contained all the exons necessary to encode the full length mCD22 cDNA. Fifteen exons, including exon 3 that encodes the translation start codon, were identified. Each extracellular Ig-like domain of mCD22 is encoded by a single exon. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of the BALB/c CD22 cDNA and the exons of the DBA/2j CD22 genomic clones revealed an 18-nucleotide deletion in exon 4 (encoding the most distal Ig-like domain 1 of mCD22) of the DBA/2j genomic sequence in addition to a number of substitutions, insertions, and deletions in other exons. These nucleotide differences were also present in a cDNA clone isolated from total RNA of LPS-activated DBA/2j splenocytes mosome 7, a region sytenic to human chromosome 19q, close to the previously reported loci, Lyb-8 and Mag (a homologue of Cd22). An antibody (CY34) against the Lyb-8.2 B cell marker reacted with a BHK transfectant expressing the full length mCd22 cDNA, thus demonstrating that Lyb-8 and Cd22 loci are identical. Furthermore, a rat anti-mCD22 mAb, NIM-R6, bound to slgM[sup +] DBA/2j B cells, confirming the expression of a CD22 protein by the Cd22[sup a]/lyb-8[sup a] allele. 63 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Yersiniabactin Production by Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli, and Description of a Second Yersiniabactin Locus Evolutionary Group

    PubMed Central

    Bultreys, Alain; Gheysen, Isabelle; de Hoffmann, Edmond

    2006-01-01

    The siderophore and virulence factor yersiniabactin is produced by Pseudomonas syringae. Yersiniabactin was originally detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC); commonly used PCR tests proved ineffective. Yersiniabactin production in P. syringae correlated with the possession of irp1 located in a predicted yersiniabactin locus. Three similarly divergent yersiniabactin locus groups were determined: the Yersinia pestis group, the P. syringae group, and the Photorhabdus luminescens group; yersiniabactin locus organization is similar in P. syringae and P. luminescens. In P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, the locus has a high GC content (63.4% compared with 58.4% for the chromosome and 60.1% and 60.7% for adjacent regions) but it lacks high-pathogenicity-island features, such as the insertion in a tRNA locus, the integrase, and insertion sequence elements. In P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and pv. phaseolicola 1448A, the locus lies between homologues of Psyr_2284 and Psyr_2285 of P. syringae pv. syringae B728a, which lacks the locus. Among tested pseudomonads, a PCR test specific to two yersiniabactin locus groups detected a locus in genospecies 3, 7, and 8 of P. syringae, and DNA hybridization within P. syringae also detected a locus in the pathovars phaseolicola and glycinea. The PCR and HPLC methods enabled analysis of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli. HPLC-proven yersiniabactin-producing E. coli lacked modifications found in irp1 and irp2 in the human pathogen CFT073, and it is not clear whether CFT073 produces yersiniabactin. The study provides clues about the evolution and dispersion of yersiniabactin genes. It describes methods to detect and study yersiniabactin producers, even where genes have evolved. PMID:16751485

  13. A Longitudinal Investigation of the Antecedents of Locus of Control Orientation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickline, Virginia B.; Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.; Kincheloe, Amy Ransom; Osborn, Albert F.

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control (LOC) is related to many aspects of human behavior, yet relatively little is known about what factors in early childhood may dispose a child to develop an internal or external LOC orientation. Data from a British epidemiological, longitudinal, cohort study of 12,463 children and their mothers were used to identify, from a wide…

  14. Intrahaplotype polymorphism at the Brassica S locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miege, C; Ruffio-Châble, V; Schierup, M H; Cabrillac, D; Dumas, C; Gaude, T; Cock, J M

    2001-01-01

    The S locus receptor kinase and the S locus glycoproteins are encoded by genes located at the S locus, which controls the self-incompatibility response in Brassica. In class II self-incompatibility haplotypes, S locus glycoproteins can be encoded by two different genes, SLGA and SLGB. In this study, we analyzed the sequences of these genes in several independently isolated plants, all of which carry the same S haplotype (S(2)). Two groups of S(2) haplotypes could be distinguished depending on whether SRK was associated with SLGA or SLGB. Surprisingly, SRK alleles from the two groups could be distinguished at the sequence level, suggesting that recombination rarely occurs between haplotypes of the two groups. An analysis of the distribution of polymorphisms along the S domain of SRK showed that hypervariable domains I and II tend to be conserved within haplotypes but to be highly variable between haplotypes. This is consistent with these domains playing a role in the determination of haplotype specificity. PMID:11606555

  15. The Preconscious: Locus for Significant Written Compositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Alvin D.

    1979-01-01

    The author suggests that the preconscious is the true locus of significant prose because of its greater amount of freedom to gather, compare, and rearrange ideas, and that the ultimate challenge to teachers of composition is to give freedom to their students' preconscious processes. (KC)

  16. Exercise Adherence and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geshuri, Yosef; Glahn, Ronald

    In 1990, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between students' locus of control and the extent to which they participated in a voluntary exercise program. First-time participants in the "Shape Up" program offered at the Porterville College Fitness Center during the summer and fall semesters of 1990 were identified through the…

  17. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  18. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  19. Multidimensionality of Locus of Control in Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Maureen J.; Kearney, James F.

    The Internal-External (I-E) Locus of Control scale (Rotter, 1966) was administered to 185 male and 185 female university students. The resulting scores were factored, producing two factors for males and four for females. The male factors were the generally-accepted "luck" and "powerful others"; for women, however, the "powerful others" dimension…

  20. Locus of Control, Social Class, and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, James A.

    The relationship between locus of control, social class, and learning processes were reviewed by analyzing: (1) externality as a function of socioeconomic status, i.e., the lower the status, the greater the degree of externality; (2) the impact of the early home environment on the child's learning and development; (3) classroom and teacher…

  1. Genetic locus for streptolysin S production by group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Nizet, V; Beall, B; Bast, D J; Datta, V; Kilburn, L; Low, D E; De Azavedo, J C

    2000-07-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671-1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep. html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins.

  2. Role of a Putative Polysaccharide Locus in Bordetella Biofilm Development▿

    PubMed Central

    Parise, Gina; Mishra, Meenu; Itoh, Yoshikane; Romeo, Tony; Deora, Rajendar

    2007-01-01

    Bordetellae are gram-negative bacteria that colonize the respiratory tracts of animals and humans. We and others have recently shown that these bacteria are capable of living as sessile communities known as biofilms on a number of abiotic surfaces. During the biofilm mode of existence, bacteria produce one or more extracellular polymeric substances that function, in part, to hold the cells together and to a surface. There is little information on either the constituents of the biofilm matrix or the genetic basis of biofilm development by Bordetella spp. By utilizing immunoblot assays and by enzymatic hydrolysis using dispersin B (DspB), a glycosyl hydrolase that specifically cleaves the polysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc), we provide evidence for the production of poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc by various Bordetella species (Bordetella bronchiseptica, B. pertussis, and B. parapertussis) and its role in their biofilm development. We have investigated the role of a Bordetella locus, here designated bpsABCD, in biofilm formation. The bps (Bordetella polysaccharide) locus is homologous to several bacterial loci that are required for the production of poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc and have been implicated in bacterial biofilm formation. By utilizing multiple microscopic techniques to analyze biofilm formation under both static and hydrodynamic conditions, we demonstrate that the bps locus, although not essential at the initial stages of biofilm formation, contributes to the stability and the maintenance of the complex architecture of Bordetella biofilms. PMID:17114249

  3. Genetic Locus for Streptolysin S Production by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nizet, Victor; Beall, Bernard; Bast, Darrin J.; Datta, Vivekananda; Kilburn, Laurie; Low, Donald E.; De Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671–1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep.html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins. PMID:10858242

  4. Recommendations for Locus-Specific Databases and Their Curation

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, R.G.H.; Auerbach, A.D.; Beckmann, J.S.; Blumenfeld, O.O.; Brookes, A.J.; Brown, A.F.; Carrera, P.; Cox, D.W.; Gottlieb, B.; Greenblatt, M.S.; Hilbert, P.; Lehvaslaiho, H.; Liang, P.; Marsh, S.; Nebert, D.W.; Povey, S.; Rossetti, S.; Scriver, C.R.; Summar, M.; Tolan, D.R.; Verma, I.C.; Vihinen, M.; den Dunnen, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Expert curation and complete collection of mutations in genes that affect human health is essential for proper genetic healthcare and research. Expert curation is given by the curators of gene-specific mutation databases or locus-specific databases (LSDBs). While there are over 700 such databases, they vary in their content, completeness, time available for curation, and the expertise of the curator. Curation and LSDBs have been discussed, written about, and protocols have been provided for over 10 years, but there have been no formal recommendations for the ideal form of these entities. This work initiates a discussion on this topic to assist future efforts in human genetics. Further discussion is welcome. PMID:18157828

  5. Recommendations for locus-specific databases and their curation.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R G H; Auerbach, A D; Beckmann, J S; Blumenfeld, O O; Brookes, A J; Brown, A F; Carrera, P; Cox, D W; Gottlieb, B; Greenblatt, M S; Hilbert, P; Lehvaslaiho, H; Liang, P; Marsh, S; Nebert, D W; Povey, S; Rossetti, S; Scriver, C R; Summar, M; Tolan, D R; Verma, I C; Vihinen, M; den Dunnen, J T

    2008-01-01

    Expert curation and complete collection of mutations in genes that affect human health is essential for proper genetic healthcare and research. Expert curation is given by the curators of gene-specific mutation databases or locus-specific databases (LSDBs). While there are over 700 such databases, they vary in their content, completeness, time available for curation, and the expertise of the curator. Curation and LSDBs have been discussed, written about, and protocols have been provided for over 10 years, but there have been no formal recommendations for the ideal form of these entities. This work initiates a discussion on this topic to assist future efforts in human genetics. Further discussion is welcome. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Natural history of the ERVWE1 endogenous retroviral locus

    PubMed Central

    Bonnaud, Bertrand; Beliaeff, Jean; Bouton, Olivier; Oriol, Guy; Duret, Laurent; Mallet, François

    2005-01-01

    Background The human HERV-W multicopy family includes a unique proviral locus, termed ERVWE1, whose full-length envelope ORF was preserved through evolution by the action of a selective pressure. The encoded Env protein (Syncytin) is involved in hominoid placental physiology. Results In order to infer the natural history of this domestication process, a comparative genomic analysis of the human 7q21.2 syntenic regions in eutherians was performed. In primates, this region was progressively colonized by LTR-elements, leading to two different evolutionary pathways in Cercopithecidae and Hominidae, a genetic drift versus a domestication, respectively. Conclusion The preservation in Hominoids of a genomic structure consisting in the juxtaposition of a retrotransposon-derived MaLR LTR and the ERVWE1 provirus suggests a functional link between both elements. PMID:16176588

  7. Uptake of environmental toxicants by the locus ceruleus: a potential trigger for neurodegenerative, demyelinating and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the locus ceruleus, with a subsequent decrease of CNS noradrenaline, occurs in a wide range of neurodegenerative, demyelinating and psychiatric disorders. The cause of the initial locus ceruleus damage remains unknown. Recently, inorganic mercury was found to enter human locus ceruleus neurons selectively. This has led to the formulation of a new hypothesis as to the cause of these disorders. Toxicants enter locus ceruleus neurons selectively, aided by the extensive exposure these neurons have to CNS capillaries, as well as by stressors that upregulate locus ceruleus activity. The resulting noradrenaline dysfunction affects a wide range of CNS cells and can trigger a number of neurodegenerative (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and motor neuron disease), demyelinating (multiple sclerosis), and psychiatric (major depression and bipolar disorder) conditions. This hypothesis proposes that environmental toxicants entering the locus ceruleus can give rise to a variety of CNS disorders. Proposals are made for experiments to gain further evidence for this hypothesis. If it is shown that toxicants in the locus ceruleus are responsible for these conditions, attempts can be made to prevent the toxicant exposures or to remove the toxicants from the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Organization and Evolutionary Trajectory of the Mating Type (MAT) Locus in Dermatophyte and Dimorphic Fungal Pathogens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size (∼3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  9. High-resolution analysis of cis-acting regulatory networks at the α-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jim R; Lower, Karen M; Dunham, Ian; Taylor, Stephen; De Gobbi, Marco; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; McGowan, Simon; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Vernimmen, Douglas; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    We have combined the circular chromosome conformation capture protocol with high-throughput, genome-wide sequence analysis to characterize the cis-acting regulatory network at a single locus. In contrast to methods which identify large interacting regions (10-1000 kb), the 4C approach provides a comprehensive, high-resolution analysis of a specific locus with the aim of defining, in detail, the cis-regulatory elements controlling a single gene or gene cluster. Using the human α-globin locus as a model, we detected all known local and long-range interactions with this gene cluster. In addition, we identified two interactions with genes located 300 kb (NME4) and 625 kb (FAM173a) from the α-globin cluster.

  10. Molecular genetic diversity and evolution at the MHC DQB locus in four species of pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Hoelzel, A R; Stephens, J C; O'Brien, S J

    1999-05-01

    Variation was investigated at exon 2 (including part of the putative peptide-binding region) of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DQB locus for two congeneric phocid seal species and two congeneric otariid seal species. Polymorphism in one phocid species, the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), was comparable to that seen in human populations, while the other phocid, the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), has been through a severe population bottleneck and exhibited much less variation at this locus. A phylogenetic comparison of the four species was consistent with the trans-specific pattern of evolution described for other taxa at this locus, and relative nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution rates suggest the maintenance of polymorphisms by natural selection. A comparison of sequence patterns also suggested that some variation could have been generated through recombinational events, primarily within genera. These results suggest a pattern of evolution of the immune response in pinnipeds similar to that in terrestrial mammal species.

  11. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    PubMed Central

    Frazão-Teixeira, E.; Sundar, N.; Dubey, J. P.; Grigg, M. E.; de Oliveira, F. C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1–5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus PCR-DNA sequencing showed that each strain possessed a unique combination of archetypal and novel alleles not previously described in South America. The data suggest that different strains circulate in pigs destined for human consumption from those previously isolated from cats and chickens in Brazil. Further, multi-locus PCR-RFLP analyses failed to accurately genotype the Brazilian isolates due to the high presence of atypical alleles. This is the first report of multi-locus DNA sequencing of T. gondii isolates in pigs from Brazil. PMID:21051148

  12. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  13. Investigation of the 5q33.3 longevity locus and age-related phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Marianne; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    A large meta-analysis recently found the 5q33.3 locus to be associated with survival to ≥ 90 years and lower all-cause mortality, thus suggesting it as a third human longevity locus alongside APOE and FOXO3A. The 5q33.3 locus has previously been associated with blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged individuals. However, part of the influence on mortality appears to be independent of cardiovascular phenotypes, and the role of the 5q33.3 locus in longevity and survival is therefore still partly unknown. We investigated the association between the longevity-associated variant rs2149954 on chromosome 5q33.3 and age-related phenotypes in two cohorts of 1,588 and 1,271 long-lived individuals (mean ages 93.1 and 95.9 years, respectively) as well as in 700 middle-aged and 677 elderly individuals (mean ages 52.5 and 78.7 years). Altogether, nominally significant associations between the rs2149954 minor allele and a decreased risk of heart attack and heart failure as well as increased physical functioning were found in the long-lived individuals. In the middle-aged and elderly individuals, rs2149954 minor allele carriers had a lower risk of hypertension. Our results thereby confirm a role of the 5q33.3 locus in cardiovascular health and, interestingly, they also suggest a role in physical functioning. PMID:28100865

  14. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  15. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  16. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  17. Locus of control and the fundamental dimensions of moods.

    PubMed

    Henson, H N; Chang, E C

    1998-06-01

    The present study examined the association between locus of control and positive and negative moods in 253 college students. Using the PANAS-X, designed by Watson and Clark, individuals scoring high on internal locus of control also scored higher across different dimensions of positive mood. Conversely, individuals scoring high on external locus of control had higher scores across different dimensions of negative mood.

  18. Fine mapping reveals that promotion susceptibility locus 1 (Psl1) is a compound locus with multiple genes that modify susceptibility to skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Angel, Joe M; Abel, Erika L; Riggs, Penny K; McClellan, S Alex; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-04-03

    Although it is well known that the majority of human cancers occur as the result of exposure to environmental carcinogens, it is clear that not all individuals exposed to a specific environmental carcinogen have the same risk of developing cancer. Considerable evidence indicates that common allelic variants of low-penetrance, tumor susceptibility genes are responsible for this interindividual variation in risk. We previously reported a skin tumor promotion susceptibility locus, Psl1, which maps to the distal portion of chromosome 9, that modified skin tumor promotion susceptibility in the mouse. Furthermore, Psl1 was shown to consist of at least two subloci (i.e., Psl1.1 and Psl1.2) and that glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 (Gsta4), which maps to Psl1.2, is a skin tumor promotion susceptibility gene. Finally, variants of human GSTA4 were found to be associated with risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer. In the current study, a combination of nested and contiguous C57BL/6 congenic mouse strains, each inheriting a different portion of the Psl1 locus from DBA/2, were tested for susceptibility to skin tumor promotion with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. These analyses indicate that Psl1 is a compound locus with at least six genes, including Gsta4, that modify skin tumor promotion susceptibility. More than 550 protein-coding genes map within the Psl1 locus. Fine mapping of the Psl1 locus, along with two-strain haplotype analysis, gene expression analysis, and the identification of genes with amino acid variants, has produced a list of fewer than 25 candidate skin tumor promotion susceptibility genes.

  19. Characterization of mutations at the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase locus

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.D.; Charlton, C.K.

    1997-02-01

    Two genetic mouse models for human phenylketonuria have been characterized by DNA sequence analysis. For each, a distinct mutation was identified within the protein coding sequence of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. This establishes that the mutated locus is the same as that causing human phenylketonuria and allows a comparison between these mouse phenylketonuria models and the human disease. A genotype/phenotype relationship that is strikingly similar to the human disease emerges, underscoring the similarity of phenylketonuria in mouse and man. In PAH{sup ENU1}, the phenotype is mild. The Pah{sup enu1} mutation predicts a conservative valine to alanine amino acid substitution and is located in exon 3, a gene region where serious mutations are rare in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2} the phenotype is severe. The Pah{sup enu2} mutation predicts a radical phenylalanine to serine substitution and is located in exon 7, a gene region where serious mutations are common in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2}, the sequence information was used to devise a direct genotyping system based on the creation of a new Alw26I restriction endonuclease site. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yea Woon; Kim, AeRi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  1. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to d